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Sample records for rrna gene mutations

  1. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori associated with clarithromycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Suk; Kang, Jung Oak; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo; Choi, Tae Yeal

    2002-01-01

    Among 12 clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Guri, Korea, 8 showed an adenine to guanine mutation at position 2143 (formerly A2144G or E. coli 2059) in the 23S rRNA gene by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. The remaining 4 strains, digested by neither BsaI nor BbsI, showed a thymine to cytosine mutation at position 2182 (T2182C) by direct sequencing of the PCR products. The T2182C mutants showed a tendency of higher levels of minimum inhibitory concentration to clarithromycin than the A2143G mutants. In conclusion, either the A2143G or the T2182C mutation was present in 100% of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates examined. The PCR-RFLP technique with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI was a rapid and relatively simple method to detect the clarithromycin resistance. But undigested isolates were quite frequent among our isolates (33.3%), the PCR-RFLP method with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI should not be used alone, and development of other rapid detection method for clarithromycin resistance is mandatory. PMID:12378008

  2. Spontaneous Erythromycin Resistance Mutation in a 23S rRNA Gene, rrlA, of the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus IB-21

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Steven T.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous, erythromycin-resistant mutants of Thermus thermophilus IB-21 were isolated and found to carry the mutation A2058G in one of two 23S rRNA operons. The heterozygosity of these mutants indicates that A2058G confers a dominant or codominant phenotype in this organism. This mutation provides a valuable tool for the genetic manipulation of the 23S rRNA genes of Thermus. PMID:11418580

  3. Mutational analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in Tunisian patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna . E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Louhichi, Nacim; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Lahmar, Imed; Driss, Nabil; Drira, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2006-02-24

    We explored the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in 100 Tunisian families affected with NSHL and in 100 control individuals. We identified the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in one out of these 100 families and not in the 100 control individuals. Members of this family harbouring the A1555G mutation showed phenotypic heterogeneity which could be explained by an eventual nuclear-mitochondrial interaction. So, we have screened three nuclear genes: GJB2, GJB3, and GJB6 but we have not found correlation between the phenotypic heterogeneity and variants detected in these genes. We explored also the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes. We detected five novel polymorphisms: T742C, T794A, A813G, C868T, and C954T, and 12 known polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. None of the 100 families or the 100 controls were found to carry mutations in the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene. We report here First mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in the Tunisian population which describes the second family harbouring the A1555G mutation in Africa and reveals novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

  4. [Nuclear gene involves in phenotype of non-syndromic deafness associated with mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Su Ying; Zhang, Hai Jun; Xu, Chun Hong; Shan, Xiang Nian

    2006-02-01

    The human mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutation at position 1555 associated with non-syndromic deafness and aminoglycoside-induced deafness. Family of Huaiyin in Jiangsu is one of the biggest non-syndromic deafness family in the world. In this family, deafness is maternally inherited. After establishing immortal lymphoblastoid cell lines of the family by EB virus, we analysed 17 lymphoblastoid cell lines derived, respectively, from symptomatic, asymptomatic and controll members of the family. Compared with control members, symptomatic and asymptomatic members both exhibited significant decreases in the rate of growth as well as in the rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis. But the extent of decreases is different and the severity of mitochondrial defect is related with its clinical phenotype. These results supported that the nuclear factor involves in the phenotypic manifestation of the non-syndromic deafness associated with the A1555G mutation.

  5. 16S rRNA Gene Mutations Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Tetracycline in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Amram, E.; Mikula, I.; Schnee, C.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.; Rosales, R. S.; Harrus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis isolates with decreased susceptibilities to tetracyclines are increasingly reported worldwide. The acquired molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon were investigated in 70 clinical isolates of M. bovis. Sequence analysis of the two 16S rRNA-encoding genes (rrs3 and rrs4 alleles) containing the primary binding pocket for tetracycline (Tet-1 site) was performed on isolates with tetracycline hydrochloride MICs of 0.125 to 16 μg/ml. Mutations at positions A965T, A967T/C (Escherichia coli numbering) of helix 31, U1199C of helix 34, and G1058A/C were identified. Decreased susceptibilities to tetracycline (MICs, ≥2 μg/ml) were associated with mutations present at two (A965 and A967) or three positions (A965, A967, and G1058) of the two rrs alleles. No tet(M), tet(O), or tet(L) determinants were found in the genome of any of the 70 M. bovis isolates. The data presented correlate (P < 0.0001) the mutations identified in the Tet-1 site of clinical isolates of M. bovis with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline. PMID:25403668

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  7. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  8. Emergence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to linezolid with rRNA gene C2190T and G2603T mutations.

    PubMed

    Cidral, Thiago André; Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article were to determinate the mechanism of linezolid resistance in coagulase-negative methicillin-resistant staphylococci from hospitals in the northeast of Brazil. We identified the isolates using VITEK(®) 2 and MALDI-TOF. Susceptibility to antibiotics was measured by the disk-diffusion method and by Etest(®) . Extraction of the whole genome DNA was performed, followed by screening of all the strains for the presence of mecA and cfr genes. The domain V region of 23S rRNA gene was sequenced and then aligned with a linezolid-susceptible reference strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) macro-restriction analysis was performed. Three linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus hominis and two linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were analyzed. The isolates showed two point mutations in the V region of the 23S rRNA gene (C2190T and G2603T). We did not detect the cfr gene in any isolate by PCR. The S. hominis showed the same pulsotype, while the S. epidermidis did not present any genetic relation to each other. In conclusion, this study revealed three S. hominis and two S. epidermidis strains with resistance to linezolid due to a double mutation (C2190T and G2603T) in the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. For the first time, the mutation of C2190T in S. epidermidis is described. This study also revealed the clonal spread of a S. hominis pulsotype between three public hospitals in the city of Natal, Brazil. These findings highlight the importance of continued vigilance of linezolid resistance in staphylococci.

  9. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  10. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  11. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  12. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers non sense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Ali; Macadré, Catherine; Lazowska, Jaga

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by 1 as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed. PMID:28357310

  13. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  14. The A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene of human mtDNA: recurrent origins and founder events in families affected by sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Torroni, A; Cruciani, F; Rengo, C; Sellitto, D; López-Bigas, N; Rabionet, R; Govea, N; López De Munain, A; Sarduy, M; Romero, L; Villamar, M; del Castillo, I; Moreno, F; Estivill, X; Scozzari, R

    1999-11-01

    The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to >/=30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments.

  15. The A1555G Mutation in the 12S rRNA Gene of Human mtDNA: Recurrent Origins and Founder Events in Families Affected by Sensorineural Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Cruciani, Fulvio; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; López-Bigas, Núria; Rabionet, Raquel; Govea, Nancy; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sarduy, Maritza; Romero, Lourdes; Villamar, Manuela; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Estivill, Xavier; Scozzari, Rosaria

    1999-01-01

    Summary The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to ⩾30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments. PMID:10521300

  16. GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Sun, Liang; Zong, Ling; Wu, Xuan; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Chang; Cao, Hui; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sudden deafness. However, the specific genes involved are largely unknown. We sought to explore the frequency of GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in patients with sudden deafness. Between September 2011 and May 2012, 62 consecutive patients with sudden deafness were seen. In 50 of these, no etiological factors for sudden deafness were found. We detected GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants by direct sequencing in these 50 patients and in 53-aged matched controls with normal hearing. In addition, we undertook functional analyses of the mitochondrial mutations which we detected, applying structural and phylogenetic analysis. GJB2 sequencing identified six mutations, including three pathogenic mutations (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, c.109G>A) and three polymorphisms, in the study participants, giving an allele frequency of 15.0 %. A homozygous c.109G>A mutation was detected in two participants. A total of 16 variants in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene were identified in the participants. No significant differences were found in GJB2 heterozygosity or in mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants between patients with sudden deafness and in controls. Our results suggest that the homozygous GJB2 c.109G>A mutation may be a cause of sudden deafness involving both ears. This finding should increase awareness of the likely role of genetic factors in the etiology of sudden deafness in general.

  17. Characterization of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 rRNA gene clusters and cloning of rrnA.

    PubMed Central

    La Farina, M; Stira, S; Mancuso, R; Grisanti, C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10595 harbors seven rRNA gene clusters which can be distinguished by BglII digestion. The three rRNA genes present in each set are closely linked with the general structure 16S-23S-5S. We cloned rrnA and sequenced the 16S-23S spacer region and the region downstream of the 5S rRNA gene. No tRNA gene was found in these regions. PMID:8631730

  18. In vitro activity of amikacin against isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex with proposed MIC breakpoints and finding of a 16S rRNA gene mutation in treated isolates.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Griffith, David E; Woods, Gail L; Stout, Jason E; Wolfe, Cameron R; Turenne, Christine Y; Wallace, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    Amikacin is a major drug used for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease, but standard laboratory guidelines for susceptibility testing are not available. This study presents in vitro amikacin MICs for 462 consecutive clinical isolates of the MAC using a broth microdilution assay. Approximately 50% of isolates had amikacin MICs of 8 μg/ml, and 86% had MICs of ≤16 μg/ml. Of the eight isolates (1.7%) with MICs of 64 μg/ml, five had an MIC of 32 μg/ml on repeat testing. Ten isolates (2.1%) had an initial amikacin MIC of >64 μg/ml, of which seven (1.5%) had MICs of >64 μg/ml on repeat testing. These seven isolates had a 16S rRNA gene A1408G mutation and included M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium chimaera. Clinical data were available for five of these seven isolates, all of which had received prolonged (>6 months) prior therapy, with four that were known to be treated with amikacin. The 16S mutation was not detected in isolates with MICs of ≤64 μg/ml. We recommend primary testing of amikacin against isolates of the MAC and propose MIC guidelines for breakpoints that are identical to the CLSI guidelines for Mycobacterium abscessus: ≤16 μg/ml for susceptible, 32 μg/ml for intermediate, and ≥64 μg/ml for resistant. If considered and approved by the CLSI, this will be only the second drug recommended for primary susceptibility testing against the MAC and should facilitate its use for both intravenous and inhaled drug therapies.

  19. Prevalence of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Min-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA is a hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Of those, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region of the 12S rRNA have been associated with hearing loss. These two mutations account for a significant number of…

  20. Helicobacter pylori specific nested PCR assay for the detection of 23S rRNA mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, S; Yoshida, H; Ogura, K; Kanai, F; Shiratori, Y; Omata, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Clarithromycin is one of the most important antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori eradication. However, 5-10% of strains are reported to be resistant. It has been shown that one point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is associated with resistance to clarithromycin. 
Aims—To establish a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system which amplifies a segment of the 23S rRNA gene containing the mutation points with primers specific for H pylori, so that H pylori infection and the mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance can be examined simultaneously. 
Methods—To detect H pylori infection and the mutation simultaneously, primers specific for the H pylori 23S rRNA gene were designed based on sequence conservation among H pylori strains and sequence specificity as compared with other bacteria. DNA from 57 cultured strains and from 39 gastric juice samples was amplified in the seminested 23S rRNA PCR. Clinical applicability was evaluated in 85patients. 
Results—DNA samples from 57 cultured strains were all amplified. The novel assay and the urease A PCR agreed in 37/39 gastric juice samples with no false positives. The assay did not amplify the DNA of bacteria other than H pylori. Eight of 85 samples had the mutation before treatment. In clarithromycin based treatment, eradication was achieved in 2/5 (40%) with the mutation and 29/34 (85%) without the mutation. 
Conclusion—The assay using gastric juice is quick (within 12 hours) and non-invasive (endoscopy not required), enabling rapid initiation of appropriate antibiotic treatment. 

 Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; eradication; clarithromycin; resistance; point mutation PMID:9863474

  1. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  2. Unstable Inheritance of 45S rRNA Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rabanal, Fernando A.; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Mandáková, Terezie; Novikova, Polina Yu.; Lysak, Martin A.; Mott, Richard; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs). Instead, GWAS implicated a trans-acting locus, as if rRNA gene CNV was a phenotype rather than a genotype. To explain these results, we investigated the inheritance and stability of rRNA gene copy number using the variety of genetic resources available in A. thaliana — F2 crosses, recombinant inbred lines, the multiparent advanced-generation inter-cross population, and mutation accumulation lines. Our results clearly show that rRNA gene CNV can be mapped to the NORs themselves, with both loci contributing equally to the variation. However, NOR size is unstably inherited, and dramatic copy number changes are visible already within tens of generations, which explains why it is not possible to map the NORs using GWAS. We did not find any evidence of trans-acting loci in crosses, which is also expected since changes due to such loci would take very many generations to manifest themselves. rRNA gene copy number is thus an interesting example of “missing heritability”—a trait that is heritable in pedigrees, but not in the general population. PMID:28188182

  3. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  4. Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin type B antibiotics due to a mutation in an rRNA operon of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Guérineau, M

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens produces spiramycin, a macrolide antibiotic and expresses an inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLS). From a mutant of S.ambofaciens exhibiting a constitutive MLS resistance phenotype a resistance determinant was cloned on a low copy number vector (pIJ61) through its expression in Streptomyces lividans. Further characterization has shown that this determinant corresponded to a mutant rRNA operon with a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. In different organisms, mutations leading to MLS resistance have been located at a position corresponding to the adenine 2058 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. In the 23S rRNA from S.ambofaciens a similar position for the mutation has been postulated and DNA sequencing of this region has shown an adenine to guanine transition at a position corresponding to 2058. S.ambofaciens possesses four rRNA operons which we have cloned. In Streptomyces, contrary to other bacteria, a mutation in one among several rRNA operons confers a selectable MLS resistance phenotype. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed.

  5. Mitochondrial tRNAArg T10454C variant may not influence the clinical expression of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the "pathogenic" role of the T10454C mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Arg) gene in deafness expression as increasing reports provided an active role of this mutation in clinical manifestation of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. For this purpose, we reanalyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data containing the T10454C mutation. Moreover, we analyzed the reported "polymorphisms" of mtDNA in the proband using the phylogentic approach. To our surprise, other mutations which occurred at protein-coding genes played more important roles in resulting mitochondrial dysfunctions by using the bioinformatic tool. In addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of the T10454C mutation indicated that this mutation was not conserved between different species. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the T10454C variant may not modulate the phenotypic expression of the deafness associated A1555G mutation.

  6. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  7. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes. PMID:27245411

  8. A Mutation in the 16S rRNA Decoding Region Attenuates the Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumura, Kazunori; Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Haishima, Yuji; Fukui, Chie; Okumura, Kayo; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Hashimoto, Masahito; Teramoto, Kanae; Kirikae, Fumiko; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a single rRNA operon that encodes targets for antituberculosis agents, including kanamycin. To date, only four mutations in the kanamycin binding sites of 16S rRNA have been reported in kanamycin-resistant clinical isolates. We hypothesized that another mutation(s) in the region may dramatically decrease M. tuberculosis viability and virulence. Here, we describe an rRNA mutation, U1406A, which was generated in vitro and confers resistance to kanamycin while highly attenuating M. tuberculosis virulence. The mutant showed decreased expression of 20% (n = 361) of mycobacterial proteins, including central metabolic enzymes, mycolic acid biosynthesis enzymes, and virulence factors such as antigen 85 complexes and ESAT-6. The mutation also induced three proteins, including KsgA (Rv1010; 16S rRNA adenine dimethyltransferase), which closely bind to the U1406A mutation site on the ribosome; these proteins were associated with ribosome maturation and translation initiation processes. The mutant showed an increase in 17S rRNA (precursor 16S rRNA) and a decrease in the ratio of 30S subunits to the 70S ribosomes, suggesting that the U1406A mutation in 16S rRNA attenuated M. tuberculosis virulence by affecting these processes.

  9. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  10. Species-specificity of rRNA gene transcription in plants manifested as a switch in RNA polymerase specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, J H; Pikaard, C S

    1996-01-01

    Rapid evolution of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene promoters often prevents their recognition in a foreign species. Unlike animal systems, we show that foreign plant rRNA gene promoters are recognized in an alien species, but tend to program transcription by a different polymerase. In plants, RNA polymerase I transcripts initiate at a TATATA element (+1 is underlined) important for promoter strength and start-site selection. However, transcripts initiate from +32 following transfection of a tomato promoter into Arabidopsis. The rRNA gene promoter of a more closely related species, Brassica oleracea, programs both +1 and +29 transcription. A point mutation at +2 improving the identity between the Brassica and Arabidopsis promoters increases +1 transcription, indicating a role for the initiator element in species-specificity. Brassica +29 transcripts can be translated to express a luciferase reporter gene, implicating RNA polymerase II. TATA mutations that disrupt TATA-binding protein (TBP) interactions inhibit +29 transcription and luciferase expression. Co-expressed TBP proteins bearing compensatory mutations restore +29 transcription and luciferase activity, suggesting a direct TBP-TATA interaction. Importantly, +1 transcription is unaffected by the TATA mutations, suggesting that in the context of pol I recognition, the TATA-containing initiator element serves a function other than TBP binding. PMID:8972859

  11. Exceptionally high and diverse mutation rates in insects small rRNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y X; Krupp, G; Gross, J H

    1985-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from the posterior silk gland of the silk worm Philosamia cynthia ricini has been determined. The comparison with other insect 5S rRNAs revealed an exceptionally conserved secondary structure, in spite of an extremely high mutation rate: Thirteen nucleotides are different in Philosamia and Drosophila 5S rRNA, but all substitutions are either compensatory or occur in loops or introduce G:U base pairs. The rates of base substitution per site per year of several insect species (diptera and lepidoptera) 5S and 5.8S rRNAs are compared with those occurring in vertebrate rRNAs. In the latter cases the rates are remarkably constant, whereas their value is not only about twofold higher in insect rRNAs, but is found to be extremely large in the 5S rRNA of the silkworm Bombyx mori. These data demonstrate that phylogenetic conclusions derived from small rRNA sequence comparisons are only of limited value.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-10-28

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels.

  13. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  14. In vivo analyses of the internal control region in the 5S rRNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Erkine, A M; Van Ryk, D I; Nazar, R N

    1995-02-25

    The internal control region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 5S rRNA gene has been characterized in vivo by genomic DNase I footprinting and by mutational analyses using base substitutions, deletions or insertions. A high copy shuttle vector was used to efficiently express mutant 5S rRNA genes in vivo and isotope labelling kinetics were used to distinguish impeded gene expression from nascent RNA degradation. In contrast to mutational studies in reconstituted systems, the analyses describe promoter elements which closely resemble the three distinct sequence elements that have been observed in Xenopus laevis 5S rRNA. The results indicate a more highly conserved structure than previously reported with reconstituted systems and suggest that the saturated conditions which are used in reconstitution studies mask sequence dependence which may be physiologically significant. Footprint analyses support the extended region of protein interaction which has recently been observed in some reconstituted systems, but mutational analyses indicate that these interactions are not sequence specific. Periodicity in the footprint provides further detail regarding the in vivo topology of the interacting protein.

  15. Transition mutations in the 23S rRNA of erythromycin-resistant isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, T S; Heitzman, K; Liu, S K; Hu, P C

    1995-01-01

    Erythromycin is the drug of choice for treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections due to its susceptibility to low levels of this antibiotic. After exposure of susceptible strains to erythromycin in vitro and in vivo, mutants resistant to erythromycin and other macrolides were isolated. Their phenotypes have been characterized, but the genetic basis for resistance has never been determined. We isolated two resistant mutants (M129-ER1 and M129-ER2) by growing M. pneumoniae M129 on agar containing different amounts of erythromycin. In broth dilution tests both strains displayed resistance to high levels of several macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics. In binding studies, ribosomes isolated from the resistant strains exhibited significantly lower affinity for [14C]erythromycin than did ribosomes from the M129 parent strain. Sequencing of DNA amplified from the region of the 2S rRNA gene encoding domain V revealed an A-to-G transition in the central loop at position 2063 of M129-ER1 and a similar A-to-G transition at position 2064 in M129-ER2. Transitions at homologous locations in the 23S rRNA from other organisms have been shown to result in resistance to MLS antibiotics. Thus, MLS-like resistance can occur in M. pneumoniae as the result of point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene which reduce the affinity of these antibiotics for the ribosome. Since they involve only single-base changes, development of resistance to erythromycin in vivo by these mechanisms could be relatively frequent event. PMID:8593017

  16. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  17. Recurrent gene mutations in CLL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Quesada, Víctor; Villamor, Neus; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of whole genomes and exomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has provided the first comprehensive view of somatic mutations in this disease. Subsequent studies have characterized the oncogenic pathways and clinical implications of a number of these mutations. The global number of somatic mutations per case is lower than those described in solid tumors but is in agreement with previous estimates of less than one mutation per megabase in hematological neoplasms. The number and pattern of somatic mutations differ in tumors with unmutated and mutated IGHV, extending at the genomic level the clinical differences observed in these two CLL subtypes. One of the striking conclusions of these studies has been the marked genetic heterogeneity of the disease, with a relatively large number of genes recurrently mutated at low frequency and only a few genes mutated in up to 10-15 % of the patients. The mutated genes tend to cluster in different pathways that include NOTCH1 signaling, RNA splicing and processing machinery, innate inflammatory response, Wnt signaling, and DNA damage and cell cycle control, among others. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of CLL and may provide new biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and management of the disease.

  18. An Escherichia coli strain with all chromosomal rRNA operons inactivated: complete exchange of rRNA genes between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Zaporojets, D; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1999-03-02

    Current global phylogenies are built predominantly on rRNA sequences. However, an experimental system for studying the evolution of rRNA is not readily available, mainly because the rRNA genes are highly repeated in most experimental organisms. We have constructed an Escherichia coli strain in which all seven chromosomal rRNA operons are inactivated by deletions spanning the 16S and 23S coding regions. A single E. coli rRNA operon carried by a multicopy plasmid supplies 16S and 23S rRNA to the cell. By using this strain we have succeeded in creating microorganisms that contain only a foreign rRNA operon derived from either Salmonella typhimurium or Proteus vulgaris, microorganisms that have diverged from E. coli about 120-350 million years ago. We also were able to replace the E. coli rRNA operon with an E. coli/yeast hybrid one in which the GTPase center of E. coli 23S rRNA had been substituted by the corresponding domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that, contrary to common belief, coevolution of rRNA with many other components in the translational machinery may not completely preclude the horizontal transfer of rRNA genes.

  19. Two distinct promoter elements in the human rRNA gene identified by linker scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiner, M M; Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    A cell-free RNA polymerase I transcription system was used to evaluate the transcription efficiency of 21 linker scanning mutations that span the human rRNA gene promoter. Our analysis revealed the presence of two major control elements, designated the core and upstream elements, that affect the level of transcription initiation. The core element extends from -45 to +18 relative to the RNA start site, and transcription is severely affected (up to 100-fold) by linker scanning mutations in this region. Linker scanning and deletion mutations in the upstream element, located between nucleotides -156 and -107, cause a three- to fivefold reduction in transcription. Under certain reaction conditions, such as the presence of a high ratio of protein to template or supplementation of the reaction with partially purified protein fractions, sequences upstream of the core element can have an even greater effect (20- to 50-fold) on RNA polymerase I transcription. Primer extension analysis showed that RNA synthesized from all of these mutant templates is initiated at the correct in vivo start site. To examine the functional relationship between the core and the upstream region, mutant promoters were constructed that alter the orientation, distance, or multiplicity of these control elements relative to each other. The upstream control element appears to function in only one orientation, and its position relative to the core is constrained within a fairly narrow region. Moreover, multiple core elements in close proximity to each other have an inhibitory effect on transcription. Images PMID:3785147

  20. Mutations in 23S rRNA and Ribosomal Protein L4 Account for Resistance in Pneumococcal Strains Selected In Vitro by Macrolide Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Cronan, M.; Jacobs, M. R.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants, selected from susceptible strains by serial passage in azithromycin, were investigated. These mutants were resistant to 14- and 15-membered macrolides, but resistance could not be explained by any clinically relevant resistance determinant [mef(A), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(TR), msr(A), mph(A), mph(B), mph(C), ere(A), ere(B)]. An investigation into the sequences of 23S rRNAs in the mutant and parental strains revealed individual changes of C2611A, C2611G, A2058G, and A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) in four mutants. Mutations at these residues in domain V of 23S rRNA have been noted to confer erythromycin resistance in other species. Not all four 23S rRNA alleles have to contain the mutation to confer resistance. Some of the mutations also confer coresistance to streptogramin B (C2611A, C2611G, and A2058G), 16-membered macrolides (all changes), and clindamycin (A2058G and A2059G). Interestingly, none of these mutations confer high-level resistance to telithromycin (HMR-3647). Further, two of the mutants which had no changes in their 23S rRNA sequences had changes in a highly conserved stretch of amino acids (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74) in ribosomal protein L4. One mutant contained a single amino acid change (G69C), while the other mutant had a 6-base insert, resulting in two amino acids (S and Q) being inserted between amino acids Q67 and K68. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mutations in 23S rRNA genes or ribosomal proteins in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:10898684

  1. Chromatin endogenous cleavage and psoralen crosslinking assays to analyze rRNA gene chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griesenbeck, Joachim; Wittner, Manuel; Charton, Romain; Conconi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes co-exist in two different chromatin states: actively transcribed (nucleosome depleted) chromatin, and nontranscribed (nucleosomal) chromatin. The presence of two rRNA gene populations compromises the interpretation of analyses obtained by the standard biochemical methods that are used to study chromatin structure (e.g., nuclease digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation). Here, we provide a protocol to investigate the specific association of proteins with the two rRNA gene chromatin populations in vivo, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote.

  2. Further involvement of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in aminoglycoside-induced deafness: A novel type of heteroplasmy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.; Prezant, T.R.; Bu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been linked recently to a predisposing mutation in the 3{prime} end of the small ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of human mitochondria (1555 A{yields}G) that makes the mitochondrial rRNA structurally more similar to its bacterial counterpart. This mutation was found in Chinese families in which the susceptibility to develop ototoxic deafness was inherited through the maternal lineage. However, the 1555 A{yields}G mutation was rarely found in sporadic patients in China, where aminoglycosides are commonly used. To further characterize the mutations predisposing to aminoglycoside ototoxicity, we analyzed the 12S rRNA gene in 35 sporadic patients without the 1555 mutation. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, heteroduplex (HD) analysis, sequencing, and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, we found that 3 of 35 sporadic patients had unique sequence changes in the 12S rRNA gene. Two of these changes were homoplasmic. One of the patients displayed a novel type of heteroplasmy, which we term multiplasmy, with one base deletion at nt 961 and different populations of mitochondrial DNA with varying numbers of inserted cytosines at that site.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of rRNA gene clusters in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among multigene families, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the most frequently studied and have been explored as cytogenetic markers to study the evolutionary history of karyotypes among animals and plants. In this report, we applied cytogenetic and genomic methods to investigate the organization of rRNA genes among cichlid fishes. Cichlids are a group of fishes that are of increasing scientific interest due to their rapid and convergent adaptive radiation, which has led to extensive ecological diversity. Results The present paper reports the cytogenetic mapping of the 5S rRNA genes from 18 South American, 22 African and one Asian species and the 18S rRNA genes from 3 African species. The data obtained were comparatively analyzed with previously published information related to the mapping of rRNA genes in cichlids. The number of 5S rRNA clusters per diploid genome ranged from 2 to 15, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 chromosomes bearing a 5S rDNA cluster. Regarding 18S rDNA mapping, the number of sites ranged from 2 to 6, with the most common pattern being the presence of 2 sites per diploid genome. Furthermore, searching the Oreochromis niloticus genome database led to the identification of a total of 59 copies of 5S rRNA and 38 copies of 18S rRNA genes that were distributed in several genomic scaffolds. The rRNA genes were frequently flanked by transposable elements (TEs) and spread throughout the genome, complementing the FISH analysis that detect only clustered copies of rRNA genes. Conclusions The organization of rRNA gene clusters seems to reflect their intense and particular evolutionary pathway and not the evolutionary history of the associated taxa. The possible role of TEs as one source of rRNA gene movement, that could generates the spreading of ribosomal clusters/copies, is discussed. The present paper reinforces the notion that the integration of cytogenetic data and genomic analysis provides a more complete picture for

  4. Mutational Evidence for a Functional Connection between Two Domains of 23S rRNA in Translation Termination

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, Alexey L.; Hedenstierna, Klas O. F.; Murgola, Emanuel J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide 1093 in domain II of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA is part of a highly conserved structure historically referred to as the GTPase center. The mutation G1093A was previously shown to cause readthrough of nonsense codons and high temperature-conditional lethality. Defects in translation termination caused by this mutation have also been demonstrated in vitro. To identify sites in 23S rRNA that may be functionally associated with the G1093 region during termination, we selected for secondary mutations in 23S rRNA that would compensate for the temperature-conditional lethality caused by G1093A. Here we report the isolation and characterization of such a secondary mutation. The mutation is a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides from helix 73 in domain V, close to the peptidyltransferase center. The deletion results in a shortening of the CGCG sequence between positions 2045 and 2048 by two nucleotides to CG. In addition to restoring viability in the presence of G1093A, this deletion dramatically decreased readthrough of UGA nonsense mutations caused by G1093A. An analysis of the amount of mutant rRNA in polysomes revealed that this decrease cannot be explained by an inability of G1093A-containing rRNA to be incorporated into polysomes. Furthermore, the deletion was found to cause UGA readthrough on its own, thereby implicating helix 73 in termination for the first time. These results also indicate the existence of a functional connection between the G1093 region and helix 73 during translation termination. PMID:12193621

  5. Identification of a Novel G2073A Mutation in 23S rRNA in Amphenicol-Selected Mutants of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Gaowa; Li, Hui; Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qijing; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the development and molecular mechanisms of amphenicol resistance in Campylobacter jejuni by using in vitro selection with chloramphenicol and florfenicol. The impact of the resistance development on growth rates was also determined using in vitro culture. Methods Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were used as selection agents to perform in vitro stepwise selection. Mutants resistant to the selective agents were obtained from the selection process. The mutant strains were compared with the parent strain for changes in MICs and growth rates. The 23S rRNA gene and the L4 and L22 ribosomal protein genes in the mutant strains and the parent strain were amplified and sequenced to identify potential resistance-associated mutations. Results C. jejuni strains that were highly resistant to chloramphenicol and florfenicol were obtained from in vitro selection. A novel G2073A mutation in all three copies of the 23S rRNA gene was identified in all the resistant mutants examined, which showed resistance to both chloramphenicol and florfenicol. In addition, all the mutants selected by chloramphenicol also exhibited the G74D modification in ribosomal protein L4, which was previously shown to confer a low-level erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter species. The mutants selected by florfenicol did not have the G74D mutation in L4. Notably, the amphenicol-resistant mutants also exhibited reduced susceptibility to erythromycin, suggesting that the selection resulted in cross resistance to macrolides. Conclusions This study identifies a novel point mutation (G2073A) in 23S rRNA in amphenicol-selected mutants of C. jejuni. Development of amphenicol resistance in Campylobacter likely incurs a fitness cost as the mutant strains showed slower growth rates in antibiotic-free media. PMID:24728007

  6. Compilation of 5S rRNA and 5S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Thomas; Wolters, Jörn; Erdmann, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    The BERLIN RNA DATABANK as of Dezember 31, 1989, contains a total of 667 sequences of 5S rRNAs or their genes, which is an increase of 114 new sequence entries over the last compilation (1). It covers sequences from 44 archaebacteria, 267 eubacteria, 20 plastids, 6 mitochondria, 319 eukaryotes and 11 eukaryotic pseudogenes. The hardcopy shows only the list (Table 1) of those organisms whose sequences have been determined. The BERLIN RNA DATABANK uses the format of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Data Library complemented by a Sequence Alignment (SA) field including secondary structure information. PMID:1692116

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of the 23S rRNA gene of the Cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S E; Doolittle, W F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Anacystis nidulans 23S rRNA gene, including the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions has been determined. The gene is 2876 nucleotides long and shows higher primary sequence homology to the 23S rRNAs of plastids (84.5%) than to that of E. coli (79%). The predicted rRNA transcript also shares many secondary structural features with those of plastids, reinforcing the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of these organelles. PMID:6326060

  8. A Census of rRNA Genes and Linked Genomic Sequences within a Soil Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Manske, Brian F.; Bintrim, Scott B.; Handelsman, Jo; Goodman, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the diversity of microbial genomes represented in a library of metagenomic DNA from soil. A total of 24,400 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones were screened for 16S rRNA genes. The sequences obtained from BAC clones were compared with a collection generated by direct PCR amplification and cloning of 16S rRNA genes from the same soil. The results indicated that the BAC library had substantially lower representation of bacteria among the Bacillus, α-Proteobacteria, and CFB groups; greater representation among the β- and γ-Proteobacteria, and OP10 divisions; and no rRNA genes from the domains Eukaryota and Archaea. In addition to rRNA genes recovered from the bacterial divisions Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Firmicutes, Cytophagales, and OP11, we identified many rRNA genes from the BAC library affiliated with the bacterial division Acidobacterium; all of these sequences were affiliated with subdivisions that lack cultured representatives. The complete sequence of one BAC clone derived from a member of the Acidobacterium division revealed a complete rRNA operon and 20 other open reading frames, including predicted gene products involved in cell division, cell cycling, folic acid biosynthesis, substrate metabolism, amino acid uptake, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. This study is the first step in using genomics to reveal the physiology of as-yet-uncultured members of the Acidobacterium division. PMID:12732537

  9. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  10. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  11. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  12. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  13. Gene arrangement and sequence of the 5S rRNA in Filobasidiella neoformans (Cryptococcus neoformans) as a phylogenetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Chang, Y C

    1994-04-01

    We cloned the 5S rRNA gene and determined its organization in the four genes encoding rRNAs in a ribosomal DNA repeat unit of Filobasidiella neoformans, the teleomorph of Cryptococcus neoformans. The 5S rRNA gene contained 118 nucleotides and was located 1 kb upstream from the 18S rRNA gene within the 8.6-kb fragment of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. The sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from F. neoformans was more similar to the sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from Tremella mesenterica than to the sequences of the 5S rRNA genes from Filobasidium species. The arrangement of the rRNA genes in F. neoformans closely resembles the arrangement of the rRNA genes in mushrooms such as Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Coprinus cinereus in that the 5S rRNA-coding region not only is located within the repeat unit that encodes the other rRNAs but also is transcribed in the same direction as the other rRNA genes. This is the first description of the arrangement of rRNA genes in a species belonging to the Heterobasidiomycetes.

  14. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA) and tRNASer(UCN) mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Lezirovitz, K; Braga, M C C; Spinelli, M; Pirana, S; Della-Rosa, V A; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%), which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNASer(UCN) did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190) of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  15. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  16. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China--Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youhua; Wen, Yan; You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China.

  17. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China—Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China. PMID:26196543

  18. New polymorphic mtDNA restriction site in the 12S rRNA gene detected in Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2008-05-09

    The 12S rRNA gene was shown to be a hot spot for aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss since several deafness-associated mtDNA mutations were identified in this gene. Among them, we distinguished the A1555G, the C1494T and the T1095C mutations and C-insertion or deletion at position 961. One hundred Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss and 100 hearing individuals were analysed in this study. A PCR-RFLP analysis with HaeIII restriction enzyme showed the presence of the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene in only one out of the 100 patients. In addition, PCR-RFLP and radioactive PCR revealed the presence of a new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site in the same gene of 12S rRNA site in 4 patients with non-syndromic hearing loss. UVIDOC-008-XD analyses showed the presence of this new polymorphic restriction site with a variable heteroplasmic rates at position +1517 of the human mitochondrial genome. On the other hand, direct sequencing of the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in the 100 patients and in 100 hearing individuals revealed the presence of the A750G and A1438G polymorphisms and the absence of the C1494T, T1095C and 961insC mutations in all the tested individuals. Sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome in the 4 patients showing the new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site revealed only the presence of the A8860G transition in the MT-ATP6 gene and the A4769G polymorphism in the ND2 gene.

  19. Histones are required for transcription of yeast rRNA genes by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; French, Sarah L; Oakes, Melanie L; Vu, Loan; Schneider, David A; Beyer, Ann L; Nomura, Masayasu

    2005-07-19

    Nucleosomes and their histone components have generally been recognized to act negatively on transcription. However, purified upstream activating factor (UAF), a transcription initiation factor required for RNA polymerase (Pol) I transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains histones H3 and H4 and four nonhistone protein subunits. Other studies have shown that histones H3 and H4 are associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes. To examine their functional role in Pol I transcription, we constructed yeast strains in which synthesis of H3 is achieved from the glucose-repressible GAL10 promoter. We found that partial depletion of H3 (approximately 50% depletion) resulted in a strong inhibition (>80%) of Pol I transcription. A combination of biochemical analysis and electron microscopic (EM) analysis of Miller chromatin spreads indicated that initiation and elongation steps and rRNA processing were compromised upon histone depletion. A clear decrease in relative amounts of UAF, presumably caused by reduced stability, was also observed under the conditions of H3 depletion. Therefore, the observed inhibition of initiation can be explained, in part, by the decrease in UAF concentration. In addition, the EM results suggested that the defects in rRNA transcript elongation and processing may be a result of loss of histones from rRNA genes rather than (or in addition to) an indirect consequence of effects of histone depletion on expression of other genes. Thus, these results show functional importance of histones associated with actively transcribed rRNA genes.

  20. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  1. Infective Arthritis: Bacterial 23S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Supplementary Diagnostic Method

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Andresen, Keld; Kjerulf, Anne; Salamon, Suheil; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Consecutively collected synovial fluids were examined for presence of bacterial DNA (a 700-bp fragment of the bacterial 23S rRNA gene) followed by DNA sequencing of amplicons, and by conventional bacteriological methods. One or more microorganisms were identified in 22 of the 227 synovial fluids (9,7%) originating from 17 patients. Sixteen of the patients had clinical signs of arthritis. For 11 patients molecular and conventional bacterial examinations were in agreement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, were detected in synovial fluids from 6, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. In 3 patients only 23S rRNA analysis was positive; 2 synovial fluids contained S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and 1 S. pneumoniae). The present study indicates a significant contribution by PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene analysis in recognizing and identification of microorganisms from synovial fluids. PMID:19088916

  2. Fitness cost due to mutations in the 16S rRNA associated with spectinomycin resistance in Chlamydia psittaci 6BC.

    PubMed

    Binet, Rachel; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2005-11-01

    The fitness cost of a resistance determinant is the primary parameter that determines its frequency in vivo. As a model for analysis of the impact of drug resistance mutations on the intracellular life cycle of Chlamydia spp., we studied the growth of four genetically defined spectinomycin-resistant (Spc(r)) clonal variants of Chlamydia psittaci 6BC isolated in the plaque assay. The development of each variant was monitored over 46 h postinfection in the absence of drug, either in pure culture or in 1:1 competition with the parent strain. Spc(r) mutations in the 16S rRNA gene at positions 1191 and 1193 were associated with a marked impairment of C.psittaci biological fitness, and the bacteria were severely out-competed by the wild-type parent. In contrast, mutations at position 1192 had minor effects on the bacterial life cycle, allowing the resistant isolates to compete more efficiently with the wild-type strain. Thus, mutations with a wide range of fitness costs can be selected in the plaque assay, providing a new strategy for prediction and monitoring of the emergence of antibiotic resistance in chlamydiae. So far, drug resistance has not been a serious threat for the treatment of chlamydial infections. Tetracycline is an effective antichlamydial drug that targets 16S rRNA. Attempts to isolate spontaneous tetracycline-resistant mutants of C. psittaci 6BC revealed a frequency <3 x 10(-9). We suggest that the rarity of genotypic antibiotic resistance among chlamydial clinical isolates reflects the deleterious effects of such mutations on the fitness of these obligate intracellular bacteria in the host.

  3. Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homeologs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Dobešová, E; Malinská, H; Matyášek, R; Leitch, A R; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Kovařík, A

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely different rRNA gene dosages. Plant 33B had ~400 rRNA genes at the D-genome locus, which is typical for T. mirus, accounting for ~25% of total rDNA. We observed characteristic expression dominance of T. dubius-origin genes in all organs. Its sister plant 33A harboured a homozygous macrodeletion that reduced the number of T. dubius-origin genes to about 70 copies (~4% of total rDNA). It showed biparental rDNA expression in root, flower and callus, but not in leaf where D-genome rDNA dominance was maintained. There was upregulation of minor rDNA variants in some tissues. The RNA polymerase I promoters of reactivated T. porrifolius-origin rRNA genes showed reduced DNA methylation, mainly at symmetrical CG and CHG nucleotide motifs. We hypothesise that active, decondensed rDNA units are most likely to be deleted via recombination. The silenced homeologs could be used as a ‘first reserve' to ameliorate mutational damage and contribute to evolutionary success of polyploids. Deletion and reactivation cycles may lead to bidirectional homogenisation of rRNA arrays in the long term. PMID:25537492

  4. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  5. [16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Sugano, Mitsutoshi

    2013-12-01

    The traditional identification of bacteria on the basis of phenotypic characteristics is generally not as accurate as identification based on genotypic methods. For many years, sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene has served as an important tool for determining phylogenetic relationships between bacteria. The features of this molecular target that make it a useful phylogenetic tool also make it useful for bacterial detection and identification in the clinical laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can better identify poorly described, rarely isolated, or phenotypically aberrant strains, and can lead to the recognition of novel pathogens and noncultured bacteria. In clinical microbiology, molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing is applied fundamentally to bacteria whose identification by means of other types of techniques is impossible or difficult. However, there are some cases in which 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis can not differentiate closely related bacteria such as Shigella spp. and Escherichia coli at the species level. Thus, it is important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  6. High or low correlation between co-occuring gene clusters and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Sekelja, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are universal for all living organisms. Yet, the correspondence between genome composition and rRNA phylogeny remains poorly known. The aim of this study was to use the information from genome sequence databases to address the correlation between rRNA gene phylogeny and total gene composition in bacteria. This was done by analysing 327 genomes with TIGRFAM functional gene annotations. Our approach consisted of two steps. First, we searched for discriminatory clusters of co-occurring genes. Using a multivariate statistical approach, we identified 11 such clusters which contain genes that were co-occurring only in a subset of genomes and contributed to explain the gene content differences between genome subsets. Second, we mapped the discovered clusters to 16S rRNA-based phylogeny and calculated the correlation between co-occuring genes and phylogeny. Six of the 11 clusters exhibited significant correlation with 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The most distinct phylogenetic finding was a high correlation between iron-sulfur oxidoreductases in combination with carbon nitrogen ligases and Chlorobium. The other correlations identified covered relatively large phylogroups: Actinobacteria were positively associated with kinases, while Gammaproteobacteria were positively associated with methylases and acyltransferases. The suggested functional differences between higher phylogroups, however, need experimental verification.

  7. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  9. The role of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease: searching for mutations in 12S mitochondrial rRNA with high disruptive potential

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul M.; Elson, Joanna L.; Greaves, Laura C.; Wortmann, Saskia B.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial DNA are linked to many human diseases. Despite the identification of a large number of variants in the mitochondrially encoded rRNA (mt-rRNA) genes, the evidence supporting their pathogenicity is, at best, circumstantial. Establishing the pathogenicity of these variations is of major diagnostic importance. Here, we aim to estimate the disruptive effect of mt-rRNA variations on the function of the mitochondrial ribosome. In the absence of direct biochemical methods to study the effect of mt-rRNA variations, we relied on the universal conservation of the rRNA fold to infer their disruptive potential. Our method, named heterologous inferential analysis or HIA, combines conservational information with functional and structural data obtained from heterologous ribosomal sources. Thus, HIA's predictive power is superior to the traditional reliance on simple conservation indexes. By using HIA, we have been able to evaluate the disruptive potential for a subset of uncharacterized 12S mt-rRNA variations. Our analysis revealed the existence of variations in the rRNA component of the human mitoribosome with different degrees of disruptive power. In cases where sufficient information regarding the genetic and pathological manifestation of the mitochondrial phenotype is available, HIA data can be used to predict the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations. In other cases, HIA analysis will allow the prioritization of variants for additional investigation. Eventually, HIA-inspired analysis of potentially pathogenic mt-rRNA variations, in the context of a scoring system specifically designed for these variants, could lead to a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:24092330

  10. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  11. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  12. Mitochondrial COX2 G7598A mutation may have a modifying role in the phenotypic manifestation of aminoglycoside antibiotic-induced deafness associated with 12S rRNA A1555G mutation in a Han Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianbin; Liu, Qicai; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Can; Ou, Qishui

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mitochondrial haplogroup markers and some specific variants in mitochondrial haplogroup may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. In this report, the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization were identified in a Chinese pedigree with the aminoglycoside antibiotic (AmAn)-induced deafness and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). The pathogenic gene responsible for this hereditary NSHL pedigree was determined by Microarray chip, which possessed the nine NSHL hot-spot mutations, including GJB2 (35delG, 176dell6bp, 235de1C, and 299delAT), GJB3 (538C>T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G and 2168A>G), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA (C1494T and A1555G). Only the homoplasmic A1555G mutation was detected, which was confirmed by direct sequencing. Also, real-time amplification refractory mutation system quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodology was performed to calculate the A1555G mutation load. The proband's complete mtDNA genome were amplified and direct sequencing was performed to determine the mitochondrial haplogroup and private mutations. The proband's mitochondrial haplogroup belonges to M7b1 and a private mutation MTCOX2 G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) is found. Phylogenetic analysis of COX2 polypeptide sequences demonstrates that the alanine residue is relatively conserved, but owing to the missense mutation (p.Ala 5 Thr), its side chain hydrophobicity will be changed, and what is more, as it is adjacent to a glutamine residue, which is highly conserved and hydrophilic, in an evolutionary stable domain; G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) may alter the protein secondary structure and physiological function of COX2 and, thus, aggravate the mitochondrial dysfunction conferred by the A1555G mutation. Furthermore, the G7598A mutation is absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls; therefore, G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) in the mitochondrial haplogoup M7b1 may have a modifying role, enhancing its penetrance and severity

  13. Improving oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes by implementation of polony microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Paul M.; Bent, Elizabeth; Li, Wei; Jeske, Daniel R.; Cui, Xinping; Braun, Jonathan; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) were obtained by implementing polony microarray technology. OFRG is an array-based method for analyzing microbial community composition. Polonies are discrete clusters of DNA, produced by solid-phase PCR in hydrogels, and derived from individual, spatially isolated DNA molecules. The advantages of a polony-based OFRG method include higher throughput and reductions in the PCR-induced errors and compositional skew inherent in all other PCR-based community composition methods, including high throughput sequencing of rRNA genes. Given the similarities between polony microarrays and certain aspects of sequencing methods such as the Illumina platform, we suggest that if concepts presented in this study were implemented in high throughput sequencing protocols, a reduction of PCR-induced errors and compositional skew may be realized. PMID:22640891

  14. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  15. Temperature Sensitivity Caused by Mutant Release Factor 1 Is Suppressed by Mutations That Affect 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of slow termination on the protein synthesizing machinery, we isolated suppressors to a temperature-sensitive release factor 1 (RF1). Of 26 independent clones, five complementation groups have been identified, two of which are presented here. The first mutation disrupts a base pair in the transcription terminator stem for the rplM-rpsI operon, which encodes ribosomal proteins L13 and S9. We have found that this leads to readthrough of the terminator and that lower levels of transcript (compared to the results seen with the wild type) are found in the cell. This probably leads to decreased expression of the two proteins. The second mutation is a small deletion of the yrdC open reading frame start site, and it is not likely that the protein is expressed. Both mutant strains show an increased accumulation of 17S rRNA (immature 16S rRNA). Maturation of 16S rRNA is dependent on proper assembly of the ribosomal proteins, a process that is disturbed when proteins are missing. The function of the YrdC protein is not known, but it is able to bind to double-stranded RNA; therefore, we suggest that it is an assembly factor important for 30S subunit biogenesis. On the basis of our findings, we propose that lesser amounts of S9 or a lack of YrdC causes the maturation defect. We have shown that as a consequence of the maturation defect, fewer 70S ribosomes and polysomes are formed. This and other results suggest that it is the lowered concentration of functional ribosomes that suppresses the temperature sensitivity caused by the mutant RF1. PMID:15126466

  16. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  17. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses.

  18. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  19. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  20. Biochemical Evidence for a Nuclear Modifier Allele (A10S) in TRMU (Methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase) Related to Mitochondrial tRNA Modification in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Deafness-associated 12S rRNA Mutation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Feilong; Cang, Xiaohui; Peng, Yanyan; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zhengyue; Li, Fushan; Fan, Qingqing; Guan, Anna S; Fischel-Ghosian, Nathan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-02-17

    Nuclear modifier gene(s) was proposed to modulate the phenotypic expression of mitochondrial DNA mutation(s). Our previous investigations revealed that a nuclear modifier allele (A10S) in TRMU (methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase) related to tRNA modification interacts with 12S rRNA 1555A→G mutation to cause deafness. The A10S mutation resided at a highly conserved residue of the N-terminal sequence. It was hypothesized that the A10S mutation altered the structure and function of TRMU, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we showed that the A10S mutation introduced the Ser(10) dynamic electrostatic interaction with the Lys(106) residue of helix 4 within the catalytic domain of TRMU. The Western blotting analysis displayed the reduced levels of TRMU in mutant cells carrying the A10S mutation. The thermal shift assay revealed the Tm value of mutant TRMU protein, lower than that of the wild-type counterpart. The A10S mutation caused marked decreases in 2-thiouridine modification of U34 of tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln) However, the A10S mutation mildly increased the aminoacylated efficiency of tRNAs. The altered 2-thiouridine modification worsened the impairment of mitochondrial translation associated with the m.1555A→G mutation. The defective translation resulted in the reduced activities of mitochondrial respiration chains. The respiratory deficiency caused the reduction of mitochondrial ATP production and elevated the production of reactive oxidative species. As a result, mutated TRMU worsened mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with m.1555A→G mutation, exceeding the threshold for expressing a deafness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited deafness that was manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and nuclear modifier gene.

  1. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  2. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  3. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  4. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  5. Application of 12S rRNA gene for the identification of animal-derived drugs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Da; Han, Yumei; Dong, Xiaoping; Yang, Yong; Deng, Kejun; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. Animal-derived drugs are the major source of biological products and traditional medicine, but they are often difficult to identify, causing confusion in the clinical application. Among these medicinal animals, a number of animal species are endangered, leading to the destruction of biodiversity. The identification of animal-derived drugs and their alternatives would be a first step toward biodiversity conservation and safe medication. Until now, no effective method for identifying animal-derived drugs has been demonstrated; DNA-based species identification presents a brand-new technique. METHODS. We designed primers to amplify a 523-bp fragment of 12S rRNA and generated sequences for 13 individuals within six medicinal animal species. We examined the efficiency of species recognition based on this sequence, and we also tested the taxonomic affiliations against the GenBank database. RESULTS. All the tested drugs were identified successfully, and a visible gap was found between the inter-specific and intra-specific variation. We further demonstrated the importance of data exploration in DNA-based species identification practice by examining the sequence characteristics of relative genera in GenBank. This region of the 12S rRNA gene had a 100% success rate of species recognition within the six medicinal animal species. CONCLUSIONS. We propose that the 12S rRNA locus might be universal for identifying animal-derived drugs and their adulterants. The development of 12S rRNA for indentifying animal-derived drugs that share a common gene target would contribute significantly to the clinical application of animal-derived drugs and the conservation of medicinal animal species. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  6. Single-base mutations at position 2661 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA increase efficiency of translational proofreading.

    PubMed Central

    Melançon, P; Tapprich, W E; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1992-01-01

    Two single-base substitutions were constructed in the 2660 loop of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA (G2661-->C or U) and were introduced into the rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. Ribosomes were isolated from bacteria transformed with the mutated plasmids and assayed in vitro in a poly(U)-directed system for their response to the misreading effect of streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamicin, three aminoglycoside antibiotics known to impair the proofreading control of translational accuracy. Both mutations decreased the stimulation of misreading by these drugs, but neither interfered with their binding to the ribosome. The response of the mutant ribosomes to these drugs suggests that the 2660 loop, which belongs to the elongation factor Tu binding site, is involved in the proofreading step of the accuracy control. In vivo, both mutations reduced read-through of nonsense codons and frameshifting, which can also be related to the increased efficiency in proofreading control which they confer to ribosomes. PMID:1281147

  7. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  8. RRP1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene affecting rRNA processing and production of mature ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, G R; Hopper, A K

    1987-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ts351 had been shown to affect processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs (C. Andrew, A. K. Hopper, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Gen. Genet. 144:29-37, 1976). We showed that this strain contains two mutations leading to temperature-sensitive lethality. The rRNA-processing defect, however, is a result of only one of the two mutations. We designated the lesion responsible for the rRNA-processing defect rrp1 and showed that it is located on the right arm of chromosome IV either allelic to or tightly linked to mak21. This rrp1 lesion also results in hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and a reduced 25S/18S rRNA ratio at semipermissive temperatures. We cloned the RRP1 gene and provide evidence that it encodes a moderately abundant mRNA which is in lower abundance and larger than most mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:3549696

  9. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-01-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen. PMID:26494728

  10. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  11. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  12. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  13. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  14. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  15. DHPLC screening of cystic fibrosis gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Atkinson, Andrew; Glavac, Damjan; Dean, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using ion-pairing reverse phase chromatography (IPRPC) columns is a technique for the screening of gene mutations. In order to evaluate the potential utility of this assay method in a clinical laboratory setting, we subjected the PCR products of 73 CF patients known to bear CFTR mutations to this analytic technique. We used thermal denaturation profile parameters specified by the MELT program tool, made available by Stanford University. Using this strategy, we determined an initial analytic sensitivity of 90.4% for any of 73 known CFTR mutations. Most of the mutations not detected by DHPLC under these conditions are alpha-substitutions. This information may eventually help to improve the MELT algorithm. Increasing column denaturation temperatures for one or two degrees above those recommended by the MELT program allowed 100% detection of CFTR mutations tested. By comparing DHPLC methodology used in this study with the recently reported study based on Wavemaker 3.4.4 software (Transgenomic, Omaha, NE) [Le Marechal et al., 2001) and with previous SSCP analysis of CFTR mutations [Ravnik-Glavac et al., 1994] we emphasized differences and similarities in order to refine the DHPLC system and discuss the relationship to the alternative approaches. We conclude that the DHPLC method, under optimized conditions, is highly accurate, rapid, and efficient in detecting mutations in the CFTR gene and may find high utility in screening individuals for CFTR mutations. Hum Mutat 19:374-383, 2002. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  17. Different chromatin structures along the spacers flanking active and inactive Xenopus rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, R; Sogo, J M

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin to psoralen was assayed to compare the chromatin structure of the rRNA coding and spacer regions of the two related frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. Isolated nuclei from tissue culture cells were photoreacted with psoralen, and the extent of cross-linking in the different rDNA regions was analyzed by using a gel retardation assay. In both species, restriction fragments from the coding regions showed two distinct extents of cross-linking, indicating the presence of two types of chromatin, one that contains nucleosomes and represents the inactive gene copies, and the other one which is more cross-linked and corresponds to the transcribed genes. A similar cross-linking pattern was obtained with restriction fragments from the enhancer region. Analysis of fragments including these sequences and the upstream portions of the genes suggests that active genes are preceded by nonnucleosomal enhancer regions. The spacer regions flanking the 3' end of the genes gave different results in the two frog species. In X. borealis, all these sequences are packaged in nucleosomes, whereas in X. laevis a distinct fraction, presumably those flanking the active genes, show a heterogeneous chromatin structure. This disturbed nucleosomal organization correlates with the presence of a weaker terminator at the 3' end of the X. laevis genes compared with those of X. borealis, which allows polymerases to transcribe into the downstream spacer. Images PMID:1406621

  18. Novel haloarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt.

    PubMed

    Radax, C; Gruber, C; Stan-Lotter, H

    2001-08-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Alpine salt sediments was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes, sequencing of cloned products, and comparisons with culturable strains. DNA was extracted from the residue following filtration of dissolved Permo-Triassic rock salt. Fifty-four haloarchaeal sequences were obtained, which could be grouped into at least five distinct clusters. Similarity values of three clusters to known 16S rRNA genes were less than 90%-95%, suggesting the presence of uncultured novel taxa; two clusters were 98% and 99% similar to isolates from Permo-Triassic or Miocene salt from England and Poland, and to Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Some rock salt samples, including drilling cores, yielded no amplifiable DNA and no cells or only a few culturable cells. This result suggested a variable distribution of haloarchaea within different strata, probably consistent with the known geologic heterogeneity of Alpine salt deposits. We recently reported identical culturable Halococcus salifodinae strains in Permo-Triassic salt sediments from England, Germany, and Austria; together with the data presented here, those results suggest one plausible scenario to be an ancient continuous hypersaline ocean (Zechstein sea) populated by haloarchaea, whose descendants are found today in the salt sediments. The novelty of the sequences also suggested avoidance of haloarchaeal contaminants during our isolation of strains, preparation of DNA, and PCR reactions.

  19. Identification of oral bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis in elderly persons requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Akihiro; Sekiya, Ryo; Karakida, Kazunari; Sasaki, Masashi; Nakatogawa, Noriko; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Sakamoto, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    After incubation of saliva from 58 semi-bedridden elderly persons, the cultures were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene base sequence to compare the identification by the conventional culture method. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene base sequence of 198 strains identified by the culture method showed 98.5% or more homology in some of the Human Oral Microbiome database, and the identification of bacterial species and genus was possible. When an organism identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method was compared with that by the culture method, the concordance rates were 54.5% at the genus level and 35.9% at the species level. Streptococcus mitis strains most frequently isolated from saliva that were identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method (32/35), and all the 11 Streptococcus salivarius strains identified by the culture method were identified as the same species by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. All the strains identified as Streptococcus anginosus group by the culture method and 8 of the 9 strains identified as Prevotella species by the culture method were identified as the same group and genus by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing method. When an oral microbial flora test with saliva samples from elderly persons is performed, the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification enables us to identify major indigenous bacteria and pathogenic bacteria and is considered useful as a means of supplementing the conventional culture method.

  20. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  1. Coexistence of mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations in two Han Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Huijun; Chen Jing; Liu Xin; Cheng Jing; Wang Xinjian; Yang Li; Yang Shuzhi; Cao Juyang; Kang Dongyang; Dai Pu; Zha, Suoqiang; Han Dongyi Young Wieyen Guan Minxin

    2007-10-12

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA are one of the important causes of hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Han Chinese pedigrees with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic bilateral hearing loss. Clinical evaluation revealed the wide range of severity, age-at-onset, and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families. The penetrances of hearing loss in these pedigrees were 20% and 18%, when aminoglycoside-induced deafness was included. When the effect of aminoglycosides was excluded, the penetrances of hearing loss in these seven pedigrees were 10% and 15%. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the presence of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations. Their distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism belonged to Eastern Asian haplogroup C4a1, while other previously identified six Chinese mitochondrial genomes harboring the C1494T mutation belong to haplogroups D5a2, D, R, and F1, respectively. This suggested that the C1494T or G7444A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in their mtDNA suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations in those Chinese families. However, aminoglycosides and other nuclear modifier genes play a modifying role in the phenotypic manifestation of the C1494T mutation in these Chinese families.

  2. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  4. Sequencing and characterization of full-length sequence of 18S rRNA gene from the reniform nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Variation within this gene is rare but it has been observed in few metazoan species. For the first time, we h...

  5. GJB2 gene mutations in childhood deafness.

    PubMed

    Angeli, S; Utrera, R; Dib, S; Chiossone, E; Naranjo, C; Henríquez, O; Porta, M

    2000-03-01

    The frequency of childhood deafness is estimated at 1:1,000 and at least half of these cases are genetic. Recently, mutations in the GJB2 gene have been found in a great number of familial and sporadic cases of congenital deafness in Caucasians. The most common mutation (70%) is the frameshift mutation of a single guanine in position 35 (35delG). More than 20 mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with DFNB1, a prevalent type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic neurosensory deafness. Last year we initiated a systematic screening programme to evaluate the causes of deafness in the population of prelingually deaf children who are referred to our cochlear implant programme. All of the deaf children and their parents undergo a comprehensive medical review, directed to identify causes of acquired deafness and manifestations of syndromic hearing impairment. DNA is extracted from the blood of all of the children. The technique AS-PCR (allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) is used for the identification of the mutation 35delG. Screening for other GJB2 gene mutations is carried out by single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP). Our results on the identification of DFNB1 will be presented, as well as a discussion on the implications of an aetiological diagnosis in cochlear implantation.

  6. The presence of highly disruptive 16S rRNA mutations in clinical samples indicates a wider role for mutations of the mitochondrial ribosome in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Elson, Joanna L.; Smith, Paul M.; Greaves, Laura C.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.; Taylor, Robert W.; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are well recognized as an important cause of disease, with over two hundred variants in the protein encoding and mt-tRNA genes associated with human disorders. In contrast, the two genes encoding the mitochondrial rRNAs (mt-rRNAs) have been studied in far less detail. This is because establishing the pathogenicity of mt-rRNA mutations is a major diagnostic challenge. Only two disease causing mutations have been identified at these loci, both mapping to the small subunit (SSU). On the large subunit (LSU), however, the evidence for the presence of pathogenic LSU mt-rRNA changes is particularly sparse. We have previously expanded the list of deleterious SSU mt-rRNA mutations by identifying highly disruptive base changes capable of blocking the activity of the mitoribosomal SSU. To do this, we used a new methodology named heterologous inferential analysis (HIA). The recent arrival of near-atomic-resolution structures of the human mitoribosomal LSU, has enhanced the power of our approach by permitting the analysis of the corresponding sites of mutation within their natural structural context. Here, we have used these tools to determine whether LSU mt-rRNA mutations found in the context of human disease and/or ageing could disrupt the function of the mitoribosomal LSU. Our results clearly show that, much like the for SSU mt-rRNA, LSU mt-rRNAs mutations capable of compromising the function of the mitoribosomal LSU are indeed present in clinical samples. Thus, our work constitutes an important contribution to an emerging view of the mitoribosome as an important element in human health. PMID:26349026

  7. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  8. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Microbacterium based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Yokota, A

    1994-11-15

    16S rRNA gene (rDNA) studies of the six species of the genus Microbacterium, M. lacticum, M. laevaniformans, M. dextranolyticum, M. imperiale, M. arborescens and M. aurum, were performed and the primary structures were compared with those of 29 representative actinobacteria and related organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six species of the genus Microbacterium and representative four species of the genus Aureobacterium appear to be phylogenetically coherent as was suggested by Rainey et al., although the peptidoglycan types of these two genera are different (peptidoglycan type B1 or B2). Thus, the phylogenetical analyses revealed that members of actinobacteria with group B-peptidoglycan do not cluster according to their peptidoglycan types, but form compact cluster different from actinobacteria or actinomycetes with group A-peptidoglycan.

  10. Identification of Scopulariopsis species by partial 28S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Kosim, Kinga; Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna Barbara; Bielecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis contains over 30 species of mitosporic moulds, which although usually saprophytic may also act as opportunistic pathogens in humans. They have mainly been associated with onychomycosis, and only sporadically reported as a cause of deep tissue infections or systemic disease. Identification of Scopulariopsis species still largely relies on phenotype-based methods. There is a need for a molecular diagnostic approach, that would allow to reliably discriminate between different Scopulariopsis species. The aim of this study was to apply sequence analysis of partial 28S rRNA gene for species identification of Scopulariopsis clinical isolates. Although the method employed did reveal some genetic polymorphism among Scopulariopsis isolates tested, it was not enough for species delineation. For this to be achieved, other genetic loci, within and beyond the rDNA operon, need to be investigated.

  11. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  12. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  13. Replication of the rRNA and legumin genes in synchronized root cells of pea (Pisum sativum): evidence for transient EcoR I sites in replicating rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hof, J V; Hernandez, P; Bjerknes, C A; Kraszewska, E K; Lamm, S S

    1987-03-01

    The temporal pattern of replication of the rRNA and legumin genes differs in synchronized pea root cells. The relative number of rRNA genes replicated hourly during the first five hours of S phase ranges between 5 and 10 percent. In late S phase, during hours six through nine, the number of rRNA genes replicated increases reaching a maximum of about 25 percent at the ninth hour. Unlike the rRNA genes, the legumin genes have a wave-like pattern of replication peaking in early S phase at the third hour and again in late S phase at the eighth hour.Replicating rDNA, isolated by benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-column chromatography, has EcoR I restriction sites that are absent in non-replicating rDNA sequences. The cleavage of these sites is independent of the time of rDNA replication. The transient nature of the EcoR I sites suggests that they exist in a hemimethylated state in parental DNA.The two Hind III repeat-size classes of rDNA of var. Alaska peas are replicated simultaneously as cells progress through S phase. Thus, even if the 9.0 kb and 8.6 kb repeat classes are located on different chromosomes, their temporal order of replication is the same.

  14. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  15. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-mediated Repression of the Xenopus Oocyte 5 S rRNA Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mariam Q.; Bertke, Michelle M.; Huber, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    The 5 S rRNA gene-specific transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) interacts with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase PIAS2b and with one of its targets, the transcriptional corepressor, XCtBP. PIAS2b is restricted to the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes but relocates to the nucleus immediately after fertilization. Following the midblastula transition, PIAS2b and XCtBP are present on oocyte-type, but not somatic-type, 5 S rRNA genes up through the neurula stage, as is a limiting amount of TFIIIA. Histone H3 methylation, coincident with the binding of XCtBP, also occurs exclusively on the oocyte-type genes. Immunohistochemical staining of embryos confirms the occupancy of a subset of the oocyte-type genes by TFIIIA that become positioned at the nuclear periphery shortly after the midblastula transition. Inhibition of SUMOylation activity relieves repression of oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes and is correlated with a decrease in methylation of H3K9 and H3K27 and disruption of subnuclear localization. These results reveal a novel function for TFIIIA as a negative regulator that recruits histone modification activity through the CtBP repressor complex exclusively to the oocyte-type 5 S rRNA genes, leading to their terminal repression. PMID:25368327

  16. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  17. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  18. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  19. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-06

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development.

  20. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  1. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  2. Retrotransposable elements R1 and R2 interrupt the rRNA genes of most insects.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczak, J L; Burke, W D; Eickbush, T H

    1991-01-01

    A large number of insect species have been screened for the presence of the retrotransposable elements R1 and R2. These elements integrate independently at specific sites in the 28S rRNA genes. Genomic blots indicated that 43 of 47 insect species from nine orders contained insertions, ranging in frequency from a few percent to greater than 50% of the 28S genes. Sequence analysis of these insertions from 8 species revealed 22 elements, 21 of which corresponded to R1 or R2 elements. Surprisingly, many species appeared to contain highly divergent copies of R1 and R2 elements. For example, a parasitic wasp contained at least four families of R1 elements; the Japanese beetle contained at least five families of R2 elements. The presence of these retrotransposable elements throughout Insecta and the observation that single species can harbor divergent families within its rRNA-encoding DNA loci present interesting questions concerning the age of these elements and the possibility of cross-species transfer. Images PMID:1849649

  3. INPPL1 gene mutations in opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Anaïs; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    The INPPL1 (inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1) gene encodes the inositol phosphatase, SHIP2 (for src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2). SHIP2 functions to dephosphorylate, and negatively regulate, the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3. SHIP2 has been well studied in the area of insulin resistance and obesity but has roles in cancer and other disorders. Recently, it was reported that mutations in INPPL1 cause opsismodysplasia, a rare, autosomal recessive severe skeletal dysplasia. This review focuses on the mutations associated with opsismodysplasia and explores the role of INPPL1/ SHIP2 in skeletal development. PMID:27708270

  4. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  5. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  7. Evolutionary and Diagnostic Implications of Intragenomic Heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA Gene in Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Alessia; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J. Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing 16S rRNA genes (SSU) cloned from Aeromonas strains revealed that strains contained up to six copies differing by ≤1.5%. The SSU copies from Aeromonas veronii LMG13695 clustered with sequences from four Aeromonas species. These results demonstrate intragenomic heterogeneity of SSU and suggest caution when using SSU to identify aeromonads. PMID:16159790

  8. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Flora in Postoperative Maxillary Cyst Fluid by 16S rRNA Gene and Culture Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Yamashita, Yoshio; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Goto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic fluid was aseptically collected from 11 patients with postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC), and DNA was extracted from the POMC fluid. Bacterial species were identified by sequencing after cloning of approximately 580 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Identification of pathogenic bacteria was also performed by culture methods. The phylogenetic identity was determined by sequencing 517–596 bp in each of the 1139 16S rRNA gene clones. A total of 1114 clones were classified while the remaining 25 clones were unclassified. A total of 103 bacterial species belonging to 42 genera were identified in POMC fluid samples by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Species of Prevotella (91%), Neisseria (73%), Fusobacterium (73%), Porphyromonas (73%), and Propionibacterium (73%) were found to be highly prevalent in all patients. Streptococcus mitis (64%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (55%), Propionibacterium acnes (55%), Staphylococcus capitis (55%), and Streptococcus salivarius (55%) were detected in more than 6 of the 11 patients. The results obtained by the culture method were different from those obtained by 16S rRNA gene analysis, but both approaches may be necessary for the identification of pathogens, especially of bacteria that are difficult to detect by culture methods, and the development of rational treatments for patients with POMC. PMID:22685668

  10. R4, a non-LTR retrotransposon specific to the large subunit rRNA genes of nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, W D; Müller, F; Eickbush, T H

    1995-01-01

    A 4.7 kb sequence-specific insertion in the 26S ribosomal RNA gene of Ascaris lumbricoides, named R4, is shown to be a non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposable element. The R4 element inserts at a site in the large subunit rRNA gene which is midway between two other sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposable elements, R1 and R2, found in most insect species. Based on the structure of its open reading frame and the sequence of its reverse transcriptase domain, R4 elements do not appear to be a family of R1 or R2 elements that have changed their insertion site. R4 is most similar in structure and in sequence to the element Dong, which is not specialized for insertion into rRNA units. Thus R4 represents a separate non-LTR retrotransposable element that has become specialized for insertion in the rRNA genes of its host. Using oligonucleotide primers directed to a conserved region of the reverse transcriptase encoding domain, insertions in the R4 site were also amplified from Parascaris equorum and Haemonchus contortus. Why several non-LTR retrotransposable elements have become specialized for insertion into a short (87 bp) region of the large subunit rRNA gene is discussed. PMID:8524653

  11. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  12. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  13. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  14. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  15. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal ... Vasculitis Therapy as Effective as Standard Care Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Connect with Us Subscribe to ...

  16. Differential rRNA genes expression in bread wheat and its inheritance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Polanco, Carlos; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-09-01

    The expression of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from rye, located within the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), is repressed by cytosine methylation in wheat x rye hybrids and in triticale, as consequence of nucleolar dominance. Our previous study revealed that bread wheat cultivars with a maximum number of four Ag-NORs presented high level of rDNA cytosine methylation when compared to others with a maximum of six Ag-NORs. In order to evaluate the inheritance of the Ag-NORs number and NOR methylation patterns, we produced F1 hybrids between bread wheat cultivars with four Ag-NORs and bread wheat cultivars with six Ag-NORs (in the direct and reciprocal senses). The F2 progenies of these F1 hybrids were also evaluated for the NOR number and methylation patterns. Parent bread wheat cultivars with a maximum of four Ag-NORs after treated with 5-azacytidine evidenced a maximum of six Ag-NORs per metaphase cell and a maximum of six nucleoli per interphase nucleus, confirming that the expression of the rRNA genes in bread wheat is related to cytosine methylation. Most of the F1 hybrids showed a maximum number of four or six Ag-NORs, similarly to that of the female parent suggesting a non-mendelian inheritance, while other hybrids presented four or six Ag-NORs in both senses of the cross. The F1 NOR methylation patterns showed some fragments common to their parents but also novel fragments suggesting genomic and/or chromosome rearrangements after hybridization. Despite the different NOR patterns among the parents, an invariable NOR pattern was found among the F1 plants suggesting a tendency to stability, which was also transmitted to the F2. The F2 progenies showed plants with a maximum of four, five and/or six Ag-NORs. The ratio of plants with four, five and/or six Ag-NORs per F2 progeny was variable and did not follow any specific mendelian proportion. These results allowed us to suggest that the inheritance of the number of Ag-NORs by the F1 and F2 plants did not

  17. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution.

  18. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA gene in strain UFO1 caused by a 100-bp insertion in helix 6

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E. Ray; Stephanie A. Connon; Peter P. Sheridan; Jeremy Gilbreath; Malcolm S. Shields; Deborah T. Newby; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2010-06-01

    The determination of variation in 16S rRNA gene sequences is perhaps the most common method for assessing microbial community diversity. However, the occurrence of multiple copies of 16S rRNA genes within some organisms can bias estimates of microbial diversity. During phylogenetic characterization of a metal-transforming, fermentative bacterium (strain UFO1) isolated from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN, we detected an apparent 16S rRNA pseudogene. The putative 16S rRNA pseudogene was first detected in clone libraries constructed with 16S rRNA genes amplified from UFO1 genomic DNA. Sequencing revealed two distinct 16S rRNA genes, with one differing from the other by a 100 bp insert near the 5’ end. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from strain UFO1 and analyzed by RT-qPCR with insert and non-insert specific primers; however, only the non-insert 16S rRNA sequence was expressed. Reverse-transcribed rRNA from strain UFO1 was also used to construct a cDNA library. Of 190 clones screened by PCR, none contained the 16S rRNA gene with the 100 bp insert. Examination of GenBank 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the same insert sequence was present in other clones, including those from an environmental library constructed from FRC enrichments. These findings demonstrate the existence of widely disparate copies of the 16S rRNA gene in the same species and a putative 16S rRNA pseudogene, which may confound 16S rRNA-based methods for assessments of microbial diversity in environmental samples.

  19. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  20. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  1. Ptc6 Is Required for Proper Rapamycin-Induced Down-Regulation of the Genes Coding for Ribosomal and rRNA Processing Proteins in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    González, Asier; Casado, Carlos; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7) of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters. PMID:23704987

  2. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  3. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  4. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  5. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  6. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further.

  7. Phylogeny of the malarial genus Plasmodium, derived from rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1994-01-01

    Malaria is among mankind's worst scourges, affecting many millions of people, particularly in the tropics. Human malaria is caused by several species of Plasmodium, a parasitic protozoan. We analyze the small subunit rRNA gene sequences of 11 Plasmodium species, including three parasitic to humans, to infer their evolutionary relationships. Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent of the human species, is closely related to Plasmodium reichenowi, which is parasitic to chimpanzee. The estimated time of divergence of these two Plasmodium species is consistent with the time of divergence (6-10 million years ago) between the human and chimpanzee lineages. The falciparum-reichenowi clade is only remotely related to two other human parasites, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax, which are also only remotely related to each other. Thus, the parasitic associations of the Plasmodium species with their human hosts are phylogenetically independent. The remote phylogenetic relationship between the two bird parasites, Plasmodium gallinaceum and Plasmodium lophurae, and any of the human parasites provides no support for the hypothesis that infection by Plasmodium falciparum is a recent acquisition of humans, possibly coincident with the onset of agriculture. PMID:7972067

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cryptosporidium. Our study revealed that the genus Cryptosporidium contains the phylogenetically distinct species C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. serpentis, which is consistent with the biological characteristics and host specificity data. The Cryptosporidium species formed two clades, with C. parvum and C. baileyi belonging to one clade and C. muris and C. serpentis belonging to the other clade. Within C. parvum, human genotype isolates and guinea pig isolates (known as Cryptosporidium wrairi) each differed from bovine genotype isolates by the nucleotide sequence in four regions. A C. muris isolate from cattle was also different from parasites isolated from a rock hyrax and a Bactrian camel. Minor differences were also detected between C. serpentis isolates from snakes and lizards. Based on the genetic information, a species- and strain-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostic tool was developed. PMID:10103253

  9. rRNA gene restriction patterns and biotypes of Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed Central

    Nastasi, A.; Pignato, S.; Mammina, C.; Giammanco, G.

    1993-01-01

    Shigella sonnei is a major agent of diarrhoeal disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Several phenotypic methods to define strain differences have been applied to this species of Shigella including, more recently, analysis of extrachromosomal and chromosomal DNA. In this study, 432 endemic and epidemic strains isolated between 1975 and 1991 in Italy, France and Switzerland were submitted to rRNA gene restriction pattern analysis, after digestion of whole-cell DNA by Hinc II, and to concomitant biotyping. Thirteen ribotypes, H1 to H13, and five biotypes, a, d, e, f, g, were detected. Ninety-five percent of the sporadic strains were assigned to ribotypes H1 to H4, which could be subtyped, except for H4, in different biotypes. Strains from each of seven different outbreaks had indistinguishable ribotype-biotype patterns. In contrast, 65 strains, isolated in Sicily in 1980 over an extended period of apparently epidemic increase of isolations and which had previously been considered to be a single bacterial clone on the basis of resistance pattern and phage type, were found to belong to two different and scarcely related ribotypes. Ribotyping and biochemical subtyping appear to be a useful epidemiological tool in studies on the circulation and distribution of strains of S. sonnei. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7679353

  10. Ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei. Cloning of a rRNA gene containing a mobile element.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, G; Turner, M J; Cordingley, J S

    1982-01-01

    An ordered restriction map of the ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei is presented. Bgl II fragments of T.b.brucei genomic DNA were cloned into pAT 153, and the clones containing rDNA identified. Restriction maps were established and the sense strands identified. One clone was shown by heteroduplex mapping to contain a 1.1 kb inserted sequence which was demonstrated to be widely distributed throughout the genomes of members of the subgenus Trypanozoon. However, in two other subgenera of Trypanosoma, Nannomonas and Schizotrypanum, the sequence is far less abundant. Analysis of the genomic DNA from two serodemes of T.b.brucei showed that the sequence was present in the rRNA of only one of them, implying that the sequence is a mobile element and that its appearance in rDNA is a comparitively recent occurrence. Images PMID:6294613

  11. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  12. Mutation from guanine to adenine in 25S rRNA at the position equivalent to E. coli A2058 does not confer erythromycin sensitivity in Sacchromyces cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Bommakanti, Ananth S.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    The macrolide erythromycin binds to the large subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome near the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) and inhibits elongation of new peptide chains beyond a few amino acids. Nucleotides A2058 and A2059 (E. coli numbering) in 23S rRNA play a crucial role in the binding of erythromycin, and mutation of nucleotide A2058 confers erythromycin resistance in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. There are high levels of sequence and structural similarity in the PTC of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. However, eukaryotic ribosomes are resistant to erythromycin and the presence of a G at the position equivalent to E. coli nucleotide A2058 is believed to be the reason. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a G to A mutation at this position of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 25S rRNA and analyzed sensitivity toward erythromycin. Neither growth studies nor erythromycin binding assays on mutated yeast ribosomes indicated any erythromycin sensitivity in mutated yeast strains. These results suggest that the identity of nucleotide 2058 is not the only determinant responsible for the difference in erythromycin sensitivity between yeast and prokaryotes. PMID:18218702

  13. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  14. Different sensitivity of H69 modification enzymes RluD and RlmH to mutations in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Margus; Ero, Rya; Liiv, Aivar; Kipper, Kalle; Remme, Jaanus

    2012-05-01

    Nucleoside modifications are introduced into the ribosomal RNA during the assembly of the ribosome. The number and the localization of the modified nucleosides in rRNAs are known for several organisms. In bacteria, rRNA modified nucleosides are synthesized by a set of specific enzymes, the majority of which have been identified in Escherichia coli. Each rRNA modification enzyme recognizes its substrate nucleoside(s) at a specific stage of ribosome assembly. Not much is known about the specificity determinants involved in the substrate recognition of the modification enzymes. In order to shed light on the substrate specificity of RluD and RlmH, the enzymes responsible for the introduction of modifications into the stem-loop 69 (H69), we monitored the formation of H69 pseudouridines (Ψ) and methylated pseudouridine (m3Ψ) in vitro on ribosomes with alterations in 23S rRNA. While the synthesis of Ψs in H69 by RluD is relatively insensitive to the point mutations at neighboring positions, methylation of one of the Ψs by RlmH exhibited a much stronger sensitivity. Apparently, in spite of synthesizing modifications in the same region or even at the same position of rRNA, the two enzymes employ different substrate recognition mechanisms.

  15. Diagnosis of Pierce's disease using biomarkers specific to Xylella fastidiosa rRNA and Vitis vinifera gene expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, H-K; Goes da Silva, F; Lim, H-J; Iandolino, A; Seo, Y-S; Lee, S-W; Cook, D R

    2010-10-01

    Pierce's disease (PD), caused by Xylella fastidiosa, represents one of the most damaging diseases of cultivated grape. Management of PD in the vineyard often relies on the removal of infected individuals, which otherwise serve as a source of inoculum for nearby healthy vines. Effective implementation of such control measures requires early diagnosis, which is complicated by the fact that infected vines often harbor high titers of the pathogen in advance of visual symptom development. Here, we report a biomarker system that simultaneously monitors Xylella-induced plant transcripts as well as Xylella ribosomal (r)RNA. Plant biomarker genes were derived from a combination of in silico analysis of grape expressed sequence tags and validation by means of reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Four genes upregulated upon PD infection were individually multiplexed with an X. fastidiosa marker rRNA and scored using either real-time RT-PCR or gel-based conventional RT-PCR techniques. The system was sufficiently sensitive to detect both host gene transcript and pathogen rRNA in asymptomatic infected plants. Moreover, these plant biomarker genes were not induced by water deficit, which is a component of PD development. Such biomarker genes could have utility for disease control by aiding early detection and as a screening tool in breeding programs.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes in Mixed Microbial Populations via 5′-Nuclease Assays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Taylor, Lance T.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2000-01-01

    Few techniques are currently available for quantifying specific prokaryotic taxa in environmental samples. Quantification of specific genotypes has relied mainly on oligonucleotide hybridization to extracted rRNA or intact rRNA in whole cells. However, low abundance and cellular rRNA content limit the application of these techniques in aquatic environments. In this study, we applied a newly developed quantitative PCR assay (5′-nuclease assay, also known as TaqMan) to quantify specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes (rDNAs) from uncultivated planktonic prokaryotes in Monterey Bay. Primer and probe combinations for quantification of SSU rDNAs at the domain and group levels were developed and tested for specificity and quantitative reliability. We examined the spatial and temporal variations of SSU rDNAs from Synechococcus plus Prochlorococcus and marine Archaea and compared the results of the quantitative PCR assays to those obtained by alternative methods. The 5′-nuclease assays reliably quantified rDNAs over at least 4 orders of magnitude and accurately measured the proportions of genes in artificial mixtures. The spatial and temporal distributions of planktonic microbial groups measured by the 5′-nuclease assays were similar to the distributions estimated by quantitative oligonucleotide probe hybridization, whole-cell hybridization assays, and flow cytometry. PMID:11055900

  17. [Spontaneous spectinomycin resistance mutations of the chloroplast rrn16 gene in Daucus carota callus lines].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, E A; Sidorchuk, Iu V; Deĭneko, E V

    2011-01-01

    Bioballistic transformation of carrot Daucus carota L. callus cultures with a plasmid containing the aadA (aminoglycoside 3'-adenyltransferase) gene and subsequent selection oftransformants on a selective medium containing spectinomycin (100-500 mg/l) yielded ten callus lines resistant to this antibiotic. PCR analysis did not detect exogenous DNA in the genomes of spectinomycin-resistant calluses. Resistance proved to be due to spontaneous mutations that occurred in two different regions of the chloroplast rrn16 gene, which codes for the 16S rRNA. Six lines displayed the G > T or G > C transverions in position 1012 of the rrn16 gene, and three lines had the A > G transition in position 1138 of the gene. Chloroplast mutations arising during passages of callus cultures in the presence of spectinomycin were described in D. carota for the first time. The cause of spectinomycin resistance was not identified in one line. The mutations observed in the D. carota plastid genome occurred in the region that is involved in the formation of a double-stranded region at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and coincided in positions with the nucleotide substitutions found in spectinomycin-resistant plants of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. and bladderpod Lesquerella fendleri L.

  18. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  19. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  20. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L.; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K. V.; Sedwick, W. David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D.; Elston, Robert C.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  1. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  2. Identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool by PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rong-Qing; Yuan, Chao; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    The efficacy of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool samples was evaluated. The specific fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, which were about 440 bp, were obtained using the PCR. Restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products with endonucleases BspT I and Hinf I revealed species-specific RFLP patterns. Application of this technique on mixed samples could identify goat cashmere and sheep wool from each other within the proportion of 8:1. The technique, however, could detect only one species when the proportion of mixture was more than 9:1. The PCR-RFLP technique was demonstrated to possess potential value in precise identification of goat cashmere and sheep wool.

  3. Analysis of rRNA gene methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb to 9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~ 4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  4. [Phylogeny of protostome moulting animals (Ecdysozoa) inferred from 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaia, N S

    2005-01-01

    Reliability of reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships within a group of protostome moulting animals was evaluated by means of comparison of 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences sets both taken separately and combined. Reliability of reconstructions was evaluated by values of the bootstrap support of major phylogenetic tree nodes and by degree of congruence of phylogenetic trees inferred by various methods. By both criteria, phylogenetic trees reconstructed from the combined 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences were better than those inferred from 18 and 28S sequences taken separately. Results obtained are consistent with phylogenetic hypothesis separating protostome animals into two major clades, moulting Ecdysozoa (Priapulida + Kinorhyncha, Nematoda + Nematomorpha, Onychophora + Tardigrada, Myriapoda + Chelicerata, Crustacea + Hexapoda) and unmoulting Lophotrochozoa (Plathelminthes, Nemertini, Annelida, Mollusca, Echiura, Sipuncula). Clade Cephalorhyncha does not include nematomorphs (Nematomorpha). Conclusion was taken that it is necessary to use combined 18 and 28S data in phylogenetic studies.

  5. Analysis of rRNA Gene Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb-9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes, and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here, we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes.

  6. Description of an Unusual Neisseria meningitidis Isolate Containing and Expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Specific 16S rRNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Skvoretz, Rhonda; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Jonas, Vivian; Brentano, Steve

    2013-01-01

    An apparently rare Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing one copy of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA gene is described herein. This isolate was identified as N. meningitidis by biochemical identification methods but generated a positive signal with Gen-Probe Aptima assays for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the purified isolate revealed mixed bases in signature regions that allow for discrimination between N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. The mixed bases were resolved by sequencing individually PCR-amplified single copies of the genomic 16S rRNA gene. A total of 121 discrete sequences were obtained; 92 (76%) were N. meningitidis sequences, and 29 (24%) were N. gonorrhoeae sequences. Based on the ratio of species-specific sequences, the N. meningitidis strain seems to have replaced one of its four intrinsic 16S rRNA genes with the gonococcal gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes specific for meningococcal and gonococcal rRNA were used to demonstrate the expression of the rRNA genes. Interestingly, the clinical isolate described here expresses both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA genes, as shown by positive FISH signals with both probes. This explains why the probes for N. gonorrhoeae in the Gen-Probe Aptima assays cross-react with this N. meningitidis isolate. The N. meningitidis isolate described must have obtained N. gonorrhoeae-specific DNA through interspecies recombination. PMID:23863567

  7. New Screening Software Shows that Most Recent Large 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries Contain Chimeras†

    PubMed Central

    Ashelford, Kevin E.; Chuzhanova, Nadia A.; Fry, John C.; Jones, Antonia J.; Weightman, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/. PMID:16957188

  8. Quantifying Microbial Diversity: Morphotypes, 16S rRNA Genes, and Carotenoids of Oxygenic Phototrophs in Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, Ulrich; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kühl, Michael; Muyzer, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    We quantified the diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms present in eight hypersaline microbial mats on the basis of three cultivation-independent approaches. Morphological diversity was studied by microscopy. The diversity of carotenoids was examined by extraction from mat samples and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The diversity of 16S rRNA genes from oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms was investigated by extraction of total DNA from mat samples, amplification of 16S rRNA gene segments from cyanobacteria and plastids of eukaryotic algae by phylum-specific PCR, and sequence-dependent separation of amplification products by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. A numerical approach was introduced to correct for crowding the results of chromatographic and electrophoretic analyses. Diversity estimates typically varied up to twofold among mats. The congruence of richness estimates and Shannon-Weaver indices based on numbers and proportional abundances of unique morphotypes, 16S rRNA genes, and carotenoids unveiled the underlying diversity of oxygenic phototrophic microorganisms in the eight mat communities studied. PMID:9925563

  9. Diversity and depth-specific distribution of SAR11 cluster rRNA genes from marine planktonic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Field, K.G.; Gordon, D.; Wright, T.

    1997-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene clusters are phylogenetically related sets of SSU rRNA genes, commonly encountered in genes amplified from natural populations. Genetic variability in gene clusters could result form artifacts (polymerase error or PCR chimera formation), microevolution (variation among rrn copies within strains), or macroevolution (genetic divergence correlated with long-term evolutionary divergence). To better understand gene clusters, this study assessed genetic diversity and distribution of a single environmental SSU rDNA gene cluster, the SAR11 cluster. SAR11 cluster genes, from an uncultured group of the {alpha} subclass of the class Proteobacteria, have been recovered from coastal and midoceanic waters of the North Atlantic and Pacific. We cloned and bidirectionally sequenced 23 new SAR11 cluster 16S rRNA genes, from 80 and 250 m im the Sargasso Sea and from surface coastal waters of the Atlantic and Pacific, and analyzed them with previously published sequences. Two SAR11 genes were obviously PCR chimeras, but the biological (nonchimeric) origins of most subgroups within the cluster were confirmed by independent recovery from separate gene libraries. Using group-specific oligonucleotide probes, we analyzed depth profiles of nucleic acids, targeting both amplified rDNAs and bulk RNAs. Two subgroups within the SAR11 cluster showed different highly depth-specific distributions. We conclude that some of the genetic diversity within the SAR11 gene cluster represents macroevolutionary divergence correlated with niche specialization. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility for marine microbial ecology of oligonucleotide probes based on gene sequences amplified from natural populations and show that a detailed knowledge of sequence variability may be needed to effectively design these probes. 48 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  11. Mutational analysis of the human MAOA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tivol, E.A.; Shalish, C.; Schuback, D.E.; Breakefield, X.O.; Hsu, Yun-Pung

    1996-02-16

    The monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) are the enzymes primarily responsible for the degradation of amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Wide variations in activity of these isozymes have been reported in control humans. The MAOA and MAOB genes are located next to each other in the p11.3-11.4 region of the human X chromosome. Our recent documentation of an MAO-A-deficiency state, apparently associated with impulsive aggressive behavior in males, has focused attention on genetic variations in the MAOA gene. In the present study, variations in the coding sequence of the MAOA gene were evaluated by RT-PCR, SSCP, and sequencing of mRNA or genomic DNA in 40 control males with >100-fold variations in MAOA activity, as measured in cultured skin fibroblasts. Remarkable conservation of the coding sequence was found, with only 5 polymorphisms observed. All but one of these were in the third codon position and thus did not alter the deduced amino acid sequence. The one amino acid alteration observed, lys{r_arrow}arg, was neutral and should not affect the structure of the protein. This study demonstrates high conservation of coding sequence in the human MAOA gene in control males, and provides primer sets which can be used to search genomic DNA for mutations in this gene in males with neuropsychiatric conditions. 47 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  13. Extremely low penetrance of deafness associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation in 16 Chinese families: Implication for early detection and prevention of deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Pu; Liu Xin; Han Dongyi . E-mail: hdy301@263.net; Qian Yaping; Huang Deliang; Yuan Huijun; Li Weiming; Yu Fei; Zhang Ruining; Lin Hongyan; He Yong; Yu Youjun; Sun Quanzhu; Qin Huaiyi; Li Ronghua; Zhang Xin; Kang Dongyang; Cao Juyang; Young Wieyen . E-mail: ywy301@163.net; Guan Minxin |. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of 16 Chinese pedigrees (a total of 246 matrilineal relatives) with aminoglycoside-induced impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: being bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss, ranging from 4% to 18%, with an average of 8%. In particular, nineteen of 246 matrilineal relatives in these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Mutational analysis of the mtDNA in these pedigrees showed the presence of homoplasmic 12S rRNA A1555G mutation, which has been associated with hearing impairment in many families worldwide. The extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in these Chinese families carrying the A1555G mutation strongly supports the notion that the A1555G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce the clinical phenotype. Children carrying the A1555G mutation are susceptible to the exposure of aminoglycosides, thereby inducing or worsening hearing impairment, as in the case of these Chinese families. Using those genetic and molecular approaches, we are able to diagnose whether children carry the ototoxic mtDNA mutation. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  14. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  15. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  16. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  17. Morphology and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence of the new brackish water ciliate Neobakuella flava n. g., n. sp. (Ciliophora, Spirotricha, Bakuellidae) and SSU rRNA gene sequences of six additional hypotrichs from Korea.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqiong; Khan, Sadia Nawroz; Ji, Daode; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Berger, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The morphology and the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence of the hypotrich Neobakuella flava n. g., n. sp. from the estuary of the Taehwagang River (Ulsan, South Korea) were investigated. The three frontal cirri, the composition of the midventral complex of cirral pairs and rows, and the simple dorsal kinety pattern of three bipolar kineties assign it to the urostyloid taxon Bakuellidae. The increased number of buccal and parabuccal cirri, the presence of transverse cirri, and more than one left marginal row, as well as the lack of caudal cirri separate Neobakuella n. g. from the other bakuellids. Neobakuella flava n. sp. has many 0.3 μm sized green and/or yellow usually dark-green cortical granules and some sparsely distributed, 2 × 1 μm sized grass green with yellowish shimmer granules. The gene sequence data indicate a close relationship with Diaxonella and a distinct separation from the bakuellid Metaurostylopsis and parabirojimid Parabirojimia. The SSU rRNA gene sequences of four further urostyloids (i.e. Diaxonella pseudorubra, Anteholosticha monilata, Metaurostylopsis struederkypkeae, Pseudourostyla cristata) and two stylonychines (i.e. Sterkiella cavicola, Sterkiella histriomuscorum) from Korea were analyzed. Anteholosticha monilata, type of the genus, is clearly separated from the Holosticha clade, supporting the morphological separation from Holosticha. Sterkiella cavicola, type of Sterkiella, clusters within the stylonychines and is obviously closely related with S. histriomuscorum.

  18. Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods: integration of both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of fastidious Gram-negative rods (GNR) by conventional phenotypic characteristics is a challenge for diagnostic microbiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular methods, e.g., 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Results A total of 158 clinical isolates covering 20 genera and 50 species isolated from 1993 to 2010 were analyzed by comparing biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based identification. 16S rRNA gene homology analysis identified 148/158 (94%) of the isolates to species level, 9/158 (5%) to genus and 1/158 (1%) to family level. Compared to 16S rRNA gene sequencing as reference method, phenotypic identification correctly identified 64/158 (40%) isolates to species level, mainly Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Pasteurella multocida, and 21/158 (13%) isolates correctly to genus level, notably Capnocytophaga sp.; 73/158 (47%) of the isolates were not identified or misidentified. Conclusions We herein propose an efficient strategy for accurate identification of fastidious GNR in the clinical microbiology laboratory by integrating both conventional phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We conclude that 16S rRNA gene sequencing is an effective means for identification of fastidious GNR, which are not readily identified by conventional phenotypic methods. PMID:23855986

  19. Phylogeny of Intestinal Ciliates, Including Charonina ventriculi, and Comparison of Microscopy and 18S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing for Rumen Ciliate Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devente, Savannah R.; Kirk, Michelle R.; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. PMID:25616800

  20. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  1. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  2. Bacteria and Bacterial rRNA Genes Associated with the Development of Colitis in IL-10–/– Mice

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Laura L.; Bent, Elizabeth; Wei, Bo; Braun, Jonathan; Schiller, Neal L.; Straus, Daniel S.; Borneman, James

    2013-01-01

    Background Microorganisms appear to play important yet ill-defined roles in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study utilized a novel population-based approach to identify bacteria and bacterial rRNA genes associated with the development of colitis in IL-10–/– mice. Methods Mice were housed in 2 environments: a community mouse facility where the mice were fed nonsterile chow (Room 3) and a limited access facility where the mice were fed sterile chow (Room 4). Every month the disease activity levels were assessed and fecal bacterial compositions were analyzed. At the end of the experiments histological and bacterial analyses were performed on intestinal tissue. Results Although disease activity increased over time in both environments, it progressed at a faster rate in Room 3 than Room 4. Culture and culture-independent bacterial analyses identified several isolates and phylotypes associated with colitis. Two phylotypes (GpC2 and Gp66) were distinguished by their negative associations with disease activity in fecal and tissue samples. Notably, rRNA genes from these phylotypes had high sequence identity (99%) to an rRNA gene from a previously described flagellated Clostridium (Lachnospiraceae bacterium A4). Conclusions The negative associations of these 2 phylotypes (GpC2 and Gp66) suggest that these bacteria were being immunologically targeted, consistent with prior findings that the Lachnospiraceae bacterium A4 bears a prevalent flagellar antigen for disease-associated immunity in murine immune colitis and human Crohn's disease. Identification of these associations suggests that the experimental approach used in this study will have considerable utility in elucidating the host–microbe interactions underlying IBD. PMID:18381614

  3. Using DGGE and 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis to Evaluate Changes in Oral Bacterial Composition

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Zhou; TRIVEDI, Harsh M.; CHHUN, Nok; BARNES, Virginia M.; SAXENA, Deepak; XU, Tao; LI, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a standard dental prophylaxis followed by tooth brushing with an antibacterial dentifrice will affect the oral bacterial community, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults were instructed to brush their teeth using commercial dentifrice for 1 week during a washout period. An initial set of pooled supragingival plaque samples was collected from each participant at baseline (0 h) before prophylaxis treatment. The subjects were given a clinical examination and dental prophylaxis and asked to brush for 1 min with a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). On the following day, a second set of pooled supragingival plaque samples (24 h) was collected. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from the samples. Differences in the microbial composition before and after the prophylactic procedure and tooth brushing were assessed by comparing the DGGE profiles of PCR-amplified and 16S rRNA gene segments sequence analysis. Results Two distinct clusters of DGGE profiles were found, suggesting that a shift in the microbial composition had occurred 24 h after the prophylaxis and brushing. A detailed sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene segments further identified six phyla and 29 genera, including known and unknown bacterial species. Importantly, an increase in bacterial diversity was observed after 24 h, including members of the Streptococcaceae family, Prevotella, Corynebacterium, TM7 and other commensal bacteria. Conclusion The results suggest that the use of a standard prophylaxis followed by the use of the dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride may promote a healthier composition within the oral bacterial community. PMID:22319750

  4. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  5. RNA polymerase I transcription factors in active yeast rRNA gene promoters enhance UV damage formation and inhibit repair.

    PubMed

    Meier, Andreas; Thoma, Fritz

    2005-03-01

    UV photofootprinting and repair of pyrimidine dimers by photolyase was used to investigate chromatin structure, protein-DNA interactions, and DNA repair in the spacer and promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains about 150 copies of rRNA genes separated by nontranscribed spacers. Under exponential growth conditions about half of the genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase I (RNAP-I). Initiation of transcription requires the assembly of the upstream activating factor (UAF), the core factor (CF), TATA binding protein, and RNAP-I with Rrn3p on the upstream element and core promoter. We show that UV irradiation of wild-type cells and transcription factor mutants generates photofootprints in the promoter elements. The core footprint depends on UAF, while the UAF footprint was also detected in absence of the CFs. Fractionation of active and inactive promoters showed the core footprint mainly in the active fraction and similar UAF footprints in both fractions. DNA repair by photolyase was strongly inhibited in active promoters but efficient in inactive promoters. The data suggest that UAF is present in vivo in active and inactive promoters and that recruitment of CF and RNAP-I to active promoters generates a stable complex which inhibits repair.

  6. Massively parallel rRNA gene sequencing exacerbates the potential for biased community diversity comparisons due to variable library sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Gihring, Thomas; Green, Stefan; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    Technologies for massively parallel sequencing are revolutionizing microbial ecology and are vastly increasing the scale of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene studies. Although pyrosequencing has increased the breadth and depth of possible rRNA gene sampling, one drawback is that the number of reads obtained per sample is difficult to control. Pyrosequencing libraries typically vary widely in the number of sequences per sample, even within individual studies, and there is a need to revisit the behaviour of richness estimators and diversity indices with variable gene sequence library sizes. Multiple reports and review papers have demonstrated the bias in non-parametric richness estimators (e.g. Chao1 and ACE) and diversity indices when using clone libraries. However, we found that biased community comparisons are accumulating in the literature. Here we demonstrate the effects of sample size on Chao1, ACE, CatchAll, Shannon, Chao-Shen and Simpson's estimations specifically using pyrosequencing libraries. The need to equalize the number of reads being compared across libraries is reiterated, and investigators are directed towards available tools for making unbiased diversity comparisons.

  7. 16S rRNA gene probe quantitates residual host cell DNA in pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Yu; Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Shi, Ke; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Kai-Hui; Yi-Zhang; Chen, Zu-Huan

    2006-03-24

    The development and widespread use of DNA-based vaccination against infectious pathogens have been a great triumph of medical science. Quality control of DNA vaccines as biopharmaceutical productions is a problem to solve. Residual genomic DNA of engineering bacteria has been identified as a potential risk factor, so whose level must be controlled under the regulatory standards. We report a dot-blot hybridization method to detect residual host cell DNA in purified DNA vaccines. The assay utilizes PCR amplified and digoxigenin-labeled Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene as probe. The sensitivity of the dot-blot hybridization assay with E. coli 16S rRNA gene probe was evaluated in comparison with single copy UidR gene probe. The optimized dot-blot hybridization assay had both low background and a suitable sensitivity, detecting 10 pg of residual E. coli DNA. The method is suitable in the routine use of measuring the levels of residual E. coli DNA in the pharmaceutical-grade DNA vaccine.

  8. Chromatin accessibility contributes to simultaneous mutations of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Xian-Bin; He, Kun-Yan; Wu, Bing-Hao; Zhang, Bo-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of many cancer genes tend to co-occur (termed co-mutations) in certain patterns during tumor initiation and progression. However, the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the co-mutations of these cancer genes have yet to be explored. Here, we systematically investigated the association between the somatic co-mutations of cancer genes and high-order chromatin conformation. Significantly, somatic point co-mutations in protein-coding genes were closely associated with high-order spatial chromatin folding. We propose that these regions be termed Spatial Co-mutation Hotspots (SCHs) and report their occurrence in different cancer types. The conserved mutational signatures and DNA sequences flanking these point co-mutations, as well as CTCF-binding sites, are also enriched within the SCH regions. The genetic alterations that are harboured in the same SCHs tend to disrupt cancer driver genes involved in multiple signalling pathways. The present work demonstrates that high-order spatial chromatin organisation may contribute to the somatic co-mutations of certain cancer genes during tumor development. PMID:27762310

  9. [Research advances of IDH gene mutation and AML].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be involved in the occurrence of leukemia. The incidence of IDH gene mutation in the patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtype and molecular biology of IDH display a different effect on the AML prognosis. This gene mutation is related with treatment response, residual, recurrence of leukemia, and it could be a sign of test and a monitoring tool of minimal residual disease (MRD). The IDH gene mutation may be an index for predicting prognosis and guiding therapy. In this article, the research progress of IDH gene mutation and its correlation with acute myeloid leukemia, especially with the clinical characteristics,are reviewed.

  10. Application of SmartGene IDNS Software to Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences for a Diverse Group of Bacteria in a Clinical Laboratory▿

    PubMed Central

    Simmon, Keith E.; Croft, Ann C.; Petti, Cathy A.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratories often receive clinical isolates for bacterial identification that have ambiguous biochemical profiles by conventional testing. With the emergence of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as an identification tool, we evaluated the usefulness of SmartGene IDNS, a 16S rRNA sequence database and software program for microbial identification. Identification by conventional methods of a diverse group of bacterial clinical isolates was compared with gene sequences interrogated by the SmartGene and MicroSeq databases. Of 300 isolates, SmartGene identified 295 (98%) to the genus level and 262 (87%) to the species level, with 5 (2%) being inconclusive. MicroSeq identified 271 (90%) to the genus level and 223 (74%) to the species level, with 29 (10%) being inconclusive. SmartGene and MicroSeq agreed on the genus for 233 (78%) isolates and the species for 212 (71%) isolates. Conventional methods identified 291 (97%) isolates to the genus level and 208 (69%) to the species level, with 9 (3%) being inconclusive. SmartGene, MicroSeq, and conventional identifications agreed for 193 (64%) of the results. Twenty-seven microorganisms were not represented in MicroSeq, compared to only 2 not represented in SmartGene. Overall, SmartGene IDNS provides comprehensive and accurate identification of a diverse group of bacteria and has the added benefit of being a user-friendly program that can be modified to meet the unique needs of clinical laboratories. PMID:17050811

  11. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis.

  12. Multiple de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Robinson, David O

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder that usually arises following a single de novo mutation in the MECP2 gene. Point mutation testing and gene dosage analysis of a cohort of British Rett syndrome patients in our laboratory revealed four females who each had two different de novo causative mutations, presumed to be in cis because the patients showed no deviation from the classical Rett syndrome phenotype. Two of these cases had a point mutation and a small intraexonic deletion, a third had a whole exon deletion and a separate small intraexonic deletion, and a fourth case had a small intraexonic deletion and a large duplication. These findings highlight the necessity to perform both point mutation analysis and exon dosage analysis in such cases, particularly because of the possibility of undetected parental mosaicism and the implications for prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. These cases also suggest that the MECP2 gene may be particularly prone to multiple mutation events.

  13. Relative Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates of Elizabethkingia Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Mi-Soon; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myungsook; Ku, Nam Su; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2017-01-01

    Some of the previously reported clinical isolates of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica may be later named species of Elizabethkingia We determined the accuracy of species identification (with two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry [MALDI-TOF MS] systems and the Vitek 2 GN card), relative prevalence of three Elizabethkingia spp. in clinical specimens, and antimicrobial susceptibility of the species identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Specimens for culture were collected from patients in a university hospital in Seoul, South Korea, between 2009 and 2015. All 3 Elizabethkingia spp. were detected in patients; among the 86 isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 17 (19.8%) were E. meningoseptica, 18 (20.9%) were Elizabethkingia miricola, and 51 (59.3%) were Elizabethkingia anophelis Only the MALDI-TOF Vitek MS system with an amended database correctly identified all of the isolates. The majority (76.7%) of the isolates were from the lower respiratory tract, and 8 (9.3%) were from blood. Over 90% of E. meningoseptica and E. anophelis isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and rifampin. In contrast, all E. miricola isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones except ciprofloxacin. Further studies are urgently needed to determine the optimal antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infections due to each individual Elizabethkingia species.

  14. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj; Clavel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea.

  15. Rhea: a transparent and modular R pipeline for microbial profiling based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    The importance of 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiles for understanding the influence of microbes in a variety of environments coupled with the steep reduction in sequencing costs led to a surge of microbial sequencing projects. The expanding crowd of scientists and clinicians wanting to make use of sequencing datasets can choose among a range of multipurpose software platforms, the use of which can be intimidating for non-expert users. Among available pipeline options for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene analysis, the R programming language and software environment for statistical computing stands out for its power and increased flexibility, and the possibility to adhere to most recent best practices and to adjust to individual project needs. Here we present the Rhea pipeline, a set of R scripts that encode a series of well-documented choices for the downstream analysis of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) tables, including normalization steps, alpha- and beta-diversity analysis, taxonomic composition, statistical comparisons, and calculation of correlations. Rhea is primarily a straightforward starting point for beginners, but can also be a framework for advanced users who can modify and expand the tool. As the community standards evolve, Rhea will adapt to always represent the current state-of-the-art in microbial profiles analysis in the clear and comprehensive way allowed by the R language. Rhea scripts and documentation are freely available at https://lagkouvardos.github.io/Rhea. PMID:28097056

  16. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  17. 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of culturable predominant bacteria from diseased Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea, Echinodermata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyan; Jiang, Guoliang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-01

    Cultured Apostichopus japonicus in China suffers from a kind of skin ulceration disease that has caused severe economic loss in recent years. The disease, pathogens of which are supposed to be bacteria by most researchers, is highly infectious and can often cause all individuals in the same culture pool to die in a very short time. The 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of the culturable bacteria from the lesions of diseased individuals was conducted to study the biodiversity of the bacterial communities in the lesions and to identify probable pathogen(s) associated with this kind of disease. S. japonica samples were selected from a hatchery located in the eastern part of Qingdao, China. Bacterial universal primers GM5F and DS907R were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria colonies, and touchdown PCR was performed to amplify the target sequences. The results suggest that γ- proteobacteria (Alteromonadales and Vibrionales) of CFB group, many strains of which have been also determined as pathogens in other marine species, are the predominant bacterial genera of the diseased Apostichopus japonicus individuals.

  18. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species. PMID:25313278

  19. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species.

  20. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  1. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  2. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  3. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m)with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  4. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded.

  5. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  6. Germline mutations of TP53 gene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Damineni, Surekha; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra; Kumar, Satish; Ravuri, Rajasekar Reddy; Kagitha, Sailaja; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Digumarthi, Raghunadharao; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2014-09-01

    Germline alterations of the TP53 gene encoding the p53 protein have been observed in the majority of families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a rare dominantly inherited disorder with breast cancer. Genomic DNA samples of 182 breast cancer cases and 186 controls were sequenced for TP53 mutations in the exon 5-9 and intervening introns 5, 7-9. Direct sequencing was done using Applied Biosystem 3730 DNA analyzer. In the present study, we observed nine mutations in the sequenced region, of which five were novel. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was done for all the mutations; C14181T, T14201G, and G13203A have shown deviation from HWE. High linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between C14181T (rs129547788) and T14201G (rs12951053) (r (2) = 0.98.3; D' = 1.00), whereas other observed mutations do not show strong LD with any of the other mutations. None of the intronic mutations has shown significant association with the breast cancer, two exonic mutations G13203A (rs28934578) and A14572G are significantly (P = 0.04, P = 0.007) associated with breast cancer. Germline mutations observed in DNA-binding domain of the gene showed significant association with breast cancer. This study reports five novel germline mutations in the TP53 gene out of which one mutation may confer significant risk to the breast cancer. Mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene may play role in the early onset and prognosis of breast cancer. The population-based studies of germline mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene helps in identification of individuals and families who are at risk of developing cancers.

  7. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  8. Mutational specificity analysis: assay for mutations in the yeast SUP4-o gene.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Mutational specificity analysis can yield valuable insights into processes that generate genetic change or maintain genetic stability. Powerful diagnostic tools for such analysis have been created by combining genetic assays for mutation with DNA sequencing. Here, steps for isolating spontaneous mutations in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suppressor tRNA gene SUP4-o as a prelude to sequence characterization are described (modifications of this protocol can be used to study induction of mutations by various physical or chemical agents). Mutations in SUP4-o are selected on drug-containing medium by virtue of their inactivation of suppressor activity. The small size, detailed knowledge of detectably mutable sites, and other features of the target gene facilitate subsequent analysis of these mutations.

  9. Role of Histone H1 as an Architectural Determinant of Chromatin Structure and as a Specific Repressor of Transcription on Xenopus Oocyte 5S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sera, Takashi; Wolffe, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    We explore the role of histone H1 as a DNA sequence-dependent architectural determinant of chromatin structure and of transcriptional activity in chromatin. The Xenopus laevis oocyte- and somatic-type 5S rRNA genes are differentially transcribed in embryonic chromosomes in vivo depending on the incorporation of somatic histone H1 into chromatin. We establish that this effect can be reconstructed at the level of a single nucleosome. H1 selectively represses oocyte-type 5S rRNA genes by directing the stable positioning of a nucleosome such that transcription factors cannot bind to the gene. This effect does not occur on the somatic-type genes. Histone H1 binds to the 5′ end of the nucleosome core on the somatic 5S rRNA gene, leaving key regulatory elements in the promoter accessible, while histone H1 binds to the 3′ end of the nucleosome core on the oocyte 5S rRNA genes, specifically blocking access to a key promoter element (the C box). TFIIIA can bind to the somatic 5S rRNA gene assembled into a nucleosome in the presence of H1. Because H1 binds with equivalent affinities to nucleosomes containing either gene, we establish that it is the sequence-selective assembly of a specific repressive chromatin structure on the oocyte 5S rRNA genes that accounts for differential transcriptional repression. Thus, general components of chromatin can determine the assembly of specific regulatory nucleoprotein complexes. PMID:9632749

  10. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  11. Genetic polymorphism of 12S rRNA gene among Dermacentor reticulatus Fabricius ticks in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Exclusion Zone.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Morozov, Alexandr; Sitnicova, Natalia

    2013-02-01

    The molecular genetic variability of the 12S rRNA gene, on the basis of partial primary sequence and in silico-predicted secondary structures among Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius 1794) ticks, was studied in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Exclusion Zone. In total, 20, 20, and 25 ethanol-preserved specimens, previously collected at 3 sites with 0.76, 1.91, and 4.5 millisievert (mSv)/hr ionizing radiation background, were examined. The primary sequence analysis generated 4 haplotypes defined by 3 polymorphic sites. The most common haplotype 1 was found in all 3 locations, representing 86.2% of all sampled individuals. Haplotype 4 (10.8%) was detected at the 1.91 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites. The unique haplotypes 2 (1.5%) and 3 (1.5%) were detected only at the 1.91 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites, respectively. The haplotype diversity, nucleotide diversity, and pairwise nucleotide differences for 2 tick populations at the 1.90 and 4.50 mSv/hr sites were 0.279, 0.00085, and 0.289, and 0.397, 0.00122, 0.413, respectively. No polymorphism was detected in ticks collected at the 0.76 mSv/hr site. The primary sequences of 12S rRNA were folded into the secondary structures and the free energy of haplotypes was calculated. The free energy at 37 C (ΔG) of the nonmutant haplotype 1 and the mutant haplotypes 2, 3, and 4 were -45.79, -44.17, -39.56, and -45.79 kcal/mol, respectively. Considering the correlation between the structural profile similarity of 12S rRNA and point mutations, haplotypes 1 and 4 have similar secondary structure profiles and have received a 0.999219 similarity score in the cluster tree. The unique haplotypes 2 and 3 have differences in the secondary structure in comparison with haplotypes 1 and 4; the similarity scores were 0.914747 and 0.169431, respectively. Further studies using more genetic markers are warranted to ascertain the genetic variability and population genetic structure within D. reticulatus tick populations in the ChNPP Exclusion Zone and to

  12. DKC1 gene mutation in a Taiwanese kindred with X-linked dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Lee, J Yu-Yun; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2002-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is a rare inherited disease characterized by the triad of abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and mucosal leukoplakia. Recent studies demonstrated mutations in the DKC1 gene encoding a protein named dyskerin, which is a component of human telomerase. In addition to the hypothesized function of pseudouridination in rRNA biosynthesis, ribosomal subunit assembly, and/or centromere/ microtubule binding, lower levels of telomerase activity in cells from patients with X-linked DKC have been observed. We report the mutation analysis of a Taiwanese family with X-linked DKC. The patient was a 19-year-old man who presented with progressive reticulate hyperpigmentation, nail dystrophy, alopecia, leukoplakia of the tongue, and pancytopenia. He died of enterocolitis and Escherichia coli sepsis at the age of 20 years. Only his mother's DNA was available for mutation analysis, which revealed a nucleotide transition of C to T (1058 C --> T), a hotspot mutation in DKC, resulting in an amino acid change from alanine to valine (A353V) in the DKC1 gene. Recent advances in the research of telomerase and its implications in the human aging process and cancer are discussed.

  13. Analysis of 525 Samples To Determine the Usefulness of PCR Amplification and Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene for Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, Florence; Roux, Véronique; Stein, Andréas; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2006-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infections has not been systematically tested. Five hundred twenty-five bone and joint samples collected from 525 patients were cultured and submitted to 16S rRNA gene PCR detection of bacteria in parallel. The amplicons with mixed sequences were also cloned. When discordant results were observed, culture and PCR were performed once again. Bacteria were detected in 139 of 525 samples. Culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR yielded identical documentation in 475 samples. Discrepancies were linked to 13 false-positive culture results, 5 false-positive PCR results, 9 false-negative PCR results, 16 false-negative culture results, and 7 mixed infections. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in 6 of 8 patients with mixed infections identified 2 to 8 bacteria per sample. Rarely described human pathogens such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas terrigena, and 21 anaerobes were characterized. We also detected, by 16S rRNA gene PCR, four previously identified bacteria never reported in human infection, Alkanindiges illinoisensis, dehydroabietic acid-degrading bacterium DhA-73, unidentified Hailaer soda lake bacterium, and uncultured bacterium clone HuCa4. Seven organisms representing new potential species were also detected. PCR followed by cloning and sequencing may help to identify new pathogens involved in mixed bone infection. PMID:16517890

  14. Novel strategies for comprehensive mutation screening of the APC gene.

    PubMed

    Wachsmannova, L; Mego, M; Stevurkova, V; Zajac, V; Ciernikova, S

    2017-03-03

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer related deaths worldwide and new possibilities in accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment are highly required. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene play a pivotal role in adenoma-carcinoma pathway of colorectal tumorigenesis. The quarter century from its´ first cloning, APC became one of the most frequently mutated, known driver genes in colorectal cancer. Intensive routine molecular testing of APC has brought the benefits for patients with family history of polyposis or colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, multiple mutational disease-causing mechanisms make the genetic testing still challenging. This minireview is focused on implementation of novel APC mutation screening diagnostic strategies for polyposis families according to the current findings. A further understanding and improved algorithms may help to increase the mutation detection rate. APC germline mutations achieve close to 100% penetrance, so more comprehensive approach followed by preventive and therapeutic strategies might reflect in decrease in burden of colorectal cancer.

  15. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  16. Clinical and Microbiological Aspects of Linezolid Resistance Mediated by the cfr Gene Encoding a 23S rRNA Methyltransferase▿

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Cesar A.; Vallejo, Martha; Reyes, Jinnethe; Panesso, Diana; Moreno, Jaime; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Villegas, Maria V.; Murray, Barbara E.; Quinn, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The cfr (chloramphenicol-florfenicol resistance) gene encodes a 23S rRNA methyltransferase that confers resistance to linezolid. Detection of linezolid resistance was evaluated in the first cfr-carrying human hospital isolate of linezolid and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (designated MRSA CM-05) by dilution and diffusion methods (including Etest). The presence of cfr was investigated in isolates of staphylococci colonizing the patient's household contacts and clinical isolates recovered from patients in the same unit where MRSA CM-05 was isolated. Additionally, 68 chloramphenicol-resistant Colombian MRSA isolates recovered from hospitals between 2001 and 2004 were screened for the presence of the cfr gene. In addition to erm(B), the erm(A) gene was also detected in CM-05. The isolate belonged to sequence type 5 and carried staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec type I. We were unable to detect the cfr gene in any of the human staphylococci screened (either clinical or colonizing isolates). Agar and broth dilution methods detected linezolid resistance in CM-05. However, the Etest and disk diffusion methods failed to detect resistance after 24 h of incubation. Oxazolidinone resistance mediated by the cfr gene is rare, and acquisition by a human isolate appears to be a recent event in Colombia. The detection of cfr-mediated linezolid resistance might be compromised by the use of the disk diffusion or Etest method. PMID:18174304

  17. Clinical resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in cutaneous propionibacteria isolated from acne patients is associated with mutations in 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J I; Eady, E A; Cove, J H; Jones, C E; Ratyal, A H; Miller, Y W; Vyakrnam, S; Cunliffe, W J

    1997-01-01

    The genetic basis of erythromycin resistance in cutaneous propionibacteria was determined by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the peptidyl transferase region in the 23S rRNAs from 9 susceptible and 26 resistant clinical isolates as well as 4 laboratory-selected erythromycin-resistant mutants of a susceptible strain. In 13 isolates and the 4 laboratory mutants, cross-resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and B-type streptogramins was associated with an A-->G transition at a position cognate with Escherichia coli 23S rRNA base 2058. These strains were resistant to > or = 512 microg of erythromycin per ml. Two other mutations were identified, an A-->G transition at base 2059 in seven strains, associated with high-level resistance to all macrolides, and a G-->A transition at base 2057 in six strains, associated with low-level resistance to erythromycin. These mutations correspond to three of four phenotypic classes previously identified by using MIC determinations. PMID:9145890

  18. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  19. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis.

  20. DNA polymorphism in morels: complete sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of genes coding for rRNA in Morchella esculenta (yellow morel) and Morchella conica (black morel).

    PubMed

    Wipf, D; Munch, J C; Botton, B; Buscot, F

    1996-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the gene coding for rRNA was sequenced in both directions with the gene walking technique in a black morel (Morchella conica) and a yellow morel (M. esculenta) to elucidate the ITS length discrepancy between the two species groups (750-bp ITS in black morels and 1,150-bp ITS in yellow morels.

  1. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  2. Bioinformatic Analysis of GJB2 Gene Missense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Akin

    2015-04-01

    Gap junction beta 2 (GJB2) gene is the most commonly mutated connexin gene in patients with autosomal recessive and dominant hearing loss. According to Ensembl (release 74) database, 1347 sequence variations are reported in the GJB2 gene and about 13.5% of them are categorized as missense SNPs or nonsynonymous variant. Because of the high incidence of GJB2 mutations in hearing loss patients, revealing the molecular effect of GJB2 mutations on protein structure may also provide clear point of view regarding the molecular etiology of deafness. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze structural and functional consequences of all known GJB2 missense variations to the Cx26 protein by applying multiple bioinformatics methods. Two-hundred and eleven nonsynonymous variants were collected from Ensembl release 74, Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) and The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). A number of bioinformatic tools were utilized for predicting the effect of GJB2 missense mutations at the sequence, structural, and functional levels. Some of the mutations were found to locate highly conserved regions and have structural and functional properties. Moreover, GJB2 mutations were also found to affect Cx26 protein at the molecular level via loss or gain of disorder, catalytic site, and post-translational modifications, including methylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination. Findings, presented here, demonstrated the application of bioinformatic algorithms to predict the effects of mutations causing hearing impairment. I expect, this type of analysis will serve as a start point for future experimental evaluation of the GJB2 gene mutations and it will also be helpful in evaluating other deafness-related gene mutations.

  3. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  4. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  5. Technical considerations in the use of 18s rRNA in gene expression studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression analysis is now commonly used in ecotoxicological studies to indicate exposure of an organism to xenobiotics. For example, the vitellogenin gene is used to diagnose exposure of fish to environmental estrogens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PC...

  6. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  7. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships between Vorticella convallaria and other species inferred from small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Mikami, Kazuyuki; Fang, Jie; Asai, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    Vorticellid ciliates generally dwell in freshwater. In nature, the species have up until now been identified by comparison with previous descriptions. It is difficult to identify between species of the genus Vorticella, because the morphological markers of vorticellid ciliates described in reports are limited and variable. Unfortunately, culturing them has only succeeded with certain species such as Vorticella convallaria, but many others have been impossible to culture. To find out whether the sequence of a small subunit rRNA gene was an appropriate marker to identify vorticellid ciliates, the gene was aligned and compared. Finding a new convenient method will contribute to research on vorticellid ciliates. In strains of V. convallaria, classified morphologically, some varieties of the SSrRNA gene sequences were recognized, but there were large variations within the same species. According to the phylogenetic tree, these strains are closely related. However, the difference was not as big as between Vorticella and Carchesium. In addition, Carchesium constructed a distinct clade from the genus Vorticella and Epistylis. These results show the possibility that the SSrRNA gene is one of the important markers to identify species of Vorticella. This study is first to approach and clarify the complicated taxa in the genus Vorticella.

  9. Molecular Diversity of Eukaryotes in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Processes as Revealed by 18S rRNA Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4–8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes. PMID:25491751

  10. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  11. Molecular diversity of eukaryotes in municipal wastewater treatment processes as revealed by 18S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4-8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes.

  12. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  13. [Polymorphism of the 12S rRNA gene and phylogeography of the Central Asian tortoises Agrionemys horsfieldii gray, 1844].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, V A; Bondarenko, D A; Peregortsev, E A; Voronov, A S; Ryskov, A P; Semenova, S K

    2008-06-01

    Based on intraspecific polymorphism of 12S rRNA gene, genetic variation of isolated populations of the Central Asian tortoise, Agrionemys horsfieldii, was for the first time investigated on a large part of the species distribution range, encompassing Uzbekistan, southern Kazakhstan, and northern and eastern Iran. In 59 tortoises, four haplotypes were discovered, including two (AH1 and AH2), described earlier. Haplotype AH1 was detected in 52 tortoises, inhabiting southern Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Haplotype AH2 was found in four tortoises from the border territory between Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan. Two novel haplotypes, AH3 and AH4, were detected in the three tortoises from Iran. Based on nucleotide substitutions in the 12S rDNA sequence, the possible divergence time between the tortoises from different parts of the range was estimated. Possible pathways of the formation of modern intraspecific groups of A. horsfieldii are discussed.

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing of the Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene for Forensic Soil Comparison: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Jesmok, Ellen M; Hopkins, James M; Foran, David R

    2016-05-01

    Soil has the potential to be valuable forensic evidence linking a person or item to a crime scene; however, there is no established soil individualization technique. In this study, the utility of soil bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was examined for associating soils with their place of origin. Soil samples were collected from ten diverse and nine similar habitats over time, and within three habitats at various horizontal and vertical distances. Bacterial profiles were analyzed using four methods: abundance charts and nonmetric multidimensional scaling provided simplification and visualization of the massive datasets, potentially aiding in expert testimony, while analysis of similarities and k-nearest neighbor offered objective statistical comparisons. The vast majority of soil bacterial profiles (95.4%) were classified to their location of origin, highlighting the potential of bacterial profiling via next-generation sequencing for the forensic analysis of soil samples.

  15. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri R; Chin, Ephrem L H; Mulle, Jennifer G; Okou, David T; Warren, Stephen T; Zwick, Michael E

    2008-09-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans>2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6 to 10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30 to 35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), detection of virtually all mutations-SSCP (DOVAM-S), and single condition amplification/internal primer sequencing (SCAIP); however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin.

  16. Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals With Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Kulke, Matthew H; Fuchs, Charles S; Allen, Brian A; Uno, Hajime; Hornick, Jason L; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Brais, Lauren K; McNamara, Philip G; Mayer, Robert J; Schrag, Deborah; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Kidd, John; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Wenstrup, Richard J; Syngal, Sapna

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Hereditary factors play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, yet the prevalence of germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations in patients with CRC unselected for high-risk features (eg, early age at diagnosis, personal/family history of cancer or polyps, tumor microsatellite instability [MSI], mismatch repair [MMR] deficiency) is unknown. Patients and Methods We recruited 1,058 participants who received CRC care in a clinic-based setting without preselection for age at diagnosis, personal/family history, or MSI/MMR results. All participants underwent germline testing for mutations in 25 genes associated with inherited cancer risk. Each gene was categorized as high penetrance or moderate penetrance on the basis of published estimates of the lifetime cancer risks conferred by pathogenic germline mutations in that gene. Results One hundred five (9.9%; 95% CI, 8.2% to 11.9%) of 1,058 participants carried one or more pathogenic mutations, including 33 (3.1%) with Lynch syndrome (LS). Twenty-eight (96.6%) of 29 available LS CRCs demonstrated abnormal MSI/MMR results. Seventy-four (7.0%) of 1,058 participants carried non-LS gene mutations, including 23 (2.2%) with mutations in high-penetrance genes (five APC, three biallelic MUTYH, 11 BRCA1/2, two PALB2, one CDKN2A, and one TP53), 15 of whom lacked clinical histories suggestive of their underlying mutation. Thirty-eight (3.6%) participants had moderate-penetrance CRC risk gene mutations (19 monoallelic MUTYH, 17 APC*I1307K, two CHEK2). Neither proband age at CRC diagnosis, family history of CRC, nor personal history of other cancers significantly predicted the presence of pathogenic mutations in non-LS genes. Conclusion Germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations are carried by 9.9% of patients with CRC. MSI/MMR testing reliably identifies LS probands, although 7.0% of patients with CRC carry non-LS mutations, including 1.0% with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  17. Bacterial rRNA Genes Associated with Soil Suppressiveness against the Plant-Parasitic Nematode Heterodera schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bei; Valinsky, Lea; Gao, Xuebiao; Becker, J. Ole; Borneman, James

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify bacteria involved in soil suppressiveness against the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii. Since H. schachtii cysts isolated from the suppressive soil can transfer this beneficial property to nonsuppressive soils, analysis of the cyst-associated microorganisms should lead to the identification of the causal organisms. Our experimental approach was to identify bacterial rRNA genes (rDNA) associated with H. schachtii cysts obtained from soil mixtures with various levels of suppressiveness. We hypothesized that we would be able to identify bacteria involved in the suppressiveness by correlating population shifts with differing levels of suppressiveness. Soil treatments containing different amounts of suppressive and fumigation-induced nonsuppressive soils exhibited various levels of suppressiveness after two nematode generations. The 10%-suppressive-soil treatment contained numbers of eggs per gram of soil similar to those of the 100%-suppressive-soil treatment, indicating that the suppressive factor(s) had been transferred. Bacterial rDNA associated with H. schachtii cysts were identified using a culture-independent method termed oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes. Bacteria from five major taxonomic groups (Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and γ-Proteobacteria) were identified. Three bacterial rDNA groups contained clones that were more prevalent in the highly suppressive soil treatments than in the less suppressive treatments, indicating a potential involvement in the H. schachtii suppressiveness. When these three groups were examined with specific PCR analyses performed on H. schachtii cysts that developed in soils treated with three biocidal compounds, only one bacterial rDNA group with moderate to high sequence identity to rDNA from several Rhizobium species and uncultured α-proteobacterial clones was consistently associated with the highly

  18. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  19. Identification of polybacterial communities in patients with postoperative, posttraumatic, and endogenous endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, Rajagopalaboopathi; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Prabagaran, Solai Ramatchandirane

    2014-05-01

    Endophthalmitis is a potential vision-threatening complication following surgical procedures (postoperative endophthalmitis [POE]), trauma (posttraumatic endophthalmitis [PTE]), and bacteremic seeding of the eye from a distant infection site (endogenous endophthalmitis [EE]). Several studies have revealed the polybacterial characteristics of endophthalmitis, which make the administration of antibiotics to treat the disease challenging. However, until now, the polybacterial communities of POE, PTE, and EE have not been precisely studied. Hence, the present study was designed to identify the bacterial community of endophthalmitis through 16S rRNA gene libraries. Of the 40 intraocular samples tested, 30 libraries were constructed with bacterial nested-PCR-positive samples. The obtained recombinant clones were screened through amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA) to identify unique clones. The multiple types of ARDRA patterns (P=0.345) and diverse bacterial sequences (P=0.277) within the libraries revealed the polybacterial nature of infection in POE, PTE, and EE. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on polybacterial infection in EE. Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus spp. (n=19), Streptococcus spp. (n=18), Staphylococcus spp. (n=6), Exiguobacterium spp. (n=3), Gemella spp. (n=2), Enterococcus spp. (n=2), a Lysinibacillus sp. (n=1), a Clostridium sp. (n=1), and a Nocardia sp. (n=1), and Gram-negative bacteria, including Serratia spp. (n=18), Pseudomonas spp. (n=10), Enterobacter spp. (n=8), Acinetobacter spp. (n=3), Pantoea spp. (n=3), a Haemophilus sp. (n=1), and a Massilia sp. (n=1), were identified. Interestingly, among them, 10 bacterial species were not previously reported to be associated with endophthalmitis or other ocular infections. Besides, the presence of 4 unidentifiable clones suggests the possibility of novel organisms that might cause eye infections. Therefore, it is recommended that, in addition to the

  20. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  1. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; ...

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n =more » 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.« less

  2. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  3. Analysis of microbiota associated with peri-implantitis using 16S rRNA gene clone library

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease which leads to the destruction of soft and hard tissues around osseointegrated implants. The subgingival microbiota appears to be responsible for peri-implant lesions and although the complexity of the microbiota has been reported in PI, the microbiota responsible for PI has not been identified. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the microbiota in subjects who have PI, clinically healthy implants, and periodontitis-affected teeth using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis to clarify the microbial differences. Design Three subjects participated in this study. The conditions around the teeth and implants were evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations and diseased implants, clinically healthy implants, and periodontally diseased teeth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets using sterile paper points. Prevalence and identity of bacteria was analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library technique. Results A total of 112 different species were identified from 335 clones sequenced. Among the 112 species, 51 (46%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 22 were novel phylotypes. The numbers of bacterial species identified at the sites of PI, periodontitis, and periodontally healthy implants were 77, 57, and 12, respectively. Microbiota in PI mainly included Gram-negative species and the composition was more diverse when compared to that of the healthy implant and periodontitis. The phyla Chloroflexi, Tenericutes, and Synergistetes were only detected at PI sites, as were Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Solobacterium moorei. Low levels of periodontopathic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were seen in peri-implant lesions. Conclusions The biofilm in PI showed a more complex microbiota when compared to periodontitis and periodontally healthy teeth

  4. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  5. De novo mutation in the NOTCH3 gene causing CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Dragan; Grozdanović, Danijela; Petrović, Sladjana; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Stefanović, Ivan; Stojanović, Nebojša; Ilić, Dušica N

    2014-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common hereditary forms of stroke, and migraine with aura, mood disorders and dementia. CADASIL is caused by mutations of the NOTCH3 gene. This mutation is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Most individuals with CADASIL have a parent with the disorder. In extremely rare cases, CADASIL may occur due to a spontaneous genetic mutation that occurs for unknown reasons (de novo mutation). We report a new case of patient with de novo mutation of the NOTCH3 gene and a condition strongly suggestive of CADASIL (migraine, stroke, and white matter abnormalities), except that this patient did not have any first-degree relatives with similar symptoms.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved.

  7. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  8. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) using sequences from the 12S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and NADH1 genes: implications for classification, biogeography, and the evolution of web building behavior.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nicholas P; Framenau, Volker W; Donnellan, Stephen C; Harvey, Mark S; Park, Yung-Chul; Austin, Andrew D

    2006-03-01

    Current knowledge of the evolutionary relationships amongst the wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) is based on assessment of morphological similarity or phylogenetic analysis of a small number of taxa. In order to enhance the current understanding of lycosid relationships, phylogenies of 70 lycosid species were reconstructed by parsimony and Bayesian methods using three molecular markers; the mitochondrial genes 12S rRNA, NADH1, and the nuclear gene 28S rRNA. The resultant trees from the mitochondrial markers were used to assess the current taxonomic status of the Lycosidae and to assess the evolutionary history of sheet-web construction in the group. The results suggest that a number of genera are not monophyletic, including Lycosa, Arctosa, Alopecosa, and Artoria. At the subfamilial level, the status of Pardosinae needs to be re-assessed, and the position of a number of genera within their respective subfamilies is in doubt (e.g., Hippasa and Arctosa in Lycosinae and Xerolycosa, Aulonia and Hygrolycosa in Venoniinae). In addition, a major clade of strictly Australasian taxa may require the creation of a new subfamily. The analysis of sheet-web building in Lycosidae revealed that the interpretation of this trait as an ancestral state relies on two factors: (1) an asymmetrical model favoring the loss of sheet-webs and (2) that the suspended silken tube of Pirata is directly descended from sheet-web building. Paralogous copies of the nuclear 28S rRNA gene were sequenced, confounding the interpretation of the phylogenetic analysis and suggesting that a cautionary approach should be taken to the further use of this gene for lycosid phylogenetic analysis.

  9. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Madhuri R.; Chin, Ephrem L.H.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Okou, David T.; Warren, Stephen T.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans > 2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6–10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30–35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, MLPA, DOVAM-S, and SCAIP; however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution CGH microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin. PMID:18663755

  10. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. Methods: 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. Conclusion: About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms. PMID:25793047

  11. Noninvasive detection of filaggrin gene mutations using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    González, Francisco J.; Valdes-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Elías, Miguel G.; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio; Saavedra-Alanis, Victor M.; Moncada, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the existence of filaggrin (FLG) gene mutations might be helpful for a subclassification of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) which can be used to introduce individualized treatments. In this work the filaggrin content in the skin is assessed using Raman spectroscopy and the results are compared to FLG genotyping of Mexican-mestizo patients. Results showed that the 2282del4 and R501X mutations present in the European population but absent in people of Asian or African descent are also present in the Mexican-mestizo population. The results also showed that patients with filaggrin gene mutations presented lower filaggrin concentrations measured using the vector correlation of their skin Raman spectra and a fixed spectrum of pure human recombinant filaggrin, these results indicate that Raman spectroscopy may be used as a noninvasive tool to detect FLG gene mutations. PMID:22162825

  12. Noninvasive detection of filaggrin gene mutations using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González, Francisco J; Valdes-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Elías, Miguel G; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio; Saavedra-Alanis, Victor M; Moncada, Benjamín

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the existence of filaggrin (FLG) gene mutations might be helpful for a subclassification of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) which can be used to introduce individualized treatments. In this work the filaggrin content in the skin is assessed using Raman spectroscopy and the results are compared to FLG genotyping of Mexican-mestizo patients. Results showed that the 2282del4 and R501X mutations present in the European population but absent in people of Asian or African descent are also present in the Mexican-mestizo population. The results also showed that patients with filaggrin gene mutations presented lower filaggrin concentrations measured using the vector correlation of their skin Raman spectra and a fixed spectrum of pure human recombinant filaggrin, these results indicate that Raman spectroscopy may be used as a noninvasive tool to detect FLG gene mutations.

  13. Mutation in δ-Sg Gene in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mutations in different genes including dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex caused familial dilated cardiomyopathy which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The δ-SG gene contains nine exons spanning a 433-kb region of genomic DNA. It encodes a 35-kDa, singlepass, and type II transmembrane glycoprotein. Materials and Methods: In this study for the first time in Iran we screened 6 patients of a large family that they had positive family history of MI or sudden death by next generation sequencing method. Results: By employing NGS method we found missense mutation (p.R97Q) of δ-SG gene in 2 of 6 patients. Conclusions: The missense mutation (p.R97Q) in familial DCM patients is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac disease. Although this mutation is already known in other populations in Iran, it is not reported before.

  14. Mutations in MTP gene in abeta- and hypobeta-lipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Enza; Lancellotti, Sandra; Penacchioni, Junia Y; Cefalù, Angelo B; Averna, Maurizio; Pisciotta, L; Bertolini, Stefano; Calandra, Sebastiano; Gabelli, Carlo; Tarugi, Patrizia

    2005-06-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) and abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) are inherited disorders of apolipoprotein B (apo B)-containing lipoproteins that result from mutations in apo B and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) genes, respectively. Here we report three patients with severe deficiency of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apo B. Two of them (probands F.A. and P.E.) had clinical and biochemical phenotype consistent with ABL. Proband F.A. was homozygous for a minute deletion/insertion (c.1228delCCCinsT) in exon 9 of MTP gene predicted to cause a truncated MTP protein of 412 amino acids. Proband P. E. was heterozygous for a mutation in intron 9 (IVS9-1G>A), previously reported in an ABL patient. We failed to find the second pathogenic mutation in MTP gene of this patient. No mutations were found in apo B gene. The third proband (D.F.) had a less severe lipoprotein phenotype which was similar to that of heterozygous FHBL and appeared to be inherited as a co-dominant trait. However, he had no mutations in apo B gene. He was found to be a compound heterozygote for two missense mutations (D384A and G661A), involving highly conserved regions of MTP. Since this proband was also homozygous for varepsilon2 allele of apolipoprotein E (apo E), it is likely that his hypobetalipoproteinemia derives from a combined effect of a mild MTP deficiency and homozygosity for apo E2 isoform.

  15. Structure and organization of the rrnD operon of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum': analysis of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Amador, E; Castro, J M; Correia, A; Martín, J F

    1999-04-01

    Five rRNA operons (rrn) were found by hybridization in the genome of 'Brevibacterium lactofermentum' ATCC 13869 and Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. 'B. lactofermentum' DSM 20412 differed from the other corynebacteria tested in showing six hybridizing BamHI bands. Two of the rrn operons (rrnD and rrnE) were located in a single cosmid. Sequencing of the rrnD operon showed that it contains a complete 16S rRNA-23S RNA-5S rRNA gene cluster. Phylogenetic studies using the complete 16S rRNA sequence showed that 'B. lactofermentum' is closely related to several species of the genus Corynebacterium but only distantly related to the type species Brevibacterium linens and the authors suggest that it should be reclassified as Corynebacterium lactofermentum. The 5' end of mature 16S rRNA was identified by primer extension. Sequence elements similar to those of mycobacteria implicated in transcription antitermination (Boxes A, B, C) and in processing of the pre-rRNA to 16S rRNA were identified. An open reading frame encoding an rpoD-like sigma factor (named SigC) different from the previously reported SigA and SigB proteins was found upstream of rrnD in the opposite orientation. Both rpoD and sigC seem to be expressed from a bidirectional promoter region.

  16. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  1. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  2. Reconstruction of ancestral 16S rRNA reveals mutation bias in the evolution of optimal growth temperature in the Thermotogae phylum.

    PubMed

    Green, Anna G; Swithers, Kristen S; Gogarten, Jan F; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optimal growth temperature is a complex trait involving many cellular components, and its physiology is not yet fully understood. Evolution of continuous characters, such as optimal growth temperature, is often modeled as a one-dimensional random walk, but such a model may be an oversimplification given the complex processes underlying the evolution of continuous characters. Recent articles have used ancestral sequence reconstruction to infer the optimal growth temperature of ancient organisms from the guanine and cytosine content of the stem regions of ribosomal RNA, allowing inferences about the evolution of optimal growth temperature. Here, we investigate the optimal growth temperature of the bacterial phylum Thermotogae. Ancestral sequence reconstruction using a nonhomogeneous model was used to reconstruct the stem guanine and cytosine content of 16S rRNA sequences. We compare this sequence reconstruction method with other ancestral character reconstruction methods, and show that sequence reconstruction generates smaller confidence intervals and different ancestral values than other reconstruction methods. Unbiased random walk simulation indicates that the lower temperature members of the Thermotogales have been under directional selection; however, when a simulation is performed that takes possible mutations into account, it is the high temperature lineages that are, in fact, under directional selection. We find that the evolution of Thermotogales optimal growth temperatures is best fit by a biased random walk model. These findings suggest that it may be easier to evolve from a high optimal growth temperature to a lower one than vice versa.

  3. Somatic cell gene mutations in humans: biomarkers for genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, R J; Nicklas, J A; O'Neill, J P

    1993-01-01

    Somatic cell gene mutations arising in vivo in humans provide biomarkers for genotoxicity. Four assays, each measuring changes in a different "recorder" gene, are available for detecting mutations of the hemoglobin (Hb) and glycophorin A (gpa) genes in red blood cells and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) and HLA genes in T-lymphocytes. Mean adult background mutant frequencies have been established; i.e., approximately 4 x 10(-8) (Hb), 5-10 x 10(-6) (hprt), 10-20 x 10(-6) (gpa) and 30 x 10(-6) (HLA). All the assays have now been used in studies of individuals exposed to physical and/or chemical genotoxic agents, and all have shown elevated values following exposures; examples are presented. In addition to quantitation, the lymphocyte assays allow molecular analyses of in vivo mutations, the definition of background and induced mutational spectra, and the search for unique changes for characterizing specific mutagens. The HPRT system currently has the largest database in this regard. Approximately 15% of adult background hprt mutations are due to gross structural alterations (primarily deletions) having random breakpoints; 85% result from "point" changes detected only by sequencing. In contrast, a specific intragenic deletion due to DNA cleavage at specific sites characterizes fetal hprt mutations, implicating a developmental mistake in their genesis. (This kind of developmental mistake in other genes is frequently observed in lymphoid malignancies.) Mutational spectra are just beginning to be defined for induced hprt mutations, e.g., ionizing radiation produces large deletions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8143616

  4. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  5. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    SciTech Connect

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. ); Child, A. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mutation analysis of the Smad3 gene in human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yan; An, Jing; Mao, Chun-Ming; Hou, Ning; Lv, Ya-Xin; Wang, You-Liang; Cui, Fang; Huang, Min; Yang, Xiao

    2003-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Recent studies have shown that targeted disruption of Smad3 in mouse results in OA. To reveal the possible association between the Smad3 gene mutation and human OA, we employed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to screen mutations in all nine exons of the Smad3 gene in 32 patients with knee OA and 50 patients with only bone fracture. A missense mutation of the Smad3 gene was found in one patient. The single base mutation located in the linker region of the SMAD3 protein was A --> T change in the position 2 of codon 197 and resulted in an asparagine to isoleucine amino-acid substitution. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in sera of the patient carrying the mutation were higher than other OA patients and controls. This is the first report showing that the Smad3 gene mutations could be associated with the pathogenesis of human OA.

  7. Monitoring the mycobiota during Greco di Tufo and Aglianico wine fermentation by 18S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of grape must is a complex process, carried out by indigenous yeast populations arising from the vineyard or the winery environment and therefore representing an autochthonous microbial terroir of the production area. Microbial diversity at species and biotype level is extremely important in order to develop the composite and typical flavour profile of DOCG (Appellation of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin) wines. In this study, we monitored fungal populations involved in spontaneous fermentations of Aglianico and Greco di Tufo grape must by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 18S rRNA gene amplicons. We firstly proposed an alternative/addition to ITS as target gene in HTS studies and highlighted consistency between the culture-dependent and -independent approaches. A complex mycobiota was found at the beginning of the fermentation, mainly characterized by non-Saccharomyces yeasts and several moulds, with differences between the two types of grapes. Moreover, Interdelta patterns revealed a succession of several Saccharomyces cerevisiae biotypes and a high genetic diversity within this species.

  8. [Molecular phylogeny of gastrotricha based on 18S rRNA genes comparison: rejection of hypothesis of relatedness with nematodes].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Pegova, A N; Manylov, O G; Vladychenskaia, N S; Miuge, N S; Aleshin, V V

    2007-01-01

    Gastrotrichs are meiobenthic free-living aquatic worms whose phylogenetic and intra-group relationships remain unclear despite some attempts to resolve them on the base of morphology or molecules. In this study we analysed complete sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of 15 taxa (8 new and 7 published) to test numerous hypotheses on gastrotrich phylogeny and to verify whether controversial interrelationships from previous molecular data could be due to the short region available for analysis and the poor taxa sampling. Data were analysed using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results obtained suggest that gastrotrichs, together with Gnathostomulida, Plathelminthes, Syndermata (Rotifera + Acanthocephala), Nemertea and Lophotrochozoa, comprise a clade Spiralia. Statistical tests reject phylogenetic hypotheses regarding Gastrotricha as close relatives of Nematoda and other Ecdysozoa or placing them at the base of bilaterian tree close to acoels and nemertodermatides. Within Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida comprise two well supported clades. Our analysis confirmed the monophyly of the Chaetonotidae and Xenotrichulidae within Chaetonida as well as Turbanellidae and Thaumastodermatidae within Macrodasyida. Mesodasys is a sister group of the Turbanellidae, and Lepidodasyidae appears to be a polyphyletic group as Cephalodasys forms a separate lineage at the base of macrodasyids, whereas Lepidodasys groups with Neodasys between Thaumastodermatidae and Turbanellidae. To infer a more reliable Gastrotricha phylogeny many species and additional genes should be involved in future analyses.

  9. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  10. p53 gene mutations in asbestos associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, B C; Fu, D C; Miao, Q; Wang, H H; You, B R

    1998-09-01

    The accumulation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells was observed by immunohistochemistry analysis. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Exons 5, 7 and 8 were amplified and studied by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis. Ten cases of asbestos associated cancer tissue were studied, of which five cases had adenocarcinoma, and the other five had mesothelioma, squamous carcinoma, small cell lung cancer, adenosquamous carcinoma and malignant lymphoma respectively. Employing monoclonal antibody PAb1801, five cases were found to be mutant p53 protein positive. Seven cases were found to have mutations by PCR-SSCP. A total of 7 cases (8 mutations) were found to be positive and 4 cases were found to be positive by both of these analyses. Of the 8 mutations found by SSCP analysis, 4(50%, 4/8) were clustered in exon 8. A high mutation frequency was noticed in adenocarcinoma (80%, 4/5). Sequencing analysis on two specimens revealed two hotspot mutations. In codon 234, TAC for tyrosin was mutated to AAC for asparagine by a T to A transversion of the first letter. In codon 273, CGT for arginine was mutated to AGT for serine by a C to A transversion of the first letter. In conclusion, the mutation of p53 gene is common in asbestos associated cancers. However, the mutational spectrum of asbestos associated cancers might be different from that of non-asbestos associated cancers.

  11. Expression and Function of Different Guanine-Plus-Cytosine Content 16S rRNA Genes in Haloarcula hispanica at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica harbors three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons (rrnA, rrnB, and rrnC) that contain the 16S rRNA genes rrsA, rrsB, and rrsC, respectively. Although rrsB and rrsC (rrsBC) have almost identical sequences, the rrsA and rrsBC sequences differ by 5.4%, and they differ by 2.5% with respect to guanine-plus-cytosine content (PGC). The strong correlation between the typical growth temperatures of archaea and PGC of their 16S rRNA genes suggests that H. hispanica may harbor different 16S rRNA genes having different PGC to maintain rapid growth in a wide range of temperatures. We therefore performed reverse transcription-coupled quantitative PCR to assess expression levels of rrsA (PGC, 58.9%) and rrsBC (PGC, 56.4–56.5%) at various temperatures. The expression ratio of rrsA to rrsBC increased with culture temperature. Mutants with complete deletions of one or two of the three rRNA operons were constructed and their growth rates at different temperatures compared to that of the wild-type. The growth characteristics of the rRNA operon single-mutant strains were indistinguishable from the wild-type. The rRNA operon double-mutant strains maintained the same temperature range as wild-type but displayed reduced growth rates. In particular, the double-mutant strains grew much slower than wild-type at low temperature related to minimum growth temperature of the wild-type. On the other hand, at physiologically high temperatures the wild-type and the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnA with high-PGC rrsA grew significantly faster than the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnC with low-PGC rrsC. These findings suggest the importance of 16S rRNAs transcribed from rrsA with high-PGC in maintaining rapid growth of this halophilic archaeon at raised growth temperatures.

  12. Succession of Microbial Communities during Hot Composting as Detected by PCR–Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism-Based Genetic Profiles of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sabine; Koschinsky, Stefanie; Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2000-01-01

    A cultivation-independent technique for genetic profiling of PCR-amplified small-subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNA) was chosen to characterize the diversity and succession of microbial communities during composting of an organic agricultural substrate. PCR amplifications were performed with DNA directly extracted from compost samples and with primers targeting either (i) the V4–V5 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes, (ii) the V3 region in the 16S rRNA genes of actinomycetes, or (iii) the V8–V9 region of fungal 18S rRNA genes. Homologous PCR products were converted to single-stranded DNA molecules by exonuclease digestion and were subsequently electrophoretically separated by their single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Genetic profiles obtained by this technique showed a succession and increasing diversity of microbial populations with all primers. A total of 19 single products were isolated from the profiles by PCR reamplification and cloning. DNA sequencing of these molecular isolates showed similarities in the range of 92.3 to 100% to known gram-positive bacteria with a low or high G+C DNA content and to the SSU rDNA of γ-Proteobacteria. The amplified 18S rRNA gene sequences were related to the respective gene regions of Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis. Specific molecular isolates could be attributed to different composting stages. The diversity of cultivated bacteria isolated from samples taken at the end of the composting process was low. A total of 290 isolates were related to only 6 different species. Two or three of these species were also detectable in the SSCP community profiles. Our study indicates that community SSCP profiles can be highly useful for the monitoring of bacterial diversity and community successions in a biotechnologically relevant process. PMID:10698754

  13. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  14. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  15. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  16. True microbiota involved in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients found by culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke B; Thomsen, Trine R; Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper N; Nielsen, Per H; Johansen, Ulla R; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infection. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in transplanted CF lungs (n = 5) by standard culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis. A correspondence between culturing and the molecular methods was observed. In conclusion, standard culturing seems reliable for the identification of the dominating pathogens.

  17. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the southeastern United States, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). Howe...

  18. The chromatin remodeling complex NuRD establishes the poised state of rRNA genes characterized by bivalent histone modifications and altered nucleosome positions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbing; Ling, Te; Zhou, Yonggang; Feng, Weijun; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Grummt, Ingrid; Tao, Wei

    2012-05-22

    rRNA genes (rDNA) exist in two distinct epigenetic states, active promoters being unmethylated and marked by euchromatic histone modifications, whereas silent ones are methylated and exhibit heterochromatic features. Here we show that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex establishes a specific chromatin structure at rRNA genes that are poised for transcription activation. The promoter of poised rRNA genes is unmethylated, associated with components of the preinitiation complex, marked by bivalent histone modifications and covered by a nucleosome in the "off" position, which is refractory to transcription initiation. Repression of rDNA transcription in growth-arrested and differentiated cells correlates with elevated association of NuRD and increased levels of poised rRNA genes. Reactivation of transcription requires resetting the promoter-bound nucleosome into the "on" position by the DNA-dependent ATPase CSB (Cockayne syndrome protein B). The results uncover a unique mechanism by which ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes with opposing activities establish a specific chromatin state and regulate transcription.

  19. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  20. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution. PMID:27688981

  1. [Archaeal diversity in permafrost deposits of Bunger Hills Oasis and King George Island (Antarctica) according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing].

    PubMed

    Karaevskaia, E S; Demchenko, L S; Demidov, N É; Rivkina, E M; Bulat, S A; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal communities of permafrost deposits of King George Island and Bunger Hills Oasis (Antarctica) differing in the content of biogenic methane were analyzed using clone libraries of two 16S rRNA gene regions. Phylotypes belonging to methanogenic archaea were identified in all horizons.

  2. Avoidance and Potential Remedy Solutions of Chimeras in Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Aphids Using the 16S rRNA Gene of Buchnera: A Case in Lachninae (Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-08-25

    It is known that PCR amplification of highly homologous genes from complex DNA mixtures can generate a significant proportion of chimeric sequences. The 16S rRNA gene is not only widely used in estimating the species diversity of endosymbionts in aphids but also used to explore the co-diversification of aphids and their endosymbionts. Thus, chimeric sequences may lead to the discovery of non-existent endosymbiont species and mislead Buchnera-based phylogenetic analysis that lead to false conclusions. In this study, a high probability (6.49%) of chimeric sequence occurrence was found in the amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences of endosymbionts from aphid species in the subfamily Lachninae. These chimeras are hybrid products of multiple parent sequences from the dominant species of endosymbionts in each corresponding host. It is difficult to identify the chimeric sequences of a new or unidentified species due to the high variability of their main parent, Buchnera aphidicola, and because the chimeric sequences can confuse the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These chimeras present a challenge to Buchnera-based phylogenetic research in aphids. Thus, our study strongly suggests that using appropriate methods to detect chimeric 16S rRNA sequences may avoid some false conclusions in endosymbiont-based aphid research.

  3. 16S rRNA gene-based identification of bacteria in postoperative endophthalmitis by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Zenteno, Juan C.; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Cancino-Díaz, Mario E.; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Cancino-Díaz, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional microbiological culture techniques are frequently insufficient to confirm endophthalmitis clinical cases which could require urgent medical attention because it could lead to permanent vision loss. We are proposing PCR-DGGE and 16S rRNA gene libraries as an alternative to improve the detection and identification rate of bacterial species from endophthalmitis cases. PMID:24031830

  4. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  5. Rapid Estimation of Numbers of Fecal Bacteroidetes by Use of a Quantitative PCR Assay for 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Linda K.; Field, Katharine G.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of health risk associated with fecal pollution requires a reliable fecal indicator and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of a Taq nuclease assay for enumeration of 16S rRNA genes of Bacteroidetes. Sensitivity and correlation with standard fecal indicators provide experimental evidence for application of the assay in monitoring fecal pollution. PMID:15345463

  6. Glandular odontogenic cyst: absence of PTCH gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; De Marco, L; Castro, W H; Gomez, R S

    2001-02-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare jawbone cyst of odontogenic origin. Human patched (PTCH) is a tumour suppressor gene that has been recently associated with signalling pathways during odontogenesis. Recently alterations of this gene were found on sporadic odontogenic keratocysts. This evidence, together with the biological behaviour similarities of both lesions, and the absence of reports on molecular analysis of GOC, led us to hypothesize that PTCH gene mutations may underlie the tumorigenesis of GOC. Therefore the aim of this study was to report one additional case of GOC and investigate the PTCH gene of the cyst. No mutations were found in the splicing and coding regions of the PTCH gene. In conclusion, the PTCH gene does not seem to be involved in GOC pathogenesis.

  7. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  8. Evolutionary origin of Plasmodium and other Apicomplexa based on rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the evolutionary history of the Apicomplexa and two related protistan phyla, Dinozoa and Ciliophora, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. We conclude that the Plasmodium lineage, to which the malarial parasites belong, diverged from other apicomplexan lineages (piroplasmids and coccidians) several hundred million years ago, perhaps even before the Cambrian. The Plasmodium radiation, which gave rise to several species parasitic to humans, occurred approximately 129 million years ago; Plasmodium parasitism of humans has independently arisen several times. The origin of apicomplexans (Plasmodium), dinoflagellates, and ciliates may be > 1 billion years old, perhaps older than the three multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants, and fungi. Digenetic parasitism independently evolved several times in the Apicomplexa. PMID:7597031

  9. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses.

  10. RAS gene hot-spot mutations in canine neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Murua Escobar, H; Günther, K; Soller, J T; Winkler, S; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs.

  11. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  12. Runaway telomere elongation caused by telomerase RNA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    McEachern, M J; Blackburn, E H

    1995-08-03

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase adds telomeric DNA onto chromosome ends and is normally regulated so that telomeric DNA lengths are kept within defined bounds. In the telomerase RNA gene from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations that alter telomeric DNA sequences result in telomeres elongating to up to 100 times their normal length and impair cell growth. Some mutations cause immediate elongation whereas others behave like genetic time bombs, causing elongation only after a latent period of hundreds of generations.

  13. High level of cross-resistance between kanamycin, amikacin, and capreomycin among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Georgia and a close relation with mutations in the rrs gene.

    PubMed

    Jugheli, Levan; Bzekalava, Nino; de Rijk, Pim; Fissette, Krista; Portaels, Françoise; Rigouts, Leen

    2009-12-01

    The aminoglycosides kanamycin and amikacin and the macrocyclic peptide capreomycin are key drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The increasing rates of resistance to these drugs and the possible cross-resistance between them are concerns for MDR-TB therapy. Mutations in the 16S rRNA gene (rrs) have been associated with resistance to each of the drugs, and mutations of the tlyA gene, which encodes a putative rRNA methyltransferase, are thought to confer capreomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Studies of possible cross-resistance have shown variable results. In this study, the MICs of these drugs for 145 clinical isolates from Georgia and the sequences of the rrs and tlyA genes of the isolates were determined. Of 78 kanamycin-resistant strains, 9 (11.5%) were susceptible to amikacin and 16 (20.5%) were susceptible to capreomycin. Four strains were resistant to capreomycin but were susceptible to the other drugs, whereas all amikacin-resistant isolates were resistant to kanamycin. Sequencing revealed six types of mutations in the rrs gene (A514C, C517T, A1401G, C1402T, C1443G, T1521C) but no mutations in the tlyA gene. The A514C, C517T, C1443G, and T1521C mutations showed no association with resistance to any of the drugs. The A1401G and C1402T mutations were observed in 65 kanamycin-resistant isolates and the 4 capreomycin-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas none of the susceptible isolates showed either of those mutations. The four mutants with the C1402T mutations showed high levels of resistance to capreomycin but no resistance to kanamycin and amikacin. Detection of the A1401G mutation appeared to be 100% specific for the detection of resistance to kanamycin and amikacin, while the sensitivities reached 85.9% and 94.2%, respectively.

  14. Automated Identification of Medically Important Bacteria by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Using a Novel Comprehensive Database, 16SpathDB▿

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Yeung, Juilian M. Y.; Tse, Herman; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, interpretation of 16S rRNA gene sequence results is one of the most difficult problems faced by clinical microbiologists and technicians. To overcome the problems we encountered in the existing databases during 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation, we built a comprehensive database, 16SpathDB (http://147.8.74.24/16SpathDB) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of all medically important bacteria listed in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and evaluated its use for automated identification of these bacteria. Among 91 nonduplicated bacterial isolates collected in our clinical microbiology laboratory, 71 (78%) were reported by 16SpathDB as a single bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, 19 (20.9%) were reported as more than one bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, and 1 (1.1%) was reported as no match. For the 71 bacterial isolates reported as a single bacterial species, all results were identical to their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach. For the 19 bacterial isolates reported as more than one bacterial species, all results contained their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach and all of them had their true identities as the “best match in 16SpathDB.” For the isolate (Gordonibacter pamelaeae) reported as no match, the bacterium has never been reported to be associated with human disease and was not included in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology. 16SpathDB is an automated, user-friendly, efficient, accurate, and regularly updated database for 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:21389154

  15. Sequence variation identified in the 18S rRNA gene of Theileria mutans and Theileria velifera from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2013-01-16

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a natural reservoir host for both pathogenic and non-pathogenic Theileria species. These often occur naturally as mixed infections in buffalo. Although the benign and mildly pathogenic forms do not have any significant economic importance, their presence could complicate the interpretation of diagnostic test results aimed at the specific diagnosis of the pathogenic Theileria parva in cattle and buffalo in South Africa. The 18S rRNA gene has been used as the target in a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva infections. However, the extent of sequence variation within this gene in the non-pathogenic Theileria spp. of the Africa buffalo is not well known. The aim of this study was, therefore, to characterise the full-length 18S rRNA genes of Theileria mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera and to determine the possible influence of any sequence variation on the specific detection of T. parva using the 18S rRNA qPCR. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to select samples which either tested positive for several different Theileria spp., or which hybridised only with the Babesia/Theileria genus-specific probe and not with any of the Babesia or Theileria species-specific probes. The full-length 18S rRNA genes from 14 samples, originating from 13 buffalo and one bovine from different localities in South Africa, were amplified, cloned and the resulting recombinants sequenced. Variations in the 18S rRNA gene sequences were identified in T. mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera, with the greatest diversity observed amongst the T. mutans variants. This variation possibly explained why the RLB hybridization assay failed to detect T. mutans and T. velifera in some of the analysed samples.

  16. Comparison of potential diatom 'barcode' genes (the 18S rRNA gene and ITS, COI, rbcL) and their effectiveness in discriminating and determining species taxonomy in the Bacillariophyta.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Shu; Ren, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Diatoms form an enormous group of photoautotrophic micro-eukaryotes and play a crucial role in marine ecology. In this study, we evaluated typical genes to determine whether they were effective at different levels of diatom clustering analysis to assess the potential of these regions for barcoding taxa. Our test genes included nuclear rRNA genes (the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene and the 5.8S rRNA gene+ITS-2), a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1, COI), a chloroplast gene [ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL)] and the universal plastid amplicon (UPA). Calculated genetic divergence was highest for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS; 5.8S+ITS-2) (p-distance of 1.569, 85.84% parsimony-informative sites) and COI (6.084, 82.14%), followed by the 18S rRNA gene (0.139, 57.69%), rbcL (0.120, 42.01%) and UPA (0.050, 14.97%), which indicated that ITS and COI were highly divergent compared with the other tested genes, and that their nucleotide compositions were variable within the whole group of diatoms. Bayesian inference (BI) analysis showed that the phylogenetic trees generated from each gene clustered diatoms at different phylogenetic levels. The 18S rRNA gene was better than the other genes in clustering higher diatom taxa, and both the 18S rRNA gene and rbcL performed well in clustering some lower taxa. The COI region was able to barcode species of some genera within the Bacillariophyceae. ITS was a potential marker for DNA based-taxonomy and DNA barcoding of Thalassiosirales, while species of Cyclotella, Skeletonema and Stephanodiscus gathered in separate clades, and were paraphyletic with those of Thalassiosira. Finally, UPA was too conserved to serve as a diatom barcode.

  17. Detecting morphological convergence in true fungi, using 18S rRNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Berbee, M L; Taylor, J W

    1992-01-01

    For the true fungi, phylogenetic relationships inferred from 18S ribosomal DNA sequence data agree with morphology when (1) the fungi exhibit diagnostic morphological characters, (2) the sequence-based phylogenetic groups are statistically supported, and (3) the ribosomal DNA evolves at roughly the same rate in the lineages being compared. 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence data and biochemical data provide a congruent definition of true fungi. Sequence data support the traditional fungal subdivisions Ascomycotina and Basidiomycotina. In conflict with morphology, some zygomycetes group with chytrid water molds rather than with other terrestrial fungi, possibly owing to unequal rates of nucleotide substitutions among zygomycete lineages. Within the ascomycetes, the taxonomic consequence of simple or reduced morphology has been a proliferation of mutually incongruent classification systems. Sequence data provide plausible resolution of relationships for some cases where reduced morphology has created confusion. For example, phylogenetic trees from rDNA indicate that those morphologically simple ascomycetes classified as yeasts are polyphyletic and that forcible spore discharge was lost convergently from three lineages of ascomycetes producing flask-like fruiting bodies.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships of Indian caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) inferred from mitochondrial rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark; A Sheps, Jonathan; Oommen, Oommen V; Cohen, Bernard L

    2002-06-01

    India has a diverse caecilian fauna, including representatives of three of the six currently recognized families, the Caeciliidae, Ichthyophiidae, the endemic Uraeotyphlidae, but previous molecular phylogenetic studies of caecilians have not included sequences for any Indian caecilians. Partial 12S and 16S mitochondrial gene sequences were obtained for a single representative of each of the caecilian families found in India and aligned against previously reported sequences for 13 caecilian species. The resulting alignment (16 taxa, 1200 sites, of which 288 cannot be aligned unambiguously) was analyzed using parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and distance methods. As judged by bootstrap proportions, decay indices, and leaf stabilities, well-supported relationships of the Indian caecilians are recovered from the alignment. The data (1) corroborate the hypothesis, based on morphology, that the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae are sister taxa, (2) recover a monophyletic Ichthyophiidae, including Indian and South East Asian representatives, and (3) place the Indian caeciliid Gegeneophis ramaswamii as the sister group of the caeciliid caecilians of the Seychelles. Rough estimates of divergence times suggest an origin of the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae while India was isolated from Laurasia and Africa and are most consistent with an Indian origin of these families and subsequent dispersal of ichthyophiids into South East Asia.

  19. Optimization of Gene Expression through Divergent Mutational Paths

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Hung; Marx, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Adaptation under similar selective pressure often leads to comparable phenotypes. A longstanding question is whether such phenotypic repeatability entails similar (parallelism) or different genotypic changes (convergence). To better understand this, we characterized mutations that optimized expression of a plasmid-borne metabolic pathway during laboratory evolution of a bacterium. Expressing these pathway genes was essential for growth but came with substantial costs. Starting from overexpression, replicate populations founded by this bacterium all evolved to reduce expression. Despite this phenotypic repetitiveness, the underlying mutational spectrum was highly diverse. Analysis of these plasmid mutations identified three distinct means to modulate gene expression: (1) reducing the gene copy number, (2) lowering transcript stability, and (3) integration of the pathway-bearing plasmid into the host genome. Our study revealed diverse molecular changes beneath convergence to a simple phenotype. This complex genotype-phenotype mapping presents a challenge to inferring genetic evolution based solely on phenotypic changes. PMID:22832162

  20. Intragenomic diversity of the V1 regions of 16S rRNA genes in high-alkaline protease-producing Bacillus clausii spp.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Nishi, Shinro; Nogi, Yuichi; Uchimura, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hitomi, Jun; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2007-07-01

    Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16, which produces high-alkaline M-protease, was characterized phenotypically, biochemically and genetically. This strain was identified as Bacillus clausii based on the results of taxonomic studies, including sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization. Seven rRNA operons in the genome were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes revealed two distinct types of variable region V1. Moreover, some cloned 16S rRNA genes in some of the reference strains of B. clausii had a V1 region of yet another type. The B. clausii strains could clearly be divided into at least two subgroups based on the frequencies of the types of cloned V1 sequence. Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16 was found to be in a different phylogenetic position from other high-alkaline protease-producing strains of B. clausii.

  1. Identification of the gene encoding the 5S ribosomal RNA maturase in Bacillus subtilis: mature 5S rRNA is dispensable for ribosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Brechemier-Baey, D; Beltchev, B; Grunberg-Manago, M; Putzer, H

    2001-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, Pace and coworkers described an activity called RNase M5 in Bacillus subtilis cell extracts responsible for 5S ribosomal RNA maturation (Sogin & Pace, Nature, 1974, 252:598-600). Here we show that RNase M5 is encoded by a gene of previously unknown function that is highly conserved among the low G + C gram-positive bacteria. We propose that the gene be named rnmV. The rnmV gene is nonessential. B. subtilis strains lacking RNase M5 do not make mature 5S rRNA, indicating that this process is not necessary for ribosome function. 5S rRNA precursors can, however, be found in both free and translating ribosomes. In contrast to RNase E, which cleaves the Escherichia coli 5S precursor in a single-stranded region, which is then trimmed to yield mature 5S RNA, RNase M5 cleaves the B. subtilis equivalent in a double-stranded region to yield mature 5S rRNA in one step. For the most part, eubacteria contain one or the other system for 5S rRNA production, with an imperfect division along gram-negative and gram-positive lines. A potential correlation between the presence of RNase E or RNase M5 and the single- or double-stranded nature of the predicted cleavage sites is explored. PMID:11233981

  2. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Chen, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics. PMID:27957494

  3. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Caamaño-Antelo, S; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp. that may be useful for typing purposes. These species include, among others, Bacillus cereus, an important pathogenic species involved in food poisoning, and Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, which are causative agents of food spoilage described as responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. With this purpose in mind, 52 Bacillus strains isolated from culture collections and fresh and processed food were considered. SNP type "Y" at sites 212 and 476 appeared in the majority of B. licheniformis studied strains. SNP type "R" at site 278 was detected in many strains of the B. subtilis/Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group, while polymorphism "Y" at site 173 was characteristic of the majority of strains of B. cereus/Bacillus thuringiensis group. The analysis of SNPs provided more intra-specific information than phylogenetic analysis in the cases of B. cereus and B. subtilis. Moreover, this study describes novel SNPs that should be considered when designing 16S rRNA-based primers and probes for multiplex-PCR, Real-Time PCR and microarray systems for foodborne Bacillus spp.

  4. Deciphering bacterial community changes in zucker diabetic fatty rats based on 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hong; Li, Shu; Liang, Lina; Sui, Hua; Zhan, Libin; Lu, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was deciphering bacterial community changes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF rats), a model of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies unmasked that the status of gastrointestinal tract microbiota has a marked impact on nutrition-related syndromes such as obesity and type-2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, samples taken from the gastrointestinal tracts (GI tracts) of ZDF and their lean littermates (ZL rats) were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities, including those located in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and feces. Results revealed that the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased and greater numbers of Lactobacillus were detected along GI tracts in ZDF rats compared to ZL rats. In conclusion, this work is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities along ZDF rat GI tract and provides substantial evidence supporting a prospective strategy to alter the GI microbial communities improving obesity and T2D. PMID:27418144

  5. The Gut Microbial Community of Antarctic Fish Detected by 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Li, Lingzhi; Huang, Hongliang; Jiang, Keji; Zhang, Fengying; Chen, Xuezhong; Zhao, Ming; Ma, Lingbo

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities are highly relevant to the digestion, nutrition, growth, reproduction, and a range of fitness in fish, but little is known about the gut microbial community in Antarctic fish. In this study, the composition of intestinal microbial community in four species of Antarctic fish was detected based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. As a result, 1 004 639 sequences were obtained from 13 samples identified into 36 phyla and 804 genera, in which Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermi, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, and Rhodococcus, Thermus, Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma were the dominant genera. The number of common OTUs (operational taxonomic units) varied from 346 to 768, while unique OTUs varied from 84 to 694 in the four species of Antarctic fish. Moreover, intestinal bacterial communities in individuals of each species were not really similar, and those in the four species were not absolutely different, suggesting that bacterial communities might influence the physiological characteristics of Antarctic fish, and the common bacterial communities might contribute to the fish survival ability in extreme Antarctic environment, while the different ones were related to the living habits. All of these results could offer certain information for the future study of Antarctic fish physiological characteristics.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Four Bacteria-Specific Primer Pairs for 16S rRNA Gene Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Sofie; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Beckers, Bram; Truyens, Sascha; Stevens, Vincent; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomic community analyses using PCR-amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and high-throughput sequencing has become a cornerstone in microbiology research. To reliably detect the members, or operational taxonomic units (OTUs), that make up bacterial communities, taxonomic surveys rely on the use of the most informative PCR primers to amplify the broad range of phylotypes present in up-to-date reference databases. However, primers specific for the domain Bacteria were often developed some time ago against database versions that are now out of date. Here we evaluated the performance of four bacterial primers for characterizing complex microbial communities in explosives contaminated and non-contaminated forest soil and by in silico evaluation against the current SILVA123 database. Primer pair 341f/785r produced the highest number of bacterial OTUs, phylogenetic richness, Shannon diversity, low non-specificity and most reproducible results, followed by 967f/1391r and 799f/1193r. Primer pair 68f/518r showed overall low coverage and a bias toward Alphaproteobacteria. In silico, primer pair 341f/785r showed the highest coverage of the domain Bacteria (96.1%) with no obvious bias toward the majority of bacterial species. This suggests the high utility of primer pair 341f/785r for soil and plant-associated bacterial microbiome studies.

  7. [Localization of nucleolar DNA and transcription sites of rRNA genes in situ in wheat cells].

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Tao, Wei; Hao, Shui

    2008-02-01

    By using the conventional electron microscopic technique and DNA specific cytochemical staining method (NAMA-Ur), we directly observed the arrangement and location of intranucleolar DNA in situ in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cells. The results showed that nucleolar DNA was found in Fibrillar Centers (FC), Dense Fibrillar Component (DFC) and the transitional region between FC and DFC. Moreover, the nucleolar DNA was distributed along the periphery of FC and by surrounding FC. We employed RNP preference staining (Bernhard staining) method to visualize the distribution and position of RNP in situ in nucleoli of wheat cells. The results directly showed that RNP mainly located in the transitional region between FC and DFC, in DFC and in Granular Component (GC). Moreover, RNP was irregularly distributed around FC. By employing anti-RNA/DNA hybrid antibodies, we directly and selectively labeled transcription sites of rRNA genes and testified that localization of transcription sites was not only in the transitional region between DFC and FC but also in DFC of nucleoli in wheat cells.

  8. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  9. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, J.; Savio, D.; Ley, R. E.; Mach, R. L.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multicompartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  10. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems.

  11. A molecular phylogeny of the marine red algae (Rhodophyta) based on the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, M A; Bird, C J; Rice, E L; Gutell, R R; Murphy, C A; Singh, R K

    1994-01-01

    A phylogeny of marine Rhodophyta has been inferred by a number of methods from nucleotide sequences of nuclear genes encoding small subunit rRNA from 39 species in 15 orders. Sequence divergences are relatively large, especially among bangiophytes and even among congeners in this group. Subclass Bangiophycidae appears polyphyletic, encompassing at least three lineages, with Porphyridiales distributed between two of these. Subclass Florideophycidae is monophyletic, with Hildenbrandiales, Corallinales, Ahnfeltiales, and a close association of Nemaliales, Acrochaetiales, and Palmariales forming the four deepest branches. Cermiales may represent a convergence of vegetative and reproductive morphologies, as family Ceramiaceae is at best weakly related to the rest of the order, and one of its members appears to be allied to Gelidiales. Except for Gigartinales, for which more data are required, the other florideophyte orders appear distinct and taxonomically justified. A good correlation was observed with taxonomy based on pit-plug ultrastructure. Tests under maximum-likelihood and parsimony of alternative phylogenies based on structure and chemistry refuted suggestions that Acrochaetiales is the most primitive florideophyte order and that Gelidiales and Hildenbrandiales are sister groups. PMID:8041780

  12. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B.; Chae, Jong Pyo; Balolong, Marilen P.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level). Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs. PMID:25656184

  13. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future. PMID:26404329

  14. Physical Localization and DNA Methylation of 45S rRNA Gene Loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhiyun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Yong; Shi, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n = 2x = 22 = 12m+10sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation. PMID:24386362

  15. 16S rRNA gene-targeted TTGE in determining diversity of gut microbiota during acute diarrhoea and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Cravioto, Alejandro; Alam, Munirul

    2012-09-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean ± standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery.

  16. 16S rRNA Gene-targeted TTGE in Determining Diversity of Gut Microbiota during Acute Diarrhoea and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean±standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery. PMID:23082626

  17. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  18. Gene-Specific Function Prediction for Non-Synonymous Mutations in Monogenic Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Xiaoming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Polychronakos, Constantin; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations. PMID:25136813

  19. [Investigation into the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, tRNA gene and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene variations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Jiao, J; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Li, Y H; Zhang, H L; Yang, Q Y; Xu, X R; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; He, L H; Zheng, Y X; Yu, S F

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To explore the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene variation, tRNA gene variation and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene point mutations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Methods: A nested case-control study was performed that followed a cohort of 7 445 noise-exposed workers in a steel factory in Henan province, China, from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Subjects whose average hearing threshold was more than 40 dB(A) in high frequency were defined as the case group, and subjects whose average hearing threshold was less than 35 dB(A) in high frequency and less than 25 dB (A) in speech frequency were defined as the control group. Subjects was recruited into the case group (n=286) and the control group (n=286) according to gender, age, job category and time of exposure to noise, and a 1∶1 case-control study was carried out. We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, the mitochondrial tRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene using SNPscan high-throughput genotyping technology from the recruited subjects. The relationship between polymorphic sites and NIHL, adjusted for covariates, was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis, as were the subgroup data. Results: The average age of the recruited subjects was (40.3±8.1) years and the length of service exposure to noise was (18.6±8.9) years. The range of noise exposed levels and cumulative noise exposure (CNE) was 80.1- 93.4 dB (A) and 86.8- 107.9 dB (A) · year, respectively. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 1.88 (1.16-3.05) compared with non-smokers; for workers exposed to noise at a CNE level ≥98 dB(A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 2.53 (1.49- 4.30) compared with non-smokers. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, the results of univariate analysis and multifactor analysis

  20. Mutation analysis of the FRAS1 gene demonstrates new mutations in a propositus with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A; Li, C; Sherr, E H; Chudley, A E

    2006-09-15

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal, and genitourinary malformations, oral clefting and mental retardation. Mutations causing loss of function of the FRAS1 gene have been demonstrated in five patients with Fraser syndrome. However, no phenotype-genotype correlation was established and there was evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Fraser syndrome is rare and the FRAS1 gene has 75 exons, complicating mutation screening in affected patients. We have screened two patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and three patients with related phenotypes (two patients with Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome and one patient with unilateral cryptophthalmos and labial fusion) for mutations in FRAS1 to increase the molecular genetic data in patients with Fraser syndrome and related conditions. We report two new mutations in a patient with Fraser syndrome, a frameshift mutation and a deletion of two amino acids that we consider pathogenic as both alter the NG2-like domain of the protein. Although we are still unable to clarify a phenotype-genotype relationship in Fraser syndrome, our data add to the list of mutations associated with this syndrome.

  1. Selection for distinct gene expression properties favours the evolution of mutational robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Soto, C

    2016-11-01

    Mutational robustness is a genotype's tendency to keep a phenotypic trait with little and few changes in the face of mutations. Mutational robustness is both ubiquitous and evolutionarily important as it affects in different ways the probability that new phenotypic variation arises. Understanding the origins of robustness is specially relevant for systems of development that are phylogenetically widespread and that construct phenotypic traits with a strong impact on fitness. Gene regulatory networks are examples of this class of systems. They comprise sets of genes that, through cross-regulation, build the gene activity patterns that define cellular responses, different tissues or distinct cell types. Several empirical observations, such as a greater robustness of wild-type phenotypes, suggest that stabilizing selection underlies the evolution of mutational robustness. However, the role of selection in the evolution of robustness is still under debate. Computer simulations of the dynamics and evolution of gene regulatory networks have shown that selection for any gene activity pattern that is steady and self-sustaining is sufficient to promote the evolution of mutational robustness. Here, I generalize this scenario using a computational model to show that selection for different aspects of a gene activity phenotype increases mutational robustness. Mutational robustness evolves even when selection favours properties that conflict with the stationarity of a gene activity pattern. The results that I present support an important role for stabilizing selection in the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks.

  2. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Dubost, Audrey; Tran-Van, Van; Mavingui, Patrick; Moro, Claire Valiente

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated. Also some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimize the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 92,615 sequences obtained. As Ae. albopictus is known to harbor two Wolbachia strains (wAlbA and wAlbB), a quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, (i.e., the bacteria-to-host gene ratios) of each strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 10(0.01) and 5.47 × 10(0.1) for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 10(0.1) and 1.4 × 10(1) for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 31 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using different method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from this area.

  3. Law-medicine interfacing: patenting of human genes and mutations.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2011-08-01

    Mutations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions and genetic rearrangements in specific genes in the human genome account for not only our physical characteristics and behavior, but can lead to many in-born and acquired diseases. Such changes in the genome can also predispose people to cancers, as well as significantly affect the metabolism and efficacy of many drugs, resulting in some cases in acute toxicity to the drug. The testing of the presence of such genetic mutations and rearrangements is of great practical and commercial value, leading many of these genes and their mutations/deletions and genetic rearrangements to be patented. A recent decision by a judge in the Federal District Court in the Southern District of New York, has created major uncertainties, based on the revocation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene patents, in the eligibility of all human and presumably other gene patents. This article argues that while patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes could be challenged based on a lack of utility, the patenting of the mutations and genetic rearrangements is of great importance to further development and commercialization of genetic tests that can save human lives and prevent suffering, and should be allowed.

  4. New mutations identified in the ocular albinism type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Ferrante, Paola; Guardiola, Ombretta; Ballabio, Andrea; Zollo, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    As the most common form of ocular albinism, ocular albinism type I (OA1) is an X-linked disorder that has an estimated prevalence of about 1:50,000. We searched for mutations through the human genome sequence draft by direct sequencing on eighteen patients with OA1, both within the coding region and in a thousand base pairs upstream of its start site. Here, we have identified eight new mutations located in the coding region of the gene. Two independent mutations, both located in the most carboxyterminal protein regions, were further characterized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, thus showing an impairment in their subcellular distribution into the lysosomal compartment of Cos-7A cells. The mutations found can result in protein misfolding, thus underlining the importance of the structure-function relationships of the protein as a major pathogenic mechanism in ocular albinism. Seven individuals out of eighteen (38.9%) with a clinical diagnosis of ocular albinism showed mutations, thus underlining the discrepancies between the clinical phenotype features and their genotype correlations. We postulate that mutations that have not yet been identified are potentially located in non-coding conserved regions or regulatory sequences of the OA1 gene.

  5. An inherited LMNA gene mutation in atypical Progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doubaj, Yassamine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Vera, Esteves-Vieira; Navarro, Claire Laure; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Tajir, Mariam; Lévy, Nicolas; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by several clinical features that begin in early childhood, recalling an accelerated aging process. The diagnosis of HGPS is based on the recognition of common clinical features and detection of the recurrent heterozygous c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) mutation within exon 11 in the Lamin A/C encoding gene (LMNA). Besides "typical HGPS," several "atypical progeria" syndromes (APS) have been described, in a clinical spectrum ranging from mandibuloacral dysplasia to atypical Werner syndrome. These patients's clinical features include progeroid manifestations, such as short stature, prominent nose, premature graying of hair, partial alopecia, skin atrophy, lipodystrophy, skeletal anomalies, such as mandibular hypoplasia and acroosteolyses, and in some cases severe atherosclerosis with metabolic complications. APS are due in several cases to de novo heterozygous LMNA mutations other than the p.Gly608Gly, or due to homozygous BAFN1 mutations in Nestor-Guillermo Progeria syndrome (NGPS). We report here and discuss the observation of a non-consanguineous Moroccan patient presenting with atypical progeria. The molecular studies showed the heterozygous mutation c.412G>A (p.Glu138Lys) of the LMNA gene. This mutation, previously reported as a de novo mutation, was inherited from the apparently healthy father who showed a somatic cell mosaicism.

  6. Gene mutations and actionable genetic lesions in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Makhdum; Zhang, Leo; Nomie, Krystle; Lam, Laura; Wang, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mutations and epigenetic alterations are key events in transforming normal cells to cancer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the B-cell, is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis especially for those patients who are resistant to the frontline drugs. There is a great need to describe the molecular basis and mechanism of drug resistance in MCL to develop new strategies for treatment. We reviewed frequent somatic mutations and mutations involving the B-cell pathways in MCL and discussed clinical trials that attempted to disrupt these gene pathways and/or epigenetic events. Recurrent gene mutations were discussed in the light of prognostic and therapeutic opportunity and also the challenges of targeting these lesions. Mutations in the ATM, CCND1, TP53, MLL2, TRAF2 and NOTCH1 were most frequently encountered in mantle cell lymphoma. Translational models should be built that would assess mutations longitudinally to identify important compensatory, pro-survival and anti-apoptic pathways and actionable genetic targets. PMID:27449094

  7. Characterization and evolution of cell division and cell wall synthesis genes in the bacterial phyla Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Planctomycetes and phylogenetic comparison with rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Pilhofer, Martin; Rappl, Kristina; Eckl, Christina; Bauer, Andreas Peter; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Petroni, Giulio

    2008-05-01

    In the past, studies on the relationships of the bacterial phyla Planctomycetes, Chlamydiae, Lentisphaerae, and Verrucomicrobia using different phylogenetic markers have been controversial. Investigations based on 16S rRNA sequence analyses suggested a relationship of the four phyla, showing the branching order Planctomycetes, Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia/Lentisphaerae. Phylogenetic analyses of 23S rRNA genes in this study also support a monophyletic grouping and their branching order--this grouping is significant for understanding cell division, since the major bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is absent from members of two of the phyla Chlamydiae and Planctomycetes. In Verrucomicrobia, knowledge about cell division is mainly restricted to the recent report of ftsZ in the closely related genera Prosthecobacter and Verrucomicrobium. In this study, genes of the conserved division and cell wall (dcw) cluster (ddl, ftsQ, ftsA, and ftsZ) were characterized in all verrucomicrobial subdivisions (1 to 4) with cultivable representatives (1 to 4). Sequence analyses and transcriptional analyses in Verrucomicrobia and genome data analyses in Lentisphaerae suggested that cell division is based on FtsZ in all verrucomicrobial subdivisions and possibly also in the sister phylum Lentisphaerae. Comprehensive sequence analyses of available genome data for representatives of Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Planctomycetes strongly indicate that their last common ancestor possessed a conserved, ancestral type of dcw gene cluster and an FtsZ-based cell division mechanism. This implies that Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae may have shifted independently to a non-FtsZ-based cell division mechanism after their separate branchings from their last common ancestor with Verrucomicrobia.

  8. Comparative analyses of phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA, khe, rpoB genes sequencing for identification of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    He, Yanxia; Guo, Xianguang; Xiang, Shifei; Li, Jiao; Li, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Hui; He, Jinlei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate 16S rRNA, khe and rpoB gene sequencing for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae in comparison with phenotypic methods. Fifteen clinical isolates were examined, which were initially identified as K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae using the automated VITEK 32 system in two hospitals in Enshi City, China. Their identity was further supported by conventional phenotypic methods on the basis of morphological and biochemical characteristics. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analyses and haplotypes network reconstruction, 13 isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae, whereas the other two isolates (K19, K24) were classified as Shigella sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. Of the three genes, 16S rRNA and khe gene could discriminate the clinical isolates at the genus level, whereas rpoB could discriminate Klebsiella at the species and even subspecies level. Overall, the gene tree based on rpoB is more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Klebsiella than those based on 16S rRNA and khe genes, showing that rpoB can be a powerful tool for identification of K. pneumoniae isolates. Above all, our study challenges the utility of khe as a species-specific marker for identification of K. pneumoniae.

  9. Distinguishing the roles of Topoisomerases I and II in relief of transcription-induced torsional stress in yeast rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    French, Sarah L; Sikes, Martha L; Hontz, Robert D; Osheim, Yvonne N; Lambert, Tashima E; El Hage, Aziz; Smith, Mitchell M; Tollervey, David; Smith, Jeffrey S; Beyer, Ann L

    2011-02-01

    To better understand the role of topoisomerase activity in relieving transcription-induced supercoiling, yeast genes encoding rRNA were visualized in cells deficient for either or both of the two major topoisomerases. In the absence of both topoisomerase I (Top1) and topoisomerase II (Top2) activity, processivity was severely impaired and polymerases were unable to transcribe through the 6.7-kb gene. Loss of Top1 resulted in increased negative superhelical density (two to six times the normal value) in a significant subset of rRNA genes, as manifested by regions of DNA template melting. The observed DNA bubbles were not R-loops and did not block polymerase movement, since genes with DNA template melting showed no evidence of slowed elongation. Inactivation of Top2, however, resulted in characteristic signs of slowed elongation in rRNA genes, suggesting that Top2 alleviates transcription-induced positive supercoiling. Together, the data indicate that torsion in front of and behind transcribing polymerase I has different consequences and different resolution. Positive torsion in front of the polymerase induces supercoiling (writhe) and is largely resolved by Top2. Negative torsion behind the polymerase induces DNA strand separation and is largely resolved by Top1.

  10. Co segregation of the m.1555A>G mutation in the MT-RNR1 gene and mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in a family with dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and hearing loss: A whole mitochondrial genome screening.

    PubMed

    Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen; Majdoub, Imen; Gargouri, Lamia; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Tabebi, Mouna; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Keskes, Leila; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2017-02-26

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is responsible for the generation of most cellular energy. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies is one of the most frequent mitochondria disorders. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy has been associated with several point mutations of mtDNA in both genes encoded mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial tRNA and rRNA. We reported here the first description of mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in two patients with clinical features of dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. The mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of m.1555A>G mutation in MT-RNR1 gene associated to the m.8527A>G (p.M>V) and the m.8392C>T (p.136P>S) variations in the mitochondrial MT-ATP6 gene in patient1 and his family members with variable phenotype including hearing impairment. The second patient with isolated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy presented the m.8605C>T (p.27P>S) mutation in the MT-ATP6 gene. The three mutations p.M1V, p.P27S and p.P136S detected in MT-ATP6 affected well conserved residues of the mitochondrial protein ATPase 6. In addition, the substitution of proline residue at position 27 and 136 effect hydrophobicity and structure flexibility conformation of the protein.

  11. [Gliomas and BRCA genes mutations: fortuitous association or imputability?].

    PubMed

    Girardstein-Boccara, Laura; Mari, Véronique; Met-Domestici, Marie; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Berthet, Pascaline; Paquis, Philippe; Frenay, Marc Paul; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine

    2014-09-01

    BRCA is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the major mechanisms of cellular stability in every type of cell. Its mutations are described in numerous cancers, mainly breast and ovarian in women. It was also found an increase of lifetime risk of pancreas, colon, prostate cancer or lymphoma in men carriers. We report the cases of two female patients aged 40 and 58-years-old female patients and one 35-years-old male patient, with brain or medullar gliomas, carriers of a germline mutation of BRCA gene. Those gliomas were particularly aggressive and were not responding to the standard treatment, with chemo and radiotherapy. The very unusual characteristics in location and evolutive profile of these central nervous system tumors raise the question of a genetical underlying mechanism, maybe linked to the BRCA gene mutation that carry these patients. In addition, a non-fortuitous association between germline mutation of BRCA and occurrence of a glioma can be evoked according to the embryological, epidemiological and biomolecular findings noted in the literature. Other clinical and experimental studies are necessary to precise the physiopathological link existing between BRCA mutations and the occurrence of a glioma; this could have therapeutical and clinical implications in the future.

  12. Characterization of the Two Intra-Individual Sequence Variants in the 18S rRNA Gene in the Plant Parasitic Nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Nyaku, Seloame T.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Gu, Yong Q.; Lawrence, Kathy; Sharma, Govind C.

    2013-01-01

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Sequence variation in this gene within a single species is rare, but it has been observed in few metazoan organisms. More frequently it has mostly been reported in the non-transcribed spacer region. Here, we have identified two sequence variants within the near full coding region of 18S rRNA gene from a single reniform nematode (RN) Rotylenchulus reniformis labeled as reniform nematode variant 1 (RN_VAR1) and variant 2 (RN_VAR2). All sequences from three of the four isolates had both RN variants in their sequences; however, isolate 13B had only RN variant 2 sequence. Specific variable base sites (96 or 5.5%) were found within the 18S rRNA gene that can clearly distinguish the two 18S rDNA variants of RN, in 11 (25.0%) and 33 (75.0%) of the 44 RN clones, for RN_VAR1 and RN_VAR2, respectively. Neighbor-joining trees show that the RN_VAR1 is very similar to the previously existing R. reniformis sequence in GenBank, while the RN_VAR2 sequence is more divergent. This is the first report of the identification of two major variants of the 18S rRNA gene in the same single RN, and documents the specific base variation between the two variants, and hypothesizes on simultaneous co-existence of these two variants for this gene. PMID:23593343

  13. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  14. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of 28S and ITS rRNA genes reveal high intragenomic variation in Cephalenchus (Nematoda): Implications for species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago José; Baldwin, James Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Concerted evolution is often assumed to be the evolutionary force driving multi-family genes, including those from ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat, to complete homogenization within a species, although cases of non-concerted evolution have been also documented. In this study, sequence variation of 28S and ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the genus Cephalenchus is assessed at three different levels, intragenomic, intraspecific, and interspecific. The findings suggest that not all Cephalenchus species undergo concerted evolution. High levels of intraspecific polymorphism, mostly due to intragenomic variation, are found in Cephalenchus sp1 (BRA-01). Secondary structure analyses of both rRNA genes and across different species show a similar substitution pattern, including mostly compensatory (CBC) and semi-compensatory (SBC) base changes, thus suggesting the functionality of these rRNA copies despite the variation found in some species. This view is also supported by low sequence variation in the 5.8S gene in relation to the flanking ITS-1 and ITS-2 as well as by the existence of conserved motifs in the former gene. It is suggested that potential cross-fertilization in some Cephalenchus species, based on inspection of female reproductive system, might contribute to both intragenomic and intraspecific polymorphism of their rRNA genes. These results reinforce the potential implications of intragenomic and intraspecific genetic diversity on species delimitation, especially in biodiversity studies based solely on metagenetic approaches. Knowledge of sequence variation will be crucial for accurate species diversity estimation using molecular methods.

  15. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg−1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  16. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg-1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  17. Sequence Diversity of the oprI Gene, Coding for Major Outer Membrane Lipoprotein I, among rRNA Group I Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Daniel; Bouton, Christiane; Sarniguet, Alain; De Vos, Paul; Vauterin, Marc; Cornelis, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The sequence of oprI, the gene coding for the major outer membrane lipoprotein I, was determined by PCR sequencing for representatives of 17 species of rRNA group I pseudomonads, with a special emphasis on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Within the P. aeruginosa species, oprI sequences for 25 independent isolates were found to be identical, except for one silent substitution at position 96. The oprI sequences diverged more for the other rRNA group I pseudomonads (85 to 91% similarity with P. aeruginosa oprI). An accumulation of silent and also (but to a much lesser extent) nonsilent substitutions in the different sequences was found. A clustering according to the respective presence and/or positions of the HaeIII, PvuII, and SphI sites could also be obtained. A sequence cluster analysis showed a rather widespread distribution of P. fluorescens isolates. All other rRNA group I pseudomonads clustered in a manner that was in agreement with other studies, showing that the oprI gene can be useful as a complementary phylogenetic marker for classification of rRNA group I pseudomonads. PMID:9851998

  18. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  19. Mutations in the deubiquitinase gene USP8 cause Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Reincke, Martin; Sbiera, Silviu; Hayakawa, Akira; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Meitinger, Thomas; Mizuno-Yamasaki, Emi; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ronchi, Cristina L; Allolio, Bruno; Buchfelder, Michael; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Komada, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by corticotroph adenomas of the pituitary. To explore the molecular mechanisms of endocrine autonomy in these tumors, we performed exome sequencing of 10 corticotroph adenomas. We found somatic mutations in the USP8 deubiquitinase gene in 4 of 10 adenomas. The mutations clustered in the 14-3-3 protein binding motif and enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity of USP8. Cleavage of USP8 led to increased deubiqutination of the EGF receptor, impairing its downregulation and sustaining EGF signaling. USP8 mutants enhanced promoter activity of the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin. In summary, our data show that dominant mutations in USP8 cause Cushing's disease via activation of EGF receptor signaling.

  20. Mutability and mutational spectrum of chromosome transmission fidelity genes.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Crisp, Matthew J; Basrai, Munira A; Tucker, Cheryl M; Dunham, Maitreya J; Spencer, Forrest A; Hieter, Philip

    2012-06-01

    It has been more than two decades since the original chromosome transmission fidelity (Ctf) screen of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was published. Since that time the spectrum of mutations known to cause Ctf and, more generally, chromosome instability (CIN) has expanded dramatically as a result of systematic screens across yeast mutant arrays. Here we describe a comprehensive summary of the original Ctf genetic screen and the cloning of the remaining complementation groups as efforts to expand our knowledge of the CIN gene repertoire and its mutability in a model eukaryote. At the time of the original screen, it was impossible to predict either the genes and processes that would be overrepresented in a pool of random mutants displaying a Ctf phenotype or what the entire set of genes potentially mutable to Ctf would be. We show that in a collection of 136 randomly selected Ctf mutants, >65% of mutants map to 13 genes, 12 of which are involved in sister chromatid cohesion and/or kinetochore function. Extensive screening of systematic mutant collections has shown that ~350 genes with functions as diverse as RNA processing and proteasomal activity mutate to cause a Ctf phenotype and at least 692 genes are required for faithful chromosome segregation. The enrichment of random Ctf alleles in only 13 of ~350 possible Ctf genes suggests that these genes are more easily mutable to cause genome instability than the others. These observations inform our understanding of recurring CIN mutations in human cancers where presumably random mutations are responsible for initiating the frequently observed CIN phenotype of tumors.

  1. Detecting gene mutations in Japanese Alzheimer's patients by semiconductor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Kuramochi, Masahito; Kurashige, Takashi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. To date, several genes have been identified as the cause of AD, including PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP. The association between APOE and late-onset AD has also been reported. We here used a bench top next-generation sequencer, which uses an integrated semiconductor device, detects hydrogen ions, and operates at a high-speed using nonoptical technology. We examined 45 Japanese AD patients with positive family histories, and 29 sporadic patients with early onset (<60-year-old). Causative mutations were detected in 5 patients in the familial group (11%). Three patients had a known heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.H163R). Two patients from 1 family had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.F386L). In the early onset group, 1 patient carrying homozygous APOEε4 had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN2 gene (p.T421M). Approximately 43% patients were APOEε4 positive in our study. This new sequencing technology is useful for detecting genetic variations in familial AD.

  2. Detection of driver pathways using mutated gene network in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Gao, Lin; Ma, Xiaoke; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-06-21

    Distinguishing driver pathways has been extensively studied because they are critical for understanding the development and molecular mechanisms of cancers. Most existing methods for driver pathways are based on high coverage as well as high mutual exclusivity, with the underlying assumption that mutations are exclusive. However, in many cases, mutated driver genes in the same pathways are not strictly mutually exclusive. Based on this observation, we propose an index for quantifying mutual exclusivity between gene pairs. Then, we construct a mutated gene network for detecting driver pathways by integrating the proposed index and coverage. The detection of driver pathways on the mutated gene network consists of two steps: raw pathways are obtained using a CPM method, and the final driver pathways are selected using a strict testing strategy. We apply this method to glioblastoma and breast cancers and find that our method is more accurate than state-of-the-art methods in terms of enrichment of KEGG pathways. Furthermore, the detected driver pathways intersect with well-known pathways with moderate exclusivity, which cannot be discovered using the existing algorithms. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an effective way to investigate driver pathways in cancers.

  3. Comparison of PCR-based restriction length polymorphism analysis of urease genes with rRNA gene profiling for monitoring Helicobacter pylori infections in patients on triple therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R J; Bickley, J; Hurtado, A; Fraser, A; Pounder, R E

    1994-01-01

    Multiple isolates of Helicobacter pylori from antral biopsies of nine patients were examined by DNA fingerprinting. Analysis of rRNA gene patterns and HaeIII restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified urease genes were compared and used to study colonization before and after failed triple therapy. H. pylori isolates from a single biopsy shared the same HaeIII DNA fingerprint regardless of the isolation method (plate or broth). DNA pattern types of paired strains of H. pylori were distinct between patients and were not grossly affected by treatment except for one patient with an altered strain type. H. pylori infections were generally associated with several subpopulations of strains, evident from the subtypic variation before and after treatment, detectable by both DNA fingerprinting methods. The urease gene patterns also provided evidence that some cultures of H. pylori probably contained a mixture of genomic subtypes. The study suggests that triple therapy has the effect either of inducing minor genomic variations or of changing the proportions of different subtypes of H. pylori. It was concluded that urease gene profiling provides a simple yet reliable method of establishing whether treatment failures are attributable to incomplete eradication of H. pylori. Images PMID:7914204

  4. GJB2 gene mutations causing familial hereditary deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayazit, Yildirim A; Cable, Benjamin B; Cataloluk, Osman; Kara, Cengiz; Chamberlin, Parker; Smith, Richard J H; Kanlikama, Muzaffer; Ozer, Enver; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Mumbuc, Semih; Arslan, Ahmet

    2003-12-01

    Mutations in Connexin 26 (Cx26) play an important role in autosomal non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss. In this study, our objective was to find out the significance of Cx26 mutations in Turkish families who had hereditary deafness. Fourteen families who had at least two prelingually deaf children per family were included in the study. One affected child from each of the 14 families was selected for single-stranded conformational polymorphism SSCP analysis. Three PCR reactions were used for each subject to amplify the entire Cx26 coding region with overlap. PCR products were sequenced on an Applied Biosystems (ABI) model 3700 automated sequencer. Six of the 14 representative family members (42.9%) demonstrated shifts on SSCP and were subsequently sequenced for Exons 1 and 2 of GJB2 and were tested for the 432 kb upstream deletion. No mutations were found in Exon 1 and no 432 kb deletions were noted. Three different GJB2 mutations were found in Exon 2 of the probands, which were 35delG, 299-300delAT, and 487G > A (M163V). GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families. Two patients were homozygous for 35delG and 299-300delAT mutations, and were given a diagnosis of DFNB1 deafness (14.3%). Two different polymorphisms, 457G > A (V153I) and 380G > AG (R127H) were also found. In conclusion, although GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families tested, only 14.3% of subject representatives were homozygous and therefore deafness caused by Cx26 mutation segregated with DFNB1. Thus, contribution of GJB2 mutations appears less significant in familial deafness. This necessitates further assessment for the other known gene regions as well as a search for new genetic factors in familial type of genetic deafness.

  5. A sequence dimorphism in a conserved domain of human 28S rRNA. Uneven distribution of variant genes among individuals. Differential expression in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Qu, L H; Nicoloso, M; Bachellerie, J P

    1991-01-01

    In humans, cellular 28S rRNA displays a sequence dimorphism within an evolutionarily conserved motif, with the presence, at position +60, of either a A (like the metazoan consensus) or a G. The relative abundance of the two forms of variant genes in the genome exhibit large differences among individuals. The two variant forms are generally represented in cellular 28S rRNA in proportion of their relative abundance in the genome, at least for leucocytes. However, in some cases, one form of variant may be markedly underexpressed as compared to the other. Thus, in HeLa cells, A-form genes contribute to only 1% of the cellular content in mature 28S rRNA although amounting to 15% of the ribosomal genes. The differential expression seems to result from different transcriptional activities rather than from differences in pre-rRNA processing efficiency or in stabilities of mature rRNAs. G-form ribosomal genes were not detected in other mammals, including chimpanzee, which suggests that the fixation of this variant type is a rather recent event in primate evolution. Images PMID:2020541

  6. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  7. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys.

    PubMed

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A; Jansson, Janet K; Caporaso, J Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5' end, allowing for a range of different 3' primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies. IMPORTANCE We continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to human skin. This confirms the utility of these primers for

  8. Strategy for microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Karim, Aos S; Sendler, Edward D; Kato, Ikuko

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the identity and changes of organisms in the urogenital and other microbiomes of the human body may be key to discovering causes and new treatments of many ailments, such as vaginosis. High-throughput sequencing technologies have recently enabled discovery of the great diversity of the human microbiome. The cost per base of many of these sequencing platforms remains high (thousands of dollars per sample); however, the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA) is estimated to have a cost per base less than one-fifth of its nearest competitor. The main disadvantage of the IGA for sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes is that the maximum read-length of the IGA is only 100 bases; whereas, at least 300 bases are needed to obtain phylogenetically informative data down to the genus and species level. In this paper we describe and conduct a pilot test of a multiplex sequencing strategy suitable for achieving total reads of > 300 bases per extracted DNA molecule on the IGA. Results show that all proposed primers produce products of the expected size and that correct sequences can be obtained, with all proposed forward primers. Various bioinformatic optimization of the Illumina Bustard analysis pipeline proved necessary to extract the correct sequence from IGA image data, and these modifications of the data files indicate that further optimization of the analysis pipeline may improve the quality rankings of the data and enable more sequence to be correctly analyzed. The successful application of this method could result in an unprecedentedly deep description (800,000 taxonomic identifications per sample) of the urogenital and other microbiomes in a large number of samples at a reasonable cost per sample.

  9. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  10. Human Blastocystis subtyping with subtype-specific primers developed from unique sequences of the SSU rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Iwamasa, Ayana

    2016-12-01

    The genus Blastocystis is one of the most genetically diverse parasites. Blastocystis isolates from humans and animals have been classified into subtypes (STs) based on the phylogeny of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA). Although human Blastocystis isolates are limited to STs 1-9, the identification of all 9 STs remains challenging due to the lack of specific primers for several STs. The sequencing of partial SSU rDNA is therefore essential for the identification of several STs. In this study, we developed 9 sets of PCR primers to detect each of the 9 kinds of ST in humans. When these ST-specific primer pairs were examined reference Blastocystis for the 9 STs, all 9 amplified only the target ST even in a DNA mixture of all 9 STs. The specificities of the 9 primer sets were tested against several intestinal parasites and fungi found in human stool samples. No amplification with these common human intestinal eukaryotes was observed using the primer pairs for 8 STs, while the ST5 primer set gave only faint bands with some parasites. Since genomic DNA levels of these parasites extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures are expected to be markedly lower than the pure or highly concentrated DNA samples tested, the cross-amplifications with these organisms are unlikely to be detected when DNA samples are extracted from Blastocystis-positive cultures. The PCR conditions for all 9 primer sets were the same, hence a one-step analysis by PCR amplification, followed by electrophoresis has potential as a simple tool for the subtyping of human Blastocystis isolates.

  11. Comparison of 16S rRNA Gene PCR and BACTEC 9240 for Detection of Neonatal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, J. A.; Durso, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Ten percent of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU) annually. Approximately one-half of these admissions are from term infants (>34 weeks of gestation) at risk for systemic infection. Most of the term infants are not infected but rather have symptoms consistent with other medical conditions that mimic sepsis. The current standard of care for evaluating bacterial sepsis in the newborn is performing blood culturing and providing antibiotic therapy while awaiting the 48-h preliminary result of culture. Implementing a more rapid means of ruling out sepsis in term newborns could result in shorter NICU stays and less antibiotic usage. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the utility of PCR to that of conventional culture. To this end, a total of 548 paired blood samples collected from infants admitted to the NICU for suspected sepsis were analyzed for bacterial growth using the BACTEC 9240 instrument and for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a PCR assay which included a 5-h preamplification culturing step. The positivity rates by culture and PCR were 25 (4.6%) and 27 (4.9%) positive specimens out of a total of 548 specimens, respectively. The comparison revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 96.0, 99.4, 88.9, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR. In summary, this PCR-based approach, requiring as little as 9 h of turnaround time and blood volumes as small as 200 μl, correlated well with conventional blood culture results obtained for neonates suspected of having bacterial sepsis. PMID:10878046

  12. Rapid identification of Penicillium marneffei by PCR-based detection of specific sequences on the rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Vanittanakom, Pramote; Hay, Roderick J

    2002-05-01

    An emerging pathogenic dimorphic fungus, Penicillium marneffei, is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Southeast Asia. A PCR-hybridization assay has been developed to identify this pathogen. This study describes the use of single and nested PCR methods for the rapid identification of P. marneffei. Two sets of oligonucleotide primers were derived from the sequence of 18S rRNA genes of P. marneffei. The outer primers (RRF1 and RRH1) were fungus specific. The inner primers (Pm1 and Pm2) were specific for P. marneffei and were used in nested or single PCR. The specific fragment of approximately 400-bp was amplified from both mold and yeast forms of 13 P. marneffei human isolates, 12 bamboo rat isolates, and 1 soil isolate, but not from other fungi, bacteria, and human DNA. The amplified products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The sensitivities of the single PCR and nested PCR were 1.0 pg/microl and 1.8 fg/microl, respectively. The assay is useful for rapid identification of P. marneffei cultures. Very young culture of P. marneffei (2-day-old filamentous colony, 2 mm in diameter) could be performed by this assay. The species was identified within 7 h (single PCR) or 10 h (nested PCR), compared to 4 to 7 days for confirmation of dimorphism. The application of these PCR methods for early diagnosis of the disease needs to be studied further.

  13. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  14. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  15. Identification of Two Distinct Hybridization Groups in the Genus Hafnia by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing and Phenotypic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J. Michael; Abbott, Sharon L.; Bystrom, Sue; Probert, Will S.

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 52 strains belonging to the Hafnia alvei complex were subjected to molecular (16S rRNA gene sequencing) and biochemical analysis. Based upon 16S rRNA gene sequencing results, two genetic groups were identified which correspond with previously recognized DNA hybridization group 1 (ATCC 13337T and ATCC 29926; n = 23) and DNA hybridization group 2 (ATCC 29927; n = 29). Of 46 biochemical tests used to characterize hafniae, 19 reactions (41%) yielded variable results. Of these 19 tests, 6 were determined to have discriminatory value in the separation of DNA groups 1 and 2, with malonate utilization found to be the most differential test. Test results of malonate utilization alone correctly assigned 90% of Hafnia isolates to their correct DNA group. PMID:16000455

  16. Community Structure and Diversity of Biofilms from a Beer Bottling Plant as Revealed Using 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries†

    PubMed Central

    Timke, Markus; Wang-Lieu, Ngoc Quynh; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2005-01-01

    The microbial composition of biofilms from a beer bottling plant was analyzed by a cultivation independent analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were differentiated by amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and representative clones from each group were sequenced. The diversity of the clone libraries was comparable with the diversity found for environmental samples. No evidences for the presence of strictly anaerobic taxa or important beer spoilers were found, indicating that biofilms developed for more than 6 months at the plant formed no appropriate habitat for those microorganisms. The genus Methylobacterium was one of the dominating groups of the clone libraries. The size of this population was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and fatty acid analysis. In addition, considerable numbers of clones were assigned to uncultivated organisms. PMID:16204578

  17. Sequencing of variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the intestinal microbiota of healthy salmonids.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Vendrell, Daniel; Gironés, Olivia; Muzquiz, José Luis

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Thirteen LAB strains were isolated from the intestinal microbiota of healthy salmonids. A approximately 500-bp region of the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and following this, a portion of the amplicon (272-bp) including the V1 and V2 variable regions was sequenced. The sequence containing both the V1 and V2 region provided strong evidence for the identification of LAB. The LAB strains were identified as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The method described was found to be a very simple, rapid, specific, and low-cost tool for the identification of unknown strains of LAB.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-01-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria. Images PMID:1577710

  19. Panel of 23S rRNA Gene-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Improved Universal and Group-Specific Detection of Phytoplasmas▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, Jennifer; Boonham, Neil; Mumford, Rick; Dickinson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Primers and probes based on the 23S rRNA gene have been utilized to design a range of real-time PCR assays for routine phytoplasma diagnostics. These assays have been authenticated as phytoplasma specific and shown to be at least as sensitive as nested PCR. A universal assay to detect all phytoplasmas has been developed, along with a multiplex assay to discriminate 16SrI group phytoplasmas from members of all of the other 16Sr groups. Assays for the 16SrII, 16SrIV, and 16SrXII groups have also been developed to confirm that the 23S rRNA gene can be used to design group-specific assays. PMID:19270148

  20. Phylogenetic relationships of chemoautotrophic bacterial symbionts of Solemya velum say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, J A; Smith, S W; Cavanaugh, C M

    1992-05-01

    The protobranch bivalve Solemya velum Say (Mollusca: Bivalvia) houses chemoautotrophic symbionts intracellularly within its gills. These symbionts were characterized through sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA coding regions and hybridization of an Escherichia coli gene probe to S. velum genomic DNA restriction fragments. The symbionts appeared to have only one copy of the 16S rRNA gene. The lack of variability in the 16S sequence and hybridization patterns within and between individual S. velum organisms suggested that one species of symbiont is dominant within and specific for this host species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S sequences of the symbionts indicates that they lie within the chemoautotrophic cluster of the gamma subdivision of the eubacterial group Proteobacteria.

  1. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  2. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  3. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  4. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Oegema, Renske; Cushion, Thomas D.; Phelps, Ian G.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Collins, Sarah; Mullins, Jonathan G.L.; Dudding, Tracy; Gill, Harinder; Green, Andrew J.; Dobyns, William B.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Rees, Mark I.; Doherty, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in only 1–13%. We identified patients with a highly characteristic cerebellar dysplasia but without lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria typically associated with tubulin mutations. Remarkably, in seven of nine patients (78%), targeted sequencing revealed mutations in three different tubulin genes (TUBA1A, TUBB2B and TUBB3), occurring de novo or inherited from a mosaic parent. Careful re-review of the cortical phenotype on brain imaging revealed only an irregular pattern of gyri and sulci, for which we propose the term tubulinopathy-related dysgyria. Basal ganglia (100%) and brainstem dysplasia (80%) were common features. On the basis of in silico structural predictions, the mutations affect amino acids in diverse regions of the alpha-/beta-tubulin heterodimer, including the nucleotide binding pocket. Cell-based assays of tubulin dynamics reveal various effects of the mutations on incorporation into microtubules: TUBB3 p.Glu288Lys and p.Pro357Leu do not incorporate into microtubules at all, whereas TUBB2B p.Gly13Ala shows reduced incorporation and TUBA1A p.Arg214His incorporates fully, but at a slower rate than wild-type. The broad range of effects on microtubule incorporation is at odds with the highly stereotypical clinical phenotype, supporting differential roles for the three tubulin genes involved. Identifying this highly characteristic phenotype is important due to the low recurrence risk compared with the other (recessive) cerebellar dysplasias and the apparent lack of non-neurological medical issues. PMID:26130693

  5. Mutational analysis of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene in Japanese ALD patients

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, R.; Onodera, O.; Tabe, H.

    1994-09-01

    Recently a putative ALD gene containing a striking homology with peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) has been identified. Besides childhood ALD, various clinical phenotypes have been identified with the onset in adolescence or adulthood (adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), adult cerebral ALD or cerebello-brainstem dominant type). The different clinical phenotypes occasionally coexist even in the same family. To investigate if there is a correlation between the clinical phenotypes and genotypes of the mutations in the ALD gene, we have analyzed 43 Japanese ALD patients. By Southern blot analysis, we identified non-overlapping deletions of 0.5 kb to 10.4 kb involving the ALD gene in 3 patients with adult onset cerebello-brainstem dominant type. By detailed direct sequence analysis, we found 4 patients who had point mutations in the coding region. An AMN patient had a point mutation leading to {sup 266}Gly{r_arrow}Arg change, and another patient with adult cerebral ALD had a 3 bp deletion resulting in the loss of glutamic acid at codon 291, which is a conserved amino acid both in ALD protein and PMP70. Two patients with childhood ALD had point mutations leading to {sup 507}Gly{r_arrow}Val, and {sup 518}Arg{r_arrow}Gln, respectively. Since amino acids from 507 to 520 are highly conserved as ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, mutations in this region are expected to result in dramatic changes of the function of this protein. Although there is a tendancy for mutation in childhood ALD to be present within the ATP-binding site motif, we found two adult patients who had large deletions involving the region. Taken together, strong correlation between genotypes and clinical phenotypes is unlikely to exist, and some other modifying factors might well play an important role for the clinical manifestations of ALD.

  6. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Bernard, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C.

  7. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  8. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene PCR Sensitivity and Specificity for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Prospective Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis. PMID:25056331

  9. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene PCR sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection: a prospective multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥ 1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥ 2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis.

  10. Empirical testing of 16S rRNA gene PCR primer pairs reveals variance in target specificity and efficacy not suggested by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic and "fingerprinting" analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of prokaryotes have been a mainstay of microbial ecology during the last two decades. However, many methods and results from studies that rely on the 16S rRNA gene for detection and quantification of specific microbial taxa have seemingly received only cursory or even no validation. To directly examine the efficacy and specificity of 16S rRNA gene-based primers for phylum-, class-, and operational taxonomic unit-specific target amplification in quantitative PCR, we created a collection of primers based solely on an extensive soil bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library containing approximately 5,000 sequences from a single soil sample (i.e., a closed site-specific library was used to create PCR primers for use at this site). These primers were initially tested in silico prior to empirical testing by PCR amplification of known target sequences and of controls based on disparate phylogenetic groups. Although all primers were highly specific according to the in silico analysis, the empirical analyses clearly exhibited a high degree of nonspecificity for many of the phyla or classes, while other primers proved to be highly specific. These findings suggest that significant care must be taken when interpreting studies whose results were obtained with target specific primers that were not adequately validated, especially where population densities or dynamics have been inferred from the data. Further, we suggest that the reliability of quantification of specific target abundance using 16S rRNA-based quantitative PCR is case specific and must be determined through rigorous empirical testing rather than solely in silico.

  11. Taxonomic Precision of Different Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Gene and Annotation Methods for Functional Bacterial Groups in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    High throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene leads us into a deeper understanding on bacterial diversity for complex environmental samples, but introduces blurring due to the relatively low taxonomic capability of short read. For wastewater treatment plant, only those functional bacterial genera categorized as nutrient remediators, bulk/foaming species, and potential pathogens are significant to biological wastewater treatment and environmental impacts. Precise taxonomic assignment of these bacteria at least at genus level is important for microbial ecological research and routine wastewater treatment monitoring. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic precisions of different ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene hypervariable regions generated from a mix activated sludge sample. In addition, three commonly used classification methods including RDP Classifier, BLAST-based best-hit annotation, and the lowest common ancestor annotation by MEGAN were evaluated by comparing their consistency. Under an unsupervised way, analysis of consistency among different classification methods suggests there are no hypervariable regions with good taxonomic coverage for all genera. Taxonomic assignment based on certain regions of the 16S rRNA genes, e.g. the V1&V2 regions – provide fairly consistent taxonomic assignment for a relatively wide range of genera. Hence, it is recommended to use these regions for studying functional groups in activated sludge. Moreover, the inconsistency among methods also demonstrated that a specific method might not be suitable for identification of some bacterial genera using certain 16S rRNA gene regions. As a general rule, drawing conclusions based only on one sequencing region and one classification method should be avoided due to the potential false negative results. PMID:24146837

  12. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence-Based Identification of Bacteria in Automatically Incubated Blood Culture Materials from Tropical Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Hahn, Andreas; Boahen, Kennedy; Sarpong, Nimako; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Halbgewachs, Eva; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Poppert, Sven; Loderstaedt, Ulrike; May, Jürgen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of microbiological diagnostic procedures depends on pre-analytic conditions. We compared the results of 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing from automatically incubated blood culture materials from tropical Ghana with the results of cultural growth after automated incubation. Methods Real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR and subsequent sequencing were applied to 1500 retained blood culture samples of Ghanaian patients admitted to a hospital with an unknown febrile illness after enrichment by automated culture. Results Out of all 1500 samples, 191 were culture-positive and 98 isolates were considered etiologically relevant. Out of the 191 culture-positive samples, 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing led to concordant results in 65 cases at species level and an additional 62 cases at genus level. PCR was positive in further 360 out of 1309 culture-negative samples, sequencing results of which suggested etiologically relevant pathogen detections in 62 instances, detections of uncertain relevance in 50 instances, and DNA contamination due to sample preparation in 248 instances. In two instances, PCR failed to detect contaminants from the skin flora that were culturally detectable. Pre-analytical errors caused many Enterobacteriaceae to be missed by culture. Conclusions Potentially correctable pre-analytical conditions and not the fastidious nature of the bacteria caused most of the discrepancies. Although 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing in addition to culture led to an increase in detections of presumably etiologically relevant blood culture pathogens, the application of this procedure to samples from the tropics was hampered by a high contamination rate. Careful interpretation of diagnostic results is required. PMID:26270631

  13. [Oxidative stress, rRNA genes, and antioxidant enzymes in pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism: modeling and clinical advices].

    PubMed

    Porokhovnik, L N; Pasekov, V P; Egolina, N A; Tsvetkova, T G; Kosiakova, N V; Gorbachevskaia, N L; Sukhotina, N K; Kozlovskaia, G V; Sorokin, A B; Korovina, N Iu; Liapunova, N A

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal genes (RG), or genes for rRNA, are represented by multiple tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes, and just a part of them is transcriptionally active. The quantity of active copies is a stable genome feature which determines the cell's capability for rapid synthesis of proteins, necessary to cope with stress conditions. Low number of active RG copies leads to reduced stress resistance and elevated risk of multifactorial disorders (MFD). Oxidative stress (OS) in the brain cells is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of infantile autism (IA) and schizophrenia, i.e., MFDs with a manifested genetic predisposition. With autism, OS markers are found almost in every research, whilst with schizophrenia, the OS data are contradictory. Earlier, in a sample of patients with schizophrenia, we have found significantly higher quantity of active RG copies than at the average in healthy population. Here we have estimated the number of active RG copies in a sample of patients with IA (n = 51) and revealed significantly lower mean value than in healthy population. A novel mathematical model of the dynamic pattern of OS has been proposed. The model is realized as an ordinary differential equation system, supposing induction of antioxidant protection enzymes being mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the subsequent decrease of ROS content in a cell. The rate of synthesis of antioxidant protection enzymes is limited by the ribosome synthesis rate which depends on the number of active RG copies. Analysis of the model showed that the system always approaches a single stable equilibrium point along a damped oscillation trajectory, which in some degree resembles the dynamics of 'predator-prey' interaction in Lotka-Volterra model. The stationary ROS level inversely depends on the number of active RG copies. Our study explains the inconsistency of clinical data of OS in schizophrenia and suggests a novel criterion for discriminative cytogenetic diagnostics of

  14. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  15. Bacterial characterization of Beijing drinking water by flow cytometry and MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Kong, Weiwen; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Jingqi; He, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing data are commonly used to monitor and characterize microbial differences in drinking water distribution systems. In this study, to assess microbial differences in drinking water distribution systems, 12 water samples from different sources water (groundwater, GW; surface water, SW) were analyzed by FCM, heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 2.2 × 10(3) cells/mL to 1.6 × 10(4) cells/mL in the network. Characteristics of each water sample were also observed by FCM fluorescence fingerprint analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that Proteobacteria (76.9-42.3%) or Cyanobacteria (42.0-3.1%) was most abundant among samples. Proteobacteria were abundant in samples containing chlorine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Interestingly, Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, and Pseudomonas, were detected in drinking water distribution systems. There was no evidence that these microorganisms represented a health concern through water consumption by the general population. However, they provided a health risk for special crowd, such as the elderly or infants, patients with burns and immune-compromised people exposed by drinking. The combined use of FCM to detect total bacteria concentrations and sequencing to determine the relative abundance of pathogenic bacteria resulted in the quantitative evaluation of drinking water distribution systems. Knowledge regarding the concentration of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria will be particularly useful for epidemiological studies.

  16. Towards a taxonomic coherence between average nucleotide identity and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity for species demarcation of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mincheol; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Park, Sang-Cheol; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    Among available genome relatedness indices, average nucleotide identity (ANI) is one of the most robust measurements of genomic relatedness between strains, and has great potential in the taxonomy of bacteria and archaea as a substitute for the labour-intensive DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) technique. An ANI threshold range (95-96%) for species demarcation had previously been suggested based on comparative investigation between DDH and ANI values, albeit with rather limited datasets. Furthermore, its generality was not tested on all lineages of prokaryotes. Here, we investigated the overall distribution of ANI values generated by pairwise comparison of 6787 genomes of prokaryotes belonging to 22 phyla to see whether the suggested range can be applied to all species. There was an apparent distinction in the overall ANI distribution between intra- and interspecies relationships at around 95-96% ANI. We went on to determine which level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity corresponds to the currently accepted ANI threshold for species demarcation using over one million comparisons. A twofold cross-validation statistical test revealed that 98.65% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity can be used as the threshold for differentiating two species, which is consistent with previous suggestions (98.2-99.0%) derived from comparative studies between DDH and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Our findings should be useful in accelerating the use of genomic sequence data in the taxonomy of bacteria and archaea.

  17. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  18. Characterization of the fecal bacteria communities of forage-fed horses by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA V4 gene amplicons.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Megan L; Swecker, William S; Jensen, Roderick V; Ponder, Monica A

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of the equine fecal bacterial community was evaluated using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Fecal samples were obtained from horses fed cool-season grass hay. Fecal bacteria were characterized by amplifying the V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Of 5898 mean unique sequences, a mean of 1510 operational taxonomic units were identified in the four fecal samples. Equine fecal bacterial richness was higher than that reported in humans, but lower than that reported in either cattle feces or soil. Bacterial classified sequences were assigned to 16 phyla, of which 10 were present in all samples. The largest number of reads belonged to Firmicutes (43.7% of total bacterial sequences), Verrucomicrobia (4.1%), Proteobacteria (3.8%), and Bacteroidetes (3.7%). The less abundant Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and TM7 phyla presented here have not been previously described in the gut contents or feces of horses. Unclassified sequences represented 38.1% of total bacterial sequences; therefore, the equine fecal microbiome diversity is likely greater than that described. This is the first study to characterize the fecal bacterial community in horses by the use of 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, expanding our knowledge of the fecal microbiota of forage-fed horses.

  19. Ecological significance of microdiversity: identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can be found in bacteria with highly divergent genomes and ecophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Elke; Overmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    A combination of cultivation-based methods with a molecular biological approach was used to investigate whether planktonic bacteria with identical 16S rRNA gene sequences can represent distinct eco- and genotypes. A set of 11 strains of Brevundimonas alba were isolated from a bacterial freshwater community by conventional plating or by using a liquid most-probable-number (MPN) dilution series. These strains had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and represented the dominant phylotype in the plateable fraction, as well as in the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series. However, internally transcribed spacer and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR fingerprinting analyses, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, revealed great genetic diversity among the 11 strains. Each strain utilized a specific combination of 59 carbon substrates, and the niche overlap indices were low, suggesting that each strain occupied a different ecological niche. In dialysis cultures incubated in situ, each strain had a different growth rate and cell yield. We thus demonstrated that the B. alba strains represent distinct populations with genetically determined adaptations and probably occupy different ecological niches. Our results have implications for assessment of the diversity and biogeography of bacteria and increase the perception of natural diversity beyond the level of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  20. First Experience of a Multicenter External Quality Assessment of Molecular 16S rRNA Gene Detection in Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bémer, Pascale; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Tandé, Didier; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Kempf, Marie; Lemarié, Carole; Guinard, Jérôme; Bret, Laurent; Cognée, Anne Sophie; Gibaud, Sophie; Burucoa, Christophe; Corvec, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of seven French laboratories for 16S rRNA gene detection by real-time PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infection (BJI) to validate a large multicenter study. External quality control (QC) was required owing to the differences in extraction procedures and the molecular equipment used in the different laboratories. Three proficiency sets were organized, including four bacterial DNA extracts and four bead mill-pretreated osteoarticular specimens. Extraction volumes, 16S rRNA gene primers, and sequencing interpretation rules were standardized. In order to assess each laboratory's ability to achieve the best results, scores were assigned, and each QC series was classified as optimal, acceptable, or to be improved. A total of 168 QCs were sent, and 160 responses were analyzed. The expected results were obtained for 93.8%, with the same proportion for extracts (75/80) and clinical specimens (75/80). For the specimens, there was no significant difference between manual and automated extraction. This QC demonstrated the ability to achieve good and homogeneous results using the same 16S rRNA gene PCR with different equipment and validates the possibility of high-quality multicenter studies using molecular diagnosis for BJI. PMID:25411177

  1. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolate from Markisa fruit (Passiflora sp.) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Habibi

    2017-03-01

    16S rRNA gene analysis of bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate from Markisa Kuning Fruit (Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics has been done. The aim of the study is to determine the protease enzyme activity and 16S rRNA gene amplification using PCR. The calculation procedure was done to M4 isolate bacteria lactic acid (LAB) Isolate which has been resistant to acids with pH 2.0 in the manner of screening protease enzyme activity test result 6.5 to clear zone is 13 mm againts colony diametre is 2 mm. The results of study enzyme activity used spectrophotometer UV-Vis obtainable the regression equation Y=0.02983+0.001312X, with levels of protein M4 isolate is 0.6594 mg/mL and enzyme activity of obtainable is 0.8626 unit/ml while the spesific enzyme activity produced is 1.308 unit/mg. Then, 16S rRNA gene amplificatiom and DNA sequencing has been done. The results of study showed that the bacteria species contained from M4 bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate is Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59. Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59 is one of bacteria could be utilized in the digestive tract.

  2. First experience of a multicenter external quality assessment of molecular 16S rRNA gene detection in bone and joint infections.

    PubMed

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Bémer, Pascale; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Tandé, Didier; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Kempf, Marie; Lemarié, Carole; Guinard, Jérôme; Bret, Laurent; Cognée, Anne Sophie; Gibaud, Sophie; Burucoa, Christophe; Corvec, Stéphane

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of seven French laboratories for 16S rRNA gene detection by real-time PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infection (BJI) to validate a large multicenter study. External quality control (QC) was required owing to the differences in extraction procedures and the molecular equipment used in the different laboratories. Three proficiency sets were organized, including four bacterial DNA extracts and four bead mill-pretreated osteoarticular specimens. Extraction volumes, 16S rRNA gene primers, and sequencing interpretation rules were standardized. In order to assess each laboratory's ability to achieve the best results, scores were assigned, and each QC series was classified as optimal, acceptable, or to be improved. A total of 168 QCs were sent, and 160 responses were analyzed. The expected results were obtained for 93.8%, with the same proportion for extracts (75/80) and clinical specimens (75/80). For the specimens, there was no significant difference between manual and automated extraction. This QC demonstrated the ability to achieve good and homogeneous results using the same 16S rRNA gene PCR with different equipment and validates the possibility of high-quality multicenter studies using molecular diagnosis for BJI.

  3. In silico analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of endophytic bacteria, isolated from the aerial parts and seeds of important agricultural crops.

    PubMed

    Bredow, C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A; Mangolin, C A; Rhoden, S A

    2015-08-19

    Because of human population growth, increased food production and alternatives to conventional methods of biocontrol and development of plants such as the use of endophytic bacteria and fungi are required. One of the methods used to study microorganism diversity is sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, which has several advantages, including universality, size, and availability of databases for comparison. The objective of this study was to analyze endophytic bacterial diversity in agricultural crops using published papers, sequence databases, and phylogenetic analysis. Fourteen papers were selected in which the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used to identify endophytic bacteria, in important agricultural crops, such as coffee, sugar cane, beans, corn, soybean, tomatoes, and grapes, located in different geographical regions (America, Europe, and Asia). The corresponding 16S rRNA gene sequences were selected from the NCBI database, aligned using the Mega 5.2 program, and phylogenetic analysis was undertaken. The most common orders present in the analyzed cultures were Bacillales, Enterobacteriales, and Actinomycetales and the most frequently observed genera were Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Microbacterium. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only approximately 1.56% of the total sequences were not properly grouped, demonstrating reliability in the identification of microorganisms. This study identified the main genera found in endophytic bacterial cultures from plants, providing data for future studies on improving plant agriculture, biotechnology, endophytic bacterium prospecting, and to help understand relationships between endophytic bacteria and their interactions with plants.

  4. Bacterial Diversity Analysis of Huanglongbing Pathogen-Infected Citrus, Using PhyloChip Arrays and 16S rRNA Gene Clone Library Sequencing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sagaram, Uma Shankar; DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Trivedi, Pankaj; Andersen, Gary L.; Lu, Shi-En; Wang, Nian

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized for citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene microarrays and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition for symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria in 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs, while 20 orders in 8 phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs than in asymptomatic midribs. “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis results were further verified by sequencing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. PMID:19151177

  5. Microbial diversity of a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment: integration of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Delforno, Tiago Palladino; Lacerda Júnior, Gileno Vieira; Noronha, Melline F; Sakamoto, Isabel K; Varesche, Maria Bernadete A; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2017-02-23

    The 16S rRNA gene amplicon and whole-genome shotgun metagenomic (WGSM) sequencing approaches were used to investigate wide-spectrum profiles of microbial composition and metabolic diversity from a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment. The data were generated by using MiSeq 2 × 250 bp and HiSeq 2 × 150 bp Illumina sequencing platforms for 16S amplicon and WGSM sequencing, respectively. Each approach revealed a distinct microbial community profile, with Pseudomonas and Psychrobacter as predominant genus for the WGSM dataset and Clostridium and Methanosaeta for the 16S rRNA gene amplicon dataset. The virome characterization revealed the presence of two viral families with Bacteria and Archaea as host, Myoviridae, and Siphoviridae. A wide functional diversity was found with predominance of genes involved in the metabolism of acetone, butanol, and ethanol synthesis; and one-carbon metabolism (e.g., methanogenesis). Genes related to the acetotrophic methanogenesis pathways were more abundant than methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic, corroborating the taxonomic results that showed the prevalence of the acetotrophic genus Methanosaeta. Moreover, the dataset indicated a variety of metabolic genes involved in sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and phosphorus cycles, with many genera able to act in all cycles. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) revealed that microbial community contained 43 different types of antibiotic resistance genes, some of them were associated with growth chicken promotion (e.g., bacitracin, tetracycline, and polymyxin).

  6. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  7. Sister chromatid exchange, DNA repair, and single-gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.; Thompson, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) has been studied in cultured mammalian cells with regard to the nature of the inducing lesion, mutation induction, and factors that modify the observed frequency following mutagen exposure, SCEs can be induced by a wide spectrum of DNA lesions and, for nine agents examined, the frequency of induced SCE is linearly related to induced single-gene mutation. Further, a deficiency in DNA repair may alter the expression of both SCE and mutation in a qualitatively similar manner. The frequency of SCE induced by mitomycin-C is suppressed in heterochromatic relative to euchromatin and, in nondividing lymphocytes, the lesions leading to the formation of SCEs may persist for several months.

  8. Spectinomycin resistance mutations in the rrn16 gene are new plastid markers in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Dudas, Brigitta; Jenes, Barnabas; Kiss, Gyorgy Botond; Maliga, Pal

    2012-11-01

    We report here the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in cultured cells of Medicago sativa line RegenSY-T2. Spectinomycin induces bleaching of cultured alfalfa cells due to inhibition of protein synthesis on the prokaryotic type 70S plastid ribosomes. Spontaneous mutants resistant to spectinomycin bleaching were identified by their ability to form green shoots on plant regeneration medium containing selective spectinomycin concentrations in the range of 25-50 mg/l. Sequencing of the plastid rrn16 gene revealed that spectinomycin resistance is due to mutations in a conserved stem structure of the 16S rRNA. Resistant plants transferred to the greenhouse developed normally and produced spectinomycin-resistant seed progeny. In light of their absence in soybean, a related leguminous plant, the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in M. sativa was unexpected. The new mutations are useful for the study of plastid inheritance, as demonstrated by detection of predominantly paternal plastid inheritance in the RegenSY-T2 × Szapko57 cross, and can be used as selective markers in plastid transformation vectors to obtain cisgenic plants.

  9. [Phylogenetic characterization of endosymbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus by analysis of the 16S rRNA, pmoL, and cbbA genes].

    PubMed

    Spiridonova, E M; Kuznetsov, B B; Pimenov, N V; Turova, T P

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the phylogenetic diversity of the endosymbiotic microbial community of the gills of marine shellfish Bathymodiolus azoricus, total DNA was extracted from the gills. The PCR fragments corresponding to the genes encoding 16S rRNA, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (cbbL), and particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. For the 16S rDNA genes, only one phylotype was revealed; it belonged to the cluster of Mytilidae thiotrophic symbionts within the Gammaproteobacteria. For the RuBisCO genes, two phylotypes were found, both belonging to Gammaproteobacteria. One of them was closely related to the previously known mytilid symbiont, the other, to a pogonophore symbiont, presumably a methanotrophic bacterium. One phylotype of particulate methane oxygenase genes was also revealed; this finding indicated the presence of a methanotrophic symbiont. Phylogenetic analysis of the pmoA placed this endosymbiont within the Gammaproteobacteria, in a cluster including the methanotrophic bacterial genus Methylobacter and other methanotrophic Bathymodiolus gill symbionts. These results provide evidence for the existence of two types of endosymbionts (thioautotrophic and methanotrophic) in the gills of B. azoricus and demonstrate that, apart from the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes, parallel analysis of functional genes is essential.

  10. Prevalence of lysogeny among soil bacteria and presence of 16S rRNA and trzN genes in viral-community DNA.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dhritiman; Roy, Krishnakali; Williamson, Kurt E; White, David C; Wommack, K Eric; Sublette, Kerry L; Radosevich, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are very abundant in the biosphere, and viral infection is believed to affect the activity and genetic diversity of bacterial communities in aquatic environments. Lysogenic conversion, for example, can improve host fitness and lead to phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about lysogeny and transduction in the soil environment. In this study we employed atrazine-impregnated Bio-Sep beads (a cell immobilization matrix) to sample active microbiota from soils with prior pesticide exposure history. Once recovered from soil, the bead communities were induced with mitomycin C (MC), and viral and bacterial abundances were determined to evaluate the incidence of inducible prophage in soil bacteria. The inducible fraction calculated within bead communities was high (ca. 85%) relative to other studies in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Moreover, the bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA and trzN, a chlorohydrolase gene responsible for dehalogenation of atrazine, were detected by PCR in the viral DNA fraction purified from MC-induced bead communities. A diverse collection of actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences occurred within the viral DNA fraction of induced, water-equilibrated beads. Similar results were observed in induced atrazine-equilibrated beads, where 77% of the cloned sequences were derived from actinobacterial lineages. Heterogeneous 16S rRNA gene sequences consisting of fragments from two different taxa were detected in the clone libraries. The results suggest that lysogeny is a prevalent reproductive strategy among soil bacteriophages and that the potential for horizontal gene transfer via transduction is significant in soil microbial communities.

  11. Persistent spread of the rmtB 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased food-producing animals in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Sun, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Zou, Meng-Ting; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-05-30

    A total of 963 non-duplicate Escherichia coli strains isolated from food-producing animals between 2002 and 2012 were screened for the presence of the 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. Among the positive isolates, resistance determinants to extended spectrum β-lactamases, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes as well as floR and fosA/A3/C2 were detected using PCR analysis. These isolates were further subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing, PCR-based plasmid replicon typing and plasmid analysis. Of the 963 E. coli isolates, 173 (18.0%), 3 (0.3%) and 2 (0.2%) were rmtB-, armA- and rmtE-positive strains, respectively. All the 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene-positive isolates were multidrug resistant and over 90% of them carried one or more type of resistance gene. IncF (especially IncFII) and non-typeable plasmids played the main role in the dissemination of rmtB, followed by the IncN plasmids. Plasmids that harbored rmtB ranged in size from 20kb to 340kb EcoRI-RFLP testing of the 109 rmtB-positive plasmids from different years and different origins suggested that horizontal (among diverse animals) and vertical transfer of IncF, non-typeable and IncN-type plasmids were responsible for the spread of rmtB gene. In summary, our findings highlight that rmtB was the most prevalent 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene, which present persistent spread in food-producing animals in China and a diverse group of plasmids was responsible for rmtB dissemination.

  12. In silico analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing based methods for identification of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jade L L; Yeung, Ming-Yiu; Yue, Geoffrey; Au-Yeung, Rex K H; Yeung, Eugene Y H; Fung, Ami M Y; Tse, Herman; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2011-09-01

    This study provides guidelines on the usefulness of full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Microseq databases for identifying medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing can identify 26.1 % and 32.6 %, respectively, of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria confidently to the species level, whereas the full-MicroSeq and 500-MicroSeq databases can identify 15.2 % and 26.1 %, respectively, of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria confidently to the species level. Among the major groups of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the methods and databases are least useful for identification of Aeromonas, Bordetella and Bartonella species. None of the Aeromonas species can be confidently or doubtfully identified, whereas only 0 % and 0-33.3 % of Bordetella species and 0-10 % and 0-10 % of Bartonella species can be confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. On the other hand, these methods and databases are most useful for identification of members of the families Pasteurellaceae and Legionellaceae and Campylobacter species: 29.6-59.3 % and 7.4-18.5 % of members of Pasteurellaceae, 36-52 % and 12-24 % of members of Legionellaceae, and 26.7-60 % and 0-13.3 % of Campylobacter species can be confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. Thirty-nine medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria that should be confidently identified by full 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the full-MicroSeq database. Twenty-three medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria that should be confidently identified by 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the 500-MicroSeq database. Compared with results of our previous studies on anaerobic and Gram-positive bacteria, full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing are able to confidently identify significantly more anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria than aerobic Gram

  13. Prevalence of α-1-Antitrypsin Gene Mutations in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aljarallah, Badr; Ali, Ahmed; Dowaidar, Moataz; Settin, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations of the protease inhibitor (PI). The AAT gene is mapped on chromosome 14 and has been associated with chronic liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective: To determine the frequency of AAT mutations on S and Z carrier alleles in healthy Saudi individuals from Qassim Province in Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: A total of 158 healthy, unrelated participants from Qassim Province were recruited. They were genotyped for the two AAT-deficiency alleles, PI*S and PI*Z, using polymerase chain reaction, with primers designed throughout to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. Results: Of the 158 subjects, 11.39% were carriers for the S mutation (i.e., had the MS genotype), whereas 2.53% were carriers for the Z mutation (i.e., had the MZ genotype). The SZ genotype was present in 3.8% of subjects, while the homozygous genotype SS was present in 1.9% of subjects. No subjects showed the ZZ mutant genotype. Accordingly, frequency of the mutant S and Z alleles of AAT gene was 9.49% and 3.19%, respectively. Conclusion: The results obtained showed a high prevalence of the AAT deficiency allele in the Saudi population. This probably warrants adoption of a screening program for at-risk individuals, so that they might initiate adequate prophylactic measures. PMID:21727732

  14. α-Globin gene mutations in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Karamzade, Arezo; Mirzapour, Hadi; Hoseinzade, Majid; Asadi, Sara; Gholamrezapour, Tahere; Tavakoli, Parvaneh; Salehi, Mansoor; Selebi, Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) encompasses a spectrum of mutations including deletion and point mutations on the α-globin chains that is characterized by a reduction or complete absence of α-globin genes. Most of the α-thal cases are deletions involving one (α(+)) or both (α(0)) α-globin genes, although point mutations (α(T)α or αα(T)) are found as well. In this study, 314 individuals with low hematological values, normal Hb A2 who were not affected with β-thal or iron deficiency, were investigated for the presence of α-thal mutations. The most common deletion was -α(3.7) (rightward) with a frequency of 70.7%, followed by α(-5 nt) (-TGAGG) (8.7%), -α(4.2) (leftward) (4.7%), the polyadenylation signal (polyA2) site (AATAAA > AATGAA) (4.2%), -(α)(20.5) (3.8%), Hb Constant Spring [Hb CS, α142, Stop→Gln; HBA2: c.427T > C] (2.9%), polyA1 (AATAAA > AATAAG) and α(codon 19) (GCG > GC-, α2) (16%), and - -(MED) (0.9%). The results of this study may be valuable for designing a plan for carrier screening, premarital genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and reducing excessive health care costs to an affordable level in Isfahan Province, Iran.

  15. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Wildin, R. S.; Antush, M. J.; Bennett, R. L.; Schoof, J. M.; Scott, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. We have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was documented in two additional cases. Carrier detection was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7913579

  16. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  18. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  19. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-08

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ).

  20. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  1. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene.

    PubMed

    Letts, V A; Valenzuela, A; Dunbar, C; Zheng, Q Y; Johnson, K R; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1(pkr)), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1(pkr) mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21.

  2. Cautionary tale of using 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values in identification of human-associated bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Tamisier, Morgane; Benamar, Samia; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2015-06-01

    Modern bacterial taxonomy is based on a polyphasic approach that combines phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, including 16S rRNA sequence similarity. However, the 95 % (for genus) and 98.7 % (for species) sequence similarity thresholds that are currently recommended to classify bacterial isolates were defined by comparison of a limited number of bacterial species, and may not apply to many genera that contain human-associated species. For each of 158 bacterial genera containing human-associated species, we computed pairwise sequence similarities between all species that have names with standing in nomenclature and then analysed the results, considering as abnormal any similarity value lower than 95 % or greater than 98.7 %. Many of the current bacterial species with validly published names do not respect the 95 and 98.7 % thresholds, with 57.1 % of species exhibiting 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity rates ≥98.7 %, and 60.1 % of genera containing species exhibiting a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity rate <95 %. In only 17 of the 158 genera studied (10.8 %), all species respected the 95 and 98.7 % thresholds. As we need powerful and reliable taxonomical tools, and as potential new tools such as pan-genomics have not yet been fully evaluated for taxonomic purposes, we propose to use as thresholds, genus by genus, the minimum and maximum similarity values observed among species.

  3. An immunoaffinity purified Schizosaccharomyces pombe TBP-containing complex directs correct initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Guo, A; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    The multi-protein complex SL1, containing TBP, which is essential for RNA polymerase I catalyzed transcription, has been analyzed in fission yeast. It was immunopurified based on association of component subunits with epitope-tagged TBP. To enable this analysis, a strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was created where the only functional TBP coding sequences were those of FLAG-TBP. RNA polymerase I transcription components were fractionated from this strain and the TBP-associated polypeptides were subsequently immunopurified together with the epitope- tagged TBP. An assessment of the activity of this candidate SL1 complex was undertaken cross-species. This fission yeast TBP-containing complex displays two activities in redirecting transcriptional initiation of an S. pombe rDNA gene promoter cross-species in Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription reactions: it both blocks an incorrect transcriptional start site at +7 and directs initiation at the correct site for S. pombe rRNA synthesis. This complex is essential for accurate initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene: rRNA synthesis is reconstituted when this S.pombe TBP-containing complex is combined with a S.pombe fraction immunodepleted of TBP. PMID:9092673

  4. The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150 bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

  5. Molecular characterization of Argulus bengalensis and Argulus siamensis (Crustacea: Argulidae) infecting the cultured carps in West Bengal, India using 18S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Avijit; Mondal, Anjan; Banerjee, Sayani; Adikesavalu, Harresh; Joardar, Siddhartha Narayan; Abraham, Thangapalam Jawahar

    2016-01-01

    The present study characterized Argulus spp. infecting the cultured carps using 18S rRNA gene sequences, estimated the genetic similarity among Argulus spp. and established their phylogenetic relationship. Of the 320 fish samples screened, 34 fish (10.6%) had Argulus infection. The parasitic frequency index (PFI) was observed to be high (20%) in Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Labeo bata. The frequency of infection was high in September (PFI: 17%) and October (PFI: 12.9%). The 18S rRNA sequences of five A. bengalensis (KF583878, KF192316, KM016968, KM016969, and KM016970) and one A. siamensis (KF583879) of this study showed genetic heterogeneity and exhibited 77-99% homology among the 18S rRNA gene sequences of Argulus spp. of NCBI GenBank database. Among the Indian Argulus spp. the sequence homology was 87–100%. Evolutionary pair-wise distances between Indian Argulus spp. and other Argulus spp. ranged from 0 to 20.20%. In the phylogenetic tree, all the crustaceans were clustered together as a separate clade with two distinct lineages. The lineage-1 comprised exclusive of Branchiura (Argulus spp.). All Argulus bengalensis clustered together and A. siamensis (KF583879) was closely related to Argulus sp. JN558648. The results of the present study provided baseline data for future work on population structure analysis of Indian Argulus species. PMID:28097169

  6. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Photobacterium damselae and Nested PCR Method for Rapid Detection of the Causative Agent of Fish Pasteurellosis

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Carlos R.; Collins, Matthew D.; Toranzo, Alicia E.; Barja, Juan L.; Romalde, Jesús L.

    1999-01-01

    The causative agent of fish pasteurellosis, the organism formerly known as Pasteurella piscicida, has been reclassified as Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and chromosomal DNA-DNA hybridization data; thus, this organism belongs to the same species as Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damselae). Since reassignment of P. damselae subsp. piscicida was based on only two strains, one objective of the present work was to confirm the taxonomic position of this fish pathogen by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of 26 strains having different geographic and host origins. In addition, a nested PCR protocol for detection of P. damselae based on 16S rRNA was developed. This PCR protocol was validated by testing 35 target and 24 nontarget pure cultures, and the detection limits obtained ranged from 1 pg to 10 fg of DNA (200 to 20 cells). A similar level of sensitivity was observed when the PCR protocol was applied to fish tissues spiked with bacteria. The PCR approach described in this paper allows detection of the pathogen in mixed plate cultures obtained from asymptomatic fish suspected to be carriers of P. damselae subsp. piscicida, in which growth of this bacterium cannot be visualized. Our results indicate that the selective primers which we designed represent a powerful tool for sensitive and specific detection of fish pasteurellosis. PMID:10388687

  7. Optimization of gene sequences under constant mutational pressure and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Gierlik, A.; Mackiewicz, P.; Cebrat, S.; Dudek, M. R.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the influence of constant mutational pressure and selection on the nucleotide composition of DNA sequences of various size, which were represented by the genes of the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. With the help of MC simulations we have found that longer DNA sequences accumulate much less base substitutions per sequence length than short sequences. This leads us to the conclusion that the accuracy of replication may determine the size of genome.

  8. Clinical and molecular analysis of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiuju; Li Qingzhong; Han Dongyi . E-mail: hdy301@263.net; Zhao Yali; Zhao Lidong; Qian Yaping; Yuan Hu; Li Ronghua; Zhai Suoqiang; Young Wieyen . E-mail: ywy301@263.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-02-10

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Five of nine matrilineal relatives had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. These matrilineal relatives exhibited variable severity and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment, despite sharing some common features: being bilateral and having sensorineural hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pedigree identified 16 variants and the homoplasmic 12S rRNA C1494T mutation, which was associated with hearing loss in the other large Chinese family. In fact, the occurrence of the C1494T mutation in these genetically unrelated pedigrees affected by hearing impairment strongly indicated that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing loss indicated that the C1494T mutation itself is not sufficient to produce a clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Those mtDNA variants, showing no evolutional conservation, may not have a potential modifying role in the pathogenesis of the C1494T mutation. However, nuclear background seems to contribute to the phenotypic variability of matrilineal relatives in this family. Furthermore, aminoglycosides modulate the expressivity and penetrance of deafness associated with the C1494T mutation in this family.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strain Carrying a blaKPC-2 Carbapenemase Gene and an rmtB 16S rRNA Methylase Gene.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhihong; Feng, Yu; Wei, Li; Zong, Zhiyong

    2017-02-09

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain WCHKP649, recovered from a human wound, carried the carbapenemase gene blaKPC-2 and 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB Here, we report its 5.6-Mb draft genome sequence, comprising 171 contigs with an average 57.34% G+C content. The genome contained 5,284 coding sequences and 84 tRNA genes.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strain Carrying a blaKPC-2 Carbapenemase Gene and an rmtB 16S rRNA Methylase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhihong; Feng, Yu; Wei, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae strain WCHKP649, recovered from a human wound, carried the carbapenemase gene blaKPC-2 and 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB. Here, we report its 5.6-Mb draft genome sequence, comprising 171 contigs with an average 57.34% G+C content. The genome contained 5,284 coding sequences and 84 tRNA genes. PMID:28183754

  11. Characterization of Enterococcus spp. from human and animal feces using 16S rRNA sequences, the esp gene, and PFGE for microbial source tracking in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sei-Yoon; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Hee Tae; Hur, Ho-Gil; Ko, Gwangpyo

    2010-05-01

    Contamination from human and animal fecal waste is a primary cause of water pollution. Microbial source tracking (MST) may be a useful tool for high-quality environmental management and for assessing human health risks associated with water pollution. The goal of this study was to evaluate Enterococcus spp. as a target organism for MST. Thirty-four fecal samples were collected from five different sources (human, chicken, pig, cow, and goose) in South Korea. In total, 237 Enterococcus spp. were isolated from feces using membrane- Enterococcus indoxyl-beta-d-glucoside agar. The 16S rRNA gene and the whole genome were analyzed using nucleic acid sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Both phylogenetic analysis and principal coordinate analysis using UniFrac were performed on the nucleic acid sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. According to P-tests from UniFrac, significant differences existed between Enterococcus spp. isolated from human feces and those from animal feces. In addition, we evaluated whether the esp gene of Enterococcus faecium could be a specific target for Enterococcus spp. isolated from human feces. Of 58 E. faecium isolates tested, only three were esp-positive. The specificity of the esp gene of E. faecium isolated from human feces was 100%, but the sensitivity was <10%. These results suggest that Enterococcus spp. have different molecular characteristics according to their fecal source and that these characteristics can be further identified by analyzing the esp gene and 16S rRNA sequences, whereas PFGE provides limited information on the fecal sources of Enterococcus spp.

  12. Unverricht-Lundborg disease: homozygosity for a new splicing mutation in the cystatin B gene.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Eugénia; Freitas, Joel; Duarte, Ana Joana; Ribeiro, Isaura; Ribeiro, Diogo; Lima, J Lopes; Chaves, João; Amaral, Olga

    2012-03-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease is the most common form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME). It is due to cystatin B gene (CSTB) mutations. Several mutations in CSTB gene have been published, but few in homozygosity. We describe a patient with a new splicing alteration. Mutation Gln22Gln leads to abnormal splicing and partial inclusion of intronic sequence. This is one of the few cases of homozygosity for a non-classic mutation and adds to mutational heterogeneity of CSTB.

  13. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  14. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA and amoA genes from archaea selected with organic and inorganic amendments in enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mouzhong; Schnorr, Jon; Keibler, Brandon; Simon, Holly M

    2012-04-01

    We took advantage of a plant-root enrichment culture system to characterize mesophilic soil archaea selected through the use of organic and inorganic amendments. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA and amoA genes indicated that specific archaeal clades were selected under different conditions. Three amoA sequence clades were identified, while for a fourth group, identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis alone and referred to as the "root" clade, we detected no corresponding amoA gene. The amoA-containing archaea were present in media with either organic or inorganic amendments, whereas archaea representing the root clade were present only when organic amendment was used. Analysis of amoA gene abundance and expression, together with nitrification-coupled growth assays, indicated potential growth by autotrophic ammonia oxidation for members of two group 1.1b clades. Increased abundance of one of these clades, however, also occurred upon the addition of organic amendment. Finally, although amoA-containing group 1.1a archaea were present in enrichments, we detected neither expression of amoA genes nor evidence for nitrification-coupled growth of these organisms. These data support a model of a diverse metabolic community in mesophilic soil archaea that is just beginning to be characterized.

  15. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob; Bik, Holly

    2015-12-22

    ABSTRACT

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5′ end, allowing for a range of different 3′ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection ofThaumarchaeotaand clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies.

    ImportanceWe continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to

  16. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Walters, William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada, Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of data sets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here, we examined the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with nonaquatic samples. We moved primer bar codes to the 5′ end, allowing for a range of different 3′ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrated that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and clade SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies. IMPORTANCE We continue to uncover a wealth of information connecting microbes in important ways to human and environmental ecology. As our scientific knowledge and technical abilities improve, the tools used for microbiome surveys can be modified to improve the accuracy of our techniques, ensuring that we can continue to identify groundbreaking connections between microbes and the ecosystems they populate, from ice caps to the human body. It is important to confirm that modifications to these tools do not cause new, detrimental biases that would inhibit the field rather than continue to move it forward. We therefore demonstrated that two recently modified primer pairs that target taxonomically discriminatory regions of bacterial and fungal genomic DNA do not introduce new biases when used on a variety of sample types, from soil to human skin. This confirms the utility of these primers

  17. Adenovirus with DNA Packaging Gene Mutations Increased Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Wechman, Stephen L.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have been extensively manipulated for the development of cancer selective replication, leading to cancer cell death or oncolysis. Clinical studies using E1-modified oncolytic Ads have shown that this therapeutic platform was safe, but with limited efficacy, indicating the necessity of targeting other viral genes for manipulation. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic Ads, we treated the entire Ad genome repeatedly with UV-light and have isolated AdUV which efficiently lyses cancer cells as reported previously (Wechman, S. L. et al. Development of an Oncolytic Adenovirus with Enhanced Spread Ability through Repeated UV Irradiation and Cancer Selection. Viruses 2016, 8, 6). In this report, we show that no mutations were observed in the early genes (E1 or E4) of AdUV while several mutations were observed within the Ad late genes which have structural or viral DNA packaging functions. This study also reported the increased release of AdUV from cancer cells. In this study, we found that AdUV inhibits tumor growth following intratumoral injection. These results indicate the potentially significant role of the viral late genes, in particular the DNA packaging genes, to enhance Ad oncolysis. PMID:27999391

  18. NDP gene mutations in 14 French families with Norrie disease.

    PubMed

    Royer, Ghislaine; Hanein, Sylvain; Raclin, Valérie; Gigarel, Nadine; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Munnich, Arnold; Steffann, Julie; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Kaplan, Josseline; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul

    2003-12-01

    Norrie disease is a rare X-inked recessive condition characterized by congenital blindness and occasionally deafness and mental retardation in males. This disease has been ascribed to mutations in the NDP gene on chromosome Xp11.1. Previous investigations of the NDP gene have identified largely sixty disease-causing sequence variants. Here, we report on ten different NDP gene allelic variants in fourteen of a series of 21 families fulfilling inclusion criteria. Two alterations were intragenic deletions and eight were nucleotide substitutions or splicing variants, six of them being hitherto unreported, namely c.112C>T (p.Arg38Cys), c.129C>G (p.His43Gln), c.133G>A (p.Val45Met), c.268C>T (p.Arg90Cys), c.382T>C (p.Cys128Arg), c.23479-1G>C (unknown). No NDP gene sequence variant was found in seven of the 21 families. This observation raises the issue of misdiagnosis, phenocopies, or existence of other X-linked or autosomal genes, the mutations of which would mimic the Norrie disease phenotype.

  19. Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD.

  20. Chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes, core histone genes and telomeric sequences in Brachidontes puniceus and Brachidontes rodriguezi (Bivalvia, Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromosome rearrangements are an important part of the speciation process in many taxa. The study of chromosome evolution in bivalves is hampered by the absence of clear chromosomal banding patterns and the similarity in both chromosome size and morphology. For this reason, obtaining good chromosome markers is essential for reliable karyotypic comparisons. To begin this task, the chromosomes of the mussels Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi were studied by means of fluorochrome staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi both have 2n = 32 chromosomes but differing karyotype composition. Vertebrate-type telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. B. puniceus presents a single terminal major rRNA gene cluster on a chromosome pair while B. rodriguezi shows two. Both mussels present two 5S rDNA and two core histone gene clusters intercalary located on the long arms of two chromosome pairs. Double and triple-FISH experiments demonstrated that one of the 5S rDNA and one of the major rDNA clusters appear on the same chromosome pair in B. rodriguezi but not in B. puniceus. On the other hand, the second 5S rDNA cluster is located in one of the chromosome pairs also bearing one of the core histone gene clusters in the two mussel species. Conclusion Knowledge of the chromosomal distribution of these sequences in the two species of Brachidontes is a first step in the understanding of the role of chromosome changes on bivalve evolution. PMID:21143946

  1. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  2. Teenage-onset non-syndromic deafness associated with a mutation and a polymorphism in the mitochondrial 12S ribsomal RNA gene in a large Zairese pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijs, G.; Claes, S.; Cassiman, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Non-syndromic deafness has been described as both an autosomal dominant and a recessive trait. Recently, Prezant et al. have identified a 1555 A to G substitution in the mitcohondrial 12S rRNA gene associated with deafness, either in an early-onset form with a postulated recessive nuclear defect for phenotypic expression, or after treatment with aminoglycosides. We have analyzed samples from a large pedigree originating from the village KAI SINGINI in Bas-Zaire. Patients have a maternally inherited, sudden-onset and bilateral sensineuronal deafness before the age of 20. To the best of our knowledge, no aminoglycosides have been given to these individuals. Sequencing of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene revealed the presence of a homoplasmic 1555 A-G mutation in 8 patients tested. This mutation is invariably associated with a newly described T-C transition at 1420 in the same gene. The 1420 mutation was also found in 1 of 30 unrelated black individuals. It is phylogenetically less conserved than its neighboring bases and than the 1555 mutation. It has been speculated that the 1555 mutation results in greater susceptibility to the effects of aminoglycosides on translational fidelity in the mitochondrial ribosome. It remains to be investigated whether the substitution at 1420 contributes to the ribosomal malfunction and the disease phenotype. Our results add to previous evidence for the 1555 mutation as a pathogenic mutation in non-syndromic deafness. We are currently collecting further family data and samples. The analysis of the entire pedigree will shed light on the possible contribution of nuclear defects in the cochlear-specific damage by impairment of mitochondrial translation.

  3. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  4. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  5. Mutations of the p53 and PTCH gene in basal cell carcinomas: UV mutation signature and strand bias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Baek, Seung-Cheol; Byun, Dae Gyoo; Houh, Dong

    2002-05-01

    Mutations of p53 and PTCH gene, two candidate tumor suppressor genes for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), were screened in 15 cases of sporadic BCCs that developed in sun-exposed skin region in a Korean population. p53 and PTCH mutations were detected at a frequency of 33 and 40%, respectively, and the mutations were predominantly UV-signature transition, C-->T transitions at dipyrimidine sites and CC-->TT tandem mutations. In both genes, the most common mutations were missense mutations resulting in amino acid substitution, which is different than the results from Caucasian BCCs where mutations are frequently predicted to make truncated or absent proteins. All mutations, except for one, occurred on the nontranscribed strand where is little efficient removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers relative to the transcribed strand. Loss of heterozygocity (LOH) of 9q22 for PTCH loci was found in eight of 15 informative cases of BCCs (53%), but none of the cases were informative for LOH of 17p13 for p53 loci. Not only do our data indicate the key role played by p53 and PTCH in the development of BCCs, these findings also suggest that UVB may significantly contribute to BCC tumorigenesis. Moreover, molecular epidemiology composed of incidence of p53 and PTCH mutations, difference in the type of mutation and repair bias of UV-induced DNA lesions might affect the distinct features of BCCs between different racial population.

  6. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A.; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  7. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  8. Progranulin gene mutation with an unusual clinical and neuropathologic presentation.

    PubMed

    Wider, Christian; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Fang, John Y; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matthew C; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Michael L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2008-06-15

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Patients usually present with a frontotemporal dementia syndrome and have prominent atrophy and neuronal loss in frontal and temporal cortices and the striatum, with neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic studies are reported on an individual with PGRN mutation and her family members. We describe a patient with a PGRN c.26C>A mutation who presented with progressive stuttering dysarthria, oculomotor abnormalities, choreic buccolingual movements, and mild parkinsonism. Two other family members were affected, one with a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia syndrome, the other with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease. At autopsy there was no neuronal loss in the cortex or medial temporal lobe structures, but there was striatal gliosis. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin and TDP-43 revealed neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as neurites. This study further expands the clinical and pathological spectrum of PGRN mutations, and suggests the diagnosis could be missed in some individuals with atypical presentations.

  9. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  10. Identification of Group B Streptococci Using 16S rRNA, cfb, scpB, and atr Genes in Pregnant Women by PCR.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Mashouf, Rasoul Yousefi; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is acommensalorganism, but it may cause infection in susceptible hosts. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCR assay compared with conventional culture method for direct detection of Streptococcus agalactiae. Total of 203 paired low vaginal swabs were collected from women at 35-37 weeks of pregnancy from June 2013 through February 2014 for detection of Streptococcus agalactiae using PCR assay targeting 16S rRNA, cfb, scpB, and atr genes and culture method following broth enrichment. The results were recorded and evaluated for determining of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of PCR assaycompared with culture method. Prevalence of Streptococcus agalactiae was determined as 7.39% (n=15) using culture method; 19.70% (n=40) by PCR targeting 16S rRNA gene; 18.23% (n=37) by targeting atr gene; 17.24% (n=35) by cfb gene; and 8.87% (n=18) by scpB gene. Generally, a total of 49 specimens were considered true positive (27 samples by PCR assay using the four genes in sum, 4 samples only by atr gene PCR, 3 samples only by cfb gene PCR, 2 samples only by culture method, and 13 samples by PCR assay and culture method in common) and prevalence of Streptococcus agalactiae determined 24.14% in Hamadan. The current data demonstrated that performing only culture method for detecting GBS from pregnant women leads to missed false negative carrier individuals. Thus, it is recommended that both the PCR assay and conventional culture method to be performed in order to detect Streptococcus agalactiae.

  11. Molecular identification of airborne bacteria associated with aerial spraying of bovine slurry waste employing 16S rRNA gene PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Yuki; Maeda, Yasunori; Rao, Juluri R; Matsuda, Motoo; Xu, Jiru; Moore, Peter J A; Millar, B Cherie; Rooney, Paul J; Goldsmith, Colin E; Loughrey, Anne; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Moore, John E

    2010-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the universal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was performed on a collection of 38 bacterial isolates, originating from air sampled immediately adjacent to the agricultural spreading of bovine slurry. A total of 16 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 34/38 (89.5%) of total bacterial numbers consisting of 12 genera and included Staphylococcus (most common genus isolated), Arthrobacter (2nd most common genus isolated), Brachybacterium, Exiguobacterium, Lactococcus, Microbacterium and Sporosarcina (next most common genera isolated) and finally, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Frigoribacterium, Mycoplana and Pseudoclavibacter. Gram-negative organisms accounted for only 4/38 (10.5%) bacterial isolates and included the following genera, Brevundimonas, Lysobacter, Psychrobacter and Rhizobium. No gastrointestinal pathogens were detected. Although this study demonstrated a high diversity of the microorganisms present, only a few have been shown to be opportunistically pathogenic to humans and none of these organisms described have been described previously as having an inhalational route of infection and therefore we do not believe that the species of organisms identified pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompetant individuals.

  12. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  13. Suppression of TGA Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis spoIIR Gene by prfB Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Karow, Margaret L.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Lovett, Paul S.; Piggot, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    An unexpectedly high proportion of TGA nonsense mutations was obtained in a collection of chemically induced mutations in the spoIIR locus of Bacillus subtilis. Of 11 different mutations obtained, TGA mutations were found in four codons, whereas only three codons yielded missense mutations. Six suppressors of the TGA mutations were isolated, and five of the suppressing mutations were mapped to the prfB gene encoding protein release factor 2. These are the first mutations shown to map to the B. subtilis prfB locus. The sequence of the prfB gene was completed, and two revisions of the published sequence were made. The five prfB mutations also resulted in suppression of the catA86-TGA mutation to between 19 and 54% of the expression of catA86+, compared to the readthrough level of 6% in the prfB+ strain. N-terminal sequencing of suppressed catA86-TGA-specified protein demonstrated that the amino acid inserted at UGA because of the prfB1 mutations was tryptophan. PMID:9696765

  14. Application of Stochastic Labeling with Random-Sequence Barcodes for Simultaneous Quantification and Sequencing of Environmental 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Inagaki, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool for analyzing environmental DNA and provides the comprehensive molecular view of microbial communities. For obtaining the copy number of particular sequences in the NGS library, however, additional quantitative analysis as quantitative PCR (qPCR) or digital PCR (dPCR) is required. Furthermore, number of sequences in a sequence library does not always reflect the original copy number of a target gene because of biases caused by PCR amplification, making it difficult to convert the proportion of particular sequences in the NGS library to the copy number using the mass of input DNA. To address this issue, we applied stochastic labeling approach with random-tag sequences and developed a NGS-based quantification protocol, which enables simultaneous sequencing and quantification of the targeted DNA. This quantitative sequencing (qSeq) is initiated from single-primer extension (SPE) using a primer with random tag adjacent to the 5’ end of target-specific sequence. During SPE, each DNA molecule is stochastically labeled with the random tag. Subsequently, first-round PCR is conducted, specifically targeting the SPE product, followed by second-round PCR to index for NGS. The number of random tags is only determined during the SPE step and is therefore not affected by the two rounds of PCR that may introduce amplification biases. In the case of 16S rRNA genes, after NGS sequencing and taxonomic classification, the absolute number of target phylotypes 16S rRNA gene can be estimated by Poisson statistics by counting random tags incorporated at the end of sequence. To test the feasibility of this approach, the 16S rRNA gene of Sulfolobus tokodaii was subjected to qSeq, which resulted in accurate quantification of 5.0 × 103 to 5.0 × 104 copies of the 16S rRNA gene. Furthermore, qSeq was applied to mock microbial communities and environmental samples, and the results were comparable to those obtained using digital PCR and

  15. Cardiac ion channel gene mutations in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Otagiri, Tesshu; Kijima, Kazuki; Osawa, Motoki; Ishii, Kuniaki; Makita, Naomasa; Matoba, Ryoji; Umetsu, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is multifactorial and may result from the interaction of a number of environmental, genetic, and developmental factors. We studied three major genes causing long QT syndrome in 42 Japanese SIDS victims and found five mutations, KCNQ1-K598R, KCNH2-T895M, SCN5A-F532C, SCN5A-G1084S, and SCN5A-F1705S, in four cases; one case had both KCNH2-T895M and SCN5A-G1084S. All mutations were novel except for SCN5A-F532C, which was previously detected in an arrhythmic patient. Heterologous expression study revealed significant changes in channel properties of KCNH2-T895M, SCN5A-G1084S, and SCN5A-F1705S, but did not in KCNQ1-K598R and SCN5A-F532C. Our data suggests that nearly 10% of SIDS victims in Japan have mutations of the cardiac ion channel genes similar to in other countries.

  16. Thyroglobulin gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fu, Chunyun; Fan, Xin; Wang, Jin; Qian, Jiale; Yi, Shang; Li, Chuan; Luo, Jingsi; Su, Jiasun; Zhang, Shujie; Xie, Bobo; Zheng, Haiyang; Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Li, Hongdou; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-03-05

    Mutations in Thyroglobulin (TG) are common genetic causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). But the TG mutation spectrum and its frequency in Chinese CH patients have not been investigated. Here we conducted a genetic screening of TG gene in a cohort of 382 Chinese CH patients. We identified 22 rare non-polymorphic variants including six truncating variants and 16 missense variants of unknown significance (VUS). Seven patients carried homozygous pathogenic variants, and three patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygous VUS. 48 out of 382 patients carried one of 18 heterozygous VUS which is significantly more often than their occurrences in control cohort (P < 0.0001). Unique to Asian population, the c.274+2T>G variant is the most common pathogenic variant with an allele frequency of 0.021. The prevalence of CH due to TG gene defect in Chinese population was estimated to be approximately 1/101,000. Our study uncovered ethnicity specific TG mutation spectrum and frequency.

  17. Melanocortin-4 receptor gene mutations in obese Slovak children.

    PubMed

    Stanikova, D; Surova, M; Ticha, L; Petrasova, M; Virgova, D; Huckova, M; Skopkova, M; Lobotkova, D; Valentinova, L; Mokan, M; Stanik, J; Klimes, I; Gasperikova, D

    2015-01-01

    The most common etiology of non-syndromic monogenic obesity are mutations in gene for the Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC485) with variable prevalence in different countries (1.2-6.3 % of obese children). The aim of our study was 1) to search for MC4R mutations in obese children in Slovakia and compare their prevalence with other European countries, and 2) to describe the phenotype of the mutation carriers. DNA analysis by direct Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and intron/exon boundaries of the MC4R gene was performed in 268 unrelated Slovak children and adolescents with body mass index above the 97(th) percentile for age and sex and obesity onset up to 11 years (mean 4.3+/-2.8 years). Two different previously described heterozygous loss of function MC4R variants (i.e. p.Ser19Alafs*34, p.Ser127Leu) were identified in two obese probands, and one obese (p.Ser19Alafs*34), and one lean (p.Ser127Leu) adult family relatives. No loss of function variants were found in lean controls. The prevalence of loss-of-function MC4R variants in obese Slovak children was 0.7 %, what is one of the lowest frequencies in Europe.

  18. Mutations and a polymorphism in the tuberin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Northup, H.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Au, K.S.; Rodriguez, E.

    1994-09-01

    Two deletions and a polymorphism have been identified in the recently described tuberin gene. The tuberin gene (designated TSC2) when mutated causes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Fifty-three affected individuals (30 from families with multiple affected and 23 isolated cases) were screened with the tuberin cDNA for gross deletions or rearrangements. Both deletions were found in families with multiple affected members (family designations: HOU-5 and HOU-22). The approximate size of the deletion in HOU-5 is ten kilobases and eliminates a BamHI restriction site. The deletion includes a portion of the 5{prime} half of the tuberin cDNA. The deletion in HOU-22 occurs in the 3{prime} half of the gene. The deletions are being further characterized. A HindIII restriction site polymorphism was detected by a 0.5 kilobase probe from the 5{prime} coding region of the tuberin gene in an individual from a family linked to chromosome 9 (posterior probability of linkage 93%). The polymorphism did not segregate with TSC in the family. The family had previously been shown to give negative results with multiple markers on chromosome 16. The polymorphism was also seen in one individual among a panel of 20 randomly selected unaffected individuals. Thirty-five additional affected probands (five from families and 30 isolated cases) are being tested with the tuberin cDNA. Testing for subtle mutations is our panel of 80 affected probands is underway utilizing SSCP. Additional mutations or polymorphisms detected will be reported. The tuberin cDNA was a kind gift of The European Chromosome 16 Tuberous Sclerosis Consortium.

  19. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  20. A novel KRAS gene mutation report in sporadic colorectal cancer, from Northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    While the role of KRAS gene mutations has been widely accepted for predicting responses to anti-EGFR therapy in patients with colorectal cancer, although this study was based on observation of a single case it gives hope that some KRAS gene mutation may have favorable prognosis. More studies are required on patients with similar mutation to validate this finding.

  1. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing reveals shift in patient faecal microbiota during high-dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montassier, Emmanuel; Batard, Eric; Massart, Sébastien; Gastinne, Thomas; Carton, Thomas; Caillon, Jocelyne; Le Fresne, Sophie; Caroff, Nathalie; Hardouin, Jean Benoit; Moreau, Philippe; Potel, Gilles; Le Vacon, Françoise; de La Cochetière, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are a side-effect frequently associated with haematological malignancies due to the intensive cytotoxic treatment given in connection with bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, intestinal microbiota changes during chemotherapy remain poorly described, probably due to the use of culture-based and low-resolution molecular methods in previous studies. The objective of our study was to apply a next generation DNA sequencing technology to analyse chemotherapy-induced changes in faecal microbiota. We included eight patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing one course of BMT conditioning chemotherapy. We collected a prechemotherapy faecal sample, the day before chemotherapy was initiated, and a postchemotherapy sample, collected 1 week after the initiation of chemotherapy. Total DNA was extracted from faecal samples, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography based on amplification of the V6 to V8 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene, and 454-pyrosequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene, using PCR primers targeting the V5 and V6 hypervariable 16S rRNA gene regions were performed. Raw sequence data were screened, trimmed, and filtered using the QIIME pipeline. We observed a steep reduction in alpha diversity and significant differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in response to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was associated with a drastic drop in Faecalibacterium and accompanied by an increase of Escherichia. The chemotherapy-induced shift in the intestinal microbiota could induce severe side effects in immunocompromised cancer patients. Our study is a first step in identifying patients at risk for gastrointestinal disturbances and to promote strategies to prevent this drastic shift in intestinal microbiota.

  2. Characterization of attached bacterial populations in deep granitic groundwater from the Stripa research mine by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ekendahl, S; Arlinger, J; Ståhl, F; Pedersen, K

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the molecular characterization of attached bacterial populations growing in slowly flowing artesian groundwater from deep crystalline bed-rock of the Stripa mine, south central Sweden. Bacteria grew on glass slides in laminar flow reactors connected to the anoxic groundwater flowing up through tubing from two levels of a borehole, 812-820 m and 970-1240 m. The glass slides were collected, the bacterial DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR using primers matching universally conserved positions 519-536 and 1392-1405. The resulting PCR fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. The sequences were compared with each other and with 16S rRNA gene sequences in the EMBL database. Three major groups of bacteria were found. Signature bases placed the clones in the appropriate systematic groups. All belonged to the proteobacterial groups beta and gamma. One group was found only at the 812-820 m level, where it constituted 63% of the sequenced clones, whereas the second group existed almost exclusively at the 970-1240 m level, where it constituted 83% of the sequenced clones. The third group was equally distributed between the levels. A few other bacteria were also found. None of the 16S rRNA genes from the dominant bacteria showed more than 88% similarity to any of the others, and none of them resembled anything in the database by more than 96%. Temperature did not seem to have any effect on species composition at the deeper level. SEM images showed rods appearing in microcolonies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The genetic diversity of genus Bacillus and the related genera revealed by 16s rRNA gene sequences and ardra analyses isolated from geothermal regions of turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Arzu Coleri; Tekin, Nilgun; Ozcan, Birgul; Cokmus, Cumhur

    2012-01-01

    Previously isolated 115 endospore-forming bacilli were basically grouped according to their temperature requirements for growth: the thermophiles (74%), the facultative thermophiles (14%) and the mesophiles (12%). These isolates were taken into 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, and they were clustered among the 7 genera: Anoxybacillus, Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Thermoactinomycetes. Of these bacilli, only the thirty two isolates belonging to genera Bacillus (16), Brevibacillus (13), Paenibacillus (1) and Thermoactinomycetes (2) were selected and presented in this paper. The comparative sequence analyses revealed that the similarity values were ranged as 91.4–100 %, 91.8- 99.2 %, 92.6- 99.8 % and 90.7 - 99.8 % between the isolates and the related type strains from these four genera, respectively. Twenty nine of them were found to be related with the validly published type strains. The most abundant species was B. thermoruber with 9 isolates followed by B. pumilus (6), B. lichenformis (3), B. subtilis (3), B. agri (3), B. smithii (2), T. vulgaris (2) and finally P. barengoltzii (1). In addition, isolates of A391a, B51a and D295 were proposed as novel species as their 16S rRNA gene sequences displayed similarities ≤ 97% to their closely related type strains. The AluI-, HaeIII- and TaqI-ARDRA results were in congruence with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The ARDRA results allowed us to differentiate these isolates, and their discriminative restriction fragments were able to be determined. Some of their phenotypic characters and their amylase, chitinase and protease production were also studied and biotechnologically valuable enzyme producing isolates were introduced in order to use in further studies. PMID:24031834

  4. Monitoring Bacterial Communities in Raw Milk and Cheese by Culture-Dependent and -Independent 16S rRNA Gene-Based Analyses▿

    PubMed Central

    Delbès, Céline; Ali-Mandjee, Leila; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2007-01-01

    The diversity and dynamics of bacterial populations in Saint-Nectaire, a raw-milk, semihard cheese, were investigated using a dual culture-dependent and direct molecular approach combining single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprinting and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The dominant clones, among 125 16S rRNA genes isolated from milk, belonged to members of the Firmicutes (58% of the total clones) affiliated mainly with the orders Clostridiales and the Lactobacillales, followed by the phyla Proteobacteria (21.6%), Actinobacteria (16.8%), and Bacteroidetes (4%). Sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of 126 milk isolates collected from four culture media revealed the presence of 36 different species showing a wider diversity in the Gammaproteobacteria phylum and Staphylococcus genus than that found among clones. In cheese, a total of 21 species were obtained from 170 isolates, with dominant species belonging to the Lactobacillales and subdominant species affiliated with the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes (Chryseobacterium sp.), or Gammaproteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas sp.). Fingerprinting DNA isolated from milk by SSCP analysis yielded complex patterns, whereas analyzing DNA isolated from cheese resulted in patterns composed of a single peak which corresponded to that of lactic acid bacteria. SSCP fingerprinting of mixtures of all colonies harvested from plate count agar supplemented with crystal violet and vancomycin showed good potential for monitoring the subdominant Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria) organisms in milk and cheese. Likewise, analyzing culturable subcommunities from cheese-ripening bacterial medium permitted assessment of the diversity of halotolerant Actinobacteria and Staphylococcus organisms. Direct and culture-dependent approaches produced complementary information, thus generating a more accurate view of milk and cheese microbial ecology. PMID:17259356

  5. Characterization of nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marcia Reed Rodrigues; von der Weid, Irene; Zahner, Viviane; Seldin, Lucy

    2003-05-28

    Forty-two strains representing the eight recognized nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species and 12 non-identified strains were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of part of 16S and 23S rRNA genes amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven different 16S rDNA genotypes were obtained from the combined data of RFLP analysis with four endonucleases and they were in agreement with the established taxonomic classification. Only one group of unclassified strains (Group I) was assigned in a separate genotype, suggesting they belong to a new species. Using the 23S PCR-RFLP method only six genotypes were detected, showing that this method is less discriminative than the 16S PCR-RFLP. Using the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) assay, the 48 strains tested could be classified into 35 zymovars. The seven enzymatic loci tested were polymorphic and the different profiles obtained among strains allowed the grouping of strains into 10 clusters. The PCR-RFLP methods together with the MLEE assay provide a rapid tool for the characterization and the establishment of the taxonomic position of isolates belonging to this nitrogen-fixing group, which shows a great potentiality in promoting plant growth.

  6. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in the Indian Ocean as Revealed by Analyses of 16S rRNA and nasA Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles. However, research on the bacterial community structure of the Indian Ocean is scarce, particularly within the vertical dimension. In this study, we investigated the bacterial diversity of the pelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones of the southwestern Indian Ocean (50.46°E, 37.71°S). The clone libraries constructed by 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that most phylotypes retrieved from the Indian Ocean were highly divergent from those retrieved from other oceans. Vertical differences were observed based on the analysis of natural bacterial community populations derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Based on the analysis of the nasA gene sequences from GenBank database, a pair of general primers was developed and used to amplify the bacterial nitrate-assimilating populations. Environmental factors play an important role in mediating the bacterial communities in the Indian Ocean revealed by canonical correlation analysis.

  7. Comparison of plastid 16S rRNA (rrn16) genes from Helicosporidium spp.: evidence supporting the reclassification of Helicosporidia as green algae (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Tartar, Aurélien; Boucias, Drion G; Becnel, James J; Adams, Byron J

    2003-11-01

    The Helicosporidia are invertebrate pathogens that have recently been identified as non-photosynthetic green algae (Chlorophyta). In order to confirm the algal nature of the genus Helicosporidium, the presence of a retained chloroplast genome in Helicosporidia cells was investigated. Fragments homologous to plastid 16S rRNA (rrn16) genes were amplified successfully from cellular DNA extracted from two different Helicosporidium isolates. The fragment sequences are 1269 and 1266 bp long, are very AT-rich (60.7 %) and are similar to homologous genes sequenced from non-photosynthetic green algae. Maximum-parsimony, maximum-likelihood and neighbour-joining methods were used to infer phylogenetic trees from an rrn16 sequence alignment. All trees depicted the Helicosporidia as sister taxa to the non-photosynthetic, pathogenic alga Prototheca zopfii. Moreover, the trees identified Helicosporidium spp. as members of a clade that included the heterotrophic species Prototheca spp. and the mesotrophic species Chlorella protothecoides. The clade is always strongly supported by bootstrap values, suggesting that all these organisms share a most recent common ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from plastid 16S rRNA genes confirmed that the Helicosporidia are non-photosynthetic green algae, close relatives of the genus Prototheca (Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae). Such phylogenetic affinities suggest that Helicosporidium spp. are likely to possess Prototheca-like organelles and organelle genomes.

  8. Bacterial diversity in a finished compost and vermicompost: differences revealed by cultivation-independent analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Letizia; Dohrmann, Anja B; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial communities are important catalysts in the production of composts. Here, it was analysed whether the diversity of bacteria in finished composts is stable and specific for the production process. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) based on polymerase chain reaction amplified partial 16S rRNA genes was used to profile and analyse bacterial communities found in total DNA extracted from finished composts. Different batches of compost samples stored over a period of 12 years and a 1-year-old vermicompost were compared to each other. According to digital image analysis, clear differences could be detected between the profiles from compost and vermicompost. Differences between three different periods of compost storage and between replicate vermicompost windrows were only minor. A total of 41 different 16S rRNA genes were identified from the SSCP profiles by DNA sequencing, with the vast majority related to yet-uncultivated bacteria. Sequences retrieved from compost mainly belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. In contrast, vermicompost was dominated by bacteria related to uncultured Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes. The differences were underscored with specific gene probes and Southern blot hybridizations. The results confirmed that different substrates and composting processes selected for specific bacterial communities in the finished products. The specificity and consistency of the bacterial communities inhabiting the compost materials suggest that cultivation-independent bacterial community analysis is a potentially useful indicator to characterize the quality of finished composts in regard to production processes and effects of storage conditions.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida (Phylum Porifera) employing ribosomal (28S rRNA) and mitochondrial (cox1, nad1) gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Niamh E; Raleigh, Jean; van Soest, Rob W M; Kelly, Michelle; Travers, Simon A A; Bradshaw, Brian; Vartia, Salla; Stephens, Kelly M; McCormack, Grace P

    2011-01-01

    The systematics of the poriferan Order Haplosclerida (Class Demospongiae) has been under scrutiny for a number of years without resolution. Molecular data suggests that the order needs revision at all taxonomic levels. Here, we provide a comprehensive view of the phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida using many species from across the order, and three gene regions. Gene trees generated using 28S rRNA, nad1 and cox1 gene data, under maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, are highly congruent and suggest the presence of four clades. Clade A is comprised primarily of species of Haliclona and Callyspongia, and clade B is comprised of H. simulans and H. vansoesti (Family Chalinidae), Amphimedon queenslandica (Family Niphatidae) and Tabulocalyx (Family Phloeodictyidae), Clade C is comprised primarily of members of the Families Petrosiidae and Niphatidae, while Clade D is comprised of Aka species. The polyphletic nature of the suborders, families and genera described in other studies is also found here.

  10. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  11. Diaphanous gene mutation affects spiral cleavage and chirality in snails

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Reiko; Fujikura, Kohei; Abe, Masanori; Hosoiri, Yuji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Miho; Umeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Futaba; Takahashi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    L-R (left and right) symmetry breaking during embryogenesis and the establishment of asymmetric body plan are key issues in developmental biology, but the onset including the handedness-determining gene locus still remains unknown. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness-determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identified the actin-related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the strongest candidate. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the tandemly duplicated Lsdia1 and Lsdia2 genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. The Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a frameshift mutation that abrogates full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases after the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout. The evolutionary relationships among body handedness, SD/SI (spiral deformation/spindle inclination) at the third cleavage, and expression of diaphanous proteins are discussed in comparison with three other pond snails (L. peregra, Physa acuta and Indoplanorbis exustus). PMID:27708420

  12. Genetic epidemiology of muscular dystrophies resulting from sarcoglycan gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fanin, M; Duggan, D J; Mostacciuolo, M L; Martinello, F; Freda, M P; Sorarù, G; Trevisan, C P; Hoffman, E P; Angelini, C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of genetically heterogeneous muscle diseases characterised by progressive proximal limb muscle weakness. Six different loci have been mapped and pathogenetic mutations in the genes encoding the sarcoglycan complex components (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-sarcoglycan) have been documented. LGMD patients affected with primary "sarcoglycanopathies" are classified as LGMD2D, 2E, 2C, and 2F, respectively. METHODS: A geographical area in north east Italy (2,319,147 inhabitants) was selected for a genetic epidemiological study on primary sarcoglycanopathies. Within the period 1982 to 1996, all patients living in this region and diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were seen at our centre. Immunohistochemical and immunoblot screening for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency was performed on all muscle biopsies from patients with a progressive muscular dystrophy of unknown aetiology and normal dystrophin. Sarcoglycan mutation analyses were conducted on all patient muscle biopsies shown to have complete or partial absence of alpha-sarcoglycan immunostaining or a decreased quantity of alpha-sarcoglycan protein on immunoblotting. RESULTS: Two hundred and four patient muscle biopsies were screened for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency and 18 biopsies showed a deficiency. Pathogenetic mutations involving one gene for sarcoglycan complex components were identified in 13 patients: alpha-sarcoglycan in seven, beta-sarcoglycan in two, gamma-sarcoglycan in four, and none in the delta-sarcoglycan gene. The overall prevalence of primary sarcoglycanopathies, as of 31 December 1996, was estimated to be 5.6 x 10(-6) inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate estimated in this study is the first to be obtained after biochemical and molecular genetic screening for sarcoglycan defects. PMID:9429136

  13. [Identification of new conserved and variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene of acetic acid bacteria and acetobacteraceae family].

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, S; Sarkar, S; Gachhui, R

    2015-01-01

    The Acetobacteraceae family of the class Alpha Proteobacteria is comprised of high sugar and acid tolerant bacteria. The Acetic Acid Bacteria are the economically most significant group of this family because of its association with food products like vinegar, wine etc. Acetobacteraceae are often hard to culture in laboratory conditions and they also maintain very low abundances in their natural habitats. Thus identification of the organisms in such environments is greatly dependent on modern tools of molecular biology which require a thorough knowledge of specific conserved gene sequences that may act as primers and or probes. Moreover unconserved domains in genes also become markers for differentiating closely related genera. In bacteria, the 16S rRNA gene is an ideal candidate for such conserved and variable domains. In order to study the conserved and variable domains of the 16S rRNA gene of Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Acetobacteraceae family, sequences from publicly available databases were aligned and compared. Near complete sequences of the gene were also obtained from Kombucha tea biofilm, a known Acetobacteraceae family habitat, in order to corroborate the domains obtained from the alignment studies. The study indicated that the degree of conservation in the gene is significantly higher among the Acetic Acid Bacteria than the whole Acetobacteraceae family. Moreover it was also observed that the previously described hypervariable regions V1, V3, V5, V6 and V7 were more or less conserved in the family and the spans of the variable regions are quite distinct as well.

  14. Comparison of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK2 system for identification of Acinetobacter clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jung; Jang, Sook Jin; Li, Xue Min; Park, Geon; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Min Jung; Chang, Young-Hyo; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Moon, Dae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Since accurate identification of species is necessary for proper treatment of Acinetobacter infections, we compared the performances of 4 bacterial identification methods using 167 Acinetobacter clinical isolates to identify the best identification method. To secure more non-baumannii Acinetobacter (NBA) strains as target strains, we first identified Acinetobacter baumannii in a total of 495 Acinetobacter clinical isolates identified using the VITEK 2 system. Because 371 of 495 strains were identified as A. baumannii using gyrB multiplex 1 PCR and blaOXA51-like PCR, we performed rpoB gene sequencing and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on remaining 124 strains belonging to NBA and 52 strains of A. baumannii. For identification of Acinetobacter at the species level, the accuracy rates of rpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, gyrB multiplex PCR, and the VITEK 2 were 98.2%, 93.4%, 77.2%, and 35.9%, respectively. The gyrB multiplex PCR seems to be very useful for the detection of ACB complex because its concordance rates to the final identification of strains of ACB complex were 100%. Both the rpoB gene sequencing and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be useful in identifying Acinetobacter.

  15. Monogenic forms of childhood obesity due to mutations in the leptin gene.

    PubMed

    Funcke, Jan-Bernd; von Schnurbein, Julia; Lennerz, Belinda; Lahr, Georgia; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Congenital leptin deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive monogenic obesity syndrome caused by mutations in the leptin gene. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of the eight distinct mutations found so far in humans.

  16. Novel germline mutations in the calreticulin gene: implications for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Szuber, Natasha; Lamontagne, Bruno; Busque, Lambert

    2016-07-27

    Mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are found in the majority of Janus kinase 2-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms MPN and, thus far, have exclusively been reported as acquired, somatic mutations. We assessed the mutational status of exon 9 of the CALR gene in 2000 blood samples submitted to our centre and identified 12 subjects (0.6%) harbouring distinctive CALR mutations, all with an allelic frequency of 50% and all involving indels occurring as multiples of 3 bp. Buccal cell samples obtained from these patients confirmed the germline nature of the mutations. Importantly, these germline mutations were not diagnostic of MPN. We thus report for the first time the identification and confirmation of germline mutations in CALR distinct from those somatic mutations that define classical MPN. The finding of a non-standard CALR mutation with an allelic frequency of 50% should raise suspicion of the possibility of a germline CALR mutation and these cases investigated further.

  17. Leptospira spp. strain identification by MALDI TOF MS is an equivalent tool to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multi locus sequence typing (MLST)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study mass spectrometry was used for evaluating extracted leptospiral protein samples and results were compared with molecular typing methods. For this, an extraction protocol for Leptospira spp. was independently established in two separate laboratories. Reference spectra were created with 28 leptospiral strains, including pathogenic, non-pathogenic and intermediate strains. This set of spectra was then evaluated on the basis of measurements with well-defined, cultured leptospiral strains and with 16 field isolates of veterinary or human origin. To verify discriminating peaks for the applied pathogenic strains, statistical analysis of the protein spectra was performed using the software tool ClinProTools. In addition, a dendrogram of the reference spectra was compared with phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Results Defined and reproducible protein spectra using MALDI-TOF MS were obtained for all leptospiral strains. Evaluation of the newly-built reference spectra database allowed reproducible identification at the species level for the defined leptospiral strains and the field isolates. Statistical analysis of three pathogenic genomospecies revealed peak differences at the species level and for certain serovars analyzed in this study. Specific peak patterns were reproducibly detected for the serovars Tarassovi, Saxkoebing, Pomona, Copenhageni, Australis, Icterohaemorrhagiae and Grippotyphosa. Analysis of the dendrograms of the MLST data, the 16S rRNA sequencing, and the MALDI-TOF MS reference spectra showed comparable clustering. Conclusions MALDI-TOF MS analysis is a fast and reliable method for species identification, although Leptospira organisms need to be produced in a time-consuming culture process. All leptospiral strains were identified, at least at the species level, using our described extraction protocol. Statistical analysis of the three genomospecies L. borgpetersenii

  18. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  19. Mutation-associated fusion cancer genes in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Frederic J

    2009-06-01

    Chromosomal translocations and fusion oncogenes serve as the ultimate biomarker for clinicians as they show specificity for distinct histopathologic malignancies while simultaneously encoding an etiologic mutation and a therapeutic target. Previously considered a minor mutational event in epithelial solid tumors, new methodologies that do not rely on the detection of macroscopic cytogenetic alterations, as well as access to large series of annotated clinical material, are expanding the inventory of recurrent fusion oncogenes in both common and rare solid epithelial tumors. Unexpectedly, related assays are also revealing a high number of tandem or chimeric transcripts in normal tissues including, in one provocative case, a template for a known fusion oncogene. These observations may force us to reassess long-held views on the definition of a gene. They also raise the possibility that some rearrangements might represent constitutive forms of a physiological chimeric transcript. Defining the chimeric transcriptome in both health (transcription-induced chimerism and intergenic splicing) and disease (mutation-associated fusion oncogenes) will play an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of patients with cancer.

  20. Design and Evaluation of Illumina MiSeq-Compatible, 18S rRNA Gene-Specific Primers for Improved Characterization of Mixed Phototrophic Communities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of high-throughput sequencing technologies with the 16S rRNA gene for characterization of bacterial and archaeal communities has become routine. However, the adoption of sequencing methods for eukaryotes has been slow, despite their significance to natural and engineered systems. There are large variations among the target genes used for amplicon sequencing, and for the 18S rRNA gene, there is no consensus on which hypervariable region provides the most suitable representation of diversity. Additionally, it is unclear how much PCR/sequencing bias affects the depiction of community structure using current primers. The present study amplified the V4 and V8-V9 regions from seven microalgal mock communities as well as eukaryotic communities from freshwater, coastal, and wastewater samples to examine the effect of PCR/sequencing bias on community structure and membership. We found that degeneracies on the 3′ end of the current V4-specific primers impact read length and mean relative abundance. Furthermore, the PCR/sequencing error is markedly higher for GC-rich members than for communities with balanced GC content. Importantly, the V4 region failed to reliably capture 2 of the 12 mock community members, and the V8-V9 hypervariable region more accurately represents mean relative abundance and alpha and beta diversity. Overall, the V4 and V8-V9 regions show similar community representations over freshwater, coastal, and wastewater environments, but specific samples show markedly different communities. These results indicate that multiple primer sets may be advantageous for gaining a more complete understanding of community structure and highlight the importance of including mock communities composed of species of interest. IMPORTANCE The quantification of error associated with community representation by amplicon sequencing is a critical challenge that is often ignored. When target genes are amplified using currently available primers, differential

  1. Differential gene expression in Neurospora crassa cell types: heterogeneity and amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1980-1981 year of the current research program are as follows: I. Studies on heterogeneity of multiple copies of rDNAs from N. crassa cell types are being continued, such as: (1) Autoradiographs of Southern transfers of EcoR/sub 1/ restricted fragments of nuclear DNA from conidia, germinated conidia (sprouts) and mycelia of N. crassa were compared after hybridization with /sup 32/P-rDNA probe. The nuclear DNA of two hours sprout and of 16 hours mycelia gave similar hybridization patterns with EcoR/sub 1/ digest, but no such hybridization pattern was evident in conidial DNA digest; (2) Procedure for concentration of rDNAs from Neurospora species and cell types was standardized; restriction analysis of purified rDNAs is being done; (3) 35S total rDNA clone, 17S rDNA clone and 26S rDNA subclone are being used to see gross differences in the precursor rRNAs of different cell types; (4) Comparison of DNA:DNA homologies of rRNA genes with different Neurospora species. II. Post-mitochondrial DNAs of N. crassa are found to be rDNA-like and were further characterized by electron microscopic studies and are found to be approximately twice the size of SV-40 DNAs. These N. crassa post-mitochondrial DNAs hybridized with /sup 32/P-labeled N. crassa nuclear DNAs. III. Previous studies on differential RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity in N. Crassa cell types and on evolution of sexual morphogenesis in the genus Neurospora are completed and published. RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity is found to be in the post-mitochondrial fraction. Heterothallism in the genus Neurospora is evolved from homothallism.

  2. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Assessment of fecal pollution sources in a small northern-plains watershed using PCR and phylogenetic analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamendella, R.; Domingo, J.W.S.; Oerther, D.B.; Vogel, J.R.; Stoeckel, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, sensitivity, host-specificity, and spatial/temporal dynamics of human- and ruminant-specific 16S rRNA gene Bacteroidetes markers used to assess the sources of fecal pollution in a fecally impacted watershed. Phylogenetic analyses of 1271 fecal and environmental 16S rRNA gene clones were also performed to study the diversity of Bacteroidetes in this watershed. The host-specific assays indicated that ruminant feces were present in 28-54% of the water samples and in all sampling seasons, with increasing frequency in downstream sites. The human-targeted assays indicated that only 3-5% of the water samples were positive for human fecal signals, although a higher percentage of human-associated signals (19-24%) were detected in sediment samples. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 57% of all water clones clustered with yet-to-be-cultured Bacteroidetes species associated with sequences obtained from ruminant feces, further supporting the prevalence of ruminant contamination in this watershed. However, since several clusters contained sequences from multiple sources, future studies need to consider the potential cosmopolitan nature of these bacterial populations when assessing fecal pollution sources using Bacteroidetes markers. Moreover, additional data is needed in order to understand the distribution of Bacteroidetes host-specific markers and their relationship to water quality regulatory standards. ?? 2006 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3–V4 and the other targeting the V4–V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results. PMID:28260999

  5. 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing, Multilocus Sequence Analysis, and Mass Spectrometry Identification of the Proposed New Species “Clostridium neonatale”

    PubMed Central

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ferraris, Laurent; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Butel, Marie Jose

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, an outbreak of necrotizing enterocolitis in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit was associated with a proposed novel species of Clostridium, “Clostridium neonatale.” To date, there are no data about the isolation, identification, or clinical significance of this species. Additionally, C. neonatale has not been formally classified as a new species, rendering its identification challenging. Indeed, the C. neonatale 16S rRNA gene sequence shows high similarity to another Clostridium species involved in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, Clostridium butyricum. By performing a polyphasic study combining phylogenetic analysis (16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analysis) and phenotypic characterization with mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that C. neonatale is a new species within the Clostridium genus sensu stricto, for which we propose the name Clostridium neonatale sp. nov. Now that the status of C. neonatale has been clarified, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) can be used for better differential identification of C. neonatale and C. butyricum clinical isolates. This is necessary to precisely define the role and clinical significance of C. neonatale, a species that may have been misidentif