Science.gov

Sample records for rps structure analysis

  1. Yeast strains with N-terminally truncated ribosomal protein S5: implications for the evolution, structure and function of the Rps5/Rps7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, Thomas; Bentley, Amber A; Beutler, William; Ghosh, Arnab; Galkin, Oleksandr; Komar, Anton A

    2010-03-01

    Ribosomal protein (rp)S5 belongs to the family of the highly conserved rp's that contains rpS7 from prokaryotes and rpS5 from eukaryotes. Alignment of rpS5/rpS7 from metazoans (Homo sapiens), fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) shows that the proteins contain a conserved central/C-terminal core region and possess variable N-terminal regions. Yeast rpS5 is 69 amino acids (aa) longer than the E. coli rpS7 protein; and human rpS5 is 48 aa longer than the rpS7, respectively. To investigate the function of the yeast rpS5 and in particular the role of its N-terminal region, we obtained and characterized yeast strains in which the wild-type yeast rpS5 was replaced by its truncated variants, lacking 13, 24, 30 and 46 N-terminal amino acids, respectively. All mutant yeast strains were viable and displayed only moderately reduced growth rates, with the exception of the strain lacking 46 N-terminal amino acids, which had a doubling time of about 3 h. Biochemical analysis of the mutant yeast strains suggests that the N-terminal part of the eukaryotic and, in particular, yeast rpS5 may impact the ability of 40S subunits to function properly in translation and affect the efficiency of initiation, specifically the recruitment of initiation factors eIF3 and eIF2.

  2. Validation Database Based Thermal Analysis of an Advanced RPS Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Emis, Nickolas D.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced RPS concepts can be conceived, designed and assessed using high-end computational analysis tools. These predictions may provide an initial insight into the potential performance of these models, but verification and validation are necessary and required steps to gain confidence in the numerical analysis results. This paper discusses the findings from a numerical validation exercise for a small advanced RPS concept, based on a thermal analysis methodology developed at JPL and on a validation database obtained from experiments performed at Oregon State University. Both the numerical and experimental configurations utilized a single GPHS module enabled design, resembling a Mod-RTG concept. The analysis focused on operating and environmental conditions during the storage phase only. This validation exercise helped to refine key thermal analysis and modeling parameters, such as heat transfer coefficients, and conductivity and radiation heat transfer values. Improved understanding of the Mod-RTG concept through validation of the thermal model allows for future improvements to this power system concept.

  3. Conservation of the structure and organization of lupin mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes.

    PubMed

    Rurek, M; Oczkowski, M; Augustyniak, H

    1998-01-01

    A high level of the nucleotide sequence conservation of mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes was found in four lupin species. The only differences concern three nucleotides in the Lupinus albus rps12 gene and three nucleotides insertion in the L. mutabilis spacer. Northern blot analysis as well as RT-PCR confirmed cotranscription of the L. luteus genes because the transcripts detected were long enough.

  4. Compliance modeling and analysis of a 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Yanqin; Dai, Jiansheng

    2014-07-01

    The compliance modeling and rigidity performance evaluation for the lower mobility parallel manipulators are still to be remained as two overwhelming challenges in the stage of conceptual design due to their geometric complexities. By using the screw theory, this paper explores the compliance modeling and eigencompliance evaluation of a newly patented 1T2R spindle head whose topological architecture is a 3-RPS parallel mechanism. The kinematic definitions and inverse position analysis are briefly addressed in the first place to provide necessary information for compliance modeling. By considering the 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine(PKM) as a typical compliant parallel device, whose three limb assemblages have bending, extending and torsional deflections, an analytical compliance model for the spindle head is established with screw theory and the analytical stiffness matrix of the platform is formulated. Based on the eigenscrew decomposition, the eigencompliance and corresponding eigenscrews are analyzed and the platform's compliance properties are physically interpreted as the suspension of six screw springs. The distributions of stiffness constants of the six screw springs throughout the workspace are predicted in a quick manner with a piece-by-piece calculation algorithm. The numerical simulation reveals a strong dependency of platform's compliance on its configuration in that they are axially symmetric due to structural features. At the last stage, the effects of some design variables such as structural, configurational and dimensional parameters on system rigidity characteristics are investigated with the purpose of providing useful information for the structural design and performance improvement of the PKM. Compared with previous efforts in compliance analysis of PKMs, the present methodology is more intuitive and universal thus can be easily applied to evaluate the overall rigidity performance of other PKMs with high efficiency.

  5. Singularity analysis of a 3-RPS parallel manipulator using geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinchuan; Xiang, Ji'nan; Chai, Xinxue; Wu, Chuanyu

    2015-11-01

    Singular configurations must be avoided in path planning and control of a parallel manipulator. However, most studies rarely focus on an overall singularity loci distribution of lower-mobility parallel mechanisms. Geometric algebra is employed in analysis of singularity of a 3-RPS parallel manipulator. Twist and wrench in screw theory are represented in geometric algebra. Linear dependency of twists and wrenches are described by outer product in geometric algebra. Reciprocity between twists and constraint wrenches are reflected by duality. To compute the positions of the three spherical joints of the 3-RPS parallel manipulator, Tilt-and-Torsion angles are used to describe the orientation of the moving platform. The outer product of twists and constraint wrenches is used as an index for closeness to singularity(ICS) of the 3-RPS parallel manipulator. An overall and thorough perspective of the singularity loci distribution of the 3-RPS parallel manipulator is disclosed, which is helpful to design, trajectory planning and control of this kind of parallel manipulator.

  6. Relationship between the monosomy X phenotype and Y-linked ribosomal protein S4 (Rps4) in several species of mammals: A molecular evolutionary analysis of Rps4 homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Omoe, Katsuhiko; Endo, Akira

    1996-01-01

    Two isoforms of the human ribosomal protein S4 gene, RPS4X and RPS4Y, are located on the X and Y chromsomes. It has been postulated and haploinsufficiency of these genes may contribute to Turner syndrome. We show here that several animal species that show the Turner-like phenotype on monosomy X have no Y-linked Rps4 homolog. There may be another gene(s) that contributes to abnormal phenotypes of monosomy X. Molecular evolutionary analysis shows that the Y-linked and RPS4X-related homologs diverged prior to the radiation of placental mammals and evolved independently. Furthermore, the functional constraints against the RPS4X-related homologs are much stronger than those against the Y-linked homologs. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee, the Energy Information Administration prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, and CO2 emissions. The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector mercury emissions and introducing renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements.

  8. Economic analysis of biomass power generation schemes under renewable energy initiative with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Jeung-Woo; Lee, Uen-Do

    2011-10-01

    An economic analysis of biomass power generation was conducted. Two key technologies--direct combustion with a steam turbine and gasification with a syngas engine--were mainly examined. In view of the present domestic biomass infrastructure of Korea, a small and distributed power generation system ranging from 0.5 to 5 MW(e) was considered. It was found that gasification with a syngas engine becomes more economically feasible as the plant size decreases. Changes in the economic feasibilities with and without RPS or heat sales were also investigated. A sensitivity analysis of each system was conducted for representative parameters. Regarding the cost of electricity generation, electrical efficiency and fuel cost significantly affect both direct combustion and gasification systems. Regarding the internal rate of return (IRR), the heat sales price becomes important for obtaining a higher IRR, followed by power generation capacity and electrical efficiency.

  9. Molecular evolution of the mammalian ribosomal protein gene, RPS14.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D D; Roufa, D J

    1991-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S14 genes (RPS14) in eukaryotic species from protozoa to primates exhibit dramatically different intron-exon structures yet share homologous polypeptide-coding sequences. To recognize common features of RPS14 gene architectures in closely related mammalian species and to evaluate similarities in their noncoding DNA sequences, we isolated the intron-containing S14 locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell DNA by using a PCR strategy and compared it with human RPS14. We found that rodent and primate S14 genes are composed of identical protein-coding exons interrupted by introns at four conserved DNA sites. However, the structures of corresponding CHO and human RPS14 introns differ significantly. Nonetheless, individual intron splice donor, splice acceptor, and upstream flanking motifs have been conserved within mammalian S14 homologues as well as within RPS14 gene fragments PCR amplified from other vertebrate genera (birds and bony fish). Our data indicate that noncoding, intronic DNA sequences within highly conserved, single-copy ribosomal protein genes are useful molecular landmarks for phylogenetic analysis of closely related vertebrate species.

  10. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal protein S25 gene (RPS25) from the Giant Panda.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan-Zhe; Hou, Wan-Ru; Hou, Yi-Ling; Du, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Tian; Peng, Zheng-Song

    2009-11-01

    RPS25 is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS25 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. Studies in reference to RPS25 gene from animals were handful. The Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), known as a "living fossil", are increasingly concerned by the world community. Studies on RPS25 of the Giant Panda could provide scientific data for inquiring into the hereditary traits of the gene and formulating the protective strategy for the Giant Panda. The cDNA of the RPS25 cloned from Giant Panda is 436 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 378 bp encoding 125 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 1,992 bp, which was found to possess four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence shows a high homology to those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus as determined by Blast analysis, 92.6, 94.4, 89.2 and 91.5%, respectively. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS25 protein is 13.7421 kDa with a theoretical pI 10.12. Topology prediction showed there is one N-glycosylation site, one cAMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, two Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites and one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site in the RPS25 protein of the Giant Panda. The RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and Western Blotting of the RPS25 protein was also done. The results indicated that the RPS25 gene can be really expressed in E. coli and the RPS25 protein fusioned with the N-terminally his-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 17.4 kDa polypeptide. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS25 were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively, which were both sequenced and analyzed preliminarily; then the cDNA of the RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and immunoblotted, which is the first

  11. The evolutionary conservation of rps3 introns and rps19-rps3-rpl16 gene cluster in Adiantum capillus-veneris mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, Savino; Regina, Teresa Maria Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    Ferns are a large and evolutionarily critical group of vascular land plants for which quite limited mitochondrial gene content and genome organization data are, currently, available. This study reports that the gene for the ribosomal protein S3 (rps3) is preserved and physically clustered to an upstream rps19 and a downstream overlapping rpl16 locus in the mitochondrial DNA of the true fern Adiantum capillus-veneris L. Sequence analysis also revealed that the rps3 gene is interrupted by two cis-splicing group II introns, like the counterpart in lycopod and gymnosperm representatives. A preliminary polymerase chain reaction (PCR) survey confirmed a scattered distribution pattern of both the rps3 introns also in other fern lineages. Northern blot and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses demonstrated that the three ribosomal protein genes are co-transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA and modified by RNA editing. Particularly, the U-to-C type editing amends numerous genomic stop codons in the A. capillus-veneris rps19, rps3 and rpl16 sequences, thus, assuring the synthesis of complete and functional polypeptides. Collectively, the findings from this study further expand our knowledge of the mitochondrial rps3 architecture and evolution, also, bridging the significant molecular data gaps across the so far underrepresented ferns and all land plants.

  12. NASA RPS Program Overview: A Focus on RPS Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet the needs of the missions. To meet this goal, the RPS Program, working closely with the Department of Energy, performs mission and system studies (such as the recently released Nuclear Power Assessment Study), assesses the readiness of promising technologies to infuse in future generators, assesses the sustainment of key RPS capabilities and knowledge, forecasts and tracks the Programs budgetary needs, and disseminates current information about RPS to the community of potential users. This process has been refined and used to determine the current content of the RPS Programs portfolio. This portfolio currently includes an effort to mature advanced thermoelectric technology for possible integration into an enhanced Multi-Mission Radioisotope Generator (eMMRTG), sustainment and production of the currently deployed MMRTG, and technology investments that could lead to a future Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). This paper describes the program planning processes that have been used, the currently available MMRTG, and one of the potential future systems, the eMMRTG.

  13. Ribosomal Proteins RPS11 and RPS20, Two Stress-Response Markers of Glioblastoma Stem Cells, Are Novel Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuai; Tso, Jonathan L.; Menjivar, Jimmy C.; Wei, Bowen; Lucey, Gregory M.; Mareninov, Sergey; Chen, Zugen; Liau, Linda M.; Lai, Albert; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Tso, Cho-Lea

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem cells (GSC) co-exhibiting a tumor-initiating capacity and a radio-chemoresistant phenotype, are a compelling cell model for explaining tumor recurrence. We have previously characterized patient-derived, treatment-resistant GSC clones (TRGC) that survived radiochemotherapy. Compared to glucose-dependent, treatment-sensitive GSC clones (TSGC), TRGC exhibited reduced glucose dependence that favor the fatty acid oxidation pathway as their energy source. Using comparative genome-wide transcriptome analysis, a series of defense signatures associated with TRGC survival were identified and verified by siRNA-based gene knockdown experiments that led to loss of cell integrity. In this study, we investigate the prognostic value of defense signatures in glioblastoma (GBM) patients using gene expression analysis with Probeset Analyzer (131 GBM) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data, and protein expression with a tissue microarray (50 GBM), yielding the first TRGC-derived prognostic biomarkers for GBM patients. Ribosomal protein S11 (RPS11), RPS20, individually and together, consistently predicted poor survival of newly diagnosed primary GBM tumors when overexpressed at the RNA or protein level [RPS11: Hazard Ratio (HR) = 11.5, p<0.001; RPS20: HR = 4.5, p = 0.03; RPS11+RPS20: HR = 17.99, p = 0.001]. The prognostic significance of RPS11 and RPS20 was further supported by whole tissue section RPS11 immunostaining (27 GBM; HR = 4.05, p = 0.01) and TCGA gene expression data (578 primary GBM; RPS11: HR = 1.19, p = 0.06; RPS20: HR = 1.25, p = 0.02; RPS11+RPS20: HR = 1.43, p = 0.01). Moreover, tumors that exhibited unmethylated O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) or wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were associated with higher RPS11 expression levels [corr (IDH1, RPS11) = 0.64, p = 0.03); [corr (MGMT, RPS11) = 0.52, p = 0.04]. These data indicate that increased expression of RPS11 and RPS20 predicts shorter patient survival. The study also

  14. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  15. RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer growth via decreasing HIF-1α-mediated glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Tong, Duo; Liu, Fei; Li, Dawei; Li, Jiajia; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-02-02

    Ribosomal protein S7 (RPS7) acts as a tumor suppressor in primary tumorigenesis but its role in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that RPS7 inhibits the colorectal cancer (CRC) cell glycolysis by suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the metabolic promoting proteins glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB). Further study found that the enhanced expression of HIF-1α abrogates the overexpression effects of RPS7 on CRC. In vivo assays also demonstrate that RPS7 suppresses colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and glycolysis. Clinically, the tissue microarray (TMA) analysis discloses the negative regulatory association between RPS7 and HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Meanwhile, overexpression of RPS7 in colorectal cancer tissues predicts good overall survival and progression-free survival, but high expression level of HIF-1α indicates poor overall survival and progression-free survival. Overall, we reveal that RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer glycolysis through HIF-1α-associated signaling and may be a promising biomarker for prognosis prediction and a potential target for therapeutic treatment.

  16. RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer growth via decreasing HIF-1α-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Li, Jiajia; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 (RPS7) acts as a tumor suppressor in primary tumorigenesis but its role in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that RPS7 inhibits the colorectal cancer (CRC) cell glycolysis by suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the metabolic promoting proteins glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB). Further study found that the enhanced expression of HIF-1α abrogates the overexpression effects of RPS7 on CRC. In vivo assays also demonstrate that RPS7 suppresses colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and glycolysis. Clinically, the tissue microarray (TMA) analysis discloses the negative regulatory association between RPS7 and HIF-1α in colorectal cancer. Meanwhile, overexpression of RPS7 in colorectal cancer tissues predicts good overall survival and progression-free survival, but high expression level of HIF-1α indicates poor overall survival and progression-free survival. Overall, we reveal that RPS7 inhibits colorectal cancer glycolysis through HIF-1α-associated signaling and may be a promising biomarker for prognosis prediction and a potential target for therapeutic treatment. PMID:26735579

  17. Pervasive survival of expressed mitochondrial rps14 pseudogenes in grasses and their relatives for 80 million years following three functional transfers to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Han Chuan; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2006-01-01

    Background Many mitochondrial genes, especially ribosomal protein genes, have been frequently transferred as functional entities to the nucleus during plant evolution, often by an RNA-mediated process. A notable case of transfer involves the rps14 gene of three grasses (rice, maize, and wheat), which has been relocated to the intron of the nuclear sdh2 gene and which is expressed and targeted to the mitochondrion via alternative splicing and usage of the sdh2 targeting peptide. Although this transfer occurred at least 50 million years ago, i.e., in a common ancestor of these three grasses, it is striking that expressed, nearly intact pseudogenes of rps14 are retained in the mitochondrial genomes of both rice and wheat. To determine how ancient this transfer is, the extent to which mitochondrial rps14 has been retained and is expressed in grasses, and whether other transfers of rps14 have occurred in grasses and their relatives, we investigated the structure, expression, and phylogeny of mitochondrial and nuclear rps14 genes from 32 additional genera of grasses and from 9 other members of the Poales. Results Filter hybridization experiments showed that rps14 sequences are present in the mitochondrial genomes of all examined Poales except for members of the grass subfamily Panicoideae (to which maize belongs). However, PCR amplification and sequencing revealed that the mitochondrial rps14 genes of all examined grasses (Poaceae), Cyperaceae, and Joinvilleaceae are pseudogenes, with all those from the Poaceae sharing two 4-NT frameshift deletions and all those from the Cyperaceae sharing a 5-NT insertion (only one member of the Joinvilleaceae was examined). cDNA analysis showed that all mitochondrial pseudogenes examined (from all three families) are transcribed, that most are RNA edited, and that surprisingly many of the edits are reverse (U→C) edits. Putatively nuclear copies of rps14 were isolated from one to several members of each of these three Poales families

  18. Loss of function mutations in RPL27 and RPS27 identified by whole-exome sequencing in Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, RuNan; Yoshida, Kenichi; Toki, Tsutomu; Sawada, Takafumi; Uechi, Tamayo; Okuno, Yusuke; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Kudo, Kazuko; Kamimaki, Isamu; Kanezaki, Rika; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Terui, Kiminori; Sato, Tomohiko; Iribe, Yuji; Ohga, Shouichi; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Hamaguchi, Isao; Ohara, Akira; Hara, Junichi; Goi, Kumiko; Matsubara, Kousaku; Koike, Kenichi; Ishiguro, Akira; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Kenichiro; Kanno, Hitoshi; Kojima, Seiji; Miyano, Satoru; Kenmochi, Naoya; Ogawa, Seishi; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome that is characterized by red blood cell aplasia. The disease has been associated with mutations or large deletions in 11 ribosomal protein genes including RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS26, RPS29, RPL5, RPL11, RPL26 and RPL35A as well as GATA1 in more than 50% of patients. However, the molecular aetiology of many Diamond-Blackfan anaemia cases remains to be uncovered. To identify new mutations responsible for Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, we performed whole-exome sequencing analysis of 48 patients with no documented mutations/deletions involving known Diamond-Blackfan anaemia genes except for RPS7, RPL26, RPS29 and GATA1. Here, we identified a de novo splicing error mutation in RPL27 and frameshift deletion in RPS27 in sporadic patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia. In vitro knockdown of gene expression disturbed pre-ribosomal RNA processing. Zebrafish models of rpl27 and rps27 mutations showed impairments of erythrocyte production and tail and/or brain development. Additional novel mutations were found in eight patients, including RPL3L, RPL6, RPL7L1T, RPL8, RPL13, RPL14, RPL18A and RPL31. In conclusion, we identified novel germline mutations of two ribosomal protein genes responsible for Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, further confirming the concept that mutations in ribosomal protein genes lead to Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

  19. Structural basis for targeting the ribosomal protein S1 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juanjuan; Liu, Yindi; Bi, Jing; Cai, Qixu; Liao, Xinli; Li, Wenqian; Guo, Chenyun; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Tianwei; Zhao, Yufen; Wang, Honghai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian; Lin, Donghai

    2015-03-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a first-line drug for tuberculosis (TB) treatment and is responsible for shortening the duration of TB therapy. The mode of action of PZA remains elusive. RpsA, the ribosomal protein S1 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), was recently identified as a target of PZA based on its binding activity to pyrazinoic acid (POA), the active form of PZA. POA binding to RpsA led to the inhibition of trans-translation. However, the nature of the RpsA-POA interaction remains unknown. Key questions include why POA exhibits an exquisite specificity to RpsA of Mtb and how RpsA mutations confer PZA resistance. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of RpsA of Mtb and its complex with POA, as well as the corresponding domains of two RpsA variants that are associated with PZA resistance. Structural analysis reveals that POA binds to RpsA through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, mediated mainly by residues (Lys303, Phe307, Phe310 and Arg357) that are essential for tmRNA binding. Conformational changes induced by mutation or sequence variation at the C-terminus of RpsA abolish the POA binding activity. Our findings provide insights into the mode of action of PZA and molecular basis of PZA resistance associated with RpsA mutations.

  20. Small-RPS Enabled Mars Rover Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2005-02-01

    Both the MER and the Mars Pathfinder rovers operated on Mars in an energy-limited mode, since the solar panels generated power during daylight hours only. At other times the rovers relied on power stored in batteries. In comparison, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) offer a power-enabled paradigm, where power can be generated for long mission durations (measured in years), independently from the Sun, and on a continuous basis. A study was performed at JPL to assess the feasibility of a small-RPS enabled MER-class rover concept and any associated advantages of its mission on Mars, The rover concept relied on design heritage from MER with two significant changes. First, the solar panels were replaced with two single GPHS module based small-RPSs. Second, the Mossbauer spectroscope was substituted with a laser Raman spectroscope, in order to move towards MEPAG defined astrobiology driven science goals. The highest power requirements were contributed to mobility and telecommunication type operating modes, hence influencing power system sizing. The resulting hybrid power system included two small-RPSs and two batteries. Each small-RPS was assumed to generate 50 We of power or 620 Wh/sol of energy (BOL), comparable to that of MER. The two 8 Ah batteries were considered available during peak power usage. Mission architecture, power trades, science instruments, data, communication, thermal and radiation environments, mobility, and mass issues were also addressed. The study demonstrated that a new set of RPS-enabled rover missions could be envisioned for Mars exploration within the next decade, targeting astrobiology oriented science objectives, while powered by 2 to 4 GPHS modules.

  1. RPS27A — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Ubiquitin, one of the most highly conserved proteins, is coded for by a family of genes whose translation products give rise to several different proteins. There are four genes that code for ubiquitin: UBB, UBC, RPS27A, and UBA52. Ubiquitin is synthesized as a precursor protein consisting of either polyubiquitin chains or a single ubiquitin moiety fused to an unrelated protein. UBA52 and RPS27A genes code for a single copy of ubiquitin fused to the ribosomal proteins L40 and S27a, respectively. UBB and UBC genes code for a polyubiquitin precursor with exact head to tail repeats, the number of repeats differ between species and strains. This gene, RPS27A, encodes a fusion protein consisting of ubiquitin at the N terminus and ribosomal protein S27a at the C terminus. When expressed in yeast, the protein is post-translationally processed, generating free ubiquitin monomer and ribosomal protein S27a. Ribosomal protein S27a is a component of the 40S subunit of the ribosome and belongs to the S27AE family of ribosomal proteins. Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants that encode the same proteins have been identified.

  2. Sensing cytosolic RpsL by macrophages induces lysosomal cell death and termination of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhan; Tao, Lili; Quick, Marsha L; Joyce, Johanna A; Qu, Jie-Ming; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila provokes strong host responses and has proven to be a valuable model for the discovery of novel immunosurveillance pathways. Our previous work revealed that an environmental isolate of L. pneumophila induces a noncanonical form of cell death, leading to restriction of bacterial replication in primary mouse macrophages. Here we show that such restriction also occurs in infections with wild type clinical isolates. Importantly, we found that a lysine to arginine mutation at residue 88 (K88R) in the ribosome protein RpsL that not only confers bacterial resistance to streptomycin, but more importantly, severely attenuated the induction of host cell death and enabled L. pneumophila to replicate in primary mouse macrophages. Although conferring similar resistance to streptomycin, a K43N mutation in RpsL does not allow productive intracellular bacterial replication. Further analysis indicated that RpsL is capable of effectively inducing macrophage death via a pathway involved in lysosomal membrane permeabilization; the K88R mutant elicits similar responses but is less potent. Moreover, cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease that causes cell death after being released into the cytosol upon the loss of membrane integrity, is required for efficient RpsL-induced macrophage death. Furthermore, despite the critical role of cathepsin B in delaying RpsL-induced cell death, macrophages lacking cathepsin B do not support productive intracellular replication of L. pneumophila harboring wild type RpsL. This suggests the involvement of other yet unidentified components in the restriction of bacterial replication. Our results identified RpsL as a regulator in the interactions between bacteria such as L. pneumophila and primary mouse macrophages by triggering unique cellular pathways that restrict intracellular bacterial replication.

  3. Regional REC and RPS Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Alvarado

    2009-09-30

    The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association conducted a program to explore the development of Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards and Renewable Energy Certificate Markets in the Midwest. The initiative represented the collaboration between the four state energy offices of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association (GLREA) and the Clean Energy State Alliance (CESA). The multi-state project explored the opportunities in the Midwest to expand the renewable energy market through Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (RPS) and the trading of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs).

  4. A Ribosomal Protein AgRPS3aE from Halophilic Aspergillus glaucus Confers Salt Tolerance in Heterologous Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xilong; Liu, Yiling; Xie, Lixia; Liu, Xiaodan; Wei, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    High salt in soils is one of the abiotic stresses that significantly reduces crop yield, although saline lands are considered potential resources arable for agriculture. Currently, genetic engineering for enhancing salt tolerance is being tested as an efficient and viable strategy for crop improvement. We previously characterized a large subunit of the ribosomal protein RPL44, which is involved in osmotic stress in the extremely halophilic fungus Aspergillus glaucus. Here, we screened another ribosomal protein (AgRPS3aE) that also produced high-salt tolerance in yeast. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that AgRPS3aE encodes a 29.2 kDa small subunit of a ribosomal protein belonging to the RPS3Ae family in eukaryotes. To further confirm its protective function against salinity, we expressed AgRPS3aE in three heterologous systems, the filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and two model plants Arabidopsis and tobacco. Overexpression of AgRPS3aE in all tested transformants significantly alleviated stress symptoms compared with controls, suggesting that AgRPS3aE functions not only in fungi but also in plants. Considering that ribosomal proteins are housekeeping components in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, we propose that AgRPS3aE is one of the optimal genes for improving high-salt tolerance in crops. PMID:25642759

  5. Transfer of rps19 to the nucleus involves the gain of an RNP-binding motif which may functionally replace RPS13 in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, H; Fester, T; Kloska, S; Schröder, W; Schuster, W

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of disrupted rps19 genes in Arabidopsis mitochondria prompted speculation about the transfer to the nuclear compartment. We here describe the functional gene transfer of rps19 into the nucleus of Arabidopsis. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of rps19 show that the nuclear gene encodes a long N-terminal extension. Import studies of the precursor protein indicate that only a small part of this extension is cleaved off during import. The larger part of the extension, which shows high similarity to conserved RNA-binding domains of the RNP-CS type, became part of the S19 protein. In the Escherichia coli ribosome S19 forms an RNA-binding complex as heterodimer with S13. By using immuno-analysis and import studies we show that a eubacterial-like S13 protein is absent from Arabidopsis mitochondria, and is not substituted by either a chloroplastic or a cytosolic homologue of this ribosomal protein. We therefore propose that either a highly diverged or missing RPS13 has been functionally replaced by an RNP domain that most likely derived from a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein. These results represent the first case of a functional replacement of a ribosomal protein by a common RNA-binding domain and offer a new view on the flexibility of biological systems in using well-adapted functional domains for different jobs. Images PMID:8641279

  6. Use of rpsL for dominance selection and gene replacement in Streptomyces roseosporus.

    PubMed Central

    Hosted, T J; Baltz, R H

    1997-01-01

    We developed a gene replacement system using the rpsL gene of Streptomyces roseosporus and demonstrated its utility by constructing a deletion in the S. roseosporus glnA gene. A 1.3-kb BamHI fragment that hybridized to the Mycobacterium smegmatis rpsL gene was subcloned from an S. roseosporus cosmid library and sequenced. Plasmid pRHB514 containing the rpsL gene conferred streptomycin sensitivity (Sm(S)) to the Sm(r) S. roseosporus TH149. The temperature-sensitive plasmid pRHB543 containing rpsL and the S. roseosporus glnA gene disrupted with a hygromycin resistance (Hm(r)) gene was introduced into S. roseosporus TH149, and recombinants containing single and double crossovers were obtained after a temperature increase. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that single crossovers occurred in the glnA or rpsL genes and that double crossovers resulted in replacement of the chromosomal glnA gene with the disrupted glnA. Glutamine synthetase activity was undetectable in the recombinant containing the disrupted glnA gene. PMID:8981996

  7. Implications of Scheduled ITC Reversion for RPS Compliance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, Travis; Miller, John; O'Shaughnessy, Eric; Heeter, Jenny

    2015-09-14

    This poster presents DRAFT initial results of a forthcoming NREL analysis. The analysis investigates the impacts of the scheduled investment tax credit (ITC) reversion from 30 percent to 10 percent for certain solar photovoltaic projects. Specifically, it considers whether the reversion will result in increased use of alternative compliance payments (ACPs) in lieu of solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015. credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015.

  8. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  9. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  10. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Overview - A Focus on RPS Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS technologies and RPS system development, working closely with the Department of Energy. This paper provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status, its collaborations with potential RPS users, and the approach employed to maintain the readiness of RPS to support future NASA mission concepts.

  11. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) Online Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, P. P.; Mazur, E.; Redding, M.; McNab, M. C.; Sorensen, G.; Weigel, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a tutorial on the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on-ine data products. RPS measures protons with energies from 60 MeV to over 1 GeV aboard the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission. The RPS data products are hosted by the Virtual Radiation Belt Observatory (ViRBO), and make extensive use of ViRBO data visualization and organization tools, including Autoplot. We will provide a hands-on demonstration of the website and data browsing capabilities provided by ViRBO.

  12. Molecular cloning and expression analyses of RPS3a gene from mulberry under abiotic stresses and among different mulberry varieties.

    PubMed

    Qian, J; Zhou, H; Zhao, M D; Wang, H; Li, F; Wang, Y H; Fang, R J; Zhao, W G; Kim, H J

    2016-04-28

    A full-length cDNA sequence coding ribosomal protein S3a of mulberry tree, which we designated MmRPS3a (GenBank accession No. KR610331), was cloned based on mulberry expressed sequence tags. Sequence analysis showed that the MmRPS3a is 1089 bp long and contains a 80-bp 5'-UTR (untranslated region) and a 220-bp 3'-UTR. Its open reading frame consists of a 789-bp encoding 262 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 30.053 kDa and an isoelectric point of 9.84. Homology analysis revealed that MmRPS3a gene is highly conservative in mulberry and other species including Morus notabilis, Theobroma cacao, and Ricinus communis. Phylogenetic analysis based on MmRPS3a of other species showed that mulberry had a closer relationship with Prunus persica, Arabidopsis thaliana, Solanum tuberosum, Solanum lycopersicum, and Vitis vinifera. The results of quantitative PCR analysis showed that the transcriptional level of MmRPS3a mRNA changed significantly under the conditions of hypothermia, aridity, salt stress, and varieties of differing resistances.

  13. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Robertson, Alison E.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance. PMID:28081566

  14. NASA'S RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could

  15. NASA's RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set. Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could

  16. Streptomyces alboflavus RPS and Its Novel and High Algicidal Activity against Harmful Algal Bloom Species Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Li, Dong; Yang, Xujun; An, Xinli; Zheng, Xiaowei; Tian, Yun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa blooms have frequently occurred along coastal waters and exerted serious impacts on ecological environments by releasing toxic hemolytic substances, forming nuisance foam, and causing oxygen depletion. An actinomycete strain RPS with high algicidal activity against P. globosa was isolated and identified as Streptomyces alboflavus, based on morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. RPS lysed 95% of P. globosa within 48 h by releasing an extracellular active substance into the growth medium. The activity of RPS supernatant was sensitive to temperature at and above 50°C and insensitive to pH from 3 to 11. The molecular weight of the active substance was between 100 Da and 1000 Da, and approximately 90% of it was extracted by ethyl acetate. It was presumed that the active component efficiently inhibited the movement of P. globosa, caused the flagella to fall off the algae, and finally lysed the algal cells. RPS showed a wide target range against harmful algae. S. alboflavus RPS with high algicidal activity and such novel features of temperature and pH sensitivity, low molecular weight, algicidal process, and target range possesses great potential in the biological control of P. globosa blooms. PMID:24675867

  17. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-03-01

    Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

  18. Chief of Naval Air Training Resource Planning System (RPS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodak, Gary W.; And Others

    The Resource Planning System (RPS) provides the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) with the capability to determine the resources required to produce a specified number of Naval Aviators and Naval Flight Officers (NAs/NFOs) quickly and efficiently. The training of NAs and NFOs is extremely time consuming and complex. It requires extensive…

  19. Inactivation of the Rps4 gene on the mouse X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zinn, A R; Bressler, S L; Beer-Romero, P; Adler, D A; Chapman, V M; Page, D C; Disteche, C M

    1991-12-01

    The human RPS4X and RPS4Y genes, located on the X and Y chromosomes, appear to encode isoforms of ribosomal protein S4. Haploinsufficiency of these genes may contribute to the human phenotype known as Turner syndrome. Although RPS4X maps near the X-inactivation center, the gene is expressed on inactive human X chromosomes. We cloned Rps4, the mouse homolog of RPS4X. Exploiting allelic variation in Rps4, we examined transcription of the gene from active and inactive mouse X chromosomes in vivo, in female mice carrying an X-autosome translocation. We report that mouse Rps4, unlike human RPS4X, is subject to X inactivation. This finding may explain, at least in part, why the phenotypic consequences of X monosomy are less severe in mice than in humans.

  20. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex. PMID:26750751

  1. RPS2, an Arabidopsis disease resistance locus specifying recognition of Pseudomonas syringae strains expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2.

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, B N; Bent, A F; Dahlbeck, D; Innes, R W; Staskawicz, B J

    1993-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach was used to identify and characterize plant genes that control bacterial disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A screen for mutants with altered resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2 resulted in the isolation of four susceptible rps (resistance to P. syringae) mutants. The rps mutants lost resistance specifically to bacterial strains expressing avrRpt2 as they retained resistance to Pst strains expressing the avirulence genes avrB or avrRpm1. Genetic analysis indicated that in each of the four rps mutants, susceptibility was due to a single mutation mapping to the same locus on chromosome 4. Identification of a resistance locus with specificity for a single bacterial avirulence gene suggests that this locus, designated RPS2, controls specific recognition of bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2. Ecotype Wü-0, a naturally occurring line that is susceptible to Pst strains expressing avrRpt2, appears to lack a functional allele at RPS2, demonstrating that there is natural variation at the RPS2 locus among wild populations of Arabidopsis. PMID:8400869

  2. Do state-level RPS policies in the U.S. deliver anticipated benefits? Examining the impact of federalized energy and environment policy on electricity price and quantity, use of renewables, and carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Joseph Alleyn

    In this dissertation, I present the findings of a formative evaluation of the changes in the electricity markets of states that implemented renewable portfolio standards (RPS policies) from 2000 to 2010. The formative evaluation is an assessment of the consequences of RPS policies that I conducted for adopting states that were still implementing their RPS policies. Using governmental data as my primary sources, I estimated the changes in carbon intensity within adopting states. I also examined the changes attributable to RPS policies in electricity prices, electricity revenues, electricity production, carbon dioxide emissions, and renewable electricity production within adopting states in order to gain a more detailed understanding of the changes in the electricity markets of adopting states caused by RPS policies. Using OLS regressions and path analysis models, I found these policies have not yet improved the electricity markets of adopting states by significantly reducing carbon intensity from 2000 to 2010, in sharp contrast with the expectations reported in the professional literature.

  3. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  4. A highly recurrent RPS27 5'UTR mutation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Rafi; Qutob, Nouar; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Robinson, William; Robinson, Steven; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Mann, Graham J.; Thompson, John F.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Samuels, Yardena

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma continues to rise globally and is increasing at a rate greater than any other cancer. To systematically search for new genes involved in melanomagenesis, we collated exome sequencing data from independent melanoma cohort datasets, including those in the public domain. We identified recurrent mutations that may drive melanoma growth, survival or metastasis, and which may hold promise for the design of novel therapies to treat melanoma. These included a frequent recurrent (i.e. hotspot) mutation in the 5' untranslated region of RPS27 in ~10% of samples. We show that the mutation expands the 5'TOP element, a motif known to regulate the expression of most of the ribosomal protein family, to which RPS27 belongs, and thus might sensitize the mutated transcript to growth-mediated regulation. This finding highlights not only the important role of non-protein coding genetic aberrations in cancer development but also their potential as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24913145

  5. Identification of the Rps28 binding motif from yeast Edc3 involved in the autoregulatory feedback loop controlling RPS28B mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, Olga; Back, Régis; Graille, Marc; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Edc3 protein was previously reported to participate in the auto-regulatory feedback loop controlling the level of the RPS28B messenger RNA (mRNA). We show here that Edc3 binds directly and tightly to the globular core of Rps28 ribosomal protein. This binding occurs through a motif that is present exclusively in Edc3 proteins from yeast belonging to the Saccharomycetaceae phylum. Functional analyses indicate that the ability of Edc3 to interact with Rps28 is not required for its general function and for its role in the regulation of the YRA1 pre-mRNA decay. In contrast, this interaction appears to be exclusively required for the auto-regulatory mechanism controlling the RPS28B mRNA decay. These observations suggest a plausible model for the evolutionary appearance of a Rps28 binding motif in Edc3.

  6. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  7. AMTEC radioisotope power system design and analysis for Pluto Express Fly-By

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T.J.; Huang, C.; Sievers, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    The Pluto Express Fly-By program requires a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) to supply spacecraft power for various internal functions and mission instruments and experiments. AMTEC (Alkali-Metal Thermal-Electric Conversion) power conversion is the DOE-selected technology for an advanced, high-efficiency RPS to power the Pluto Express Fly-By spacecraft. An AMTEC-based RPS using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) has been conceptually designed to satisfy the Pluto Express power requirements. Integrated AMTEC cell and system thermal/electrical design analyses, structural design analyses, and mass analyses were performed to define an optimum system design. Using fresh radioisotope fuel at beginning of mission, the RPS produces 102 watts of power, has a mass of 8.35 kg (specific power density = 12.2 watts/kg), with a system conversion efficiency of 20.3%. Mass/power scale-up estimates have also been generated, indicating that a 150-watt version of this RPS would weigh approximately 11.3 kg. This paper presents and discusses the key features of this RPS design, the design and analysis methodology, and the numerous system and AMTEC cell tradeoff studies establishing the optimum AMTEC-based RPS.

  8. The leucine-rich repeat domain can determine effective interaction between RPS2 and other host factors in arabidopsis RPS2-mediated disease resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, D; Zhang, X; Bent, A F

    2001-01-01

    Like many other plant disease resistance genes, Arabidopsis thaliana RPS2 encodes a product with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. This study explored the hypothesized interaction of RPS2 with other host factors that may be required for perception of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens that express avrRpt2 and/or for the subsequent induction of plant defense responses. Crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes Col-0 (resistant) and Po-1 (susceptible) revealed segregation of more than one gene that controls resistance to P. syringae that express avrRpt2. Many F(2) and F(3) progeny exhibited intermediate resistance phenotypes. In addition to RPS2, at least one additional genetic interval associated with this defense response was identified and mapped using quantitative genetic methods. Further genetic and molecular genetic complementation experiments with cloned RPS2 alleles revealed that the Po-1 allele of RPS2 can function in a Col-0 genetic background, but not in a Po-1 background. The other resistance-determining genes of Po-1 can function, however, as they successfully conferred resistance in combination with the Col-0 allele of RPS2. Domain-swap experiments revealed that in RPS2, a polymorphism at six amino acids in the LRR region is responsible for this allele-specific ability to function with other host factors. PMID:11333251

  9. Nuclear import of dimerized ribosomal protein Rps3 in complex with its chaperone Yar1

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Gantenbein, Nadine; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Murat, Guillaume; Bergler, Helmut; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    After their cytoplasmic synthesis, ribosomal proteins need to be transported into the nucleus, where they assemble with ribosomal RNA into pre-ribosomal particles. Due to their physicochemical properties, they need protection from aggregation on this path. Newly synthesized ribosomal protein Rps3 forms a dimer that is associated with one molecule of its specific chaperone Yar1. Here we report that redundant pathways contribute to the nuclear import of Rps3, with the classical importin α/β pathway (Kap60/Kap95 in yeast) constituting a main import route. The Kap60/Kap95 heterodimer mediates efficient nuclear import of Rps3 by recognition of an N-terminal monopartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). This Rps3-NLS is located directly adjacent to the Yar1-binding site and, upon binding of Kap60 to Rps3, Yar1 is displaced from the ribosomal protein in vitro. While Yar1 does not directly interact with Kap60 in vitro, affinity purifications of Yar1 and Rps3, however, revealed that Kap60 is present in the Rps3/Yar1 complex in vivo. Indeed we could reconstitute such a protein complex containing Rps3 and both Yar1 and Kap60 in vitro. Our data suggest that binding of Yar1 to one N-domain and binding of Kap60 to the second N-domain of dimerized Rps3 orchestrates import and protection of the ribosomal protein. PMID:27819319

  10. The poly(A)-dependent degradation pathway of rpsO mRNA is primarily mediated by RNase R

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, José M.; Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Régnier, Philippe; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an important factor controlling RNA degradation and RNA quality control mechanisms. In this report we demonstrate for the first time that RNase R has in vivo affinity for polyadenylated RNA and can be a key enzyme involved in poly(A) metabolism. RNase II and PNPase, two major RNA exonucleases present in Escherichia coli, could not account for all the poly(A)-dependent degradation of the rpsO mRNA. RNase II can remove the poly(A) tails but fails to degrade the mRNA as it cannot overcome the RNA termination hairpin, while PNPase plays only a modest role in this degradation. We now demonstrate that in the absence of RNase E, RNase R is the relevant factor in the poly(A)-dependent degradation of the rpsO mRNA. Moreover, we have found that the RNase R inactivation counteracts the extended degradation of this transcript observed in RNase II-deficient cells. Elongated rpsO transcripts harboring increasing poly(A) tails are specifically recognized by RNase R and strongly accumulate in the absence of this exonuclease. The 3′ oligo(A) extension may stimulate the binding of RNase R, allowing the complete degradation of the mRNA, as RNase R is not susceptible to RNA secondary structures. Moreover, this regulation is shown to occur despite the presence of PNPase. Similar results were observed with the rpsT mRNA. This report shows that polyadenylation favors in vivo the RNase R-mediated pathways of RNA degradation. PMID:19103951

  11. Inclusion of renal vascular lesions in the 2003 ISN/RPS system for classifying lupus nephritis improves renal outcome predictions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Hua; Yu, Feng; Tan, Ying; Qu, Zhen; Chen, Meng-Hua; Wang, Su-Xia; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The 2003 International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) pathological classification system of lupus nephritis specified the importance of vascular damage and indicated this should be included in the diagnostic summary. Few pathological studies of lupus nephritis, however, focus on the patterns of renal vascular involvement. Here we assessed renal vascular lesions in lupus nephritis based on the 2003 ISN/RPS classification system and evaluated their association with clinical and pathological data in a large cohort from a single center in China. Among 341 patients with lupus nephritis, 279 were diagnosed with single or multiple renal vascular lesions that included 253 with vascular immune complex deposits, 82 with atherosclerosis, 60 with thrombotic microangiopathy, 13 with noninflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy, and 2 with true renal vasculitis. Patients with thrombotic microangiopathy had the poorest renal outcome. In multivariate Cox hazard analysis after inclusion of renal vascular lesions, the new chronicity index score became a significantly better independent risk factor for renal outcome (hazard ratio 2.32). Thus, renal vascular lesions are common in lupus nephritis and closely correlate with clinical disease activity and renal outcome. Inclusion of a detailed description of renal vascular lesions in the ISN/RPS classification of lupus nephritis may strengthen its predictive value for renal outcome.

  12. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Development for NASA RPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) initiated development under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and after a series of successful demonstrations, the ASC began transitioning from a technology development project to flight development project. The ASC has very high power conversion efficiency making it attractive for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) in order to make best use of the low plutonium-238 fuel inventory in the U.S. In recent years, the ASC became part of the NASA-Department of Energy Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Integrated Project. Sunpower held two parallel contracts to produce ASC convertors, one with the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin to produce the ASC-F flight convertors, and one with NASA GRC for the production of ASC-E3 engineering units, the initial units of which served as production pathfinders. The integrated ASC technical team successfully overcame various technical challenges that led to the completion and delivery of the first two pairs of flight-like ASC-E3 by 2013. However, in late Fall 2013, the DOE initiated termination of the Lockheed Martin ASRG flight development contract driven primarily by budget constraints. NASA continues to recognize the importance of high efficiency ASC power conversion for RPS and continues investment in the technology including the continuation of ASC-E3 production at Sunpower and the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit #2. This paper provides a summary of ASC technical accomplishments, overview of tests at GRC, plans for continued ASC production at Sunpower, and status of Stirling technology development.

  13. Different domains of Phytophthora sojae effector Avr4/6 are recognized by soybean resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6.

    PubMed

    Dou, Daolong; Kale, Shiv D; Liu, Tingli; Tang, Qinghua; Wang, Xia; Arredondo, Felipe D; Basnayake, Shiromi; Whisson, Stephen; Drenth, Andre; Maclean, Don; Tyler, Brett M

    2010-04-01

    At least 12 avirulence genes have been genetically identified and mapped in Phytophthora sojae, an oomycete pathogen causing root and stem rot of soybean. Previously, the Avr4 and Avr6 genes of P. sojae were genetically mapped within a 24 kb interval of the genome. Here, we identify Avr4 and Avr6 and show that they are actually a single gene, Avr4/6, located near the 24-kb region. Avr4/6 encodes a secreted protein of 123 amino acids with an RXLR-dEER protein translocation motif. Transient expression of Avr4/6 in soybean leaves revealed that its gene product could trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) in the presence of either Rps4 or Rps6. Silencing Avr4/6 in P. sojae stable transformants abolished the avirulence phenotype exhibited on both Rps4 and Rps6 soybean cultivars. The N terminus of Avr4/6, including the dEER motif, is sufficient to trigger Rps4-dependent HR while its C terminus is sufficient to trigger Rps6-mediated HR. Compared with alleles from avirulent races, alleles of Avr4/6 from virulent races possess nucleotide substitutions in the 5' untranslated region of the gene but not in the protein-coding region.

  14. Released polysaccharides (RPS) from Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 as biosorbent for heavy metals bioremediation: interactions between metals and RPS binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mota, Rita; Rossi, Federico; Andrenelli, Luisa; Pereira, Sara Bernardes; De Philippis, Roberto; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms can be advantageous compared to conventional physicochemical methods due to the use of renewable resources and efficiencies of removal particularly cations at low concentrations. In this context, cyanobacteria/cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) emerge as a valid alternative due to the anionic nature and particular composition of these polymers. In this work, various culture fractions of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 were employed in bioremoval assays using three of the most common heavy metal pollutants in water bodies-copper, cadmium, and lead-separately or in combined systems. Our study showed that the released polysaccharides (RPS) were the most efficient fraction, removing the metal(s) by biosorption. Therefore, this polymer was subsequently used to evaluate the interactions between the metals/RPS binding sites using SEM-EDX, ICP-OES, and FTIR. Acid and basic pretreatments applied to the polymer further improve the process efficiency, and the exposure to an alkaline solution seems to alter the RPS conformation. The differences observed in the specific metal bioremoval seem to be mainly due to the RPS organic functional groups available, mainly carboxyl and hydroxyl, than to an ion exchange mechanism. Considering that Cyanothece is a highly efficient RPS-producer and that RPS can be easily separated from the culture, immobilized or confined, this polymer can be advantageous for the establishment/improvement of heavy metal removal systems.

  15. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  16. Genetic architecture and pleiotropy shape costs of Rps2-mediated resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Alice; Sun, Xiaoqin; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-01-01

    The mounting evidence that R-genes incur large fitness costs raises a question: how can there be a 5-10% fitness reduction for all 149 R-genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome? The R-genes tested to date segregate for insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphisms where susceptible alleles are complete deletions. Since costs of resistance are measured as the differential fitness of isolines carrying resistant and susceptible alleles, indels reveal costs that may be masked when susceptible alleles are expressed. Rps2 segregates for two expressed clades of alleles, one resistant and one susceptible. Plants with resistant Rps2 are not less fit than those with a susceptible Rps2 allele in the absence of disease. Instead, all alleles provide a fitness benefit relative to an artificial deletion, due to the role of RPS2 as a negative regulator of defense. Our results highlight the interplay between genomic architecture and the magnitude of costs of resistance. PMID:27428524

  17. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  18. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  19. Specific recognition of rpsO mRNA and 16S rRNA by Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S15 relies on both mimicry and site differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mathy, Nathalie; Pellegrini, Olivier; Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Ehresmann, Chantal; Portier, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ribosomal protein S15 binds to 16S rRNA, during ribosome assembly, and to its own mRNA (rpsO mRNA), affecting autocontrol of its expression. In both cases, the RNA binding site is bipartite with a common subsite consisting of a G•U/G-C motif. The second subsite is located in a three-way junction in 16S rRNA and in the distal part of a stem forming a pseudoknot in Escherichia coli rpsO mRNA. To determine the extent of mimicry between these two RNA targets, we determined which amino acids interact with rpsO mRNA. A plasmid carrying rpsO (the S15 gene) was mutagenized and introduced into a strain lacking S15 and harbouring an rpsO–lacZ translational fusion. Analysis of deregulated mutants shows that each subsite of rpsO mRNA is recognized by a set of amino acids known to interact with 16S rRNA. In addition to the G•U/G-C motif, which is recognized by the same amino acids in both targets, the other subsite interacts with amino acids also involved in contacts with helix H22 of 16S rRNA, in the region adjacent to the three-way junction. However, specific S15–rpsO mRNA interactions can also be found, probably with A(−46) in loop L1 of the pseudoknot, demonstrating that mimicry between the two targets is limited. PMID:15101974

  20. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  1. RNA editing makes mistakes in plant mitochondria: editing loses sense in transcripts of a rps19 pseudogene and in creating stop codons in coxI and rps3 mRNAs of Oenothera.

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1991-01-01

    An intact gene for the ribosomal protein S19 (rps19) is absent from Oenothera mitochondria. The conserved rps19 reading frame found in the mitochondrial genome is interrupted by a termination codon. This rps19 pseudogene is cotranscribed with the downstream rps3 gene and is edited on both sides of the translational stop. Editing, however, changes the amino acid sequence at positions that were well conserved before editing. Other strange editings create translational stops in open reading frames coding for functional proteins. In coxI and rps3 mRNAs CGA codons are edited to UGA stop codons only five and three codons, respectively, downstream to the initiation codon. These aberrant editings in essential open reading frames and in the rps19 pseudogene appear to have been shifted to these positions from other editing sites. These observations suggest a requirement for a continuous evolutionary constraint on the editing specificities in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:1762921

  2. IspH-RPS1 and IspH-UbiA: "Rosetta Stone" Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rao, Guodong; O'Dowd, Bing; Li, Jikun; Wang, Ke; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The protein IspH, (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl 4-diphosphate (HMPPP) reductase, is an essential 4Fe-4S cluster-containing protein in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Using a sequence similarity network we found that there are >400 IspH proteins that are about twice as large as most of the IspHs studied to date since their IspH domains are fused to either the ribosomal protein S1 (RPS1), or to a UbiA (4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase)-like protein. Many of the IspH-RPS1 proteins are present in anaerobes found in the human gut and some, such as Clostridium botulinum, C. tetani and Fusobacterium nucleatum, are pathogens. The IspH-UbiAs are all found in sulfate-reducing anaerobes. The IspH domains in IspH-RPS1 are fused to 4 and in a few cases 6 tandem repeats in RPS1 that, in most organisms, bind to mRNA or form part of the bacterial ribosome. Mutants in which the four RPS1 domains were sequentially eliminated had similar IspH activity as wild-type protein, indicating they are not essential for IspH catalysis. Overall, the results are of interest since they represent the first isolation of a catalytically active IspH-RPS1, as well as the identification of IspH-UbiA hybrids, two "Rosetta stone" proteins that are likely to be functionally related-IspH producing the isoprenoids required for a UbiA-like prenyl transferase; the IspH-RPS1 hybrids, perhaps, being involved in the stringent response or as Fe/O2 sensors.

  3. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  4. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  5. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of the small ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells. PMID:20035717

  6. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-22

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

  7. A mutation within the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Arabidopsis disease resistance gene RPS5 partially suppresses multiple bacterial and downy mildew resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R F; Henk, A; Mowery, P; Holub, E; Innes, R W

    1998-01-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants is mediated by several distinct families of functionally variable but structurally related disease resistance (R) genes. The largest family is defined by the presence of a putative nucleotide binding domain and 12 to 21 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). The function of these LRRs has not been defined, but they are speculated to bind pathogen-derived ligands. We have isolated a mutation in the Arabidopsis RPS5 gene that indicates that the LRR region may interact with other plant proteins. The rps5-1 mutation causes a glutamate-to-lysine substitution in the third LRR and partially compromises the function of several R genes that confer bacterial and downy mildew resistance. The third LRR is relatively well conserved, and we speculate that it may interact with a signal transduction component shared by multiple R gene pathways. PMID:9724691

  8. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  9. Reciprocal peer support (RPS): a decade of not so random acts of kindness.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Cherie

    2012-01-01

    A model entitled "reciprocal peer support" (RPS) is introduced in this article to describe the peer support activity provided at University Behavioral HealthCare-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) in a variety of peer programs. More than 10 years of peer support have been developed, reviewed, and assessed by this writer in an attempt to clarify the "lessons learned" and encourage RPS as an effective approach to peer support service in the future. The Cop 2 Cop, NJ Vet 2 Vet, and several other UBHC peer support programs, which conform to "best practices" criteria, have been sustained and expanded based on the RSP principles discussed in this article.

  10. The β-hairpin of 40S exit channel protein Rps5/uS7 promotes efficient and accurate translation initiation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Pittman, Yvette; Dever, Thomas E; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic 43S pre-initiation complex bearing tRNAiMet scans the mRNA leader for an AUG start codon in favorable context. Structural analyses revealed that the β-hairpin of 40S protein Rps5/uS7 protrudes into the 40S mRNA exit-channel, contacting the eIF2∙GTP∙Met-tRNAi ternary complex (TC) and mRNA context nucleotides; but its importance in AUG selection was unknown. We identified substitutions in β-strand-1 and C-terminal residues of yeast Rps5 that reduced bulk initiation, conferred ‘leaky-scanning’ of AUGs; and lowered initiation fidelity by exacerbating the effect of poor context of the eIF1 AUG codon to reduce eIF1 abundance. Consistently, the β-strand-1 substitution greatly destabilized the ‘PIN’ conformation of TC binding to reconstituted 43S·mRNA complexes in vitro. Other substitutions in β-hairpin loop residues increased initiation fidelity and destabilized PIN at UUG, but not AUG start codons. We conclude that the Rps5 β-hairpin is as crucial as soluble initiation factors for efficient and accurate start codon recognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07939.001 PMID:26134896

  11. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  12. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma (RPS) High Risk Gross Tumor Volume Boost (HR GTV Boost) Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation and Surgical Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Bosch, Walter; Kane, John M.; Abrams, Ross A.; Salerno, Kilian E.; Deville, Curtiland; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Mullen, John T.; Millikan, Keith W.; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kendrick, Michael L.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curative intent management of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) requires gross total resection. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) often is used as an adjuvant to surgery, but recurrence rates remain high. To enhance RT efficacy with acceptable tolerance, there is interest in delivering “boost doses” of RT to high-risk areas of gross tumor volume (HR GTV) judged to be at risk for positive resection margins. We sought to evaluate variability in HR GTV boost target volume delineation among collaborating sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams. Methods Radiation planning CT scans for three cases of RPS were distributed to seven paired radiation and surgical oncologist teams at six institutions. Teams contoured HR GTV boost volumes for each case. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results HRGTV boost volume contour agreement between the seven teams was “substantial” or “moderate” for all cases. Agreement was best on the torso wall posteriorly (abutting posterior chest abdominal wall) and medially (abutting ipsilateral para-vertebral space and great vessels). Contours varied more significantly abutting visceral organs due to differing surgical opinions regarding planned partial organ resection. Conclusions Agreement of RPS HRGTV boost volumes between sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams was substantial to moderate. Differences were most striking in regions abutting visceral organs, highlighting the importance of collaboration between the radiation and surgical oncologist for “individualized” target delineation on the basis of areas deemed at risk and planned resection. PMID:26018727

  13. Drosophila RpS3a, a novel Minute gene situated between the segment polarity genescubitus interruptus and dTCF.

    PubMed

    van Beest, M; Mortin, M; Clevers, H

    1998-10-01

    Genetic analysis of the small chromosome 4 of Drosophila has been hampered by the virtual lack of recombination. The segment polarity gene cubitus interruptus (ci) maps to the most intensively studied locus on this chromosome. Up to four complementation groups have been found to be associated with ci. We and others have recently characterized a second segment polarity gene, dTCF or pan, 12 kb upstream of ci, in a head-to-head configuration. During the course of these studies we identified a transcription unit in the intergenic region. We report here the cloning of cDNAs from this transcription unit, which encode the Drosophila homologue of the human ribosomal protein S3a (RpS3a). The RpS3a gene is expressed ubiquitously and throughout development. A Minute allele, M(4)101, linked tightly to ci, was found to harbour an integration of a Doc retroposon in the promotor region of RpS3a. Thus, like other Minute loci, M(4)101 encodes a component of the protein synthesis machinery. These data further unravel the complex genetics surrounding the ci and dTCF loci.

  14. Versatile properties of an exopolysaccharide R-PS18 produced by Rhizobium sp. PRIM-18.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, P; Arun, A B; Ashwini, P; Rekha, P D

    2015-08-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by bacteria have attracted scientific and industrial attention due to their multifunctional properties and relatively easier production. In this study, an EPS viz., R-PS18 produced by Rhizobium sp. PRIM-18 was characterized and its functional properties were assessed. Cell proliferative and in vitro wound healing activities of the EPS were established using human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells. The isolate produced 2.1 g L(-1) purified EPS (molecular weight 9.33×10(6) Da) comprising of glucose, galactose, and mannose (6.1:1.8:1). Viscosity of 0.25% solution was 23.4 mPa s (shear rate 75 s(-1)) and it showed pseudoplastic and thixotropic behavior. High emulsification, iron chelation, and superoxide scavenging abilities were also observed. Significant increase in HDF cell proliferation and wound healing in vitro was achieved by R-PS18 treatment. Sulfation of R-PS18 significantly enhanced the cell proliferative and wound healing activities. In conclusion, these findings indicate potential applications of R-PS18.

  15. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J. S.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, P. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ~60 MeV to ~2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  16. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J.; Friesen, L.; Lin, A.; Mabry, D.; Katz, N.; Dotan, Y.; George, J.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M.; Redding, M.; O'Brien, T. P.; Cha, J.; Birkitt, A.; Carranza, P.; Lalic, M.; Fuentes, F.; Galvan, R.; McNab, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft is a particle spectrometer designed to measure the flux, angular distribution, and energy spectrum of protons from ˜60 MeV to ˜2000 MeV. RPS will investigate decades-old questions about the inner Van Allen belt proton environment: a nearby region of space that is relatively unexplored because of the hazards of spacecraft operation there and the difficulties in obtaining accurate proton measurements in an intense penetrating background. RPS is designed to provide the accuracy needed to answer questions about the sources and losses of the inner belt protons and to obtain the measurements required for the next-generation models of trapped protons in the magnetosphere. In addition to detailed information for individual protons, RPS features count rates at a 1-second timescale, internal radiation dosimetry, and information about electrostatic discharge events on the RBSP spacecraft that together will provide new information about space environmental hazards in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Understanding modern energy policy: An evaluation of RPS mandates and behavioral nudges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannan, Deborah Lynn Baker

    Climate change has emerged as one of the leading policy issues of the early 21st century. In response, a variety of policies and programs have been adopted encouraging renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy conservation. My dissertation consists of three research papers which evaluate two classes of modern energy policy in the United States: renewable energy mandates and behavioral nudges. The Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) is the most prominent state-level renewable energy policy in the United States and has been debated several times at the federal level. Using a fixed-effects panel data model I study the existing experience of the RPS to help inform the policy debate. In contrast with the previous literature that has predominantly studied the average effect of the RPS on renewable capacity investments I explore factors resulting in the heterogeneous effect of the RPS policy. Relying on a basic understanding the electric utility industry and the electricity dispatch process I provide insight into existing experience with the RPS. Spurred by political and economic barriers to adopting renewable energy policy, interest has increased in using motivational techniques informed by behavioral science to encourage reductions in energy consumption. Existing research has predominantly addressed residential energy consumption. The remainder of my dissertation applies well-established motivational techniques to the transportation sector. Using an experimental design, I test whether real-time feedback and social norms can encourage fuel efficient driving behavior. I find that real-time feedback has a large impact on fuel economy, particularly when aggregated across the entire vehicle fleet. I also find some evidence suggesting that social norms can encourage eco-driving, but perhaps more importantly, identify key challenges associated with using social norms in a transportation setting.

  18. Using Supercomputers to Speed Execution of the CAISO/PLEXOS 33% RPS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C; Streitz, F; Yao, Y; Smith, S; Lamont, A

    2011-09-19

    The study's official title is 'ISO Study of Operational Requirements and Market Impacts at 33% Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS).' The stated objectives are twofold: (1) identifying operational requirements and resource options to reliably operate the ISO-controlled grid under a 33% RPS in 2020; and (2) inform market, planning, and policy/regulatory decisions by the ISO, state agencies, market participants, and other stakeholders. The first of these objectives requires the hourly estimates of integration requirements, measured in terms of operational ramp, load following and regulation capacity and ramp rates, as well as additional capacity to resolve operational violations. It also involves consideration of other variables that affect the results, such as the impact of different mixes of renewable technologies, and the impact of forecasting error and variability. The second objective entails supporting the CPUC to identify long-term procurement planning needs, costs, and options, as well as informing other decisions made by the CPUC and state agencies. For the ISO itself this includes informing state-wide transmission planning needs for renewables up to a 33% RPS, and informing design of wholesale markets for energy and ancillary services to facilitate provision of integration capacities. The study is designed in two phases. The first (current) phase is focused on operational requirements and addressing these requirements with existing and new conventional fossil generation; for instance, gas turbines and/or combined cycle units. The second (planned) phase will address the same operational requirements with a combination of conventional fossil generation resources, new non-generation resources, and a renewable resource dispatch. There are seven different scenarios considered in the current phase: a 20% RPS reference case; four 33% RPS cases (a reference case, a high out-of-state case, a high distributed generation case, and a low load case); an alternative 27

  19. Program for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    November 1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlineer Structural Analysis", Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell...1970. 2. R. E. Jones and W. L. Salus , "Survey and Development of Finite Elements for Nonlinear Structural Analysis," Volume II, "Nonlinear Shell

  20. TNB Experience in Developing Solar Hybrid Station at RPS Kemar, Gerik, Perak Darul Ridzuan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, K. A.; Shamsudin, K. N.

    2013-06-01

    This paper will discuss on TNB experience in developing Solar Hybrid Station at RPS Kemar, Gerik, Perak. TNB has been approached by KKLW to submit proposal to provide electricity in the rural area namely RPS Kemar. Looking at area and source available, Solar Hybrid System was the best method in order to provide electricity at this area. This area is far from national grid sources. Solar Hybrid System is the best method to produce electrical power using the renewable energy from Solar PV, Battery and Diesel Generator Set. Nowadays, price of petroleum is slightly high due to higher demand from industry. Solar energy is good alternative in this country to practice in order to reduce cost for produce of electrical energy. Generally, Solar will produce energy during daytime and when become cloudy and dark, automatically battery and diesel generator set will recover the system through the hybrid controller system.

  1. The Role of Autophagy in Chloroplast Degradation and Chlorophagy in Immune Defenses during Pst DC3000 (AvrRps4) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Junjian; Chen, Wenli

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorosis of leaf tissue normally observed during pathogen infection may result from the degradation of chloroplasts. There is a growing evidence to suggest that the chloroplast plays a significant role during pathogen infection. Although most degradation of the organelles and cellular structures in plants is mediated by autophagy, its role in chloroplast catabolism during pathogen infection is largely unknown. Results In this study, we investigated the function of autophagy in chloroplast degradation during avirulent Pst DC3000 (AvrRps4) infection. We examined the expression of defensive marker genes and suppression of bacterial growth using the electrolyte leakage assay in normal light (N) and low light (L) growing environments of wild-type and atg5-1 plants during pathogen treatment. Stroma-targeted GFP proteins (CT-GFP) were observed with LysoTracker Red (LTR) staining of autophagosome-like structures in the vacuole. The results showed that Arabidopsis expressed a significant number of small GFP-labeled bodies when infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (AvrRps4). While barely detectable, there were small GFP-labeled bodies in plants with the CT-GFP expressing atg5-1 mutation. The results showed that chloroplast degradation depends on autophagy and this may play an important role in inhibiting pathogen growth. Conclusion Autophagy plays a role in chloroplast degradation in Arabidopsis during avirulent Pst DC3000 (AvrRps4) infection. Autophagy dependent chloroplast degradation may be the primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as the pathogen-response signaling molecules that induce the defense response. PMID:24023671

  2. Observations on the Optimality Tolerance in the CAISO 33% RPS Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Y; Meyers, C; Schmidt, A; Smith, S; Streitz, F

    2011-09-22

    In 2008 Governor Schwarzenegger of California issued an executive order requiring that 33 percent of all electricity in the state in the year 2020 should come from renewable resources such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and small hydroelectric facilities. This 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) was further codified and signed into law by Governor Brown in 2011. To assess the market impacts of such a requirement, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) initiated a study to quantify the cost, risk, and timing of achieving a 33% RPS by 2020. The California Independent System Operator (CAISO) was contracted to manage this study. The production simulation model used in this study was developed using the PLEXOS software package, which allows energy planners to optimize long-term system planning decisions under a wide variety of system constraints. In this note we describe our observations on varying the optimality tolerance in the CAISO 33% RPS model. In particular, we observe that changing the optimality tolerance from .05% to .5% leads to solutions over 5 times faster, on average, producing very similar solutions with a negligible difference in overall distance from optimality.

  3. An evaluation of the impact of state Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) on retail, commercial, and industrial electricity prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puram, Rakesh

    The Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) has become a popular mechanism for states to promote renewable energy and its popularity has spurred a potential bill within Congress for a nationwide Federal RPS. While RPS benefits have been touted by several groups, it also has detractors. Among the concerns is that RPS standards could raise electricity rates, given that renewable energy is costlier than traditional fossil fuels. The evidence on the impact of RPS on electricity prices is murky at best: Complex models by NREL and USEIA utilize computer programs with several assumptions which make empirical studies difficult and only predict slight increases in electricity rates associated with RPS standards. Recent theoretical models and empirical studies have found price increases, but often fail to comprehensively include several sets of variables, which in fact could confound results. Utilizing a combination of past papers and studies to triangulate variables this study aims to develop both a rigorous fixed effects regression model as well as a theoretical framework to explain the results. This study analyzes state level panel data from 2002 to 2008 to analyze the effect of RPS on residential, commercial, and industrial electricity prices, controlling for several factors including amount of electricity generation from renewable and non-renewable sources, customer incentives for renewable energy, macroeconomic and demographic indicators, and fuel price mix. The study contrasts several regressions to illustrate important relationships and how inclusions as well as exclusion of various variables have an effect on electricity rates. Regression results indicate that the presence of RPS within a state increases the commercial and residential electricity rates, but have no discernable effect on the industrial electricity rate. Although RPS tends to increase electricity prices, the effect has a small impact on higher electricity prices. The models also indicate that jointly all

  4. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  5. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Theory Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, O. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project is to develop analysis techniques and computer programs for predicting the probabilistic response of critical structural components for current and future space propulsion systems. This technology will play a central role in establishing system performance and durability. The first year's technical activity is concentrating on probabilistic finite element formulation strategy and code development. Work is also in progress to survey critical materials and space shuttle mian engine components. The probabilistic finite element computer program NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) is being developed. The final probabilistic code will have, in the general case, the capability of performing nonlinear dynamic of stochastic structures. It is the goal of the approximate methods effort to increase problem solving efficiency relative to finite element methods by using energy methods to generate trial solutions which satisfy the structural boundary conditions. These approximate methods will be less computer intensive relative to the finite element approach.

  6. Synthetic Lethality Screen Identifies RPS6KA2 as Modifier of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic, Nada; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Mühlberg, Leonie; Ripka, Stefanie; Griesmann, Heidi; Lölkes, Carolin; Buchholz, Malte; Aust, Daniela; Pilarsky, Christian; Krug, Sebastian; Gress, Thomas; Michl, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high degree of resistance to chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using the small-molecule inhibitor erlotinib was shown to provide a small survival benefit in a subgroup of patients. To identify kinases whose inhibition acts synergistically with erlotinib, we employed a kinome-wide small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based loss-of-function screen in the presence of erlotinib. Of 779 tested kinases, we identified several targets whose inhibition acted synergistically lethal with EGFR inhibition by erlotinib, among them the S6 kinase ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (RPS6KA2)/ribosomal S6 kinase 3. Activated RPS6KA2 was expressed in approximately 40% of 123 human pancreatic cancer tissues. RPS6KA2 was shown to act downstream of EGFR/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and was activated by EGF independently of the presence of KRAS mutations. Knockdown of RPS6KA2 by siRNA led to increased apoptosis only in the presence of erlotinib, whereas RPS6KA2 activation or overexpression rescued from erlotinib- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This effect was at least in part mediated by downstream activation of ribosomal protein S6. Genetic as well as pharmacological inhibition of RPS6KA2 by the inhibitor BI-D1870 acted synergistically with erlotinib. By applying this synergistic lethality screen using a kinome-wide RNA interference-library approach, we identified RPS6KA2 as potential drug target whose inhibition synergistically enhanced the effect of erlotinib on tumor cell survival. This kinase therefore represents a promising drug candidate suitable for the development of novel inhibitors for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24403857

  7. FaRP cell distribution in the developing CNS suggests the involvement of FaRPs in all parts of the chromatophore control pathway in Sepia officinalis (Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Aroua, Salima; Andouche, Aude; Martin, Madeleine; Baratte, Sébastien; Bonnaud, Laure

    2011-04-01

    The FMRFamide-related peptide (FaRP) family includes a wide range of neuropeptides that have a role in many biological functions. In cephalopods, these peptides intervene in the peculiar body patterning system used for communication and camouflage. This system is particularly well developed in the cuttlefish and is functional immediately after hatching (stage 30). In this study, we investigate when and how the neural structures involved in the control of body patterning emerge and combine during Sepia embryogenesis, by studying the expression or the production of FaRPs. We detected FaRP expression and production in the nervous system of embryos from the beginning of organogenesis (stage 16). The wider FaRP expression was observed concomitantly with brain differentiation (around stage 22). Until hatching, FaRP-positive cells were located in specific areas of the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS). Most of these areas were implicated in the control of body patterns, suggesting that FaRPs are involved in all parts of the neural body pattern control system, from the 'receptive areas' via the CNS to the chromatophore effectors.

  8. IKKβ phosphorylation regulates RPS3 nuclear translocation and NF-κB function during Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fengyi; Weaver, Amanda; Gao, Xiaofei; Bern, Michael; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    NF-κB is a major gene regulator in immune responses and ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3) is an NF-κB subunit that directs specific gene transcription. However, it is unknown how RPS3 nuclear translocation is regulated. Here we report that IKKβ phosphorylation of serine 209 (S209) was crucial for RPS3 nuclear localization in response to activating stimuli. Moreover, the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 virulence protein NleH1 specifically inhibited RPS3 S209 phosphorylation and blocked RPS3 function, thereby promoting bacterial colonization and diarrhea but decreasing mortality in a gnotobiotic piglet infection model. Thus, the IKKβ-dependent modification of a specific amino acid in RPS3 promotes specific NF-κB functions that underlie the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:21399639

  9. Streptococcal group B integrative and mobilizable element IMESag-rpsI encodes a functional relaxase involved in its transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Fernández-Lopez, Cris; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Baez-Ortega, Adrian; Flores, Carlos; Glaser, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are opportunistic bacteria that can cause lethal sepsis in children and immuno-compromised patients. Their genome is a reservoir of mobile genetic elements that can be horizontally transferred. Among them, integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and the smaller integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) primarily reside in the bacterial chromosome, yet have the ability to be transferred between cells by conjugation. ICEs and IMEs are therefore a source of genetic variability that participates in the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although IMEs seem to be the most prevalent class of elements transferable by conjugation, they are poorly known. Here, we have studied a GBS-IME, termed IMESag-rpsI, which is widely distributed in GBS despite not carrying any apparent virulence trait. Analyses of 240 whole genomes showed that IMESag-rpsI is present in approximately 47% of the genomes, has a roughly constant size (approx. 9 kb) and is always integrated at a single location, the 3′-end of the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S9 (rpsI). Based on their genetic variation, several IMESag-rpsI types were defined (A–J) and classified in clonal complexes (CCs). CC1 was the most populated by IMESag-rpsI (more than 95%), mostly of type-A (71%). One CC1 strain (S. agalactiae HRC) was deep-sequenced to understand the rationale underlying type-A IMESag-rpsI enrichment in GBS. Thirteen open reading frames were identified, one of them encoding a protein (MobSag) belonging to the broadly distributed family of relaxases MOBV1. Protein MobSag was purified and, by a newly developed method, shown to cleave DNA at a specific dinucleotide. The S. agalactiae HRC-IMESag-rpsI is able to excise from the chromosome, as shown by the presence of circular intermediates, and it harbours a fully functional mobilization module. Further, the mobSag gene encoded by this mobile element is able to promote plasmid transfer among pneumococcal

  10. Analysis of structures causing instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple new method to systematically identify all topological structures (e.g., positive feedback loops) potentially leading to locally unstable steady states: ICSA-The instability causing structure analysis. Systems without any instability causing structure (i.e., not fulfilling the necessary topological condition for instabilities) cannot have unstable steady states. It follows that common bistability or multistability and Hopf bifurcations are excluded and sustained oscillations and deterministic chaos are most unlikely. The ICSA leads to new insights into the topological organization of chemical and biochemical systems, such as metabolic, gene regulatory, and signal transduction networks.

  11. Evolutionary aspects of a unique internal mitochondrial targeting signal in nuclear-migrated rps19 of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Takahashi, Yoshiya; Yui-Kurino, Rika; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2013-03-15

    The endosymbiotic theory postulates that many genes migrated from endosymbionts to the nuclear genomes of their hosts. Some migrated genes lack presequences directing proteins to mitochondria, and their mitochondrial targeting signals appear to be inscribed in the core coding regions as internal targeting signals (ITSs). ITSs may have evolved after sequence transfer to nuclei or ITSs may have pre-existed before sequence transfer. Here, we report the molecular cloning of a sugar beet gene for ribosomal protein S19 (Rps19; the first letter is capitalized when the gene is a nuclear gene). We show that sugar beet Rps19 (BvRps19) is an ITS-type gene. Based on amino-acid sequence comparison, dicotyledonous rps19s (the first letter is lower-cased when the gene is a mitochondrial gene), such as tobacco rps19 (Ntrps19), resemble an ancestral form of BvRps19. We investigated whether differences in amino-acid sequences between BvRps19 and Ntrps19 were involved in ITS evolution. Analyses of the intracellular localization of chimaeric GFP-fusion proteins that were transiently expressed in Welsh onion cells showed that Ntrps19-gfp was not localized in mitochondria. When several BvRps19-type amino acid substitutions, none of which was seen in any other angiosperm rps19, were introduced into Ntrps19-gfp, the modified Ntrps19-gfp became localized in mitochondria, supporting the notion that an ITS in BvRps19 evolved following sequence transfer to nuclei. Not all of these substitutions were seen in other ITS-type Rps19s, suggesting that the ITSs of Rps19 are diverse.

  12. The origin and evolution of Eragrostis tef (Poaceae) and related polyploids: evidence from nuclear waxy and plastid rps16.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Amanda L; Doyle, Jeff J

    2003-01-01

    Tef (Eragrostis tef; Poaceae) is an allotetraploid (2n = 4x = 40) cereal crop whose origin within the large genus Eragrostis is unknown. Previous studies have suggested a total of 14 wild Eragrostis species as potential progenitors. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data from the nuclear gene waxy and the plastid locus rps16 strongly supports the widely held hypothesis of a close relationship between tef and E. pilosa, a wild allotetraploid. Eragrostis heteromera, another previously proposed progenitor, is shown by the waxy data to be a close relative of one of the tef genomes. Other putative progenitors included in the taxon sample are not supported as closely related to tef. Plastid sequences from five varieties of tef and four E. pilosa accessions are identical and therefore are uninformative with respect to the question of multiple origins of these polyploids. The waxy phylogeny also resolves the relationships among other allopolyploids, supporting a close relationship between the morphologically similar allotetraploids E. macilenta, E. minor, and E. mexicana. Eragrostis cilianensis, another morphologically similar allopolyploid, appears to have shared one diploid progenitor with these species but derived its other genome from an unrelated diploid.

  13. The Fully Developed Stage of Radiative Plasma Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazak, G.; Klapisch, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Colombant, D. G.; Gardner, J. H.; Phillips, L.; Metzler, N.

    1999-11-01

    Radiating plasma structures (RPS) discovered in the simulations by Dahlburg et al., JQSRT 54, 113 (1995), and observed experimentally by Obenschain et al., BAPS 43, 1710 (1998), are nonlinear waves with peaked density and pressure profiles that propagate upstream the mass flow in the blow-off plasma. The RPS can strongly modify laser energy coupling to a direct-drive fusion target, and imprint large mass perturbations into the target. We study the developed stage of RPS in plastic targets irradiated by a KrF laser analytically and numerically. Shock-like features of the RPS (density jump, super-to-subsonic transition, and downstream expansion), characteristic of laser-supported detonation waves, are discussed. Self-similar and steady-state propagation regimes of RPS are described analytically and compared to the simulations. Methods of controlling the emergence of the RPS via adjusting the density profile in the target and the laser pulse shape are discussed.

  14. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  15. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  16. Structural Analysis and Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Collier Research and Development Corporation received a one-of-a-kind computer code for designing exotic hypersonic aircraft called ST-SIZE in the first ever Langley Research Center software copyright license agreement. Collier transformed the NASA computer code into a commercial software package called HyperSizer, which integrates with other Finite Element Modeling and Finite Analysis private-sector structural analysis program. ST-SIZE was chiefly conceived as a means to improve and speed the structural design of a future aerospace plane for Langley Hypersonic Vehicles Office. Including the NASA computer code into HyperSizer has enabled the company to also apply the software to applications other than aerospace, including improved design and construction for offices, marine structures, cargo containers, commercial and military aircraft, rail cars, and a host of everyday consumer products.

  17. QA system for structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiko, Heikki

    The activities to be addressed by an organization involved in structural analysis by numerical methods and/or development and maintenance of such computer codes or systems are described. The requirements are based on International Standard 9001. The interpretation of the requirements is done according to an application presented by a Quality Analysis (QA) working group. The purpose of a quality analysis system is to help anyone to do a better job. Emphasis on technical documentation to speed up operations is recommended. The first steps in implementing a finite element quality assurance system in an organization are as follows: constitute a technical body with responsibility and authority for the analysis quality system; agree on management responsibilities for each quality analysis activity; and review current practices against the quality system standard requirements. Experience shows that it is mainly a process of rationalizing, formalizing, and reinforcing existing practices.

  18. 625 kb microduplication at Xp22.12 including RPS6KA3 in a child with mild intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Veronica; Cambi, Francesca; Bruno, Rossella; Toschi, Benedetta; Forli, Francesca; Berrettini, Stefano; Simi, Paolo; Valetto, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report on a patient with a 625 kb duplication in Xp22.12, detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The duplicated region contains only one gene, RPS6KA3, that results in partial duplication. The same duplication was present in his mother and his maternal uncle. This partial duplication inhibits the RPS6KA3 expression, mimicking the effect of loss-of-function mutations associated with Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). The phenotype of the patient here presented is not fully evocative of this syndrome because he does not present some of the facial, digital and skeletal abnormalities that are considered the main diagnostic features of CLS. This case is one of the few examples where RPS6KA3 mutations are associated with a non-specific X-linked mental retardation.

  19. Structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon.

    PubMed Central

    Zurawski, G; Zurawski, S M

    1985-01-01

    The complete structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon is presented. Based on the DNA sequence, the deduced order of the 11 genes in the operon is rpsJ, rplC, rplD, rplW, rplB, rpsS, rplV, rpsC, rplP, rpmC, rpsQ. The estimated transcribed length of the operon is 5181 base pairs. Putative sequences involved in ribosome binding are discussed. The DNA sequence data corrects several errors in previously determined protein sequence data. PMID:3892488

  20. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  1. Structural analysis of vibroacoustical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromov, A. P.; Myasnikov, L. L.; Myasnikova, Y. N.; Finagin, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The method of automatic identification of acoustical signals, by means of the segmentation was used to investigate noises and vibrations in machines and mechanisms, for cybernetic diagnostics. The structural analysis consists of presentation of a noise or vibroacoustical signal as a sequence of segments, determined by the time quantization, in which each segment is characterized by specific spectral characteristics. The structural spectrum is plotted as a histogram of the segments, also as a relation of the probability density of appearance of a segment to the segment type. It is assumed that the conditions of ergodic processes are maintained.

  2. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  3. MANBA, CXCR5, SOX8, RPS6KB1 and ZBTB46 are genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lill, Christina M; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M; Graetz, Christine; Ban, Maria; Alcina, Antonio; Ortiz, Miguel A; Pérez, Jennifer; Damotte, Vincent; Booth, David; Lopez de Lapuente, Aitzkoa; Broer, Linda; Schilling, Marcel; Akkad, Denis A; Aktas, Orhan; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafa; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Compston, Alastair; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Dörner, Thomas; Epplen, Joerg T; Fernández, Óscar; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hoffjan, Sabine; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Kemppinen, Anu; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lohse, Peter; Lubetzki, Catherine; Luessi, Felix; Malhotra, Sunny; Mescheriakova, Julia; Montalban, Xavier; Papeix, Caroline; Paredes, Lidia F; Rieckmann, Peter; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe K; Hintzen, Rogier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Stewart, Graeme; Fontaine, Bertrand; Comabella, Manuel; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Sawcer, Stephen; Bertram, Lars; Zipp, Frauke

    2013-06-01

    A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ≈ 20,000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10(-6); rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10(-4); rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10(-6); rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10(-7); rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10(-3)). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology.

  4. MANBA, CXCR5, SOX8, RPS6KB1 and ZBTB46 are genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Christina M.; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M.; Graetz, Christiane; Ban, Maria; Alcina, Antonio; Ortiz, Miguel A.; Pérez, Jennifer; Damotte, Vincent; Booth, David; Lopez de Lapuente, Aitzkoa; Broer, Linda; Schilling, Marcel; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafa; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Compston, Alastair; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Dörner, Thomas; Epplen, Joerg T.; Fernández, Óscar; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hoffjan, Sabine; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Kemppinen, Anu; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lohse, Peter; Lubetzki, Catherine; Luessi, Felix; Malhotra, Sunny; Mescheriakova, Julia; Montalban, Xavier; Papeix, Caroline; Paredes, Lidia F.; Rieckmann, Peter; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe K.; Hintzen, Rogier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Stewart, Graeme; Fontaine, Bertrand; Comabella, Manuel; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Sawcer, Stephen; Bertram, Lars; Zipp, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ∼20 000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10−6; rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10−4; rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10−6; rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10−7; rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10−3). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology. PMID:23739915

  5. Rps14 haploinsufficiency causes a block in erythroid differentiation mediated by S100A8/S100A9

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Rebekka K.; Schenone, Monica; Ferreira, Monica Ventura; Kramann, Rafael; Joyce, Cailin E.; Hartigan, Christina; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Gehrming, Ulrich; Platzbecker, Uwe; Büsche, Guntram; Knüchel, Ruth; Chen, Michelle C.; Waters, Christopher S.; Chen, Edwin; Chu, Lisa P.; Novina, Carl D.; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Carr, Steven A.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous deletion of RPS14 occurs in del(5q) MDS and has been linked to impaired erythropoiesis, characteristic of this disease subtype. We generated a murine model with conditional inactivation of Rps14 and demonstrated a p53-dependent erythroid differentiation defect with apoptosis at the transition from polychromatic to orthochromatic erythroblasts resulting in age-dependent progressive anemia, megakaryocyte dysplasia, and loss of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence. Using quantitative proteomics, we identified significantly increased expression of proteins involved in innate immune signaling, particularly the heterodimeric S100a8/S100a9 proteins in purified erythroblasts. S100a8 expression was significantly increased in erythroblasts, monocytes and macrophages and recombinant S100a8 was sufficient to induce an erythroid differentiation defect in wild-type cells. We rescued the erythroid differentiation defect in Rps14 haploinsufficient HSCs by genetic inactivation of S100a8 expression. Our data link Rps14 haploinsufficiency to activation of the innate immune system via induction of S100A8/A9 and the p53-dependant erythroid differentiation defect in del(5q) MDS. PMID:26878232

  6. The Effect of a Radiation Positioning Stent (RPS) in the Reduction of Radiation Dosage to the Opposing Jaw and Maintenance of Mouth opening after Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Suresh; Brett, Rachel; Clayton, Naomi; Marsden, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    The effect of a radiation positioning stent (RPS) in radiation dosage reduction to the opposing jaw and maintenance of mouth opening was audited. 55 Head and Neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy were reviewed. Radiation dosages at similar points in the primary/opposing jaws were measured along with the mouth opening. Results showed a significant reduction in the radiation dosage to the opposing jaw in patients given the RPS. Mouth opening was generally maintained in patients given the RPS (77.7% improvement in mouth opening) compared to patients without RPS. Patients undergoing radiotherapy who had an RPS showed a significant reduction in radiation dosage to the opposing jaw and maintained their mouth opening in the short-term.

  7. Structural Analysis of Fungal Cerebrosides

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Sassaki, Guilherme L.; de Souza, Lauro M.

    2011-01-01

    Of the ceramide monohexosides (CMHs), gluco- and galactosyl-ceramides are the main neutral glycosphingolipids expressed in fungal cells. Their structural determination is greatly dependent on the use of mass spectrometric techniques, including fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization, and energy collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. Nuclear magnetic resonance has also been used successfully. Such a combination of techniques, combined with classical analytical separation, such as high-performance thin layer chromatography and column chromatography, has led to the structural elucidation of a great number of fungal CMHs. The structure of fungal CMH is conserved among fungal species and consists of a glucose or galactose residue attached to a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine with an amidic linkage to hydroxylated fatty acids, most commonly having 16 or 18 carbon atoms and unsaturation between C-3 and C-4. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. Fungal cerebrosides were also characterized as antigenic molecules directly or indirectly involved in cell growth or differentiation in Schizophyllum commune, Cryptococcus neoformans, Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Besides classical techniques for cerebroside (CMH) analysis, we now describe new approaches, combining conventional thin layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as emerging technologies for subcellular localization and distribution of glycosphingolipids by secondary ion mass spectrometry and imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight. PMID:22164155

  8. Functional Generalized Structured Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Hye Won; Hwang, Heungsun

    2016-12-01

    An extension of Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA), called Functional GSCA, is proposed to analyze functional data that are considered to arise from an underlying smooth curve varying over time or other continua. GSCA has been geared for the analysis of multivariate data. Accordingly, it cannot deal with functional data that often involve different measurement occasions across participants and a large number of measurement occasions that exceed the number of participants. Functional GSCA addresses these issues by integrating GSCA with spline basis function expansions that represent infinite-dimensional curves onto a finite-dimensional space. For parameter estimation, functional GSCA minimizes a penalized least squares criterion by using an alternating penalized least squares estimation algorithm. The usefulness of functional GSCA is illustrated with gait data.

  9. Evolution of tertiary structure of viral RNA dependent polymerases.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylogram of vRdPs demonstrates that RNA-dependent DNA polymerases (RdDPs) of viruses within Retroviridae family cluster in a clearly separated group of vRdPs, while RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) of dsRNA and +ssRNA viruses are mixed together. This evidence supports the hypothesis that RdRPs replicating +ssRNA viruses evolved multiple times from RdRPs replicating +dsRNA viruses, and vice versa. Moreover, our phylogram may be presented as a scheme for RNA virus evolution. The results are in concordance with the actual concept of RNA virus evolution. Finally, the methods used in our work provide a new direction for studying ancient virus evolution.

  10. Progress in thermostructural analysis of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Mahaney, J.; Pandey, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element space structures research focused on the interdisciplinary problems of heating, thermal, and structural analysis is discussed. Slender member shadowing effects, and cable stiffened structures are described.

  11. Step-Wise Increase in Tigecycline Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated with Mutations in ramR, lon and rpsJ

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Chen, Qiong; Shi, Keren; Li, Xi; Shi, Qiucheng; He, Fang; Zhou, Jiancang; Yu, Yunsong

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes numerous diseases, including pneumonia and urinary tract infections. An increase in multidrug resistance has complicated the treatment of these bacterial infections, and although tigecycline shows activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, resistant strains have emerged. In this study, the whole genomes of two clinical and six laboratory-evolved strains were sequenced to identify putative mutations related to tigecycline resistance. Of seven tigecycline-resistant strains, seven (100%) had ramR mutations, five (71.4%) had lon mutations, one (14.2%) had a ramA mutation, and one (14.2%) had an rpsJ mutation. A higher fitness cost was observed in the laboratory-evolved strains but not in the clinical strains. A transcriptome analysis demonstrated high expression of the ramR operon and acrA in all tigecycline-resistant strains. Genes involved in nitrogen metabolism were induced in the laboratory-evolved strains compared with the wild-type and clinical strains, and this difference in nitrogen metabolism reflected the variation between the laboratory-evolved and the clinical strains. Complementation experiments showed that both the wild-type ramR and the lon genes could partially restore the tigecycline sensitivity of K. pneumoniae. We believe that this manuscript describes the first construct of a lon mutant in K. pneumoniae, which allowed confirmation of its association with tigecycline resistance. Our findings illustrate the importance of the ramR operon and the lon and rpsJ genes in K. pneumoniae resistance to tigecycline. PMID:27764207

  12. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  13. Venus Mobile Explorer with RPS for Active Cooling: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Green, Jacklyn R.; Balint, Tibor S.; Manvi, Ram

    2009-01-01

    We present our findings from a study to evaluate the feasibility of a radioisotope power system (RPS) combined with active cooling to enable a long-duration Venus surface mission. On-board power with active cooling technology featured prominently in both the National Research Council's Decadal Survey and in the 2006 NASA Solar System Exploration Roadmap as mission-enabling for the exploration of Venus. Power and cooling system options were reviewed and the most promising concepts modeled to develop an assessment tool for Venus mission planners considering a variety of future potential missions to Venus, including a Venus Mobile Explorer (either a balloon or rover concept), a long-lived Venus static lander, or a Venus Geophysical Network. The concepts modeled were based on the integration of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules with different types of Stirling cycle heat engines for power and cooling. Unlike prior investigations which reported on single point design concepts, this assessment tool allows the user to generate either a point design or parametric curves of approximate power and cooling system mass, power level, and number of GPHS modules needed for a "black box" payload housed in a spherical pressure vessel.

  14. Evaluation of Housekeeping Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Caihua; Yang, Fengshan; Zhu, Xun; Du, Erxia; Yang, Yuting; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The soil insect Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae) causes substantial damage to Chinese chive. Suitable reference genes in B. odoriphaga (Bradysia odoriphaga) have yet to be identified for normalizing target gene expression among samples by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). This study was focused on identifying the expression stability of 12 candidate housekeeping genes in B. odoriphaga under various experiment conditions. The final stability ranking of 12 housekeeping genes was obtained with RefFinder, and the most suitable number of reference genes was analyzed by GeNorm. The results revealed that the most appropriate sets of internal controls were RPS15, RPL18, and RPS18 across developmental phases; RPS15, RPL28, and GAPDH across temperatures; RPS15 and RPL18 across pesticide treatments; RSP5, RPS18, and SDHA across photoperiods; ACTb, RPS18, and RPS15 across diets; RPS13 and RPL28 across populations; and RPS15, ACTb, and RPS18 across all samples. The use of the most suitable reference genes versus an arbitrarily selected reference gene resulted in significant differences in the analysis of a target gene expression. HSP23 in B. odoriphaga was found to be up-regulated under low temperatures. These results will contribute to the standardization of qRT-PCR and will also be valuable for further research on gene function in B. odoriphaga. PMID:27399679

  15. Tn5. 7 construction and physical mapping of pRPS404 containing photosynthetic genes from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Zsebo, K.M.; Wu, F.; Hearst J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A transposon, Tn5.7, has been constructed incorporating the transposition functions of Tn5 and the antibiotic-resistance factors from Tn7. It was used to mutagenize the plasmid pRPS404 which contains the photosynthetic genes of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and is Kanamycin. In conjunction with the mutagenesis, physical mapping of the restriction endonuclease recognition sites for XhoI. Bg/II, KnpI, and SstI has been accomplished. 13 references, 2 figures.

  16. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  17. Structure-Function Relationships Among RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in viral transcription and genome replication, as well as epigenetic and post-transcriptional control of cellular gene expression. In this article, we review the crystallographic, biochemical, and molecular genetic data available for viral RdRPs that have led to a detailed description of substrate and cofactor binding, fidelity of nucleotide selection and incorporation, and catalysis. It is likely that the cellular RdRPs will share some of the basic structural and mechanistic principles gleaned from studies of viral RdRPs. Therefore, studies of the viral RdRP establish a framework for the study of cellular RdRPs, an important yet understudied class of nucleic acid polymerases. PMID:18268843

  18. Downregulation of Chloroplast RPS1 Negatively Modulates Nuclear Heat-Responsive Expression of HsfA2 and Its Target Genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Dong; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Si-Ting; Wang, Yu-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Qi; Liu, Xun-Liang; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Heat stress commonly leads to inhibition of photosynthesis in higher plants. The transcriptional induction of heat stress-responsive genes represents the first line of inducible defense against imbalances in cellular homeostasis. Although heat stress transcription factor HsfA2 and its downstream target genes are well studied, the regulatory mechanisms by which HsfA2 is activated in response to heat stress remain elusive. Here, we show that chloroplast ribosomal protein S1 (RPS1) is a heat-responsive protein and functions in protein biosynthesis in chloroplast. Knockdown of RPS1 expression in the rps1 mutant nearly eliminates the heat stress-activated expression of HsfA2 and its target genes, leading to a considerable loss of heat tolerance. We further confirm the relationship existed between the downregulation of RPS1 expression and the loss of heat tolerance by generating RNA interference-transgenic lines of RPS1. Consistent with the notion that the inhibited activation of HsfA2 in response to heat stress in the rps1 mutant causes heat-susceptibility, we further demonstrate that overexpression of HsfA2 with a viral promoter leads to constitutive expressions of its target genes in the rps1 mutant, which is sufficient to reestablish lost heat tolerance and recovers heat-susceptible thylakoid stability to wild-type levels. Our findings reveal a heat-responsive retrograde pathway in which chloroplast translation capacity is a critical factor in heat-responsive activation of HsfA2 and its target genes required for cellular homeostasis under heat stress. Thus, RPS1 is an essential yet previously unknown determinant involved in retrograde activation of heat stress responses in higher plants. PMID:22570631

  19. Structural analysis considerations for wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Approaches to the structural analysis of wind turbine blade designs are reviewed. Specifications and materials data are discussed along with the analysis of vibrations, loads, stresses, and failure modes.

  20. Convergent Evolution of Fern-Specific Mitochondrial Group II Intron atp1i361g2 and Its Ancient Source Paralogue rps3i249g2 and Independent Losses of Intron and RNA Editing among Pteridaceae

    PubMed Central

    Zumkeller, Simon Maria; Knoop, Volker; Knie, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial intron patterns are highly divergent between the major land plant clades. An intron in the atp1 gene, atp1i361g2, is an example for a group II intron specific to monilophytes (ferns). Here, we report that atp1i361g2 is lost independently at least 4 times in the fern family Pteridaceae. Such plant organelle intron losses have previously been found to be accompanied by loss of RNA editing sites in the flanking exon regions as a consequence of genomic recombination of mature cDNA. Instead, we now observe that RNA editing events in both directions of pyrimidine exchange (C-to-U and U-to-C) are retained in atp1 exons after loss of the intron in Pteris argyraea/biaurita and in Actiniopteris and Onychium. We find that atp1i361g2 has significant similarity with intron rps3i249g2 present in lycophytes and gymnosperms, which we now also find highly conserved in ferns. We conclude that atp1i361g2 may have originated from the more ancestral rps3i249g2 paralogue by a reverse splicing copy event early in the evolution of monilophytes. Secondary structure elements of the two introns, most characteristically their domains III, show strikingly convergent evolution in the monilophytes. Moreover, the intron paralogue rps3i249g2 reveals relaxed evolution in taxa where the atp1i361g2 paralogue is lost. Our findings may reflect convergent evolution of the two related mitochondrial introns exerted by co-evolution with an intron-binding protein simultaneously acting on the two paralogues. PMID:27492234

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of novel Acinetobacter symbionts: A combined systems biology and genomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vipin; Haider, Shazia; Sood, Utkarsh; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ramjee, Meenakshi; Forbes, Ken; Singh, Yogendra; Lopes, Bruno S.; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    The increasing trend of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter drastically limits the range of therapeutic agents required to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) infections. This study focused on analysis of novel Acinetobacter strains using a genomics and systems biology approach. Here we used a network theory method for pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acinetobacter spp. to identify the key regulatory proteins (hubs) in each strain. We identified nine key regulatory proteins, guaA, guaB, rpsB, rpsI, rpsL, rpsE, rpsC, rplM and trmD, which have functional roles as hubs in a hierarchical scale-free fractal protein-protein interaction network. Two key hubs (guaA and guaB) were important for insect-associated strains, and comparative analysis identified guaA as more important than guaB due to its role in effective module regulation. rpsI played a significant role in all the novel strains, while rplM was unique to sheep-associated strains. rpsM, rpsB and rpsI were involved in the regulation of overall network topology across all Acinetobacter strains analyzed in this study. Future analysis will investigate whether these hubs are useful as drug targets for treating Acinetobacter infections. PMID:27378055

  2. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  3. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  4. NASA Structural Analysis System (NASTRAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, L.

    1991-01-01

    Program aids in structural design of wide range of objects, from high-impact printer parts to turbine engine blades, and fully validated. Since source code included, NASTRAN modified or enhanced for new applications.

  5. Structural analysis of ultra-high speed aircraft structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenzen, K. H.; Siegel, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a hypersonic beaded skin panel were investigated under pure compression with boundary conditions similar to those found in a wing mounted condition. The primary phases of analysis reported include: (1) experimental testing of the panel to failure; (2) finite element structural analysis of the beaded panel with the computer program NASTRAN; and (3) summary of the semiclassical buckling equations for the beaded panel under purely compressive loads. A comparison of each of the analysis methods is also included.

  6. Structural analysis consultation using artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Marcal, P. V.; Berke, L.

    1978-01-01

    The primary goal of consultation is definition of the best strategy to deal with a structural engineering analysis objective. The knowledge base to meet the need is designed to identify the type of numerical analysis, the needed modeling detail, and specific analysis data required. Decisions are constructed on the basis of the data in the knowledge base - material behavior, relations between geometry and structural behavior, measures of the importance of time and temperature changes - and user supplied specifics characteristics of the spectrum of analysis types, the relation between accuracy and model detail on the structure, its mechanical loadings, and its temperature states. Existing software demonstrated the feasibility of the approach, encompassing the 36 analysis classes spanning nonlinear, temperature affected, incremental analyses which track the behavior of structural systems.

  7. Static Nonlinear Analysis In Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Ali

    2008-07-08

    Push-over analysis is a simple and applied approach which can be used for estimation of demand responses influenced by earthquake stimulations. The analysis is non-linear static analysis of the structure affected under increasing lateral loads and specifying the displacement--load diagram or structure capacity curve, draw the curve the base shear values and lateral deflection on the roof level of the building will be used. However, for estimation of the real behavior of the structure against earthquake, the non-linear dynamic analysis approaches and various accelerographs should be applied. Of course it should be noted that this approach especially in relation with tall buildings is complex and time consuming. In the article, the different patterns of lateral loading in push-over analysis have been compared with non-linear dynamic analysis approach so that the results represented accordingly. The researches indicated the uniformly--distributed loading is closer to real status.

  8. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue–residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein–protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  9. Thermal and structural analysis of Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petiau, C.

    1989-08-01

    After a brief recap of Hermes TPS and structure principles, we present the organization of thermal and structural analysis of the Hermes project, and we describe the way to resolve the problems of connections between calculations performed by the different Hermes partners. We describe in detail the interactions between the general model of TPS, used for global dimensioning of insulation, and refined thermal models giving an accurate temperature map inside details of "hot" and "cold" structures. The organization for structural analysis is based on a finite element general model which supports preliminary design, loads and vibration analyses. Boundary conditions for refined subpart analyses are cut to size, into the general model by a super element technique. This process involves the use by all partners of efficient computer codes, in the field of structural analysis and optimization integrated with CAD; for this Dassault proposes as a reference: the CATIA-ELFINI system.

  10. Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Ryszard

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses constructions known as semantic antinomies, that is, the paradoxical results of false presuppositions, and how they can be dealt with by means of deep structure analysis. See FL 508 186 for availability. (CLK)

  11. The historical Coffin-Lowry syndrome family revisited: identification of two novel mutations of RPS6KA3 in three male patients.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Hiromi Koso; Ha, Kyungsoo; Jones, Julie R; Dwivedi, Alka; Cho, Hyun-Min; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a rare X-linked dominant disorder characterized by intellectual disability, craniofacial abnormalities, short stature, tapering fingers, hypotonia, and skeletal malformations. CLS is caused by mutations in the Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase, 90 kDa, Polypeptide 3 (RPS6KA3) gene located at Xp22.12, which encodes Ribosomal S6 Kinase 2 (RSK2). Here we analyzed RPS6KA3 in three unrelated CLS patients including one from the historical Coffin-Lowry syndrome family and found two novel mutations. To date, over 140 mutations in RPS6KA3 have been reported. However, the etiology of the very first familial case, which was described in 1971 by Lowry with detailed phenotype and coined the term CLS, has remained unknown. More than 40 years after the report, we succeeded in identifying deposited fibroblast cells from one patient of this historic family and found a novel heterozygous 216 bp in-frame deletion, encompassing exons 15 and 16 of RPS6KA3. Drop episodes in CLS patients were reported to be associated with truncating mutations deleting the C-terminal kinase domain (KD), and only one missense mutation and one single basepair duplication involving the C-terminal KD of RSK2 in the patients with drop episode have been reported thus far. Here we report the first in-frame deletion in C-terminal KD of RPS6KA3 in a CLS patient with drop episodes.

  12. Histochemical Analysis of Plant Secretory Structures.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Histochemical analysis is essential for the study of plant secretory structures whose classification is based, at least partially, on the composition of their secretion. As each gland may produce one or more types of substances, a correct analysis of its secretion should be done using various histochemical tests to detect metabolites of different chemical classes. Here I describe some of the most used methods to detect carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, phenolic compounds, and alkaloids in the secretory structures.

  13. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  14. Concomitant partial exon skipping by a unique missense mutation of RPS6KA3 causes Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Chung, Min Ji; Jones, Julie R; Anand, Priya; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Iacoboni, Daniela; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked semi-dominant disorder characterized by diverse phenotypes including intellectual disability, facial and digital anomalies. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase Polypeptide 3 (RPS6KA3) gene have been shown to be responsible for CLS. Among the large number of mutations, however, no exonic mutation causing exon skipping has been described. Here, we report a male patient with CLS having a novel mutation at the 3' end of an exon at a splice donor junction. Interestingly, this nucleotide change causes both a novel missense mutation and partial exon skipping leading to a truncated transcript. These two transcripts were identified by cDNA sequencing of RT-PCR products. In the carrier mother, we found only wildtype transcripts suggesting skewed X-inactivation. Methylation studies confirmed X-inactivation was skewed moderately, but not completely, which is consistent with her mild phenotype. Western blot showed that the mutant RSK2 protein in the patient is expressed at similar levels relative to his mother. Protein modeling demonstrated that the missense mutation is damaging and may alter binding to ATP molecules. This is the first report of exon skipping from an exonic mutation of RPS6KA3, demonstrating that a missense mutation and concomitant disruption of normal splicing contribute to the manifestation of CLS.

  15. Fourier Analysis Of Vibrations Of Round Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-series representation developed for analysis of vibrations in complicated, round structures like turbopump impellers. Method eliminates guesswork involved in characterization of shapes of vibrational modes. Easy way to characterize complicated modes, leading to determination of responsiveness of given mode to various forcing functions. Used in conjunction with finite-element numerical simulation of vibrational modes of structure.

  16. Structural analysis of second-generation heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Dunder, V.D.

    1981-12-01

    As part of the overall evaluation of the four second-generation heliostats, a finite element analysis was performed to evaluate structure performance of the mirror modules subjected to gravity, operational wind loads and survival wind loads. All designs evaluated were found to be structurally adequate.

  17. Covariance Structure Analysis of Ordinal Ipsative Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Wai; Bentler, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a two-stage estimation method for the analysis of covariance structure models with ordinal ipsative data (OID). A goodness-of-fit statistic is given for testing the hypothesized covariance structure matrix, and simulation results show that the method works well with a large sample. (SLD)

  18. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  19. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  20. Structural Analysis in a Conceptual Design Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Robinson, Jay H.; Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic aircraft designers must shape the outer mold line of the aircraft to improve multiple objectives, such as mission performance, cruise efficiency, and sonic-boom signatures. Conceptual designers have demonstrated an ability to assess these objectives for a large number of candidate designs. Other critical objectives and constraints, such as weight, fuel volume, aeroelastic effects, and structural soundness, are more difficult to address during the conceptual design process. The present research adds both static structural analysis and sizing to an existing conceptual design framework. The ultimate goal is to include structural analysis in the multidisciplinary optimization of a supersonic aircraft. Progress towards that goal is discussed and demonstrated.

  1. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  2. A protein structure data and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Weber, Irene; Wang, Haibin; Yang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a protein structure data and analysis system that is only used in the lab for analyzing the proprietary data. It is capable of storing public protein data, such as the data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) [1], and life scientists' proprietary data. This toolkit is targeted at life scientists who want to maintain proprietary protein structure data (may be incomplete), to search and query publicly known protein structures and to compare their structure data with others. The comparison functions can be used to find structure differences between two proteins at atom level, especially in mutant versions of proteins. The system can also be used as a tool of choosing better protein structure template in new protein's tertiary structure prediction. The system is developed in Java and the protein data is stored in a relational database (Oracle 9i).

  3. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeffrey; Irish, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). A STOP analysis is a multidiscipline analysis, consisting of Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance Analyses, that is performed for all space flight instruments and satellites. This course will explain the different parts of performing this analysis. The student will learn how to effectively interact with each discipline in order to accurately obtain the system analysis results.

  4. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  5. Thermal and structural analysis of Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petiau, C.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of the thermal and structural analysis of the Hermes project is described. A way to resolve the problem of connections between calculations performed by the different Hermes partners is outlined. The interactions between the general model of TPS (thermal protection system) used for global dimensioning of insulation, and refined thermal models giving accurate temperature map details of hot and cold structures, are described. The organization of the structural analysis is based on a finite element general model which supports preliminary design, loads and vibration analyses. Boundary conditions for refined subpart analyses, are cut to size, into the general model by super element techniques. This process involves the use by all partners of efficient computer codes. The Catia-Elfini software system is proposed as a possible code system for structural analysis and optimization purposes.

  6. The Specific Analysis of Structural Equation Models.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Roderick P

    2004-10-01

    Conventional structural equation modeling fits a covariance structure implied by the equations of the model. This treatment of the model often gives misleading results because overall goodness of fit tests do not focus on the specific constraints implied by the model. An alternative treatment arising from Pearl's directed acyclic graph theory checks identifiability and lists and tests the implied constraints. This approach is complete for Markov models, but has remained incomplete for models with correlated disturbances. Some new algebraic results overcome the limitations of DAG theory and give a specific form of structural equation analysis that checks identifiability, tests the implied constraints, equation by equation, and gives consistent estimators of the parameters in closed form from the equations. At present the method is limited to recursive models subject to exclusion conditions. With further work, specific structural equation modeling may yield a complete alternative to the present, rather unsatisfactory, global covariance structure analysis.

  7. Thermal-Structural Analysis of Sunshield Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John; Parrish, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Future large infrared space telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will require deployable sunshields to provide passive cooling for optics and instruments. Deployable sunshield structures for such applications typically consist of multiple thin-film membrane layers supported by deployable booms. The mechanical design of the sunshield must accommodate thermal strains due to layer-to-layer temperature differences as well as potentially large in-plane temperature gradients within individual film layers. This paper describes a thermal-structural analysis for predicting the stress state in a thin-film membrane subject to both mechanical thermal loads that could aid in the mechanical design of future sunshield structures. First the temperature field predicted by a thermal analysis is mapped to a structural finite element model, and then the structural response is predicted using a nonlinear static analysis. The structural model uses membrane elements in conjunction with a tension field material model to predict the response of the thin-film membrane layer. The tension field material model accounts for no-compression behavior associated with wrinkling and slackness. This approach was used to study the problem of a single membrane layer from the NASA reference concept for the JWST sunshield. Results from the analysis show that the membrane can experience a loss of tensile preload due to the presence of an in-plane temperature gradient representative of the cold-side layer temperature distribution predicted for the reference concept JWST.

  8. ITER Central Solenoid support structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberg, Kevin D; Myatt, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is comprised of six independent coils held together by a pre-compression support structure. This structure must provide enough preload to maintain sufficient coil-to-coil contact and interface load throughout the current pulse. End of burn (EOB) represents one of the most extreme time-points doing the reference scenario when the currents in the CS3 coils oppose those of CS1 & CS2. The CS structure is performance limited by the room temperature static yield requirements needed to support the roughly 180 MN preload to resist coil separation during operation. This preload is applied by inner and external tie plates along the length of the coil stack by mechanical fastening methods utilizing Superbolt technology. The preloading structure satisfies the magnet structural design criteria of ITER and will be verified during mockup studies. The solenoid is supported from the bottom of the toroidal field (TF) coil casing in both the vertical radial directions. The upper support of the CS coil structure maintains radial registration with the TF coil in the event of vertical disruptions (VDE) loads and earthquakes. All of these structure systems are analyzed via a global finite element analysis (FEA). The model includes a complete sector of the TF coil and the CS coil/structure in one self-consistent analysis. The corresponding results and design descriptions are described in this report.

  9. Structural analysis for a 40-story building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, L.

    1972-01-01

    NASTRAN was chosen as the principal analytical tool for structural analysis of the Illinois Center Plaza Hotel Building in Chicago, Illinois. The building is a 40-story, reinforced concrete structure utilizing a monolithic slab-column system. The displacements, member stresses, and foundation loads due to wind load, live load, and dead load were obtained through a series of NASTRAN runs. These analyses and the input technique are described.

  10. On the structural analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    The local structural inhomogeneities which distinguish textile composites from laminated materials are discussed. Techniques for quantifying these inhomogeneities through three dimensional geometric modelling are introduced and methods of translating them into elastic properties are presented. Some basic ideas on application of spline functions to the stress field analysis in textile composites are proposed. The significance of internal continuity conditions for these materials is emphasized. Several analytical techniques based on the concept of a meso-volume are discussed. An example is presented to demonstrate the application of the method to structural analysis of textile composites.

  11. Structural sensitivity analysis: Methods, applications and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.; Camarda, C. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Innovative techniques applicable to sensitivity analysis of discretized structural systems are reviewed. The techniques include a finite difference step size selection algorithm, a method for derivatives of iterative solutions, a Green's function technique for derivatives of transient response, simultaneous calculation of temperatures and their derivatives, derivatives with respect to shape, and derivatives of optimum designs with respect to problem parameters. Computerized implementations of sensitivity analysis and applications of sensitivity derivatives are also discussed. Some of the critical needs in the structural sensitivity area are indicated along with plans for dealing with some of those needs.

  12. Structural sensitivity analysis: Methods, applications, and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.; Camarda, C. J.; Walsh, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some innovative techniques applicable to sensitivity analysis of discretized structural systems are reviewed. These techniques include a finite-difference step-size selection algorithm, a method for derivatives of iterative solutions, a Green's function technique for derivatives of transient response, a simultaneous calculation of temperatures and their derivatives, derivatives with respect to shape, and derivatives of optimum designs with respect to problem parameters. Computerized implementations of sensitivity analysis and applications of sensitivity derivatives are also discussed. Finally, some of the critical needs in the structural sensitivity area are indicated along with Langley plans for dealing with some of these needs.

  13. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Unmasks the Lowest Exciton State of the B850 Assembly in LH2 from Rps. acidophila

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Ralf; Timpmann, Kõu; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Freiberg, Arvi; Köhler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We have recorded fluorescence-excitation and emission spectra from single LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) acidophila. Both types of spectra show strong temporal spectral fluctuations that can be visualized as spectral diffusion plots. Comparison of the excitation and emission spectra reveals that for most of the complexes the lowest exciton transition is not observable in the excitation spectra due to the cutoff of the detection filter characteristics. However, from the spectral diffusion plots we have the full spectral and temporal information at hand and can select those complexes for which the excitation spectra are complete. Correlating the red most spectral feature of the excitation spectrum with the blue most spectral feature of the emission spectrum allows an unambiguous assignment of the lowest exciton state. Hence, application of fluorescence-excitation and emission spectroscopy on the same individual LH2 complex allows us to decipher spectral subtleties that are usually hidden in traditional ensemble spectroscopy. PMID:24806933

  14. Improving transient analysis technology for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Chargin, Mladen

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic analyses are demanding of computer simulation capabilities. The modeling complexities of semi-monocoque construction, irregular geometry, high-performance materials, and high-accuracy analysis are present. At issue are the safety of the passengers and the integrity of the structure for a wide variety of flight-operating and emergency conditions. The technology which supports engineering of aircraft structures using computer simulation is examined. Available computer support is briefly described and improvement of accuracy and efficiency are recommended. Improved accuracy of simulation will lead to a more economical structure. Improved efficiency will result in lowering development time and expense.

  15. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    listed in order of preference, based on applicability, reliability, cost , and sample requirements. Figure 5-4. Failure Analysis Technique...development of a methodology in which optical analysis is used to increase the time and cost effectiveness of analyzing failed composite material struc...regarding the integrity of the bond. Accurate bondline defect information was achieved in such structures utilizing a transportable californium -252 (2 5 2

  16. A Prospective Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Trieu; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Keyser, David; Krishnan, Venkat; Macknick, Jordan; Millstein, Dev

    2016-12-31

    As states have gained experience with renewable portfolio standards (RPS) policies, many have made significant revisions to existing programs. In 2015 and 2016, seven states raised and extended their final RPS targets, while another state enacted a new RPS policy (Barbose 2016b). Interest in expanding and strengthening state RPS programs may continue, while efforts like recent proposals in many states to repeal or freeze existing RPS policies may also persist. In either context, questions about the potential costs, benefits, and other impacts of RPS programs are usually central to the decision-making process. This report follows on previous analyses that have focused on the historical costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing state RPS programs (Heeter et al. 2014; Wiser et al. 2016a). This report examines RPS outcomes prospectively, considering both current RPS policies as well as a potential expansion of those policies. The goal of this work is to provide a consistent and independent analytical methodology for that examination. This analysis relies on National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to estimate changes to the U.S. electric power sector across a number of scenarios and sensitivity cases, focusing on the 2015–2050 timeframe. Based on those modeled results, we evaluate the costs, benefits, and other impacts of renewable energy contributing to RPS compliance using the suite of methods employed in a number of recent studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): a report examining retrospective benefits and impacts of RPS programs (Wiser et al. 2016a), the Wind Vision report (DOE 2015), the On the Path to SunShot report focusing on environmental benefits (Wiser et al. 2016b), and the Hydropower Vision report (DOE 2016).

  17. Simplified method for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program was developed for predicting the stress-strain history of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a simulated plasticity hardening model. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, and different materials and plasticity models. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  18. Structural Target Analysis And Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harry C.

    1984-06-01

    The structural target analysis and recognition system (STARS) is a pyramid and syntactical based vision system that uniquely classifies targets, using their viewable internal structure. Being a totally structural approach, STARS uses a resolution sequence to develop a hierarchical pyramid organized segmentation and formal language to perform the recognition function. Global structure of the target is derived by the segment connectivity of the inter-resolution levels, while local structure is based on the local relationship of segments at a single level. The relationships of both the global and local structures form a resolution syntax tree (RST). Two targets are said to be structurally similar if they have similar RSTs. The matching process of the RSTs proceeds from the root to the leaves of the tree. The depth to which the match progresses before failure or completion determines the degree of patch in a resolution sense. RSTs from various views of a target are grouped together to form a formal language. The underlying grammar is transformed into a stochastic grammar so as to accommodate segmentation and environmental variations. Recognition metrics are a function of the resolution structure and posterior probability at each resolution level. Because of the inherent resolution sequence, STARS can accommodate both candidate and reference targets from various resolutions.

  19. Turbine blade nonlinear structural and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Laflen, J. H.; Halford, G. R.; Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of advanced structural analysis and life prediction techniques was evaluated for the life assessment of a commercial air-cooled turbine blade with a history of tip cracking. Three dimensional, nonlinear finite element structural analyses were performed for the blade tip region. The computed strain-temperature history of the critical location was imposed on a uniaxial strain controlled test specimen to evaluate the validity of the structural analysis method. Experimental results indicated higher peak stresses and greater stress relaxation than the analytical predictions. Life predictions using the Strainrange Partitioning and Frequency Modified approaches predicted 1200 to 4420 cycles and 2700 cycles to crack initiation, respectively, compared to an observed life of 3000 cycles.

  20. Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Heeter, Jenny; Mai, Trieu; Bird, Lori; Bolinger, Mark; Carpenter, Alberta; Heath, Garvin; Keyser, David; Macknick, Jordan; Mills, Andrew; Millstein, Dev

    2016-01-06

    This analysis is the first-ever comprehensive assessment of the benefits and impacts of state renewable portfolio standards (RPSs). This joint National Renewable Energy Laboratory-Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory project provides a retrospective analysis of RPS program benefits and impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions reductions, air pollution emission reductions, water use reductions, gross jobs and economic development impacts, wholesale electricity price reduction impacts, and natural gas price reduction impacts. Wherever possible, benefits and impacts are quantified in monetary terms. The paper will inform state policymakers, RPS program administrators, industry, and others about the costs and benefits of state RPS programs. In particular, the work seeks to inform decision-making surrounding ongoing legislative proposals to scale back, freeze, or expand existing RPS programs, as well as future discussions about increasing RPS targets or otherwise increasing renewable energy associated with Clean Power Plan compliance or other emission-reduction goals.

  1. Numerical analysis of soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlangen, Harry

    1991-05-01

    A study to improve some existing procedures for the finite element analysis of soil deformation and collapse is presented. Special attention is paid to problems of soil structure interaction. Emphasis is put on the behavior of soil rather than on that of structures. This seems to be justifiable if static interaction of stiff structures and soft soil is considered. In such a case nonlinear response will exclusively stem from soil deformation. In addition, the quality of the results depends to a high extent on the proper modeling of soil flow along structures and not on the modeling of the structure itself. An exception is made when geotextile reinforcement is considered. In that case the structural element, i.e., the geotextile, is highly flexible. The equation of continuum equilibrium, which serves as a starting point for the finite element formulation of large deformation elastoplasticity, is discussed with special attention being paid to the interpretation of some objective stress rate tensors. The solution of nonlinear finite element equations is addressed. Soil deformation in the prefailure range is discussed. Large deformation effect in the analysis of soil deformation is touched on.

  2. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  4. Segmentation of histological structures for fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Vanessa; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Pathologists examine histology sections to make diagnostic and prognostic assessments regarding cancer based on deviations in cellular and/or glandular structures. However, these assessments are subjective and exhibit some degree of observer variability. Recent studies have shown that fractal dimension (a quantitative measure of structural complexity) has proven useful for characterizing structural deviations and exhibits great potential for automated cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Computing fractal dimension relies on accurate image segmentation to capture the architectural complexity of the histology specimen. For this purpose, previous studies have used techniques such as intensity histogram analysis and edge detection algorithms. However, care must be taken when segmenting pathologically relevant structures since improper edge detection can result in an inaccurate estimation of fractal dimension. In this study, we established a reliable method for segmenting edges from grayscale images. We used a Koch snowflake, an object of known fractal dimension, to investigate the accuracy of various edge detection algorithms and selected the most appropriate algorithm to extract the outline structures. Next, we created validation objects ranging in fractal dimension from 1.3 to 1.9 imitating the size, structural complexity, and spatial pixel intensity distribution of stained histology section images. We applied increasing intensity thresholds to the validation objects to extract the outline structures and observe the effects on the corresponding segmentation and fractal dimension. The intensity threshold yielding the maximum fractal dimension provided the most accurate fractal dimension and segmentation, indicating that this quantitative method could be used in an automated classification system for histology specimens.

  5. Static Structural and Modal Analysis Using Isogeometric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondegaon, Sangamesh; Voruganti, Hari K.

    2016-12-01

    Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) is a new analysis method for unification of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). With the use of NURBS basis functions for both modelling and analysis, the bottleneck of meshing is avoided and a seamless integration is achieved. The CAD and computational geometry concepts in IGA are new to the analysis community. Though, there is a steady growth of literature, details of calculations, explanations and examples are not reported. The content of the paper is complimentary to the existing literature and addresses the gaps. It includes summary of the literature, overview of the methodology, step-by-step calculations and Matlab codes for example problems in static structural and modal analysis in 1-D and 2-D. At appropriate places, comparison with the Finite Element Analysis (FEM) is also included, so that those familiar with FEM can appreciate IGA better.

  6. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  7. Phylogeny and biogeography of Allium (Amaryllidaceae: Allieae) based on nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and chloroplast rps16 sequences, focusing on the inclusion of species endemic to China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; He, Xing-Jin; Yu, Yan; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Allium comprises more than 800 species, placing it among the largest monocotyledonous genera. It is a variable group that is spread widely across the Holarctic region. Previous studies of Allium have been useful in identifying and assessing its evolutionary lineages. However, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of infrageneric taxonomy and evolution of Allium. Further understanding of its phylogeny and biogeography will be achieved only through continued phylogenetic studies, especially of those species endemic to China that have often been excluded from previous analyses. Earlier molecular studies have shown that Chinese Allium is not monophyletic, so the goal of the present study was to infer the phylogeny and biogeography of Allium and to provide a classification of Chinese Allium by placement of Chinese species in the context of the entire phylogeny. Methods Phylogenetic studies were based on sequence data of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rps16 intron, analysed using parsimony and Bayesian approaches. Biogeographical patterns were conducted using statistical dispersal–vicariance analysis (S-DIVA). Key Results Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Allium is monophyletic and consists of three major clades. Optimal reconstructions have favoured the ancestors of Amerallium, Anguinum, Vvedenskya, Porphyroprason and Melanocrommyum as originating in eastern Asia. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Allium is monophyletic but that some subgenera are not. The large genetic distances imply that Allium is of ancient origin. Molecular data suggest that its evolution proceeded along three separate evolutionary lines. S-DIVA indicates that the ancestor of Amerallium, Anguinum, Vvedenskya, Porphyroprason and Melanocrommyum originated from eastern Asia and underwent different biogeographical pathways. A taxonomic synopsis of Chinese Allium at sectional level is given, which divides Chinese

  8. Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis is a focused effort within the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) program to streamline multidisciplinary analysis of aeropropulsion components and assemblies. Multidisciplinary analysis of axial-flow compressor performance has been selected for the initial focus of this project. CATS will permit more accurate compressor system analysis by enabling users to include thermal and mechanical effects as an integral part of the aerodynamic analysis of the compressor primary flowpath. Thus, critical details, such as the variation of blade tip clearances and the deformation of the flowpath geometry, can be more accurately modeled and included in the aerodynamic analyses. The benefits of this coupled analysis capability are (1) performance and stall line predictions are improved by the inclusion of tip clearances and hot geometries, (2) design alternatives can be readily analyzed, and (3) higher fidelity analysis by researchers in various disciplines is possible. The goals for this project are a 10-percent improvement in stall margin predictions and a 2:1 speed-up in multidisciplinary analysis times. Working cooperatively with Pratt & Whitney, the Lewis CATS team defined the engineering processes and identified the software products necessary for streamlining these processes. The basic approach is to integrate the aerodynamic, thermal, and structural computational analyses by using data management and Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based data mapping. Five software products have been defined for this task: (1) a primary flowpath data mapper, (2) a two-dimensional data mapper, (3) a database interface, (4) a blade structural pre- and post-processor, and (5) a computational fluid dynamics code for aerothermal analysis of the drum rotor. Thus far (1) a cooperative agreement has been established with Pratt & Whitney, (2) a Primary Flowpath Data Mapper has been prototyped and delivered to General Electric

  9. Structural analysis of light aircraft using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Bruce, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    An application of NASTRAN to the structural analysis of light aircraft was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness. A model of the Baby Ace D model homebuilt aircraft was used. The NASTRAN model of the aircraft consists of 193 grid points connected by 352 structural members. All members are either rod or beam elements, including bending of unsymmetrical cross sections and torsion of noncircular cross sections. The aerodynamic loads applied to the aircraft were in accordance with FAA regulations governing the utility category aircraft.

  10. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  11. Energy flow analysis of coupled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Phillip Eung-Ho

    1993-01-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; firstly, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; secondly, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, plate-to-plate, and structure-to acoustic field couplings). In this investigation, EFA is used to predict the vibrational response of various coupled structures. In the process of predicting the vibrational response of the coupled structures, the energy flow coupling relationships at the joints of these structures are derived. In addition, the finite element formulation of the governing energy equations are developed. Because the energy density is discontinuous at the joint, a special global assembly procedure is developed to assemble the finite element matrix equations into global matrix equations. The global matrix assembly procedure is predicated on the development of joint element matrix equations using energy flow coupling relationships for various structural joints. The results predicted by EFA for a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure, are shown to be a reasonable approximation of the frequency-averaged 'exact' energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions. The accuracy of the results predicted by EFA increased with high mode count and modal overlap factor or high non-dimensional wavenumber band and non-dimensional damped wavenumber band in the frequency band of interest. An experimental investigation of vibrational response of a light truck frame structure was performed to verify the results of EFA when applied

  12. Structural analysis of ITER magnet feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, Yuri; Gung, Chen-Yu; Bauer, Pierre; Chen, Yonghua; Jong, Cornelis; Devred, Arnaud; Mitchell, Neil; Lorriere, Philippe; Farek, Jaromir; Nannini, Matthieu

    2012-06-15

    This paper summarizes the results of the static structural analyses, which were conducted in support of the ITER magnet feeder design with the aim of validating certain components against the structural design criteria. While almost every feeder has unique features, they all share many common constructional elements and the same functional specifications. The analysis approach to assess the load conditions and stresses that have driven the design is equivalent for all feeders, except for particularities that needed to be modeled in each case. The mechanical analysis of the feeders follows the sub-modeling approach: the results of the global mechanical model of a feeder assembly are used as input for the detailed models of the feeder' sub-assemblies or single components. Examples of such approach, including the load conditions, stress assessment criteria and solutions for the most critical components, are discussed. It has been concluded that the feeder system is safe in the referential operation scenarios. (authors)

  13. Microfluidic Approaches for Protein Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes two microfluidic-based protein crystallization methods, protein crystallization behavior in the microfluidic devices, and their applications for X-ray crystal structure analysis. Microfluidic devices provide many advantages for protein crystallography; they require small sample volumes, provide high-throughput screening, and allow control of the protein crystallization. A droplet-based protein crystallization method is a useful technique for high-throughput screening and the formation of a single crystal without any complicated device fabrication process. Well-based microfluidic platforms also enable effective protein crystallization. This review also summarizes the protein crystal growth behavior in microfluidic devices as, is known from viewpoints of theoretical and experimental approaches. Finally, we introduce applications of microfluidic devices for on-chip crystal structure analysis.

  14. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  15. Structural analysis at aircraft conceptual design stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Reza

    In the past 50 years, computers have helped by augmenting human efforts with tremendous pace. The aircraft industry is not an exception. Aircraft industry is more than ever dependent on computing because of a high level of complexity and the increasing need for excellence to survive a highly competitive marketplace. Designers choose computers to perform almost every analysis task. But while doing so, existing effective, accurate and easy to use classical analytical methods are often forgotten, which can be very useful especially in the early phases of the aircraft design where concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions [39, 2004]. Structural analysis methods have been used by human beings since the very early civilization. Centuries before computers were invented; the pyramids were designed and constructed by Egyptians around 2000 B.C, the Parthenon was built by the Greeks, around 240 B.C, Dujiangyan was built by the Chinese. Persepolis, Hagia Sophia, Taj Mahal, Eiffel tower are only few more examples of historical buildings, bridges and monuments that were constructed before we had any advancement made in computer aided engineering. Aircraft industry is no exception either. In the first half of the 20th century, engineers used classical method and designed civil transport aircraft such as Ford Tri Motor (1926), Lockheed Vega (1927), Lockheed 9 Orion (1931), Douglas DC-3 (1935), Douglas DC-4/C-54 Skymaster (1938), Boeing 307 (1938) and Boeing 314 Clipper (1939) and managed to become airborne without difficulty. Evidencing, while advanced numerical methods such as the finite element analysis is one of the most effective structural analysis methods; classical structural analysis methods can also be as useful especially during the early phase of a fixed wing aircraft design where major decisions are made and concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions

  16. RNA Structure Analysis of Viruses Using SHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Selective 2'hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) provides a means to investigate RNA structure with better resolution and higher throughput than has been possible with traditional methods. We present several protocols, which are based on a variety of previously published methods and were adapted and optimized for the analysis of poliovirus RNA in the Andino laboratory. These include methods for non-denaturing RNA extraction, RNA modification and primer extension, and data processing in ShapeFinder. PMID:24510890

  17. USNO Analysis Center for Source Structure Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    IVS determination of the "definition and maintenance of the celestial reference frame." These include, primarily, radio frequency images of...International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, intrinsic structure models derived from the radio images, and an assessment of the astrometric...pointing your browser to http://rorf.usno.navy.mil/ivs_saac/ The primary service of the Analysis Center is the Radio Reference Frame Image Database

  18. Probabilistic structural analysis methods and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Wu, Y.-T.; Dias, B.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced algorithm for simulating the probabilistic distribution of structural responses due to statistical uncertainties in loads, geometry, material properties, and boundary conditions is reported. The method effectively combines an advanced algorithm for calculating probability levels for multivariate problems (fast probability integration) together with a general-purpose finite-element code for stress, vibration, and buckling analysis. Application is made to a space propulsion system turbine blade for which the geometry and material properties are treated as random variables.

  19. Industrial entrepreneurial network: Structural and functional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Berg, D. B.; Nazarova, J. J.; Parusheva, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Structure and functioning of two model industrial entrepreneurial networks are investigated in the present paper. One of these networks is forming when implementing an integrated project and consists of eight agents, which interact with each other and external environment. The other one is obtained from the municipal economy and is based on the set of the 12 real business entities. Analysis of the networks is carried out on the basis of the matrix of mutual payments aggregated over the certain time period. The matrix is created by the methods of experimental economics. Social Network Analysis (SNA) methods and instruments were used in the present research. The set of basic structural characteristics was investigated: set of quantitative parameters such as density, diameter, clustering coefficient, different kinds of centrality, and etc. They were compared with the random Bernoulli graphs of the corresponding size and density. Discovered variations of random and entrepreneurial networks structure are explained by the peculiarities of agents functioning in production network. Separately, were identified the closed exchange circuits (cyclically closed contours of graph) forming an autopoietic (self-replicating) network pattern. The purpose of the functional analysis was to identify the contribution of the autopoietic network pattern in its gross product. It was found that the magnitude of this contribution is more than 20%. Such value allows using of the complementary currency in order to stimulate economic activity of network agents.

  20. Evaluation, analysis and prediction of geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Nicholas B.

    2012-08-01

    Balanced cross-sections claim to be better because they apply a rigorous set of rules to develop the conceptual model of the structures present in an area. Balanced cross-sections can be further improved and become more useful to understanding real physical problems by collection of additional data such as seismic reflection surveys, collection of additional stratigraphic data, or collection of rock fabric information. The additional information validates the initial model and provides details on deformation conditions and on local rock responses to the deformation. Although individual cross-sections are two dimensional, the objective of evaluation and analysis of deformed regions should be three dimensional whenever possible to recognize the challenges of the real world. Subsurface system analysis derived from the hydrologic community emphasizes conceptual model development through model verification, validation, uncertainty quantification, benchmarking and meta-analysis. Their approach includes many steps informally used by the structural geology community but in a much more explicit way. Newer geological applications of structural geology would benefit from this more rigorous approach for designing and doing performance predictions as technological needs become more socially sensitive such as for carbon storage sites, new areas of energy exploration in higher population density areas, or for nuclear waste storage facilities.

  1. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, M. G.; Heasler, P. G.; Hoover, K. A.; Rynes, N. J.; Thiessen, R. L.; Alfaro, J. L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures.

  2. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. ); Rynes, N.J. ); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. )

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A.; Rynes, N.J.; Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Nanoscale analysis of structural synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jennifer N.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1950’s, transmission electron microscopy was first used to reveal the diversity in synaptic structure and composition in the central nervous system [1;2]. Since then, visualization and reconstruction of serial thin sections have provided three-dimensional contexts in which to understand how synapses are modified with plasticity, learning, and sensory input [3–17]. Three-dimensional reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) has proven invaluable for the comprehensive analysis of structural synaptic plasticity. It has provided the needed nanometer resolution to localize and measure key subcellular structures, such as the postsynaptic density (PSD) and presynaptic vesicles which define a synapse, polyribosomes as sites of local protein synthesis, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) for local regulation of calcium and trafficking of membrane proteins, endosomes for recycling, and fine astroglial processes at the perimeter of some synapses. Thus, ssEM is an essential tool for nanoscale analysis of the cell biological and anatomical modifications that underlie changes in synaptic strength. Here we discuss several important issues associated with interpreting the functional significance of structural synaptic plasticity, especially during long-term potentiation, a widely studied cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:22088391

  5. Probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.; Fossum, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element program is used to perform probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure. The program used in this study is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), under development at Southwest Research Institute. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the radial stress of a thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure is computed and compared with the analytical solution. In addition, sensitivity factors showing the relative importance of the input random variables are calculated. Significant plasticity is present in this problem and has a pronounced effect on the probabilistic results. The random input variables are the material yield stress and internal pressure with Weibull and normal distributions, respectively. The results verify the ability of NESSUS to compute the CDF and sensitivity factors of a materially nonlinear structure. In addition, the ability of the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) procedure to assess the probabilistic behavior of structures which exhibit a highly nonlinear response is shown. Thus, the AMV procedure can be applied with confidence to other structures which exhibit nonlinear behavior.

  6. Structural Analysis Using Computer Based Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The stiffness of a flex hose that will be used in the umbilical arms of the Space Launch Systems mobile launcher needed to be determined in order to properly qualify ground umbilical plate behavior during vehicle separation post T-0. This data is also necessary to properly size and design the motors used to retract the umbilical arms. Therefore an experiment was created to determine the stiffness of the hose. Before the test apparatus for the experiment could be built, the structure had to be analyzed to ensure it would not fail under given loading conditions. The design model was imported into the analysis software and optimized to decrease runtime while still providing accurate restlts and allow for seamless meshing. Areas exceeding the allowable stresses in the structure were located and modified before submitting the design for fabrication. In addition, a mock up of a deep space habitat and the support frame was designed and needed to be analyzed for structural integrity under different loading conditions. The load cases were provided by the customer and were applied to the structure after optimizing the geometry. Once again, weak points in the structure were located and recommended design changes were made to the customer and the process was repeated until the load conditions were met without exceeding the allowable stresses. After the stresses met the required factors of safety the designs were released for fabrication.

  7. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Huo, X. Sharon

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  8. Energy and Economic Impacts of Implementing Both a 25% RPS and a 25% RFS by 2025

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a request by Senator James Inhofe for analysis of a "25-by-25" proposal that combines a requirement that a 25% share of electricity sales be produced from renewable sources by 2025 with a requirement that a 25% share of liquid transportation fuel sales also be derived from renewable sources by 2025.

  9. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  10. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  11. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  12. A molecular phylogenetic study of the subtribe Glycininae (Leguminosae) derived from the chloroplast DNA rps16 intron sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Hymowitz, T

    2001-11-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 13 genera of the subtribe Glycininae, two genera of the allied subtribe Diocleinae that were included within Glycininae by Polhill, and two genera of the subtribe Erythrininae as outgroups were inferred from chloroplast DNA rps16 intron sequence variation. Pairwise sequence divergence values ranged from identity between Teramnus mollis and T. micans and between T. flexilis and T. labialis to 7.89% between Pueraria wallichii and Pseudeminia comosa across all accessions. Phylogenies estimated using parsimony and neighbor-joining methods revealed that (1) Glycininae is monophyletic if Pachyrhizus and Calopogonium (both Diocleinae) are included within Glycininae; (2) the genus Teramnus is closely related to Glycine, and Amphicarpaea showed a sister relationship to the clade comprising Teramnus and Glycine; (3) the expanded Glycininae including two genera of Diocleinae is divided into three branches, temporarily named I (comprising the rest of the examined taxa), II (Pueraria wallichii), and III (Mastersia), but their relationships are equivocal; and (4) the genus Pueraria, regarded as a closely related genus to Glycine, is not monophyletic and should be divided into at least four genera (a hypothesis supported previously by Lackey).

  13. Zfrp8/PDCD2 Interacts with RpS2 Connecting Ribosome Maturation and Gene-Specific Translation.

    PubMed

    Minakhina, Svetlana; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Changela, Neha; Tan, William; Steward, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Zfrp8/PDCD2 is a highly conserved protein essential for stem cell maintenance in both flies and mammals. It is also required in fast proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Our previous studies suggested that Zfrp8 functions in the formation of mRNP (mRNA ribonucleoprotein) complexes and also controls RNA of select Transposable Elements (TEs). Here we show that in Zfrp8/PDCD2 knock down (KD) ovaries, specific mRNAs and TE transcripts show increased nuclear accumulation. We also show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 interacts with the (40S) small ribosomal subunit through direct interaction with RpS2 (uS5). By studying the distribution of endogenous and transgenic fluorescently tagged ribosomal proteins we demonstrate that Zfrp8/PDCD2 regulates the cytoplasmic levels of components of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, but does not control nuclear/nucleolar localization of ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 functions at late stages of ribosome assembly and may regulate the binding of specific mRNA-RNPs to the small ribosomal subunit ultimately controlling their cytoplasmic localization and translation.

  14. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  15. The matrix exponential in transient structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1987-01-01

    The primary usefulness of the presented theory is in the ability to represent the effects of high frequency linear response with accuracy, without requiring very small time steps in the analysis of dynamic response. The matrix exponential contains a series approximation to the dynamic model. However, unlike the usual analysis procedure which truncates the high frequency response, the approximation in the exponential matrix solution is in the time domain. By truncating the series solution to the matrix exponential short, the solution is made inaccurate after a certain time. Yet, up to that time the solution is extremely accurate, including all high frequency effects. By taking finite time increments, the exponential matrix solution can compute the response very accurately. Use of the exponential matrix in structural dynamics is demonstrated by simulating the free vibration response of multi degree of freedom models of cantilever beams.

  16. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  17. Identification of the first deep intronic mutation in the RPS6KA3 gene in a patient with a severe form of Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anne; Maas, Saskia M; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hanauer, André

    2013-03-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by growth and psychomotor retardation, hypotonia and progressive skeletal changes. RPS6KA3 is the only gene known to be associated with CLS, and over 150 distinct inactivating mutations in this gene have so far been reported in CLS patients. However, no defect is found in about half of the CLS compatible patients by exon sequencing. We report here the first deep intronic mutation in RPS6KA3, which is associated with the retention of intronic sequences in the mRNAs. Indeed, this finding suggests that all the patients with a highly suggestive CLS clinical diagnosis, but in whom exon screening has failed to detect a mutation, should be reanalyzed at the RNA level.

  18. A familial case of Coffin-Lowry syndrome caused by RPS6KA3 C.898C>T mutation associated with multiple abnormal brain imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tos, T; Alp, M Y; Aksoy, A; Ceylaner, S; Hanauer, A

    2015-01-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a rare X linked mental retardation syndrome characterised by severe psychomotor and growth retardation, distinct facial phenotype, and progressive skeletal malformations. It is caused by mutations in the RPS6KA3 gene located at Xp22.2. In this report we describe a family with CLS consists of three affected males, and two affected females, arising from c.898C>T mutation in RPS6KA3 gene. A 6 year-old, and a 3 year-old boy both had distinct clinical features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome; severe mental and motor retardation, microcephaly, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, large mouth, large ears, large soft hands, puffy tapered fingers, and pectus carinatum. In addition, they had multiple abnormal brain MRI findings. Other siblings presented with a mild and variable phenotype.

  19. Arabidopsis dual resistance proteins, both RPS4 and RRS1, are required for resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial wilt phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a serious soil-borne disease that attacks several economically important plants worldwide, including Brassicaceae. Previous studies indicate that recognition of avirulence (Avr)-effector PopP2 by resistance (R) protein, RRS1-R, and physical interaction between RRS1-R and PopP2 in the nucleus are required for resistance. Of late, we showed that a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, function together in disease resistance against multiple pathogen isolates. Here, we report that dual R proteins, RRS1 and RPS4, from A. thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija confer resistance to bacterial wilt in transgenic Brassica crops. For practical applications, this finding may provide a new strategy for developing disease resistant plants that express R genes from other plants.

  20. Analysis of Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Julie Olmsted

    This thesis presents a systematic study of the application of DAFS to determine site-specific local structural and chemical information in complex materials, and the first application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations using the computer program scFEFF to model DAFS data. In addition, the iterative dispersion analysis method, first suggested by Pickering, et al., has been generalized to accommodate the off-resonance anomalous scattering from heavy atoms in the unit cell. The generalized algorithm scKKFIT was applied to DAFS data from eight (00 l) reflections of the high-T _{c} superconductor YBa _2Cu_3O_ {6.8} to obtain the weighted complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E). The fine-structure functions chi_{rm w}(Q, E) isolated from the Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E) are linear combinations of the individual site fine structure functions chi _{rm w}(Q, E) = Sigma_{i}W_{i,{ bf Q}}chi_{i}(E) from the two inequivalent Cu sites, added together according to the structure factor for the Cu sublattice. The chi_{rm w}(Q, E) were fit en masse using the XAFS analysis program scFEFFIT under a set of constraints on the coefficients W _{i,{bf Q}} based on the structure factor for kinematic scattering. The W_{i,{bf Q}} determined by scFEFFIT were used to obtain the fully separated complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f(E) for the two Cu sites. The theoretical connection between DAFS and XAFS is used to justify the application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations to DAFS analysis. The polarization dependence of DAFS is described in terms of individual virtual photoelectron scattering paths in the Rehr-Albers separable curved-wave formalism. Polarization is shown to be an important factor in all DAFS experiments. Three experimental constraints are found necessary for obtaining site-separated Delta f(E) from DAFS data by linear inversion of the W_{i, {bf Q}} matrix and scKKFIT isolated Delta f_{rm w }(Q, E): (1) The diffraction must be

  1. Complete plastid genome sequence of the chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and the phylogenetic distribution of rps12 and clpP intron losses among legumes (Leguminosae)

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Robert K.; Wojciechowski, Martin F.; Sanniyasi, Elumalai; Lee, Seung-Bum; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum, Leguminosae), an important grain legume, is widely used for food and fodder throughout the world. We sequenced the complete plastid genome of chickpea, which is 125,319 bp in size, and contains only one copy of the inverted repeat (IR). The genome encodes 108 genes, including 4 rRNAs, 29 tRNAs, and 75 proteins. The genes rps16, infA, and ycf4 are absent in the chickpea plastid genome, and ndhB has an internal stop codon in the 5′exon, similar to other legumes. Two genes have lost their introns, one in the 3′exon of the transpliced gene rps12, and the one between exons 1 and 2 of clpP; this represents the first documented case of the loss of introns from both of these genes in the same plastid genome. An extensive phylogenetic survey of these intron losses was performed on 302 taxa across legumes and the related family Polygalaceae. The clpP intron has been lost exclusively in taxa from the temperate “IR-lacking clade” (IRLC), whereas the rps12 intron has been lost in most members of the IRLC (with the exception of Wisteria, Callerya, Afgekia, and certain species of Millettia, which represent the earliest diverging lineages of this clade), and in the tribe Desmodieae, which is closely related to the tribes Phaseoleae and Psoraleeae. Data provided here suggest that the loss of the rps12 intron occurred after the loss of the IR. The two new genomic changes identified in the present study provide additional support of the monophyly of the IR-loss clade, and resolution of the pattern of the earliest-branching lineages in this clade. The availability of the complete chickpea plastid genome sequence also provides valuable information on intergenic spacer regions among legumes and endogenous regulatory sequences for plastid genetic engineering. PMID:18638561

  2. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by CX-5011 counteracts imatinib-resistance preventing rpS6 phosphorylation in chronic myeloid leukaemia cells: new combined therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Salizzato, Valentina; Borgo, Christian; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Donella-Deana, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder promoted by the constitutive tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Although treatment with the Bcr-Abl-inhibitor imatinib represents the first-line therapy against CML, almost 20-30% of patients develop chemotherapeutic resistance and require alternative therapy. Here we show that a strong hyper-phosphorylation/activation of ERK1/2, Akt Ser473, and 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) is detectable in imatinib-resistant KCL22 and K562 CML cells as compared to the -sensitive cell variants. In imatinib-resistant CML cells, high concentration of imatinib is required to strongly inhibit Bcr-Abl, ERK1/2 and Akt Ser473 phosphorylation, but under these conditions the phosphorylation of rpS6, a common downstream effector of MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways is only slightly reduced. By contrast, down-regulation of the protein kinase CK2 by the inhibitor CX-5011 or by silencing the CK2 subunits does not affect the activation state of MEK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling, but causes a drop in rpS6 phosphorylation in parallel with reduced protein synthesis. CK2-inhibition by CX-5011 induces cell death by apoptosis and acts synergistically with imatinib or the MEK-inhibitor U0126 in reducing the viability of imatinib-resistant CML cells. The ternary mixture containing CX-5011, imatinib and U0126 represents the most effective synergistic combination to counteract CML cell viability. These results disclose a novel CK2-mediated mechanism of acquired imatinib-resistance resulting in hyper-phosphorylation of rpS6. We suggest that co-targeting CK2 and MEK protein kinases is a promising strategy to restore responsiveness of resistant CML cells to imatinib. PMID:26919095

  3. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  4. Rhetorical structure theory and text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, William C.; Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.; Thompson, Sandra A.

    1989-11-01

    Recent research on text generation has shown that there is a need for stronger linguistic theories that tell in detail how texts communicate. The prevailing theories are very difficult to compare, and it is also very difficult to see how they might be combined into stronger theories. To make comparison and combination a bit more approachable, we have created a book which is designed to encourage comparison. A dozen different authors or teams, all experienced in discourse research, are given exactly the same text to analyze. The text is an appeal for money by a lobbying organization in Washington, DC. It informs, stimulates and manipulates the reader in a fascinating way. The joint analysis is far more insightful than any one team's analysis alone. This paper is our contribution to the book. Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), the focus of this paper, is a way to account for the functional potential of text, its capacity to achieve the purposes of speakers and produce effects in hearers. It also shows a way to distinguish coherent texts from incoherent ones, and identifies consequences of text structure.

  5. The transcription factor Ace2 and its paralog Swi5 regulate ethanol production during static fermentation through their targets Cts1 and Rps4a in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Du, Jie; Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most widely used fermentation organism for ethanol production. However, the gene expression regulatory networks behind the ethanol fermentation are still not fully understood. Using a static fermentation model, we examined the ethanol yields on biomass of deletion mutants for 77 yeast genes encoding nonessential transcription factors, and found that deletion mutants for ACE2 and SWI5 showed dramatically increased ethanol yields. Overexpression of ACE2 or SWI5 in wild type cells reduced their ethanol yields. Furthermore, among the 34 target genes regulated by Ace2 and Swi5, deletion of CTS1,RPS4a,SIC1,EGT2,DSE2, or SCP160 led to increased ethanol yields, with the former two showing higher effects. Overexpression of CTS1 or RPS4a in both ace2/ace2 and swi5/swi5 mutants reduced their ethanol yields. In contrast, deletion of MCR1 or HO significantly decreased ethanol yields, with the former one showing the highest effect. Therefore, Ace2 and Swi5 are two negative regulators of ethanol yield during static fermentation of yeast cells, and both CTS1 and RPS4a are major effectors mediating these two transcription factors in regulating ethanol production.

  6. A disputed evidence on obesity: comparison of the effects of Rcan2 −/− and Rps6kb1 −/− mutations on growth and body weight in C57BL/6J mice* #

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Shi-wei; Gong, Qian-qian; Ding, Ling-cui; Jin, Ye-cheng; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Jian-gang; Sun, Xiao-yang

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that body weight and adipose mass are tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms, in which leptin plays a critical role through hypothalamic pathways, and obesity is a result of homeostatic disorder. However, in C57BL/6J mice, we found that Rcan2 increases food intake and plays an important role in the development of age-and diet-induced obesity through a leptin-independent mechanism. RCAN2 was initially identified as a thyroid hormone (T3)-responsive gene in human fibroblasts. Expression of RCAN2 is regulated by T3 through the PI3K-Akt/PKB-mTOR-Rps6kb1 signaling pathway. Intriguingly, both Rcan2 −/− and Rps6kb1 −/− mutations were reported to result in lean phenotypes in mice. In this study we compared the effects of these two mutations on growth and body weight in C57BL/6J mice. We observed reduced body weight and lower fat mass in both Rcan2 −/− and Rps6kb1 −/− mice compared to the wild-type mice, and we reported other differences unique to either the Rcan2 −/− or Rps6kb1 −/− mice. Firstly, loss of Rcan2 does not directly alter body length; however, Rcan2 −/− mice exhibit reduced food intake. In contrast, Rps6kb1 −/− mice exhibit abnormal embryonic development, which leads to smaller body size and reduced food intake in adulthood. Secondly, when fed a normal chow diet, Rcan2 −/− mice weigh significantly more than Rps6kb1 −/− mice, but both Rcan2 −/− and Rps6kb1−/− mice develop similar amounts of epididymal fat. On a high-fat diet, Rcan2 −/− mice gain body weight and fat mass at slower rates than Rps6kb1 −/− mice. Finally, using the double-knockout mice (Rcan2 −/− Rps6kb1 −/−), we demonstrate that concurrent loss of Rcan2 and Rps6kb1 has an additive effect on body weight reduction in C57BL/6J mice. Our data suggest that Rcan2 and Rps6kb1 mutations both affect growth and body weight of mice, though likely through different mechanisms. PMID:27604858

  7. A disputed evidence on obesity: comparison of the effects of Rcan2(-/-) and Rps6kb1(-/-) mutations on growth and body weight in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Shi-Wei; Gong, Qian-Qian; Ding, Ling-Cui; Jin, Ye-Cheng; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Jian-Gang; Sun, Xiao-Yang

    2016-09-01

    It is widely accepted that body weight and adipose mass are tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms, in which leptin plays a critical role through hypothalamic pathways, and obesity is a result of homeostatic disorder. However, in C57BL/6J mice, we found that Rcan2 increases food intake and plays an important role in the development of age- and diet-induced obesity through a leptin-independent mechanism. RCAN2 was initially identified as a thyroid hormone (T3)-responsive gene in human fibroblasts. Expression of RCAN2 is regulated by T3 through the PI3K-Akt/PKB-mTOR-Rps6kb1 signaling pathway. Intriguingly, both Rcan2(-/-) and Rps6kb1(-/-) mutations were reported to result in lean phenotypes in mice. In this study we compared the effects of these two mutations on growth and body weight in C57BL/6J mice. We observed reduced body weight and lower fat mass in both Rcan2(-/-) and Rps6kb1(-/-) mice compared to the wild-type mice, and we reported other differences unique to either the Rcan2(-/-) or Rps6kb1(-/-) mice. Firstly, loss of Rcan2 does not directly alter body length; however, Rcan2(-/-) mice exhibit reduced food intake. In contrast, Rps6kb1(-/-) mice exhibit abnormal embryonic development, which leads to smaller body size and reduced food intake in adulthood. Secondly, when fed a normal chow diet, Rcan2(-/-) mice weigh significantly more than Rps6kb1(-/-) mice, but both Rcan2(-/-) and Rps6kb1(-/-) mice develop similar amounts of epididymal fat. On a high-fat diet, Rcan2(-/-) mice gain body weight and fat mass at slower rates than Rps6kb1(-/-) mice. Finally, using the double-knockout mice (Rcan2(-/-) Rps6kb1(-/-)), we demonstrate that concurrent loss of Rcan2 and Rps6kb1 has an additive effect on body weight reduction in C57BL/6J mice. Our data suggest that Rcan2 and Rps6kb1 mutations both affect growth and body weight of mice, though likely through different mechanisms.

  8. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  9. Structured analysis and modeling of complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, David R.; Dalrymple, Mathieu A.

    1992-01-01

    The Aircrew Evaluation Sustained Operations Performance (AESOP) facility at Brooks AFB, Texas, combines the realism of an operational environment with the control of a research laboratory. In recent studies we collected extensive data from the Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) Weapons Directors subjected to high and low workload Defensive Counter Air Scenarios. A critical and complex task in this environment involves committing a friendly fighter against a hostile fighter. Structured Analysis and Design techniques and computer modeling systems were applied to this task as tools for analyzing subject performance and workload. This technology is being transferred to the Man-Systems Division of NASA Johnson Space Center for application to complex mission related tasks, such as manipulating the Shuttle grappler arm.

  10. Multi-grid for structures analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.

    1989-01-01

    In structural analysis the amount of computational time necessary for a solution is proportional to the number of degrees of freedom times the bandwidth squared. In implicit time analysis, this must be done at each discrete point in time. If, in addition, the problem is nonlinear, then this solution must be iterated at each point in time. If the bandwidth is large, the size of the problem that can be analyzed is severely limited. The multi-grid method is a possible algorithm which can make this solution much more computationally efficient. This method has been used for years in computational fluid mechanics. It works on the fact that relaxation is very efficient on the high frequency components of the solution (nearest neighbor interactions) and not very good on low frequency components of the solution (far interactions). The multi-grid method is then to relax the solution on a particular model until the residual stops changing. This indicates that the solution contains the higher frequency components. A coarse model is then generated for the lower frequency components to the solution. The model is then relaxed for the lower frequency components of the solution. These lower frequency components are then interpolated to the fine model. In computational fluid mechanics the equations are usually expressed as finite differences.

  11. Power System Overview for the Small RPS Centaur Flyby and the Mars Polar Hard Lander NASA COMPASS Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Radioisotope Power System Program Office (RPSPO) sponsored two studies lead by their mission analysis team. The studies were performed by NASA GRCs Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team. Typically a complete toplevel design reference mission (DRM) is performed assessing conceptual spacecraft design, launch mass, trajectory, science strategy and sub-system design such as, power, propulsion, structure and thermal.

  12. Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-02

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--07-9051 Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures July 2, 2007...ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures S.G. Lambrakos and N.E...signature analysis A general methodology is presented for in situ detection of cavitation impact phenomena on structures based on inverse analysis of

  13. Microbial Community Structure of Activated Sludge for Biosolubilization of Two Different Rock Phosphates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunqiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Tingting; Xu, Guang; Chi, Ruan

    2016-12-16

    A microbial consortium was directly taken from activated sludge and was used to solubilize rock phosphates (RPs) in a lab-scale bioreactor in this study. Results showed that the microbial consortium could efficiently release soluble phosphorus (P) from the RPs, and during 30-day incubation, it grew well in the bioreactor and reduced the pH of the solutions. The biosolubilization process was also illustrated by the observation of scanning electron microscopy combined with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), which showed an obvious corrosion on the ore surfaces, and most elements were removed from the ore samples. The analysis of microbial community structure by Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and 18S rRNA gene MiSeq sequencing reflected different microbial diversity and richness in the solutions added with different ore samples. A lower richness and diversity of bacteria but a higher richness and diversity of fungi occurred in the solution added with ore sample 1 compared to that of in the solution added with ore sample 2. Alphaproteobacteria and Saccharomycetes were the dominating bacterial and fungal group, respectively, both in the solutions added with ore samples 1 and 2 at the class level. However, their abundances in the solution added with ore sample 1 were obviously lower than that in the solution added with ore sample 2. This study provides new insights into our understanding of the microbial community structure in the biosolubilization of RPs by a microbial consortium directly taken from activated sludge.

  14. Strategies for Nonlinear Analysis of Marine Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Many such structures may be seen in the Gulf of Mexico. On the other hana, large- volumed production structures made of concrete and steel that...height, d = water depth and y = elevation from bottom. Assuming that the linear t...ca.i " appli up to t.e frcc .rf-, , th-, tztal f;,rce is obtained...the structure is expected to encounter during its design lifetime. For fixed structures, for example, steel piled and concrete gravity structures, a

  15. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Haibo

    2003-01-01

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  16. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Huang, H.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the first year effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) the results of the selective literature survey; (2) 8-, 16-, and 20-noded isoparametric plate and shell elements; (3) large deformation structural analysis; (4) eigenanalysis; (5) anisotropic heat transfer analysis; and (6) anisotropic electromagnetic analysis.

  17. Structural and vibrational analysis of thymoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschi, A. B.; Romano, E.; Benavente, A. M.; Altabef, A. Ben; Tuttolomondo, M. E.

    2010-10-01

    The molecular structure of 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, C 6O 2H 2 (CH 3) 3CH, has been optimized using methods based on density functional theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2). As regards C 6O 2H 2 (CH 3) 3CH, two populated conformations with C 1 ( trans) and C s ( cis) symmetries are obtained, the former being more stable than the latter. The theoretical data indicate that although both anti and cis conformers are possible by rotation about the C-C bond, the preferred conformation is trans. The effects governing the torsion barriers and preferred conformations were analyzed at B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied to the cis and trans conformers in order to detect intramolecular contacts. Furthermore, the infrared spectra for the gas and solid phases and the Raman spectrum for the solid one, were recorded and the observed bands assigned to the vibrational modes.

  18. A structural analysis model for clay caps

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tsu-te; Yau, Wen Foo

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents a structural analysis model for clay caps used in the landfill of low-level nuclear waste to minimize the migration of fluid through the soil. The clay cap resting on the soil foundation is treated as an axially symmetric elastic plate supported by an elastic foundation. A circular hole (concentric with the plate) in the elastic foundation represents an underlying cavity formed in the landfill due to waste decomposition and volume reduction. Unlike the models that commonly represent the soil foundation with equivalent springs, this model treats the foundation as a semi-infinite space and accounts for the work done by both compression and shear stresses in the foundation. The governing equation of the plate is based upon the classical theory of plate bending, whereas the governing equation derived by using Vlasov`s general variational method describes the soil foundation. The solutions are expressed in terms of Basset functions. A FORTRAN program was written to carry out the numerical calculations.

  19. IL-3 Maintains Activation of the p90S6K/RPS6 Pathway and Increases Translation in Human Eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A B; Shen, Zhong-Jian; Johansson, Mats W; Malter, James S; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2015-09-15

    IL-5 is a major therapeutic target to reduce eosinophilia. However, all of the eosinophil-activating cytokines, such as IL-5, IL-3, and GM-CSF, are typically present in atopic diseases, including allergic asthma. As a result of the functional redundancy of these three cytokines on eosinophils and the loss of IL-5R on airway eosinophils, it is important to take IL-3 and GM-CSF into account to efficiently reduce tissue eosinophil functions. Moreover, these three cytokines signal through a common β-chain receptor but yet differentially affect protein production in eosinophils. Notably, the increased ability of IL-3 to induce the production of proteins, such as semaphorin-7A, without affecting mRNA levels suggests a unique influence of IL-3 on translation. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which IL-3 distinctively affects eosinophil function compared with IL-5 and GM-CSF, with a focus on protein translation. Peripheral blood eosinophils were used to study intracellular signaling and protein translation in cells activated with IL-3, GM-CSF, or IL-5. We establish that, unlike GM-CSF or IL-5, IL-3 triggers prolonged signaling through activation of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and the upstream kinase 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p90S6K). Blockade of p90S6K activation inhibited phosphorylation of RPS6 and IL-3-enhanced semaphorin-7A translation. Furthermore, in an allergen-challenged environment, in vivo phosphorylation of RPS6 and p90S6K was enhanced in human airway compared with circulating eosinophils. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying differential activation of eosinophils by IL-3, GM-CSF, and IL-5. These observations identify IL-3 and its downstream intracellular signals as novel targets that should be considered to modulate eosinophil functions.

  20. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  1. The Importance of Structure Coefficients in Structural Equation Modeling Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    A general linear model (GLM) framework is used to suggest that structure coefficients ought to be interpreted in structural equation modeling confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) studies in which factors are correlated. The computation of structure coefficients in explanatory factor analysis and CFA is explained. Two heuristic data sets are used to…

  2. Development of a probabilistic analysis methodology for structural reliability estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torng, T. Y.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1991-01-01

    The novel probabilistic analysis method for assessment of structural reliability presented, which combines fast-convolution with an efficient structural reliability analysis, can after identifying the most important point of a limit state proceed to establish a quadratic-performance function. It then transforms the quadratic function into a linear one, and applies fast convolution. The method is applicable to problems requiring computer-intensive structural analysis. Five illustrative examples of the method's application are given.

  3. Structural weight analysis of hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    The weights of major structural components of hypersonic, liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft are estimated and discussed. The major components are the body structure, body thermal protection system tankage and wing structure. The method of estimating body structure weight is presented in detail while the weights of the other components are estimated by methods given in referenced papers. Two nominal vehicle concepts are considered. The advanced concept employs a wing-body configuration and hot structure with a nonintegral tank, while the potential concept employs an all body configuration and cold, integral pillow tankage structure. Characteristics of these two concepts are discussed and parametric data relating their weight fractions to variations in vehicle shape and size design criteria and mission requirements, and structural arrangement are presented. Although the potential concept is shown to have a weight advantage over the advanced, it involves more design uncertainties since it is farther removed in design from existing aircraft.

  4. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  5. Recent developments of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Torng, T.; Thacker, B.; Riha, D.; Leung, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis computer program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general purpose structural analysis methods to compute the probabilistic response and the reliability of engineering structures. Uncertainty in loading, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include nonlinear finite element and boundary element methods. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. The scope of the code has recently been expanded to include probabilistic life and fatigue prediction of structures in terms of component and system reliability and risk analysis of structures considering cost of failure. The code is currently being extended to structural reliability considering progressive crack propagation. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the new capabilities.

  6. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  7. Advertising Agencies: An Analysis of Industry Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra J.

    Noting that advertising agencies have not been examined as a collective industry, this paper looks at the development and structure of the advertising agency industry. The first portion of the paper discusses the development of the agency. The remaining two sections deal with trends in and the structure of the industry including: (1) the growth of…

  8. Optimum structural design based on reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heer, E.; Shinozuka, M.; Yang, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Proof-load test improves statistical confidence in the estimate of reliability, numerical examples indicate a definite advantage of the proof-load approach in terms of savings in structural weight. The cost of establishing the statistical distribution of strength of the structural material is also introduced into the cost formulation

  9. The Specific Analysis of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional structural equation modeling fits a covariance structure implied by the equations of the model. This treatment of the model often gives misleading results because overall goodness of fit tests do not focus on the specific constraints implied by the model. An alternative treatment arising from Pearl's directed acyclic graph theory…

  10. Crystal structure analysis of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, R. A., Jr.; Downey, J. W.; Dwight, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Study concerns crystal structures and lattice parameters for a number of new intermetallic compounds. Crystal structure data have been collected on equiatomic compounds, formed between an element of the Sc, Ti, V, or Cr group and an element of the Co or Ni group. The data, obtained by conventional methods, are presented in an easily usable tabular form.

  11. Streptomycin affinity depends on 13 amino acids forming a loop in homology modelled ribosomal S12 protein (rpsL gene) of Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 associated with marine sponge (Tedania anhelans).

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Balasubramanian; Lakshmi, Praveena Pothuraju; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Dhevendaran, Kandasamy; Priya, Balakrishnan; Krishna, Shivaani

    2016-06-01

    Streptomycin, an antibiotic used against microbial infections, inhibits the protein synthesis by binding to ribosomal protein S12, encoded by rpsL12 gene, and associated mutations cause streptomycin resistance. A streptomycin resistant, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 (MIC >300 µg/mL for streptomycin), was isolated from a marine sponge (Tedania anhelans). The characterisation of rpsL12 gene showed a region having similarity to long terminal repeat sequences of murine lukemia virus which added 13 amino acids for loop formation in RpsL12; in addition, a K56R mutation which corresponds to K43R mutation present in streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli is also present. The RpsL12 protein was modelled and compared with that of Lysinibacillus boronitolerans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The modelled proteins docked with streptomycin indicate compound had less affinity. The effect of loop on streptomycin resistance was analysed by constructing three different models of RpsL12 by, (i) removing both loop and mutation, (ii) removing the loop alone while retaining the mutation and (iii) without mutation having loop. The results showed that the presence of loop causes streptomycin resistance (decreases the affinity), and it further enhanced in the presence of mutation at 56th codon. Further study will help in understanding the evolution of streptomycin resistance in organisms.

  12. Reliability analysis applied to structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, P.; Payne, A. O.

    1972-01-01

    The application of reliability theory to predict, from structural fatigue test data, the risk of failure of a structure under service conditions because its load-carrying capability is progressively reduced by the extension of a fatigue crack, is considered. The procedure is applicable to both safe-life and fail-safe structures and, for a prescribed safety level, it will enable an inspection procedure to be planned or, if inspection is not feasible, it will evaluate the life to replacement. The theory has been further developed to cope with the case of structures with initial cracks, such as can occur in modern high-strength materials which are susceptible to the formation of small flaws during the production process. The method has been applied to a structure of high-strength steel and the results are compared with those obtained by the current life estimation procedures. This has shown that the conventional methods can be unconservative in certain cases, depending on the characteristics of the structure and the design operating conditions. The suitability of the probabilistic approach to the interpretation of the results from full-scale fatigue testing of aircraft structures is discussed and the assumptions involved are examined.

  13. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  14. An analysis of doping modulated superlattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new method of growing doping modulated superlattice structures is discussed. This method uses organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) with the added feature of controlled plasma in the growth regions. The main objective was to study how the growth environment affected the electronic and optical properties of the superlattice structures. Because a serious safety hazard was discovered in the growth process, no superlattice structures were fabricated and the research on this material had to be terminated. The hazard had to do with the lack of adequate means for the disposal of toxic elemental beryllium.

  15. Enabling Rapid and Robust Structural Analysis During Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Padula, Sharon L.; Li, Wu

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-year effort to add a structural analysis subprocess to a supersonic aircraft conceptual design process. The desired capabilities include parametric geometry, automatic finite element mesh generation, static and aeroelastic analysis, and structural sizing. The paper discusses implementation details of the new subprocess, captures lessons learned, and suggests future improvements. The subprocess quickly compares concepts and robustly handles large changes in wing or fuselage geometry. The subprocess can rank concepts with regard to their structural feasibility and can identify promising regions of the design space. The automated structural analysis subprocess is deemed robust and rapid enough to be included in multidisciplinary conceptual design and optimization studies.

  16. A novel CFD/structural analysis of a cross parachute

    SciTech Connect

    LaFarge, R.A.; Nelsen, J.M.; Gwinn, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    A novel CFD/structural analysis was performed to predict functionality of a cross parachute under loadings near the structural limits of the parachute. The determination of parachute functionality was based on the computed structural integrity of the canopy and suspension lines. In addition to the standard aerodynamic pressure loading on the canopy, the structural analysis considered the reduction in fabric strength due to the computed aerodynamic heating. The intent was to illustrate the feasibility of such an analysis with the commercially available software PATRAN.

  17. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-12-31

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  18. Static Structural Analysis for a Neutron Shielding Block in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Junchuan; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ioki, K.; Du, Shuangsong; Ji, Xiang; Feng, Changle; Xu, Yang

    2013-02-01

    The ITER neutron shielding blocks are located between the outer shell and the inner shell of the vacuum vessel to provide neutron shielding. Considering the combined loads acting on the shielding blocks during ITER plasma operation, the structure of the shielding blocks must be evaluated. Using the finite element method with ANSYS analysis software, static structural analysis is performed, including elastic analysis and limit analysis for one typical shielding block. The evaluated results based on RCC-MR code show that the structure of this shielding block can meet the design requirement.

  19. Shape design sensitivity analysis and optimal design of structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.

    1987-01-01

    The material derivative concept of continuum mechanics and an adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis are used to relate variations in structural shape to measures of structural performance. A domain method of shape design sensitivity analysis is used to best utilize the basic character of the finite element method that gives accurate information not on the boundary but in the domain. Implementation of shape design sensitivty analysis using finite element computer codes is discussed. Recent numerical results are used to demonstrate the accuracy obtainable using the method. Result of design sensitivity analysis is used to carry out design optimization of a built-up structure.

  20. Rhetorical Structure Theory and Text Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    O’Malley 73] Larkin, Don and Michael H. O’Malley, "Declarative Sentences and the Rule-Of-Conversation Hypothesis," in Papers from. the Ninth Regional...34Rhetorical Structure Theory: A Theory of Text Organization," in Livia Polanyi (ed.), The Structure of Discourse, Ablex, Norwood, N.J., 1989. Also...Characterization of the News of the BBC World News Service. Antwerp, Belgium, 1986. Antwerp Papers in Linguistics, Number 49. [Reddy 79] Reddy, Michael , "The

  1. [RPS4 and NAD5 sequences evidenced of polyphyly of ditrichaceae and parallelisms in the evolution of haplolepidous mosses].

    PubMed

    Fedosov, V E; Fedorova, A V; Ignatova, E A; Bobrova, V K; Troitsky, A V

    2015-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of 66 representatives of haplolepidous mosses showed polyphylia of Ditrichaceae. According to the data obtained, the structure of the peristome, as well as features of the gametophyte on which a family traditionally allocated, arose independently in different groups of haplolepideous mosses. At least six genera (Distichium, Saelania, Eccremidium, Garckea, Rhamphidium, and Wilsoniella) should be excluded from the Ditrichaceae family, while Saelania and Distichium should be assigned even to another order. The loss of the peristome and forming of cleistocarpous capsules also occurs independently in at least two lineages of Ditrichaceae s. str., and in representatives of several lineages of Pottiaceae, a family derived from this group. Ditrichum, the type genus of Ditrichaceae, is also polyphyletic, species of this genus belong to two clades. It was concluded that parallel lines of the morphological variability in this group of mosses occur and its phylogeny need to be resolved based on molecular data.

  2. Probabilistic structural analysis of aerospace components using NESSUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic structural analysis of a Space Shuttle main engine turbopump blade is conducted using the computer code NESSUS (numerical evaluation of stochastic structures under stress). The goal of the analysis is to derive probabilistic characteristics of blade response given probabilistic descriptions of uncertainties in blade geometry, material properties, and temperature and pressure distributions. Probability densities are derived for critical blade responses. Risk assessment and failure life analysis is conducted assuming different failure models.

  3. Structural Analysis of the NCSX Vacuum Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Dahlgren; Art Brooks; Paul Goranson; Mike Cole; Peter Titus

    2004-09-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) vacuum vessel has a rather unique shape being very closely coupled topologically to the three-fold stellarator symmetry of the plasma it contains. This shape does not permit the use of the common forms of pressure vessel analysis and necessitates the reliance on finite element analysis. The current paper describes the NCSX vacuum vessel stress analysis including external pressure, thermal, and electro-magnetic loading from internal plasma disruptions and bakeout temperatures of up to 400 degrees centigrade. Buckling and dynamic loading conditions are also considered.

  4. Total-System Approach To Design And Analysis Of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents overview and study of, and comprehensive approach to, multidisciplinary engineering design and analysis of structures. Emphasizes issues related to design of semistatic structures in environments in which spacecraft launched, underlying concepts applicable to other structures within unique terrestrial, marine, or flight environments. Purpose of study to understand interactions among traditionally separate engineering design disciplines with view toward optimizing not only structure but also overall design process.

  5. Structural Analysis Using NX Nastran 9.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolewicz, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    NX Nastran is a powerful Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software package used to solve linear and non-linear models for structural and thermal systems. The software, which consists of both a solver and user interface, breaks down analysis into four files, each of which are important to the end results of the analysis. The software offers capabilities for a variety of types of analysis, and also contains a respectable modeling program. Over the course of ten weeks, I was trained to effectively implement NX Nastran into structural analysis and refinement for parts of two missions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the Restore mission and the Orion mission.

  6. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  7. Cognitive Diagnostic Analysis Using Hierarchically Structured Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yu-Lan

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation proposes two modified cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs), the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "and" gate with hierarchy (DINA-H) model and the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "or" gate with hierarchy (DINO-H) model. Both models incorporate the hierarchical structures of the cognitive skills in the model estimation…

  8. Theses "Discussion" Sections: A Structural Move Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Khakbaz, Nafiseh

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at finding the probable differences between the move structure of Iranian MA graduates' thesis discussion subgenres and those of their non-Iranian counterparts, on the one hand, and those of journal paper authors, on the other. It also aimed at identifying the moves that are considered obligatory, conventional, or optional…

  9. Structural analysis of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium.

    PubMed

    Ducheyne, P; Van Raemdonck, W; Heughebaert, J C; Heughebaert, M

    1986-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite from two sources was electrophoretically deposited onto flat titanium plate material. Depending upon the deposition conditions various changes in the structure of the ceramic were identified. A well-adhering Ti-P compound was present at the interface. Hydroxyapatite oxygenated to various degrees and tetracalcium phosphate were reproducibly formed in the coating.

  10. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  11. Experiences with a preliminary NICE/SPAR structural analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotts, C. G.; Greene, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Development of a new structural analysis system based on the original SPAR finite element code and the NICE system is described. The system is denoted NICE/SPAR. NICE was designed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and contains data management utilities, a command language interpreter, and a command language definition for integrating engineering computational modules. SPAR is a system of programs used for finite element structural analysis developed for NASA by Engineering Information Systems, Inc. It includes many complementary structural analysis and utility functions which communicate through a common database. The work on NICE/SPAR was motivated by requirements for a highly modular and flexible structural analysis system to use as a tool in carrying out research in computational methods and exploring new computer hardware. Analysis examples are presented which demonstrate the benefits gained from a combination of the NICE command language with the SPAR computational modules.

  12. Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, JIM

    2007-03-29

    P-CARES 2.0.0, Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures, was developed for NRC staff use to determine the validity and accuracy of the analysis methods used by various utilities for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. P-CARES provides the capability to effectively evaluate the probabilistic seismic response using simplified soil and structural models and to quickly check the validity and/or accuracy of the SSI data received from applicants and licensees. The code is organized in a modular format with the basic modules of the system performing static, seismic, and nonlinear analysis.

  13. ANOVA like analysis for structured families of stochastic matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Cristina; Santos, Carla; Varadinov, Maria; Mexia, João T.

    2016-12-01

    Symmetric stochastic matrices width a width a dominant eigenvalue λ and the corresponding eigenvector α appears in many applications. Such matrices can be written as M =λ α αt+E¯. Thus β = λ α will be the structure vector. When the matrices in such families correspond to the treatments of a base design we can carry out a ANOVA like analysis of the action of the treatments in the model on the structured vectors. This analysis can be transversal-when we worked width homologous components and - longitudinal when we consider contrast on the components of each structure vector. The analysis will be briefly considered at the end of our presentation.

  14. Analysis and Synthesis of Robust Data Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    1.3.2 Multiversion Software. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. ... .. ...... 5 1.3.3 Robust Data Structure .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. ..... 6 1.4...context are 0 multiversion software, which is an adaptation oi N-modulo redundancy (NMR) tech- nique. * recovery blocks, which is an adaptation of...implementations using these features for such a hybrid approach. 1.3.2 Multiversion Software Avizienis [AC77] was the first to adapt NMR technique into

  15. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H. .

    2005-07-01

    Several of the new generation nuclear power plant designs have structural configurations which are proposed to be deeply embedded. Since current seismic analysis methodologies have been applied to shallow embedded structures (e.g., ASCE 4 suggest that simple formulations may be used to model embedment effect when the depth of embedment is less than 30% of its foundation radius), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory with the objective of investigating the extent to which procedures acceptable for shallow embedment depths are adequate for larger embedment depths. This paper presents the results of a study comparing the response spectra obtained from two of the more popular analysis methods for structural configurations varying from shallow embedment to complete embedment. A typical safety related structure embedded in a soil profile representative of a typical nuclear power plant site was utilized in the study and the depths of burial (DOB) considered range from 25-100% the height of the structure. Included in the paper are: (1) the description of a simplified analysis and a detailed approach for the SSI analyses of a structure with various DOB, (2) the comparison of the analysis results for the different DOBs between the two methods, and (3) the performance assessment of the analysis methodologies for SSI analyses of deeply embedded structures. The resulting assessment from this study has indicated that simplified methods may be capable of capturing the seismic response for much deeper embedded structures than would be normally allowed by the standard practice.

  17. Template matching method for the analysis of interstellar cloud structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The structure of interstellar medium can be characterised at large scales in terms of its global statistics (e.g. power spectra) and at small scales by the properties of individual cores. Interest has been increasing in structures at intermediate scales, resulting in a number of methods being developed for the analysis of filamentary structures. Aims: We describe the application of the generic template-matching (TM) method to the analysis of maps. Our aim is to show that it provides a fast and still relatively robust way to identify elongated structures or other image features. Methods: We present the implementation of a TM algorithm for map analysis. The results are compared against rolling Hough transform (RHT), one of the methods previously used to identify filamentary structures. We illustrate the method by applying it to Herschel surface brightness data. Results: The performance of the TM method is found to be comparable to that of RHT but TM appears to be more robust regarding the input parameters, for example, those related to the selected spatial scales. Small modifications of TM enable one to target structures at different size and intensity levels. In addition to elongated features, we demonstrate the possibility of using TM to also identify other types of structures. Conclusions: The TM method is a viable tool for data quality control, exploratory data analysis, and even quantitative analysis of structures in image data.

  18. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  19. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  20. Development of advanced structural analysis methodologies for predicting widespread fatigue damage in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA is developing a 'tool box' that includes a number of advanced structural analysis computer codes which, taken together, represent the comprehensive fracture mechanics capability required to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage. These structural analysis tools have complementary and specialized capabilities ranging from a finite-element-based stress-analysis code for two- and three-dimensional built-up structures with cracks to a fatigue and fracture analysis code that uses stress-intensity factors and material-property data found in 'look-up' tables or from equations. NASA is conducting critical experiments necessary to verify the predictive capabilities of the codes, and these tests represent a first step in the technology-validation and industry-acceptance processes. NASA has established cooperative programs with aircraft manufacturers to facilitate the comprehensive transfer of this technology by making these advanced structural analysis codes available to industry.

  1. Statistical energy analysis of complex structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for estimating the structural vibration properties of complex systems in high frequency environments was investigated. The structure analyzed was the Materials Experiment Assembly, (MEA), which is a portion of the OST-2A payload for the space transportation system. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) techniques were used to model the structure and predict the structural element response to acoustic excitation. A comparison of the intial response predictions and measured acoustic test data is presented. The conclusions indicate that: the SEA predicted the response of primary structure to acoustic excitation over a wide range of frequencies; and the contribution of mechanically induced random vibration to the total MEA is not significant.

  2. Seismic Response Analysis and Design of Structure with Base Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, Peter

    2010-05-21

    The paper reports the study on seismic response and energy distribution of a multi-story civil structure. The nonlinear analysis used the 2003 Bam earthquake acceleration record as the excitation input to the structural model. The displacement response was analyzed in time domain and in frequency domain. The displacement and its derivatives result energy components. The energy distribution in each story provides useful information for the structural upgrade with help of added devices. The objective is the structural displacement response minimization. The application of the structural seismic response research is presented in base-isolation example.

  3. Applications of mass spectrometry to structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-06-30

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out.

  4. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Structural Analysis of Marine Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-01-01

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out. PMID:24983643

  5. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  6. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  7. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  8. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  9. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  10. Nonlinear transient analysis of joint dominated structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Shaw, F. H.; Russell, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    A residual force technique is presented that can perform the transient analyses of large, flexible, and joint dominated structures. The technique permits substantial size reduction in the number of degrees of freedom describing the nonlinear structural models and can account for such nonlinear joint phenomena as free-play and hysteresis. In general, joints can have arbitrary force-state map representations but these are used in the form of residual force maps. One essential feature of the technique is to replace the arbitrary force-state maps describing the nonlinear joints with residual force maps describing the truss links. The main advantage of this replacement is that the incrementally small relative displacements and velocities across a joint are not monitored directly thereby avoiding numerical difficulties. Instead, very small and 'soft' residual forces are defined giving a numerically attractive form for the equations of motion and thereby permitting numerically stable integration algorithms. The technique was successfully applied to the transient analyses of a large 58 bay, 60 meter truss having nonlinear joints. A method to perform link testing is also presented.

  11. An expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of a research study on the development of an expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization is presented. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was developed first in conjunction with a rule-based system. This ORL/AI shell was then used to develop expert systems to provide assistance with a variety of structural analysis and design optimization tasks, in conjunction with procedural modules for finite element structural analysis and design optimization. The main goal of the research study was to provide expertise, judgment, and reasoning capabilities in the aerospace structural design process. This will allow engineers performing structural analysis and design, even without extensive experience in the field, to develop error-free, efficient and reliable structural designs very rapidly and cost-effectively. This would not only improve the productivity of design engineers and analysts, but also significantly reduce time to completion of structural design. An extensive literature survey in the field of structural analysis, design optimization, artificial intelligence, and database management systems and their application to the structural design process was first performed. A feasibility study was then performed, and the architecture and the conceptual design for the integrated 'intelligent' structural analysis and design optimization software was then developed. An Object Representation Language (ORL), in conjunction with a rule-based system, was then developed using C++. Such an approach would improve the expressiveness for knowledge representation (especially for structural analysis and design applications), provide ability to build very large and practical expert systems, and provide an efficient way for storing knowledge. Functional specifications for the expert systems were then developed. The ORL/AI shell was then used to develop a variety of modules of expert systems for a variety of modeling, finite element analysis, and

  12. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  13. Sensitivity Analysis for Coupled Aero-structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunta, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for calculating gradients of aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for an aeroelastic aircraft model. This method uses the Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) to account for the aero-structural coupling, and a reduced-order modal analysis approach to condense the coupling bandwidth between the aerodynamic and structural models. Parallel computing is applied to reduce the computational expense of the numerous high fidelity aerodynamic analyses needed for the coupled aero-structural system. Good agreement is obtained between aerodynamic force and moment gradients computed with the GSE/modal analysis approach and the same quantities computed using brute-force, computationally expensive, finite difference approximations. A comparison between the computational expense of the GSE/modal analysis method and a pure finite difference approach is presented. These results show that the GSE/modal analysis approach is the more computationally efficient technique if sensitivity analysis is to be performed for two or more aircraft design parameters.

  14. Neodymium nanoparticles: biosynthesis and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ascencio, J A; Canizal, G; Medina-Flores, A; Bejar, L; Tavera, L; Matamoros, H; Liu, H B

    2006-04-01

    Small metallic nanoparticles of neodymium are obtained by a facile route based on the biosynthesis and the pH conditions that demonstrate the possibility of obtaining particles of 1-8 nm. The size is controlled by synthesis conditions. Smaller clusters were obtained with pH = 5, while for pH = 10 evidences of nanorods productions are found and this opens the perspective to use this rare-earth element for zero and one dimensional based applications. Using transmission electron microscopy techniques, the size distribution and structure are studied. Density functional theory-based calculations allow the determination of the lowest energy configuration, which is based on the hexagonal bulk symmetry. Theoretical models are used to simulate the high resolution transmission electron microscopy to identify the experimental image, determining that the synthesized nanoparticles reach the lowest energy hexagonal configurations.

  15. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  16. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for select space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project developed at the Southwest Research Institute integrates state-of-the-art structural analysis techniques with probability theory for the design and analysis of complex large-scale engineering structures. An advanced efficient software system (NESSUS) capable of performing complex probabilistic analysis has been developed. NESSUS contains a number of software components to perform probabilistic analysis of structures. These components include: an expert system, a probabilistic finite element code, a probabilistic boundary element code and a fast probability integrator. The NESSUS software system is shown. An expert system is included to capture and utilize PSAM knowledge and experience. NESSUS/EXPERT is an interactive menu-driven expert system that provides information to assist in the use of the probabilistic finite element code NESSUS/FEM and the fast probability integrator (FPI). The expert system menu structure is summarized. The NESSUS system contains a state-of-the-art nonlinear probabilistic finite element code, NESSUS/FEM, to determine the structural response and sensitivities. A broad range of analysis capabilities and an extensive element library is present.

  17. A Family Structure Approach to the Analysis of Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuby, Richard G.

    A typological approach to the analysis of poverty, based on selected characteristics of family structure, is suggested since the family unit is a concrete or actual structure in society, and much of the research and many of the action programs of the war on poverty have implicitly invoked some concept of the family. The typology of family…

  18. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  19. Analysis and Test Support for Phillips Laboratory Precision Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ), Phillips Research Site . Task objectives centered...around analysis and structural dynamic test support on experiments within the Space Vehicles Directorate at Kirtland Air Force Base. These efforts help...support for Phillips Laboratory Precision Structures." Mr. James Goodding of CSA Engineering was the principal investigator for this task. Mr.

  20. Thermal-structural finite element analysis using linear flux formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Wieting, Allan R.

    1990-01-01

    A linear flux approach is developed for a finite element thermal-structural analysis of steady state thermal and structural problems. The element fluxes are assumed to vary linearly in the same form as the element unknown variables, and the finite element matrices are evaluated in closed form. Since numerical integration is avoided, significant computational time saving is achieved. Solution accuracy and computational speed improvements are demonstrated by solving several two and three dimensional thermal-structural examples.

  1. Microfabricated structures for integrated DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, M A; Mastrangelo, C H; Sammarco, T S; Man, F P; Webster, J R; Johnsons, B N; Foerster, B; Jones, D; Fields, Y; Kaiser, A R; Burke, D T

    1996-01-01

    Photolithographic micromachining of silicon is a candidate technology for the construction of high-throughput DNA analysis devices. However, the development of complex silicon microfabricated systems has been hindered in part by the lack of a simple, versatile pumping method for integrating individual components. Here we describe a surface-tension-based pump able to move discrete nanoliter drops through enclosed channels using only local heating. This thermocapillary pump can accurately mix, measure, and divide drops by simple electronic control. In addition, we have constructed thermal-cycling chambers, gel electrophoresis channels, and radiolabeled DNA detectors that are compatible with the fabrication of thermocapillary pump channels. Since all of the components are made by conventional photolithographic techniques, they can be assembled into more complex integrated systems. The combination of pump and components into self-contained miniaturized devices may provide significant improvements in DNA analysis speed, portability, and cost. The potential of microfabricated systems lies in the low unit cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643614

  2. Tanker Structural Analysis for Minor Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    masses (including virtual masses of the water), the initial bearings, and velocities. 2. Throughout the analysis, the bow of the striking ship Is...initial velocity of the striking ship: m( F ______ (1 t 0 V20) =0.0 f= virtual mass, ship I 2 = virtual mass, ship 2~ m I V . V f ’ K’ Jt 11 FIUR m-2...situ .K. 5Y( i~ lZAKD bow $H 14ILIQj P Lh5T I C. EQ k Y kps) 0 0 94-1 W~IAk) J~~E 0 oC4O.1 ,I Hi PL~c,1C. tlA% ;OQ)- AULA / ;0) 4 4 4~IN -c Q

  3. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  4. Continuous wavelet analysis of coherent structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farge, M.; Guezennec, Y.; Ho, C. M.; Meneveau, C.

    1990-01-01

    We perform an analysis of planar cuts through three dimensional turbulent fields (planar channel flow and mixing layer) using the 2D continuous wavelet transform. We propose two new diagnostics: (1) a measure of intermittency I(r, vector x), which is the ratio of local energy and average energy at a given scale r; and (2) a local Reynolds number, defined on the local velocity contribution at a given scale, computed from the wavelet transform of the three velocity components, the scale of the transform, and molecular viscosity; this gives a representation of the local non-linearity of the flow viewed in both space and scale. We find, for the analyzed flows, strong small-scale intermittency located in the ejection regions for the channel flow and in the vortex core of the mixing layer.

  5. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-14

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation--a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  6. Partial Wave Analysis of Coupled Photonic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The very high quality factors sustained by microcavity optical resonators are relevant to applications in wavelength filtering, routing, switching, modulation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing. Increases in the density of photonic elements require that attention be paid to how electromagnetic (EM) coupling modifies their optical properties. This is especially true when cavity resonances are involved, in which case, their characteristics may be fundamentally altered. Understanding the optical properties of microcavities that are near or in contact with photonic elements---such as other microcavities, nanostructures, couplers, and substrates---can be expected to advance our understanding of the roles that these structures may play in VLSI photonics, biosensors and similar device technologies. Wc present results from recent theoretical studies of the effects of inter- and intracavity coupling on optical resonances in compound spherical particles. Concentrically stratified spheres and bispheres constituted from homogeneous and stratified spheres are subjects of this investigation. A new formulation is introduced for the absorption of light in an arbitrary layer of a multilayered sphere, which is based on multiple reflections of the spherical partial waves of the Lorenz-Mie solution for scattering by a sphere. Absorption efficiencies, which can be used to profile cavity resonances and to infer fluorescence yields or the onset of nonlinear optical processes in the microcavities, are presented. Splitting of resonances in these multisphere systems is paid particular attention, and consequences for photonic device development and possible performance enhancements through carefully designed architectures that exploit EM coupling are considered.

  7. CC Pre-Amp Platform: Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sakla, S.; /Fermilab

    1994-06-09

    The structure in question is an existing personnel access platform located in the D-Zero Assembly Building. This platform is used to access the preamplifiers located on the central calorimeter. The platform will need to be shortened to a 'fold-out' length of 36 in. due to some modifications recently made to the detector. The purpose of this note is to determine whether this modification affects the safety and the rated load of the platform. Three of the load carrying members were analyzed; the gusset supports, the hinge supports, and the hinge pins. The long and short beams which make up the platform's flooring were not analyzed. The long beams will not be affected by this modification because there is no change in the length of their moment arms. The short beams will be affected, but will see a smaller bending stress because of the decrease in the length of their moment arms. Any weld results previously found will also not be affected.

  8. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  9. Reliability analysis of RC containment structures under combined loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Kagami, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses a reliability analysis method and load combination design criteria for reinforced concrete containment structures under combined loads. The probability based reliability analysis method is briefly described. For load combination design criteria, derivations of the load factors for accidental pressure due to a design basis accident and safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) for three target limit state probabilities are presented.

  10. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  11. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  12. Fundamental studies of heat load and thermal-structure analysis of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the basic requirements for modeling slender member shadowing effects on thermally induced deformation continues. The theoretical formulation is complete and computer programming is underway. The basic requirements for thermal finite elements to model heat transfer in orbiting structures were also studied. The need for planar isothermal elements to model large space structures' antenna meshes was established. Finite Element approaches for modeling space structure cable and membrane components with thermal effects is underway. Three levels of structural modeling and analysis were identified: (1) a linear-elastic small deflection analysis that does not permit cable slackening; (2) a linear-elastic analysis that includes stress stiffening (the ANSYS program), but not large deflections; and (3) full nonlinear large deflection analysis with stress stiffening. Methods of determining cable initial tensions are currently being evaluated.

  13. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuezhong; Wang, Haoxu; Xie, Liqiang; Dong, Peitao

    2014-03-01

    Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  14. Rapid structural analysis of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Tsutsui, Makusu; He, Yuhui; Yokota, Kazumichi; Arima, Akihide; Morikawa, Takanori; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2017-04-01

    Rapid structural analysis of nanoscale matter in a liquid environment represents innovative technologies that reveal the identities and functions of biologically important molecules. However, there is currently no method with high spatio-temporal resolution that can scan individual particles in solutions to gain structural information. Here we report the development of a nanopore platform realizing quantitative structural analysis for suspended nanomaterials in solutions with a high z-axis and xy-plane spatial resolution of 35.8 ± 1.1 and 12 nm, respectively. We used a low thickness-to-diameter aspect ratio pore architecture for achieving cross sectional areas of analyte (i.e. tomograms). Combining this with multiphysics simulation methods to translate ionic current data into tomograms, we demonstrated rapid structural analysis of single polystyrene (Pst) beads and single dumbbell-like Pst beads in aqueous solutions.

  15. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  16. Structural analysis of turbine blades using unified constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Tong, M.; Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of advanced constitutive models and structural analysis methods in predicting the cyclic life of an air-cooled turbine blade is assessed. Five structural analysis methods were exercised in calculating the cyclic stress-strain response at the airfoil critical location. The methods studied were a cyclic elastic finite-element analysis, nonlinear finite-element analyses based on classical inelastic models and the unified models of Bodner and Walker, and a simplified inelastic procedure. These analyses were compared in terms of computing times and of predicted crack initiation lives using the Strainrange Partitioning method.

  17. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  18. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  19. Probabilistic structural analysis of space propulsion system LOX post

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Rajagopal, K. R.; Ho, H. W.; Cunniff, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The probabilistic structural analysis program NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress; Cruse et al., 1988) is applied to characterize the dynamic loading and response of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) LOX post. The design and operation of the SSME are reviewed; the LOX post structure is described; and particular attention is given to the generation of composite load spectra, the finite-element model of the LOX post, and the steps in the NESSUS structural analysis. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs, and it is shown that NESSUS correctly predicts the structural effects of changes in the temperature loading. The probabilistic approach also facilitates (1) damage assessments for a given failure model (based on gas temperature, heat-shield gap, and material properties) and (2) correlation of the gas temperature with operational parameters such as engine thrust.

  20. Recent advances in numerical analysis of structural eigenvalue problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    A wide range of eigenvalue problems encountered in practical structural engineering analyses is defined, in which the structures are assumed to be discretized by any suitable technique such as the finite-element method. A review of the usual numerical procedures for the solution of such eigenvalue problems is presented and is followed by an extensive account of recently developed eigenproblem solution procedures. Particular emphasis is placed on the new numerical algorithms and associated computer programs based on the Sturm sequence method. Eigenvalue algorithms developed for efficient solution of natural frequency and buckling problems of structures are presented, as well as some eigenvalue procedures formulated in connection with the solution of quadratic matrix equations associated with free vibration analysis of structures. A new algorithm is described for natural frequency analysis of damped structural systems.

  1. Structure and sequence based analysis of alpha-amylase evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    α-Amylases hydrolyze α- 1,4-glycosidic bonds during assimilation of biological macromolecules. The amino acid sequences of these enzymes in thousands of diverse organisms are known and the 3D structures of several proteins have been solved. The 3D structure analysis of these universal enzymes from diverse organisms has been studied by the generation of phylogenetic trees and structure based sequence analysis to generate a metric for the degree of conservation that is responsible for individual speciation. Greater similarities are observed between reference NCBI tree and structure based phylogenetic tree compared to sequence based phylogenetic tree indicating that structures truly represent the functional aspects of proteins than from the sequence information alone. We report differences in the profile specific conserved and insertion/deletion regions, factors responsible for the Ca(2+) and Cl(-) ion binding and the disulfide connectivity pattern that discriminate the enzymes over evolution.

  2. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the fourth years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded component structures. These accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of coupled solution capability; (2) alternate CSTEM electromagnetic technology; (3) CSTEM acoustic capability; (4) CSTEM tailoring; (5) CSTEM composite micromechanics using ICAN; and (6) multiple layer elements in CSTEM.

  3. Structural analysis methods development for turbine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    The structural analysis technologies and activities of the NASA Lewis Research Center's gas turbine engine HOT Section Technoloogy (HOST) program are summarized. The technologies synergistically developed and validated include: time-varying thermal/mechanical load models; component-specific automated geometric modeling and solution strategy capabilities; advanced inelastic analysis methods; inelastic constitutive models; high-temperature experimental techniques and experiments; and nonlinear structural analysis codes. Features of the program that incorporate the new technologies and their application to hot section component analysis and design are described. Improved and, in some cases, first-time 3-D nonlinear structural analyses of hot section components of isotropic and anisotropic nickel-base superalloys are presented.

  4. A discourse on sensitivity analysis for discretely-modeled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    A descriptive review is presented of the most recent methods for performing sensitivity analysis of the structural behavior of discretely-modeled systems. The methods are generally but not exclusively aimed at finite element modeled structures. Topics included are: selections of finite difference step sizes; special consideration for finite difference sensitivity of iteratively-solved response problems; first and second derivatives of static structural response; sensitivity of stresses; nonlinear static response sensitivity; eigenvalue and eigenvector sensitivities for both distinct and repeated eigenvalues; and sensitivity of transient response for both linear and nonlinear structural response.

  5. Course transformation: Content, structure and effectiveness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuHadway, Linda P.

    The organization of learning materials is often limited by the systems available for delivery of such material. Currently, the learning management system (LMS) is widely used to distribute course materials. These systems deliver the material in a text-based, linear way. As online education continues to expand and educators seek to increase their effectiveness by adding more effective active learning strategies, these delivery methods become a limitation. This work demonstrates the possibility of presenting course materials in a graphical way that expresses important relations and provides support for manipulating the order of those materials. The ENABLE system gathers data from an existing course, uses text analysis techniques, graph theory, graph transformation, and a user interface to create and present graphical course maps. These course maps are able to express information not currently available in the LMS. Student agents have been developed to traverse these course maps to identify the variety of possible paths through the material. The temporal relations imposed by the current course delivery methods have been replaced by prerequisite relations that express ordering that provides educational value. Reducing the connections to these more meaningful relations allows more possibilities for change. Technical methods are used to explore and calibrate linear and nonlinear models of learning. These methods are used to track mastery of learning material and identify relative difficulty values. Several probability models are developed and used to demonstrate that data from existing, temporally based courses can be used to make predictions about student success in courses using the same material but organized without the temporal limitations. Combined, these demonstrate the possibility of tools and techniques that can support the implementation of a graphical course map that allows varied paths and provides an enriched, more informative interface between the educator

  6. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  7. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  8. Computational simulation for analysis and synthesis of impact resilient structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2013-10-01

    Impact resilient structures are of great interest in many engineering applications varying from civil, land vehicle, aircraft and space structures, to mention a few examples. To design such structure, one has to resort fundamental principles and take into account progress in analytical and computational approaches as well as in material science and technology. With such perspectives, this work looks at a generic beam and plate structure subject to impact loading and carry out analysis and numerical simulation. The first objective of the work is to develop a computational algorithm to analyze flat plate as a generic structure subjected to impact loading for numerical simulation and parametric study. The analysis will be based on dynamic response analysis. Consideration is given to the elastic-plastic region. The second objective is to utilize the computational algorithm for direct numerical simulation, and as a parallel scheme, commercial off-the shelf numerical code is utilized for parametric study, optimization and synthesis. Through such analysis and numerical simulation, effort is devoted to arrive at an optimum configuration in terms of loading, structural dimensions, material properties and composite lay-up, among others. Results will be discussed in view of practical applications.

  9. Numerical Analysis on Neutron Shielding Structure of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changle; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie; Sheng, Daolin

    2008-06-01

    The neutron shielding component of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a kind of structure resembling a wall in appearance. A FE (finite element) model is set up by using ANSYS code in terms of its structural features. Static analysis, thermal expansion analysis and dynamic analysis are performed. The static results show that the stress and displacement distribution are allowable, but the high stress appears in the junction between the upper and lower parts. The modal analysis indicates that the biggest deformation exists in the port area. Through modal superposition, the single-point response has been found with the lower rank frequency of the acceleration seismic response spectrum. But the deformation and the stress values are within the permissible limit. The analysis results would benefit the work in the next step and provide some reference for the implementation of the engineering plan in the future.

  10. Fine mapping of Xq11.1-q21.33 and mutation screening of RPS6KA6, ZNF711, ACSL4, DLG3, and IL1RAPL2 for autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Kantojärvi, Katri; Kotala, Ilona; Rehnström, Karola; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Vanhala, Raija; von Wendt, Taina Nieminen; von Wendt, Lennart; Järvelä, Irma

    2011-06-01

    About 80% of cases with autism express intellectual disability. Both in autism and in mental retardation without autism the majority of the cases are males, suggesting a X-chromosomal effect. In fact, some molecular evidence has been obtained for a common genetic background for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). In several genome-wide scans (GWS), evidence for linkage at X-chromosome has been reported including the GWS of Finnish ASD families with the highest multipoint lod score (MLS) of 2.75 obtained close to DXS7132 at Xq11.1. To further dissect the relationship between autism and genes implicated in XLMR, we have fine-mapped Xq11.1-q21.33 and analyzed five candidate genes in the region. We refined the region using 26 microsatellite markers and linkage analysis in 99 Finnish families with ASD. The most significant evidence for linkage was observed at DXS1225 on Xq21.1 with a nonparametric multipoint NPL(all) value of 3.43 (P = 0.0004). We sequenced the coding regions and splice sites of RPS6KA6 and ZNF711 residing at the peak region in 42 male patients from families contributing to the linkage. We also analyzed ACSL4 and DLG3, which have previously been known to cause XLMR and IL1RAPL2, a homologous gene for IL1RAPL1 that is mutated in autism and XLMR. A total of six novel and 11 known single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Further studies are warranted to analyze the candidate genes at Xq11.1-q21.33.

  11. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Bereg, Vera; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at . PMID:18700982

  12. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  13. DTFM Modeling and Analysis Method for Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Hou-Fei; Lou, Michael; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gossamer systems are mostly composed of support structures formed by highly flexible, long tubular elements and pre-tensioned thin-film membranes. These systems offer order-of-magnitude reductions in mass and launch volume and will revolutionize the architecture and design of space flight systems that require large in-orbit configurations and apertures. A great interest has been generated in recent years to fly gossamer systems on near-term and future space missions. Modeling and analysis requirements for gossamer structures are unique. Simulation of in-space performance issues of gossamer structures, such as inflation deployment of flexible booms, formation and effects of wrinkle in tensioned membranes, synthesis of tubular and membrane elements into a complete structural system, usually cannot be accomplished by using the general-purpose finite-element structural analysis codes. This has led to the need of structural modeling and analysis capabilities specifically suitable for gossamer structures. The Distributed Transfer Function Method (DTFM) can potentially meet this urgent need. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  15. Analysis on the structure of the TMT's Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhuan; Liu, Yan; Tao, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The concepts of atmospheric refraction and atmospheric dispersion are introduced and the method of how to eliminate atmospheric dispersion. This article introduces the structure of Atmospheric Dispersion Correction , the installation position of ADC in TMT telescope and the introduction to the principle of ADC in detail. Using the finite element analysis software Ansys Workbench to analyze the rationality of the ADC structure. Static analysis The ADC structure is loaded with two tape lens, which is more 400kg in weight, as well as itself weight, will deform in x, y, z directions. Dynamic analysis The dynamic performances of ADC structure are very important for the construction of the instrument, for the environmental vibration need to be tested. That is the effect of ADC dynamic deformation on optical accuracy is crucial for imaging quality. Here three order modes of dynamic performance are presented for the references of ADC design. They are 1st order mode , 2nd order mode and 3rd order mode. Thermal deformation according to the ADC working environment temperature change, the instrument temperature would be from -5 to 9 degree. So the thermal deformation of ADC is performed in this temperature fluctuation. ADC structure FEA conclusions: The ADC tapered lens are assumed as a rigid body and the mechanical analysis results are: Static analysis, Kinetics analysis and Thermodynamic analysis. Based on the FEA results, we get the image motion information in the telescope plane. Then, we draw a conclusion that: image motions induced by current structure design are very small and meet the requirements of ADC.

  16. Validation of Design and Analysis Techniques of Tailored Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Wijayratne, Dulnath D.

    2004-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is the relationship between the elasticity of an aircraft structure and its aerodynamics. This relationship can cause instabilities such as flutter in a wing. Engineers have long studied aeroelasticity to ensure such instabilities do not become a problem within normal operating conditions. In recent decades structural tailoring has been used to take advantage of aeroelasticity. It is possible to tailor an aircraft structure to respond favorably to multiple different flight regimes such as takeoff, landing, cruise, 2-g pull up, etc. Structures can be designed so that these responses provide an aerodynamic advantage. This research investigates the ability to design and analyze tailored structures made from filamentary composites. Specifically the accuracy of tailored composite analysis must be verified if this design technique is to become feasible. To pursue this idea, a validation experiment has been performed on a small-scale filamentary composite wing box. The box is tailored such that its cover panels induce a global bend-twist coupling under an applied load. Two types of analysis were chosen for the experiment. The first is a closed form analysis based on a theoretical model of a single cell tailored box beam and the second is a finite element analysis. The predicted results are compared with the measured data to validate the analyses. The comparison of results show that the finite element analysis is capable of predicting displacements and strains to within 10% on the small-scale structure. The closed form code is consistently able to predict the wing box bending to 25% of the measured value. This error is expected due to simplifying assumptions in the closed form analysis. Differences between the closed form code representation and the wing box specimen caused large errors in the twist prediction. The closed form analysis prediction of twist has not been validated from this test.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  18. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  19. Aero-Structural Interaction, Analysis, and Shape Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis technique that has been shown to be independent of step-size selection is examined further. The accuracy of this step-size independent technique, which uses complex variables for determining sensitivity derivatives, has been previously established. The primary focus of this work is to validate the aero-structural analysis procedure currently being used. This validation consists of comparing computed and experimental data obtained for an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2). Since the aero-structural analysis procedure has the complex variable modifications already included into the software, sensitivity derivatives can automatically be computed. Other than for design purposes, sensitivity derivatives can be used for predicting the solution at nearby conditions. The use of sensitivity derivatives for predicting the aero-structural characteristics of this configuration is demonstrated.

  20. Structural Analysis of the ITER VV Lower Port Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yingxiang; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie

    2007-08-01

    A structural analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel's lower port region was presented by means of a finite element analysis method. The purpose is to evaluate the stress and displacement level on this structure under various combinations of five designed loads, including the gravity of the vacuum vessel, seismic loads, electromagnetic loads, and possible pressure loads to ensure structural safety. The cyclic symmetry finite element model of this structure was developed by using ANSYS code. The results showed that the maximum stress does not exceed the allowable value for any of the load combinations according to ASME code and the nine vacuum vessel (VV) supports have the ability to sustain the entire VV and in vessel-components and withstand load combinations under both normal as well as off-normal operation conditions. Stress mainly concentrates on the connecting region of the VV support and lower port stub extension.

  1. Transfinite element methodology towards a unified thermal/structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, K. K.; Railkar, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes computational developments towards thermal/structural modeling and analysis via a generalized common numerical methodology for effectively and efficiently interfacing interdisciplinary areas. The proposed formulations use transform methods in conjunction with finite element developments for each of the heat transfer and structural disciplines, respectively, providing avenues for obtaining the structural response due to thermal effects. An alternative methodology for unified thermal/structural analysis is presented. The potential of the approach is outlined in comparison with conventional schemes and existing practices. Highlights and characteristic features of the approach are described via general formulations and applications to several problems. Results obtained demonstrate excellent agreement in comparison with analytic and/or conventional finite element schemes accurately and efficiently.

  2. Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data

    DOEpatents

    Eliason, Jay R.; Eliason, Valerie L. C.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

  3. Interactive computer code for dynamic and soil structure interaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulliken, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    A new interactive computer code is presented in this paper for dynamic and soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses. The computer program FETA (Finite Element Transient Analysis) is a self contained interactive graphics environment for IBM-PC`s that is used for the development of structural and soil models as well as post-processing dynamic analysis output. Full 3-D isometric views of the soil-structure system, animation of displacements, frequency and time domain responses at nodes, and response spectra are all graphically available simply by pointing and clicking with a mouse. FETA`s finite element solver performs 2-D and 3-D frequency and time domain soil-structure interaction analyses. The solver can be directly accessed from the graphical interface on a PC, or run on a number of other computer platforms.

  4. A computer program for cyclic plasticity and structural fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computerized tool for the analysis of time independent cyclic plasticity structural response, life to crack initiation prediction, and crack growth rate prediction for metallic materials is described. Three analytical items are combined: the finite element method with its associated numerical techniques for idealization of the structural component, cyclic plasticity models for idealization of the material behavior, and damage accumulation criteria for the fatigue failure.

  5. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  6. Recent literature on structural modeling, identification, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The literature on the mathematical modeling of large space structures is first reviewed, with attention given to continuum models, model order reduction, substructuring, and computational techniques. System identification and mode verification are then discussed with reference to the verification of mathematical models of large space structures. In connection with analysis, the paper surveys recent research on eigensolvers and dynamic response solvers for large-order finite-element-based models.

  7. Structural analysis of cylindrical thrust chambers, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    A system of three computer programs is described for use in conjunction with the BOPAGE finite element program. The programs are demonstrated by analyzing cumulative plastic deformation in a regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chamber. The codes provide the capability to predict geometric and material nonlinear behavior of cyclically loaded structures without performing a cycle-by-cycle analysis over the life of the structure. The program set consists of a BOPACE restart tape reader routine, and extrapolation program and a plot package.

  8. Reliability analysis of ship structure system with multi-defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hai; An, Weigang; Zhao, Weitao

    2010-11-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of multi-defects including the initial distortions, welding residual stresses, cracks and local dents on the ultimate strength of the plate element, and has worked out expressions of reliability calculation and sensitivity analysis of the plate element. Reliability analysis is made for the system with multi-defects plate elements. Failure mechanism, failure paths and the calculating approach to global reliability index are also worked out. After plate elements with multi-defects fail, the formula of reverse node forces which affect the residual structure is deduced, so are the sensitivity expressions of the system reliability index. This ensures calculating accuracy and rationality for reliability analysis, and makes it convenient to find weakness plate elements which affect the reliability of the structure system. Finally, for the validity of the approach proposed, we take the numerical example of a ship cabin to compare and contrast the reliability and the sensitivity analysis of the structure system with multi-defects with those of the structure system with no defects. The approach has implications for the structure design, rational maintenance and renewing strategy.

  9. Structural Configuration Analysis of Crew Exploration Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2006-01-01

    Structural configuration modeling and finite element analysis of crew exploration vehicle (CEV) concepts are presented. In the structural configuration design approach, parametric solid models of the pressurized shell and tanks are developed. The CEV internal cabin pressure is same as in the International Space Station (ISS) to enable docking with the ISS without an intermediate airlock. Effects of this internal pressure load on the stress distribution, factor of safety, mass and deflections are investigated. Uniform 7 mm thick skin shell, 5 mm thick shell with ribs and frames, and isogrid skin construction options are investigated. From this limited study, the isogrid construction appears to provide most strength/mass ratio. Initial finite element analysis results on the service module tanks are also presented. These rapid finite element analyses, stress and factor of safety distribution results are presented as a part of lessons learned and to build up a structural mass estimation and sizing database for future technology support. This rapid structural analysis process may also facilitate better definition of the vehicles and components for rapid prototyping. However, these structural analysis results are highly conceptual and exploratory in nature and do not reflect current configuration designs being conducted at the program level by NASA and industry.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    respect to the nominal alloy composition at the center of weld surface (Point 6 of Figure 7) -21 - U CO 2000 - * cE axc -2000 o" "....". . -401.11𔃺 1󈧄...Final Report Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street Arlington...3/31/05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Sb. GRANT NUMBER N000

  11. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  12. Fuzzy Structures Analysis of Aircraft Panels in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper concerns an application of the fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) procedures of Soize to prototypical aerospace panels in MSC/NASTRAN, a large commercial finite element program. A brief introduction to the FSA procedures is first provided. The implementation of the FSA methods is then disclosed, and the method is validated by comparison to published results for the forced vibrations of a fuzzy beam. The results of the new implementation show excellent agreement to the benchmark results. The ongoing effort at NASA Langley and Penn State to apply these fuzzy structures analysis procedures to real aircraft panels is then described.

  13. Three-dimensional structural analysis using interactive graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, J.; Sumlin, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The application of computer interactive graphics to three-dimensional structural analysis was described, with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) structural analysis, and (2) generation and checking of input data and examination of the large volume of output data (stresses, displacements, velocities, accelerations). Handling of three-dimensional input processing with a special MESH3D computer program was explained. Similarly, a special code PLTZ may be used to perform all the needed tasks for output processing from a finite element code. Examples were illustrated.

  14. Development and Application of Viscoplastic Models in Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1996-01-01

    A number of numerical solution technologies were developed for advanced analysis capabilities involving the finite element method in advanced constitutive modeling and structural analysis for improved and rational designs of aerospace propulsive systems. These technologies were incorporated into several advanced viscoplastic models and were applied to a wide spectrum of structural engineering problems involving extremes of thermal/mechanical loading. Results of the research performed under the grant were presented at a number of scientific meetings and conferences and have resulted in numerous publications.

  15. Factors Influencing Progressive Failure Analysis Predictions for Laminated Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model for use with a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for laminated composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented and to demonstrate their influence on progressive failure analysis predictions.

  16. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  17. NRT Rotor Structural / Aeroelastic Analysis for the Preliminary Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Brandon Lee; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    This document describes the initial structural design for the National Rotor Testbed blade as presented during the preliminary design review at Sandia National Laboratories on October 28- 29, 2015. The document summarizes the structural and aeroelastic requirements placed on the NRT rotor for satisfactory deployment at the DOE/SNL SWiFT experimental facility to produce high-quality datasets for wind turbine model validation. The method and result of the NRT blade structural optimization is also presented within this report, along with analysis of its satisfaction of the design requirements.

  18. Seismic response analysis of an instrumented building structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.-J.; Zhu, S.-Y.; Celebi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Sheraton - Universal hotel, an instrumented building lying in North Hollywood, USA is selected for case study in this paper. The finite element method is used to produce a linear time - invariant structural model, and the SAP2000 program is employed for the time history analysis of the instrumented structure under the base excitation of strong motions recorded in the basement during the Northridge, California earthquake of 17 January 1994. The calculated structural responses are compared with the recorded data in both time domain and frequency domain, and the effects of structural parameters evaluation and indeterminate factors are discussed. Some features of structural response, such as the reason why the peak responses of acceleration in the ninth floor are larger than those in the sixteenth floor, are also explained.

  19. Structural monitoring by curvature analysis using interferometric fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, D.; Vurpillot, S.; Casanova, N.; Kronenberg, P.

    1998-04-01

    All structures undergo deformations under the effects of loads or degradation of the constituent materials. The deformations of any structure (bridges, dams, frames, shells, tunnels, towers, wings, trusses,0964-1726/7/2/007/img9) contain a lot of information about its health state. By measuring these deformations it is possible to analyse the loading and aging behavior of the structure. The presented method analyses a structure by subdividing it into sections and cells. The deformation of each of these macro-elements is first analysed separately to obtain local information about the materials, and then combined to provide insight on the global behavior. Examples of these techniques applied to civil engineering structures fitted with long-gage-length fiber optic sensors show the variety of information that can be obtained using this powerful analysis technique.

  20. Tools for comparative protein structure modeling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Eswar, Narayanan; John, Bino; Mirkovic, Nebojsa; Fiser, Andras; Ilyin, Valentin A; Pieper, Ursula; Stuart, Ashley C; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Madhusudhan, M S; Yerkovich, Bozidar; Sali, Andrej

    2003-07-01

    The following resources for comparative protein structure modeling and analysis are described (http://salilab.org): MODELLER, a program for comparative modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints; MODWEB, a web server for automated comparative modeling that relies on PSI-BLAST, IMPALA and MODELLER; MODLOOP, a web server for automated loop modeling that relies on MODELLER; MOULDER, a CPU intensive protocol of MODWEB for building comparative models based on distant known structures; MODBASE, a comprehensive database of annotated comparative models for all sequences detectably related to a known structure; MODVIEW, a Netscape plugin for Linux that integrates viewing of multiple sequences and structures; and SNPWEB, a web server for structure-based prediction of the functional impact of a single amino acid substitution.

  1. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process.

  2. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  3. Computational analysis of RNA structures with chemical probing data

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-01-01

    RNAs play various roles, not only as the genetic codes to synthesize proteins, but also as the direct participants of biological functions determined by their underlying high-order structures. Although many computational methods have been proposed for analyzing RNA structures, their accuracy and efficiency are limited, especially when applied to the large RNAs and the genome-wide data sets. Recently, advances in parallel sequencing and high-throughput chemical probing technologies have prompted the development of numerous new algorithms, which can incorporate the auxiliary structural information obtained from those experiments. Their potential has been revealed by the secondary structure prediction of ribosomal RNAs and the genome-wide ncRNA function annotation. In this review, the existing probing-directed computational methods for RNA secondary and tertiary structure analysis are discussed. PMID:25687190

  4. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  5. Practical Application of Finite Element Analysis to Aircraft Structural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    t] Cook, Robert D., "Concepts and Applications of Finite element Analysis," John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1981. [5] Rao, S. S., "The Finite...generation large-scale computer programs is discussed. V.P. Analysis of aircraft structure using applied fracture mechanics (AA) WILHEM , D. P. Northrop...Analytical, finite element for surface flaws, holes (AA) WILHEM , D. P. Northrop Corp., Hawthorne, Calif. (N5631231) Aircraft Group. In AGARD Fracture

  6. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  7. Structural analysis of airborne flux estimates over a region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caramori, Paulo; Schuepp, Peter; Desjardins, Raymond; Macpherson, Ian

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft-based observations of turbulence fields of velocity, moisture, and temperature are used to study coherent turbulent structures that dominate turbulent transfer of moisture and heat above three different eco-systems. Flux traces are defragmented, to reconstruct the presumed full size (along the sampled transect) of these structures, and flux traces are simplified by elimination of those that contribute negligibly to the flux estimate. Structures are analyzed in terms of size, spatial distribution, and contribution to the flux, in the four 'quadrant' modes of eddy-covariance transfer (excess up/down and deficit up/down). The effect of nonlinear detrending of moisture and temperature data on this 'structural analysis,' over surfaces with heterogeneous surface wetness, is also examined. Results over grassland, wetland, and moist and dry agricultural land, show that nonlinear detrending may provide a more physically realistic description of structures. Significant differences are observed between structure size and associated relative flux contribution, between moist and dry areas, with smaller structures playing a more important role over the moist areas. Structure size generally increases with height, as spatial reorganization from smaller structures into larger ones takes place. This coincides with a gradual loss of surface 'signature' (position and clustering of plumes above localized source areas). The data are expected to provide a basis for an eventual statistical description of boundary-layer transfer events , and help to interpret the link between boundary-layer transfer and hydrological surface conditions.

  8. Selecting Earthquake Records for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mario E.

    2008-07-08

    An area in earthquake risk reduction that needs an urgent examination is the selection of earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. An often-mentioned shortcoming from results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of structures is that these results are limited to the type of records that these analyses use as input data. This paper proposes a procedure for selecting earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. This procedure uses a seismic damage index evaluated using the hysteretic energy dissipated by a Single Degree of Freedom System (SDOF) representing a multi-degree-of freedom structure responding to an earthquake record, and the plastic work capacity of the system at collapse. The type of structural system is considered using simple parameters. The proposed method is based on the evaluation of the damage index for a suite of earthquake records and a selected type of structural system. A set of 10 strong ground motion records is analyzed to show an application of the proposed procedure for selecting earthquake records for structural design.

  9. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  10. The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal causes protein synthesis in cardiac myocytes via activated mTORC1-p70S6K-RPS6 signaling.

    PubMed

    Calamaras, Timothy D; Lee, Charlie; Lan, Fan; Ido, Yasuo; Siwik, Deborah A; Colucci, Wilson S

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are elevated in the heart in response to hemodynamic and metabolic stress and promote hypertrophic signaling. ROS also mediate the formation of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes that may promote myocardial hypertrophy. One lipid peroxidation by-product, 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), is a reactive aldehyde that covalently modifies proteins thereby altering their function. HNE adducts directly inhibit the activity of LKB1, a serine/threonine kinase involved in regulating cellular growth in part through its interaction with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but whether this drives myocardial growth is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that HNE promotes myocardial protein synthesis and if this effect is associated with impaired LKB1-AMPK signaling. In adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, exposure to HNE (10 μM for 1h) caused HNE-LKB1 adduct formation and inhibited LKB1 activity. HNE inhibited the downstream kinase AMPK, increased hypertrophic mTOR-p70S6K-RPS6 signaling, and stimulated protein synthesis by 27.1 ± 3.5%. HNE also stimulated Erk1/2 signaling, which contributed to RPS6 activation but was not required for HNE-stimulated protein synthesis. HNE-stimulated RPS6 phosphorylation was completely blocked using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. To evaluate if LKB1 inhibition by itself could promote the hypertrophic signaling changes observed with HNE, LKB1 was depleted in adult rat ventricular myocytes using siRNA. LKB1 knockdown did not replicate the effect of HNE on hypertrophic signaling or affect HNE-stimulated RPS6 phosphorylation. Thus, in adult cardiac myocytes HNE stimulates protein synthesis by activation of mTORC1-p70S6K-RPS6 signaling most likely mediated by direct inhibition of AMPK. Because HNE in the myocardium is commonly increased by stimuli that cause pathologic hypertrophy, these findings suggest that therapies that prevent activation of mTORC1-p70S6K-RPS6 signaling may be of therapeutic value.

  11. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  12. Equivalent Skin Analysis of Wing Structures Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    An efficient method of modeling trapezoidal built-up wing structures is developed by coupling. in an indirect way, an Equivalent Plate Analysis (EPA) with Neural Networks (NN). Being assumed to behave like a Mindlin-plate, the wing is solved using the Ritz method with Legendre polynomials employed as the trial functions. This analysis method can be made more efficient by avoiding most of the computational effort spent on calculating contributions to the stiffness and mass matrices from each spar and rib. This is accomplished by replacing the wing inner-structure with an "equivalent" material that combines to the skin and whose properties are simulated by neural networks. The constitutive matrix, which relates the stress vector to the strain vector, and the density of the equivalent material are obtained by enforcing mass and stiffness matrix equities with rec,ard to the EPA in a least-square sense. Neural networks for the material properties are trained in terms of the design variables of the wing structure. Examples show that the present method, which can be called an Equivalent Skin Analysis (ESA) of the wing structure, is more efficient than the EPA and still fairly good results can be obtained. The present ESA is very promising to be used at the early stages of wing structure design.

  13. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  14. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Wrinkled Membrane Structures for Sunshield Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The deployable sunshield is an example of a gossamer structure envisioned for use on future space telescopes. The basic structure consists of multiple layers of pretensioned, thin-film membranes supported by deployable booms. The prediction and verification of sunshield dynamics has been identified as an area in need of technology development due to the difficulties inherent in predicting nonlinear structural behavior of the membranes and because of the challenges involved. in ground testing of the full-scale structure. This paper describes a finite element analysis of a subscale sunshield that has been subjected to ground testing in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The analysis utilizes a nonlinear material model that accounts for wrinkling of the membranes. Results are presented from a nonlinear static preloading analysis and subsequent dynamics analyses to illustrate baseline sunshield structural characteristics. Studies are then described which provide further insight into the effect of membrane. preload on sunshield dynamics and the performance of different membrane modeling techniques. Lastly, a comparison of analytical predictions and ground test results is presented.

  16. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for improving Space Shuttle engine reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.

    1989-01-01

    Probabilistic structural analysis methods are particularly useful in the design and analysis of critical structural components and systems that operate in very severe and uncertain environments. These methods have recently found application in space propulsion systems to improve the structural reliability of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components. A computer program, NESSUS, based on a deterministic finite-element program and a method of probabilistic analysis (fast probability integration) provides probabilistic structural analysis for selected SSME components. While computationally efficient, it considers both correlated and nonnormal random variables as well as an implicit functional relationship between independent and dependent variables. The program is used to determine the response of a nickel-based superalloy SSME turbopump blade. Results include blade tip displacement statistics due to the variability in blade thickness, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio or density. Modulus of elasticity significantly contributed to blade tip variability while Poisson's ratio did not. Thus, a rational method for choosing parameters to be modeled as random is provided.

  17. Building Workplace Vocabulary for E & I: Structural Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Rhonda; And Others

    Developed as part of the ABCs of Construction National Workplace Literacy Project, this instructional module teaches word attack skills for use in understanding technical terms encountered by persons employed in electrical and instrumentation occupations. The following topics are covered: the principles of structural analysis, word parts and their…

  18. Computer-aided analysis of Riemann sheet structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hameren, André; Kleiss, Ronald

    1999-02-01

    We report on experience with an investigation of the analytic structure of the solution of certain algebraic complex equations. In particular the behavior of their series expansions around the origin is discussed. The investigation imposes the need for an analysis of the singularities and the Riemann sheets of the solution, in which numerical methods are used.

  19. The NASA NASTRAN structural analysis computer program - New content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Capabilities of a NASA-developed structural analysis computer program, NASTRAN, are evaluated with reference to finite-element modelling. Applications include the automotive industry as well as aerospace. It is noted that the range of sub-programs within NASTRAN has expanded, while keeping user cost low.

  20. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  1. Transient Analysis Method for HEMi Sabot Structural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Transient analysis method for HEMi sabot structural design F.C. Wong DRDC Valcartier Defence R&D Canada – Valcartier Technical Note DRDC Valcartier......that can withstand the high g- forces generated by the expanding gas and the inertia of the penetrator. This document discusses the finite element

  2. Structural Analysis of Chemokine Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimont, Marta; Sun, Shan-Liang; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-03-10

    This review focuses on the construction and application of structural chemokine receptor models for the elucidation of molecular determinants of chemokine receptor modulation and the structure-based discovery and design of chemokine receptor ligands. A comparative analysis of ligand binding pockets in chemokine receptors is presented, including a detailed description of the CXCR4, CCR2, CCR5, CCR9, and US28 X-ray structures, and their implication for modeling molecular interactions of chemokine receptors with small-molecule ligands, peptide ligands, and large antibodies and chemokines. These studies demonstrate how the integration of new structural information on chemokine receptors with extensive structure-activity relationship and site-directed mutagenesis data facilitates the prediction of the structure of chemokine receptor-ligand complexes that have not been crystallized. Finally, a review of structure-based ligand discovery and design studies based on chemokine receptor crystal structures and homology models illustrates the possibilities and challenges to find novel ligands for chemokine receptors.

  3. [Comparative analysis of spatial organization of myoglobins. II. Secondary structure].

    PubMed

    Korobov, V N; Nazarenko, V I; Radomskiĭ, N F; Starodub, N F

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of probability of distribution curves of alpha-helical sites and bends of polypeptide chains of myoglobins in half-water mammals (beaver, nutria, muskrat, otter) carried out in comparison with those of myoglobins of the horse and Sperm whale (X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed their tertiary structure) has revealed a coincidence of the secondary structure sites end bends of the chain in the studied respiratory hemoproteins of muscles. Despite a considerable number of amino acid substitutions the profiles of alpha-helicity and B-bends of the compared proteins are practically identical. This indicates to the "resistance" of the probability curves to amino acid substitutions and to retention of the tertiary structure of myoglobins in evolutionary remote species of the animals.

  4. Structural Analysis of ITER Lower In-Vessel-Viewing Port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yingxiang; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie; Liu, Changle

    2006-11-01

    A finite element model of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in-vessel viewing port was developed by the ANSYS code in order to evaluate the stress level of this structure. The thermal, elastic and modal analyses were made in succession based on the loads designated by the ITER International team. The designed loads include electromagnetic loads, seismic loads, pressure, temperature and gravity. The preliminary results of the finite element analysis (FEA) show that the stress intensity exceeded the allowable stress and the maximum stress was concentrated in the geometric discontinuous region of the shroud stub extension (SSE). Therefore, the SSE has been modified recently. For the modified structure, we found that the stresses do not exceed the allowable value for all load combinations. In addition the modal analysis results show that the natural frequencies of the IVV port structure are located in the typical diapason of seismic excitation.

  5. Analysis of forest structure using thematic mapper simulator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Westman, W. E.; Brass, J. A.; Stephenson, N. J.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Spanner, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for sensing forest structure information has been explored by principal components and feature selection techniques. In a survey of forest structural properties conducted for 123 field sites of the Sequoia National Park, the canopy closure could be well estimated (r = 0.62 to 0.69) by a variety of channel bands and band ratios, without reference to the forest type. Estimation of the basal area was less successful (r = 0.51 or less) on the average, but could be improved for certain forest types when data were stratified by floristic composition. To achieve such a stratification, individual sites were ordinated by a detrended correspondence analysis based on the canopy of dominant species. The analysis of forest structure in the Sequoia data suggests that total basal area can be best predicted in stands of lower density, and in younger even-aged managed stands.

  6. VIPR III VADR SPIDER Structural Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley; Chen, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III team to evaluate the volcanic ash environment effects on the Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofan engine, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center has successfully performed structural design and analysis on the Volcanic Ash Distribution Rig (VADR) and the Structural Particulate Integration Device for Engine Research (SPIDER) for the ash ingestion test. Static and dynamic load analyses were performed to ensure no structural failure would occur during the test. Modal analysis was conducted, and the results were used to develop engine power setting avoidance zones. These engine power setting avoidance zones were defined to minimize the dwell time when the natural frequencies of the VADR/SPIDER system coincided with the excitation frequencies of the engine which was operating at various revolutions per minute. Vortex-induced vibration due to engine suction air flow during the ingestion test was also evaluated, but was not a concern.

  7. Analysis Methods for Progressive Damage of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides an overview of recent accomplishments and lessons learned in the development of general progressive damage analysis methods for predicting the residual strength and life of composite structures. These developments are described within their State-of-the-Art (SoA) context and the associated technology barriers. The emphasis of the authors is on developing these analysis tools for application at the structural level. Hence, modeling of damage progression is undertaken at the mesoscale, where the plies of a laminate are represented as a homogenous orthotropic continuum. The aim of the present effort is establish the ranges of validity of available models, to identify technology barriers, and to establish the foundations of the future investigation efforts. Such are the necessary steps towards accurate and robust simulations that can replace some of the expensive and time-consuming "building block" tests that are currently required for the design and certification of aerospace structures.

  8. Structural Simulations and Conservation Analysis -Historic Building Information Model (HBIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.; McCarthy, S.; Brechin, F.; Casidy, C.; Dirix, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper the current findings to date of the Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) of the Four Courts in Dublin are presented. The Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) forms the basis for both structural and conservation analysis to measure the impact of war damage which still impacts on the building. The laser scan survey was carried out in the summer of 2014 of the internal and external structure. After registration and processing of the laser scan survey, the HBIM was created of the damaged section of the building and is presented as two separate workflows in this paper. The first is the model created from historic data, the second a procedural and segmented model developed from laser scan survey of the war damaged drum and dome. From both models structural damage and decay simulations will be developed for documentation and conservation analysis.

  9. Neural networks in structural analysis and design - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in the application of neural networks in problems of structural analysis and design, including a survey of published applications in structural engineering. Such applications have included, among others, the use of neural networks in modeling nonlinear analysis of structures, as a rapid reanalysis capability in optimal design, and in developing problem parameter sensitivity of optimal solutions for use in multilevel decomposition based design. While most of the applications reported in the literature have been restricted to the use of the multilayer perceptron architecture and minor variations thereof, other network architectures have also been successfully explored, including the ART network, the counterpropagation network and the Hopfield-Tank model.

  10. Probabilistic analysis of structures involving random stress-strain behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Thacker, B. H.; Harren, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present methodology for analysis of structures with random stress strain behavior characterizes the uniaxial stress-strain curve in terms of (1) elastic modulus, (2) engineering stress at initial yield, (3) initial plastic-hardening slope, (4) engineering stress at point of ultimate load, and (5) engineering strain at point of ultimate load. The methodology is incorporated into the Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress code for probabilistic structural analysis. The illustrative problem of a thick cylinder under internal pressure, where both the internal pressure and the stress-strain curve are random, is addressed by means of the code. The response value is the cumulative distribution function of the equivalent plastic strain at the inner radius.

  11. Analysis of vibration of two-dimensional periodic cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Min (Joseph)

    The vibration of and wave propagation in periodic cellular structures are analyzed. Cellular structures exhibit a number of desirable multifunctional properties, which make them attractive in a variety of engineering applications. These include ultra-light structures, thermal and acoustic insulators, and impact amelioration systems, among others. Cellular structures with deterministic architecture can be considered as example of periodic structures. Periodic structures feature unique wave propagation characteristics, whereby elastic waves propagate only in specific frequency bands, known as "pass band", while they are attenuated in all other frequency bands, known as "stop bands". Such dynamic properties are here exploited to provide cellular structures with the capability of behaving as directional, pass-band mechanical filters, thus complementing their well documented multifunctional characteristics. This work presents a methodology for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of periodic cellular structures, which allows the evaluation of location and spectral width of propagation and attenuation regions in non-dimensional form. The filtering characteristics are tested and demonstrated for structures of various geometry and topology, including cylindrical grid-like structures, Kagome and tetrhedral truss core lattices. Experimental investigations is done on a 2-D lattice manufactured out of aluminum. The complete wave field of the specimen at various frequencies is measured using a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV). Experimental results show good agreement with the methodology and computational tools developed in this work. The results demonstrate how wave propagation characteristics are defined by cell geometry and configuration. Numerical and experimental results show the potential of periodic cellular structures as mechanical filters and/or isolators of vibrations.

  12. On the design and structural analysis of jet engine fan blade structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoo, Leye M.

    2013-07-01

    Progress in the design and structural analysis of commercial jet engine fan blades is reviewed and presented. This article is motivated by the key role fan blades play in the performance of advanced gas turbine jet engines. The fundamentals of the associated physics are emphasized. Recent developments and advancements have led to an increase and improvement in fan blade structural durability, stability and reliability. This article is intended as a high level review of the fan blade environment and current state of structural design to aid further research in developing new and innovative fan blade technologies.

  13. Structural Analysis Methods for Structural Health Management of Future Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Two finite element based computational methods, Smoothing Element Analysis (SEA) and the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), are reviewed, and examples of their use for structural health monitoring are discussed. Due to their versatility, robustness, and computational efficiency, the methods are well suited for real-time structural health monitoring of future space vehicles, large space structures, and habitats. The methods may be effectively employed to enable real-time processing of sensing information, specifically for identifying three-dimensional deformed structural shapes as well as the internal loads. In addition, they may be used in conjunction with evolutionary algorithms to design optimally distributed sensors. These computational tools have demonstrated substantial promise for utilization in future Structural Health Management (SHM) systems.

  14. Structural Analysis of the Redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. R.; Dawicke, D. S.; Gentz, S. J.; Roberts, P. W.; Raju, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the interim structural analysis of a redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp bracket for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The proposed redesigned bracket consists of mounts for attachment to the ET wall, supports for the electronic/instrument cables and propellant repressurization lines that run along the ET, an upper plate, a lower plate, and complex bolted connections. The eight nominal bolted connections are considered critical in the summarized structural analysis. Each bolted connection contains a bolt, a nut, four washers, and a non-metallic spacer and block that are designed for thermal insulation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the bracket is developed using solid 10-node tetrahedral elements. The loading provided by the ET Project is used in the analysis. Because of the complexities associated with accurately modeling the bolted connections in the bracket, the analysis is performed using a global/local analysis procedure. The finite element analysis of the bracket identifies one of the eight bolted connections as having high stress concentrations. A local area of the bracket surrounding this bolted connection is extracted from the global model and used as a local model. Within the local model, the various components of the bolted connection are refined, and contact is introduced along the appropriate interfaces determined by the analysts. The deformations from the global model are applied as boundary conditions to the local model. The results from the global/local analysis show that while the stresses in the bolts are well within yield, the spacers fail due to compression. The primary objective of the interim structural analysis is to show concept viability for static thermal testing. The proposed design concept would undergo continued design optimization to address the identified analytical assumptions and concept shortcomings, assuming successful thermal testing.

  15. Design and analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbo, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of an analytic procedure which can be used to provide comprehensive stress and strength analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations is given. The methodology provides designer/analysts with a user-oriented procedure which, within acceptable engineering accuracy, accounts for the effects of a wide range of application design variables. The procedure permits the strength of arbitrary laminate constructions under general bearing/bypass load conditions to be predicted with only unnotched unidirectional strength and stiffness input data required. Included is a brief discussion of the relevancy of this analysis to the design of primary aircraft structure; an overview of the analytic procedure with theory/test correlations; and an example of the use and interaction of this strength analysis relative to the design of high-load transfer bolted composite joints.

  16. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anja; Schreiber, Falk

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM2 – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato. PMID:25674560

  17. Interface between 40S exit channel protein uS7/Rps5 and eIF2α modulates start codon recognition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic pre-initiation complex (PIC) bearing the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAiMet ternary complex (TC) scans the mRNA for an AUG codon in favorable context. AUG recognition evokes rearrangement of the PIC from an open, scanning to a closed, arrested conformation. Cryo-EM reconstructions of yeast PICs suggest remodeling of the interface between 40S protein Rps5/uS7 and eIF2α between open and closed states; however, its importance was unknown. uS7 substitutions disrupting eIF2α contacts favored in the open complex increase initiation at suboptimal sites, and uS7-S223D stabilizes TC binding to PICs reconstituted with a UUG start codon, indicating inappropriate rearrangement to the closed state. Conversely, uS7-D215 substitutions, perturbing uS7-eIF2α interaction in the closed state, confer the opposite phenotypes of hyperaccuracy and (for D215L) accelerated TC dissociation from reconstituted PICs. Thus, remodeling of the uS7/eIF2α interface appears to stabilize first the open, and then the closed state of the PIC to promote accurate AUG selection in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22572.001 PMID:28169832

  18. ACT Payload Shroud Structural Concept Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart B.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Aerospace structural applications demand a weight efficient design to perform in a cost effective manner. This is particularly true for launch vehicle structures, where weight is the dominant design driver. The design process typically requires many iterations to ensure that a satisfactory minimum weight has been obtained. Although metallic structures can be weight efficient, composite structures can provide additional weight savings due to their lower density and additional design flexibility. This work presents structural analysis and weight optimization of a composite payload shroud for NASA s Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Two concepts, which were previously determined to be efficient for such a structure are evaluated: a hat stiffened/corrugated panel and a fiber reinforced foam sandwich panel. A composite structural optimization code, HyperSizer, is used to optimize the panel geometry, composite material ply orientations, and sandwich core material. HyperSizer enables an efficient evaluation of thousands of potential designs versus multiple strength and stability-based failure criteria across multiple load cases. HyperSizer sizing process uses a global finite element model to obtain element forces, which are statistically processed to arrive at panel-level design-to loads. These loads are then used to analyze each candidate panel design. A near optimum design is selected as the one with the lowest weight that also provides all positive margins of safety. The stiffness of each newly sized panel or beam component is taken into account in the subsequent finite element analysis. Iteration of analysis/optimization is performed to ensure a converged design. Sizing results for the hat stiffened panel concept and the fiber reinforced foam sandwich concept are presented.

  19. Total systems design analysis of high performance structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1993-01-01

    Designer-control parameters were identified at interdiscipline interfaces to optimize structural systems performance and downstream development and operations with reliability and least life-cycle cost. Interface tasks and iterations are tracked through a matrix of performance disciplines integration versus manufacturing, verification, and operations interactions for a total system design analysis. Performance integration tasks include shapes, sizes, environments, and materials. Integrity integrating tasks are reliability and recurring structural costs. Significant interface designer control parameters were noted as shapes, dimensions, probability range factors, and cost. Structural failure concept is presented, and first-order reliability and deterministic methods, benefits, and limitations are discussed. A deterministic reliability technique combining benefits of both is proposed for static structures which is also timely and economically verifiable. Though launch vehicle environments were primarily considered, the system design process is applicable to any surface system using its own unique filed environments.

  20. Lumped mass modelling for the dynamic analysis of aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Saba, Elias G.; Shen, Ji Yao; Mcginley, William M.; Montgomery, Raymond C.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft structures may be modelled by lumping the masses at particular strategic points and the flexibility or stiffness of the structure is obtained with reference to these points. Equivalent moments of inertia for the section at these positions are determined. The lumped masses are calculated based on the assumption that each point will represent the mass spread on one half of the space on each side. Then these parameters are used in the differential equation of motion and the eigen characteristics are determined. A comparison is made with results obtained by other established methods. The lumped mass approach in the dynamic analysis of complicated structures provides an easier means of predicting the dynamic characteristics of these structures. It involves less computer time and avoids computational errors that are inherent in the numerical solution of complicated systems.

  1. Kinetic analysis of pre-ribosome structure in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Wlotzka, Wiebke; Tuck, Alex; Barrass, J. David; Beggs, Jean D.; Tollervey, David

    2012-01-01

    Pre-ribosomal particles undergo numerous structural changes during maturation, but their high complexity and short lifetimes make these changes very difficult to follow in vivo. In consequence, pre-ribosome structure and composition have largely been inferred from purified particles and analyzed in vitro. Here we describe techniques for kinetic analyses of the changes in pre-ribosome structure in living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To allow this, in vivo structure probing by DMS modification was combined with affinity purification of newly synthesized 20S pre-rRNA over a time course of metabolic labeling with 4-thiouracil. To demonstrate that this approach is generally applicable, we initially analyzed the accessibility of the region surrounding cleavage site D site at the 3′ end of the mature 18S rRNA region of the pre-rRNA. This revealed a remarkably flexible structure throughout 40S subunit biogenesis, with little stable RNA–protein interaction apparent. Analysis of folding in the region of the 18S central pseudoknot was consistent with previous data showing U3 snoRNA–18S rRNA interactions. Dynamic changes in the structure of the hinge between helix 28 (H28) and H44 of pre-18S rRNA were consistent with recently reported interactions with the 3′ guide region of U3 snoRNA. Finally, analysis of the H18 region indicates that the RNA structure matures early, but additional protection appears subsequently, presumably reflecting protein binding. The structural analyses described here were performed on total, affinity-purified, newly synthesized RNA, so many classes of RNA and RNA–protein complex are potentially amenable to this approach. PMID:23093724

  2. Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis & Design Optimization for Structural Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deivanayagam, Arumugam

    This study focuses on implementing probabilistic nature of material properties (Kevlar® 49) to the existing deterministic finite element analysis (FEA) of fabric based engine containment system through Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) and implementation of probabilistic analysis in engineering designs through Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO). First, the emphasis is on experimental data analysis focusing on probabilistic distribution models which characterize the randomness associated with the experimental data. The material properties of Kevlar® 49 are modeled using experimental data analysis and implemented along with an existing spiral modeling scheme (SMS) and user defined constitutive model (UMAT) for fabric based engine containment simulations in LS-DYNA. MCS of the model are performed to observe the failure pattern and exit velocities of the models. Then the solutions are compared with NASA experimental tests and deterministic results. MCS with probabilistic material data give a good prospective on results rather than a single deterministic simulation results. The next part of research is to implement the probabilistic material properties in engineering designs. The main aim of structural design is to obtain optimal solutions. In any case, in a deterministic optimization problem even though the structures are cost effective, it becomes highly unreliable if the uncertainty that may be associated with the system (material properties, loading etc.) is not represented or considered in the solution process. Reliable and optimal solution can be obtained by performing reliability optimization along with the deterministic optimization, which is RBDO. In RBDO problem formulation, in addition to structural performance constraints, reliability constraints are also considered. This part of research starts with introduction to reliability analysis such as first order reliability analysis, second order reliability analysis followed by simulation technique that

  3. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  4. Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis of the Lipocalin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Balasubramanian; Mishra, Madhulika; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins constitute a superfamily of extracellular proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life. Although very divergent in their sequences and functions, they show remarkable similarity in 3-D structures. Lipocalins bind and transport small hydrophobic molecules. Earlier sequence-based phylogenetic studies of lipocalins highlighted that they have a long evolutionary history. However the molecular and structural basis of their functional diversity is not completely understood. The main objective of the present study is to understand functional diversity of the lipocalins using a structure-based phylogenetic approach. The present study with 39 protein domains from the lipocalin superfamily suggests that the clusters of lipocalins obtained by structure-based phylogeny correspond well with the functional diversity. The detailed analysis on each of the clusters and sub-clusters reveals that the 39 lipocalin domains cluster based on their mode of ligand binding though the clustering was performed on the basis of gross domain structure. The outliers in the phylogenetic tree are often from single member families. Also structure-based phylogenetic approach has provided pointers to assign putative function for the domains of unknown function in lipocalin family. The approach employed in the present study can be used in the future for the functional identification of new lipocalin proteins and may be extended to other protein families where members show poor sequence similarity but high structural similarity. PMID:26263546

  5. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  6. A new structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS. [Approximation Concepts Code for Efficient Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1975-01-01

    The creation of an efficient automated capability for minimum weight design of structures is reported. The ACCESS 1 computer program combines finite element analysis techniques and mathematical programming algorithms using an innovative collection of approximation concepts. Design variable linking, constraint deletion techniques and approximate analysis methods are used to generate a sequence of small explicit mathematical programming problems which retain the essential features of the design problem. Organization of the finite element analysis is carefully matched to the design optimization task. The efficiency of the ACCESS 1 program is demonstrated by giving results for several example problems.

  7. Horizontal Structure: A Neo-Piagetian Analysis of Structural Parallels across Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeough, Anne M.

    An analysis of children's narrative composition and art revealed concurrent development at both a general structural level and at a fine-grained detail level. A three-part study investigated whether this general cognitive pattern would be maintained across a different range of tasks: literary composition, scientific reasoning, and working memory.…

  8. Python package for model STructure ANalysis (pySTAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoey, Stijn; van der Kwast, Johannes; Nopens, Ingmar; Seuntjens, Piet

    2013-04-01

    The selection and identification of a suitable hydrological model structure is more than fitting parameters of a model structure to reproduce a measured hydrograph. The procedure is highly dependent on various criteria, i.e. the modelling objective, the characteristics and the scale of the system under investigation as well as the available data. Rigorous analysis of the candidate model structures is needed to support and objectify the selection of the most appropriate structure for a specific case (or eventually justify the use of a proposed ensemble of structures). This holds both in the situation of choosing between a limited set of different structures as well as in the framework of flexible model structures with interchangeable components. Many different methods to evaluate and analyse model structures exist. This leads to a sprawl of available methods, all characterized by different assumptions, changing conditions of application and various code implementations. Methods typically focus on optimization, sensitivity analysis or uncertainty analysis, with backgrounds from optimization, machine-learning or statistics amongst others. These methods also need an evaluation metric (objective function) to compare the model outcome with some observed data. However, for current methods described in literature, implementations are not always transparent and reproducible (if available at all). No standard procedures exist to share code and the popularity (and amount of applications) of the methods is sometimes more dependent on the availability than the merits of the method. Moreover, new implementations of existing methods are difficult to verify and the different theoretical backgrounds make it difficult for environmental scientists to decide about the usefulness of a specific method. A common and open framework with a large set of methods can support users in deciding about the most appropriate method. Hence, it enables to simultaneously apply and compare different

  9. Residual Strength Analysis Methodology: Laboratory Coupons to Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Rose, C. A.; Young, R. D.; Seshadri, B. R.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Structural Integrity (NASIP) and Airframe Airworthiness Assurance/Aging Aircraft (AAA/AA) Programs have developed a residual strength prediction methodology for aircraft fuselage structures. This methodology has been experimentally verified for structures ranging from laboratory coupons up to full-scale structural components. The methodology uses the critical crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to characterize the fracture behavior and a material and a geometric nonlinear finite element shell analysis code to perform the structural analyses. The present paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the fracture behavior of 2024-T3 aluminum alloys with thickness of 0.04 inches to 0.09 inches. The critical CTOA and the corresponding plane strain core height necessary to simulate through-the-thickness effects at the crack tip in an otherwise plane stress analysis, were determined from small laboratory specimens. Using these parameters, the CTOA fracture criterion was used to predict the behavior of middle crack tension specimens that were up to 40 inches wide, flat panels with riveted stiffeners and multiple-site damage cracks, 18-inch diameter pressurized cylinders, and full scale curved stiffened panels subjected to internal pressure and mechanical loads.

  10. The Least Squares Stochastic Finite Element Method in Structural Stability Analysis of Steel Skeletal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, M.; Szafran, J.

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is to verify the influence of the weighting procedure in the Least Squares Method on the probabilistic moments resulting from the stability analysis of steel skeletal structures. We discuss this issue also in the context of the geometrical nonlinearity appearing in the Stochastic Finite Element Method equations for the stability analysis and preservation of the Gaussian probability density function employed to model the Young modulus of a structural steel in this problem. The weighting procedure itself (with both triangular and Dirac-type) shows rather marginal influence on all probabilistic coefficients under consideration. This hybrid stochastic computational technique consisting of the FEM and computer algebra systems (ROBOT and MAPLE packages) may be used for analogous nonlinear analyses in structural reliability assessment.

  11. [Structure analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the structure and properties of identified pathogenic proteins are important for elucidating the molecular basis of diseases and in drug discovery research. Vibrational spectroscopy has advantages over other techniques in terms of sensitivity of detection of structural changes. Spectral analysis, however, is complicated because the spectrum involves a substantial amount of information. This article includes examples of structural analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy in combination with additional techniques that facilitate data acquisition and analysis. Residue-specific conformation analysis of an amyloid fibril was conducted using IR absorption spectroscopy in combination with (13)C-isotope labeling, linear dichroism measurement, and analysis of amide I band features. We reveal a pH-dependent property of the interacting segment of an amyloidogenic protein, β2-microglobulin, which causes dialysis-related amyloidosis. We also reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH-dependent sugar-binding activity of human galectin-1, which is involved in cell adhesion, using spectroscopic techniques including UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. The decreased activity at acidic pH was attributed to a conformational change in the sugar-binding pocket caused by protonation of His52 (pKa 6.3) and the cation-π interaction between Trp68 and the protonated His44 (pKa 5.7). In addition, we show that the peak positions of the Raman bands of the C4=C5 stretching mode at approximately 1600 cm(-1) and the Nπ-C2-Nτ bending mode at approximately 1405 cm(-1) serve as markers of the His side-chain structure. The Raman signal was enhanced 12 fold using a vertical flow apparatus.

  12. Comparative Analysis on Time Series with Included Structural Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeski, Cvetko J.; Vasant, Pandian

    2009-08-01

    The time series analysis (ARIMA models) is a good approach for identification of time series. But, if we have structural break in the time series, we cannot create only one model of time series. Further more, if we don't have enough data between two structural breaks, it's impossible to create valid time series models for identification of the time series. This paper explores the possibility of identification of the inflation process dynamics via of the system-theoretic, by means of both Box-Jenkins ARIMA methodologies and artificial neural networks.

  13. Synthesis of aircraft structures using integrated design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Goetz, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic research is reported to develop and validate methods for structural sizing of an airframe designed with the use of composite materials and active controls. This research program includes procedures for computing aeroelastic loads, static and dynamic aeroelasticity, analysis and synthesis of active controls, and optimization techniques. Development of the methods is concerned with the most effective ways of integrating and sequencing the procedures in order to generate structural sizing and the associated active control system, which is optimal with respect to a given merit function constrained by strength and aeroelasticity requirements.

  14. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  15. Analysis of cold worked holes for structural life extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, David H.; Cutshall, Jon T.; Burnside, O. Hal; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    1994-01-01

    Cold working holes for improved fatigue life of fastener holes are widely used on aircraft. This paper presents methods used by the authors to determine the percent of cold working to be applied and to analyze fatigue crack growth of cold worked fastener holes. An elastic, perfectly-plastic analysis of a thick-walled tube is used to determine the stress field during the cold working process and the residual stress field after the process is completed. The results of the elastic/plastic analysis are used to determine the amount of cold working to apply to a hole. The residual stress field is then used to perform damage tolerance analysis of a crack growing out of a cold worked fastener hole. This analysis method is easily implemented in existing crack growth computer codes so that the cold worked holes can be used to extend the structural life of aircraft. Analytical results are compared to test data where appropriate.

  16. Structure analysis methods for crystalline solids and supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Qi; Chen, Min; Han, Xiu-Jun

    2005-11-01

    The three most widely used methods for analyzing atomic structures are evaluated by simulating crystalline solids and supercooled liquids. The local order parameter approach due to Volkov [Phys. Rev. E 66, 061401 (2002)] fails in randomly perturbed body-centered-cubic environments, while the pair analysis method behaves as an approximate approach depending on how the neighborhood is defined. As to the Voronoi analysis method, we improve the procedure of Brostow [Phys. Rev. B 57, 13448 (1998)] to eliminate distorted Voronoi faces and edges which originate from thermal vibrations and computational rounding errors. The improved procedure works robustly in face-centered-cubic, body-centered-cubic, and hexagonal close-packed environments. When the pair analysis technique and the Voronoi analysis method are applied to detect the microstructure and its evolution in supercooled liquids, qualitatively consistent results are attained.

  17. Design and Analysis of a Stiffened Composite Structure Repair Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam

    2011-01-01

    A design and analysis of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened thin-skin composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure is presented. Since the repair concept is a bolted repair using metal components, it can easily be applied in the operational environment. Initial analyses are aimed at validating the finite element modeling approach by comparing with available test data. Once confidence in the analysis approach is established several repair configurations are explored and the most efficient one presented. Repairs involving damage to the top of the stiffener alone are considered in addition to repairs involving a damaged stiffener, flange and underlying skin. High fidelity finite element modeling techniques such as mesh-independent definition of compliant fasteners, elastic-plastic metallic material properties and geometrically nonlinear analysis are utilized in the effort. The results of the analysis are presented and factors influencing the design are assessed and discussed.

  18. Multiscale analysis of structure development in expanded starch snacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sman, R. G. M.; Broeze, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we perform a multiscale analysis of the food structuring process of the expansion of starchy snack foods like keropok, which obtains a solid foam structure. In particular, we want to investigate the validity of the hypothesis of Kokini and coworkers, that expansion is optimal at the moisture content, where the glass transition and the boiling line intersect. In our analysis we make use of several tools, (1) time scale analysis from the field of physical transport phenomena, (2) the scale separation map (SSM) developed within a multiscale simulation framework of complex automata, (3) the supplemented state diagram (SSD), depicting phase transition and glass transition lines, and (4) a multiscale simulation model for the bubble expansion. Results of the time scale analysis are plotted in the SSD, and give insight into the dominant physical processes involved in expansion. Furthermore, the results of the time scale analysis are used to construct the SSM, which has aided us in the construction of the multiscale simulation model. Simulation results are plotted in the SSD. This clearly shows that the hypothesis of Kokini is qualitatively true, but has to be refined. Our results show that bubble expansion is optimal for moisture content, where the boiling line for gas pressure of 4 bars intersects the isoviscosity line of the critical viscosity 106 Pa.s, which runs parallel to the glass transition line.

  19. Multiscale analysis of structure development in expanded starch snacks.

    PubMed

    van der Sman, R G M; Broeze, J

    2014-11-19

    In this paper we perform a multiscale analysis of the food structuring process of the expansion of starchy snack foods like keropok, which obtains a solid foam structure. In particular, we want to investigate the validity of the hypothesis of Kokini and coworkers, that expansion is optimal at the moisture content, where the glass transition and the boiling line intersect. In our analysis we make use of several tools, (1) time scale analysis from the field of physical transport phenomena, (2) the scale separation map (SSM) developed within a multiscale simulation framework of complex automata, (3) the supplemented state diagram (SSD), depicting phase transition and glass transition lines, and (4) a multiscale simulation model for the bubble expansion. Results of the time scale analysis are plotted in the SSD, and give insight into the dominant physical processes involved in expansion. Furthermore, the results of the time scale analysis are used to construct the SSM, which has aided us in the construction of the multiscale simulation model. Simulation results are plotted in the SSD. This clearly shows that the hypothesis of Kokini is qualitatively true, but has to be refined. Our results show that bubble expansion is optimal for moisture content, where the boiling line for gas pressure of 4 bars intersects the isoviscosity line of the critical viscosity 10(6) Pa.s, which runs parallel to the glass transition line.

  20. Ulysses Data Analysis: Magnetic Topology of Heliospheric Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    In this final technical report on research funded by a NASA grant, a project overview is given by way of summaries on nine published papers. Research has included: 1) Using suprathermal electron data to study heliospheric magnetic structures; 2) Analysis of magnetic clouds, coronal mass ejections (CME), and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS); 3) Analysis of the corotating interaction region (CIR) which develop from interactions between solar wind streams of different velocities; 4) Use of Ulysses data in the interpretation of heliospheric events and phenomena.

  1. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan Rahman, Anwar Abdul Hamzah, Mohd Arif Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  2. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  3. Thermal/structural analysis of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Thompson, Jon E.; Babcock, Dale A.; Gray, Carl E., Jr.; Mouring, Chris A.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at LaRC is a combustion driven, high enthalpy blow down wind tunnel. In Mar. 1991, during check out of the transpiration cooled nozzle, pieces of platelets were found in the tunnel test section. It was determined that incorrect tolerancing between the platelets and the housing was the primary cause of the platelet failure. An analysis was performed to determine the tolerance layout between the platelets and the housing to meet the structural and performance criteria under a range of thermal, pressure, and bolt preload conditions. Three recommendations resulted as a product of this analysis.

  4. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  5. Analysis of direct action fuzzy PID controller structures.

    PubMed

    Mann, G I; Hu, B G; Gosine, R G

    1999-01-01

    The majority of the research work on fuzzy PID controllers focuses on the conventional two-input PI or PD type controller proposed by Mamdani (1974). However, fuzzy PID controller design is still a complex task due to the involvement of a large number of parameters in defining the fuzzy rule base. This paper investigates different fuzzy PID controller structures, including the Mamdani-type controller. By expressing the fuzzy rules in different forms, each PLD structure is distinctly identified. For purpose of analysis, a linear-like fuzzy controller is defined. A simple analytical procedure is developed to deduce the closed form solution for a three-input fuzzy inference. This solution is used to identify the fuzzy PID action of each structure type in the dissociated form. The solution for single-input-single-output nonlinear fuzzy inferences illustrates the effect of nonlinearity tuning. The design of a fuzzy PID controller is then treated as a two-level tuning problem. The first level tunes the nonlinear PID gains and the second level tunes the linear gains, including scale factors of fuzzy variables. By assigning a minimum number of rules to each type, the linear and nonlinear gains are deduced and explicitly presented. The tuning characteristics of different fuzzy PID structures are evaluated with respect to their functional behaviors. The rule decoupled and one-input rule structures proposed in this paper provide greater flexibility and better functional properties than the conventional fuzzy PHD structures.

  6. Musical structure analysis using similarity matrix and dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Yu; Jeong, Hong; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2005-10-01

    Automatic music segmentation and structure analysis from audio waveforms based on a three-level hierarchy is examined in this research, where the three-level hierarchy includes notes, measures and parts. The pitch class profile (PCP) feature is first extracted at the note level. Then, a similarity matrix is constructed at the measure level, where a dynamic time warping (DTW) technique is used to enhance the similarity computation by taking the temporal distortion of similar audio segments into account. By processing the similarity matrix, we can obtain a coarse-grain music segmentation result. Finally, dynamic programming is applied to the coarse-grain segments so that a song can be decomposed into several major parts such as intro, verse, chorus, bridge and outro. The performance of the proposed music structure analysis system is demonstrated for pop and rock music.

  7. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  8. Development of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Integrated with Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    An effort has been initiated to integrate manufacturing process simulations with probabilistic structural analyses in order to capture the important impacts of manufacturing uncertainties on component stress levels and life. Two physics-based manufacturing process models (one for powdered metal forging and the other for annular deformation resistance welding) have been linked to the NESSUS structural analysis code. This paper describes the methodology developed to perform this integration including several examples. Although this effort is still underway, particularly for full integration of a probabilistic analysis, the progress to date has been encouraging and a software interface that implements the methodology has been developed. The purpose of this paper is to report this preliminary development.

  9. Structure-function analysis of vitamin D and VDR model.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Yamamoto, K; Masuno, H

    2000-05-01

    In the first section, the general three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of nuclear receptors (NR) was briefly described on the basis of their x-ray crystal structures. Emphasis was placed on the three major conformations of NR-LBD and their role in the transactivation function. In the second part, the structure-function relationship of vitamin D was analyzed based on the ligand structure, in particular by using systematic conformational analysis as a tool. On the basis of the conformational analysis of the vitamin D side chain and studies using conformationally restricted synthetic vitamin D analogs, we suggested the active space region concept of vitamin D: The vitamin D side-chain region was grouped into five regions (A, G, EA, EG and F). Activity orders, in terms of the spatial region, found by these studies are as follows: Affinity for vitamin D receptor (VDR), EA>A>F>G>EG; Affinity for vitamin D binding protein (DBP), A>G,EA, EG; Target gene transactivation, EA>F>A>EG G; Cell differentiation, EA>F>A>EG G; Bone calcium mobilization, EA>G A>F EG; Intestinal calcium absorption, EA=A G>EG. In the third section, homology modeling of VDR-LBD and docking of the natural ligand, 1,25-(OH)2D3, into the ligand binding cavity of the model are described. Amino acid residues forming hydrogen bonds with the biologically important 1alpha- and 25-OH groups were identified: 1alpha-OH forms a pincer-type hydrogen bond with R274 and S237 and 25-OH with H397. This VDR-LBD/1,25-(OH)2D3 docking model was firmly substantiated by mutation analysis. Using this VDR model, the structure-function relationship of highly potent vitamin D analogs was discussed.

  10. Nonlinear analysis of the forced response of structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Mook, D. T.; Sridhar, S.

    1974-01-01

    A general procedure is presented for the nonlinear analysis of the forced response of structural elements to harmonic excitations. Internal resonances (i.e., modal interactions) are taken into account. All excitations are considered, with special consideration given to resonant excitations. The general procedure is applied to clamped-hinged beams. The results reveal that exciting a higher mode may lead to a larger response in a lower interacting mode, contrary to the results of linear analyses.

  11. Thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Neil J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional finite element modeling techniques developed for the thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure (HWTS) are described. The computed results are compared to measured test data. In addition, the results of a NASA two-dimensional parameter finite difference local thermal model and the results of a contractor two-dimensional lumped parameter finite difference local thermal model will be presented.

  12. Thermal and structural analysis of a filter vessel ceramic tubesheet

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.; Zievers, J.F.

    1995-08-01

    A ceramic tubesheet assembly for a hot gas filter vessel is analyzed using the finite element method to determine stresses under differential pressure loading. The stresses include local concentration effects. Selection of the stress measures for evaluation of structural integrity is discussed. Specification of stress limits based upon limited data is considered. Stress results from this ongoing design analysis technology project are shown for one design concept.

  13. Fractal analysis of the hierarchic structure of fossil coal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.D.; Vasilenko, T.A.; Kirillov, A.K.

    2008-05-15

    The fractal analysis is described as method of studying images of surface of fossil coal, one of the natural sorbent, with the aim of determining its structural surface heterogeneity. The deformation effect as a reduction in the dimensions of heterogeneity boundaries is considered. It is shown that the theory of nonequilibrium dynamic systems permits to assess a formation level of heterogeneities involved into a sorbent composition by means of the Hurst factor.

  14. Processing Cones: A Computational Structure for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    image analysis applications, referred to as a processing cone, is described and sample algorithms are presented. A fundamental characteristic of the structure is its hierarchical organization into two-dimensional arrays of decreasing resolution. In this architecture, a protypical function is defined on a local window of data and applied uniformly to all windows in a parallel manner. Three basic modes of processing are supported in the cone: reduction operations (upward processing), horizontal operations (processing at a single level) and projection operations (downward

  15. Energy minimization versus pseudo force technique for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of using minimization techniques for the solution of nonlinear structural analysis problems is discussed and demonstrated by comparison with the conventional pseudo force technique. The comparison involves nonlinear problems with a relatively few degrees of freedom. A survey of the state-of-the-art of algorithms for unconstrained minimization reveals that extension of the technique to large scale nonlinear systems is possible.

  16. Analysis of time-domain scattering by periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yixian; Li, Peijun

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of a time-domain electromagnetic scattering by periodic structures which are known as diffraction gratings. The scattering problem is reduced equivalently into an initial-boundary value problem in a bounded domain by using an exact transparent boundary condition. The well-posedness and stability of the solution are established for the reduced problem. Moreover, a priori energy estimates are obtained with minimum regularity requirement for the data and explicit dependence on the time.

  17. Forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical, user's, programmer's and demonstration manuals for this new capability are presented.

  18. Structural Test and Analysis of a Hybrid Inflatable Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, James L.; Mann, Troy; Sreekantamurthy, Tham; Behun, Vaughn

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing ultra-lightweight structures technology for communication antennas for space missions. One of the research goals is to evaluate the structural characteristics of inflatable and rigidizable antennas through test and analysis. Being able to test and analyze the structural characteristics of a full scale antenna is important to enable the simulation of various mission scenarios to determine system performance in space. Recent work completed to evaluate a Hybrid Inflatable Antenna concept will be discussed. Tests were completed on a 2-m prototype to optimize its static shape and identify its modal dynamics that are important for analytical model validation. These test results were used to evaluate a preliminary finite element model of the antenna, and this model development and correlation activity is also described in the paper.

  19. Structural analysis of a multifunctional, tandemly repeated inositol polyphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; Selinger, L Brent; Mosimann, Steven C

    2009-09-11

    Mitsuokella multacida expresses a unique inositol polyphosphatase (PhyAmm) that is composed of tandem repeats (TRs). Each repeat possesses a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) active-site signature sequence and fold. Using a combination of structural, mutational, and kinetic studies, we show that the N-terminal (D1) and C-terminal (D2) active sites of the TR have diverged and possess significantly different specificities for inositol polyphosphate. Structural analysis and molecular docking calculations identify steric and electrostatic differences within the substrate binding pocket of each TR that may be involved in the altered substrate specificity. The implications of our results for the biological function of related PTP-like phytases are discussed. Finally, the structures and activities of PhyAmm and tandemly repeated receptor PTPs are compared and discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an inositol phosphatase with tandem PTP domains possessing substrate specificity for different inositol phosphates.

  20. Computational modeling and impact analysis of textile composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Hae-Kyu

    This study is devoted to the development of an integrated numerical modeling enabling one to investigate the static and the dynamic behaviors and failures of 2-D textile composite as well as 3-D orthogonal woven composite structures weakened by cracks and subjected to static-, impact- and ballistic-type loads. As more complicated modeling about textile composite structures is introduced, some of homogenization schemes, geometrical modeling and crack propagations become more difficult problems to solve. To overcome these problems, this study presents effective mesh-generation schemes, homogenization modeling based on a repeating unit cell and sinusoidal functions, and also a cohesive element to study micro-crack shapes. This proposed research has two: (1) studying behavior of textile composites under static loads, (2) studying dynamic responses of these textile composite structures subjected to the transient/ballistic loading. In the first part, efficient homogenization schemes are suggested to show the influence of textile architectures on mechanical characteristics considering the micro modeling of repeating unit cell. Furthermore, the structures of multi-layered or multi-phase composites combined with different laminar such as a sub-laminate, are considered to find the mechanical characteristics. A simple progressive failure mechanism for the textile composites is also presented. In the second part, this study focuses on three main phenomena to solve the dynamic problems: micro-crack shapes, textile architectures and textile effective moduli. To obtain a good solutions of the dynamic problems, this research attempts to use four approaches: (I) determination of governing equations via a three-level hierarchy: micro-mechanical unit cell analysis, layer-wise analysis accounting for transverse strains and stresses, and structural analysis based on anisotropic plate layers, (II) development of an efficient computational approach enabling one to perform transient

  1. Meshfree natural vibration analysis of 2D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosta, Tomislav; Tsukanov, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Determination of resonance frequencies and vibration modes of mechanical structures is one of the most important tasks in the product design procedure. The main goal of this paper is to describe a pioneering application of the solution structure method (SSM) to 2D structural natural vibration analysis problems and investigate the numerical properties of the method. SSM is a meshfree method which enables construction of the solutions to the engineering problems that satisfy exactly all prescribed boundary conditions. This method is capable of using spatial meshes that do not conform to the shape of a geometric model. Instead of using the grid nodes to enforce boundary conditions, it employs distance fields to the geometric boundaries and combines them with the basis functions and prescribed boundary conditions at run time. This defines unprecedented geometric flexibility of the SSM as well as the complete automation of the solution procedure. In the paper we will explain the key points of the SSM as well as investigate the accuracy and convergence of the proposed approach by comparing our results with the ones obtained using analytical methods or traditional finite element analysis. Despite in this paper we are dealing with 2D in-plane vibrations, the proposed approach has a straightforward generalization to model vibrations of 3D structures.

  2. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Conserved EFhd2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yancy Ferrer; Rodríguez Cruz, Eva N.; Vaquer, Ana del C.; Vega, Irving E.

    2013-01-01

    EFhd2 is a novel protein conserved from C. elegans to H. sapiens. This novel protein was originally identified in cells of the immune and central nervous systems. However, it is most abundant in the central nervous system, where it has been found associated with pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The physiological or pathological roles of EFhd2 are poorly understood. In this study, a functional and structural analysis was carried to characterize the molecular requirements for EFhd2’s calcium binding activity. The results showed that mutations of a conserved aspartate on either EF-hand motif disrupted the calcium binding activity, indicating that these motifs work in pair as a functional calcium binding domain. Furthermore, characterization of an identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that introduced a missense mutation indicates the importance of a conserved phenylalanine on EFhd2 calcium binding activity. Structural analysis revealed that EFhd2 is predominantly composed of alpha helix and random coil structures and that this novel protein is thermostable. EFhd2’s thermo stability depends on its N-terminus. In the absence of the N-terminus, calcium binding restored EFhd2’s thermal stability. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding on EFhd2 functional and structural properties, and introduce it into the family of canonical EF-hand domain containing proteins. PMID:22973849

  3. Analysis of tensioned membrane structures considering cable sliding.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-yong

    2003-01-01

    In routine design of tensioned membrane structures, the membrane is generally modeled using space membrane elements and the cables by space cable elements, with no sliding allowed between the membrane and the cables. On the other hand, large deflections are expected and sliding between the membrane and the cables is inevitable. In the present paper, the general finite element code ABAQUS was employed to investigate the influence of cable sliding on membrane surface on the structural behavior. Three analysis models were devised to fulfill this purpose: (1) The membrane element shares nodes with the cable element; (2) The cable can slide on the membrane surface freely (without friction) and (3) The cable can slide on the membrane surface, but with friction between the cable and the membrane. The sliding problem is modeled using a surface-based contact algorithm. The results from three analysis models are compared, showing that cable sliding has only little influence on the structure shape and on the stress distributions in the membrane. The main influence of cable sliding may be its effect on the dynamic behavior of tensioned membrane structures.

  4. Structure-based statistical analysis of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in determination of the high-resolution structure of membrane proteins now enable analysis of the main features of amino acids in transmembrane (TM) segments in comparison with amino acids in water-soluble helices. In this work, we conducted a large-scale analysis of the prevalent locations of amino acids by using a data set of 170 structures of integral membrane proteins obtained from the MPtopo database and 930 structures of water-soluble helical proteins obtained from the protein data bank. Large hydrophobic amino acids (Leu, Val, Ile, and Phe) plus Gly were clearly prevalent in TM helices whereas polar amino acids (Glu, Lys, Asp, Arg, and Gln) were less frequent in this type of helix. The distribution of amino acids along TM helices was also examined. As expected, hydrophobic and slightly polar amino acids are commonly found in the hydrophobic core of the membrane whereas aromatic (Trp and Tyr), Pro, and the hydrophilic amino acids (Asn, His, and Gln) occur more frequently in the interface regions. Charged amino acids are also statistically prevalent outside the hydrophobic core of the membrane, and whereas acidic amino acids are frequently found at both cytoplasmic and extra-cytoplasmic interfaces, basic amino acids cluster at the cytoplasmic interface. These results strongly support the experimentally demonstrated biased distribution of positively charged amino acids (that is, the so-called the positive-inside rule) with structural data.

  5. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  6. Multilevel Dynamic Generalized Structured Component Analysis for Brain Connectivity Analysis in Functional Neuroimaging Data.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Hwang, Heungsun; Woodward, Todd S

    2016-06-01

    We extend dynamic generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) to enhance its data-analytic capability in structural equation modeling of multi-subject time series data. Time series data of multiple subjects are typically hierarchically structured, where time points are nested within subjects who are in turn nested within a group. The proposed approach, named multilevel dynamic GSCA, accommodates the nested structure in time series data. Explicitly taking the nested structure into account, the proposed method allows investigating subject-wise variability of the loadings and path coefficients by looking at the variance estimates of the corresponding random effects, as well as fixed loadings between observed and latent variables and fixed path coefficients between latent variables. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach by applying the method to the multi-subject functional neuroimaging data for brain connectivity analysis, where time series data-level measurements are nested within subjects.

  7. Phylogeny and divergence times inferred from rps16 sequence data analyses for Tricyrtis (Liliaceae), an endemic genus of north-east Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sophia Wan-Pyo; Jury, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Tricyrtis is a genus of monocots with attractive and sophisticated flower shapes and colours, endemic to north-east Asia. There are 18 known species. The highly restricted geographical distribution of the genus is of great interest in terms of both abiotic (continental drift) and biotic (long-distance dispersal) impacts on monocot plant speciation events and their timing, and of evolutionary patterns of diversification leading to the extant taxa. The aims of this study were to (i) predict the time of speciation (divergence) events at infraspecific levels of Tricyrtis, (ii) estimate the rate of evolution of the genus and (iii) provide information on an excellent plant model system in terms of studying loss of biodiversity or extinction of organisms in the dynamic earth environment. Methodology To investigate the divergence time and evolution rate of Tricyrtis, Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analyses were performed by calculating the mean branch lengths of evolutionary paths based on base substitution variations between rps16 intron nucleotide sequences from the 18 known species. Principal results Based upon the relaxed molecular clock model test data, a Bayesian phylogenetic inference tree is presented, and the divergence times and rate of evolution of Tricyrtis were estimated. The analyses also suggest that evolution is occurring at the infraspecific level of the genus in a manner that is not strictly clock bound. Conclusions Continental drift may have been the main speciation process giving rise to the current distribution of the taxa of Tricyrtis. The single-locus gene sequence data presented here are a significant step towards an improved future understanding of the molecular evolution of Tricyrtis via multi-locus evaluation. PMID:22476495

  8. Induction of actinorhodin production by rpsL (encoding ribosomal protein S12) mutations that confer streptomycin resistance in Streptomyces lividans and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed Central

    Shima, J; Hesketh, A; Okamoto, S; Kawamoto, S; Ochi, K

    1996-01-01

    A strain of Streptomyces lividans, TK24, was found to produce a pigmented antibiotic, actinorhodin, although S. lividans normally does not produce this antibiotic. Genetic analyses revealed that a streptomycin-resistant mutation str-6 in strain TK24 is responsible for induction of antibiotic synthesis. DNA sequencing showed that str-6 is a point mutation in the rpsL gene encoding ribosomal protein S12, changing Lys-88 to Glu. Gene replacement experiments with the Lys88-->Glu str allele demonstrated unambiguously that the str mutation is alone responsible for the activation of actinorhodin production observed. In contrast, the strA1 mutation, a genetic marker frequently used for crosses, did not restore actinorhodin production and was found to result in an amino acid alteration of Lys-43 to Asn. Induction of actinorhodin production was also detected in strain TK21, which does not harbor the str-6 mutation, when cells were incubated with sufficient streptomycin or tetracycline to reduce the cell's growth rate, and 40 and 3% of streptomycin- or tetracycline-resistant mutants, respectively, derived from strain TK21 produced actinorhodin. Streptomycin-resistant mutations also blocked the inhibitory effects of relA and brgA mutations on antibiotic production, aerial mycelium formation or both. These str mutations changed Lys-88 to Glu or Arg and Arg-86 to His in ribosomal protein S12. The decrease in streptomycin production in relC mutants in Streptomyces griseus could also be abolished completely by introducing streptomycin-resistant mutations, although the impairment in antibiotic production due to bldA (in Streptomyces coelicolor) or afs mutations (in S. griseus) was not eliminated. These results indicate that the onset and extent of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces spp. is significantly controlled by the translational machinery. PMID:8955413

  9. Loss of ULK1 increases RPS6KB1-NCOR1 repression of NR1H/LXR-mediated Scd1 transcription and augments lipotoxicity in hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Singh, Brijesh K.; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin; Farah, Benjamin L.; Lesmana, Ronny; Ohba, Kenji; Tripathi, Madhulika; Ghosh, Sujoy; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Yen, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipotoxicity caused by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) induces tissue damage and inflammation in metabolic disorders. SCD1 (stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1) converts SFAs to mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) that are incorporated into triglycerides and stored in lipid droplets. SCD1 thus helps protect hepatocytes from lipotoxicity and its reduced expression is associated with increased lipotoxic injury in cultured hepatic cells and mouse models. To further understand the role of SCD1 in lipotoxicity, we examined the regulation of Scd1 in hepatic cells treated with palmitate, and found that NR1H/LXR (nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group H) ligand, GW3965, induced Scd1 expression and lipid droplet formation to improve cell survival. Surprisingly, ULK1/ATG1 (unc-51 like kinase) played a critical role in protecting hepatic cells from SFA-induced lipotoxicity via a novel mechanism that did not involve macroautophagy/autophagy. Specific loss of Ulk1 blocked the induction of Scd1 gene transcription by GW3965, decreased lipid droplet formation, and increased apoptosis in hepatic cells exposed to palmitate. Knockdown of ULK1 increased RPS6KB1 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, polypeptide 1) signaling that, in turn, induced NCOR1 (nuclear receptor co-repressor 1) nuclear uptake, interaction with NR1H/LXR, and recruitment to the Scd1 promoter. These events abrogated the stimulation of Scd1 gene expression by GW3965, and increased lipotoxicity in hepatic cells. In summary, we have identified a novel autophagy-independent role of ULK1 that regulates NR1H/LXR signaling, Scd1 expression, and intracellular lipid homeostasis in hepatic cells exposed to a lipotoxic environment. PMID:27846372

  10. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  11. A simplified method for elastic-plastic-creep structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYPM) was developed for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects are calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  12. Statistical analysis of static shape control in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    The article addresses the problem of efficient analysis of the statistics of initial and corrected shape distortions in space structures. Two approaches for improving efficiency are considered. One is an adjoint technique for calculating distortion shapes: the second is a modal expansion of distortion shapes in terms of pseudo-vibration modes. The two techniques are applied to the problem of optimizing actuator locations on a 55 m radiometer antenna. The adjoint analysis technique is used with a discrete-variable optimization method. The modal approximation technique is coupled with a standard conjugate-gradient continuous optimization method. The agreement between the two sets of results is good, validating both the approximate analysis and optimality of the results.

  13. Development of a simplified procedure for cyclic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Development was extended of a simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYMP) for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects can be calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress, or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials, and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite-element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  14. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  15. Analysis, optimization, and modification the back-structure of FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Wang, Qi-ming; Niu, Shuang; Qian, Hong-liang

    2008-07-01

    FAST, five-hundred-meter aperture spherical radio telescope will be the largest radio telescope in the world which has been established science and research items recently. One of the innovative engineering concepts is the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and a wide band without involving a complex feed system. Besides the reflector simulation, it is very important to study the supporting structure for the reflecting surface. As the cable-net structure has been adopted, the in-depth study of back-structure is very important which is connected between cable-net and panel. In this paper, structure forms and parameters are studied in detail due to catch the costs and technical requirements. Throughout analysis, parameters are compared and modified. Meanwhile, Comparing experiments has carried out on some sample frames. The stiffness experiments with different load situations are going to confirm the feasibility of certain back-structure. Some conclusions is obtained, which can avail in further study.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Metabolic Dissipative, Self-Organized Structures

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Ildefonso Martínez

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important goals of the postgenomic era is understanding the metabolic dynamic processes and the functional structures generated by them. Extensive studies during the last three decades have shown that the dissipative self-organization of the functional enzymatic associations, the catalytic reactions produced during the metabolite channeling, the microcompartmentalization of these metabolic processes and the emergence of dissipative networks are the fundamental elements of the dynamical organization of cell metabolism. Here we present an overview of how mathematical models can be used to address the properties of dissipative metabolic structures at different organizational levels, both for individual enzymatic associations and for enzymatic networks. Recent analyses performed with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that unicellular organisms display a singular global enzymatic structure common to all living cellular organisms, which seems to be an intrinsic property of the functional metabolism as a whole. Mathematical models firmly based on experiments and their corresponding computational approaches are needed to fully grasp the molecular mechanisms of metabolic dynamical processes. They are necessary to enable the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the cellular catalytic reactions and also to help comprehend the conditions under which the structural dynamical phenomena and biological rhythms arise. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metabolic dissipative structures is crucial for unraveling the dynamics of cellular life. PMID:20957111

  17. In situ structural analysis of the Yersinia enterocolitica injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Stenta, Marco; Schmelz, Stefan; Amstutz, Marlise; Wiesand, Ulrich; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Münnich, Stefan; Bleck, Christopher KE; Kowal, Julia; Diepold, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Cornelis, Guy R; Stahlberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Injectisomes are multi-protein transmembrane machines allowing pathogenic bacteria to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells, a process called type III secretion. Here we present the first three-dimensional structure of Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella flexneri injectisomes in situ and the first structural analysis of the Yersinia injectisome. Unexpectedly, basal bodies of injectisomes inside the bacterial cells showed length variations of 20%. The in situ structures of the Y. enterocolitica and S. flexneri injectisomes had similar dimensions and were significantly longer than the isolated structures of related injectisomes. The crystal structure of the inner membrane injectisome component YscD appeared elongated compared to a homologous protein, and molecular dynamics simulations documented its elongation elasticity. The ring-shaped secretin YscC at the outer membrane was stretched by 30–40% in situ, compared to its isolated liposome-embedded conformation. We suggest that elasticity is critical for some two-membrane spanning protein complexes to cope with variations in the intermembrane distance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00792.001 PMID:23908767

  18. Analysis of asteroid (216) Kleopatra using dynamical and structural constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-01-10

    This paper evaluates a dynamically and structurally stable size for Asteroid (216) Kleopatra. In particular, we investigate two different failure modes: material shedding from the surface and structural failure of the internal body. We construct zero-velocity curves in the vicinity of this asteroid to determine surface shedding, while we utilize a limit analysis to calculate the lower and upper bounds of structural failure under the zero-cohesion assumption. Surface shedding does not occur at the current spin period (5.385 hr) and cannot directly initiate the formation of the satellites. On the other hand, this body may be close to structural failure; in particular, the neck may be situated near a plastic state. In addition, the neck's sensitivity to structural failure changes as the body size varies. We conclude that plastic deformation has probably occurred around the neck part in the past. If the true size of this body is established through additional measurements, this method will provide strong constraints on the current friction angle for the body.

  19. The analytic solution of the structural analysis problem and its use in structural synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M. B.

    An overview is presented of the analytic expressions for the inverse of the stiffness matrix, the nodal displacements, and the internal forces in linear elastic redundant structures. The inverse of the stiffness matrix and the nodal displacements are obtained using Binet and Cauchy's theorem on the product of compound matrices. The formula for the internal forces is derived from the principles of structural mechanics. This approach is shown to apply to all framed structures via the unimodal stiffnesses of its elements. Approximate models are constructed which are exact at preselected points along a line in the analysis space. An argument is also made for the use of multilinear polynomials as an alternative to Taylor expansion-based approximations.

  20. Giant panda ribosomal protein S14: cDNA, genomic sequence cloning, sequence analysis, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wu, G-F; Hou, Y-L; Hou, W-R; Song, Y; Zhang, T

    2010-10-13

    RPS14 is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS14 gene and is required for its maturation. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS14 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively; they were both sequenced and analyzed. The length of the cloned cDNA fragment was 492 bp; it contained an open-reading frame of 456 bp, encoding 151 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 3421 bp; it contains four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence shares a high degree of homology with those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio (93.64, 83.37, 92.54, 91.89, 87.28, 84.21, and 84.87%, respectively). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the giant panda with those of these other species revealed that the RPS14 of giant panda is highly homologous with those of B. taurus, R. norvegicus and D. rerio (85.99, 99.34 and 99.34%, respectively), and is 100% identical with the others. This degree of conservation of RPS14 suggests evolutionary selection. Topology prediction shows that there are two N-glycosylation sites, three protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, four N-myristoylation sites, two amidation sites, and one ribosomal protein S11 signature in the RPS14 protein of the giant panda. The RPS14 gene can be readily expressed in Escherichia coli. When it was fused with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, it gave rise to accumulation of an expected 22-kDa polypeptide, in good agreement with the predicted molecular weight. The expression product obtained can be purified for studies of its function.

  1. Simplified analysis of frame structures with viscoelastic dampers considering the effect of soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefei; Wang, Shuguang; Du, Dongsheng; Liu, Weiqing

    2017-01-01

    In this study, simplified numerical models are developed to analyze the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect on frame structures equipped with viscoelastic dampers (VEDs) based on pile group foundation. First, a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator is successfully utilized to replace the SDOF energy dissipated structure considering the SSI effect. The equivalent period and damping ratio of the system are obtained through analogical analysis using the frequency transfer function with adoption of the modal strain energy (MSE) technique. A parametric analysis is carried out to study the SSI effect on the performance of VEDs. Then the equilibrium equations of the multi degree-of-freedom (MDOF) structure with VEDs considering SSI effect are established in the frequency domain. Based on the assumption that the superstructure of the coupled system possesses the classical normal mode, the MDOF superstructure is decoupled to a set of individual SDOF systems resting on a rigid foundation with adoption of the MSE technique through formula derivation. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methods have the advantage of reducing computational cost, however, retaining the satisfactory accuracy. The numerical method proposed herein can provide a fast evaluation of the efficiency of VEDs considering the SSI effect.

  2. Probabilistic and structural reliability analysis of laminated composite structures based on the IPACS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Larry; Buttitta, Claudio; Suarez, James

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic predictions based on the Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures (IPACS) code are presented for the material and structural response of unnotched and notched, 1M6/3501-6 Gr/Ep laminates. Comparisons of predicted and measured modulus and strength distributions are given for unnotched unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates. The predicted modulus distributions were found to correlate well with the test results for all three unnotched laminates. Correlations of strength distributions for the unnotched laminates are judged good for the unidirectional laminate and fair for the cross-ply laminate, whereas the strength correlation for the quasi-isotropic laminate is deficient because IPACS did not yet have a progressive failure capability. The paper also presents probabilistic and structural reliability analysis predictions for the strain concentration factor (SCF) for an open-hole, quasi-isotropic laminate subjected to longitudinal tension. A special procedure was developed to adapt IPACS for the structural reliability analysis. The reliability results show the importance of identifying the most significant random variables upon which the SCF depends, and of having accurate scatter values for these variables.

  3. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  4. RASMOL AB - new functionalities in the program for structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Pikora, Mateusz; Gieldon, Artur

    2015-01-01

    For many years RasMol was one of the most used programs for molecular visualization. It was an excellent tool due to its simplicity and its low demand of computer power. Today it is replaced by OpenGL programs, which have excellent graphics that new computers can additionally handle. Molecular graphics is one of the best tools for the analysis of biomolecular data. With high efficiency and a low demand of computer power, RasMol can still be used as a quick and handy tool used for the analysis of biomolecular structures with good results. In this paper, we describe modifications to the RasMol program, as implemented on the base of RasMol AB 2. We introduced several new functions, namely: the identification of histidine isomers, and advanced structural selection and macro capabilities (as implemented in the point-click menu), which result in an increase in the speed and accuracy of structural analyses. The program can be downloaded from the project page: http://etoh.chem.univ.gda.pl/rasmol/.

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of Phytotoxin Toxoflavin-Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Il; Ma, Jun; Nagamatsu, Tomohisa; Goo, Eunhye; Kim, Hongsup; Hwang, Ingyu; Han, Jaehong; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria synthesize and secrete toxic low molecular weight compounds as virulence factors. These microbial toxins play essential roles in the pathogenicity of bacteria in various hosts, and are emerging as targets for antivirulence strategies. Toxoflavin, a phytotoxin produced by Burkholderia glumae BGR1, has been known to be the key factor in rice grain rot and wilt in many field crops. Recently, toxoflavin-degrading enzyme (TxDE) was identified from Paenibacillus polymyxa JH2, thereby providing a possible antivirulence strategy for toxoflavin-mediated plant diseases. Here, we report the crystal structure of TxDE in the substrate-free form and in complex with toxoflavin, along with the results of a functional analysis. The overall structure of TxDE is similar to those of the vicinal oxygen chelate superfamily of metalloenzymes, despite the lack of apparent sequence identity. The active site is located at the end of the hydrophobic channel, 9 Å in length, and contains a Mn(II) ion interacting with one histidine residue, two glutamate residues, and three water molecules in an octahedral coordination. In the complex, toxoflavin binds in the hydrophobic active site, specifically the Mn(II)-coordination shell by replacing a ligating water molecule. A functional analysis indicated that TxDE catalyzes the degradation of toxoflavin in a manner dependent on oxygen, Mn(II), and the reducing agent dithiothreitol. These results provide the structural features of TxDE and the early events in catalysis. PMID:21799856

  6. Multiscale FE method for analysis of bone micro-structures.

    PubMed

    Podshivalov, L; Fischer, A; Bar-Yoseph, P Z

    2011-08-01

    Bones are composed of hierarchical bio-composite materials characterized by complex multiscale structural geometry and behavior. The architecture and the mechanical properties of bone tissue differ at each level of hierarchy. Thus, a multiscale approach for mechanical analysis of bone is imperative. This paper proposes a new approach for 3D multiscale finite element analysis of trabecular bone that can offer physicians a "digital magnifying glass" to facilitate continuous transition between macro- and micro-scales. The approach imitates the human ability to perceive details. That is, zooming-out from an object causes fewer details to be visible. As a result, the material appears to be smoother and more homogeneous. Zooming-in, in contrast, reveals additional details and material heterogeneity. Realization of the proposed approach requires synergy between a hierarchical geometric model for representing intermediate scales and a mechanical model for local material properties of bone tissue for each scale. The geometric model facilitates seamless and continuous bi-directional transition between macro- and micro-scales, while the mechanical model preserves the effective material properties. A 2D model of a simplified trabecular structure was implemented and analyzed in order to assess the feasibility of the proposed multiscale approach. The successful results of this model led to extending the method into 3D and analyzing real trabecular structures.

  7. Structural analysis of tropical cyclone using INSAT-3D observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Neeru; Kishtawal, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    The continuous observations from visible and thermal infrared (TIR) channels of geostationary satellites are highly useful for obtaining the features associated with the shape and dynamics of cloud structures within the tropical cyclones (TCs). As TC develops from an unstructured cloud cluster and intensifies, the cloud structures become more axisymmetric around the centre of the TC. To better understand the structure of TC during different stages of its evolution i.e. from its cyclogenesis to maturity and dissipation, the continuous satellite observations plays a key role. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations from geostationary satellites are very useful in order to analyze the cloud organization during the cyclogenesis. The gradient of the brightness temperatures measures the level of symmetry of each structure, which characterizes the degree of cloud organization of the TC. In the present work, the structural analysis of TC during its life period using the observations from Indian geostationary satellite INSAT-3D has been discussed. The visible and TIR observations from INSAT-3D satellite were used to fix the center position of the cyclone which is an input for the cyclone track and intensity prediction models. This data is also used to estimate the intensity of cyclone in the advanced Dvorak technique (ADT), and in the estimation of radius of maximum winds (Rmax) of TC which is an essential input parameter for the prediction of storm surge associated to the cyclones. The different patterns of cloud structure during the intensification stage, eye-wall formation and dissipation have been discussed. The early identification of these features helps in predicting the rapid intensification of TC which in turn improves the intensity predictions.

  8. The effects of bazedoxifene on bone structural strength evaluated by hip structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas J; Fuerst, Thomas; Gaither, Kenneth W; Sutradhar, Santosh; Levine, Amy B; Hines, Teresa; Yu, Ching-Ray; Williams, Robert; Mirkin, Sebastian; Chines, Arkadi A

    2015-08-01

    Bazedoxifene (BZA) is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has been shown to prevent and treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Hip structure analysis (HSA) can be used to extract bone structural properties related to strength from hip bone mineral density (BMD) scans. This exploratory analysis used HSA to evaluate changes in hip structural geometry in postmenopausal women enrolled in a phase 3 osteoporosis treatment study who were treated with BZA 20mg or placebo for 2 years. This analysis cohort included women at increased fracture risk based on known skeletal risk factors (n = 521); 1 or more moderate or severe fractures or 2 or more mild vertebral fractures and/or femoral neck BMD T-score ≤ -3.0 at baseline combined with additional women from the overall study population (n = 475); a subgroup analysis included just those women at increased fracture risk. HSA was applied to duplicate hip dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans acquired at screening and 24 months. Percent change from baseline was evaluated using an analysis of covariance for BMD and geometric parameters including section modulus (SM), cross-sectional area (CSA), outer diameter (OD), and buckling ratio (BR). In all regions, BZA was associated with increased BMD and improvements in hip structural geometry. In the narrow neck, BZA 20mg significantly increased SM, CSA, OD, and BMD compared with placebo (P < 0.05 for all). In the intertrochanter region, BZA 20mg significantly increased CSA and BMD and decreased BR compared with placebo (P < 0.05 for all). Other than BMD (P < 0.05), effects of BZA 20mg at the shaft did not reach statistical significance. Similar trends toward improvement in structural geometry with BZA 20mg were observed in all three regions of the hip for the subgroup of women at increased fracture risk. Overall, BZA was associated with geometry-related improvements in bone strength with regard to resistance to bending and compressive forces and to local buckling. These

  9. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Royle, J Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S

    2003-12-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  10. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  11. Structural and dynamical analysis of monodisperse and polydisperse colloidal systems.

    PubMed

    Yiannourakou, Marianna; Economou, Ioannis G; Bitsanis, Ioannis A

    2010-12-14

    We present a semigrand ensemble Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics simulation study of structural and dynamical properties of polydisperse soft spheres interacting via purely repulsive power-law potentials with a varying degree of "softness." Comparisons focus on crystal and amorphous phases at their coexistence points. It is shown through detailed structural analysis that as potential interactions soften, the "quality of crystallinity" of both monodisperse and polydisperse systems deteriorates. In general, polydisperse crystalline phases are characterized by a more ordered structure than the corresponding monodisperse ones (i.e., for the same potential softness). This counter-intuitive feature originates partly from the fact that particles of different sizes may be accommodated more flexibly in a crystal structure and from the reality that coexistence (osmotic) pressure is substantially higher for polydisperse systems. These trends diminish for softer potentials. Potential softness eventually produces substitutionally disordered crystals. However, substitutional order is apparent for the hard-spherelike interactions. Diffusionwise, crystals appear quite robust with a slight difference in the vibrational amplitudes of small and large particles. This difference, again, diminishes with potential softness. Overcrowding in amorphous polydisperse suspensions causes "delayed" diffusion at intermediate times.

  12. Preparation, structural analysis, and properties of tenoxicam cocrystals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jagdishwar R; Carlton, Robert A; Needham, Thomas E; Chichester, Clinton O; Vogt, Frederick G

    2012-10-15

    Cocrystals of tenoxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are screened, prepared, and characterized in this study. Nine tenoxicam cocrystals were identified using solvent-drop grinding (SDG) techniques. Structural characterization was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry, and multinuclear solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Thermal analysis, PXRD, and 1D SSNMR are used to detect solvates and phase mixtures encountered in SDG cocrystal screening. 2D SSNMR methods are then used to confirm cocrystal formation and determine structural aspects for selected cocrystals formed with saccharin, salicylic acid, succinic acid, and glycolic acid in comparison to Forms I and III of tenoxicam. Molecular association is demonstrated using cross-polarization heteronuclear dipolar correlation (CP-HETCOR) methods involving (1)H and (13)C nuclei. Short-range (1)H-(13)C CP-HETCOR and (1)H-(1)H double-quantum interactions between atoms of interest, including those engaged in hydrogen bonding, are used to reveal local aspects of the cocrystal structure. (15)N SSNMR is used to assess ionization state and the potential for zwitterionization in the selected cocrystals. The tenoxicam saccharin cocrystal was found to be similar in structure to a previously-reported cocrystal of piroxicam and saccharin. The four selected cocrystals yielded intrinsic dissolution rates that were similar or reduced relative to tenoxicam Form III.

  13. Detailed analysis of structure and particle trajectories in sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Jeffrey; Katyal, Bhavana

    1999-11-01

    The structure and particle dynamics of sheared suspensions of hard spheres over a range of shear strength to Brownain motion (Péclet number, Pe) have been studied by detailed analysis of extended sampling of Stokesian Dynamics simulations of simple shear. The emphasis is upon large Pe. The structure has been analyzed by decomposition of the pair distribution function, g(r), into spherical harmonics; the harmonics are a complete set for the decompositon. The results indicate a profound and very marked change in structure due to shearing. It is shown that as Pe increases, the structure is increasingly distorted from teh equilibrium spherical symmetry and the number of harmonics required to recompose the original data to within an arbitrary accuracy increases, and this variation depends upon particle fraction. We present information on the content of the dominant harmonics as a function of radial distance for a pair, and interpret the results in terms of preferred directions in the material. Dynamic particle trajectories at time scales long relative to that used for the Brownian step are analyzed in a novel fashion by simple differential geometric measures, such as root mean square path curvature and torsion. Preliminary results illustrate that the path variation from mean flow correlates with the particle stress.

  14. Bayesian analysis of structural equation models with dichotomous variables.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan

    2003-10-15

    Structural equation modelling has been used extensively in the behavioural and social sciences for studying interrelationships among manifest and latent variables. Recently, its uses have been well recognized in medical research. This paper introduces a Bayesian approach to analysing general structural equation models with dichotomous variables. In the posterior analysis, the observed dichotomous data are augmented with the hypothetical missing values, which involve the latent variables in the model and the unobserved continuous measurements underlying the dichotomous data. An algorithm based on the Gibbs sampler is developed for drawing the parameters values and the hypothetical missing values from the joint posterior distributions. Useful statistics, such as the Bayesian estimates and their standard error estimates, and the highest posterior density intervals, can be obtained from the simulated observations. A posterior predictive p-value is used to test the goodness-of-fit of the posited model. The methodology is applied to a study of hypertensive patient non-adherence to medication.

  15. Materials constitutive models for nonlinear analysis of thermally cycled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of inelastic materials models on computed stress-strain solutions for thermally loaded structures were studied by performing nonlinear (elastoplastic creep) and elastic structural analyses on a prismatic, double edge wedge specimen of IN 100 alloy that was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic kinematic, and combined plus transient creep) were exercised for the problem by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Maximum total strain ranges computed from the elastic and nonlinear analyses agreed within 5 percent. Mean cyclic stresses, inelastic strain ranges, and inelastic work were significantly affected by the choice of inelastic constitutive model. The computing time per cycle for the nonlinear analyses was more than five times that required for the elastic analysis.

  16. Analysis of the surface structure of HFCVD diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, P.; Feigerle, C.S.; Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.; Thundat, T.

    1995-07-01

    Structure analysis was carried out on various surface features of diamond films using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The films were grown via hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) in methane and hydrogen gas mixtures. The authors investigated the surfaces of films grown under parameters selected to produce certain textures or surface features such as penetration twins or hopper shaped faces. The SEM images of these films show that the {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes are usually flatter than the {l_brace}111{r_brace}. The {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes show interesting growth features. The ``hopper`` shaped structures were imaged in the tapping mode of the AFM, and the angles between planes and their orientations have been determined. These AFM and SEM images are presented with quantitative analyses of the exposed surfaces. Detailed quantitative information will be useful in understanding the growth of these films.

  17. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  18. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  19. Structural analysis of 5-fluorouracil and thymine solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frederick G.; Vena, Joseph A.; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Strohmeier, Mark; Barnett, Maria E.

    2009-08-01

    Solid-state analysis with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), solid-state NMR (SSNMR), and other spectroscopic and physical methods can provide detailed structural information about organic and pharmaceutical cocrystals. In this study, a range of solid-state analysis methods are used to characterize co-crystallized solid solutions of 5-fluorouracil and thymine. 1H, 13C and 19F SSNMR and PXRD methods are used to study the structure and disorder present in a solid solution previously prepared by solution evaporation methods; here the solid solution is prepared over a wider stoichiometric range by solvent-drop grinding techniques. Long-range perturbations of key chemical shifts are detectable by SSNMR, indicating that the solid solution is not random. Cross-polarization and heteronuclear correlation SSNMR experiments between 1H, 13C, and 19F nuclei offer insight into the structure of this solid solution, and density functional theory (DFT) methods are applied to calculate lattice energies and NMR properties in order to understand the population of the two primary disordered sites in the crystal structure. In addition, a second solid solution of 5-fluorouracil and thymine is reported and analyzed. This solid solution, which was produced by solvent-drop grinding experiments and characterized by SSNMR and powder X-ray diffraction methods, is determined to be an isostructural phase to that of anhydrous thymine with the inclusion of 5-fluorouracil defects. A similar effect does not occur under excess 5-fluorouracil conditions; instead, phase-separated Form 1 of 5-fluorouracil and anhydrous thymine are obtained. DFT calculations are applied to offer a possible explanation for this disparity.

  20. Structural Analysis for the American Airlines Flight 587 Accident Investigation: Global Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Moore, David F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) supported the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in the American Airlines Flight 587 accident investigation due to LaRC's expertise in high-fidelity structural analysis and testing of composite structures and materials. A Global Analysis Team from LaRC reviewed the manufacturer s design and certification procedures, developed finite element models and conducted structural analyses, and participated jointly with the NTSB and Airbus in subcomponent tests conducted at Airbus in Hamburg, Germany. The Global Analysis Team identified no significant or obvious deficiencies in the Airbus certification and design methods. Analysis results from the LaRC team indicated that the most-likely failure scenario was failure initiation at the right rear main attachment fitting (lug), followed by an unstable progression of failure of all fin-to-fuselage attachments and separation of the VTP from the aircraft. Additionally, analysis results indicated that failure initiates at the final observed maximum fin loading condition in the accident, when the VTP was subjected to loads that were at minimum 1.92 times the design limit load condition for certification. For certification, the VTP is only required to support loads of 1.5 times design limit load without catastrophic failure. The maximum loading during the accident was shown to significantly exceed the certification requirement. Thus, the structure appeared to perform in a manner consistent with its design and certification, and failure is attributed to VTP loads greater than expected.

  1. Review of Preliminary Analysis Techniques for Tension Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    COMPLETING FORM I REPORT NuMBER 12 GOVT ACCESSION MO. I PECoPENT*5 CATALO G NUMBER CR 84.017 Sb- " TYPE OFR PO TI PERIOD COVERED6 Review of...Preliminary AnalysisFia 1 Oct 82-30 Sep 83Techniques for Tension Structures 6PROMN R EOTNME 7 A.JTnOR(. 0 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER (.) John W. Leonard N62583/82...11 NUMBER OF PA’,VS ,Port H-ueneme, CA 93043 6- 14 MONiTORINC. AGENCY NAME A ADORESS(,l dilfforn fromW Co-r,Ind Otro 15 SECURITY CL.ASS fol thso *Poof

  2. Engine Structures Analysis Software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-01-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  3. Morphological Algorithms For The Analysis Of Pavement Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivas, Dimitri A.; Skolnick, Michael M.

    1989-11-01

    The applicability of morphological image processing techniques for the description of condition and analysis of pavement surfaces is examined. Morphological techniques can be used in the measurement of pavement media consisting of grain (aggregates) and binding substances (bituminous or Portland cement mixtures). Measurements of size and size distributions on surface features related to texture and distresses can be obtained via morphological opening and closing transformations and distributions. When correlated with actual physical measurements of such quantities, the presented morphological measures of size and size distributions may prove to be useful in characterizing the surface condition of both asphalt and concrete pavement structures.

  4. Development and application of structural dynamics analysis capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, Klaus W.; Hozaki, Shig

    1994-01-01

    Extensive research activities were performed in the area of multidisciplinary modeling and simulation of aerospace vehicles that are relevant to NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The efforts involved theoretical development, computer coding, and debugging of the STARS code. New solution procedures were developed in such areas as structures, CFD, and graphics, among others. Furthermore, systems-oriented codes were developed for rendering the code truly multidisciplinary and rather automated in nature. Also, work was performed in pre- and post-processing of engineering analysis data.

  5. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  6. Engine structures analysis software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-08-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  7. Development of solution techniques for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Andrews, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Nonlinear structural solution methods in the current research literature are classified according to order of the solution scheme, and it is shown that the analytical tools for these methods are uniformly derivable by perturbation techniques. A new perturbation formulation is developed for treating an arbitrary nonlinear material, in terms of a finite-difference generated stress-strain expansion. Nonlinear geometric effects are included in an explicit manner by appropriate definition of an applicable strain tensor. A new finite-element pilot computer program PANES (Program for Analysis of Nonlinear Equilibrium and Stability) is presented for treatment of problems involving material and geometric nonlinearities, as well as certain forms on nonconservative loading.

  8. SPAR data set contents. [finite element structural analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The contents of the stored data sets of the SPAR (space processing applications rocket) finite element structural analysis system are documented. The data generated by each of the system's processors are stored in a data file organized as a library. Each data set, containing a two-dimensional table or matrix, is identified by a four-word name listed in a table of contents. The creating SPAR processor, number of rows and columns, and definitions of each of the data items are listed for each data set. An example SPAR problem using these data sets is also presented.

  9. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  10. Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

    2008-12-25

    We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

  11. Computational methods for efficient structural reliability and reliability sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in efficient structural reliability analysis methods. The paper proposes an efficient, adaptive importance sampling (AIS) method that can be used to compute reliability and reliability sensitivities. The AIS approach uses a sampling density that is proportional to the joint PDF of the random variables. Starting from an initial approximate failure domain, sampling proceeds adaptively and incrementally with the goal of reaching a sampling domain that is slightly greater than the failure domain to minimize over-sampling in the safe region. Several reliability sensitivity coefficients are proposed that can be computed directly and easily from the above AIS-based failure points. These probability sensitivities can be used for identifying key random variables and for adjusting design to achieve reliability-based objectives. The proposed AIS methodology is demonstrated using a turbine blade reliability analysis problem.

  12. Asymmetric-Structure Analysis of Carbon and Energy Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Cao, Guangxi

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the asymmetric structure between the carbon and energy markets from two aspects of different trends (up or down) and volatility-transmission direction using asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) cross-correlation coefficient test, multifractal asymmetric DCCA (MF-ADCCA) method, asymmetric volatility-constrained correlation metric and time rate of information-flow approach. We sampled 1283 observations from January 2008 to December 2012 among pairs of carbon and energy markets for analysis. Empirical results show that the (1) asymmetric characteristic from the cross-correlation between carbon and returns in the energy markets is significant, (2) asymmetric cross-correlation between carbon and energy market price returns is persistent and multifractral and (3) volatility of the base assets of energy market returns is more influential to the base asset of the carbon market than that of the energy market.

  13. Berkeley Phylogenomics Group web servers: resources for structural phylogenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Glanville, Jake Gunn; Kirshner, Dan; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenomic analysis addresses the limitations of function prediction based on annotation transfer, and has been shown to enable the highest accuracy in prediction of protein molecular function. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group provides a series of web servers for phylogenomic analysis: classification of sequences to pre-computed families and subfamilies using the PhyloFacts Phylogenomic Encyclopedia, FlowerPower clustering of proteins sharing the same domain architecture, MUSCLE multiple sequence alignment, SATCHMO simultaneous alignment and tree construction and SCI-PHY subfamily identification. The PhyloBuilder web server provides an integrated phylogenomic pipeline starting with a user-supplied protein sequence, proceeding to homolog identification, multiple alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, subfamily identification and structure prediction. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group resources are available at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu.

  14. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  15. Employing Social Network Construction and Analysis in Web Structure Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xagi, Mohamad; Guerbas, Abdelghani; Kianmehr, Keivan; Karampelas, Panagiotis; Ridley, Mick; Alhajj, Reda; Rokne, Jon

    The world wide web is growing continuously and rapidly; it is quickly facilitating the migration of tasks of the daily life into web-based. This trend shows time will come when everyone is forced to use the web for daily activities. Naive users arc the major concern of such a shift; so, it is necessary to have the web ready to serve them. We argue that this requires well optimized websites for users to quickly locate the information they arc looking for. This, on the other hand, becomes more and more important due to the widespread reliance on the many services available on the Internet nowadays. It is true that search engines can facilitate the task of finding the information one is looking for. However, search engines will never replace but do complement the optimization of a website's internal structure based on previously recorded user behavior. In this chapter, wc will present a novel approach for identifying problematic structures in websites. This method consists of two phases. The first phase compares user behavior, derived via web log mining techniques, to a combined analysis of the website's link structure obtained by applying three methods leading to more robust framework and hence strong and consistent outcome: (1) constructing and analyzing a social network of the pages constituting the website by considering both the structure and the usage information; (2) applying the Weighted PageRank algorithm; and (3) applying the Hypertext Induced Topic Selection (HITS) method. In the second phase, we use the term frequency-inverse document frequency (TFIDF) measure to investigate further the correlation between the page that contains the link and the linked to pages in order to further support the findings of the first phase of our approach. We will then show how to use these intermediate results in order to point out problematic website structures to the website owner.

  16. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  17. X-ray CT analysis of pore structure in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Miyata, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Kazuaki; Shiota, Erika

    2016-06-01

    The development of microfocused X-ray computed tomography (CT) devices enables digital imaging analysis at the pore scale. The applications of these devices are diverse in soil mechanics, geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering, petroleum engineering, and agricultural engineering. In particular, the imaging of the pore space in porous media has contributed to numerical simulations for single-phase and multiphase flows or contaminant transport through the pore structure as three-dimensional image data. These obtained results are affected by the pore diameter; therefore, it is necessary to verify the image preprocessing for the image analysis and to validate the pore diameters obtained from the CT image data. Moreover, it is meaningful to produce the physical parameters in a representative element volume (REV) and significant to define the dimension of the REV. This paper describes the underlying method of image processing and analysis and discusses the physical properties of Toyoura sand for the verification of the image analysis based on the definition of the REV. On the basis of the obtained verification results, a pore-diameter analysis can be conducted and validated by a comparison with the experimental work and image analysis. The pore diameter is deduced from Young-Laplace's law and a water retention test for the drainage process. The results from previous study and perforated-pore diameter originally proposed in this study, called the voxel-percolation method (VPM), are compared in this paper. In addition, the limitations of the REV, the definition of the pore diameter, and the effectiveness of the VPM for an assessment of the pore diameter are discussed.

  18. Structural analysis of photosystem I polypeptides using chemical crosslinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armbrust, T. S.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes, obtained from leaves of 14 d soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Williams) plants, were treated with the chemical crosslinkers glutaraldehyde or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) to investigate the structural organization of photosystem I. Polypeptides were resolved using lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were identified by western blot analysis using a library of polyclonal antibodies specific for photosystem I subunits. An electrophoretic examination of crosslinked thylakoids revealed numerous crosslinked products, using either glutaraldehyde or EDC. However, only a few of these could be identified by western blot analysis using subunit-specific polyclonal antibodies. Several glutaraldehyde dependent crosslinked species were identified. A single band was identified minimally composed of PsaC and PsaD, documenting the close interaction between these two subunits. The most interesting aspect of these studies was a crosslinked species composed of the PsaB subunit observed following EDC treatment of thylakoids. This is either an internally crosslinked species, which will provide structural information concerning the topology of the complex PsaB protein, a linkage with a polypeptide for which we do not yet have an immunological probe, or a masking of epitopes by the EDC linkage at critical locations in the peptide which is linked to PsaB.

  19. Structural analysis of photosystem I polypeptides using chemical crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, T S; Odom, W R; Guikema, J A

    1994-07-01

    Thylakoid membranes, obtained from leaves of 14 d soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Williams) plants, were treated with the chemical crosslinkers glutaraldehyde or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) to investigate the structural organization of photosystem I. Polypeptides were resolved using lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were identified by western blot analysis using a library of polyclonal antibodies specific for photosystem I subunits. An electrophoretic examination of crosslinked thylakoids revealed numerous crosslinked products, using either glutaraldehyde or EDC. However, only a few of these could be identified by western blot analysis using subunit-specific polyclonal antibodies. Several glutaraldehyde dependent crosslinked species were identified. A single band was identified minimally composed of PsaC and PsaD, documenting the close interaction between these two subunits. The most interesting aspect of these studies was a crosslinked species composed of the PsaB subunit observed following EDC treatment of thylakoids. This is either an internally crosslinked species, which will provide structural information concerning the topology of the complex PsaB protein, a linkage with a polypeptide for which we do not yet have an immunological probe, or a masking of epitopes by the EDC linkage at critical locations in the peptide which is linked to PsaB.

  20. Insights from the structural analysis of protein heterodimer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Anita, Sathyanarayanan; Kangueane, Pandjassarame

    2011-05-07

    Protein heterodimer complexes are often involved in catalysis, regulation, assembly, immunity and inhibition. This involves the formation of stable interfaces between the interacting partners. Hence, it is of interest to describe heterodimer interfaces using known structural complexes. We use a non-redundant dataset of 192 heterodimer complex structures from the protein databank (PDB) to identify interface residues and describe their interfaces using amino-acids residue property preference. Analysis of the dataset shows that the heterodimer interfaces are often abundant in polar residues. The analysis also shows the presence of two classes of interfaces in heterodimer complexes. The first class of interfaces (class A) with more polar residues than core but less than surface is known. These interfaces are more hydrophobic than surfaces, where protein-protein binding is largely hydrophobic. The second class of interfaces (class B) with more polar residues than core and surface is shown. These interfaces are more polar than surfaces, where binding is mainly polar. Thus, these findings provide insights to the understanding of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Structures using Commercial Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-01-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  2. Structural analysis of strained quantum dots using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Kavokin, K V; Puebla, J; Krysa, A B; Hopkinson, M; Andreev, A D; Sanchez, A M; Beanland, R; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2012-10-01

    Strained semiconductor nanostructures can be used to make single-photon sources, detectors and photovoltaic devices, and could potentially be used to create quantum logic devices. The development of such applications requires techniques capable of nanoscale structural analysis, but the microscopy methods typically used to analyse these materials are destructive. NMR techniques can provide non-invasive structural analysis, but have been restricted to strain-free semiconductor nanostructures because of the significant strain-induced quadrupole broadening of the NMR spectra. Here, we show that optically detected NMR spectroscopy can be used to analyse individual strained quantum dots. Our approach uses continuous-wave broadband radiofrequency excitation with a specially designed spectral pattern and can probe individual strained nanostructures containing only 1 × 10(5) quadrupole nuclear spins. With this technique, we are able to measure the strain distribution and chemical composition of quantum dots in the volume occupied by the single confined electron. The approach could also be used to address problems in quantum information processing such as the precise control of nuclear spins in the presence of strong quadrupole effects.

  3. A Simplified Mesh Deformation Method Using Commercial Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Samareh, Jamshid

    2004-01-01

    Mesh deformation in response to redefined or moving aerodynamic surface geometries is a frequently encountered task in many applications. Most existing methods are either mathematically too complex or computationally too expensive for usage in practical design and optimization. We propose a simplified mesh deformation method based on linear elastic finite element analyses that can be easily implemented by using commercially available structural analysis software. Using a prescribed displacement at the mesh boundaries, a simple structural analysis is constructed based on a spatially varying Young s modulus to move the entire mesh in accordance with the surface geometry redefinitions. A variety of surface movements, such as translation, rotation, or incremental surface reshaping that often takes place in an optimization procedure, may be handled by the present method. We describe the numerical formulation and implementation using the NASTRAN software in this paper. The use of commercial software bypasses tedious reimplementation and takes advantage of the computational efficiency offered by the vendor. A two-dimensional airfoil mesh and a three-dimensional aircraft mesh were used as test cases to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations were performed for the deformed two-dimensional meshes.

  4. LOOS: an extensible platform for the structural analysis of simulations.

    PubMed

    Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis library) as an object-oriented library designed to facilitate the rapid development of tools for the structural analysis of simulations. LOOS supports the native file formats of most common simulation packages including AMBER, CHARMM, CNS, Gromacs, NAMD, Tinker, and X-PLOR. Encapsulation and polymorphism are used to simultaneously provide a stable interface to the programmer and make LOOS easily extensible. A rich atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included as part of the library. LOOS enables students and casual programmer-scientists to rapidly write their own analytical tools in a compact and expressive manner resembling scripting. LOOS is written in C++ and makes extensive use of the Standard Template Library and Boost, and is freely available under the GNU General Public License (version 3) LOOS has been tested on Linux and MacOS X, but is written to be portable and should work on most Unix-based platforms.

  5. Analysis of interstellar cloud structure based on IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalo, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop new tools for the analysis of the structure of densely sampled maps of interstellar star-forming regions. A particular emphasis was on the recognition and characterization of nested hierarchical structure and fractal irregularity, and their relation to the level of star formation activity. The panoramic IRAS images provided data with the required range in spatial scale, greater than a factor of 100, and in column density, greater than a factor of 50. In order to construct densely sampled column density maps of star-forming clouds, column density images of four nearby cloud complexes were constructed from IRAS data. The regions have various degrees of star formation activity, and most of them have probably not been affected much by the disruptive effects of young massive stars. The largest region, the Scorpius-Ophiuchus cloud complex, covers about 1000 square degrees (it was subdivided into a few smaller regions for analysis). Much of the work during the early part of the project focused on an 80 square degree region in the core of the Taurus complex, a well-studied region of low-mass star formation.

  6. Structural analysis for horizontal storage of 9975 shipping packages

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.

    2000-03-16

    This paper presents a nonlinear dynamic analysis for a 9975 shipping package to evaluate its structural response while stored in a horizontal assembly of packages. The structural response of the 9975 shipping package stored on a 24-inch-wide bottom rack while the upper two tiers of 9975 shipping packages are being loaded on top of it is analyzed. The upper two tiers of the packages are lifted by a forklift truck and then loaded onto the bottom tier of the packages. A nonlinear finite-element dynamic analysis with explicit time integration was performed for a 9975 shipping package to evaluate the consequence of the loading process described above. The effect of the impact load generated by the sudden release of the upper two tiers of the packages to the deformation of the bottom package is accounted for. The ABAQUS/Explicit computer code (Reference 1) was used to perform the computations. The time histories of the deflections and stresses were generated.

  7. NURBS-Based Geometry for Integrated Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, James H.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was initiated in April 1993 and completed in September 1996. The primary goal of the project was to exploit the emerging defacto CAD standard of Non- Uniform Rational B-spline (NURBS) based curve and surface geometry to integrate and streamline the process of turbomachinery structural analysis. We focused our efforts on critical geometric modeling challenges typically posed by the requirements of structural analysts. We developed a suite of software tools that facilitate pre- and post-processing of NURBS-based turbomachinery blade models for finite element structural analyses. We also developed tools to facilitate the modeling of blades in their manufactured (or cold) state based on nominal operating shape and conditions. All of the software developed in the course of this research is written in the C++ language using the Iris Inventor 3D graphical interface tool-kit from Silicon Graphics. In addition to enhanced modularity, improved maintainability, and efficient prototype development, this design facilitates the re-use of code developed for other NASA projects and provides a uniform and professional 'look and feel' for all applications developed by the Iowa State Team.

  8. Magneto-Structural Analysis of Iron(III) Keggin Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Nuno A G; Sadeghi, Omid; Woods, Toby J; Zhang, Yuan-Zhu; Schnack, Jürgen; Dunbar, Kim; Nyman, May; Bo, Carles

    2017-02-16

    A computational study and magnetic susceptibility measurements of three homonuclear Fe(III) Keggin structures are herein presented: the [FeO4@Fe12F24(μ-OCH3)12](5-) anion (1), the [Bi6{FeO4@Fe12O12(OH)12}(μ-O2CCCl3)12](+) cation (2) and its polymorph [Bi6{FeO4@Fe12O12(OH)10(H2O)2}(μ-O2CCF3)10](3+) (3). These results are contrasted with the exchange interactions present in the previously characterized [Fe6(OH)3Ge2W18O68(OH)6](11-) and [H12As4Fe8W30O120(H2O)2](4-) anions. The computational analysis shows that the most significant antiferromagnetic spin coupling takes place at the junction between each of the {Fe3O6(OH)3}/{Fe3F6(OCH3)3} framework motifs, a possibility that had been previously discarded in the literature on the basis of the Fe-Fe distances. For all the examined iron(III) Keggin structures, it is found that the magnitude of the magnetic couplings within each structural subunit follows the same trend.

  9. Finite element analysis accuracy of the GTC commissioning instrument structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Alejandro; Godoy, Javier; Velazquez, F.; Espejo, Carlos; Cuevas, Salvador; Bringas, Vicente; Manzo, A.; del Llano, L.; Sanchez, J. L.; Chavoya, Armando; Devaney, Nicholas; Castro, Javier; Cavaller, Luis

    2003-02-01

    Under a contract with the GRANTECAN, the Commissioning Instrument (CI) is a project developed by a team of Mexican scientists and engineers from the Instrumentation Department of the Astronomy Institute at the UNAM and the CIDESI Engineering Center. The CI will verify the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) performance during the commissioning phase between First Light and Day One. The design phase is now completed and the project is currently in the manufacturing phase. The CI main goal is to measure the telescope image quality. To obtain a stable high resolution image, the mechanical structures should be as rigid as possible. This paper describes the several steps of the conceptual design and the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for the CI mechanical structures. A variety of models were proposed. The FEA was useful to evaluate the displacements, shape modes, weight, and thermal expansions of each model. A set of indicators were compared with decision matrixes. The best performance models were subjected to a re-optimization stage. By applying the same decision method, a CI Structure Model was proposed. The FEA results complied with all the instruments specifications. Displacements values and vibration frequencies are reported.

  10. Parameterization of 3D brain structures for statistical shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Litao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2004-05-01

    Statistical Shape Analysis (SSA) is a powerful tool for noninvasive studies of pathophysiology and diagnosis of brain diseases. It also provides a shape constraint for the segmentation of brain structures. There are two key problems in SSA: the representation of shapes and their alignments. The widely used parameterized representations are obtained by preserving angles or areas and the alignments of shapes are achieved by rotating parameter net. However, representations preserving angles or areas do not really guarantee the anatomical correspondence of brain structures. In this paper, we incorporate shape-based landmarks into parameterization of banana-like 3D brain structures to address this problem. Firstly, we get the triangulated surface of the object and extract two landmarks from the mesh, i.e. the ends of the banana-like object. Then the surface is parameterized by creating a continuous and bijective mapping from the surface to a spherical surface based on a heat conduction model. The correspondence of shapes is achieved by mapping the two landmarks to the north and south poles of the sphere and using an extracted origin orientation to select the dateline during parameterization. We apply our approach to the parameterization of lateral ventricle and a multi-resolution shape representation is obtained by using the Discrete Fourier Transform.

  11. Statistical shape analysis of subcortical structures using spectral matching.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Mahsa; Lombaert, Herve; Datta, Alexandre N; Oser, Nadine; Létourneau-Guillon, Laurent; Lapointe, Laurence Vincent; Martin, Florence; Malfait, Domitille; Tucholka, Alan; Lippé, Sarah; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Studying morphological changes of subcortical structures often predicate neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Hence, methods for quantifying morphological variations in the brain anatomy, including groupwise shape analyses, are becoming increasingly important for studying neurological disorders. In this paper, a novel groupwise shape analysis approach is proposed to detect regional morphological alterations in subcortical structures between two study groups, e.g., healthy and pathological subjects. The proposed scheme extracts smoothed triangulated surface meshes from segmented binary maps, and establishes reliable point-to-point correspondences among the population of surfaces using a spectral matching method. Mean curvature features are incorporated in the matching process, in order to increase the accuracy of the established surface correspondence. The mean shapes are created as the geometric mean of all surfaces in each group, and a distance map between these shapes is used to characterize the morphological changes between the two study groups. The resulting distance map is further analyzed to check for statistically significant differences between two populations. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated on two separate subcortical structures (hippocampus and putamen). Furthermore, the proposed methodology is validated in a clinical application for detecting abnormal subcortical shape variations in Alzheimer's disease. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art algorithms, has less computational cost, and is more sensitive to small morphological variations in patients with neuropathologies.

  12. LRIG1 extracellular domain: structure and function analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Soo, Priscilla; Walker, Francesca; Zhang, Hui Hua; Redpath, Nicholas; Tan, Chin Wee; Nicola, Nicos A; Adams, Timothy E; Garrett, Thomas P; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-22

    We have expressed and purified three soluble fragments of the human LRIG1-ECD (extracellular domain): the LRIG1-LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain, the LRIG1-3Ig (immunoglobulin-like) domain, and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment using baculovirus vectors in insect cells. The two LRIG1 domains crystallised so that we have been able to determine the three-dimensional structures at 2.3Å resolution. We developed a three-dimensional structure for the LRIG1-ECD using homology modelling based on the LINGO-1 structure. The LRIG1-LRR domain and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment are monomers in solution, whereas the LRIG1-3Ig domain appears to be dimeric. We could not detect any binding of the LRIG1 domains or the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment to the EGF receptor (EGFR), either in solution using biosensor analysis or when the EGFR was expressed on the cell surface. The FLAG-tagged LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment binds weakly to colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of EGFRs. Similarly, neither the soluble LRIG1-LRR nor the LRIG1-3Ig domains nor the full-length LRIG1 co-expressed in HEK293 cells inhibited ligand-stimulated activation of cell-surface EGFR.

  13. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  14. Code System for Analysis of 3-D Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, C. A.

    1999-11-22

    Version 00 NONSAP-C is a finite element program for determining the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures. Long-term, or creep, behavior of concrete structures can also be analyzed. Nonlinear constitutive relations for concrete under short-term loads are incorporated in two time-independent models, a variable-modulus approach with orthotropic behavior induced in the concrete due to the development of different tangent moduli in different directions and an elastic-plastic model in which the concrete is assumed to be a continuous, isotropic, and linearly elastic-plastic strain-hardening-fracture material. A viscoelastic constitutive model for long-term thermal creep of concrete is included. Three-dimensional finite elements available in NONSAP-C include a truss element, a multinode tendon element for prestressed and post tensioned concrete structures, an elastic-plastic membrane element to represent the behavior of cavity liners, and a general isoparametric element with a variable number of nodes for analysis of solids and thick shells.

  15. Conceptual Design Oriented Wing Structural Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, May Yuen

    1996-01-01

    Airplane optimization has always been the goal of airplane designers. In the conceptual design phase, a designer's goal could be tradeoffs between maximum structural integrity, minimum aerodynamic drag, or maximum stability and control, many times achieved separately. Bringing all of these factors into an iterative preliminary design procedure was time consuming, tedious, and not always accurate. For example, the final weight estimate would often be based upon statistical data from past airplanes. The new design would be classified based on gross characteristics, such as number of engines, wingspan, etc., to see which airplanes of the past most closely resembled the new design. This procedure works well for conventional airplane designs, but not very well for new innovative designs. With the computing power of today, new methods are emerging for the conceptual design phase of airplanes. Using finite element methods, computational fluid dynamics, and other computer techniques, designers can make very accurate disciplinary-analyses of an airplane design. These tools are computationally intensive, and when used repeatedly, they consume a great deal of computing time. In order to reduce the time required to analyze a design and still bring together all of the disciplines (such as structures, aerodynamics, and controls) into the analysis, simplified design computer analyses are linked together into one computer program. These design codes are very efficient for conceptual design. The work in this thesis is focused on a finite element based conceptual design oriented structural synthesis capability (CDOSS) tailored to be linked into ACSYNT.

  16. Advance in orientation microscopy: quantitative analysis of nanocrystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Seyring, Martin; Song, Xiaoyan; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2011-04-26

    The special properties of nanocrystalline materials are generally accepted to be a consequence of the high density of planar defects (grain and twin boundaries) and their characteristics. However, until now, nanograin structures have not been characterized with similar detail and statistical relevance as coarse-grained materials, due to the lack of an appropriate method. In the present paper, a novel method based on quantitative nanobeam diffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented to determine the misorientation of adjacent nanograins and subgrains. Spatial resolution of <5 nm can be achieved. This method is applicable to characterize orientation relationships in wire, film, and bulk materials with nanocrystalline structures. As a model material, nanocrystalline Cu is used. Several important features of the nanograin structure are discovered utilizing quantitative analysis: the fraction of twin boundaries is substantially higher than that observed in bright-field images in the TEM; small angle grain boundaries are prominent; there is an obvious dependence of the grain boundary characteristics on grain size distribution and mean grain size.

  17. Population genetic analysis and sub-structuring in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Simuunza, Martin; Bilgic, Huseyin; Karagenc, Tulin; Syakalima, Michelo; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    The tick-borne protozoan parasite, Babesia bovis is one of the causes of bovine babesiosis, an economically important disease of cattle in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Using the recently published genome sequence of the parasite, we developed a panel of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers and used these to investigate the role of genetic exchange in the population structure and diversity of the parasite using isolates from Zambia and Turkey. This population genetic analysis showed that genetic exchange occurs and that there are high levels of genetic diversity, with geographical sub-structuring quantified using Wright's F Index. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when isolates from both countries were treated as one population, but when isolates from Zambia were analysed separately linkage equilibrium was observed. The Turkish isolates were sub-structured, containing two genetically distinct sub-groups, both of which appeared to be in linkage equilibrium. The results of the Zambian study suggest that a sub-set of the parasite population is responsible for the westward spread of babesiosis into the previously disease-free central region of the country. The Zambian isolates had a significantly higher number of genotypes per sample than those from Turkey and age was found to be a significant predictor of the multiplicity of infection. The high levels of diversity seen in the Zambian and Turkish B. bovis populations have implications in the development of subunit vaccines against the disease and the spread of drug resistance.

  18. Applying microscopy to the analysis of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Francisco; Cook, Peter R; Jackson, Dean A

    2003-02-01

    One of the ultimate goals of biological research is to understand mechanisms of cell function within living organisms. With this in mind, many sophisticated technologies that allow us to inspect macromolecular structure in exquisite detail have been developed. Although knowledge of structure derived from techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance is of vital importance, these approaches cannot reveal the remarkable complexity of molecular interactions that exists in vivo. With this in mind, this review focuses on the use of microscopy techniques to analyze cell structure and function. We describe the different basic microscopic methodologies and how the routine techniques are best applied to particular biological problems. We also emphasize the specific capabilities and uses of light and electron microscopy and highlight their individual advantages and disadvantages. For completion, we also comment on the alternative possibilities provided by a variety of advanced imaging technologies. We hope that this brief analysis of the undoubted power of microscopy techniques will be enough to stimulate a wider participation in this rapidly developing area of biological discovery.

  19. Online anomaly detection in crowd scenes via structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Fang, Jianwu; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal behavior detection in crowd scenes is continuously a challenge in the field of computer vision. For tackling this problem, this paper starts from a novel structure modeling of crowd behavior. We first propose an informative structural context descriptor (SCD) for describing the crowd individual, which originally introduces the potential energy function of particle's interforce in solid-state physics to intuitively conduct vision contextual cueing. For computing the crowd SCD variation effectively, we then design a robust multi-object tracker to associate the targets in different frames, which employs the incremental analytical ability of the 3-D discrete cosine transform (DCT). By online spatial-temporal analyzing the SCD variation of the crowd, the abnormality is finally localized. Our contribution mainly lies on three aspects: 1) the new exploration of abnormal detection from structure modeling where the motion difference between individuals is computed by a novel selective histogram of optical flow that makes the proposed method can deal with more kinds of anomalies; 2) the SCD description that can effectively represent the relationship among the individuals; and 3) the 3-D DCT multi-object tracker that can robustly associate the limited number of (instead of all) targets which makes the tracking analysis in high density crowd situation feasible. Experimental results on several publicly available crowd video datasets verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Conformational Analysis on structural perturbations of the zinc finger NEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Ryan; Salsbury, Freddie; Salsbury Group Team

    2014-03-01

    The NEMO (NF-kB Essential Modulator) Zinc Finger protein (2jvx) is a functional Ubiquitin-binding domain, and plays a role in signaling pathways for immune/inflammatory responses, apoptosis, and oncogenesis [Cordier et al., 2008]. Characterized by 3 cysteines and 1 histidine residue at the active site, the biologically occurring, bound zinc configuration is a stable structural motif. Perturbations of the zinc binding residues suggest conformational changes in the 423-atom protein characterized via analysis of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Structural perturbations include simulations with and without a zinc ion and with and without de-protonated cysteines, resulting in four distinct configurations. Simulations of various time scales show consistent results, yet the longest, GPU driven, microsecond runs show more drastic structural and dynamic fluctuations when compared to shorter duration time-scales. The last cysteine residue (26 of 28) and the helix on which it resides exhibit a secondary, locally unfolded conformation in addition to its normal bound conformation. Combined analytics elucidate how the presence of zinc and/or protonated cysteines impact the dynamics and energetic fluctuations of NEMO. Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University Computational Biosciences shared resource supported by NCI CCSG P30CA012197.