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Sample records for rt env shiv

  1. MZC Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in Macaque Vaginal Mucosa and SHIV-RT in Rectal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Giulia; Villegas, Guillermo; Barnable, Patrick; Litterst, Claudia; Levendosky, Keith; Gettie, Agegnehu; Cooney, Michael L; Blanchard, James; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    The Population Council's microbicide gel MZC (also known as PC-1005) containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) has shown promise as a broad-spectrum microbicide against HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human papillomavirus. Previous data show antiviral activity against these viruses in cell-based assays, prevention of vaginal and rectal simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection, and reduction of vaginal HSV shedding in rhesus macaques and also excellent antiviral activity against HSV and human papillomavirus in murine models. Recently, we demonstrated that MZC is safe and effective against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. Here we established models of ex vivo SHIV-RT/HSV-2 coinfection of vaginal mucosa and SHIV-RT infection of rectal mucosa in macaques (challenge of rectal mucosa with HSV-2 did not result in reproducible tissue infection), evaluated antiviral activity of MZC, and compared quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay readouts for monitoring SHIV-RT infection. MZC (at nontoxic dilutions) significantly inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal and rectal mucosas and HSV-2 in vaginal mucosa when present during viral challenge. Analysis of SHIV-RT infection and MZC activity by 1-step simian immunodeficiency virus gag quantitative RT-PCR and p27 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated similar virus growth dynamics and MZC activity by both methods and higher sensitivity of quantitative RT-PCR. Our data provide more evidence that MZC is a promising dual compartment multipurpose prevention technology candidate.

  2. Production of Mucosally Transmissible SHIV Challenge Stocks from HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 01_AE env Sequences.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Chang, Hui-Wen; Lee, Benjamin C; Abbink, Peter; Ng'ang'a, David; Boyd, Michael; Lavine, Christy L; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Whitney, James B; Seaman, Michael S; Rolland, Morgane; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks are critical for preclinical testing of vaccines, antibodies, and other interventions aimed to prevent HIV-1. A major unmet need for the field has been the lack of a SHIV challenge stock expressing circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE) env sequences. We therefore sought to develop mucosally transmissible SHIV challenge stocks containing HIV-1 CRF01_AE env derived from acutely HIV-1 infected individuals from Thailand. SHIV-AE6, SHIV-AE6RM, and SHIV-AE16 contained env sequences that were >99% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging. These viruses exhibited CCR5 tropism and displayed a tier 2 neutralization phenotype. These challenge stocks efficiently infected rhesus monkeys by the intrarectal route, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic viremia in a subset of animals. SHIV-AE16 was titrated for use in single, high dose as well as repetitive, low dose intrarectal challenge studies. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and other interventions targeted at preventing HIV-1 CRF01_AE infection.

  3. A MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT Infection in Macaque Vaginal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Barnable, Patrick; Calenda, Giulia; Ouattara, Louise; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Abraham, Ciby; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Cooney, Michael L.; Roberts, Kevin D.; Sperling, Rhoda; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernandez-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    To extend our observations that single or repeated application of a gel containing the NNRTI MIV-150 (M) and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) (MZC) inhibits vaginal transmission of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT in macaques, we evaluated safety and anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZC and related gel formulations ex vivo in macaque mucosal explants. In addition, safety was further evaluated in human ectocervical explants. The gels did not induce mucosal toxicity. A single ex vivo exposure to diluted MZC (1∶30, 1∶100) and MC (1∶30, the only dilution tested), but not to ZC gel, up to 4 days prior to viral challenge, significantly inhibited SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal mucosa. MZC's activity was not affected by seminal plasma. The antiviral activity of unformulated MIV-150 was not enhanced in the presence of ZA, suggesting that the antiviral activity of MZC was mediated predominantly by MIV-150. In vivo administration of MZC and CG significantly inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection (51–62% inhibition relative to baselines) of vaginal (but not cervical) mucosa collected 24 h post last gel exposure, indicating barrier effect of CG. Although the inhibitory effect of MZC (65–74%) did not significantly differ from CG (32–45%), it was within the range of protection (∼75%) against vaginal SHIV-RT challenge 24 h after gel dosing. Overall, the data suggest that evaluation of candidate microbicides in macaque explants can inform macaque efficacy and clinical studies design. The data support advancing MZC gel for clinical evaluation. PMID:25259616

  4. Topical nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor MC 1220 partially prevents vaginal RT-SHIV infection of macaques.

    PubMed

    Stolte-Leeb, Nicole; Loddo, Roberta; Antimisiaris, Sophia; Schultheiss, Tina; Sauermann, Ulrike; Franz, Monika; Mourtas, Spyridon; Parsy, Christophe; Storer, Richard; La Colla, Paolo; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2011-09-01

    The availability of an effective vaginal microbicide would be a major step toward containment of HIV transmission as well as allowing women self-protection against HIV infection. Here we evaluated the efficacy of vaginal application of the potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MC 1220 against vaginal challenge of macaques with RT-SHIV, a chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) containing the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV-1. Challenge infection of monkeys with RT-SHIV currently represents the only nonhuman primate model available to test the anti-HIV-1 effects of NNRTIs. Two different gel formulations containing different MC 1220 concentrations were evaluated for efficacy in female rhesus macaques exposed to RT-SHIV. Five groups of five animals each were treated with two different gel compositions containing no drug, 0.1% or 0.5% MC 1220, followed by vaginal RT-SHIV challenge 30 min later. One animal in each group treated with the low concentration of MC 1220 as well as one control animal remained uninfected after vaginal challenge. By contrast, three of the animals receiving 0.5% MC 1220 remained uninfected, suggesting a threshold of the drug. Despite being negative for plasma viral RNA and absence of seroconversion, almost all uninfected animals exhibited SIV-specific T cells, either in the periphery or in lymph nodes draining the portal of virus entry. Our results make MC 1220 a promising compound for further development as a topical microbicide and warrant additional testing with improved formulation, long-lasting vaginal delivery systems, or even combinations with other inhibitors.

  5. A potent combination microbicide that targets SHIV-RT, HSV-2 and HPV.

    PubMed

    Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Mizenina, Olga; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Zhang, Shimin; Levendosky, Keith; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Pugach, Pavel; Villegas, Guillermo; Ford, Brian E; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Paglini, Gabriela; Teleshova, Natalia; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A

    2014-01-01

    Prevalent infection with human herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2) or human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Microbicides that target HIV as well as these sexually transmitted infections (STIs) may more effectively limit HIV incidence. Previously, we showed that a microbicide gel (MZC) containing MIV-150, zinc acetate (ZA) and carrageenan (CG) protected macaques against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-RT) infection and that a ZC gel protected mice against HSV-2 infection. Here we evaluated a modified MZC gel (containing different buffers, co-solvents, and preservatives suitable for clinical testing) against both vaginal and rectal challenge of animals with SHIV-RT, HSV-2 or HPV. MZC was stable and safe in vitro (cell viability and monolayer integrity) and in vivo (histology). MZC protected macaques against vaginal (p<0.0001) SHIV-RT infection when applied up to 8 hours (h) prior to challenge. When used close to the time of challenge, MZC prevented rectal SHIV-RT infection of macaques similar to the CG control. MZC significantly reduced vaginal (p<0.0001) and anorectal (p = 0.0187) infection of mice when 10(6) pfu HSV-2 were applied immediately after vaginal challenge and also when 5×10(3) pfu were applied between 8 h before and 4 h after vaginal challenge (p<0.0248). Protection of mice against 8×10(6) HPV16 pseudovirus particles (HPV16 PsV) was significant for MZC applied up to 24 h before and 2 h after vaginal challenge (p<0.0001) and also if applied 2 h before or after anorectal challenge (p<0.0006). MZC provides a durable window of protection against vaginal infection with these three viruses and, against HSV-2 and HPV making it an excellent candidate microbicide for clinical use.

  6. MIV-150-containing intravaginal rings protect macaque vaginal explants against SHIV-RT infection.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Louise A; Barnable, Patrick; Mawson, Paul; Seidor, Samantha; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Fernández-Romero, José A; Cooney, Michael L; Roberts, Kevin D; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that intravaginal rings (IVRs) containing 100 mg of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 significantly protect macaques against a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus that expresses the HIV-1 HxB2 reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) when present before and after vaginal challenge. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the pharmacodynamics (PD) of MIV-150 in vaginal fluids (VF) and in ectocervical and vaginal tissues following 100-mg MIV-150 IVR exposure and to (ii) gain more insight whether pharmacokinetics (PK) of MIV-150 can predict PD. MIV-150 in VF collected at 1 day and 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection in vaginal biopsy specimens from untreated animals (not carrying IVRs) in a dose-dependent manner. Previous PK studies demonstrated a significant increase of ectocervical and vaginal tissue MIV-150 concentrations 14 days versus 1 day post-IVR insertion, with the highest increase in vaginal tissue. Therefore, we tested PD of MIV-150 in tissues 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion. Ex vivo SHIV-RT infection of vaginal, but not ectocervical, tissues collected 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion was significantly inhibited compared to infection at the baseline (prior to MIV-150 IVR exposure). No changes in vaginal and ectocervical tissue infection were observed after placebo IVR exposure. Overall, these data underscore the use of the ex vivo macaque explant challenge models to evaluate tissue and VF PK/PD of candidate microbicides before in vivo animal efficacy studies. The data support further development of MIV-150-containing IVRs.

  7. A Novel Microbicide/Contraceptive Intravaginal Ring Protects Macaque Genital Mucosa against SHIV-RT Infection Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Ugaonkar, Shweta; Zhang, Shimin; Kizima, Larisa; Mizenina, Olga; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Cooney, Michael L; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Women need multipurpose prevention products (MPTs) that protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and provide contraception. The Population Council has developed a prototype intravaginal ring (IVR) releasing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 (M), zinc acetate (ZA), carrageenan (CG) and levonorgestrel (LNG) (MZCL IVR) to protect against HIV, HSV-2, HPV and unintended pregnancy. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZCL IVR in genital mucosa. First, macaque vaginal tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT in the presence of (i) MIV-150 ± LNG or (ii) vaginal fluids (VF); available from studies completed earlier) collected at various time points post insertion of MZCL and MZC IVRs. Then, (iii) MZCL IVRs (vs. LNG IVRs) were inserted in non-Depo Provera-treated macaques for 24h and VF, genital biopsies, and blood were collected and tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT. Infection was monitored with one step SIV gag qRT-PCR or p27 ELISA. MIV-150 (LCMS/MS, RIA), LNG (RIA) and CG (ELISA) were measured in different compartments. Log-normal generalized mixed linear models were used for analysis. LNG did not affect the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MIV-150 in vitro. MIV-150 in VF from MZC/MZCL IVR-treated macaques inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal mucosa in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). MIV-150 in vaginal tissue from MZCL IVR-treated animals inhibited ex vivo infection relative to baseline (96%; p<0.0001) and post LNG IVR group (90%, p<0.001). No MIV-150 dose-dependent protection was observed, likely because of high MIV-150 concentrations in all vaginal tissue samples. In cervical tissue, MIV-150 inhibited infection vs. baseline (99%; p<0.05). No cervical tissue was available for MIV-150 measurement. Exposure to LNG IVR did not change tissue infection level. These observations support further development of MZCL IVR as a multipurpose prevention technology to improve women's sexual and reproductive health.

  8. A Novel Microbicide/Contraceptive Intravaginal Ring Protects Macaque Genital Mucosa against SHIV-RT Infection Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ugaonkar, Shweta; Zhang, Shimin; Kizima, Larisa; Mizenina, Olga; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Cooney, Michael L.; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Teleshova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Women need multipurpose prevention products (MPTs) that protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and provide contraception. The Population Council has developed a prototype intravaginal ring (IVR) releasing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 (M), zinc acetate (ZA), carrageenan (CG) and levonorgestrel (LNG) (MZCL IVR) to protect against HIV, HSV-2, HPV and unintended pregnancy. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZCL IVR in genital mucosa. First, macaque vaginal tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT in the presence of (i) MIV-150 ± LNG or (ii) vaginal fluids (VF); available from studies completed earlier) collected at various time points post insertion of MZCL and MZC IVRs. Then, (iii) MZCL IVRs (vs. LNG IVRs) were inserted in non-Depo Provera-treated macaques for 24h and VF, genital biopsies, and blood were collected and tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT. Infection was monitored with one step SIV gag qRT-PCR or p27 ELISA. MIV-150 (LCMS/MS, RIA), LNG (RIA) and CG (ELISA) were measured in different compartments. Log-normal generalized mixed linear models were used for analysis. LNG did not affect the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MIV-150 in vitro. MIV-150 in VF from MZC/MZCL IVR-treated macaques inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal mucosa in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). MIV-150 in vaginal tissue from MZCL IVR-treated animals inhibited ex vivo infection relative to baseline (96%; p<0.0001) and post LNG IVR group (90%, p<0.001). No MIV-150 dose-dependent protection was observed, likely because of high MIV-150 concentrations in all vaginal tissue samples. In cervical tissue, MIV-150 inhibited infection vs. baseline (99%; p<0.05). No cervical tissue was available for MIV-150 measurement. Exposure to LNG IVR did not change tissue infection level. These observations support further development of MZCL IVR as a multipurpose prevention technology to improve women’s sexual and reproductive health. PMID

  9. Pre-existing neutralizing antibody mitigates B cell dysregulation and enhances the Env-specific antibody response in SHIV-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Juan Pablo; Bryk, Peter; Brower, Zachary; Zheng, Bo; Hessell, Ann J.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Wu, Tong Tong; Sanz, Ignacio; Keefer, Michael C.; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Our central hypothesis is that protection against HIV infection will be powerfully influenced by the magnitude and quality of the B cell response. Although sterilizing immunity, mediated by pre-formed abundant and potent antibodies is the ultimate goal for B cell-targeted HIV vaccine strategies, scenarios that fall short of this may still confer beneficial defenses against viremia and disease progression. We evaluated the impact of sub-sterilizing pre-existing neutralizing antibody on the B cell response to SHIV infection. Adult male rhesus macaques received passive transfer of a sub-sterilizing amount of polyclonal neutralizing immunoglobulin (Ig) purified from previously infected animals (SHIVIG) or control Ig prior to intra-rectal challenge with SHIVSF162P4 and extensive longitudinal sampling was performed. SHIVIG treated animals exhibited significantly reduced viral load and increased de novo Env-specific plasma antibody. Dysregulation of the B cell profile was grossly apparent soon after infection in untreated animals; exemplified by a ≈50% decrease in total B cells in the blood evident 2–3 weeks post-infection which was not apparent in SHIVIG treated animals. IgD+CD5+CD21+ B cells phenotypically similar to marginal zone-like B cells were highly sensitive to SHIV infection, becoming significantly decreased as early as 3 days post-infection in control animals, while being maintained in SHIVIG treated animals, and were highly correlated with the induction of Env-specific plasma antibody. These results suggest that B cell dysregulation during the early stages of infection likely contributes to suboptimal Env-specific B cell and antibody responses, and strategies that limit this dysregulation may enhance the host’s ability to eliminate HIV. PMID:28222180

  10. Robust suppression of env-SHIV viremia in M. nemestrina by 3-drug ART is independent of timing of initiation during chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W; Younan, Patrick; Polacino, Patricia S; Maurice, Nicholas J; Miller, Hannah W; Prlic, Martin; Jerome, Keith R; Woolfrey, Ann E; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are an important model organism for studies of HIV pathogenesis and pre-clinical evaluation of anti-HIV therapies. The successful translation of NHP-derived data to clinically relevant anti-HIV studies will require better understanding of the viral strains and NHP species used, and their responses to existing antiretroviral therapies (ART). Methods Five pigtailed macaques (M. nemestrina) were productively infected with the SIV/HIV chimeric virus SHIV-1157ipd3N4 following intravenous challenge. After 8 or 27 weeks, ART (PMPA, FTC, Raltegravir) was initiated. Viral load, T-Cell counts, and production of SHIV-specific antibodies were monitored throughout the course of infection and ART. Results ART led to a rapid and sustained decrease in plasma viral load. Suppression of plasma viremia by ART was independent of the timing of initiation during chronic infection. Conclusions We present a new NHP model of HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy, which should prove applicable to multiple clinically relevant anti-HIV approaches. PMID:24025078

  11. Partial protection against multiple RT-SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge of rhesus macaques by a silicone elastomer vaginal ring releasing the NNRTI MC1220

    PubMed Central

    Fetherston, Susan M.; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Goldman, Laurie; Murphy, Diarmaid J.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Blois, Sylvain; La Colla, Paolo; Moore, John P.; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor MC1220 has potent in vitro activity against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). A liposome gel formulation of MC1220 has previously been reported to partially protect rhesus macaques against vaginal challenge with a simian HIV (SHIV). Here, we describe the pre-clinical development of an MC1220-releasing silicone elastomer vaginal ring (SEVR), including pharmacokinetic (PK) and efficacy studies in macaques. Methods In vitro release studies were conducted on SEVRs loaded with 400 mg of MC1220, using simulated vaginal fluid (SVF, n = 4) and 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (IPA/H2O, n = 4) as release media. For PK evaluation, SEVRs were inserted into adult female macaques (n = 6) for 30 days. Following a 1week washout period, fresh rings were placed in the same animals, which were then challenged vaginally with RT-SHIV162P3 once weekly for 4 weeks. Results SEVRs released 1.66 and 101 mg of MC1220 into SVF and IPA/H2O, respectively, over 30 days, the differential reflecting the low aqueous solubility of the drug. In macaque PK studies, MC1220 was consistently detected in vaginal fluid (peak 845 ng/mL) and plasma (peak 0.91 ng/mL). Kaplan–Meier analysis over 9weeks showed significantly lower infection rates for animals given MC1220-containing SEVRs than placebo rings (hazard ratio 0.20, P = 0.0037). Conclusions An MC1220-releasing SEVR partially protected macaques from vaginal challenge. Such ring devices are a practical method for providing sustained, coitally independent protection against vaginal exposure to HIV-1. PMID:23109186

  12. Generation of a neutralization-resistant CCR5 tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) molecular clone, a derivative of SHIV-89.6.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuki; Yoneda, Mai; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yuji; Kato, Fumihiro; Matsuura, Kanako; Kikukawa, Minako; Matsushita, Shuzo; Hishiki, Takayuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported that a new genetically diverse CCR5 (R5) tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) adapted to rhesus monkeys became more neutralization resistant to SHIV-infected plasma than did the parental SHIV-KS661 clone. Here, to clarify the significance of the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV in a macaque model, we initially investigated the precise neutralization phenotype of the SHIVs, including SHIV-MK38 molecular clones, using SHIV-MK38-infected plasma, a pooled plasma of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, soluble CD4 and anti-HIV-1 neutralizing mAbs, the epitopes of which were known. The results show that SHIV-KS661 had tier 1 neutralization sensitivity, but monkey-adapted R5 tropic SHIV-MK38 acquired neutralization resistance similar to that of tier 2 or 3 as a clone virus. Sequence analysis of the env gene suggested that the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV-MK38 was acquired by conformational changes in Env associated with the net charge and potential N-linked glycosylation sites. To examine the relationship between neutralization phenotype and stably persistent infection in monkeys, we performed in vivo rectal inoculation experiments using a SHIV-MK38 molecular clone. The results showed that one of three rhesus monkeys exhibited durable infection with a plasma viral load of 105 copies ml- 1 despite the high antibody responses that occurred in the host. Whilst further improvements are required in the development of a challenge virus, it will be useful to generate a neutralization-resistant R5 tropic molecular clone of the SHIV-89.6 lineage commonly used for vaccine development - a result that can be used to explore the foundation of AIDS pathogenesis.

  13. Analysis of immunoglobulin transcripts and hypermutation following SHIV(AD8) infection and protein-plus-adjuvant immunization.

    PubMed

    Francica, Joseph R; Sheng, Zizhang; Zhang, Zhenhai; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Shingai, Masashi; Ramesh, Akshaya; Keele, Brandon F; Schmidt, Stephen D; Flynn, Barbara J; Darko, Sam; Lynch, Rebecca M; Yamamoto, Takuya; Matus-Nicodemos, Rodrigo; Wolinsky, David; Nason, Martha; Valiante, Nicholas M; Malyala, Padma; De Gregorio, Ennio; Barnett, Susan W; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Koup, Richard A; Mascola, John R; Martin, Malcolm A; Kepler, Thomas B; Douek, Daniel C; Shapiro, Lawrence; Seder, Robert A

    2015-04-10

    Developing predictive animal models to assess how candidate vaccines and infection influence the ontogenies of Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies is critical for the development of an HIV vaccine. Here we use two nonhuman primate models to compare the roles of antigen persistence, diversity and innate immunity. We perform longitudinal analyses of HIV Env-specific B-cell receptor responses to SHIV(AD8) infection and Env protein vaccination with eight different adjuvants. A subset of the SHIV(AD8)-infected animals with higher viral loads and greater Env diversity show increased neutralization associated with increasing somatic hypermutation (SHM) levels over time. The use of adjuvants results in increased ELISA titres but does not affect the mean SHM levels or CDR H3 lengths. Our study shows how the ontogeny of Env-specific B cells can be tracked, and provides insights into the requirements for developing neutralizing antibodies that should facilitate translation to human vaccine studies.

  14. Impact of antibody quality and anamnestic response on viremia control post-challenge in a combined Tat/Env vaccine regimen in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Demberg, Thorsten; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Kuate, Seraphin; Aladi, Stanley; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Venzon, David; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V.S.; Lee, Eun Mi; Pal, Ranajit; DiPasquale, Janet; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Montefiori, David C.; Srivastava, Indresh; Barnett, Susan W.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    Previously, priming rhesus macaques with Adenovirus type 5 host range mutant-recombinants encoding Tat and Env and boosting with Tat and Env protein in MPL-SE controlled chronic viremia by 4 logs following homologous intravenous SHIV89.6P challenge. Here we evaluated Tat, Env, and Tat/Env regimens for immunogenicity and protective efficacy using clade C Env, alum adjuvant, and a heterologous intrarectal SHIV1157ipd3N4 challenge. Despite induction of strong cellular and humoral immunity, Tat/Env group T and B-cell memory responses were not significantly enhanced over Tat- or Env-only groups. Lack of viremia control post-challenge was attributed to lower avidity Env antibodies and no anamnestic ADCC response or SHIV1157ipd3N4 neutralizing antibody development post-challenge. Poor biologic activity of the Tat immunogen may have impaired Tat immunity. In the absence of sterilizing immunity, strong anamnestic responses to heterologous virus can help control viremia. Both antibody breadth and optimal adjuvanticity are needed to elicit high-quality antibody for protective efficacy. PMID:23528732

  15. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  16. Multimodality vaccination against clade C SHIV: partial protection against mucosal challenges with a heterologous tier 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Lakhashe, Samir K; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Zhou, Mingkui; Bachler, Barbara C; Hemashettar, Girish; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Villinger, Francois; Else, James G; Stock, Shannon; Lee, Sandra J; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Cofano, Egidio Brocca; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Johnson, Welkin E; Polonis, Victoria R; Forthal, Donald N; Loret, Erwann P; Rasmussen, Robert A; Ruprecht, Ruth M

    2014-11-12

    We sought to test whether vaccine-induced immune responses could protect rhesus macaques (RMs) against upfront heterologous challenges with an R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-2873Nip. This SHIV strain exhibits many properties of transmitted HIV-1, such as tier 2 phenotype (relatively difficult to neutralize), exclusive CCR5 tropism, and gradual disease progression in infected RMs. Since no human AIDS vaccine recipient is likely to encounter an HIV-1 strain that exactly matches the immunogens, we immunized the RMs with recombinant Env proteins heterologous to the challenge virus. For induction of immune responses against Gag, Tat, and Nef, we explored a strategy of immunization with overlapping synthetic peptides (OSP). The immune responses against Gag and Tat were finally boosted with recombinant proteins. The vaccinees and a group of ten control animals were given five low-dose intrarectal (i.r.) challenges with SHIV-2873Nip. All controls and seven out of eight vaccinees became systemically infected; there was no significant difference in viremia levels of vaccinees vs. controls. Prevention of viremia was observed in one vaccinee which showed strong boosting of virus-specific cellular immunity during virus exposures. The protected animal showed no challenge virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in the TZM-bl or A3R5 cell-based assays and had low-level ADCC activity after the virus exposures. Microarray data strongly supported a role for cellular immunity in the protected animal. Our study represents a case of protection against heterologous tier 2 SHIV-C by vaccine-induced, virus-specific cellular immune responses.

  17. Tropism-independent protection of macaques against vaginal transmission of three SHIVs by the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor T-1249.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Ketas, Thomas A; Klasse, Per Johan; Davison, Donna K; Singletary, Morgan; Green, Linda C; Greenberg, Michael L; Moore, John P

    2008-07-29

    We have assessed the potential of the fusion inhibitory peptide T-1249 for development as a vaginal microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. When formulated as a simple gel, T-1249 provided dose-dependent protection to macaques against high-dose challenge with three different SHIVs that used either CCR5 or CXCR4 for infection (the R5 virus SHIV-162P3, the X4 virus SHIV-KU1 and the R5X4 virus SHIV-89.6P), and it also protected against SIVmac251 (R5). Protection of half of the test animals was estimated by interpolation to occur at T-1249 concentrations of approximately 40-130 muM, whereas complete protection was observed at 0.1-2 mM. In vitro, T-1249 had substantial breadth of activity against HIV-1 strains from multiple genetic subtypes and in a coreceptor-independent manner. Thus, at 1 muM in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based replication assay, T-1249 inhibited all 29 R5 viruses, all 12 X4 viruses and all 7 R5X4 viruses in the test panel, irrespective of their genetic subtype. Combining lower concentrations of T-1249 with other entry inhibitors (CMPD-167, BMS-C, or AMD3465) increased the proportion of test viruses that could be blocked. In the PhenoSense assay, T-1249 was active against 636 different HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses of varying tropism and derived from clinical samples, with IC(50) values typically clustered in a 10-fold range approximately 10 nM. Overall, these results support the concept of using T-1249 as a component of an entry inhibitor-based combination microbicide to prevent the sexual transmission of diverse HIV-1 variants.

  18. Inclusion of a CRF01_AE HIV envelope protein boost with a DNA/MVA prime-boost vaccine: Impact on humoral and cellular immunogenicity and viral load reduction after SHIV-E challenge.

    PubMed

    Cox, Josephine H; Ferrari, Maria G; Earl, Patricia; Lane, James R; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Polonis, Victoria R; Kuta, Ellen G; Boyer, Jean D; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Eller, Leigh-Anne; Pham, Doan-Trang; Hart, Lydia; Montefiori, David; Ferrari, Guido; Parrish, Stephanie; Weiner, David B; Moss, Bernard; Kim, Jerome H; Birx, Deborah; VanCott, Thomas C

    2012-02-27

    The current study assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of various prime-boost vaccine regimens in rhesus macaques using combinations of recombinant DNA (rDNA), recombinant MVA (rMVA), and subunit gp140 protein. The rDNA and rMVA vectors were constructed to express Env from HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE and Gag-Pol from CRF01_AE or SIVmac 239. One of the rMVAs, MVA/CMDR, has been recently tested in humans. Immunizations were administered at months 0 and 1 (prime) and months 3 and 6 (boost). After priming, HIV env-specific serum IgG was detected in monkeys receiving gp140 alone or rMVA but not in those receiving rDNA. Titers were enhanced in these groups after boosting either with gp140 alone or with rMVA plus gp140. The groups that received the rDNA prime developed env-specific IgG after boosting with rMVA with or without gp140. HIV Env-specific serum IgG binding antibodies were elicited more frequently and of higher titer, and breadth of neutralizing antibodies was increased with the inclusion of the subunit Env boost. T cell responses were measured by tetramer binding to Gag p11c in Mamu-A*01 macaques, and by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay to SIV-Gag. T cell responses were induced after vaccination with the highest responses seen in macaques immunized with rDNA and rMVA. Macaques were challenged intravenously with a novel SHIV-E virus (SIVmac239 Gag-Pol with an HIV-1 subtype E-Env CAR402). Post challenge with SHIV-E, antibody titers were boosted in all groups and peaked at 4 weeks. Robust T cell responses were seen in all groups post challenge and in macaques immunized with rDNA and rMVA a clear boosting of responses was seen. A greater than two-log drop in RNA copies/ml at peak viremia and earlier set point was achieved in macaques primed with rDNA, and boosted with rMVA/SHIV-AE plus gp140. Post challenge viremia in macaques immunized with other regimens was not significantly different to that of controls. These results demonstrate that a gp140 subunit and

  19. Induction of HIV-specific antibody response and protection against vaginal SHIV transmission by intranasal immunization with inactivated SHIV-capturing nanospheres in macaques.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ariko; Akagi, Takami; Enose, Yoshimi; Ueno, Masamichi; Kawamura, Masaki; Horiuchi, Reii; Hiraishi, Katsuya; Adachi, Masakazu; Serizawa, Takeshi; Narayan, Opendra; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori; Hayami, Masanori

    2004-07-01

    We have previously reported that concanavalin A-immobilized polystyrene nanospheres (Con A-NS) could efficiently capture HIV-1 particles and that intranasal immunization with inactivated HIV-1-capturing nanospheres (HIV-NS) induced vaginal anti-HIV-1 IgA antibody response in mice. In this study, to evaluate the protective effect of immunization, each three macaques was intranasally immunized with Con A-NS or inactivated simian/human immunodeficiency virus KU-2-capturing nanospheres (SHIV-NS) and then intravaginally challenged with a pathogenic virus, SHIV KU-2. After a series of six immunizations, vaginal anti-HIV-1 gp120 IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in all SHIV-NS-immunized macaques. After intravaginal challenge, one of the three macaques in each of the Con A-NS- and SHIV-NS-immunized groups was infected. Plasma viral RNA load of infected macaque in SHIV-NS-immunized macaques was substantially less than that in unimmunized control macaque and reached below the detectable level. However, it could not be determined whether intranasal immunization with SHIV-NS is effective in giving complete protection against intravaginal challenge. To explore the effect of the SHIV-NS vaccine, the remaining non-infected macaques were rechallenged intravenously with SHIV KU-2. After intravenous challenge, all macaques became infected. However, SHIV-NS-immunized macaques had lower viral RNA loads and higher CD4(+) T cell counts than unimmunized control macaques. Plasma anti-HIV-1 gp120 IgA and IgG antibodies were induced more rapidly in the SHIV-NS-immunized macaques than in the controls. The rapid antibody responses having neutralizing activity might contribute to the clearance of the challenge virus. Thus, SHIV-NS-immunized macaques exhibited partial protection to vaginal and systemic challenges with SHIV KU-2.

  20. SHIV Susceptibility Changes during the Menstrual Cycle of Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Henning, Tara; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica; Butler, Katherine; Adams, Debra R.; Guenthner, Patricia; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, James; Radzio, Jessica; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormonal changes during menstrual cycling may affect susceptibility to HIV. Methods We determined the SHIV acquisition time point in 43 cycling pigtail macaques infected by repeated vaginal virus exposures initiated randomly in the cycle. Results SHIV infection was first detected in the follicular phase in 38 macaques (88%), and in the luteal phase in 5 macaques (12%), indicating a statistically significant timing difference. Assuming a 7-day eclipse phase, most infections occurred during or following a high-progesterone period associated with menstruation, vaginal epithelium thinning and suppressed mucosal immunity. Conclusions This raises questions whether other high progesterone conditions (pregnancy, hormonal contraception) similarly affect HIV risk. PMID:24779484

  1. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Matthew R; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Kondur, Hema R; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J; Haworth, Kevin G; Decker, Julie M; Alpert, Michael D; Bailey, Charles C; Neale, Ernest S; Fellinger, Christoph H; Joshi, Vinita R; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Martinez-Navio, Jose M; Quinlan, Brian D; Yao, Annie Y; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Burton, Dennis R; Kwong, Peter D; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Evans, David T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M; Seaman, Michael S; Farzan, Michael

    2015-03-05

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). However, even the best bNAbs neutralize 10-50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (80% inhibitory concentration (IC80) > 5 μg ml(-1)), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) < 0.05 μg ml(-1)). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46 and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17-77 μg ml(-1) of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for more than 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from several infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well-characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  2. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Matthew R.; Kattenhorn, Lisa M.; Kondur, Hema R.; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Decker, Julie M.; Alpert, Michael D.; Bailey, Charles C.; Neale, Ernest S.; Fellinger, Christoph H.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, Jose M.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Yao, Annie Y.; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Burton, Dennis R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Evans, David T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs)1,2. However even the best bNAbs neutralize 10–50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (IC80 > 5 μg/ml), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection3–6. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean IC50 < 0.05 μg/ml). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46, and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17 to 77 μg/ml of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from multiple infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25707797

  3. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  4. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure.

  5. Prevention of SHIV transmission by topical IFN-β treatment

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Pilch Cooper, Heather A.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit; Carias, Ann M.; Sips, Magdalena; Wang, Xiaolei; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sieg, Scott F.; Reich, Adrian; Wilkinson, Peter; Cameron, Mark J.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding vaginal and rectal HIV transmission and protective cellular and molecular mechanisms is critical for designing new prevention strategies, including those required for an effective vaccine. The determinants of protection against HIV infection are, however, poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggest that innate immune defenses may help protect mucosal surfaces from HIV transmission in highly exposed, uninfected subjects 1. More recent studies suggest that systemically administered type 1 interferon protects against simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques 2. Here we hypothesized that topically applied type 1 interferons might stimulate vaginal innate responses that could protect against HIV transmission. We therefore applied a recombinant human type 1 interferon (IFN-β) to the vagina of rhesus macaques and vaginally challenged them with pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). Vaginal administration of IFN-β resulted in marked local changes in immune cell phenotype, increasing immune activation and HIV coreceptor expression, yet provided significant protection from SHIV acquisition as interferon response genes (IRGs) were also upregulated. These data suggest that protection from vaginal HIV acquisition may be achieved by activating innate mucosal defenses. PMID:26838048

  6. Primate immune responses to HIV-1 Env formulated in the saponin-based adjuvant AbISCO-100 in the presence or absence of TLR9 co-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Paola; Sundling, Christopher; O'Dell, Sijy; Mascola, John R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based vaccines require adjuvants to achieve optimal responses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 agonists were previously shown to improve responses to protein-based vaccines, such as the Hepatitis B virus vaccine formulated in alum. Here, we used CpG-C together with the clinically relevant saponin-based adjuvant AbISCO-100/Matrix-M (AbISCO), to assess if TLR9 co-stimulation would quantitatively or qualitatively modulate HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-specific B and T cell responses in rhesus macaques. The macaques were inoculated with soluble Env trimers in AbISCO, with or without the addition of CpG-C, using an interval similar to the Hepatitis B virus vaccine. Following a comprehensive evaluation of antigen-specific responses in multiple immune compartments, we show that the Env-specific circulating IgG, memory B cells and plasma cells displayed similar kinetics and magnitude in the presence or absence of CpG-C and that there was no apparent difference between the two groups in the elicited HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers or antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Importantly, the control of SHIV viremia was significantly improved in animals from both Env-immunized groups relative to adjuvant alone controls, demonstrating the potential of AbISCO to act as a stand-alone adjuvant for Env-based vaccines. PMID:25762407

  7. Prime-boost vaccination with heterologous live vectors encoding SIV gag and multimeric HIV-1 gp160 protein: efficacy against repeated mucosal R5 clade C SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lakhashe, Samir K.; Velu, Vijayakumar; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; DiPasquale, Janet M.; Hemashettar, Girish; Yoon, John K.; Rasmussen, Robert A.; Yang, Feng; Lee, Sandra J.; Montefiori, David C.; Novembre, Francis J.; Villinger, François; Amara, Rama Rao; Kahn, Maria; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Li, Sufen; Li, Zhongxia; Frankel, Fred R.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Johnson, Welkin E.; Lieberman, Judy; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to induce primate immunodeficiency virus-specific cellular and neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses in rhesus macaques (RM) through a bimodal vaccine approach. RM were immunized intragastrically (i.g.) with the live-attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) vector Lmdd-BdopSIVgag encoding SIVmac239 gag. SIV Gag-specific cellular responses were boosted by intranasal and intratracheal administration of replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5hr-SIVgag) encoding the same gag. To broaden antiviral immunity, the RM were immunized with multimeric HIV clade C (HIV-C) gp160 and HIV Tat. SIV Gag-specific cellular immune responses and HIV-1 nAb developed in some RM. The animals were challenged intrarectally with five low doses of R5 SHIV-1157ipEL-p, encoding a heterologous HIV-C Env (22.1% divergent to the Env immunogen). All five controls became viremic. One out of ten vaccinees was completely protected and another had low peak viremia. Sera from the completely and partially protected RM neutralized the challenge virus >90%; these RM also had strong SIV Gag-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells. Peak and area under the curve of plasma viremia (during acute phase) among vaccinees was lower than for controls, but did not attain significance. The completely protected RM showed persistently low numbers of the α4β7-expressing CD4+ T cells; the latter have been implicated as preferential virus targets in-vivo. Thus, vaccine-induced immune responses and relatively lower numbers of potential target cells were associated with protection. PMID:21693155

  8. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Breakthrough infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  9. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  10. Nucleotide Sequence of the Akv env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Jack; Crowther, Robert; Straceski, Anthony; Haseltine, William

    1982-01-01

    The sequence of 2,191 nucleotides encoding the env gene of murine retrovirus Akv was determined by using a molecular clone of the Akv provirus. Deduction of the encoded amino acid sequence showed that a single open reading frame encodes a 638-amino acid precursor to gp70 and p15E. In addition, there is a typical leader sequence preceding the amino terminus of gp70. The locations of potential glycosylation sites and other structural features indicate that the entire gp70 molecule and most of p15E are located on the outer side of the membrane. Internal cleavage of the env precursor to generate gp70 and p15E occurs immediately adjacent to several basic amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of gp70. This cleavage generates a region of 42 uncharged, relatively hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus of p15E, which is located in a position analogous to the hydrophobic membrane fusion sequence of influenza virus hemagglutinin. The mature polypeptides are predicted to associate with the membrane via a region of 30 uncharged, mostly hydrophobic amino acids located near the carboxyl terminus of p15E. Distal to this membrane association region is a sequence of 35 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the env precursor, which is predicted to be located on the inner side of the membrane. By analogy to Moloney murine leukemia virus, a proteolytic cleavage in this region removes the terminal 19 amino acids, thus generating the carboxyl terminus of p15E. This leaves 15 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of p15E on the inner side of the membrane in a position to interact with virion cores during budding. The precise location and order of the large RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides in the env region were determined and compared with those from several leukemogenic viruses of AKR origin. This permitted a determination of how the differences in the leukemogenic viruses affect the primary structure of the env gene products. PMID:6283170

  11. Comparison of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Virus Neutralization by HIV-1 Env-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa; Robinson, James E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein have been studied extensively for their ability to block viral infectivity, little data are currently available on nonneutralizing functions of these antibodies, such as their ability to eliminate virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 Env-specific antibodies of diverse specificities, including potent broadly neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies, were therefore tested for ADCC against cells infected with a lab-adapted HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1NL4-3), a primary HIV-1 isolate (HIV-1JR-FL), and a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) adapted for pathogenic infection of rhesus macaques (SHIVAD8-EO). In accordance with the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization, HIV-1NL4-3-infected cells were considerably more sensitive to ADCC, both in terms of the number of antibodies and magnitude of responses, than cells infected with HIV-1JR-FL or SHIVAD8-EO. ADCC activity generally correlated with antibody binding to Env on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and with viral neutralization; however, neutralization was not always predictive of ADCC, as instances of ADCC in the absence of detectable neutralization, and vice versa, were observed. These results reveal incomplete overlap in the specificities of antibodies that mediate these antiviral activities and provide insights into the relationship between ADCC and neutralization important for the development of antibody-based vaccines and therapies for combating HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE This study provides fundamental insights into the relationship between antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and virus neutralization that may help to guide the development of antibody-based vaccines and immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27122574

  12. Antibody-Mediated Protection Against SHIV Challenge Includes Systemic Clearance of Distal Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Ghneim, Khader; Sok, Devin; Bosche, William J.; Li, Yuan; Chipriano, Elizabeth; Berkemeier, Brian; Oswald, Kelli; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Jimenez, Jessica; Mondesir, Jade; Lee, Benjamin; Giglio, Patricia; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Abbink, Peter; Colantonio, Arnaud; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G.; Li, Wenjun; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can protect rhesus monkeys against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, the site of antibody interception of virus and the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection remain unclear. We administered a fully protective dose of the bNAb PGT121 to rhesus monkeys and challenged them intravaginally with SHIV-SF162P3. In PGT121 treated animals, we detected low levels of viral RNA and viral DNA in distal tissues for several days following challenge. Viral RNA positive tissues showed transcriptomic changes indicative of innate immune activation, and cells from these tissues initiated infection following adoptive transfer into naïve hosts. These data demonstrate that bNAb mediated protection against a mucosal virus challenge can involve clearance of infectious virus in distal tissues. PMID:27540005

  13. A combined oral contraceptive affects mucosal SHIV susceptibility factors in a pigtail macaque model

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Butler, Katherine; Ritter, Jana M.; Johnson, Ryan; Sanders, Jeanine; Powell, Nathaniel; Lathrop, George; Zaki, Sherif R.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Injectable hormonal contraception may increase women’s risk of HIV acquisition, and can affect biological risk factors in animal models of HIV. We established, for the first time, a model to investigate whether combined oral contraceptives (COC) alter SHIV susceptibility in macaques. Methods Seven pigtail macaques were administered a monophasic levonorgestrel (LNG)/ethinyl estradiol (EE) COC at 33% or 66% of the human dose for 60 days. Menstrual cycling, vaginal epithelial thickness and other SHIV susceptibility factors were monitored for a mean of 18 weeks. Results Mean vaginal epithelial thicknesses was 290.8 μm at baseline and 186.2 μm during COC (p=0.0141, Mann Whitney test). Vaginal pH decreased from 8.5 during to 6.5 post- treatment (0.0176 two-tailed t-test). Measured microflora was unchanged. Conclusions COC caused thinning of the vaginal epithelium and vaginal pH changes, which may increase SHIV susceptibility. 0.033 mg LNG + 0.0066 mg EE appeared effective in suppressing ovulation. PMID:25536296

  14. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women.

  15. Loss of immune homeostasis dictates SHIV rebound after stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W.; Benne, Clarisse; Polacino, Patricia; Kaur, Jasbir; McAllister, Cristina E.; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Obenza, Willi; Pecor, Tiffany A.; Huang, Meei-Li; Baldessari, Audrey; Murnane, Robert D.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Klatt, Nichole R.; DeRosa, Stephen; Sékaly, Rafick P.

    2017-01-01

    The conditioning regimen used as part of the Berlin patient’s hematopoietic cell transplant likely contributed to his eradication of HIV infection. We studied the impact of conditioning in simian-human immunodeficiency virus–infected (SHIV-infected) macaques suppressed by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The conditioning regimen resulted in a dramatic, but incomplete depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD20+ B cells, increased T cell activation and exhaustion, and a significant loss of SHIV-specific Abs. The disrupted T cell homeostasis and markers of microbial translocation positively correlated with an increased viral rebound after cART interruption. Quantitative viral outgrowth and Tat/rev–induced limiting dilution assays showed that the size of the latent SHIV reservoir did not correlate with viral rebound. These findings identify perturbations of the immune system as a mechanism for the failure of autologous transplantation to eradicate HIV. Thus, transplantation strategies may be improved by incorporating immune modulators to prevent disrupted homeostasis, and gene therapy to protect transplanted cells. PMID:28239658

  16. Persistence of Virus Reservoirs in ART-Treated SHIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques after Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Benton; Lee, S. Thera; Chahroudi, Ann; Kean, Leslie; Silvestri, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Despite many advances in AIDS research, a cure for HIV infection remains elusive. Here, we performed autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in three Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated rhesus macaques (RMs) using HSCs collected prior to infection and compared them to three SHIV-infected, ART-treated, untransplanted control animals to assess the effect of conditioning and autologous HSCT on viral persistence. As expected, ART drastically reduced virus replication, below 100 SHIV-RNA copies per ml of plasma in all animals. After several weeks on ART, experimental RMs received myeloablative total body irradiation (1080 cGy), which resulted in the depletion of 94–99% of circulating CD4+ T-cells, and low to undetectable SHIV-DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Following HSC infusion and successful engraftment, ART was interrupted (40–75 days post-transplant). Despite the observed dramatic reduction of the peripheral blood viral reservoir, rapid rebound of plasma viremia was observed in two out of three transplanted RMs. In the third transplanted animal, plasma SHIV-RNA and SHIV DNA in bulk PBMCs remained undetectable at week two post-ART interruption. No further time-points could be assessed as this animal was euthanized for clinical reasons; however, SHIV-DNA could be detected in this animal at necropsy in sorted circulating CD4+ T-cells, spleen and lymph nodes but not in the gastro-intestinal tract or tonsils. Furthermore, SIV DNA levels post-ART interruption were equivalent in several tissues in transplanted and control animals. While persistence of virus reservoir was observed despite myeloablation and HSCT in the setting of short term ART, this experiment demonstrates that autologous HSCT can be successfully performed in SIV-infected ART-treated RMs offering a new experimental in vivo platform to test innovative interventions aimed at curing HIV infection in humans. PMID

  17. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi-Mao; Schutte, Robert J; Pemble Iv, Charles W; Dennison, S Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Montefiori, David C; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Soderberg, Kelly A; Giorgi, Elena E; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J; Letvin, Norman L; Schmitz, Joern E; Moody, M A; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  18. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; ...

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant regionmore » of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.« less

  19. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi -Mao; Schutte, Robert J.; Pemble IV, Charles W.; Dennison, S. Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Montefiori, David C.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T.; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J.; Letvin, Norman L.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Moody, M. A.; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  20. Presence of env-like sequences in Quercus suber retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M; Ribeiro, T; Viegas, W; Morais-Cecilio, L; Rocheta, M

    2010-01-01

    The main difference between LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses is the presence of the envelope (env) gene in the latter, downstream of the pol gene. The env gene is involved in their infectious capacity. Here we report the presence of env-like sequences in the genome of Quercus suber (cork oak), one of the most economically important Portuguese species. These gene sequences were isolated through DNA amplification between RNaseH conserved motifs and 3' LTR, based on the structure of copia retrotransposons. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that almost all the clones isolated are clustered with Cyclops-2, a Ty3-gypsy element identified in Pisum sativum, except one clustered with gypsy and copia retroelements found in different species. This suggests the existence of a potential ancestral sequence of the env gene, prior to the separation of Ty3-gypsy and Ty1-copia retrotransposons. Additionally, the isolated env-like sequences showed 26-39% of homology with env-like sequences characterized in viruses. The origin of env-like sequences in retrotransposons from host plant taxa is discussed.

  1. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by an orally delivered CCR5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Springer, Martin S; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P

    2005-12-01

    Pre-exposure oral prophylaxis with antiviral drugs is a potential method for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We show that oral delivery of CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to the CCR5 coreceptor, for 10-14 d can protect a substantial proportion of macaques from vaginal infection with a CCR5-using virus (SHIV-162P3). The macaques that became infected despite receiving CMPD167 had reduced plasma viremia levels during the earliest stages of infection.

  2. Prevention of vaginal SHIV transmission in rhesus macaques through inhibition of CCR5.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Michael M; Veazey, Ronald S; Offord, Robin; Mosier, Donald E; Dufour, Jason; Mefford, Megan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Salkowitz, Janelle R; Rodriguez, Benigno; Blauvelt, Andrew; Hartley, Oliver

    2004-10-15

    Topical agents, such as microbicides, that can protect against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission are urgently needed. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV SF162), which is tropic for the chemokine receptor CCR5, we report that topical application of high doses of PSC-RANTES, an amino terminus-modified analog of the chemokine RANTES, provided potent protection against vaginal challenge in rhesus macaques. These experimental findings have potentially important implications for understanding vaginal transmission of HIV and the design of strategies for its prevention.

  3. Lentivirus-mediated Gene Transfer in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Impaired in SHIV-infected, ART-treated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Younan, Patrick M; Peterson, Christopher W; Polacino, Patricia; Kowalski, John P; Obenza, Willimark; Miller, Hannah W; Milless, Brian P; Gafken, Phil; DeRosa, Stephen C; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can reduce HIV viremia. We have developed an HIV/AIDS-patient model in Simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected pigtailed macaques that are stably suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART: raltegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir). Following SHIV infection and ART, animals undergo autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT) with lentivirally transduced cluster of differentiation (CD)34(+) cells expressing the mC46 anti-HIV fusion protein. We show that SHIV(+), ART-treated animals had very low gene marking levels after HSCT. Pretransduction CD34(+) cells contained detectable levels of all three ART drugs, likely contributing to the low gene transfer efficiency. Following HSCT recovery and the cessation of ART, plasma viremia rebounded, indicating that myeloablative total body irradiation cannot completely eliminate viral reservoirs after autologous HSCT. The kinetics of recovery following autologous HSCT in SHIV(+), ART-treated macaques paralleled those observed following transplantation of control animals. However, T-cell subset analyses demonstrated a high percentage of C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-expressing CD4(+) T-cells after HSCT. These data suggest that an extended ART interruption time may be required for more efficient lentiviral transduction. To avoid complications associated with ART interruption in the context of high percentages of CD4(+)CCR5(+)T-cells after HSCT, the use of vector systems not impaired by the presence of residual ART may also be beneficial.

  4. A long-acting integrase inhibitor protects female macaques from repeated high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Chasity D; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R; St Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-14

    Long-acting GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) is a strand transfer inhibitor of the HIV/SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) integrase and was shown to be an effective preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) rhesus macaque challenge model. We examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate), which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with GSK744 LA (50 mg/kg) monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were fivefold lower on average in cervical tissues than in rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high-dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected six of eight female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for PrEP.

  5. Antiretroviral Drug Activity in Macaques Infected during Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Has a Transient Effect on Cell-Associated SHIV DNA Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Mian-er; Pau, Chou-Pong; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) is a novel HIV prevention strategy. Suboptimal PrEP adherence and HIV infection creates an opportunity for continued antiretroviral drug activity during undiagnosed infection. We previously showed that macaques infected with SHIV during PrEP with FTC/TDF display reduced acute plasma viremias and limited virus diversity. We investigated the effect of PrEP on acute SHIV DNA dynamics and on the size of the persistent virus reservoir in lymphoid tissues. Design Cell-associated SHIV DNA levels in PBMCs were measured in 8 macaques infected during PrEP with FTC/TDF or single-agent TAF and was compared to those seen in untreated infections (n = 10). PrEP breakthrough infections continued treatment with 1–2 weekly drug doses to model suboptimal drug exposure during undiagnosed HIV infection in humans. SHIV DNA was also measured in lymphoid tissues collected from FTC/TDF PrEP breakthroughs after 1 year of infection. Results Compared to untreated controls, PrEP infections had reduced plasma RNA viremias both at peak and throughout weeks 1–12 (p<0.005). SHIV DNA levels were also reduced at peak and during the first 12 weeks of infection (p<0.043) but not throughout weeks 12–20. At 1 year, SHIV DNA reservoirs in lymphoid tissues were similar in size among macaques that received PrEP or placebo. Conclusions Antiviral drug activity due to PrEP limits acute SHIV replication but has only a transient effect on cell-associated SHIV DNA levels. Our model suggests that suboptimal drug exposure in persons that are taking PrEP and become infected with HIV may not be sufficient to reduce the pool of HIV-infected cells, and that treatment intensification may be needed to sustain potential virological benefits from the PrEP regimen. PMID:27806064

  6. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  7. Prevention of vaginal SHIV transmission in macaques by a live recombinant Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Lagenaur, L A; Sanders-Beer, B E; Brichacek, B; Pal, R; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Yu, R; Venzon, D; Lee, P P; Hamer, D H

    2011-11-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions in women occur through the cervicovaginal mucosa, which is coated by a bacterial biofilm including Lactobacillus. This commensal bacterium has a role in maintaining a healthy mucosa and can be genetically engineered to produce antiviral peptides. Here, we report a 63% reduction in transmission of a chimeric simian/HIV (SHIV(SF162P3)) after repeated vaginal challenges of macaques treated with Lactobacillus jensenii expressing the HIV-1 entry inhibitor cyanovirin-N. Furthermore, peak viral loads in colonized macaques with breakthrough infection were reduced sixfold. Colonization and prolonged antiviral protein secretion by the genetically engineered lactobacilli did not cause any increase in proinflammatory markers. These findings lay the foundation for an accessible and durable approach to reduce heterosexual transmission of HIV in women, which is coitally independent, inexpensive, and enhances the natural protective effects of the vaginal microflora.

  8. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  9. Passive transfer of modest titers of potent and broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies block SHIV infection in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Shingai, Masashi; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Nason, Martha C.; Montefiori, David; Moldt, Brian; Poignard, Pascal; Diskin, Ron; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Cetrulo Lorenzi, Julio Cesar; Gazumyan, Anna; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that effective human vaccines directed against viral pathogens elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The passive transfer of anti–HIV-1 NAbs conferring sterilizing immunity to macaques has been used to determine the plasma neutralization titers, which must be present at the time of exposure, to prevent acquisition of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infections. We administered five recently isolated potent and broadly acting anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus macaques and challenged them intrarectally 24 h later with either of two different R5-tropic SHIVs. By combining the results obtained from 60 challenged animals, we determined that the protective neutralization titer in plasma preventing virus infection in 50% of the exposed monkeys was relatively modest (∼1:100) and potentially achievable by vaccination. PMID:25155019

  10. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanakaran, S; Shen, Tongye; Lynch, Rebecca M; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  11. Expression of pIgR in the tracheal mucosa of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Wang, Feng-Jie; Yu, Lei; Yao, Wen-Rong; Cui, Yan-Fang; Yang, Gui-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric immunoglobulin receptors (pIgR) are key participants in the formation and secretion of secretory IgA (S-IgA), which is critical for the prevention of microbial infection and colonization in the respiratory system. Although increased respiratory colonization and infections are common in HIV/AIDS, little is known about the expression of pIgR in the airway mucosa of these patients. To address this, the expression levels of pIgR in the tracheal mucosa and lungs of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques were examined by real-time RTPCR and confocal microscopy. We found that the levels of both PIGR mRNA and pIgR immunoreactivity were lower in the tracheal mucosa of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques than that in non-infected rhesus macaques, and the difference in pIgR immunoreactivity was statistically significant. IL-17A, which enhances pIgR expression, was also changed in the same direction as that of pIgR. In contrast to changes in the tracheal mucosa, pIgR and IL-17A levels were higher in the lungs of infected rhesus macaques. These results indicated abnormal pIgR expression in SHIV/SIV, and by extension HIV infections, which might partially result from IL-17A alterations and might contribute to the increased microbial colonization and infection related to pulmonary complications in HIV/AIDS. PMID:28271669

  12. SPL7013 gel as a topical microbicide for prevention of vaginal transmission of SHIV89.6P in macaques.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-Hou; Emau, Peter; Cairns, J Scott; Flanary, Leon; Morton, William R; McCarthy, Tom D; Tsai, Che-Chung

    2005-03-01

    SPL7013 is a dendrimer with a polyanionic outer surface that allows multiple interactions with target sites. It potently binds and blocks HIV-1 and chimeric simian/HIV-1 viruses (SHIVs) replication in vitro. Gels containing different concentrations of SPL7013 were used as topical microbicides in female pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) to study their ability to prevent vaginal transmission of SHIV(89,6P). On virus challenge, all untreated macaques (8/8) and seven of eight macaques treated with placebo gel were infected within 2 weeks postinfection (PI) and showed high plasma viremia and dramatic CD4(+) cell decline within 4 weeks PI. In contrast, 6/6 macaques, 5/6 macaques, and 2/6 macaques treated with 5% w/w (50 mg/ml), 3% w/w (30 mg/ml), and 1% w/w (10 mg/ml) SPL7013 gels, respectively, resisted viral challenge. The results showed that animals treated with SPL7013 showed a dose-dependent resistance to virus challenge. Neither SPL7013 nor placebo gels produced any adverse effects following the single application in the study. These results showed that 3-5% w/w SPL7013 gels were effective in blocking vaginal transmission of SHIV in macaques after single gel application followed by single virus challenge. These results suggest that SPL7013 gel may be a promising anti-HIV microbicide formulation for further evaluation.

  13. Feline immunodeficiency virus env gene evolution in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Kraase, Martin; Sloan, Richard; Klein, Dieter; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Linda; Biek, Roman; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), an immunosuppressive lentivirus found in cats worldwide, is studied to illuminate mechanisms of lentiviral pathogenesis and to identify key components of protective immunity. During replication, lentiviruses accumulate errors of nucleotide mis-incorporation due to the low-fidelity of reverse transcriptase and recombination between viral variants, resulting in the emergence of a complex viral "quasispecies". In patients infected with HIV-1, env sequences may vary by up to 10% and the detection of quasispecies with greater heterogeneity is associated with higher viral loads and reduced CD4+ T cell numbers [1], indicating that transmission of more complex quasispecies may lead to disease progression. However, little is known about how FIV evolves as disease progresses, or why some cats develop AIDS rapidly while disease progression is slow in others. The aim of this study was to determine whether disease progression may be governed by viral evolution and to examine the diversity of viral variants emerging following infection with an infectious molecular clone. The FIV env gene encoding the envelope glycoprotein (Env) was examined at early (12 weeks) and late (322 weeks) stages of FIV infection in two groups of cats infected experimentally with the FIV-GL8 molecular clone. Viral variants were detected within quasispecies in cats in the late stages of FIV infection that contained differing amino acid compositions in several variable loops of Env, some of which were identified as determinants of receptor usage and resistance to neutralization. Therefore these results indicate that the FIV env gene evolves during the course of infection, giving rise to variants that resist neutralization and likely lead to disease progression.

  14. Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Yankee, Thomas M. Sheffer, Darlene; Liu Zhengian; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Jia Fenglan; Chebloune, Yahia; Stephens, Edward B.; Narayan, Opendra

    2009-01-05

    Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, a live virus vaccine derived from SHIV{sub PPC}. Macaques were administered two inoculations of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years.

  15. Glycosylation Benchmark Profile for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Production Based on Eleven Env Trimers.

    PubMed

    Go, Eden P; Ding, Haitao; Zhang, Shijian; Ringe, Rajesh P; Nicely, Nathan; Hua, David; Steinbock, Robert T; Golabek, Michael; Alin, James; Alam, S Munir; Cupo, Albert; Haynes, Barton F; Kappes, John C; Moore, John P; Sodroski, Joseph G; Desaire, Heather

    2017-05-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) glycosylation is important because individual glycans are components of multiple broadly neutralizing antibody epitopes, while shielding other sites that might otherwise be immunogenic. The glycosylation on Env is influenced by a variety of factors, including the genotype of the protein, the cell line used for its expression, and the details of the construct design. Here, we used a mass spectrometry (MS)-based approach to map the complete glycosylation profile at every site in multiple HIV-1 Env trimers, accomplishing two goals. (i) We determined which glycosylation sites contain conserved glycan profiles across many trimeric Envs. (ii) We identified the variables that impact Env's glycosylation profile at sites with divergent glycosylation. Over half of the gp120 glycosylation sites on 11 different trimeric Envs have a conserved glycan profile, indicating that a native consensus glycosylation profile does indeed exist among trimers. We showed that some soluble gp120s and gp140s exhibit highly divergent glycosylation profiles compared to trimeric Env. We also assessed the impact of several variables on Env glycosylation: truncating the full-length Env; producing Env, instead of the more virologically relevant T lymphocytes, in CHO cells; and purifying Env with different chromatographic platforms, including nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA), 2G12, and PGT151 affinity. This report provides the first consensus glycosylation profile of Env trimers, which should serve as a useful benchmark for HIV-1 vaccine developers. This report also defines the sites where glycosylation may be impacted when Env trimers are truncated or produced in CHO cells.IMPORTANCE A protective HIV-1 vaccine will likely include a recombinant version of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Env is highly glycosylated, and yet vaccine developers have lacked guidance on how to assess whether their immunogens have optimal glycosylation. The following important

  16. Early short-term treatment with neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies halts SHIV infection in newborn macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hessell, Ann J.; Jaworski, J. Pablo; Epson, Erin; Matsuda, Kenta; Pandey, Shilpi; Kahl, Christoph; Reed, Jason; Sutton, William F.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Cheever, Tracy A.; Barnette, Philip T.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Planer, Shannon; Stanton, Jeffrey J.; Pegu, Amarendra; Chen, Xuejun; Wang, Keyun; Siess, Don; Burke, David; Park, Byung S.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Lewis, Anne; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Graham, Barney S.; Mascola, John R.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested anti-HIV-1 human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAb) as post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with SHIVSF162P3. On days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after virus exposure, we injected animals subcutaneously with NmAbs and quantified systemic distribution of NmAbs in multiple tissues within 24 h following administration. Replicating virus was found in multiple tissues by day 1 in animals without treatment. All NmAb-treated macaques were free of virus in blood and tissues at 6 months post-exposure. We detected no anti-SHIV T cell responses in blood or tissues at necropsy, and no virus emerged following CD8+ T cell depletion. These results suggest early passive immunotherapy can eliminate early viral foci and thereby prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs. PMID:26998834

  17. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by vaginally delivered inhibitors of virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Klasse, Per Johan; Schader, Susan M; Hu, Qinxue; Ketas, Thomas J; Lu, Min; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Colonno, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J; Springer, Martin S; Moore, John P

    2005-11-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continues to spread, principally by heterosexual sex, but no vaccine is available. Hence, alternative prevention methods are needed to supplement educational and behavioural-modification programmes. One such approach is a vaginal microbicide: the application of inhibitory compounds before intercourse. Here, we have evaluated the microbicide concept using the rhesus macaque 'high dose' vaginal transmission model with a CCR5-receptor-using simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) and three compounds that inhibit different stages of the virus-cell attachment and entry process. These compounds are BMS-378806, a small molecule that binds the viral gp120 glycoprotein and prevents its attachment to the CD4 and CCR5 receptors, CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to CCR5 to inhibit gp120 association, and C52L, a bacterially expressed peptide inhibitor of gp41-mediated fusion. In vitro, all three compounds inhibit infection of T cells and cervical tissue explants, and C52L acts synergistically with CMPD167 or BMS-378806 to inhibit infection of cell lines. In vivo, significant protection was achieved using each compound alone and in combinations. CMPD167 and BMS-378806 were protective even when applied 6 h before challenge.

  18. Immune mechanisms associated with protection from vaginal SIV challenge in rhesus monkeys infected with virulence-attenuated SHIV 89.6.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher J; Abel, Kristina

    2005-10-01

    Although live-attenuated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) vaccines may never be used clinically, these vaccines have provided the most durable protection from intravenous (IV) challenge in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/rhesus macaque model. Systemic infection with virulence attenuated-simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6 provides protection against vaginal SIV challenge. This paper reviews the findings related to the innate and adaptive immune responses and the role of inflammation associated with protection in the SHIV 89.6/SIVmac239 model. By an as yet undefined mechanism, most monkeys vaccinated with live-attenuated SHIV 89.6 mounted effective anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses while avoiding the self-destructive inflammatory cycle found in the lymphoid tissues of unprotected and unvaccinated monkeys.

  19. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  20. Evaluation of -2 RANTES vaginal microbicide formulations in a nonhuman primate simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge model.

    PubMed

    Kish-Catalone, Tina; Pal, Ranajit; Parrish, John; Rose, Nicholas; Hocker, Lindsey; Hudacik, Lauren; Reitz, Marvin; Gallo, Robert; Devico, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A potential strategy to combat the worldwide AIDS epidemic is to develop a vaginal microbicide that prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. One approach for preventing vaginal HIV transmission is to block the viral coreceptor CCR5 with naturally occurring chemokine ligands. In this study, we used a cynomolgus macaque model to evaluate whether a variant of the CCR5 ligand RANTES (-2 RANTES), tested alone or in a nonphospholipid liposome carrier (Novasomes 7474), blocks vaginal challenge with a CCR5-tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV(162P3)). When tested in vitro, the synthetic chemokine potently inhibited SHIV(162P3) infection of cynomolgus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Colposcopic examinations of treated animals and histological examination of cervicovaginal biopsies showed minimal signs of tissue inflammation following vaginal application of Novasomes 7474, -2 RANTES formulated in Novasomes 7474, or -2 RANTES alone. Following vaginal challenge with SHIV(162P3), complete protection was observed in four of six animals treated vaginally with -2 RANTES (0.13 mM) formulated in Novasomes 7474. However, the same proportion of animals was protected by treatment with Novasomes 7474 carrier alone. Two of five animals treated with 0.5 mM -2 RANTES in PBS were protected from infection. Further, all animals were infected when treated with lower chemokine concentrations. These findings indicate that natural CCR5 ligands may have limited efficacy in stringent nonhuman primate models for vaginal infection. In comparison, liposomal agents such as Novasomes 7474 provide comparatively robust protection against vaginal transmission.

  1. Enhancing the sensitivity of Dengue virus serotype detection by RT-PCR among infected children in India.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Syed Fazil; Vivek, Rosario; Kotabagi, Shalini; Nayak, Kaustuv; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Shet, Anita

    2017-02-27

    Dengue surveillance relies on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), for confirmation of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. We compared efficacies of published and modified primer sets targeting envelope (Env) and capsid-premembrane (C-prM) genes for detection of circulating DENV serotypes in southern India. Acute samples from children with clinically-diagnosed dengue were used for RT-PCR testing. All samples were also subjected to dengue serology (NS1 antigen and anti-dengue-IgM/IgG rapid immunochromatographic assay). Nested RT-PCR was performed on viral RNA using three methods targeting 654bp C-prM, 511bp C-prM and 641bp Env regions, respectively. RT-PCR-positive samples were validated by population sequencing. Among 171 children with suspected dengue, 121 were dengue serology-positive and 50 were dengue serology-negative. Among 121 serology-positives, RT-PCR detected 91 (75.2%) by CprM654, 72 (59.5%) by CprM511, and 74 (61.1%) by Env641. Among 50 serology-negatives, 10 (20.0%) were detected by CprM654, 12 (24.0%) by CprM511, and 11 (22.0%) by Env641. Overall detection rate using three methods sequentially was 82.6% (100/121) among serology-positive and 40.0% (20/50) among serology-negative samples; 6.6% (8/120) had co-infection with multiple DENV serotypes. We conclude that detection of acute dengue was enhanced by a modified RT-PCR method targeting the 654bp C-prM region, and further improved by using all three methods sequentially.

  2. Estimating the impact of vaccination in acute SHIV-SIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy

    2008-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infects approxmately 0.5% of the world population, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A vaccine for HIV is urgently required, and a variety of vaccine modalities have been tested in animal models of infection. A number of these studies have shown protection in monkey models of infection, although the ability of the vaccine to protect appears to vary with the viral strain and animal model used. The recent failure of a large vaccine study in humans suggests that further understanding of the basic dynamics of infection and impact of vaccination are required, in order to understand the variable efficacy of vaccination in different infections. The dynamics of HIV infection have been studied in humans and in a variety of animal models. The standard model of infection has been used to estimate the basic reproductive ratio (R{sub 0}) of the virus, calculated from the growth rate of virus in acute infection. This method has not been useful in studying the effects of vaccination, since, in the vaccines developed so far, early growth rates of virus do not differ between control and vaccinated animals. Here, we use the standard model of viral dynamics to derive the reproductive ratio from the peak viral load and nadir of target cell numbers in acute infection. We apply this method to data from studies of vaccination in Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection and demonstrate that vaccination can reduce the reproductive ratio by 2.3 and 2 fold respectively. This method allows the comparison of vaccination efficacy amongst different viral strains and animal models in vivo.

  3. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  4. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Amandine Thiery, Maxime Lafond, Julie Barbeau, Benoit

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  5. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  6. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody 8ANC195 Recognizes Closed and Open States of HIV-1 Env.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Louise; Wang, Haoqing; Gao, Han; Chen, Songye; McDowall, Alasdair W; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-09-10

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike contains limited epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs); thus, most neutralizing antibodies are strain specific. The 8ANC195 epitope, defined by crystal and electron microscopy (EM) structures of bNAb 8ANC195 complexed with monomeric gp120 and trimeric Env, respectively, spans the gp120 and gp41 Env subunits. To investigate 8ANC195's gp41 epitope at higher resolution, we solved a 3.58 Å crystal structure of 8ANC195 complexed with fully glycosylated Env trimer, revealing 8ANC195 insertion into a glycan shield gap to contact gp120 and gp41 glycans and protein residues. To determine whether 8ANC195 recognizes the CD4-bound open Env conformation that leads to co-receptor binding and fusion, one of several known conformations of virion-associated Env, we solved EM structures of an Env/CD4/CD4-induced antibody/8ANC195 complex. 8ANC195 binding partially closed the CD4-bound trimer, confirming structural plasticity of Env by revealing a previously unseen conformation. 8ANC195's ability to bind different Env conformations suggests advantages for potential therapeutic applications.

  7. Alterations in Peripheral Blood B-cell Populations in SHIV89.6P-infected Macaques (Macacca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Heather M; Shipley, Timothy W; Norris, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ T cell depletion, the B cell compartment of HIV-infected patients exhibits abnormalities, including deficits and diminished responses to ex vivo antigenic stimulation and in vivo vaccination. We used chimeric simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of cynomolgus macaques to determine the dynamics of peripheral blood B cell alterations in this model of HIV infection. During the course of infection, we observed progressive loss of total and memory (CD27+) B cells, increased percentages of activated (CD95+) B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and deficits in the CD21+ B cell population. In addition, we noted declines in subsets of memory B cells, including both IgM+ and class-switched (IgD–IgM– CD27+) cells, with sustained deficits in the IgM+ memory (IgM+CD27+) B cell population. The similarity of the B cell alterations in these studies to those observed in HIV+ subjects supports the utility of the SHIV macaque model for examination of HIV-related B cell dysfunction. PMID:21819698

  8. Duration of SHIV production by infected cells is not exponentially distributed: Implications for estimates of infection parameters and antiviral efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    The duration of the eclipse phase, from cell infection to the production and release of the first virion progeny, immediately followed by the virus-production phase, from the first to the last virion progeny, are important steps in a viral infection, by setting the pace of infection progression and modulating the response to antiviral therapy. Using a mathematical model (MM) and data for the infection of HSC-F cells with SHIV in vitro, we reconfirm our earlier finding that the eclipse phase duration follows a fat-tailed distribution, lasting 19 h (18–20 h). Most importantly, for the first time, we show that the virus-producing phase duration, which lasts 11 h (9.8–12 h), follows a normal-like distribution, and not an exponential distribution as is typically assumed. We explore the significance of this finding and its impact on analysis of plasma viral load decays in HIV patients under antiviral therapy. We find that incorrect assumptions about the eclipse and virus-producing phase distributions can lead to an overestimation of antiviral efficacy. Additionally, our predictions for the rate of plasma HIV decay under integrase inhibitor therapy offer an opportunity to confirm whether HIV production duration in vivo also follows a normal distribution, as demonstrated here for SHIV infections in vitro. PMID:28202942

  9. Topical Delivery of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine from Pod-Intravaginal Rings Protects Macaques from Multiple SHIV Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Churchman, Scott A.; Yang, Flora; Dinh, Chuong T.; Mitchell, James M.; Zhang, Jining; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S.; Butkyavichene, Irina; McNicholl, Janet M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Baum, Marc M.; Smith, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Topical preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV has been marginally successful in recent clinical trials with low adherence rates being a primary factor for failure. Controlled, sustained release of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may help overcome these low adherence rates if the product is protective for extended periods of time. The oral combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only FDA-approved ARV drug for HIV PrEP. A novel pod-intravaginal ring (IVR) delivering TDF and FTC at independently controlled rates was evaluated for efficacy at preventing SHIV162p3 infection in a rigorous, repeat low-dose vaginal exposure model using normally cycling female pigtailed macaques. Six macaques received pod-IVRs containing TDF (65 mg) and FTC (68 mg) every two weeks, and weekly vaginal exposures to 50 TCID50 of SHIV162p3 began one week after the first pod-IVR insertion. All pod-IVR-treated macaques were fully protected throughout the study (P = 0.0002, Log-rank test), whereas all control animals became infected with a median of 4 exposures to infection. The topical, sustained release of TDF and FTC from the pod-IVR maintained protective drug levels in macaques over four months of virus exposures. This novel and versatile delivery system has the capacity to deliver and maintain protective levels of multiple drugs and the protection observed here warrants clinical evaluation of this pod-IVR design. PMID:27275923

  10. Protective effect of vaginal application of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory antibodies against vaginal SHIV challenge in macaques.

    PubMed

    Moog, C; Dereuddre-Bosquet, N; Teillaud, J-L; Biedma, M E; Holl, V; Van Ham, G; Heyndrickx, L; Van Dorsselaer, A; Katinger, D; Vcelar, B; Zolla-Pazner, S; Mangeot, I; Kelly, C; Shattock, R J; Le Grand, R

    2014-01-01

    Definition of antibody (Ab) functions capable of preventing mucosal HIV transmission may be critical to both effective vaccine development and the prophylactic use of monoclonal Abs. Although direct antibody-mediated neutralization is highly effective against cell-free virus, increasing evidence suggests an important role for immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition of HIV replication. Thus, a panel of well-known neutralizing (NAbs) and nonneutralizing Abs (NoNAbs) were screened for their ability to block HIV acquisition and replication in vitro in either an independent or FcγR-dependent manner. Abs displaying the highest Fc-mediated inhibitory activity in various in vitro assays were selected, formulated for topical vaginal application in a microbicide gel, and tested for their antiviral activity against SHIVSF162P3 vaginal challenge in non-human primates (NHPs). A combination of three NAbs, 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10, fully prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) vaginal transmission in 10 out of 15 treated NHPs, whereas a combination of two NoNAbs, 246-D and 4B3, although having no impact on SHIV acquisition, reduced plasma viral load. These results indicate that anti-HIV Abs with distinct neutralization and inhibitory functions differentially affect in vivo HIV acquisition and replication, by interfering with early viral replication and dissemination. Therefore, combining diverse Ab properties may potentiate the protective effects of anti-HIV-Ab-based strategies.

  11. Duration of SHIV production by infected cells is not exponentially distributed: Implications for estimates of infection parameters and antiviral efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2017-02-01

    The duration of the eclipse phase, from cell infection to the production and release of the first virion progeny, immediately followed by the virus-production phase, from the first to the last virion progeny, are important steps in a viral infection, by setting the pace of infection progression and modulating the response to antiviral therapy. Using a mathematical model (MM) and data for the infection of HSC-F cells with SHIV in vitro, we reconfirm our earlier finding that the eclipse phase duration follows a fat-tailed distribution, lasting 19 h (18–20 h). Most importantly, for the first time, we show that the virus-producing phase duration, which lasts 11 h (9.8–12 h), follows a normal-like distribution, and not an exponential distribution as is typically assumed. We explore the significance of this finding and its impact on analysis of plasma viral load decays in HIV patients under antiviral therapy. We find that incorrect assumptions about the eclipse and virus-producing phase distributions can lead to an overestimation of antiviral efficacy. Additionally, our predictions for the rate of plasma HIV decay under integrase inhibitor therapy offer an opportunity to confirm whether HIV production duration in vivo also follows a normal distribution, as demonstrated here for SHIV infections in vitro.

  12. Repeated vaginal SHIV challenges in macaques receiving oral or topical Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis induce virus-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Tsegaye, Theodros Solomon; Butler, Katherine; Luo, Wei; Radzio, Jessica; Srinivasan, Priya; Sharma, Sunita; Aubert, Rachael D.; Hanson, Debra L.; Dobard, Charles; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention is a novel biomedical prevention method. We have previously modeled PrEP during rectal SHIV exposures in macaques and identified that SHIV-specific T cell responses were induced in the presence of antiretroviral drugs, an observation previously termed T cell chemo-vaccination. This report expands those initial findings by examining a larger group of macaques that were given oral or topical PrEP during repeated vaginal virus exposure. Methods Thirty-six female pigtail macaques received up to 20 repeat low-dose vaginal inoculations with wild type (WT) SHIVSF162P3 (n=24) or a clonal derivative with the tenofovir K65R drug resistant mutation (n=12). PrEP consisted of oral Truvada (n=6, WT), tenofovir vaginal gel (n=6, K65R), or tenofovir intra-vaginal ring (n=6, WT). The remaining animals were PrEP-inexperienced controls (n=12, WT; n=6, K65R). SHIV-specific T cells were identified and characterized using IFNγ ELISPOT and multi-parameter flow cytometry. Results Of nine animals that were on PrEP and remained uninfected during WT SHIV vaginal challenges, eight (88.9%) developed virus-specific T cell responses. T cells were in CD4 and CD8 compartments, reached up to 4,900 IFNγ producing cells per million PBMCs, and primarily pol directed. In contrast, the replication impaired K65R virus did not induce detectable T cell responses, likely reflecting the need for adequate replication. Conclusion Virus-specific T cell responses occur frequently in oral or topical PrEP-protected pigtail macaques after vaginal exposure to WT SHIV virus. The contribution of such immune responses to protection from infection during and following PrEP warrants further investigation. PMID:25886925

  13. NMobTec-EnvEdu: M-Learning System for Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduced the implementation of a New Mobile Technologies and Environmental Education System (NMobTec-EnvEdu) designed for m-learning environments. The NMobTec-EnvEdu system has been developed to provide environmental education in a collaborative framework to undergraduate students through the Internet using mobile phones. The study…

  14. Nucleotide sequencing of an apparent proviral copy of env mRNA defines determinants of expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Majors, J E; Varmus, H E

    1983-01-01

    To extend our understanding of the organization and expression of the mouse mammary tumor virus genome, we determined the nucleotide sequence of large regions of a cloned mouse mammary tumor virus strain C3H provirus that appears to be a DNA copy of env mRNA. In conjunction with analysis of several additional clones of integrated and unintegrated mouse mammary tumor virus DNAs, we came to the following conclusions: (i) the mRNA for env is generated by splicing mechanisms that recognize conventional eucaryotic signals at donor and acceptor sites with a leader of at least 289 bases in length; (ii) the first of three possible initiation codons for translation of env follows the splice junction by a single nucleotide and produces a signal peptide of 98 amino acids; (iii) the amino terminal sequence of the major virion glycoprotein gp52env is confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and is encoded by a sequence beginning 584 nucleotides from the 5' end of env mRNA; (iv) the final 17 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the primary product of env are encoded within the long terminal repeat by the 51 bases at the 5' end of the U3 domain; and (v) bases 2 through 4 at the 5' end of the long terminal repeat constitute an initiation codon that commences an open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 36-kilodalton protein. PMID:6312081

  15. Phenethyl Alcohol as a Suppressor of the EnvA Phenotype Associated with the envA Gene in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Staffan

    1971-01-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12 the envA gene was previously shown to mediate chain formation and a decreased tolerance to several antibacterial agents. Phenethyl alcohol at low concentrations has now been found to increase the tolerance to actinomycin D, ampicillin, rifampin, and gentian violet in strains containing envA. The increased tolerance to gentian violet was correlated to a decreased uptake of the dye. A phenotype suppression of chain formation and colony morphology in envA mutants was also obtained. Except for an increase in palmitic acid, chemical analysis revealed no differences between an envA and its wild-type strain in the lipopolysaccharide part of the envelope. However, a decrease in the amount of phosphatidylglycerol and a C18: 1 fatty acid was observed in the extractable lipids of a strain containing envA. Growth in the presence of phenethyl alcohol reversed the changes in fatty acid and the phospholipid composition. Phenethyl alcohol was found to cause an immediate but transient inhibition of ribonucleic acid synthesis. It is suggested that this inhibition affects the penetrability barrier of the outer cell envelope layers in strains containing envA. Images PMID:4941568

  16. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) susceptible to rimantadine

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Lisa M.; Pacyniak, Erik; Miller, Jean-Marie; Hill, M. Sarah; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-05-10

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIV{sub M2}) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIV{sub VpuA19H} replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. This SHIV{sub VpuA19H} virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIV{sub M2}. Electron microscopic examination of SHIV{sub VpuA19H}-infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the

  17. Planning for RtI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Jennifer; Antrim, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In 2004 the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act authorized funding for Response to Intervention (RtI) instruction in the United States. By 2011, 71 percent of school districts had adopted RtI (Institute of Education Sciences 2011). The goal of RtI is to provide personalized, just-in-time intervention in reading and math for students who…

  18. Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to LOX-1 Elicits Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Richert, Laura; Wagner, Ralf; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Bonnabau, Henri; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Jacobs, Bertram L; Kibler, Karen; Asbach, Benedikt; Kliche, Alexander; Salazar, Andres; Reed, Steve; Self, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Improved antigenicity against HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein is needed to elicit vaccine-induced protective immunity in humans. Here we describe the first tests in non-human primates (NHPs) of Env gp140 protein fused to a humanized anti-LOX-1 recombinant antibody for delivering Env directly to LOX-1-bearing antigen presenting cells, especially dendritic cells (DC). LOX-1, or 1ectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1, is expressed on various antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and is involved in promoting humoral immune responses. The anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 fusion protein was tested for priming immune responses and boosting responses in animals primed with replication competent NYVAC-KC Env gp140 vaccinia virus. Anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 vaccination elicited robust cellular and humoral responses when used for either priming or boosting immunity. Co-administration with Poly ICLC, a TLR3 agonist, was superior to GLA, a TLR4 agonist. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Env-specific T cell responses were elicited by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140, but in particular the CD4+ T cells were multifunctional and directed to multiple epitopes. Serum IgG and IgA antibody responses induced by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 against various gp140 domains were cross-reactive across HIV-1 clades; however, the sera neutralized only HIV-1 bearing sequences most similar to the clade C 96ZM651 Env gp140 carried by the anti-LOX-1 vehicle. These data, as well as the safety of this protein vaccine, justify further exploration of this DC-targeting vaccine approach for protective immunity against HIV-1.

  19. Functional and structural characterization of EnvZ, an osmosensing histidine kinase of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Phadtare, Sangita; Inouye, Masayori

    2007-01-01

    EnvZ is an osmosensing histidine kinase located in the inner membrane, and one of the most extensively studied Escherichia coli histidine kinases. Because of its structural complexity, functional and structural studies have been quite challenging. It is a multidomain transmembrane protein consisting of 450 amino acid residues. In addition, it must form a dimer to function as a histidine kinase like all the other histidine kinases. EnvZ consists of the 115-residue periplasmic domain, two transmembrane domains (TM1 and TM2), and the cytoplasmic domain consisting of the 43-residue linker (HAMP) domain and the 228-residue kinase domain. It has been shown that the kinase domain of EnvZ, responsible for its enzymatic activities, contains all of the conserved regions of histidine kinases such as H, F, N, G1, G2, and G3 boxes. Therefore, the 271-residue cytoplasmic domain of EnvZ (termed EnvZc) has been used as a model system to establish fundamental characteristics of histidine kinases. The DNA fragment encoding EnvZc was cloned in pET vector and EnvZc was expressed and purified. It is highly soluble and retains all the enzymatic activities of EnvZ. We demonstrated that it consists of two functional domains, domain A and domain B. NMR spectroscopic studies of these two domains revealed, for the first time, the structure of a histidine kinase. Domain A is responsible for dimerization of EnvZc forming a four-helical bundle containing two alpha-helical hairpin structures, while domain B is a monomer and has an ATP-binding pocket formed by regions conserved among the histidine kinases. In this chapter, we describe functional and structural studies of EnvZc, which can be applied to characterize other histidine kinases.

  20. Pseudotyping incompatibility between HIV-1 and gibbon ape leukemia virus Env is modulated by Vpu.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tiffany M; Lyddon, Terri D; Cannon, Paula M; Johnson, Marc C

    2010-03-01

    The Env protein from gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) has been shown to be incompatible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the production of infectious pseudotyped particles. This incompatibility has been mapped to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of GaLV Env. Surprisingly, we found that the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu modulates this incompatibility. The infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with murine leukemia virus (MLV) Env was not affected by Vpu. However, the infectivity of HIV-1 pseudotyped with an MLV Env with the cytoplasmic tail from GaLV Env (MLV/GaLV Env) was restricted 50- to 100-fold by Vpu. A Vpu mutant containing a scrambled membrane-spanning domain, Vpu(RD), was still able to restrict MLV/GaLV Env, but mutation of the serine residues at positions 52 and 56 completely alleviated the restriction. Loss of infectivity appeared to be caused by reduced MLV/GaLV Env incorporation into viral particles. The mechanism of this downmodulation appears to be distinct from Vpu-mediated CD4 downmodulation because Vpu-expressing cells that failed to produce infectious HIV-1 particles nonetheless continued to display robust surface MLV/GaLV Env expression. In addition, if MLV and HIV-1 were simultaneously introduced into the same cells, only the HIV-1 particle infectivity was restricted by Vpu. Collectively, these data suggest that Vpu modulates the cellular distribution of MLV/GaLV Env, preventing its recruitment to HIV-1 budding sites.

  1. Clustering and Mobility of HIV-1 Env at Viral Assembly Sites Predict Its Propensity To Induce Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Chan, Jany; Lambelé, Marie

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates virus attachment to and fusion with target cell membranes, and yet, while Env is still situated at the plasma membrane of the producer cell and before its incorporation into newly formed particles, Env already interacts with the viral receptor CD4 on target cells, thus enabling the formation of transient cell contacts that facilitate the transmission of viral particles. During this first encounter with the receptor, Env must not induce membrane fusion, as this would prevent the producer cell and the target cell from separating upon virus transmission, but how Env's fusion activity is controlled remains unclear. To gain a better understanding of the Env regulation that precedes viral transmission, we examined the nanoscale organization of Env at the surface of producer cells. Utilizing superresolution microscopy (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy [STORM]) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we quantitatively assessed the clustering and dynamics of Env upon its arrival at the plasma membrane. We found that Gag assembly induced the aggregation of small Env clusters into larger domains and that these domains were completely immobile. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env abrogated Gag's ability to induce Env clustering and restored Env mobility at assembly sites, both of which correlated with increased Env-induced fusion of infected and uninfected cells. Hence, while Env trapping by Gag secures Env incorporation into viral particles, Env clustering and its sequestration at assembly sites likely also leads to the repression of its fusion function, and thus, by preventing the formation of syncytia, Gag helps to secure efficient transfer of viral particles to target cells. PMID:23637402

  2. Polymorphisms in the HIV-1 gp41 env gene, natural resistance to enfuvirtide (T-20) and pol resistance among pregnant Brazilian women.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mônica Nogueira da Guarda; de Alcântara, Keila Correa; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2014-01-01

    The selective pressure of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) targeting HIV-1 pol can promote drug resistance mutations in other genomic regions, such as env. Drug resistance among women should be monitored to avoid horizontal and mother-to-child transmission. To describe natural resistance to T-20 (enfuvirtide), gp41 env polymorphisms, mutations in pol and HIV-1 subtypes, 124 pregnant women were recruited. For 98 patients, the gp41 env, protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) fragments were sequenced. The patients were ARV naïve (n = 30), taking mother-to-child transmission prophylaxis (n = 50), or being treated with highly active ARV therapy/HAART (n = 18). The Stanford and IAS/USA databases and other sources were used to analyze PR/RT, gp41 env resistance mutations. The HIV-1 genetic diversity was analyzed by REGA/phylogenetic analyses. The patients' median age was 25 years (range, 16-42), 18.4% had AIDS. The frequency of natural resistance to T-20 (N42D, L44M, and R46M-low-impact mutations) was 6.1% (6/98); 20.4% (20/98) had compensatory mutations in HR2. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in the pol was 13.3% (4/30), and the prevalence of secondary drug resistance was 33.3% (6/18). Two patients were infected with multidrug resistant/MDR viruses. The analysis of HIV-1 subtypes (PR/RT/gp41) revealed that 61.2% (60/98) were subtype B, 12.2% (12/98) were subtype C, 4.1% (4/98) were subtype F1, and 22.4% (22/98) were possible recombinants (BF1 = 20.4%; BC = 2%). Natural resistance to T-20 was not associated with pol resistance or previous ARV use. The high rate of secondary resistance, including MDR, indicates that the number of women that may need T-20 salvage therapy may be higher than anticipated.

  3. Protection against SHIV Challenge by Subcutaneous Administration of the Plant-Derived PGT121 Broadly Neutralizing Antibody in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Lewis, Mark G.; Sack, Markus; Lees, Jonathan P.; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) has shown promise for prevention and treatment of HIV infection. However, multiple IV administrations in geographic locations with poor accessibility to medical care have practical limitations. We have assessed the efficacy of plant-derived PGT121 delivered subcutaneously (SC) against pre-and post-intravaginal challenge using a rigorous SHIV-SF162P3 macaque protection model. SC administered PGT121 exhibited a longer serum half-life than IV administration and was more consistent than intramuscular delivery. A dose of 3.5mg/kg PGT121 prevented infection at a minimum ID50 neutralization titer of 1:295 while 5mg/kg protected five of six macaques when delivered immediately post-challenge. These results suggest the utility of plant-derived bnAbs delivered SC for HIV prevention. PMID:27031108

  4. Relationship of estimated SHIV acquisition time points during the menstrual cycle and thinning of vaginal epithelial layers in pigtail macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Ritter, Jana; Butler, Katherine; Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Hanson, Debra; Ellis, Shanon; Zaki, Sherif; McNicholl, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV acquisition in the female genital tract remains incompletely understood. Quantitative data on biological HIV risk factors, the influence of reproductive hormones, and infection risk are lacking. We evaluated vaginal epithelial thickness during the menstrual cycle in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina). This model previously revealed increased susceptibility to vaginal infection during and following progesterone-dominated periods in the menstrual cycle. Methods Nucleated and non-nucleated (superficial) epithelial layers were quantitated throughout the menstrual cycle of 16 macaques. We examined the relationship with previously estimated vaginal SHIVSF162P3 acquisition time points in the cycle of 43 different animals repeatedly exposed to low virus doses. Results In the luteal phase (days 17 to cycle end), the mean vaginal epithelium thinned to 66% of mean follicular thickness (days 1-16; p=0.007, Mann-Whitney test). Analyzing four-day segments, the epithelium was thickest on days 9-12, and thinned to 31% thereof on days 29-32, with reductions of nucleated and non-nucleated layers to 36 and 15% of their previous thickness, respectively. The proportion of animals with estimated SHIV acquisition in each cycle segment correlated with non-nucleated layer thinning (Pearson’s r = 0.7, p<0.05, linear regression analysis), but not nucleated layer thinning (Pearson’s r = 0.6, p=0.15). Conclusions These data provide a detailed picture of dynamic cycle-related changes in the vaginal epithelium of pigtail macaques. Substantial thinning occurred in the superficial, non-nucleated layer, which maintains the vaginal microbiome. The findings support vaginal tissue architecture as susceptibility factor for infection and contribute to our understanding of innate resistance to SHIV infection. PMID:26562699

  5. Effects of modification of the HIV-1 Env cytoplasmic tail on immunogenicity of VLP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vzorov, Andrei N; Wang, Li; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Compans, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects on assembly and antigenic properties of specific modifications of the transmembrane spanning (TMS) and cytoplasmic tail (CT) domains of HIV-1 Env from a transmitted/founder (T/F) ZM53 Env glycoprotein. A construct containing a short version of the TMS domain derived from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) Env with or without a GCN4 trimerization sequence in the CT exhibited the highest levels of incorporation into VLPs and induced the highest titers of anti-Env IgG immune responses in a VLP context. Sera from guinea pigs immunized by VLPs with high Env content, and containing the CT trimerization sequence, had increased neutralization activity and antibody avidity. A cross-clade prime-boost regimen with clade B SF162 or clade C ZM53 Env DNA priming and boosting with VLPs containing modified ZM53 Env further enhanced these immune responses. The modified VLPs demonstrate improved potential as HIV-1 vaccine antigens.

  6. ALV-J GP37 molecular analysis reveals novel virus-adapted sites and three tyrosine-based Env species.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianqiang; Fan, Zhonglei; Shang, Jianjun; Tian, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jialiang; Chen, Hongjun; Shao, Hongxia; Qin, Aijian

    2015-01-01

    Compared to other avian leukosis viruses (ALV), ALV-J primarily induces myeloid leukemia and hemangioma and causes significant economic loss for the poultry industry. The ALV-J Env protein is hypothesized to be related to its unique pathogenesis. However, the molecular determinants of Env for ALV-J pathogenesis are unclear. In this study, we compared and analyzed GP37 of ALV-J Env and the EAV-HP sequence, which has high homology to that of ALV-J Env. Phylogenetic analysis revealed five groups of ALV-J GP37 and two novel ALV-J Envs with endemic GP85 and EAV-HP-like GP37. Furthermore, at least 15 virus-adapted mutations were detected in GP37 compared to the EAV-HP sequence. Further analysis demonstrated that three tyrosine-based motifs (YxxM, ITIM (immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif) and ITAM-like (immune tyrosine-based active motif like)) associated with immune disease and oncogenesis were found in the cytoplasmic tail of GP37. Based on the potential function and distribution of these motifs in GP37, ALV-J Env was grouped into three species, inhibitory Env, bifunctional Env and active Env. Accordingly, 36.91%, 61.74% and 1.34% of ALV-J Env sequences from GenBank are classified as inhibitory, bifunctional and active Env, respectively. Additionally, the Env of the ALV-J prototype strain, HPRS-103, and 17 of 18 EAV-HP sequences belong to the inhibitory Env. And models for signal transduction of the three ALV-J Env species were predicted. Our findings and models provide novel insights for identifying the roles and molecular mechanism of ALV-J Env in the unique pathogenesis of ALV-J.

  7. env Gene of Chicken RNA Tumor Viruses: Extent of Conservation in Cellular and Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Donald J.; Tal, Jacov; Varmus, Harold E.; Bishop, J. Michael

    1978-01-01

    The env gene of avian sarcoma-leukosis viruses codes for envelope glycoproteins that determine viral host range, antigenic specificity, and interference patterns. We used molecular hybridization to analyze the natural distribution and possible origins of the nucleotide sequences that encode env; our work exploited the availability of radioactive DNA (cDNAgp) complementary to most or all of env. env sequences were detectable in the DNAs of chickens which synthesized an env gene product (chick helper factor positive) encoded by an endogenous viral gene and also in the DNAs of chickens which synthesized little or no env gene product (chick helper factor negative). env sequences were not detectable in DNAs from Japanese quail, ring-necked pheasant, golden pheasant, duck, squab, salmon sperm, or calf thymus. The detection of sequences closely related to viral env only in chicken DNA contrasts sharply with the demonstration that the transforming gene (src) of avian sarcoma viruses has readily detectable homologues in the DNAs of all avian species tested [D. Stehelin, H. E. Varmus, J. M. Bishop, and P. K. Vogt, Nature (London) 260: 170-173, 1976] and in the DNAs of other vertebrates (D. Spector, personal communication). Thermal denaturation studies on duplexes formed between cDNAgp and chicken DNA and also between cDNAgp and RNAs of subgroup A to E viruses derived from chickens indicated that these duplexes were well matched. In contrast, cDNAgp did not form stable hybrids with RNAs of viruses which were isolated from ring-necked and golden pheasants. We conclude that substantial portions of nucleotide sequences within the env genes of viruses of subgroups A to E are closely related and that these genes probably have a common, perhaps cellular, evolutionary origin. PMID:212576

  8. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge.

  9. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. PMID:26889025

  10. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues.

  11. Multilineage polyclonal engraftment of Cal-1 gene-modified cells and in vivo selection after SHIV infection in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Burke, Bryan P.; Polacino, Patricia; Norman, Krystin K.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bartlett, Jeffrey S.; Symonds, Geoff P.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have focused on gene therapy approaches to induce functional cure/remission of HIV-1 infection. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of the clinical grade anti-HIV lentiviral vector, Cal-1, in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Cal-1 animals exhibit robust levels of gene marking in myeloid and lymphoid lineages without measurable adverse events, suggesting that Cal-1 transduction and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells are safe, and lead to long-term, multilineage engraftment following myeloablative conditioning. Ex vivo, CD4+ cells from transplanted animals undergo positive selection in the presence of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). In vivo, Cal-1 gene-marked cells are evident in the peripheral blood and in HIV-relevant tissue sites such as the gastrointestinal tract. Positive selection for gene-marked cells is observed in blood and tissues following SHIV challenge, leading to maintenance of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell counts in a normal range. Analysis of Cal-1 lentivirus integration sites confirms polyclonal engraftment of gene-marked cells. Following infection, a polyclonal, SHIV-resistant clonal repertoire is established. These findings offer strong preclinical evidence for safety and efficacy of Cal-1, present a new method for tracking protected cells over the course of virus-mediated selective pressure in vivo, and reveal previously unobserved dynamics of virus-dependent T-cell selection. PMID:26958575

  12. High susceptibility to repeated, low-dose, vaginal SHIV exposure late in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle of pigtail macaques.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Guenthner, Patricia C; Lin, Carol Y; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Adams, Debra R; Otten, Ron A; Heneine, Walid; Hendry, R Michael; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in susceptibility to HIV or SHIV during the menstrual cycle are currently not fully documented. To address this, the time point of infection was determined in 19 adult female pigtail macaques vaginally challenged during their undisturbed menstrual cycles with repeated, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) exposures. Eighteen macaques (95%) first displayed viremia in the follicular phase, as compared with 1 macaque (5%) in the luteal phase (P < 0.0001). Due to a viral eclipse phase, we estimated a window of most frequent virus transmission between days 24 and 31 of the menstrual cycle, in the late luteal phase. Thus, susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection is significantly elevated in the second half of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are high and when local immunity may be low. Such susceptibility windows have been postulated before but not definitively documented. Our data support the findings of higher susceptibility to HIV in women during progesterone-dominated periods including pregnancy and contraceptive use.

  13. Quantifying Selection against Synonymous Mutations in HIV-1 env Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Intrapatient evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is driven by the adaptive immune system resulting in rapid change of HIV-1 proteins. When cytotoxic CD8+ T cells or neutralizing antibodies target a new epitope, the virus often escapes via nonsynonymous mutations that impair recognition. Synonymous mutations do not affect this interplay and are often assumed to be neutral. We test this assumption by tracking synonymous mutations in longitudinal intrapatient data from the C2-V5 part of the env gene. We find that most synonymous variants are lost even though they often reach high frequencies in the viral population, suggesting a cost to the virus. Using published data from SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) assays, we find that synonymous mutations that disrupt base pairs in RNA stems flanking the variable loops of gp120 are more likely to be lost than other synonymous changes: these RNA hairpins might be important for HIV-1. Computational modeling indicates that, to be consistent with the data, a large fraction of synonymous mutations in this genomic region need to be deleterious with a cost on the order of 0.002 per day. This weak selection against synonymous substitutions does not result in a strong pattern of conservation in cross-sectional data but slows down the rate of evolution considerably. Our findings are consistent with the notion that large-scale patterns of RNA structure are functionally relevant, whereas the precise base pairing pattern is not. PMID:23986591

  14. Receptor Activation of HIV-1 Env Leads to Asymmetric Exposure of the gp41 Trimer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Structural rearrangements of HIV-1 glycoprotein Env promote viral entry through membrane fusion. Env is a symmetric homotrimer with each protomer composed of surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41. Cellular CD4- and chemokine receptor-binding to gp120 coordinate conformational changes in gp41, first to an extended prehairpin intermediate (PHI) and, ultimately, into a fusogenic trimer-of-hairpins (TOH). HIV-1 fusion inhibitors target gp41 in the PHI and block TOH formation. To characterize structural transformations into and through the PHI, we employed asymmetric Env trimers containing both high and low affinity binding sites for individual fusion inhibitors. Asymmetry was achieved using engineered Env heterotrimers composed of protomers deficient in either CD4- or chemokine receptor-binding. Linking receptor engagement to inhibitor affinity allowed us to assess conformational changes of individual Env protomers in the context of a functioning trimer. We found that the transition into the PHI could occur symmetrically or asymmetrically depending on the stoichiometry of CD4 binding. Sequential engagement of multiple CD4s promoted progressive exposure of individual fusion inhibitor binding sites in a CD4-dependent fashion. By contrast, engagement of only a single CD4 molecule led to a delayed, but symmetric, exposure of the gp41 trimer. This complex coupling between Env-CD4 interaction and gp41 exposure explained the multiphasic fusion-inhibitor titration observed for a mutant Env homotrimer with a naturally asymmetric gp41. Our results suggest that the spatial and temporal exposure of gp41 can proceed in a nonconcerted, asymmetric manner depending on the number of CD4s that engage the Env trimer. The findings have important implications for the mechanism of viral membrane fusion and the development of vaccine candidates designed to elicit neutralizing antibodies targeting gp41 in the PHI. PMID:27992602

  15. Phylogenetics of HIV-1 subtype G env: Greater complexity and older origins than previously reported.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Essomba, René G; Nindo, Frederick; Abrahams, Fatima; Nanfack, Aubin Joseph; Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Desire; Torimiro, Judith N; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Burgers, Wendy A; Martin, Darren P; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype G has played an early and central role in the emergent complexity of the HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) epidemic in central/west Africa. Here, we analysed new subtype G env sequences sampled from 8 individuals in Yaoundé, Cameroon during 2007-2010, together with all publically available subtype G-attributed full-length env sequences with known sampling dates and locations. We inferred that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the analysed subtype G env sequences most likely occurred in ∼1953 (95% Highest Posterior Density interval [HPD] 1939-1963): about 15 years earlier than previous estimates. We found that the subtype G env phylogeny has a complex structure including seven distinct lineages, each likely dating back to the late 1960s or early 1970s. Sequences from Angola, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo failed to group consistently in these lineages, possibly because they are related to more ancient sequences that are poorly sampled. The circulating recombinant form (CRF), CRF06_cpx env sequences but not CRF25_cpx env sequences are phylogenetically nested within the subtype G clade. This confirms that the CRF06_cpx env plausibly was derived through recombination from a subtype G parent, and suggests that the CRF25_cpx env was likely derived from an HIV-1M lineage related to the MRCA of subtype G that has remained undiscovered and may be extinct. Overall, this fills important gaps in our knowledge of the early events in the spread of HIV-1M.

  16. Receptor Activation of HIV-1 Env Leads to Asymmetric Exposure of the gp41 Trimer.

    PubMed

    Khasnis, Mukta D; Halkidis, Konstantine; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Root, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Structural rearrangements of HIV-1 glycoprotein Env promote viral entry through membrane fusion. Env is a symmetric homotrimer with each protomer composed of surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41. Cellular CD4- and chemokine receptor-binding to gp120 coordinate conformational changes in gp41, first to an extended prehairpin intermediate (PHI) and, ultimately, into a fusogenic trimer-of-hairpins (TOH). HIV-1 fusion inhibitors target gp41 in the PHI and block TOH formation. To characterize structural transformations into and through the PHI, we employed asymmetric Env trimers containing both high and low affinity binding sites for individual fusion inhibitors. Asymmetry was achieved using engineered Env heterotrimers composed of protomers deficient in either CD4- or chemokine receptor-binding. Linking receptor engagement to inhibitor affinity allowed us to assess conformational changes of individual Env protomers in the context of a functioning trimer. We found that the transition into the PHI could occur symmetrically or asymmetrically depending on the stoichiometry of CD4 binding. Sequential engagement of multiple CD4s promoted progressive exposure of individual fusion inhibitor binding sites in a CD4-dependent fashion. By contrast, engagement of only a single CD4 molecule led to a delayed, but symmetric, exposure of the gp41 trimer. This complex coupling between Env-CD4 interaction and gp41 exposure explained the multiphasic fusion-inhibitor titration observed for a mutant Env homotrimer with a naturally asymmetric gp41. Our results suggest that the spatial and temporal exposure of gp41 can proceed in a nonconcerted, asymmetric manner depending on the number of CD4s that engage the Env trimer. The findings have important implications for the mechanism of viral membrane fusion and the development of vaccine candidates designed to elicit neutralizing antibodies targeting gp41 in the PHI.

  17. Diverse antibody genetic and recognition properties revealed following HIV-1 Env immunization

    PubMed Central

    Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Feng, Yu; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Murillo, Paola Andrea Martinez; O’Dell, Sijy; Li, Yuxing; Mascola, John R.; Sundling, Christopher; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) elicited by vaccination provides opportunities to define the development of effective immunity. Ab responses elicited by current HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogens display narrow neutralizing activity with limited capacity to block infection by tier 2 viruses. Intense work in the field suggests that improved Env immunogens are forthcoming and it is therefore important to concurrently develop approaches to investigate the quality of vaccine-elicited responses at a higher level of resolution. Here, we cloned a representative set of MAbs elicited by a model Env immunogen in rhesus macaques and comprehensively characterized their genetic and functional properties. The MAbs were genetically diverse, even within groups of Abs targeting the same sub-region of Env, consistent with a highly polyclonal response. MAbs directed against two sub-determinants of Env, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) and the V3 region, could in part account for the neutralizing activity observed in the plasma of the animal from which they were cloned, demonstrating the power of MAb isolation for a detailed understanding of the elicited response. Finally, through comparative analyses of MAb binding and neutralizing capacity of HIV-1 using matched Envs, we demonstrate complex relationships between epitope recognition and accessibility, highlighting the protective quaternary packing of the HIV-1 spike relative to vaccine-induced MAbs. PMID:25964491

  18. With minimal systemic T-cell expansion, CD8+ T Cells mediate protection of rhesus macaques immunized with attenuated simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV89.6 from vaginal challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Genescà, Meritxell; Skinner, Pamela J; Hong, Jung Joo; Li, Jun; Lu, Ding; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J

    2008-11-01

    The presence, at the time of challenge, of antiviral effector T cells in the vaginal mucosa of female rhesus macaques immunized with live-attenuated simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6 (SHIV89.6) is associated with consistent and reproducible protection from pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaginal challenge (18). Here, we definitively demonstrate the protective role of the SIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response in SHIV-immunized monkeys by CD8(+) lymphocyte depletion, an intervention that abrogated SHIV-mediated control of challenge virus replication and largely eliminated the SIV-specific T-cell responses in blood, lymph nodes, and genital mucosa. While in the T-cell-intact SHIV-immunized animals, polyfunctional and degranulating SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells were present in the genital tract and lymphoid tissues from the day of challenge until day 14 postchallenge, strikingly, expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the immunized monkeys was minimal and limited to the vagina. Thus, protection from uncontrolled SIV replication in animals immunized with attenuated SHIV89.6 is primarily mediated by CD8(+) T cells that do not undergo dramatic systemic expansion after SIV challenge. These findings demonstrate that despite, and perhaps because of, minimal systemic expansion of T cells at the time of challenge, a stable population of effector-cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells can provide significant protection from vaginal SIV challenge.

  19. Processing and amino acid sequence analysis of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S; Schochetman, G

    1982-01-01

    The envelope proteins of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are synthesized from a subgenomic 24S mRNA as a 75,000-dalton glycosylated precursor polyprotein which is eventually processed to the mature glycoproteins gp52 and gp36. In vivo synthesis of this env precursor in the presence of the core glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin yielded a precursor of approximately 61,000 daltons (P61env). However, a 67,000-dalton protein (P67env) was obtained from cell-free translation with the MMTV 24S mRNA as the template. To determine whether the portion of the protein cleaved from P67env to give P61env was removed from the NH2-terminal end of P67env and as such would represent a leader sequence, the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the terminal peptide gp52 was determined. Glutamic acid, and not methionine, was found to be the amino-terminal residue of gp52, indicating that the cleaved portion was derived from the NH2-terminal end of P67env. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of gp52's from endogenous and exogenous C3H MMTVs were determined though 46 residues and found to be identical. However, amino acid composition and type-specific gp52 radioimmunoassays from MMTVs grown in heterologous cells indicated primary structure differences between gp52's of the two viruses. The nucleic acid sequence of cloned MMTV DNA fragments (J. Majors and H. E. Varmus, personal communication) in conjunction with the NH2-terminal sequence of gp52 allowed localization of the env gene in the MMTV genome. Nucleotides coding for the NH2 terminus of gp52 begin approximately 0.8 kilobase to the 3' side of the single EcoRI cleavage site. Localization of the env gene at that point agrees with the proposed gene order -gag-pol-env- and also allows sufficient coding potential for the glycoprotein precursor without extending into the long terminal repeat. Images PMID:6281457

  20. RT 128: New Project Incubator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-04

    i Contract No. HQ0034-13-D-0004 Task Order: 0028, RT128 Technical Report No. SERC-2015-TR-106 Copyright © 2015 Stevens...the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E)) under Contract HQ0034-13-D-0004. Any views, opinions, findings and...been approved for public release and unlimited distribution. Contract No. HQ0034-13-D-0004 Task Order: 0028, RT128 Technical Report No. SERC-2015

  1. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, Eveline J; Glenn, Jolene A; Winton, James R; Batts, William N; Gregg, Jacob L; Hershberger, Paul K

    2014-11-07

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  2. Antibody to gp41 MPER alters functional properties of HIV-1 Env without complete neutralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur S; Leaman, Daniel P; Zwick, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design.

  3. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Glenn, Jolene A.; Winton, James R.; Batts, William N.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  4. A method to determine the duration of the eclipse phase for in vitro infection with a highly pathogenic SHIV strain

    PubMed Central

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Shinji; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.; Morita, Satoru; Mori, Hiromi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The time elapsed between successful cell infection and the start of virus production is called the eclipse phase. Its duration is specific to each virus strain and, along with an effective virus production rate, plays a key role in infection kinetics. How the eclipse phase varies amongst cells infected with the same virus strain and therefore how best to mathematically represent its duration is not clear. Most mathematical models either neglect this phase or assume it is exponentially distributed, such that at least some if not all cells can produce virus immediately upon infection. Biologically, this is unrealistic (one must allow for the translation, transcription, export, etc. to take place), but could be appropriate if the duration of the eclipse phase is negligible on the time-scale of the infection. If it is not, however, ignoring this delay affects the accuracy of the mathematical model, its parameter estimates, and predictions. Here, we introduce a new approach, consisting in a carefully designed experiment and simple analytical expressions, to determine the duration and distribution of the eclipse phase in vitro. We find that the eclipse phase of SHIV-KS661 lasts on average one day and is consistent with an Erlang distribution. PMID:25996439

  5. Immunization with HIV-1 gp41 subunit virosomes induces mucosal antibodies protecting nonhuman primates against vaginal SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Bomsel, Morgane; Tudor, Daniela; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Alfsen, Annette; Ganor, Yonatan; Roger, Marie-Gaëlle; Mouz, Nicolas; Amacker, Mario; Chalifour, Anick; Diomede, Lorenzo; Devillier, Gilles; Cong, Zhe; Wei, Qiang; Gao, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Yang, Gui-Bo; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Lopalco, Lucia; Fleury, Sylvain

    2011-02-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is mainly transmitted mucosally during sexual intercourse. We therefore evaluated the protective efficacy of a vaccine active at mucosal sites. Macaca mulatta monkeys were immunized via both the intramuscular and intranasal routes with an HIV-1 vaccine made of gp41-subunit antigens grafted on virosomes, a safe delivery carrier approved in humans with self-adjuvant properties. Six months after 13 vaginal challenges with simian-HIV (SHIV)-SF162P3, four out of five vaccinated animals remained virus-negative, and the fifth was only transiently infected. None of the five animals seroconverted to p27gag-SIV. In contrast, all 6 placebo-vaccinated animals became infected and seroconverted. All protected animals showed gp41-specific vaginal IgAs with HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking properties and vaginal IgGs with neutralizing and/or antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity activities. In contrast, plasma IgGs totally lacked virus-neutralizing activity. The protection observed challenges the paradigm whereby circulating antiviral antibodies are required for protection against HIV-1 infection and may serve in designing a human vaccine against HIV-1-AIDS.

  6. A method to determine the duration of the eclipse phase for in vitro infection with a highly pathogenic SHIV strain.

    PubMed

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Shinji; Beauchemin, Catherine A A; Morita, Satoru; Mori, Hiromi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Miura, Tomoyuki; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-05-21

    The time elapsed between successful cell infection and the start of virus production is called the eclipse phase. Its duration is specific to each virus strain and, along with an effective virus production rate, plays a key role in infection kinetics. How the eclipse phase varies amongst cells infected with the same virus strain and therefore how best to mathematically represent its duration is not clear. Most mathematical models either neglect this phase or assume it is exponentially distributed, such that at least some if not all cells can produce virus immediately upon infection. Biologically, this is unrealistic (one must allow for the translation, transcription, export, etc. to take place), but could be appropriate if the duration of the eclipse phase is negligible on the time-scale of the infection. If it is not, however, ignoring this delay affects the accuracy of the mathematical model, its parameter estimates, and predictions. Here, we introduce a new approach, consisting in a carefully designed experiment and simple analytical expressions, to determine the duration and distribution of the eclipse phase in vitro. We find that the eclipse phase of SHIV-KS661 lasts on average one day and is consistent with an Erlang distribution.

  7. Role of Virus Receptor Hyal2 in Oncogenic Transformation of Rodent Fibroblasts by Sheep Betaretrovirus Env Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan-Lu; Duh, Fuh-Mei; Lerman, Michael I.; Miller, A. Dusty

    2003-01-01

    The ovine betaretroviruses jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) cause contagious cancers in the lungs and upper airways of sheep and goats. Oncogenic transformation assays using mouse and rat fibroblasts have localized the transforming activity to the Env proteins encoded by these viruses, which require the putative lung and breast cancer tumor suppressor hyaluronidase 2 (Hyal2) to promote virus entry into cells. These results suggested the hypothesis that the JSRV and ENTV Env proteins cause cancer by inhibiting the tumor suppressor activity of Hyal2. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that human Hyal2 and other Hyal2 orthologs that can promote virus entry, including rat Hyal2, can suppress transformation by the Env proteins of JSRV and ENTV. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for binding of the surface (SU) region of JSRV Env to human and rat Hyal2. However, mouse Hyal2 did not mediate entry of virions bearing JSRV or ENTV Env proteins, bound JSRV SU poorly if at all, and did not suppress transformation by the JSRV or ENTV Env proteins, indicating that mouse Hyal2 plays no role in transformation of mouse fibroblasts and that the Env proteins can transform at least some cells by a Hyal2-independent mechanism. Expression of human Hyal2 in mouse cells expressing JSRV Env caused a marked reduction in Env protein levels, indicating that human Hyal2 suppresses Env-mediated transformation in mouse cells by increasing Env degradation rather than by exerting a more general Env-independent tumor suppressor activity. PMID:12584308

  8. The nonnucleoside reverse transcription inhibitor MIV-160 delivered from an intravaginal ring, but not from a carrageenan gel, protects against simian/human immunodeficiency virus-RT Infection.

    PubMed

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Singer, Rachel; Derby, Nina; Calenda, Giulia; Mawson, Paul; Abraham, Ciby J; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Villegas, Guillermo; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2012-11-01

    We previously showed that a carrageenan (CG) gel containing 50 μM MIV-150 (MIV-150/CG) reduced vaginal simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT infection of macaques (56%, p>0.05) when administered daily for 2 weeks with the last dose given 8 h before challenge. Additionally, when 100 mg of MIV-150 was loaded into an intravaginal ring (IVR) inserted 24 h before challenge and removed 2 weeks after challenge, >80% protection was observed (p<0.03). MIV-160 is a related NNRTI with a similar IC(50), greater aqueous solubility, and a shorter synthesis. To objectively compare MIV-160 with MIV-150, herein we evaluated the antiviral effects of unformulated MIV-160 in vitro as well as the in vivo protection afforded by MIV-160 delivered in CG (MIV-160/CG gel) and in an IVR under regimens used with MIV-150 in earlier studies. Like MIV-150, MIV-160 exhibited potent antiviral activity against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. However, formulated MIV-160 exhibited divergent effects in vivo. The MIV-160/CG gel offered no protection compared to CG alone, whereas the MIV-160 IVRs protected significantly. Importantly, the results of in vitro release studies of the MIV-160/CG gel and the MIV-160 IVR suggested that in vivo efficacy paralleled the amount of MIV-160 released in vitro. Hundreds of micrograms of MIV-160 were released daily from IVRs while undetectable amounts of MIV-160 were released from the CG gel. Our findings highlight the importance of testing different modalities of microbicide delivery to identify the optimal formulation for efficacy in vivo.

  9. Intracellular trafficking of Gag and Env proteins and their interactions modulate pseudotyping of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Muriaux, Delphine; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-07-01

    Glycoproteins derived from most retroviruses and from several families of enveloped viruses can form infectious pseudotypes with murine leukemia virus (MLV) and lentiviral core particles, like the MLV envelope glycoproteins (Env) that are incorporated on either virus type. However, coexpression of a given glycoprotein with heterologous core proteins does not always give rise to highly infectious viral particles, and restrictions on pseudotype formation have been reported. To understand the mechanisms that control the recruitment of viral surface glycoproteins on lentiviral and retroviral cores, we exploited the fact that the feline endogenous retrovirus RD114 glycoprotein does not efficiently pseudotype lentiviral cores derived from simian immunodeficiency virus, whereas it is readily incorporated onto MLV particles. Our results indicate that recruitment of glycoproteins by the MLV and lentiviral core proteins occurs in intracellular compartments and not at the cell surface. We found that Env and core protein colocalization in intracytoplasmic vesicles is required for pseudotype formation. By investigating MLV/RD114 Env chimeras, we show that signals in the cytoplasmic tail of either glycoprotein differentially influenced their intracellular localization; that of MLV allows endosomal localization and hence recruitment by both lentiviral and MLV cores. Furthermore, we found that upon membrane binding, MLV core proteins could relocalize Env glycoproteins in late endosomes and allow their incorporation on viral particles. Thus, intracellular colocalization, as well as interactions between Env and core proteins, may influence the recruitment of the glycoprotein onto viral particles and generate infectious pseudotyped viruses.

  10. Parenteral Administration of Capsule Depolymerase EnvD Prevents Lethal Inhalation Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Negus, David; Vipond, Julia; Hatch, Graham J.; Rayner, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Left untreated, inhalation anthrax is usually fatal. Vegetative forms of Bacillus anthracis survive in blood and tissues during infection due to elaboration of a protective poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule that permits uncontrolled bacterial growth in vivo, eventually leading to overwhelming bacillosis and death. As a measure to counter threats from multidrug-resistant strains, we are evaluating the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of the PDGA depolymerase EnvD, a stable and potent enzyme which rapidly and selectively removes the capsule from the surface of vegetative cells. Repeated intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg recombinant EnvD (rEnvD) to mice infected with lethal doses of B. anthracis Ames spores by inhalation prevented the emergence of symptoms of anthrax and death; all animals survived the 5-day treatment period, and 70% survived to the end of the 14-day observation period. In contrast to results in sham-treated animals, the lungs and spleen of rEnvD-dosed animals were free of gross pathological changes. We conclude that rEnvD has potential as an agent to prevent the emergence of inhalation anthrax in infected animals and is likely to be effective against drug-resistant forms of the pathogen. PMID:26438506

  11. [VLP vaccines and effects of HIV-1 Env protein modifications on their antigenic properties].

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Compans, R W

    2016-01-01

    An ideal protective HIV-1 vaccine can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of preventing HIV transmission. The strategies of designing vaccines include generation of soluble recombinant proteins which mimic the native Env complex and are able to enhance the immunogenicity of gp120. Recent data indicate that the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein has multiple functions, which can affect the early steps of infection, as well as viral assembly and antigenic properties. Modifications in the CT can be used to induce conformational changes in functional regions of gp120 and to stabilize the trimeric structure, avoiding immune misdirection and induction of non-neutralizing antibody responses. Env-trimers with modified CTs in virus-like particles (VLPs) are able to induce antibodies with broad spectrum neutralizing activity and high avidity and have the potential for developing an effective vaccine against HIV.

  12. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  13. Immunogenicity of HIV-1 IIIB and SHIV 89.6P Tat and Tat toxoids in rhesus macaques: induction of humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Max W; Mirchandani, Jyotika; Silvera, Peter; Régulier, Emmanuel G; Capini, Christelle; Bojczuk, Paul M; Hu, Jason; Gracely, Edward J; Boyer, Jean D; Khalili, Kamel; Zagury, Jean-François; Lewis, Mark G; Rappaport, Jay

    2002-09-01

    This study compared immune responses in rhesus macaques immunized with unmodified HIV-1 IIIB Tat, SHIV89.6P Tat, and carboxymethylated IIIB and 89.6P Tat toxoids. Immunization with either IIIB or 89.6P preparation induced high titer and broadly crossreactive serum anti-Tat IgG that recognized HIV-1 subtype-E and SIVmac251 Tat. However, the response was delayed, and titers were lower in 89.6P vaccination groups. Serum anti-Tat IgG recognized peptides corresponding to the amino-terminus, basic domain, and carboxy-terminal region. Cellular proliferative responses to Tat toxoids corresponding to the immunogen were evident in vitro in both IIIB and 89.6P groups. Crossreactive proliferative responses were observed in IIIB groups in response to stimulation with 89.6P or SIVmac251 Tat toxoids, but were much less prevalent in 89.6P groups. The truncated 86 amino acid IIIB Tat appears to be more immunogenic than the 102 amino acid 89.6P Tat with respect to both humoral and cellular immune responses, and may be a better vaccine component. Despite induction of robust humoral and cellular immune responses (including both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses) to Tat, all animals were infected upon intravenous challenge with 30 MID(50) of SHIV89.6P and outcome of vaccine groups was not different from controls. Sequencing both Tat exons from serum viral RNA revealed no evidence of escape mutants. These results suggest that with intravenous SHIV89.6P challenge in rhesus macaques, precipitous CD4+ T-cell decline overwhelms potentially protective immune responses. Alternatively, Tat specific CD8+ T-cell responses may not appropriately recognize infected cells in vivo in this model. In view of evidence demonstrating Tat specific CTLs in the SIV model and in humans infected with HIV-1, results in this pathogenic SHIV model may not apparently predict the efficacy of this approach in human studies. The potency and cross-reactivity of these immune responses confirm Tat toxoid as an excellent

  14. Direct evidence for intracellular anterograde co-transport of M-PMV Gag and Env on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lara E.; Clark, Jasmine; Grznarova, Petra; Wen, Xiaoyun; LaCasse, Rachel; Ruml, Tomas; Spearman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular transport of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) assembled capsids from the pericentriolar region to the plasma membrane (PM) requires trafficking of envelope glycoprotein (Env) to the assembly site via the recycling endosome. However, it is unclear if Env-containing vesicles play a direct role in trafficking capsids to the PM. Using live cell microscopy, we demonstrate, for the first time, anterograde co-transport of Gag and Env. Nocodazole disruption of microtubules had differential effects on Gag and Env trafficking, with pulse-chase assays showing a delayed release of Env-deficient virions. Particle tracking demonstrated an initial loss of linear movement of GFP-tagged capsids and mCherry-tagged Env, followed by renewed movement of Gag but not Env at 4 h post-treatment. Thus, while delayed capsid trafficking can occur in the absence of microtubules, efficient anterograde transport of capsids appears to be mediated by microtubule-associated Env-containing vesicles. PMID:24418544

  15. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Center, Rob J.; Gonelli, Christopher; Muller, Brian; Mackenzie, Charlene; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F. J.

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs) capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env) that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both neutralising and non

  16. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response.

    PubMed

    Heydarchi, Behnaz; Center, Rob J; Gonelli, Christopher; Muller, Brian; Mackenzie, Charlene; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F J

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs) capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env) that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both neutralising and non

  17. Env sequence determinants in CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 subtype C.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nina H; Becerril, Carlos; Giguel, Francoise; Novitsky, Vladimir; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Lockman, Shahin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Sagar, Manish

    2012-11-25

    HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) CXCR4-using virus is isolated infrequently and is poorly characterized. Understanding HIV-1C env characteristics has implications for the clinical use of antiretrovirals that target viral entry. A total of 209 env clones derived from 10 samples with mixed CCR5-(R5), CXCR4-using (X4) or dual-tropic HIV-1C were phenotyped for coreceptor usage. Intra-patient X4 and R5 variants generally formed distinct monophyletic phylogenetic clusters. X4 compared to R5 envs had significantly greater amino acid variability and insertions, higher net positive charge, fewer glycosylation sites and increased basic amino acid substitutions in the GPGQ crown. Basic amino acid substitution and/or insertion prior to the crown are highly sensitive characteristics for predicting X4 viruses. Chimeric env functional studies suggest that the V3 loop is necessary but often not sufficient to impart CXCR4 utilization. Our studies provide insights into the unique genotypic characteristics of X4 variants in HIV-1C.

  18. Env sequence determinants in CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 subtype C

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nina H.; Becerril, Carlos; Giguel, Francoise; Novitsky, Vladimir; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Lockman, Shahin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Sagar, Manish

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) CXCR4-using virus is isolated infrequently and is poorly characterized. Understanding HIV-1C env characteristics has implications for the clinical use of antiretrovirals that target viral entry. A total of 209 env clones derived from 10 samples with mixed CCR5-(R5), CXCR4-using (X4) or dual-tropic HIV-1C were phenotyped for coreceptor usage. Intra-patient X4 and R5 variants generally formed distinct monophyletic phylogenetic clusters. X4 compared to R5 envs had significantly greater amino acid variability and insertions, higher net positive charge, fewer glycosylation sites and increased basic amino acid substitutions in the GPGQ crown. Basic amino acid substitution and/or insertion prior to the crown are highly sensitive characteristics for predicting X4 viruses. Chimeric env functional studies suggest that the V3 loop is necessary but often not sufficient to impart CXCR4 utilization. Our studies provide insights into the unique genotypic characteristics of X4 variants in HIV-1C. PMID:22954962

  19. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Rosemarie D.; Welles, Hugh C.; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O’Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Roederer, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-27312A. This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  20. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  1. Env7p Associates with the Golgin Protein Imh1 at the trans-Golgi Network in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kongara Hanumantha; Ghosh, Swagata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vesicular dynamics is one of the very important aspects of cellular physiology, an imbalance of which leads to the disorders or diseases in higher eukaryotes. We report the functional characterization of a palmitoylated protein kinase from Candida albicans whose homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be involved in negative regulation of membrane fusion and was named Env7. However, the downstream target of this protein remains to be identified. Env7 in C. albicans (CaEnv7) could be isolated from the membrane fraction and localized to vesicular structures associated with the Golgi apparatus. Our work reports Env7 in C. albicans as a new player involved in maintaining the functional dynamics at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by interacting with two other TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1p and Arl1p. Direct interaction could be detected between Env7p and the golgin protein Imh1p. Env7 is itself phosphorylated (Env7p) and phosphorylates Imh1 in vivo. An interaction between Env7 and Imh1 is required for the targeted localization of Imh1. CaEnv7 has a putative palmitoylation site toward both N and C termini. An N-terminal palmitoylation-defective strain retains its ability to phosphorylate Imh1 in vitro. An ENV7 homozygous mutant showed compromised filamentation in solid media and attenuated virulence, whereas an overexpressed strain affected cell wall integrity. Thus, Env7 plays a subtle but important role at the level of multitier regulation that exists at the TGN. IMPORTANCE A multitier regulation exists at the trans-Golgi network in all higher organisms. We report a palmitoylated protein kinase, Env7, that functions at the TGN interface by interacting with two more TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1 and Arl1. Palmitoylation seems to be important for the specific localization. This study focuses on the involvement of a ubiquitous protein kinase, whose substrates had not yet been reported from any organism, as an upstream signaling

  2. The inner membrane histidine kinase EnvZ senses osmolality via helix-coil transitions in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Loo Chien; Morgan, Leslie K; Godakumbura, Pahan; Kenney, Linda J; Anand, Ganesh S

    2012-05-30

    Two-component systems mediate bacterial signal transduction, employing a membrane sensor kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). Environmental sensing is typically coupled to gene regulation. Understanding how input stimuli activate kinase autophosphorylation remains obscure. The EnvZ/OmpR system regulates expression of outer membrane proteins in response to osmotic stress. To identify EnvZ conformational changes associated with osmosensing, we used HDXMS to probe the effects of osmolytes (NaCl, sucrose) on the cytoplasmic domain of EnvZ (EnvZ(c)). Increasing osmolality decreased deuterium exchange localized to the four-helix bundle containing the autophosphorylation site (His(243)). EnvZ(c) exists as an ensemble of multiple conformations and osmolytes favoured increased helicity. High osmolality increased autophosphorylation of His(243), suggesting that these two events are linked. In-vivo analysis showed that the cytoplasmic domain of EnvZ was sufficient for osmosensing, transmembrane domains were not required. Our results challenge existing claims of robustness in EnvZ/OmpR and support a model where osmolytes promote intrahelical H-bonding enhancing helix stabilization, increasing autophosphorylation and downstream signalling. The model provides a conserved mechanism for signalling proteins that respond to diverse physical and mechanical stimuli.

  3. Sequencing of Gag/Env association with HIV genotyping resolution and HIV-related epidemiologic studies of HIV in China.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Wang, H W; Xu, Y; Feng, Y; Zhang, H F; Wang, K H

    2016-10-24

    HIV genotyping has led to conflicting results between laboratories. Therefore, identifying the most accurate gene combinations to sequence remains a priority. Datasets of Chinese HIV subtypes based on several markers and deposited in PubMed, Metstr, CNKI, and VIP databases between 2000 and 2015 were studied. In total, 9177 cases of amplification-positive samples from 26 provinces of China were collected and used to classify HIV subtypes based on eight individual genes or a combination thereof. CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and B were the prevalent HIV subtypes in China, accounting for 84.07% of all genotypes. Gag/Env sequencing classified a greater number of HIV subtypes compared to other genes or combination of gene fragments. The geographical distribution of Gag and Gag/Env genotypes was similar to that observed with all genetic markers. Further principal component analysis showed a significantly different geographical distribution pattern of HIV in China for HIV genotypes detected with Gag/Env, which was in line with the distribution of all HIV genotypes in China. Gag/Env sequences had the highest diversity of the eight markers studied, followed by Gag and Gag/Pol/Env; Pol/Env polymorphisms were the least divergent. Gag/Env can serve as a high-resolution marker for HIV genotyping.

  4. Analysis of the human env-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in natural human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: low prevalence of broadly cross-reactive env-specific CTL.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, A; Jin, X; Sissons, P

    1996-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are part of the cellular immune response to persistent virus infections. Candidate vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) should elicit broad cross-reactive immunity to confer protection against different strains of HIV-1. As it is likely that candidate vaccines will include the envelope gene product Env, we determined the proportion of CTL clones which recognized variable and conserved determinants in three env variants during natural infection. Limiting dilution analysis was used to characterize numerous short-term CTL clones derived from peripheral blood of HIV-1-infected subjects, using split-well analysis to assay cytotoxicity against target cells expressing gp160env of HIV-1 strains IIIB, MN, and RF. In 9 of 12 HIV-1-infected subjects, at the clonal level most env-specific CTL recognized determinant(s) within one env variant but not in the other variants. In some subjects, CTL recognized multiple nonconserved determinants in different variants. The pattern of recognition of different env variants was relatively stable over time. In most of the patients studied, the proportion of CTL which showed cross-recognition of conserved determinants shared among the three strains was low. Two novel CTL epitopes within gp41 were identified by using 15-mer peptides of the HIV-SF2 sequence. When specific peptide was used to stimulate CTL precursors in vitro, the frequency of peptide-specific CTL precursors was very high, but the CTL elicited by this stimulation were highly strain specific. We conclude that the use of a single HIV env variant to detect CTL activity can underestimate the magnitude and complexity of the env-specific CTL response. The low prevalence of CTL clones which show cross-recognition of conserved determinants may have implications for immunization strategies based solely on env; to elicit broadly cross-reactive CTL other, more conserved viral antigens are

  5. Implementing RtI with Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth, Ed.; Johnsen, Susan K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Implementing RtI With Gifted Students" shares how RtI can fit within the framework of gifted education programming models. This edited book will serve as a reference guide for those interested in learning more about RtI and how it might be effectively implemented to meet the needs of all gifted students. Chapters contributed by top gifted…

  6. Crystallographic snapshot of the Escherichia coli EnvZ histidine kinase in an active conformation.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N; Hartmann, Marcus D

    2014-06-01

    Sensor histidine kinases are important sensors of the extracellular environment and relay signals via conformational changes that trigger autophosphorylation of the kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of a response regulator. The exact mechanism and the regulation of this protein family are a matter of ongoing investigation. Here we present a crystal structure of a functional chimeric protein encompassing the entire catalytic part of the Escherichia coli EnvZ histidine kinase, fused to the HAMP domain of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus Af1503 receptor. The construct is thus equivalent to the full cytosolic part of EnvZ. The structure shows a putatively active conformation of the catalytic domain and gives insight into how this conformation could be brought about in response to sensory input. Our analysis suggests a sequential flip-flop autokinase mechanism.

  7. Comprehensive Characterization of the Transmitted/founder env Genes from a Single MSM Cohort in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Huang, Xiaojie; Cai, Fangping; Vandergrift, Nathan; Xin, Ruolei; Meng, Zhefeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Chunlai; Xu, Xiaoning; Montefiori, David C; Gao, Feng; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The men having sex with men (MSM) population has become one of major risk groups for HIV-1 infection in China. However, the epidemiological patterns, function of the env genes, and autologous and heterologous neutralization activity in the same MSM population have not been systematically characterized. Methods The env gene sequences were obtained by the single genome amplification (SGA). The time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was estimated for each genotype using the Bayesian MCMC approach. Coreceptor usage was determined in NP-2 cells. Neutralization was analyzed using Env pseudoviruses in TZM-bl cells. Results We have obtained 547 full-length env gene sequences by SGA from 30 acute/early HIV-1-infected individuals in the Beijing MSM cohort. Three genotypes (Subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF07_BC) were identified and 20% of the individuals were infected with multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. The tight clusters of the MSM sequences regardless of geographic origins indicated nearly exclusive transmission within the MSM population and limited number of introductions. The tMRCA for each genotype was 10-15 years after each was first introduced in China. Disparate preferences for coreceptor usages among three genotypes might lead to the changes in percentage of different genotypes in the MSM population over time. The genotype-matched and -mismatched neutralization activity varied among the three genotypes. Conclusions Identification of unique characteristics for transmission, coreceptor usage, neutralization profile and epidemic patterns of HIV-1 is critical for the better understanding of transmission mechanisms, development of preventive strategies, and evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the MSM population in China. PMID:25886933

  8. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120–gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120–gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  9. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-09-25

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  10. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  11. Aerobic Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine by the Propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425▿

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H.; McClay, Kevin R.; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [14C]NDMA to 14CO2, growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  12. Novel Monoclonal Antibody Directed at the Receptor Binding Site on the Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus Env Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Delos, Sue E.; Accavitti, Mary Ann; White, Judith M.; Hunter, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We report here on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) subgroup A Env that will be useful in functional and structural analysis of RSV Env, as well as in approaches employing the RCAS/Tva system for gene targeting. BALB/c mice were primed and given boosters twice with EnvA-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. Resulting hybridomas were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against RCANBP virions and SU-A-immunoglobulin G immunoadhesin. One highly reactive hybridoma clone, mc8C5, was subcloned and tested in immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation (IP), and Western blotting assays. In all three assays, mc8C5-4 subgroup-specifically recognizes SR-A Env, through the SU domain, expressed from different vectors in both avian and mammalian cells. This multifunctionality is notable for a mouse monoclonal. We furthermore observed a preference for binding to terminally glycosylated Env over core-glycosylated Env precursor in IPs, suggesting that the epitope is at least partially conformational and dependent on glycosylation. Most importantly, we found mc8C5-4 inhibited Env function: in vitro, the monoclonal not only interferes with binding of the EnvA receptor, Tva, but it also blocks the Tva-induced conformational change required for activation of the fusion peptide, without inducing that change itself. Infection of Tva-expressing avian or mammalian cells by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) or EnvA-pseudotyped murine leukemia virus, respectively, is efficiently inhibited by mc8C5-4. The apparent interference of the monoclonal with the EnvA-Tva complex formation suggests that the epitope seen by mc8C5 overlaps with the receptor binding site. This is supported by the observation that mutations of basic residues in hr2 or of the downstream glycosylation site, which both impair Tva-binding to EnvA, have similar effects on the binding of mc8C5. Thus, anti-ASLV-SU-A mc8C5-4 proves to be a unique new immunoreagent that targets

  13. R5-SHIV Induces Multiple Defects in T Cell Function during Early Infection of Rhesus Macaques Including Accumulation of T Reg Cells in Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Santosuosso, Michael; Righi, Elda; Hill, E. David; Leblanc, Pierre R.; Kodish, Brett; Mylvaganam, Hari N.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Stevceva, Liljana; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Ghebremichael, Musie; Chenine, Agnes-L.; Hovav, Avi-Hai; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Poznansky, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is a pathogen that T cell responses fail to control. HIV-1gp120 is the surface viral envelope glycoprotein that interacts with CD4 T cells and mediates entry. HIV-1gp120 has been implicated in immune dysregulatory functions that may limit anti-HIV antigen-specific T cell responses. We hypothesized that in the context of early SHIV infection, immune dysregulation of antigen-specific T-effector cell and regulatory functions would be detectable and that these would be associated or correlated with measurable concentrations of HIV-1gp120 in lymphoid tissues. Methods Rhesus macaques were intravaginally inoculated with a Clade C CCR5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipd3N4. HIV-1gp120 levels, antigen-specificity, levels of apoptosis/anergy and frequency and function of Tregs were examined in lymph node and blood derived T cells at 5 and 12 weeks post inoculation. Results/Conclusions We observed reduced responses to Gag in CD4 and gp120 in CD8 lymph node-derived T cells compared to the peripheral blood at 5 weeks post-inoculation. Reduced antigen-specific responses were associated with higher levels of PD-1 on lymph node-derived CD4 T cells as compared to peripheral blood and uninfected lymph node-derived CD4 T cells. Lymph nodes contained increased numbers of Tregs as compared to peripheral blood, which positively correlated with gp120 levels; T regulatory cell depletion restored CD8 T cell responses to Gag but not to gp120. HIV gp120 was also able to induce T regulatory cell chemotaxis in a dose-dependent, CCR5-mediated manner. These studies contribute to our broader understanding of the ways in which HIV-1 dysregulates T cell function and localization during early infection. PMID:21483689

  14. Study of the HIV-2 Env Cytoplasmic Tail Variability and Its Impact on Tat, Rev and Nef

    PubMed Central

    Bakouche, Nordine; Vandenbroucke, Anne-Thérèse; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV-2 env’s 3’ end encodes the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. This genomic region also encodes the rev, Tat and Nef protein in overlapping reading frames. We studied the variability in the CT coding region in 46 clinical specimens and in 2 reference strains by sequencing and by culturing. The aims were to analyse the variability of Env CT and the evolution of proteins expressed from overlapping coding sequences. Results A 70% reduction of the length of the CT region affected the HIV-2 ROD and EHO strains in vitro due to a premature stop codon in the env gene. In clinical samples this wasn’t observed, but the CT length varied due to insertions and deletions. We noted 3 conserved and 3 variable regions in the CT. The conserved regions were those containing residues involved in Env endocytosis, the potential HIV-2 CT region implicated in the NF-kB activation and the potential end of the lentiviral lytic peptide one. The variable regions were the potential HIV-2 Kennedy region, the potential lentiviral lytic peptide two and the beginning of the potential lentiviral lytic peptide one. A very hydrophobic region was coded downstream of the premature stop codon observed in vitro, suggesting a membrane spanning region. Interestingly, the nucleotides that are responsible for the variability of the CT don’t impact rev and Nef. However, in the Kennedy-like coding region variability resulted only from nucleotide changes that impacted Env and Tat together. Conclusion The HIV-2 Env, Tat and Rev C-terminal part are subject to major length variations in both clinical samples and cultured strains. The HIV-2 Env CT contains variable and conserved regions. These regions don’t affect the rev and Nef amino acids composition which evolves independently. In contrast, Tat co-evolves with the Env CT. PMID:24223892

  15. HIV-1 Nef responsiveness is determined by Env variable regions involved in trimer association and correlates with neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2013-11-14

    HIV-1 Nef and the unrelated murine leukemia virus glycoGag similarly enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virions. We now show that the effects of Nef and glycoGag are similarly determined by variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 that control Env trimer association and neutralization sensitivity. Whereas neutralization-sensitive X4-tropic Env proteins conferred high responsiveness to Nef and glycoGag, particles bearing neutralization-resistant R5-tropic Envs were considerably less affected. The profoundly different Nef/glycoGag responsiveness of a neutralization-resistant and a neutralization-sensitive R5-tropic Env could be switched by exchanging their gp120 V1/V2 regions, which also switches their neutralization sensitivity. Within V1/V2, the same determinants governed Nef/glycoGag responsiveness and neutralization sensitivity, indicating that these phenotypes are mechanistically linked. The V1/V2 and V3 regions, which form an apical trimer-association domain, together determined the Nef and glycoGag responsiveness of an X4-tropic Env. Our results suggest that Nef and glycoGag counteract the inactivation of Env spikes with relatively unstable apical trimer-association domains.

  16. Antibody potency relates to the ability to recognize the closed, pre-fusion form of HIV Env

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-02-01

    HIV’s envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for neutralizing antibodies. The structures of many broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in complex with truncated Env subunits or components have been reported. However, their interaction with the intact Env trimer, and the structural determinants that underlie neutralization resistance in this more native context are less well understood. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange to examine the interactions between a panel of bNAbs and native-like Env trimers (SOSIP.664 trimers). Highly potent bNAbs cause only localized effects at their binding interface, while the binding of less potent antibodies is associated with elaborate changes throughout the trimer. In conjunction with binding kinetics, our results suggest that poorly neutralizing antibodies can only bind when the trimer transiently samples an open state. We propose that the kinetics of such opening motions varies among isolates, with Env from neutralization-sensitive viruses opening more frequently than Env from resistant viruses.

  17. Quantifying electrocardiogram RT-RR variability interactions.

    PubMed

    Porta, A; Baselli, G; Caiani, E; Malliani, A; Lombardi, F; Cerutti, S

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic linear parametric model is designed to quantify the dependence of ventricular repolarisation duration variability on heart period changes and other immeasurable factors. The model analyses the beat-to-beat series of the RR duration and of the interval between R- and T-wave apexes (RT period). Directly from these two signals, a parametric identification procedure and spectral decomposition techniques allow RT variability to be divided into RR-related and RR-unrelated parts and allow the RT-RR transfer function to be calculated. RT variability is driven by RR changes at low frequency (LF, around 0.1 Hz) and high frequency (HF, at the respiratory rate), whereas, at very low frequencies, the RR-unrelated contribution to the total RT variability is remarkable. During tilt at LF the RR-related RT percentage power increases (p < 0.02), the RR-unrelated RT percentage power remains unchanged, the gain of the RT-RR relationship largely increases (p < 0.001), and the phase is not significantly modified. Both the RR-related and the RR-unrelated RT percentage powers at LF are not affected by controlled respiration, and an increase in the RT-RR gain at HF is observed (p < 0.02). The proposed analysis may help to describe the regulation of the ventricular repolarisation process and to extract indexes quantifying the coupling between heart period and ventricular repolarisation interval changes.

  18. Open reading frame sequencing and structure-based alignment of polypeptides encoded by RT1-Bb, RT1-Ba, RT1-Db, and RT1-Da alleles.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Ruth A; Moustakas, Antonis K; Lobaton, Suzanne D

    2004-11-01

    MHC class II genes are major genetic components in rats developing autoimmunity. The majority of rat MHC class II sequencing has focused on exon 2, which forms the first external domain. Sequence of the complete open reading frame for rat MHC class II haplotypes and structure-based alignment is lacking. Herein, the complete open reading frame for RT1-Bbeta, RT1-Balpha, RT1-Dbeta, and RT1-Dalpha was sequenced from ten different rat strains, covering eight serological haplotypes, namely a, b, c, d, k, l, n, and u. Each serological haplotype was unique at the nucleotide level of the sequenced RT1-B/D region. Within individual genes, the number of alleles identified was seven, seven, six, and three and the degree of amino-acid polymorphism between allotypes for each gene was 22%, 16%, 19%, and 0.4% for RT1-Bbeta, RT1-Balpha, RT1-Dbeta, and RT1-Dalpha, respectively. The extent and distribution of amino-acid polymorphism was comparable with mouse and human MHC class II. Structure-based alignment identified the beta65-66 deletion, the beta84a insertion, the alpha9a insertion, and the alpha1a-1c insertion in RT1-B previously described for H2-A. Rat allele-specific deletions were found at RT1-Balpha76 and RT1-Dbeta90-92. The mature RT1-Dbeta polypeptide was one amino acid longer than HLA-DRB1 due to the position of the predicted signal peptide cleavage site. These data are important to a comprehensive understanding of MHC class II structure-function and for mechanistic studies of rat models of autoimmunity.

  19. Real-time analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env-mediated membrane fusion by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Rika A; Nishikawa, Masao; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2006-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated membrane fusion occurs as a sequence of events that is triggered by CD4 binding to the Env gp120 subunit. In this study, we analyzed the dynamics of Env-mediated membrane fusion at the single-cell level using fluorescent fusion proteins and confocal laser fluorescent microscopy. Either enhanced cyan or yellow fluorescent protein (CFP and YFP, respectively) was fused to the end of the cytoplasmic regions of the HIV-1 receptors (CD4 and CCR5) and Env proteins. Real-time imaging of membrane fusion mediated by these recombinant proteins revealed that the kinetics of fusion in our system was faster than that previously reported. Analysis of the receptor interaction by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) at the single-cell level demonstrated a tendency for oligomerization of CD4-CD4, but not of CD4-CCR5, in the absence of Env-expressing cells. However, when Env-expressing cells attached to the receptor cells, FRET produced by CD4-CCR5 interaction was increased; the FRET intensity began to decline before the formation of the fusion pore. These changes in FRET may represent the temporal association of these receptors, triggered by gp120 binding, and their dissociation during the formation of the fusion pore. In addition, the FRET analysis of receptor interactions in the presence of fusion inhibitors showed that not only inhibitors acting on CCR5 but also the gp41-derived peptide T-20 interfered with CD4-CCR5 interaction during fusion. These data suggest that T-20 could affect the formation of Env-receptors complexes during the membrane fusion.

  20. Safety and Immunogenicity of a rAd35-EnvA Prototype HIV-1 Vaccine in Combination with rAd5-EnvA in Healthy Adults (VRC 012)

    PubMed Central

    Crank, Michelle C.; Wilson, Eleanor M. P.; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E.; Hendel, Cynthia S.; Gu, Wenjuan; Nason, Martha C.; Bailer, Robert T.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    Background VRC 012 was a Phase I study of a prototype recombinant adenoviral-vector serotype-35 (rAd35) HIV vaccine, the precursor to two recently published clinical trials, HVTN 077 and 083. On the basis of prior evaluation of multiclade rAd5 HIV vaccines, Envelope A (EnvA) was selected as the standard antigen for a series of prototype HIV vaccines to compare various vaccine platforms. In addition, prior studies of rAd5-vectored vaccines suggested pre-existing human immunity may be a confounding factor in vaccine efficacy. rAd35 is less seroprevalent across human populations and was chosen for testing alone and in combination with a rAd5-EnvA vaccine in the present two-part phase I study. Methods First, five subjects each received a single injection of 109, 1010, or 1011 particle units (PU) of rAd35-EnvA in an open-label, dose-escalation study. Next, 20 Ad5/Ad35-seronegative subjects were randomized to blinded, heterologous prime-boost schedules combining rAd5-EnvA and rAd35-EnvA with a three month interval. rAd35-EnvA was given at 1010 or 1011 PU to ten subjects each; all rAd5-EnvA injections were 1010 PU. EnvA-specific immunogenicity was assessed four weeks post-injection. Solicited reactogenicity and clinical safety were followed after each injection. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated at all dosages. Antibody responses measured by ELISA were detected at 4 weeks in 30% and 50% of subjects after single doses of 1010 or 1011 PU rAd35, respectively, and in 89% after a single rAd5-EnvA 1010 PU injection. EnvA-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were detected at four weeks in 0%, 70%, and 50% of subjects after the respective rAd35-EnvA dosages compared to 89% of subjects after rAd5. T cell responses were higher after a single rAd5-EnvA 1010 PU injection than after a single rAd35-EnvA 1010 PU injection, and humoral responses were low after a single dose of either vector. Of those completing the vaccine schedule, 100% of rAd5-EnvA recipients and 90% of rAd35-Env

  1. Phylogenetic and structural diversity in the feline leukemia virus env gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Kawamura, Maki; Odahara, Yuka; Anai, Yukari; Ochi, Haruyo; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the genus Gammaretrovirus, and causes a variety of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases in cats. Alteration of viral env sequences is thought to be associated with disease specificity, but the way in which genetic diversity of FeLV contributes to the generation of such variants in nature is poorly understood. We isolated FeLV env genes from naturally infected cats in Japan and analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of these genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions separated our FeLV samples into three distinct genetic clusters, termed Genotypes I, II, and III. Genotype I is a major genetic cluster and can be further classified into Clades 1-7 in Japan. Genotypes were correlated with geographical distribution; Genotypes I and II were distributed within Japan, whilst FeLV samples from outside Japan belonged to Genotype III. These results may be due to geographical isolation of FeLVs in Japan. The observed structural diversity of the FeLV env gene appears to be caused primarily by mutation, deletion, insertion and recombination, and these variants may be generated de novo in individual cats. FeLV interference assay revealed that FeLV genotypes did not correlate with known FeLV receptor subgroups. We have identified the genotypes which we consider to be reliable for evaluating phylogenetic relationships of FeLV, which embrace the high structural diversity observed in our sample. Overall, these findings extend our understanding of Gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field, and may provide a useful basis for assessing the emergence of novel strains and understanding the molecular mechanisms of FeLV transmission in cats.

  2. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  3. Biochem-Env: a platform of biochemistry for research in environmental and agricultural sciences.

    PubMed

    Cheviron, Nathalie; Grondin, Virginie; Mougin, Christian

    2017-04-07

    Biochemical indicators are potent tools to assess ecosystem functioning under anthropic and global pressures. Nevertheless, additional work is needed to improve the methods used for the measurement of these indicators, and for a more relevant interpretation of the obtained results. To face these challenges, the platform Biochem-Env aims at providing innovative and standardized measurement protocols, as well as database and information system favoring result interpretation and opening. Its skills and tools are also offered for expertise, consulting, training, and standardization. In addition, the platform is a service of a French Research Infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems, for research in environmental and agricultural sciences.

  4. A Small Molecule, Which Competes with MAdCAM-1, Activates Integrin α4β7 and Fails to Prevent Mucosal Transmission of SHIV-SF162P3

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Goode, Diana; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Wilk, Jolanta; Frank, Ines; Byrareddy, Siddappa; Arthos, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Zydowsky, Thomas; Gettie, Agegnehu; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission is inefficient. However, certain viral and host characteristics may play a role in facilitating HIV acquisition and systemic expansion. Cells expressing high levels of integrin α4β7 have been implicated in favoring the transmission process and the infusion of an anti-α4β7 mAb (RM-Act-1) prior to, and during a repeated low-dose vaginal challenge (RLDC) regimen with SIVmac251 reduced SIV acquisition and protected the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) in the macaques that acquired SIV. α4β7 expression is required for lymphocyte trafficking to the gut lamina propria and gut inductive sites. Several therapeutic strategies that target α4β7 have been shown to be effective in treating inflammatory conditions of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To determine if blocking α4β7 with ELN, an orally available anti-α4 small molecule, would inhibit SHIV-SF162P3 acquisition, we tested its ability to block MAdCAM-1 (α4β7 natural ligand) and HIV-gp120 binding in vitro. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of ELN after oral and vaginal delivery in macaques. Twenty-six macaques were divided into 3 groups: 9 animals were treated with ELN orally, 9 orally and vaginally and 8 were used as controls. All animals were challenged intra-vaginally with SHIV-SF162P3 using the RLDC regimen. We found that ELN did not protect macaques from SHIV acquisition although it reduced the SHIV-induced inflammatory status during the acute phase of infection. Notably, integrins can exist in different activation states and, comparing the effect of ELN and the anti-α4β7 mAb RM-Act-1 that reduced susceptibility to SIV infection, we determined that ELN induces the active conformation of α4β7, while RM-Act-1 inhibits its activation through an allosteric mechanism. These results suggest that inhibition of α4β7 activation may be necessary to reduce susceptibility to SIV/SHIV infection and highlight the complexity of anti

  5. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  6. Using CoRT Thinking in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchior, Timothy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of Edward de Bono's CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) program in English classes during the past five years at Memorial Junior High School in Valley Stream, New York. CoRT tools were used to analyze literary characters and plot development and to generate and organize ideas for writing assignments. (TE)

  7. Activation of HERV-K Env protein is essential for tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fuling; Li, Ming; Wei, Yongchang; Lin, Kevin; Lu, Yue; Shen, Jianjun; Johanning, Gary L; Wang-Johanning, Feng

    2016-12-20

    Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) Env protein was previously demonstrated to be overexpressed in human breast cancer (BC) cells and tissues. However, the molecular pathways driving the specific alterations are unknown. We now show that knockdown of its expression with an shRNA (shRNAenv) blocked BC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. shRNAenv transduction also attenuated the ability of BC cells to form tumors, and notably prevented metastasis. Mechanistically, downregulation of HERV-K blocked expression of tumor-associated genes that included Ras, p-RSK, and p-ERK. The major upstream regulators influenced by HERV-K knockdown were p53, TGF- β1, and MYC. Of interest, when the HERV-K env gene was overexpressed in shRNAenv-transduced BC cells using an HERV-K env expression vector, Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway signaling was restored. CDK5, which alters p53 phosphorylation in some cancers, was upregulated and p53 was downregulated when HERV-K was overexpressed. CDK5 is also a mediator of TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migration in cancer cells, and is involved in tumor formation. Importantly, reductions in migration, invasion, and transformation of BC cells stably transduced with shRNAenv was reversed after adding back a vector with a synonymous mutation of HERV-K env. Taken together, these results indicate that HERV-K Env protein plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis of BC.

  8. HIV-1 Env associates with HLA-C free-chains at the cell membrane modulating viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Serena, Michela; Parolini, Francesca; Biswas, Priscilla; Sironi, Francesca; Blanco Miranda, Almudena; Zoratti, Elisa; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Ziglio, Serena; Valenzuela-Fernandez, Agustin; Gibellini, Davide; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Siccardi, Antonio; Malnati, Mauro; Beretta, Alberto; Zipeto, Donato

    2017-01-04

    HLA-C has been demonstrated to associate with HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). Virions lacking HLA-C have reduced infectivity and increased susceptibility to neutralizing antibodies. Like all others MHC-I molecules, HLA-C requires β2-microglobulin (β2m) for appropriate folding and expression on the cell membrane but this association is weaker, thus generating HLA-C free-chains on the cell surface. In this study, we deepen the understanding of HLA-C and Env association by showing that HIV-1 specifically increases the amount of HLA-C free chains, not bound to β2m, on the membrane of infected cells. The association between Env and HLA-C takes place at the cell membrane requiring β2m to occur. We report that the enhanced infectivity conferred to HIV-1 by HLA-C specifically involves HLA-C free chain molecules that have been correctly assembled with β2m. HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses produced in the absence of β2m are less infectious than those produced in the presence of β2m. We hypothesize that the conformation and surface expression of HLA-C molecules could be a discriminant for the association with Env. Binding stability to β2m may confer to HLA-C the ability to preferentially act either as a conventional immune-competent molecule or as an accessory molecule involved in HIV-1 infectivity.

  9. HIV-1 Env associates with HLA-C free-chains at the cell membrane modulating viral infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Michela; Parolini, Francesca; Biswas, Priscilla; Sironi, Francesca; Blanco Miranda, Almudena; Zoratti, Elisa; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Ziglio, Serena; Valenzuela-Fernandez, Agustin; Gibellini, Davide; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Siccardi, Antonio; Malnati, Mauro; Beretta, Alberto; Zipeto, Donato

    2017-01-01

    HLA-C has been demonstrated to associate with HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). Virions lacking HLA-C have reduced infectivity and increased susceptibility to neutralizing antibodies. Like all others MHC-I molecules, HLA-C requires β2-microglobulin (β2m) for appropriate folding and expression on the cell membrane but this association is weaker, thus generating HLA-C free-chains on the cell surface. In this study, we deepen the understanding of HLA-C and Env association by showing that HIV-1 specifically increases the amount of HLA-C free chains, not bound to β2m, on the membrane of infected cells. The association between Env and HLA-C takes place at the cell membrane requiring β2m to occur. We report that the enhanced infectivity conferred to HIV-1 by HLA-C specifically involves HLA-C free chain molecules that have been correctly assembled with β2m. HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses produced in the absence of β2m are less infectious than those produced in the presence of β2m. We hypothesize that the conformation and surface expression of HLA-C molecules could be a discriminant for the association with Env. Binding stability to β2m may confer to HLA-C the ability to preferentially act either as a conventional immune-competent molecule or as an accessory molecule involved in HIV-1 infectivity. PMID:28051183

  10. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response.

  11. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  12. Superiority in Rhesus Macaques of Targeting HIV-1 Env Gp140 to CD40 Versus LOX-1 in Combination with Replication Competent NYVAC-KC for Induction of Env-Specific Antibody and T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Gerard; Shen, Xiaoying; Zurawski, Sandra; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yu, Xuesong; Sato, Alicia; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bertram; Salazar, Andres; Self, Steve; Fulp, Jimmy; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2017-02-15

    We compared the HIV-1-specific immune responses generated by targeting HIV-1 envelope protein (Env gp140) to either CD40 or LOX-1, two endocytic receptors on dendritic cells (DCs), in Rhesus macaques primed with a poxvirus vector (NYVAC-KC) expressing Env gp140. The DC-targeting vaccines, humanized recombinant monoclonal antibodies fused to Env gp140, were administered as a boost with poly ICLC adjuvant either alone or co-administered with the NYVAC-KC vector. All the DC-targeting vaccine administrations with poly ICLC increased the low-level serum anti-Env IgG responses elicited by NYVAC-KC priming significantly more (up to P =0.01) than a group without poly ICLC. The responses were robust, cross-reactive, and contained antibodies specific to multiple epitopes within gp140 including the C1, C2, V1-3, C4, C5, and gp41 immuno-dominant regions. The DC-targeting vaccines also elicited modest serum Env-specific IgA responses. All groups gave serum neutralization activity limited to Tier 1 viruses and antibody dependent cytotoxicity responses (ADCC) after DC-targeting boosts. Furthermore, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses specific to multiple Env epitopes were strongly boosted by the DC-targeting vaccines + poly ICLC. Together, these results indicate that prime/boost immunization via NYVAC-KC and either αCD40.Env gp140/poly ICLC or αLOX-1.Env gp140/poly ICLC induced balanced antibody and T cell responses against HIV-1 Env. Co-administration of NYVAC-KC with the DC-targeting vaccines increased T cell responses, but had minimal effects on antibody responses except for suppressing serum IgA responses. Overall, compared to LOX-1, targeting Env to CD40 gave more robust T cell and serum antibody responses with broader epitope representation and greater durability.IMPORTANCE An effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection does not yet exist. An approach to elicit strong protective antibody development is to direct virus protein antigens specifically to dendritic cells

  13. Respiratory virus multiplex RT-PCR assay sensitivities and influence factors in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jikui; Ma, Zhuoya; Huang, Wenbo; Li, Chengrong; Wang, Heping; Zheng, Yuejie; Zhou, Rong; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays have been widely used tools for detection and differentiation of a panel of respiratory viral pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the Qiagen ResPlex II V2.0 kit and explored factors influencing its sensitivity. Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens were prospectively collected from pediatric inpatients with lower respiratory tract infections at the time of admission in the Shenzhen Children's Hospital from May 2009 to April 2010. Total nucleic acids were extracted using the EZ1 system (Qiagen, Germany) and 17 respiratory viruses and genotypes including influenza A virus (FluA), FluB, parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV1), PIV2, PIV3, PIV4, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses (RhV), enteroviruses (EnV), human bocaviruses (hBoV), adenoviruses (AdV), four coronaviruses (229E, OC43, NL63 and HKU1), and FluA 2009 pandemic H1N1(H1N1-p) were detected and identified by the ResPlex II kit. In parallel, 16 real-time TaqMan quantitative RT-PCR assays were used to quantitatively detect each virus except for RhV. Influenza and parainfluenza viral cultures were also performed. Among the total 438 NPS specimens collected during the study period, one or more viral pathogens were detected in 274 (62.6%) and 201(45.9%) specimens by monoplex TaqMan RT-PCR and multiplex ResPlex, respectively. When results from monoplex PCR or cell culture were used as the reference standard, the multiplex PCR possessed specificities of 92.9-100.0%. The sensitivity of multiplex PCR for PIV3, hMPV, PIV1 and BoV were 73.1%, 70%, 66.7% and 55.6%, respectively, while low sensitivities (11.1%-40.0%) were observed for FluA, EnV, OC43, RSV and H1N1. Among the seven viruses/genotypes detected with higher frequencies, multiplex PCR sensitivities were correlated significantly with viral loads determined by the TaqMan RT-PCR in FluA, H1N1-p and RSV (p=0.011-0.000). The Qiagen ResPlex II multiplex RT-PCR kit possesses excellent specificity for simultaneous

  14. Structural insights into key sites of vulnerability on HIV-1 Env and influenza HA.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Peter S; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are the surface glycoproteins responsible for viral entry into host cells, the first step in the virus life cycle necessary to initiate infection. These glycoproteins exhibit a high degree of sequence variability and glycosylation, which are used as strategies to escape host immune responses. Nonetheless, antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against these viruses have been isolated that have managed to overcome these barriers. Here, we review recent advances in the structural characterization of these antibodies with their viral antigens that defines a few sites of vulnerability on these viral spikes. These broadly neutralizing antibodies tend to focus their recognition on the sites of similar function between the two viruses: the receptor-binding site and membrane fusion machinery. However, some sites of recognition are unique to the virus neutralized, such as the dense shield of oligomannose carbohydrates on HIV-1 Env. These observations are discussed in the context of structure-based design strategies to aid in vaccine design or development of antivirals.

  15. Ultrastructural evidence of an interaction between Env and Gag proteins during assembly of HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Bugelski, P J; Maleeff, B E; Klinkner, A M; Ventre, J; Hart, T K

    1995-01-01

    Assembly and budding of retroviruses is believed to involve a complex interaction of envelope and capsid proteins at the host cell membrane. The nature of these interactions is, however, incompletely understood. Studies of the topography of the surface of HIV-1 have shown that the envelope glycoprotein projections (knobs) are arranged in a T = 7 levo rotational symmetry. Similarly, an icosahedral structure has been suggested for the p17 matrix of HIV-1. In an effort to investigate whether there is a structural interaction between these molecules, virions whose maturation was blocked by an inhibitor of HIV protease were studied using cytochemistry, morphometry, and 2D fast Fourier transform image enhancement. Analysis of the relationship between core morphology and the topographic distribution of envelope glycoprotein projections on HIV-1 provided structural evidence of an interaction between Env and Gag proteins. Furthermore, image enhancement revealed a periodic substructure in the Pr55gag plaque. Taken together, the data suggest an interaction between Pr55gag and the gp120-gp41 complex during assembly and budding of HIV-1. This interaction may, in part, contribute to determining the amount of Env glycoprotein that will be incorporated into a virion, and therefore play a role in the biology of HIV-1.

  16. A Highly Conserved gp120 Inner Domain Residue Modulates Env Conformation and Trimer Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Tolbert, William D.; Prévost, Jérémie; Pacheco, Beatriz; Coutu, Mathieu; Debbeche, Olfa; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that highly conserved residues in the inner domain of gp120 are required for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) transitions to the CD4-bound conformation (A. Finzi, S. H. Xiang, B. Pacheco, L. Wang, J. Haight, et al., Mol Cell 37:656–667, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2010.02.012; A. Desormeaux, M. Coutu, H. Medjahed, B. Pacheco, A. Herschhorn, et al., J Virol 87:2549–2562, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03104-12). Moreover, W69, a highly conserved residue located at the interface between layer 1 and layer 2 of the inner domain, was recently shown to be important for efficient Env recognition by CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies capable of potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (W. D. Tolbert, N. Gohain, M. Veillette, J. P. Chapleau, C. Orlandi, et al., 2016, Structure 24:697–709, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.str.2016.03.005; S. Ding, M. Veillette, M. Coutu, J. Prevost, L. Scharf, et al., 2016, J Virol 90:2127–2134, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02779-15). We evaluated the contribution of the hydrophobicity of W69 to conformational changes of Env by replacing it with a series of residues with aliphatic or aromatic side chains of decreasing chain length. We have found that the hydrophobicity of residue 69 is important for Env processing, CD4 binding, and its transition to the CD4-bound conformation. The most deleterious effect was observed when W69 was replaced with alanine or glycine residues. However, the functions lost due to W69 mutations could be progressively restored with amino acids of increasing aliphatic chain length and fully recovered with residues bearing an aromatic ring. Interestingly, poor CD4 binding of W69A could be fully restored by introducing a compensatory mutation within layer 2 (S115W). Structural studies of HIV-1 gp120 coree W69A/S115W mutant bound to the CD4 peptide mimetic M48U1 and Fab of anti-cluster A antibody N60-i3 revealed no perturbations to the overall structure of the

  17. Antidiabetic, antidyslipidemic and toxicity profile of ENV-2: A potent pyrazole derivative against diabetes and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, Eduardo; Ocampo-Montalban, Hugo; Cerón-Romero, Litzia; Cruz, Miguel; Gómez-Zamudio, Jaime; Hiriart-Valencia, Guadalupe; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Flores-Flores, Angelica; Estrada-Soto, Samuel

    2017-03-18

    Diabetes is a major health problem and a predisposition factor for further degenerative complications and, therefore, novel therapies are urgently needed. Currently, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 receptor) antagonists have been considered as promissory entities for metabolic disorders treatment. Accordingly, the purpose of this work was the evaluation of the sub-acute antidiabetic, anti-hyperglycemic, antidyslipidemic and toxicological profile of ENV-2, a potent hypoglycemic and antioxidant CB1 receptor antagonist. In this study, ENV-2 showed a pronounced anti-hyperglycemic effect even at a dose of 5mg/kg (P<0.05) in a glucose tolerance test on normoglycemic rats. Moreover, after administration of ENV-2 (16mg/kg) to diabetic rats, a prominent antidiabetic activity was observed (P<0.05), which was higher than glibenclamide. Sub-acute treatment (10 days) of ENV-2 resulted in a significant reduction of plasma glucose (P<0.05). Also, the levels of peripheral lipids were improved; blood triacylglycerols (TG) and cholesterol (CHOL) were diminished (P<0.05). In addition, it was found that ENV-2 reduced IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA expression in adipose tissue (P<0.05). Due to the satisfactory outcomes, we were interested in evaluating the toxicity of ENV-2 in both acute and sub-chronic approaches. Regarding the acute administration, the compound resulted to be non-toxic and was grouped in category 5 according to OECD. It was also found that sub-chronic administration did not increase the size of the studied organs, while no structural damage was observed in heart, lung, liver and kidney tissues. Finally, neither AST nor ALT damage hepatic markers were augmented.

  18. Protection of rhesus macaques against disease progression from pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD by vaccination with phage-displayed HIV-1 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Scala, G; Quinto, I; Liu, W; Chun, T W; Justement, J S; Cohen, O J; vanCott, T C; Iwanicki, M; Lewis, M G; Greenhouse, J; Barry, T; Venzon, D; Fauci, A S

    2001-11-01

    The antigenic polymorphism of HIV-1 is a major obstacle in developing an effective vaccine. Accordingly, we screened random peptide libraries (RPLs) displayed on phage with antibodies from HIV-infected individuals and identified an array of HIV-specific epitopes that behave as antigenic mimics of conformational epitopes of gp120 and gp41 proteins. We report that the selected epitopes are shared by a collection of HIV-1 isolates of clades A-F. The phage-borne epitopes are immunogenic in rhesus macaques, where they elicit envelope-specific antibody responses. Upon intravenous challenge with 60 MID50 of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD, all monkeys became infected; however, in contrast to the naive and mock-immunized monkeys, four of five mimotope-immunized monkeys experienced lower levels of peak viremia, followed by viral set points of undetectable or transient levels of viremia and a mild decline of CD4+ T cells, and were protected from progression to AIDS-like illness. These results provide a new approach to the design of broadly protective HIV-1 vaccines.

  19. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  20. Putative Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Binding Motifs in Ovine Betaretrovirus Env Proteins Are Not Essential for Rodent Fibroblast Transformation and PI3K/Akt Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan-Lu; Lerman, Michael I.; Miller, A. Dusty

    2003-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) are simple betaretroviruses that cause epithelial cell tumors in the lower and upper airways of sheep and goats. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of both viruses can transform rodent and chicken fibroblasts, indicating that they play an essential role in oncogenesis. Previous studies found that a YXXM motif in the Env cytoplasmic tail, a putative docking site for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) after tyrosine phosphorylation, was necessary for rodent cell transformation but was not required for transformation of DF-1 chicken fibroblasts. Here we show that JSRV and ENTV Env proteins with tyrosine or methionine mutations in the YXXM motif can still transform rodent fibroblasts, albeit with reduced efficiency. Akt was activated in cells transformed by JSRV or ENTV Env proteins and in cells transformed by the proteins with tyrosine mutations. Furthermore, the PI3K-specific inhibitor LY294002 could inhibit Akt activation and cell transformation in all cases, indicating that Akt activation and transformation is PI3K dependent. However, we could not detect tyrosine phosphorylation of JSRV or ENTV Env proteins or an interaction between the Env proteins and PI3K in the transformed cells. We found no evidence for mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in cells that were transformed by the JSRV or ENTV Env proteins. We conclude that ovine betaretrovirus Env proteins transform the rodent fibroblasts by indirectly activating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:12829832

  1. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-02-24

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype.

  2. Hypothyroid Graves' disease complicated with elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV): a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ukinç, Kubilay; Bayraktar, Miyase; Gedik, Arzu

    2009-08-01

    Thyroid dermopathy is not a frequent feature of hyperthyroid Graves' disease, being present in less than 5% of the patients. Graves' disease has been shown to exist in euthyroid or hypothyroid forms in untreated patients. Here, we describe a case of hypothyroid Graves' disease with elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV), which is an extreme form of thyroid dermopathy (TD). A 58-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with somnolence, hypothermia, and bradycardia. Her mental status gradually worsened, resulting in a deep coma. She was intubated and followed in the intensive care unit, as she needed mechanical ventilatory assistance due to respiratory failure. She also had bilateral non-pitting edema, a cobblestone-like appearance, and hyperkeratotic greenish-brown-colored lesions in the pretibial and dorsal regions of the feet that were compatible with ENV. Hypothyroid Graves' disease is a very rare condition among autoimmune thyroid disorders, and ENV is an extremely rare form of TD. Here, we present a patient with hypothyroid Graves' disease and ENV.

  3. Natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structure reveals new mode for antibody recognition of the CD4-binding site

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P; Schamber, Michael; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Seaman, Michael S; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 vaccine design is informed by structural studies elucidating mechanisms by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize and/or accommodate N-glycans on the trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env). Variability in high-mannose and complex-type Env glycoforms leads to heterogeneity that usually precludes visualization of the native glycan shield. We present 3.5-Å- and 3.9-Å-resolution crystal structures of the HIV-1 Env trimer with fully processed and native glycosylation, revealing a glycan shield of high-mannose and complex-type N-glycans, which we used to define complete epitopes of two bNAbs. Env trimer was complexed with 10-1074 (against the V3-loop) and IOMA, a new CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody. Although IOMA derives from VH1-2*02, the germline gene of CD4bs-targeting VRC01-class bNAbs, its light chain lacks the short CDRL3 that defines VRC01-class bNAbs. Thus IOMA resembles 8ANC131-class/VH1-46–derived CD4bs bNAbs, which have normal-length CDRL3s. The existence of bNAbs that combine features of VRC01-class and 8ANC131-class antibodies has implications for immunization strategies targeting VRC01-like bNAbs. PMID:27617431

  4. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  5. An amphipathic sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env alters cell tropism and modulates viral receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Yang, C; Compans, R W

    2015-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 92UG046 Env protein, obtained from a CD4-independent HIV-1 primary isolate (Zerhouni et al., 2004), has the ability to initiate an infection in HeLa cells expressing CD4 when carrying the full-length (FL) Env, but uses CD8 molecules for receptor-mediated entry when carrying a truncated Env (CT84). To determine whether a specific length or structure in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) is responsible for this alteration of tropism, we compared a series of Env constructs with different CT truncations and the presence or absence of an amphipathic alpha- helical sequence. We found that truncated constructs containing the alpha-helical LLP-2 structure in their CT domains conferred a switch from CD4 to CD8 tropism. The results support the conclusion that the structure of the CT domain can play an important role in determining receptor specificity.

  6. Structural and functional studies of the HAMP domain of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Ryuta; Falzon, Liliana; Yoshida, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inouye, Masayori

    2007-09-07

    The HAMP domain plays an essential role in signal transduction not only in histidine kinase but also in a number of other signal-transducing receptor proteins. Here we expressed the EnvZ HAMP domain (Arg(180)-Thr(235)) with the R218K mutation (termed L(RK)) or with L(RK) connected with domain A (Arg(180)-Arg(289)) (termed LA(RK)) of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli, by fusing it with protein S. The L(RK) and LA(RK) proteins were purified after removing protein S. The CD analysis of the isolated L protein revealed that it consists of a random structure or is unstructured. This suggests that the EnvZ HAMP domain by itself is unable to form a stable structure and that this structural fragility may be important for its role in signal transduction. Interestingly the substitution of Ala(193) in the EnvZ HAMP domain with valine or leucine in Tez1A1, a chimeric protein of Tar and EnvZ, caused a constitutive OmpC phenotype. The CD analysis of LA(RK)(A193L) revealed that this mutated HAMP domain possesses considerable secondary structures and that the thermostability of this entire LA(RK)(A193L) became substantially lower than that of LA(RK) or just domain A, indicating that the structure of the HAMP domain with the A193L mutation affects the stability of downstream domain A. This results in cooperative thermodenaturation of domain A with the mutated HAMP domain. These results are discussed in light of the recently solved NMR structure of the HAMP domain from a thermophilic bacterium (Hulko, M., Berndt, F., Gruber, M., Linder, J. U., Truffault, V., Schultz, A., Martin, J., Schultz, J. E., Lupas, A. N., and Coles, M. (2006) Cell 126, 929-940).

  7. Direct in situ rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Gambino, Graziana; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    In situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a histological technique that exploits the advantages of PCR for detection of mRNA directly in tissue sections. It somehow conjugates together PCR and in situ hybridization that is more traditionally employed for mRNA localization in cell organelles, intact cells, or tissue sections. This chapter describes the application of in situ PCR for neuropeptide mRNA localization. We provide here a detailed protocol for direct in situ reverse transcription (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) with nonradioactive probes after fixation and paraffin embedding or cryosectioning. Digoxigenin-labeled nucleotides (digoxigenin-11-dUTP) are incorporated in the PCR product after RT and subsequently detected with an anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase. The procedure can be modified for use with fluorescent probes and employed in combination with enzyme/fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling.

  8. First Plasma in the RT-1 Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Watanabe, Sho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Mizumaki, Shoichi; Tosaka, Taizo; Ohtani, Yasumi; Hayakawa, Atsuro; Shibui, Masanao

    The first plasma experiment using the Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) was performed on January 12, 2006. The RT-1 is a novel plasma device constructed to explore ways to the advanced-fuel fusion. The mechanism of plasma confinement is based on the theory of high-beta equilibrium that is self-organized in a flowing plasma. A superconducting ring, levitated in the vacuum chamber, produces a magnetic field that traps high-temperature plasma, creating a magnetosphere-like configuration. Plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using an 8.2 GHz microwave.

  9. CD4-mimetic sulfopeptide conjugates display sub-nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity and protect macaques against a SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ariën, Kevin K.; Baleux, Françoise; Desjardins, Delphine; Porrot, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Michiels, Johan; Bouchemal, Kawthar; Bonnaffé, David; Bruel, Timothée; Schwartz, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Vanham, Guido; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The CD4 and the cryptic coreceptor binding sites of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are key to viral attachment and entry. We developed new molecules comprising a CD4 mimetic peptide linked to anionic compounds (mCD4.1-HS12 and mCD4.1-PS1), that block the CD4-gp120 interaction and simultaneously induce the exposure of the cryptic coreceptor binding site, rendering it accessible to HS12- or PS1- mediated inhibition. Using a cynomolgus macaque model of vaginal challenge with SHIV162P3, we report that mCD4.1-PS1, formulated into a hydroxyethyl-cellulose gel provides 83% protection (5/6 animals). We next engineered the mCD4 moiety of the compound, giving rise to mCD4.2 and mCD4.3 that, when conjugated to PS1, inhibited cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 with particularly low IC50, in the nM to pM range, including some viral strains that were resistant to the parent molecule mCD4.1. These chemically defined molecules, which target major sites of vulnerability of gp120, are stable for at least 48 hours in conditions replicating the vaginal milieu (37 °C, pH 4.5). They efficiently mimic several large gp120 ligands, including CD4, coreceptor or neutralizing antibodies, to which their efficacy compares very favorably, despite a molecular mass reduced to 5500 Da. Together, these results support the development of such molecules as potential microbicides. PMID:27721488

  10. Limited or no protection by weakly or nonneutralizing antibodies against vaginal SHIV challenge of macaques compared with a strongly neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Burton, Dennis R; Hessell, Ann J; Keele, Brandon F; Klasse, Per Johan; Ketas, Thomas A; Moldt, Brian; Dunlop, D Cameron; Poignard, Pascal; Doyle, Lara A; Cavacini, Lisa; Veazey, Ronald S; Moore, John P

    2011-07-05

    To guide vaccine design, we assessed whether human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) b12 and b6 against the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1 gp120 and F240 against an immundominant epitope on gp41 could prevent vaginal transmission of simian HIV (SHIV)-162P4 to macaques. The two anti-gp120 MAbs have similar monomeric gp120-binding properties, measured in vitro, but b12 is strongly neutralizing and b6 is not. F240 is nonneutralizing. Applied vaginally at a high dose, the strongly neutralizing MAb b12 provided sterilizing immunity in seven of seven animals, b6 in zero of five animals, and F240 in two of five animals. Compared with control animals, the protection by b12 achieved statistical significance, whereas that caused by F240 did not. For two of three unprotected F240-treated animals there was a trend toward lowered viremia. The potential protective effect of F240 may relate to the relatively strong ability of this antibody to capture infectious virions. Additional passive transfer experiments also indicated that the ability of the administered anti-gp120 MAbs to neutralize the challenge virus was a critical influence on protection. Furthermore, when data from all of the experiments were combined, there was a significant increase in the number of founder viruses establishing infection in animals receiving MAb b6, compared with other nonprotected macaques. Thus, a gp120-binding, weakly neutralizing MAb to the CD4bs was, at best, completely ineffective at protection. A nonneutralizing antibody to gp41 may have a limited capacity to protect, but the results suggest that the central focus of HIV-1 vaccine research should be on the induction of potently neutralizing antibodies.

  11. Rectal Application of a Highly Osmolar Personal Lubricant in a Macaque Model Induces Acute Cytotoxicity but Does Not Increase Risk of SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica R.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Luo, Wei; Rose, Charles E.; Blau, Dianna M.; Tsegaye, Theodros; Zaki, Sherif R.; Garber, David A.; Jenkins, Leecresia T.; Henning, Tara C.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Hendry, R. Michael; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal lubricant use is common during anal intercourse. Some water-based products with high osmolality and low pH can damage genital and rectal tissues, and the polymer polyquaternium 15 (PQ15) can enhance HIV replication in vitro. This has raised concerns that lubricants with such properties may increase STD/HIV infection risk, although in vivo evidence is scarce. We use a macaque model to evaluate rectal cytotoxicity and SHIV infection risk after use of a highly osmolar (>8,000 mOsm/kg) water-based lubricant with pH of 4.4, and containing PQ15. Methods Cytotoxicity was documented by measuring inflammatory cytokines and epithelial tissue sloughing during six weeks of repeated, non-traumatic lubricant or control buffer applications to rectum and anus. We measured susceptibility to SHIVSF162P3 infection by comparing virus doses needed for rectal infection in twenty-one macaques treated with lubricant or control buffer 30 minutes prior to virus exposure. Results Lubricant increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and tissue sloughing while control buffer (phosphate buffered saline; PBS) did not. However, the estimated AID50 (50% animal infectious dose) was not different in lubricant- and control buffer-treated macaques (p = 0.4467; logistic regression models). Conclusions Although the test lubricant caused acute cytotoxicity in rectal tissues, it did not increase susceptibility to infection in this macaque model. Thus neither the lubricant-induced type/extent of inflammation nor the presence of PQ15 affected infection risk. This study constitutes a first step in the in vivo evaluation of lubricants with regards to HIV transmission. PMID:25853710

  12. Relationship of the env genes and the endonuclease domain of the pol genes of simian foamy virus type 1 and human foamy virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mergia, A; Shaw, K E; Lackner, J E; Luciw, P A

    1990-01-01

    We have molecularly cloned and sequenced a portion of the simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1); open reading frames representing the endonuclease domain of the polymerase (pol) and the envelope (env) genes were identified by comparison with the human foamy virus (HFV). Unlike the HFV genomic organization, the SFV-1 pol gene overlaps the env gene; thus, the open reading frames reported for HFV between pol and env is not present in SFV-1. Comparisons of predicted amino acid sequences of HFV and SFV-1 reveal that the endonuclease domains of the pol genes are about 84% related. The region predicted to encode the SFV-1 extracellular env domain is 569 codons; SFV-1 and HFV have 64% amino acid similarity in this env domain. The predicted hydrophobic transmembrane env proteins of both HFV and SFV-1 show about 73% similarity. A total of 16 potential glycosylation sites are found in SFV-1 env, and 15 are found in HFV; 11 are shared. SFV-1 has 25 cysteine residues, and HFV has 23 residues; all 23 cysteine residues of HFV are conserved in SFV-1. This sequence analysis reveals that the human and simian foamy viruses are highly related. PMID:2152825

  13. Identification and characterization of the Escherichia coli envC gene encoding a periplasmic coiled-coil protein with putative peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiroshi; Narita, Setsuko; Karibian, Doris; Park, James T; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Yukinobu

    2002-07-02

    PM61 is a chain-forming envC strain of Escherichia coli with a leaky outer membrane. It was found to have an oversized penicillin-binding protein 3, which was the result of an IS4 insertion in the prc gene. The other properties of PM61 were caused by the envC mutation. We cloned the envC (yibP) gene and identified the mutation site, causing a single residue substitution, H366Y, in the PM61 envC allele. The gene product was predicted to be a periplasmic protein having coiled-coil structure in the N-terminal region and homology to lysostaphin in the C-terminal region. Overexpression of envC inhibited cell growth, and overexpression of the PM61 mutant allele caused cell lysis. Disruption of the chromosomal envC caused the same defects as the envC point mutation, indicating the gene is dispensable for growth but important for normal septation/separation and cell envelope integrity.

  14. Macrophage entry mediated by HIV Envs from brain and lymphoid tissues is determined by the capacity to use low CD4 levels and overall efficiency of fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Elaine R.; Dunfee, Rebecca L.; Stanton, Jennifer; Bogdan, Derek; Taylor, Joann; Kunstman, Kevin; Bell, Jeanne E.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana . E-mail: dana_gabuzda@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-03-30

    HIV infects macrophages and microglia in the central nervous system (CNS), which express lower levels of CD4 than CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood. To investigate mechanisms of HIV neurotropism, full-length env genes were cloned from autopsy brain and lymphoid tissues from 4 AIDS patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Characterization of 55 functional Env clones demonstrated that Envs with reduced dependence on CD4 for fusion and viral entry are more frequent in brain compared to lymphoid tissue. Envs that mediated efficient entry into macrophages were frequent in brain but were also present in lymphoid tissue. For most Envs, entry into macrophages correlated with overall fusion activity at all levels of CD4 and CCR5. gp160 nucleotide sequences were compartmentalized in brain versus lymphoid tissue within each patient. Proline at position 308 in the V3 loop of gp120 was associated with brain compartmentalization in 3 patients, but mutagenesis studies suggested that P308 alone does not contribute to reduced CD4 dependence or macrophage-tropism. These results suggest that HIV adaptation to replicate in the CNS selects for Envs with reduced CD4 dependence and increased fusion activity. Macrophage-tropic Envs are frequent in brain but are also present in lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients with HAD, and entry into macrophages in the CNS and other tissues is dependent on the ability to use low receptor levels and overall efficiency of fusion.

  15. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    PubMed

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques.

  16. Life+ EnvEurope DEIMS - improving access to long-term ecosystem monitoring data in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliment, Tomas; Peterseil, Johannes; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pugnetti, Alessandra; Blankman, David

    2013-04-01

    Long-term ecological (LTER) studies aim at detecting environmental changes and analysing its related drivers. In this respect LTER Europe provides a network of about 450 sites and platforms. However, data on various types of ecosystems and at a broad geographical scale is still not easily available. Managing data resulting from long-term observations is therefore one of the important tasks not only for an LTER site itself but also on the network level. Exchanging and sharing the information within a wider community is a crucial objective in the upcoming years. Due to the fragmented nature of long-term ecological research and monitoring (LTER) in Europe - and also on the global scale - information management has to face several challenges: distributed data sources, heterogeneous data models, heterogeneous data management solutions and the complex domain of ecosystem monitoring with regard to the resulting data. The Life+ EnvEurope project (2010-2013) provides a case study for a workflow using data from the distributed network of LTER-Europe sites. In order to enhance discovery, evaluation and access to data, the EnvEurope Drupal Ecological Information Management System (DEIMS) has been developed. This is based on the first official release of the Drupal metadata editor developed by US LTER. EnvEurope DEIMS consists of three main components: 1) Metadata editor: a web-based client interface to manage metadata of three information resource types - datasets, persons and research sites. A metadata model describing datasets based on Ecological Metadata Language (EML) was developed within the initial phase of the project. A crosswalk to the INSPIRE metadata model was implemented to convey to the currently on-going European activities. Person and research site metadata models defined within the LTER Europe were adapted for the project needs. The three metadata models are interconnected within the system in order to provide easy way to navigate the user among the related

  17. Global Panel of HIV-1 Env Reference Strains for Standardized Assessments of Vaccine-Elicited Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    deCamp, Allan; Hraber, Peter; Bailer, Robert T.; Seaman, Michael S.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John; Gottardo, Raphael; Edlefsen, Paul; Self, Steve; Tang, Haili; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Daniell, Xiaoju; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; LaBranche, Celia C.; Mascola, John R.; Korber, Bette T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Standardized assessments of HIV-1 vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibody responses are complicated by the genetic and antigenic variability of the viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs). To address these issues, suitable reference strains are needed that are representative of the global epidemic. Several panels have been recommended previously, but no clear answers have been available on how many and which strains are best suited for this purpose. We used a statistical model selection method to identify a global panel of reference Env clones from among 219 Env-pseudotyped viruses assayed in TZM-bl cells with sera from 205 HIV-1-infected individuals. The Envs and sera were sampled globally from diverse geographic locations and represented all major genetic subtypes and circulating recombinant forms of the virus. Assays with a panel size of only nine viruses adequately represented the spectrum of HIV-1 serum neutralizing activity seen with the larger panel of 219 viruses. An optimal panel of nine viruses was selected and augmented with three additional viruses for greater genetic and antigenic coverage. The spectrum of HIV-1 serum neutralizing activity seen with the final 12-virus panel closely approximated the activity seen with subtype-matched viruses. Moreover, the final panel was highly sensitive for detection of many of the known broadly neutralizing antibodies. For broader assay applications, all 12 Env clones were converted to infectious molecular clones using a proviral backbone carrying a Renilla luciferase reporter gene (Env.IMC.LucR viruses). This global panel should facilitate highly standardized assessments of vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies across multiple HIV-1 vaccine platforms in different parts of the world. IMPORTANCE An effective HIV-1 vaccine will need to overcome the extraordinary genetic variability of the virus, where most variation occurs in the viral envelope glycoproteins that are the sole targets for neutralizing antibodies

  18. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  19. Isolation and sequencing of infectious clones of feline foamy virus and a human/feline foamy virus Env chimera.

    PubMed

    Hatama, S; Otake, K; Omoto, S; Murase, Y; Ikemoto, A; Mochizuki, M; Takahashi, E; Okuyama, H; Fujii, Y

    2001-12-01

    Full-length DNAs of the Coleman and S7801 strains (pSKY3.0, pSKY5.0) of infectious feline foamy viruses (FFVs) were cloned and sequenced. Parental viruses, designated SKY3.0 and SKY5.0, were secreted following transfection of Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Production of the rescued parental viruses was enhanced in the presence of trichostatin A. Amino acid sequence similarities between FFV and human foamy virus (HFV) are extremely low for the envelope protein and capsid antigen, as predicted from the two clones. However, a chimeric FFV clone was constructed with the HFV Env substituted for the FFV Env. The chimeric virus (HFFV, SKY4.0) was able to infect and replicate in CRFK cells as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cats in vivo. Consequently, the chimeric HFFV may be useful for the creation of FV vectors for gene transfer strategies.

  20. Comparing the flammability of fabrics in accordance with EN 531 and ENV 50354.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Helena; Mustonen, Suvi Sanna

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of protective clothing and other personal protective equipment (PPE) is to provide escape time, to reduce the burn injury level, and to prevent aggravation of the consequences to workers during exposure to an electric arc. In this study the flammability properties of 12 different types of flame-retardant fabrics were compared with the normally used flame spread test method (EN 532:1994) and electric arc test method (ENV 50354:2001). In the arc test at the lower testing current level of 4 kA, the requirement was passed by materials which did not pass the flame spread test. These materials contained a large amount of melting fibres, and therefore tended to shrink or melt. In order to meet the current level of 7 kA, a rather thick and heavy flame-retardant fabric is needed to pass the requirement. Lighter fabrics tended to break open in the tests. The flame retardancy of the under layer fabric is therefore important to ensure the needed protection.

  1. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  2. Increased HIV-1 vaccine efficacy against viruses with genetic signatures in Env V2.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Morgane; Edlefsen, Paul T; Larsen, Brendan B; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Hertz, Tomer; deCamp, Allan C; Carrico, Chris; Menis, Sergey; Magaret, Craig A; Ahmed, Hasan; Juraska, Michal; Chen, Lennie; Konopa, Philip; Nariya, Snehal; Stoddard, Julia N; Wong, Kim; Zhao, Hong; Deng, Wenjie; Maust, Brandon S; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; Bates, Adam; Lazzaro, Michelle; O'Sullivan, Annemarie; Lei, Esther; Bradfield, Andrea; Ibitamuno, Grace; Assawadarachai, Vatcharain; O'Connell, Robert J; deSouza, Mark S; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; McLellan, Jason S; Georgiev, Ivelin; Kwong, Peter D; Carlson, Jonathan M; Michael, Nelson L; Schief, William R; Gilbert, Peter B; Mullins, James I; Kim, Jerome H

    2012-10-18

    The RV144 trial demonstrated 31% vaccine efficacy at preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Antibodies against the HIV-1 envelope variable loops 1 and 2 (Env V1 and V2) correlated inversely with infection risk. We proposed that vaccine-induced immune responses against V1/V2 would have a selective effect against, or sieve, HIV-1 breakthrough viruses. A total of 936 HIV-1 genome sequences from 44 vaccine and 66 placebo recipients were examined. We show that vaccine-induced immune responses were associated with two signatures in V2 at amino acid positions 169 and 181. Vaccine efficacy against viruses matching the vaccine at position 169 was 48% (confidence interval 18% to 66%; P = 0.0036), whereas vaccine efficacy against viruses mismatching the vaccine at position 181 was 78% (confidence interval 35% to 93%; P = 0.0028). Residue 169 is in a cationic glycosylated region recognized by broadly neutralizing and RV144-derived antibodies. The predicted distance between the two signature sites (21 ± 7 Å) and their match/mismatch dichotomy indicate that multiple factors may be involved in the protection observed in RV144. Genetic signatures of RV144 vaccination in V2 complement the finding of an association between high V1/V2-binding antibodies and reduced risk of HIV-1 acquisition, and provide evidence that vaccine-induced V2 responses plausibly had a role in the partial protection conferred by the RV144 regimen.

  3. Structures of HIV-1-Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M.; Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Jarosinski, Marissa C.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M.; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K.; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C.; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1-Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had only been determined with antibodies from a single donor, making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the co-crystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third. These V1V2-directed bNAbs utilized strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand, but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated protruding loops to develop early, with glycan interactions maturing over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested V1V2-directed bNAbs to form an ‘extended class’, for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class. PMID:26689967

  4. Comparison of intradermal and intramuscular delivery followed by in vivo electroporation of SIV Env DNA in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Pilkington, Guy R; Jalah, Rashmi; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Singh, Ashish K; Alicea, Candido; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Kim, Eun-Young; Wolinsky, Steven M; Huang, Wensheng; Guan, Yongjun; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Valentin, Antonio; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2013-01-01

    A panel of SIVmac251 transmitted Env sequences were tested for expression, function and immunogenicity in mice and macaques. The immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine cocktail expressing SIVmac239 and three transmitted SIVmac251 Env sequences was evaluated upon intradermal or intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation in macaques using sequential vaccination of gp160, gp120 and gp140 expressing DNAs. Both intradermal and intramuscular vaccination regimens using the gp160 expression plasmids induced robust humoral immune responses, which further improved using the gp120 expressing DNAs. The responses showed durability of binding and neutralizing antibody titers and high avidity for > 1 y. The intradermal DNA delivery regimen induced higher cross-reactive responses able to neutralize the heterologous tier 1B-like SIVsmE660_CG7V. Analysis of cellular immune responses showed induction of Env-specific memory responses and cytotoxic granzyme B+ T cells in both vaccine groups, although the magnitude of the responses were ~10x higher in the intramuscular/electroporation group. The cellular responses induced by both regimens were long lasting and could be detected ~1 y after the last vaccination. These data show that both DNA delivery methods are able to induce robust and durable immune responses in macaques. PMID:23811579

  5. A novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protein, tev, shares sequences with tat, env, and rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, D M; Schwartz, S; Pavlakis, G N; Felber, B K

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 28-kilodalton protein, p28tev, detected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells. tev is recognized by both tat and rev monospecific antibodies. tev is initiated at the tat AUG and contains the first exon of tat at its amino terminus, a small portion of env in the middle, and the second exon of rev at its carboxy terminus. A cDNA clone producing tev was cloned and expressed in human cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the tev mRNA is generated by splicing to a novel exon located in the env region. This identifies a fourth class of multiply spliced human immunodeficiency virus mRNAs, produced in infected and transfected cells. tev is regulated during the virus life cycle similarly to the other regulatory proteins, tat, rev, and nef, and displays both tat and rev activities in functional assays. Since tev contains important functional domains of tat and rev and is produced very early after transfection, it may be an important regulator in the initial phase of virus expression. Another rev-related protein, p18(6)Drev, containing env and rev sequences, was characterized and was found not to have detectable rev activity. Images PMID:2186172

  6. HIV cell-to-cell transmission requires the production of infectious virus particles and does not proceed through env-mediated fusion pores.

    PubMed

    Monel, Blandine; Beaumont, Elodie; Vendrame, Daniela; Schwartz, Olivier; Brand, Denys; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2012-04-01

    Direct cell-to-cell transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a more potent and efficient means of virus propagation than infection by cell-free virus particles. The aim of this study was to determine whether cell-to-cell transmission requires the assembly of enveloped virus particles or whether nucleic acids with replication potential could translocate directly from donor to target cells through envelope glycoprotein (Env)-induced fusion pores. To this end, we characterized the transmission properties of viruses carrying mutations in the matrix protein (MA) that affect the incorporation of Env into virus particles but do not interfere with Env-mediated cell-cell fusion. By use of cell-free virus, the infectivity of MA mutant viruses was below the detection threshold both in single-cycle and in multiple-cycle assays. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env restored the incorporation of Env into MA mutant viruses and rescued their cell-free infectivity to different extents. In cell-to-cell transmission assays, MA mutations prevented HIV transmission from donor to target cells, despite efficient Env-dependent membrane fusion. HIV transmission was blocked at the level of virus core translocation into the cytosol of target cells. As in cell-free assays, rescue of Env incorporation by truncation of the Env CT restored the virus core translocation and cell-to-cell infectivity of MA mutant viruses. These data show that HIV cell-to-cell transmission requires the assembly of enveloped virus particles. The increased efficiency of this infection route may thus be attributed to the high local concentrations of virus particles at sites of cellular contacts rather than to a qualitatively different transmission process.

  7. Human Ubc9 Is Involved in Intracellular HIV-1 Env Stability after Trafficking out of the Trans-Golgi Network in a Gag Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bohl, Christopher R.; Abrahamyan, Levon G.; Wood, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The cellular E2 Sumo conjugase, Ubc9 interacts with HIV-1 Gag, and is important for the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. In the previous study we demonstrated that in the absence of Ubc9, a defect in virion assembly was associated with decreased levels of mature intracellular Envelope (Env) that affected Env incorporation into virions and virion infectivity. We have further characterized the effect of Ubc9 knockdown on HIV Env processing and assembly. We found that gp160 stability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its trafficking to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) were unaffected, indicating that the decreased intracellular mature Env levels in Ubc9-depleted cells were due to a selective degradation of mature Env gp120 after cleavage from gp160 and trafficked out of the TGN. Decreased levels of Gag and mature Env were found to be associated with the plasma membrane and lipid rafts, which suggest that these viral proteins were not trafficked correctly to the assembly site. Intracellular gp120 were partially rescued when treated with a combination of lysosome inhibitors. Taken together our results suggest that in the absence of Ubc9, gp120 is preferentially degraded in the lysosomes likely before trafficking to assembly sites leading to the production of defective virions. This study provides further insight in the processing and packaging of the HIV-1 gp120 into mature HIV-1 virions. PMID:23861967

  8. Defense-in-depth by mucosally administered anti-HIV dimeric IgA2 and systemic IgG1 mAbs: Complete protection of rhesus monkeys from mucosal SHIV challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sholukh, Anton M.; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Vyas, Hemant K.; Gupta, Sandeep; Lakhashe, Samir K.; Thorat, Swati; Zhou, Mingkui; Hemashettar, Girish; Bachler, Barbara C.; Forthal, Donald N.; Villinger, Francois; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Agatic, Gloria; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2015-01-01

    Although IgA is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin in humans, its role in preventing HIV-1 acquisition, which occurs mostly via mucosal routes, remains unclear. In our passive mucosal immunizations of rhesus macaques (RMs), the anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nmAb) HGN194, given either as dimeric IgA1 (dIgA1) or dIgA2 intrarectally (i.r.), protected 83% or 17% of the RMs against i.r. simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge, respectively. Data from the RV144 trial implied that vaccine-induced plasma IgA counteracted the protective effector mechanisms of IgG1 with the same epitope specificity. We thus hypothesized that mucosal dIgA2 might diminish the protection provided by IgG1 mAbs targeting the same epitope. To test our hypothesis, we administered HGN194 IgG1 intravenously (i.v.) either alone or combined with i.r. HGN194 dIgA2. We enrolled SHIV-exposed, persistently aviremic RMs protected by previously administered nmAbs; RM anti-human IgG responses were undetectable. However, low-level SIV Gag-specific proliferative T-cell responses were found. These animals resemble HIV-exposed, uninfected humans, in which local and systemic cellular immune responses have been observed. HGN194 IgG1 and dIgA2 used alone and the combination of the two neutralized the challenge virus equally well in vitro. All RMs given only i.v. HGN194 IgG1 became infected. In contrast, all RMs given HGN194 IgG1 + dIgA2 were completely protected against high-dose i.r. SHIV-1157ipEL-p challenge. These data imply that combining suboptimal defenses at the mucosal and systemic levels can completely prevent virus acquisition. Consequently, active vaccination should focus on defense-in-depth, a strategy that seeks to build up defensive fall-back positions well behind the fortified frontline. PMID:25769884

  9. Single Amino Acid Substitution N659D in HIV-2 Envelope Glycoprotein (Env) Impairs Viral Release and Hampers BST-2 Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Dufrasne, François E; Lombard, Catherine; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2016-10-14

    BST-2 or tetherin is a host cell restriction factor that prevents the budding of enveloped viruses at the cell surface, thus impairing the viral spread. Several countermeasures to evade this antiviral factor have been positively selected in retroviruses: the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) relies on the envelope glycoprotein (Env) to overcome BST-2 restriction. The Env gp36 ectodomain seems involved in this anti-tetherin activity, however residues and regions interacting with BST-2 are not clearly defined. Among 32 HIV-2 ROD Env mutants tested, we demonstrated that the asparagine residue at position 659 located in the gp36 ectodomain is mandatory to exert the anti-tetherin function. Viral release assays in cell lines expressing BST-2 showed a loss of viral release ability for the HIV-2 N659D mutant virus compared to the HIV-2 wild type virus. In bst-2 inactivated H9 cells, those differences were lost. Subtilisin treatment of infected cells demonstrated that the N659D mutant was more tethered at the cell surface. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments confirmed a direct molecular link between Env and BST-2 and highlighted an inability of the mutant to bind BST-2. We also tested a virus presenting a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminal part of Env, a cytoplasmic tail partial deletion that is spontaneously selected in vitro. Interestingly, viral release assays and FRET experiments indicated that a full Env cytoplasmic tail was essential in BST-2 antagonism. In HIV-2 infected cells, an efficient Env-mediated antagonism of BST-2 is operated through an intermolecular link involving the asparagine 659 residue as well as the C-terminal part of the cytoplasmic tail.

  10. Identification of a HERV-K env surface peptide highly recognized in RA patients: A cross-sectional case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mameli, G; Erre, G L; Caggiu, E; Mura, S; Cossu, D; Bo, Marco; Cadoni, M L; Piras, A; Mundula, N; Colombo, E; Buscetta, G; Passiu, G; Sechi, L A

    2017-03-21

    Endogenous Retroviruses (HERV) are believed to be pathogenic in several autoimmune diseases. Among them, HERV-K viruses have been recently reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study we have explored the role of humoral immune response against HERV-K as a potential pathogenetic mechanism in RA. Four different peptides from the extracellular portion of the env protein of HERV-K (env-su 19-37 , env-su 109-26 , env-su 164-186 , env-su 209-226 ) were selected by bioinformatic analysis on the basis of their putative immunogenicity. Indirect ELISA was then carried out to quantify antibodies against those peptides on blood samples of seventy consecutive RA patients and seventy-one healthy controls (HC). Differences between the two groups were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test. Potential correlations between RA laboratory, clinical descriptors and IgGs levels were explored by bivariate regression analysis. Serum autoantibodies against one out of four tested peptides of HERV-K (env-su 19-37 ) were significantly higher in RA than in HC (19% vs 3%, p=0.0025). Subgroup analysis showed no association between anti-HERV-K peptide humoral response and clinical, serological and clinimetric RA disease descriptors. Serum from RA patients in our series significantly reacted against HERV-K env-su 19-37 peptide in comparison to the general population suggesting a role for the HERV-K related, secondary antigenic driven immune response in the pathogenesis of RA. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to explore the role of this HERV-K surface peptide as a potential therapeutic target. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Protection against SHIV-KB9 infection by combining rDNA and rFPV vaccines based on HIV multiepitope and p24 protein in Chinese rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang; Shen, Zhenwei; Li, Xiao; Bai, Jieying; Zeng, Lin; Tian, Mingyao; Song, Ying Jin; Ye, Ming; Du, Shouwen; Ren, Dayong; Liu, Cunxia; Zhu, Na; Sun, Dandan; Li, Yi; Jin, Ningyi

    2012-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine against HIV infection remains an urgent goal. We used a DNA prime/fowlpox virus boost regimen to immunize Chinese rhesus macaques. The animals were challenged intramuscularly with pathogenic molecularly cloned SHIV-KB9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines were investigated by measuring IFN-γ levels, monitoring HIV-specific binding antibodies, examining viral load, and analyzing CD4/CD8 ratio. Results show that, upon challenge, the vaccine group can induce a strong immune response in the body, represented by increased expression of IFN-γ, slow and steady elevated antibody production, reduced peak value of acute viral load, and increase in the average CD4/CD8 ratio. The current research suggests that rapid reaction speed, appropriate response strength, and long-lasting immune response time may be key protection factors for AIDS vaccine. The present study contributes significantly to AIDS vaccine and preclinical research.

  12. Antiviral CD8+ T cells in the genital tract control viral replication and delay progression to AIDS after vaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaques immunized with virulence attenuated SHIV 89.6.

    PubMed

    Genescà, M; McChesney, M B; Miller, C J

    2009-01-01

    The recently failed clinical efficacy trial of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine that elicits antiviral CD8(+) T-cell responses has emphasized the challenge of producing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/ rhesus monkey model of AIDS, live-attenuated lentivirus 'vaccines' provide the best protection from uncontrolled viral replication and clinical disease after pathogenic SIV challenge. This review summarizes a recent series of studies in which we show that after vaginal SIV challenge of rhesus macaques immunized with an attenuated lentivirus protection from uncontrolled viral replication is primarily mediated by CD8(+) T cells in the vaginal mucosa. Immunization with a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) results in a systemic infection that induces a moderate population of SIV-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells with cytolytic potential in the vaginal mucosa. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells at the time of SIV challenge completely abrogates the protection mediated by prior infection with attenuated SHIV. Further after vaginal SIV challenge, the only significant expansion of SIV-specific T cells occurs in the vagina in these animals. No significant expansion of T-cell responses was observed in systemic lymphoid tissues. Thus, the presence of SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the vagina on the day of vaginal SIV challenge and a modest expansion of local effector T cells is sufficient to stop uncontrolled SIV replication. It seems that T-cell based vaccine strategies that can elicit mucosal effector CD8(+) T-cell populations and avoid inducing systemic T-cell proliferation upon exposure to HIV have the greatest potential for mimicking the success of live-attenuated lentiviral vaccines.

  13. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIV{sub KU2} infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    SciTech Connect

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-05

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-{gamma}-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV{sub KU2}. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-{gamma} production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-{gamma} producing CD4{sup +} cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies.

  14. Enhancing Transport of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735 for Bioaugmentation of Aquifers Contaminated with Methyl tert-Butyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Streger, Sheryl H.; Vainberg, Simon; Dong, Hailiang; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2002-01-01

    The gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has become a widespread contaminant in groundwater throughout the United States. Bioaugmentation of aquifers with MTBE-degrading cultures may be necessary to enhance degradation of the oxygenate in some locations. However, poor cell transport has sometimes limited bioaugmentation efforts in the past. The objective of this study was to evaluate the transport characteristics of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735, a pure culture capable of growth on MTBE, and to improve movement of the strain through aquifer solids. The wild-type culture moved only a few centimeters in columns of aquifer sediment. An adhesion-deficient variant (H. flava ENV735:24) of the wild-type strain that moved more readily through sediments was obtained by sequential passage of cells through columns of sterile sediment. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography revealed that the wild-type strain is much more hydrophobic than the adhesion-deficient variant. Electrophoretic mobility assays and transmission electron microscopy showed that the wild-type bacterium contains two distinct subpopulations, whereas the adhesion-deficient strain has only a single, homogeneous population. Both the wild-type strain and adhesion-deficient variant degraded MTBE, and both were identified by 16S rRNA analysis as pure cultures of H. flava. The effectiveness of surfactants for enhancing transport of the wild-type strain was also evaluated. Many of the surfactants tested were toxic to ENV735; however, one nonionic surfactant, Tween 20, enhanced cell transport in sand columns. Improving microbial transport may lead to a more effective bioaugmentation strategy for MTBE-contaminated sites where indigenous oxygenate degraders are absent. PMID:12406751

  15. The V3 Loop of HIV-1 Env Determines Viral Susceptibility to IFITM3 Impairment of Viral Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Pan, Qinghua; Ding, Shilei; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Jingyou; Finzi, Andrés; Liu, Shan-Lu; Liang, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit a broad spectrum of viruses, including HIV-1. IFITM proteins deter HIV-1 entry when expressed in target cells and also impair HIV-1 infectivity when expressed in virus producer cells. However, little is known about how viruses resist IFITM inhibition. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibilities of different primary isolates of HIV-1 to the inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITMs. Our results demonstrate that the infectivity of different HIV-1 primary isolates, including transmitted founder viruses, is diminished by IFITM3 to various levels, with strain AD8-1 exhibiting strong resistance. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that HIV-1 Env, and the V3 loop sequence in particular, determines the extent of inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITM3. IFITM3-sensitive Env proteins are also more susceptible to neutralization by soluble CD4 or the 17b antibody than are IFITM3-resistant Env proteins. Together, data from our study suggest that the propensity of HIV-1 Env to sample CD4-bound-like conformations modulates viral sensitivity to IFITM3 inhibition.IMPORTANCE Results of our study have revealed the key features of the HIV-1 envelope protein that are associated with viral resistance to the IFITM3 protein. IFITM proteins are important effectors in interferon-mediated antiviral defense. A variety of viruses are inhibited by IFITMs at the virus entry step. Although it is known that envelope proteins of several different viruses resist IFITM inhibition, the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Taking advantage of the fact that envelope proteins of different HIV-1 strains exhibit different degrees of resistance to IFITM3 and that these HIV-1 envelope proteins share the same domain structure and similar sequences, we performed mutagenesis studies and determined the key role of the V3 loop in this viral resistance phenotype. We were also able to associate viral resistance to IFITM3

  16. Overlapping cis sites used for splicing of HIV-1 env/nef and rev mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Swanson, A K; Stoltzfus, C M

    1998-12-18

    Alternative splicing is used to generate more than 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) spliced and unspliced mRNAs from a single primary transcript. The abundance of HIV-1 mRNAs is determined by the efficiencies with which its different 5' and 3' splice sites are used. Three splice sites (A4c, A4a, and A4b) are upstream of the rev initiator AUG. RNAs spliced at A4c, A4a, and A4b are used as mRNAs for Rev. Another 3' splice site (A5) is immediately downstream of the rev initiator. RNAs spliced at A5 are used as mRNAs for Env and Nef. In this report, primer extension analysis of splicing intermediates was used to show that there are eight branch points in this region, all of which map to adenosine residues. In addition, cis elements recognized by the cellular splicing machinery overlap; the two most 3' branch points overlap with the AG dinucleotides at rev 3' splice sites A4a and A4b. Competition of the overlapping cis sites for different splicing factors may play a role in maintaining the appropriate balance of mRNAs in HIV-1-infected cells. In support of this possibility, mutations at rev 3' splice site A4b AG dinucleotide dramatically increased splicing of the env/nef 3' splice site A5. This correlated with increased usage of the four most 3' branch points, which include those within the rev 3' splice site AG dinucleotides. Consistent with these results, analysis of a mutant in which three of the four env/nef branch points were inactivated indicated that use of splice site A5 was inhibited and splicing was shifted predominantly to the most 5' rev 3' splice site A4c with preferential use of the two most 5' branch points. Our results suggest that spliceosomes formed at rev A4a-4b, rev A4c, and env/nef A5 3' splice sites each recognize different subsets of the eight branch point sequences.

  17. Changes in Structure and Antigenicity of HIV-1 Env Trimers Resulting from Removal of a Conserved CD4 Binding Site-Proximal Glycan

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Guttman, Miklos; Williams, James A.; Verkerke, Hans; Alvarado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the major target for HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). One of the mechanisms that HIV has evolved to escape the host's immune response is to mask conserved epitopes on Env with dense glycosylation. Previous studies have shown that the removal of a particular conserved glycan at N197 increases the neutralization sensitivity of the virus to antibodies targeting the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), making it a site of significant interest from the perspective of vaccine design. At present, the structural consequences that result from the removal of the N197 glycan have not been characterized. Using native-like SOSIP trimers, we examine the effects on antigenicity and local structural dynamics resulting from the removal of this glycan. A large increase in the binding of CD4bs and V3-targeting antibodies is observed for the N197Q mutant in trimeric Env, while no changes are observed with monomeric gp120. While the overall structure and thermostability are not altered, a subtle increase in the flexibility of the variable loops at the trimeric interface of adjacent protomers is evident in the N197Q mutant by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Structural modeling of the glycan chains suggests that the spatial occupancy of the N197 glycan leads to steric clashes with CD4bs antibodies in the Env trimer but not monomeric gp120. Our results indicate that the removal of the N197 glycan enhances the exposure of relevant bNAb epitopes on Env with a minimal impact on the overall trimeric structure. These findings present a simple modification for enhancing trimeric Env immunogens in vaccines. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein presents a dense patchwork of host cell-derived N-linked glycans. This so-called glycan shield is considered to be a major protective mechanism against immune recognition. While the positions of many N-linked glycans are isolate specific, some are highly conserved and are believed to play key

  18. Intelligence and RT: A Modified Hick Paradigm and a New RT Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between speed of information processing (SIP) and psychometric intelligence was investigated by giving 60 college students (22 males and 38 females) 2 choice reaction time (RT) tests (modified Hick paradigm) and Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices. Results support an association between intelligence and SIP. (SLD)

  19. RtI for Nurturing Giftedness: Implications for the RtI School-Based Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Claire E.; Rollins, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Because implementation of Response to Intervention (RtI) in the framework of special education's identification process still is relatively new, many districts are only now determining the implications at the school or system level. The concept of also identifying students who show promise in a nurturing framework, as opposed to a preventative…

  20. Characterization of Env antigenicity of feline foamy virus (FeFV) using FeFV-infected cat sera and a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Phung, Hang T T; Tohya, Yukinobu; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2005-04-10

    To characterize neutralizing antigenicity in relation to env genotypes of feline foamy virus (FeFV), serological analyses were performed using FeFV-infected cat sera and several field isolates including two env genotypes (F17- and FUV-types). Since three cats from which FeFV were isolated were found to have undetectable titers of virus neutralization (VN) antibodies, even to the homologous virus, VN antibodies were further examined with complement supplementation as an enhancement factor. With the presence of complement, the VN titers of FeFV-infected cat sera increased drastically. Although most of serum samples neutralized strains of either env genotype, sera sampled from two cats neutralized all the strains examined at similar titers, suggesting that superinfection with both env genotypes of FeFV might have occurred in the two cats. Further, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specifically neutralizing FeFV strains of FUV-type. The mAb was shown to have higher affinity to an epitope on Env of FUV-type than that of F17-type by immunoprecipitation assay. This study supplies basic information important for studies on FeFV vector development as well as on the relationship between the virus and the host immune response.

  1. Immunization with an SIV-based IDLV Expressing HIV-1 Env 1086 Clade C Elicits Durable Humoral and Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Donatella; Blasi, Maria; LaBranche, Celia; Parks, Robert; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Lifton, Michelle; Shen, Xiaoying; Denny, Thomas; Ferrari, Guido; Vescio, Maria Fenicia; Andersen, Hanne; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Liao, Hua-Xin; Santra, Sampa; Haynes, Barton F; Klotman, Mary E; Cara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The design of an effective HIV-1 vaccine remains a major challenge. Several vaccine strategies based on viral vectors have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials, with largely disappointing results. Integrase defective lentiviral vectors (IDLV) represent a promising vaccine candidate given their ability to induce durable and protective immune responses in mice after a single immunization. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of a SIV-based IDLV in nonhuman primates. Six rhesus monkeys were primed intramuscularly with IDLV-Env and boosted with the same vector after 1 year. A single immunization with IDLV-Env induced broad humoral and cellular immune responses that waned over time but were still detectable at 1 year postprime. The boost with IDLV-Env performed at 1 year from the prime induced a remarkable increase in both antibodies and T-cell responses. Antibody binding specificity showed a predominant cross-clade gp120-directed response. Monkeys' sera efficiently blocked anti-V2 and anti-CD4 binding site antibodies, neutralized the tier 1 MW965.26 pseudovirus and mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Durable polyfunctional Env-specific T-cell responses were also elicited. Our study demonstrates that an IDLV-Env-based vaccine induces functional, comprehensive, and durable immune responses in Rhesus macaques. These results support further evaluation of IDLV as a new HIV-1 vaccine delivery platform. PMID:27455880

  2. Early Steps of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus-Mediated Cell Transformation Involve the Interaction between Env and the RALBP1 Cellular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Monot, Margaux; Erny, Alexandra; Gineys, Barbara; Desloire, Sophie; Dolmazon, Christine; Aublin-Gex, Anne; Lotteau, Vincent; Archer, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma is a naturally occurring lung cancer in sheep induced by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). Its envelope glycoprotein (Env) carries oncogenic properties, and its expression is sufficient to induce in vitro cell transformation and in vivo lung adenocarcinoma. The identification of cellular partners of the JSRV envelope remains crucial for deciphering mechanisms leading to cell transformation. We initially identified RALBP1 (RalA binding protein 1; also known as RLIP76 or RIP), a cellular protein implicated in the ras pathway, as a partner of JSRV Env by yeast two-hybrid screening and confirmed formation of RALBP1/Env complexes in mammalian cells. Expression of the RALBP1 protein was repressed in tumoral lungs and in tumor-derived alveolar type II cells. Through its inhibition using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), we showed that RALBP1 was involved in envelope-induced cell transformation and in modulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)/p70S6K pathway by the retroviral envelope. IMPORTANCE JSRV-induced lung adenocarcinoma is of importance for the sheep industry. While the envelope has been reported as the oncogenic determinant of the virus, the cellular proteins directly interacting with Env are still not known. Our report on the formation of RALBP/Env complexes and the role of this interaction in cell transformation opens up a new hypothesis for the dysregulation observed upon virus infection in sheep. PMID:26041289

  3. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Ekstroem, Maria; Wallin, Michael; Garoff, Henrik . E-mail: henrik.garoff@cbt.ki.se

    2007-04-25

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca{sup 2+} depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol.

  4. Variability of the env gene in cynomolgus macaques persistently infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 strain ben.

    PubMed Central

    Tolle, T; Petry, H; Bachmann, B; Hunsmann, G; Lüke, W

    1994-01-01

    The sequence variability of distinct regions of the proviral env gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 strain ben (HIV-2ben) isolated sequentially over 3 to 4 years from six experimentally infected macaques was studied. The regions investigated were homologous to the V1, V2, V3, V4, V5, and V7 hypervariable regions identified in the env genes of HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac, respectively. In contrast to findings with HIV-1 and SIVmac, the V1- and V2-homologous regions were found to be highly conserved during the course of the HIV-2ben infection in macaques. The V3-homologous region showed a degree of variation comparable to that of HIV-1 but not of SIV. In the V4-, V5-, and V7-homologous regions, mutation hot spots were detected in most reisolates of the infected monkeys. Most of these mutations occurred during the first 10 weeks after infection. After 50 weeks, new mutations were rarely detected. At most mutation sites, a dynamic equilibrium between the mutated viral isotype and the infecting predominant wild type was present. This equilibrium might prevent an accumulation of mutations in isolates later in the course of infection. PMID:8139054

  5. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  6. Position-specific automated processing of V3 env ultra-deep pyrosequencing data for predicting HIV-1 tropism

    PubMed Central

    Jeanne, Nicolas; Saliou, Adrien; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Dubois, Martine; Cazabat, Michelle; Nicot, Florence; Loiseau, Claire; Raymond, Stéphanie; Izopet, Jacques; Delobel, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor usage must be accurately determined before starting CCR5 antagonist-based treatment as the presence of undetected minor CXCR4-using variants can cause subsequent virological failure. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing of HIV-1 V3 env allows to detect low levels of CXCR4-using variants that current genotypic approaches miss. However, the computation of the mass of sequence data and the need to identify true minor variants while excluding artifactual sequences generated during amplification and ultra-deep pyrosequencing is rate-limiting. Arbitrary fixed cut-offs below which minor variants are discarded are currently used but the errors generated during ultra-deep pyrosequencing are sequence-dependant rather than random. We have developed an automated processing of HIV-1 V3 env ultra-deep pyrosequencing data that uses biological filters to discard artifactual or non-functional V3 sequences followed by statistical filters to determine position-specific sensitivity thresholds, rather than arbitrary fixed cut-offs. It allows to retain authentic sequences with point mutations at V3 positions of interest and discard artifactual ones with accurate sensitivity thresholds. PMID:26585833

  7. In-line alignment and Mg2+ coordination at the cleavage site of the env22 twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aiming; Košutić, Marija; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Frener, Marina; Santner, Tobias; Westhof, Eric; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes contain catalytic domains that accelerate site-specific cleavage/ligation of phosphodiester backbones. We report on the 2.9-Å crystal structure of the env22 twister ribozyme, which adopts a compact tertiary fold stabilized by co-helical stacking, double-pseudoknot formation and long-range pairing interactions. The U-A cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with the modeled 2′-O of U positioned for in-line attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5′ bond. Both an invariant guanosine and a Mg2+ are directly coordinated to the non-bridging phosphate oxygens at the U-A cleavage step, with the former positioned to contribute to catalysis and the latter to structural integrity. The impact of key mutations on cleavage activity identified an invariant guanosine that contributes to catalysis. Our structure of the in-line aligned env22 twister ribozyme is compared with two recently-reported twister ribozymes structures, which adopt similar global folds, but differ in conformational features around the cleavage site. PMID:25410397

  8. [Functional analysis of Grp and Iris, the gag and env domesticated errantivirus genes, in the Drosophila melanogaster genome].

    PubMed

    Makhnovskii, P A; Kuzmin, I V; Nefedova, L N; Kima, A I

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is the only invertebrate that contains endogenous retroviruses, which are called errantiviruses. Two domesticated genes, Grp and Iris, which originate from errantivirus gag and env, respectively, have been found in the D. melanogaster genome. The functions performed by the genes in Drosophila are still unclear. To identify the functions of domesticated gag and env in the D. melanogaster genome, expression of Iris and Grp was studied in strains differing by the presence or absence of the functional gypsy errantivirus. In addition, the expression levels were measured after injection of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, which activate different immune response pathways, and exposure to various abiotic stress factors. The presence of functional D. melanogaster retrovirus gypsy was found to increase the Grp expression level in somatic tissues of the carcass, while exerting no effect on the Iris expression level. Activation of the immune response in D. melanogaster by bacteria Bacillus cereus increased the Grp expression level and did not affect Iris expression. As for the effects of abiotic stress factors (oxidative stress, starvation, and heat and cold stress), the Grp expression level increased in response to starvation in D. melanogaster females, and the Iris expression level was downregulated in heat shock and oxidative stress. Based on the findings, Grp was assumed to play a direct role in the immune response in D. melanogaster; Iris is not involved in immune responses, but and apparently performs a cell function that is inhibited in stress.

  9. Model Building and Refinement of a Natively Glycosylated HIV-1 Env Protein by High-Resolution Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-10-06

    Secretory and membrane proteins from mammalian cells undergo post-translational modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, which can result in a large number of possible glycoforms. This sample heterogeneity can be problematic for structural studies, particularly X-ray crystallography. Thus, crystal structures of heavily glycosylated proteins such as the HIV-1 Env viral spike protein have been determined by removing the majority of glycans. This step is most frequently carried out using Endoglycosidase H (EndoH) and requires that all expressed glycans be in the high-mannose form, which is often not the native glycoform. With significantly improved technologies in single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate that it is now possible to refine and build natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structures in solution to 4.36 Å resolution. At this resolution we can now analyze the complete epitope of a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb), PGT128, in the context of the trimer expressed with native glycans.

  10. T-Cell Immune Responses Against Env from CRF12_BF and Subtype B HIV-1 Show High Clade-Specificity that Can Be Overridden by Multiclade Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Mónaco, Daniela C.; Rodríguez, Ana M.; Pascutti, María F.; Carobene, Mauricio; Falivene, Juliana; Gómez, Alejandro; Maeto, Cynthia; Turk, Gabriela; Nájera, José L.; Esteban, Mariano; Gherardi, M. Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Background The extreme genetic diversity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) poses a daunting challenge to the generation of an effective AIDS vaccine. In Argentina, the epidemic is characterized by the high prevalence of infections caused by subtype B and BF variants. The aim of this study was to characterize in mice the immunogenic and antigenic properties of the Env protein from CRF12_BF in comparison with clade B, employing prime-boost schemes with the combination of recombinant DNA and vaccinia virus (VV) vectors. Methodology/Principal Findings As determined by ELISPOT from splenocytes of animals immunized with either EnvBF or EnvB antigens, the majority of the cellular responses to Env were found to be clade-specific. A detailed peptide mapping of the responses reveal that when there is cross-reactivity, there are no amino acid changes in the peptide sequence or were minimal and located at the peptide ends. In those cases, analysis of T cell polifunctionality and affinity indicated no differences with respect to the cellular responses found against the original homologous sequence. Significantly, application of a mixed immunization combining both clades (B and BF) induced a broader cellular response, in which the majority of the peptides targeted after the single clade vaccinations generated a positive response. In this group we could also find significant cellular and humoral responses against the whole gp120 protein from subtype B. Conclusions/Significance This work has characterized for the first time the immunogenic peptides of certain EnvBF regions, involved in T cell responses. It provides evidence that to improve immune responses to HIV there is a need to combine Env antigens from different clades, highlighting the convenience of the inclusion of BF antigens in future vaccines for geographic regions where these HIV variants circulate. PMID:21364754

  11. Robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses to sublingually delivered adenoviral vectors encoding HIV-1 Env: association with mucoadhesion and efficient penetration of the sublingual barrier.

    PubMed

    Domm, William; Brooks, Lauren; Chung, Hung Li; Feng, Changyong; Bowers, William J; Watson, Gene; McGrath, James L; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-09-16

    The efficient induction of virus-specific mucosal antibodies is an important unmet objective in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine research. One promising approach is sublingual (SL) immunization. We examined the effectiveness of SL delivery of two different viral vectors: (i) a recombinant adenovirus (rAd5), and (ii) a Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 amplicon vector (HSV-1). Initial in vitro videomicroscopy experiments showed that rAd5 particles were trapped in saliva (i.e., that Ad5 was mucoadhesive) - unlike HSV-1 virions, which migrated freely in both saliva and water. In vivo imaging studies in mice revealed that only the rAd5 vector efficiently transduced the SL epithelium. Consistent with this, SL delivery of an rAd5 encoding HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) resulted in robust antigen-specific antibody responses in plasma and in vaginal washes, whereas SL delivery of a HSV-1 amplicon vector encoding HIV-1 Env failed to elicit Env-specific antibodies. In contrast, both vectors elicited equivalent humoral responses following intramuscular (IM) delivery. Finally, SL delivery of the rAd5:Env vector resulted in elevated levels of Env-specific serum IgA, and vaginal IgA and IgG, when compared to IM delivery of the same vector. These results findings shed light on vector properties (mucoadhesion, penetration of the sublingual barrier) which may be important for the induction of potent humoral immune responses following sublingual vector administration. Our data also show that SL delivery of an Env-encoding rAd5 vector can elicit a potent antigen-specific mucosal antibody response in the absence of adjuvant. Overall, these findings support the further exploration of the SL delivery route for HIV-1 vaccine delivery.

  12. Robust Antigen-Specific Humoral Immune Responses to Sublingually Delivered Adenoviral Vectors Encoding HIV-1 Env: Association with Mucoadhesion and Efficient Penetration of the Sublingual Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Domm, William; Brooks, Lauren; Chung, Hung Li; Feng, Changyong; Bowers, William J.; Watson, Gene; McGrath, James L.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The efficient induction of virus-specific mucosal antibodies is an important unmet objective in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine research. One promising approach is sublingual (SL) immunization. We examined the effectiveness of SL delivery of two different viral vectors: (i) a recombinant adenovirus (rAd5), and (ii) a Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 amplicon vector (HSV-1). Initial in vitro videomicroscopy experiments showed that rAd5 particles were trapped in saliva (i.e., that Ad5 was mucoadhesive) - unlike HSV-1 virions, which migrated freely in both saliva and water. In vivo imaging studies in mice revealed that only the rAd5 vector efficiently transduced the SL epithelium. Consistent with this, SL delivery of an rAd5 encoding HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) resulted in robust antigen-specific antibody responses in plasma and in vaginal washes, whereas SL delivery of a HSV-1 amplicon vector encoding HIV-1 Env failed to elicit Env-specific antibodies. In contrast, both vectors elicited equivalent humoral responses following intramuscular (IM) delivery. Finally, SL delivery of the rAd5:Env vector resulted in elevated levels of Env-specific serum IgA, and vaginal IgA and IgG, when compared to IM delivery of the same vector. These results findings shed light on vector properties (mucoadhesion, penetration of the sublingual barrier) which may be important for the induction of potent humoral immune responses following sublingual vector administration. Our data also show that SL delivery of an Env-encoding rAd5 vector can elicit a potent antigen-specific mucosal antibody response in the absence of adjuvant. Overall, these findings support the further exploration of the SL delivery route for HIV-1 vaccine delivery. PMID:21801777

  13. Detection and quantitation of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 mRNA species by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Green, Patrick L

    2007-06-01

    HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are highly related delta-retroviruses that infect and transform T-lymphocytes, but have distinct pathogenic properties. HTLV replication and survival requires the expression of multiple gene products from an unspliced and a series of highly related alternatively spliced mRNA species. To date, the comparative levels of all known HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 viral mRNAs in different transformed cell lines and at different stages of virus infection have not been assessed. In this study, we compiled a series of oligonucleotide primer pairs and probes to quantify both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 mRNA species using real-time RT-PCR. The optimized reaction for detection of each mRNA had amplification efficiency greater than 90% with a linear range spanning 25-2.5 x 10(7) copies. The R(2)'s of all standard curves were greater than 0.97. Quantitation of HTLV mRNAs between different cell lines showed variability (gag/pol>or=tax/rex>env>or=accessory proteins), but the overall levels of each mRNA relative to each other within a cell line were similar. These results provide a method to quantify all specific mRNAs from both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, which can be used to evaluate further viral gene expression and correlate transcript levels to key stages of the virus life cycle and ultimately, pathogenesis.

  14. Yersinia pestis requires the 2-component regulatory system OmpR-EnvZ to resist innate immunity during the early and late stages of plague.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Angéline; Lemaître, Nadine; Titecat, Marie; Merchez, Maud; Deloison, Gaspard; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Marceau, Michaël; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-11-01

    Plague is transmitted by fleas or contaminated aerosols. To successfully produce disease, the causal agent (Yersinia pestis) must rapidly sense and respond to rapid variations in its environment. Here, we investigated the role of 2-component regulatory systems (2CSs) in plague because the latter are known to be key players in bacterial adaptation to environmental change. Along with the previously studied PhoP-PhoQ system, OmpR-EnvZ was the only one of Y. pestis' 23 other 2CSs required for production of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In vitro, OmpR-EnvZ was needed to counter serum complement and leukocytes but was not required for the secretion of antiphagocyte exotoxins. In vivo, Y. pestis lacking OmpR-EnvZ did not induce an early immune response in the skin and was fully virulent in neutropenic mice. We conclude that, throughout the course of Y. pestis infection, OmpR-EnvZ is required to counter toxic effectors secreted by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the tissues.

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  16. Radiation-induced human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-R env gene expression by epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Ahn, Kung; Kim, Yun-Ji; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2012-11-01

    It is commonly accepted that ionizing radiation induces genomic instability by changes in genomic structure, epigenetic regulation and gene expression. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV)-R also are often differentially expressed between normal and disease tissues under unstable genomic conditions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. To understand the influence of ionizing radiation on HERV-R expression, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses using γ-irradiated normal human cells. Compared to nonirradiated cells, HERV-R expression was up-regulated in γ-irradiated cells. The regulatory mechanism of HERV-R expression in irradiated cells was investigated by methylation analyses of HERV-R 5'LTRs and treatment with garcinol. These data indicated that the up-regulated transcription of HERV-R may be regulated by radiation-induced epigenetic changes induced by histone modification, and thus could be of great importance for understanding the relationship between radiation-induced biological effects and transposable elements.

  17. Cocirculation of Two env Molecular Variants, of Possible Recombinant Origin, in Gorilla and Chimpanzee Simian Foamy Virus Strains from Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Léa; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Kazanji, Mirdad; Leroy, Eric; Njouom, Richard; Buseyne, Florence; Afonso, Philippe V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian foamy virus (SFV) is a ubiquitous retrovirus in nonhuman primates (NHPs) that can be transmitted to humans, mostly through severe bites. In the past few years, our laboratory has identified more than 50 hunters from central Africa infected with zoonotic SFVs. Analysis of the complete sequences of five SFVs obtained from these individuals revealed that env was the most variable gene. Furthermore, recombinant SFV strains, some of which involve sequences in the env gene, were recently identified. Here, we investigated the variability of the env genes of zoonotic SFV strains and searched for possible recombinants. We sequenced the complete env gene or its surface glycoprotein region (SU) from DNA amplified from the blood of (i) a series of 40 individuals from Cameroon or Gabon infected with a gorilla or chimpanzee foamy virus (FV) strain and (ii) 1 gorilla and 3 infected chimpanzees living in the same areas as these hunters. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the existence of two env variants among both the gorilla and chimpanzee FV strains that were present in zoonotic and NHP strains. These variants differ greatly (>30% variability) in a 753-bp-long region located in the receptor-binding domain of SU, whereas the rest of the gene is very conserved. Although the organizations of the Env protein sequences are similar, the potential glycosylation patterns differ between variants. Analysis of recombination suggests that the variants emerged through recombination between different strains, although all parental strains could not be identified. IMPORTANCE SFV infection in humans is a great example of a zoonotic retroviral infection that has not spread among human populations, in contrast to human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). Recombination was a major mechanism leading to the emergence of HIV. Here, we show that two SFV molecular envelope gene variants circulate among ape populations in Central Africa and that both

  18. A Comparative Phase I Study of Combination, Homologous Subtype-C DNA, MVA, and Env gp140 Protein/Adjuvant HIV Vaccines in Two Immunization Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah; Quinn, Killian; Greenwood, Aldona; Cope, Alethea V.; McKay, Paul F.; Hayes, Peter J.; Kopycinski, Jakub T.; Gilmour, Jill; Miller, Aleisha N.; Geldmacher, Christof; Nadai, Yuka; Ahmed, Mohamed I. M.; Montefiori, David C.; Dally, Len; Bouliotis, George; Lewis, David J. M.; Tatoud, Roger; Wagner, Ralf; Esteban, Mariano; Shattock, Robin J.; McCormack, Sheena; Weber, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    There remains an urgent need for a prophylactic HIV vaccine. We compared combined MVA and adjuvanted gp140 to sequential MVA/gp140 after DNA priming. We expected Env-specific CD4+ T-cells after DNA and MVA priming, and Env-binding antibodies in 100% individuals after boosting with gp140 and that combined vaccines would not compromise safety and might augment immunogenicity. Forty volunteers were primed three times with DNA plasmids encoding (CN54) env and (ZM96) gag-pol-nef at 0, 4 and 8 weeks then boosted with MVA-C (CN54 env and gag-pol-nef) and glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant—aqueous formulation (GLA-AF) adjuvanted CN54gp140. They were randomised to receive them in combination at the same visit at 16 and 20 weeks (accelerated) or sequentially with MVA-C at 16, 20, and GLA-AF/gp140 at 24 and 28 weeks (standard). All vaccinations were intramuscular. Primary outcomes included ≥grade 3 safety events and the titer of CN54gp140-specific binding IgG. Other outcomes included neutralization, binding antibody specificity and T-cell responses. Two participants experienced asymptomatic ≥grade 3 transaminitis leading to discontinuation of vaccinations, and three had grade 3 solicited local or systemic reactions. A total of 100% made anti-CN54gp140 IgG and combining vaccines did not significantly alter the response; geometric mean titer 6424 (accelerated) and 6578 (standard); neutralization of MW965.2 Tier 1 pseudovirus was superior in the standard group (82 versus 45% responders, p = 0.04). T-cell ELISpot responses were CD4+ and Env-dominant; 85 and 82% responding in the accelerated and standard groups, respectively. Vaccine-induced IgG responses targeted multiple regions within gp120 with the V3 region most immunodominant and no differences between groups detected. Combining MVA and gp140 vaccines did not result in increased adverse events and did not significantly impact upon the titer of Env-specific binding antibodies, which were seen in 100% individuals

  19. Single-Chain Soluble BG505.SOSIP gp140 Trimers as Structural and Antigenic Mimics of Mature Closed HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Yongping; Sastry, Mallika; Zhang, Baoshan; Baxa, Ulrich; Chen, Rita E.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Lees, Christopher R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Schön, Arne; Van Galen, Joseph; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Harned, Adam; Pancera, Marie; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Cheng, Cheng; Freire, Ernesto; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to other type I fusion machines, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) requires proteolytic activation; specifically, cleavage of a gp160 precursor into gp120 and gp41 subunits creates an N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide and permits folding from an immature uncleaved state to a mature closed state. While the atomic-level consequences of cleavage for HIV-1 Env are still being determined, the uncleaved state is antigenically distinct from the mature closed state, and cleavage has been reported to be essential for mimicry of the mature viral spike by soluble versions of Env. Here we report the redesign of a current state-of-the-art soluble Env mimic, BG505.SOSIP, to make it cleavage independent. Specifically, we replaced the furin cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with Gly-Ser linkers of various lengths. The resultant linked gp120-gp41 constructs, termed single-chain gp140 (sc-gp140), exhibited different levels of structural and antigenic mimicry of the parent cleaved BG505.SOSIP. When constructs were subjected to negative selection to remove subspecies recognized by poorly neutralizing antibodies, trimers of high antigenic mimicry of BG505.SOSIP could be obtained; negative-stain electron microscopy indicated these to resemble the mature closed state. Higher proportions of BG505.SOSIP-trimer mimicry were observed in sc-gp140s with linkers of 6 or more residues, with a linker length of 15 residues exhibiting especially promising traits. Overall, flexible linkages between gp120 and gp41 in BG505.SOSIP can thus substitute for cleavage, and sc-gp140s that closely mimicked the vaccine-preferred mature closed state of Env could be obtained. IMPORTANCE The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target of virus-directed neutralizing antibody responses and a primary focus of vaccine design. Soluble mimics of Env have proven challenging to obtain and have been thought to require proteolytic cleavage into two-component subunits, gp120 and gp41

  20. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  1. HIV-1 Receptor Binding Site-Directed Antibodies Using a VH1-2 Gene Segment Orthologue Are Activated by Env Trimer Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shridhar; Phad, Ganesh E.; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Soldemo, Martina; McKee, Krisha; Sundling, Christopher; Mascola, John; Li, Yuxing; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) isolated from chronically HIV-1 infected individuals reveal important information regarding how antibodies target conserved determinants of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike such as the primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Many CD4bs-directed bNAbs use the same heavy (H) chain variable (V) gene segment, VH1-2*02, suggesting that activation of B cells expressing this allele is linked to the generation of this type of Ab. Here, we identify the rhesus macaque VH1.23 gene segment to be the closest macaque orthologue to the human VH1-2 gene segment, with 92% homology to VH1-2*02. Of the three amino acids in the VH1-2*02 gene segment that define a motif for VRC01-like antibodies (W50, N58, flanking the HCDR2 region, and R71), the two identified macaque VH1.23 alleles described here encode two. We demonstrate that immunization with soluble Env trimers induced CD4bs-specific VH1.23-using Abs with restricted neutralization breadth. Through alanine scanning and structural studies of one such monoclonal Ab (MAb), GE356, we demonstrate that all three HCDRs are involved in neutralization. This contrasts to the highly potent CD4bs-directed VRC01 class of bNAb, which bind Env predominantly through the HCDR2. Also unlike VRC01, GE356 was minimally modified by somatic hypermutation, its light (L) chain CDRs were of average lengths and it displayed a binding footprint proximal to the trimer axis. These results illustrate that the Env trimer immunogen used here activates B cells encoding a VH1-2 gene segment orthologue, but that the resulting Abs interact distinctly differently with the HIV-1 Env spike compared to VRC01. PMID:25166308

  2. A functional interaction between gp41 and gp120 is observed for monomeric but not oligomeric, uncleaved HIV-1 Env gp140.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K

    2013-11-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole antigenic feature on the surface of HIV and the target for the humoral immune system. Soluble, uncleaved gp140 Env constructs truncated at the transmembrane domain are being investigated intensively as potential vaccine immunogens by many groups, and understanding their structural properties is essential. We used hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry and small-angle X-ray scattering to probe structural order in a panel of commonly used gp140 constructs and matched gp120 monomers. We observed that oligomeric forms of uncleaved gp140, generally presumed to be trimeric, contain a protease-resistant form of gp41 akin to the postfusion, helical bundle conformation and appear to lack specific interactions between gp120 and gp41. In contrast, the monomeric form of gp140 shows significant stabilization of the gp120 inner domain imparted by the gp41 region, demonstrating excellent agreement with past mutagenesis studies. Moreover, the gp140 monomers respond to CD4 binding in manner that is consistent with the initial stages of Env activation: CD4 binding induces structural ordering throughout gp120 while loosening its association with gp41. The results indicate that uncleaved gp140 oligomers do not represent an authentic prefusion form of Env, whereas gp140 monomers isolated from the same glycoprotein preparations in many ways exhibit function and internal structural order that are consistent with expectations for certain aspects of native Env. gp140 monomers may thus be a useful reagent for advancing structural and functional studies.

  3. Recombinant pro-apoptotic Mycobacterium tuberculosis generates CD8+ T cell responses against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env and M. tuberculosis in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Uma Devi K; Larsen, Michelle H; Kim, John; Porcelli, Steven A; Jacobs, William R; Fennelly, Glenn J

    2009-12-10

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is an attractive vaccine vector against breast milk HIV transmission because it elicits Th1-type responses in newborns. However, BCG causes disease in HIV-infected infants. Genetically attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mutants represent a safer alternative for immunocompromised populations. In the current study, we compared the immunogenicity in mice of three different recombinant attenuated Mtb strains expressing an HIV envelope (Env) antigen construct. Two of these strains (DeltalysA DeltapanCD Mtb and DeltaRD1 DeltapanCD Mtb) failed to induce significant levels of HIV Env-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. In striking contrast, an HIV-1 Env-expressing attenuated DeltalysA Mtb containing a deletion in secA2, which encodes a virulence-related secretion system involved in evading adaptive immunity, generated consistently measurable Env-specific CD8(+) T cell responses that were significantly greater than those observed after immunization with BCG expressing HIV Env. Similarly, another strain of DeltalysA DeltasecA2 Mtb expressing SIV Gag induced Gag- and Mtb-specific CD8(+) T cells producing perforin or IFNgamma, and Gag-specific CD4(+) T cells producing IFNgamma within 3 weeks after immunization in adult mice; in addition, IFNgamma-producing Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells and Mtb-specific CD4(+) T cells were observed in neonatal mice within 1 week of immunization. We conclude that DeltalysA DeltasecA2 Mtb is a promising vaccine platform to construct a safe combination HIV-TB vaccine for use in neonates.

  4. BLyS-mediated modulation of naïve B cell subsets impacts HIV Env-induced antibody responses1

    PubMed Central

    Dosenovic, Pia; Soldemo, Martina; Scholz, Jean L.; O’Dell, Sijy; Grasset, Emilie K.; Pelletier, Nadège; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Mascola, John R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Cancro, Michael P.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing Abs provide the protective effect of the majority of existing human vaccines. For a prophylactic vaccine against HIV-1, broadly neutralizing Abs (bNAbs) targeting conserved epitopes of the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely required, as the pool of circulating HIV-1 variants is extremely diverse. The failure to efficiently induce bNAbs by vaccination may be due to the use of sub-optimal immunogens or immunization regimens, or it may indicate that B cells specific for broadly neutralizing Env determinants are selected against during peripheral checkpoints, either before or after antigen encounter. To investigate if perturbation of B cell subsets prior to immunization with recombinant Env protein affects the vaccine-induced Ab response in mice, we used B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS), a cytokine that regulates survival and selection of peripheral B cells. We show that the transient BLyS treatment used here substantially affected naïve B cell populations; in particular, it resulted in an increased number of B cells surviving counter-selection at the transitional stages. We also observed an increased number of mature naïve B cells, especially marginal zone B cells, in BLyS-treated mice. Intriguingly, provision of excess BLyS prior to immunization led to a consistent improvement in the frequency and potency of HIV-1 Env vaccine-induced neutralizing Ab responses, without increasing the number of Env-specific Ab-secreting cells or the Ab binding titers measured after boosting. The results presented here suggest that an increased understanding of BLyS-regulated processes may help the design of vaccine regimens aimed at eliciting improved neutralizing Ab responses against HIV-1. PMID:22561155

  5. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J.; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (µtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the µtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The µtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 µm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5%bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of µtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  6. Antibodies against Gag are diagnostic markers for feline foamy virus infections while Env and Bet reactivity is undetectable in a substantial fraction of infected cats.

    PubMed

    Romen, Fabian; Pawlita, Michael; Sehr, Peter; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; Lutz, Hans; Löchelt, Martin

    2006-02-20

    Spumaretroviruses or foamy viruses constitute a distinct subfamily of retroviruses. The biology of foamy viruses within the authentic host, their mode of transmission, and disease potential in the authentic host or after zoonotic transmission into human or other species are almost unknown. Using feline foamy virus (FFV) as model system, we established modular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) suited to determine feline IgG and IgM antibody responses against structural and non-structural FFV proteins. We validated the ELISAs with standard reference sera. In 99 cats admitted to a Swiss veterinary hospital, overall FFV Gag antibody prevalence was 36%, reactivity against Env and the non-structural protein Bet each was about 25%, and 19% of the sera were directed against all three FFV antigens. With one exception, all Bet- and/or Env-positive sera were also positive for Gag. In this small epidemiological pilot study, FFV antibodies were not significantly associated with clinical disease.

  7. Level of education and multiple sclerosis risk after adjustment for known risk factors: The EnvIMS study

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnevik, Kjetil; Riise, Trond; Cortese, Marianna; Holmøy, Trygve; Kampman, Margitta T; Magalhaes, Sandra; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Wolfson, Christina; Pugliatti, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have found a higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) among people with a low level of education. This has been suggested to reflect an effect of smoking and lower vitamin D status in the social class associated with lower levels of education. Objective: The objective of this paper is to investigate the association between level of education and MS risk adjusting for the known risk factors smoking, infectious mononucleosis, indicators of vitamin D levels and body size. Methods: Within the case-control study on Environmental Factors In MS (EnvIMS), 953 MS patients and 1717 healthy controls from Norway reported educational level and history of exposure to putative environmental risk factors. Results: Higher level of education were associated with decreased MS risk (p trend = 0.001) with an OR of 0.53 (95% CI 0.41–0.68) when comparing those with the highest and lowest level of education. This association was only moderately reduced after adjusting for known risk factors (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44–0.83). The estimates remained similar when cases with disease onset before age 28 were excluded. Conclusion: These findings suggest that factors related to lower socioeconomic status other than established risk factors are associated with MS risk. PMID:26014605

  8. The Environmental-Data Automated Track Annotation (Env-DATA) System: Linking Animal Tracks with Environmental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, G.; Dodge, S.; Weinzierl, R.; Davidson, S. C.; Kays, R.; Douglas, D. C.; Brandes, D.; Bildstein, K.; Wikelski, M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of animals is strongly influenced by external factors in their surrounding environment such as weather, habitat types, and human land use. With the advances in positioning and sensor technologies, it is now possible to capture data of animal locations at high spatial and temporal granularities. Likewise, modern technology provides us with an increasing access to large volumes of environmental data, some of which changes on an hourly basis. Although there have been strong developments in computational methods for the analysis of movement in its environmental context, there remain challenges in efficiently linking the spatiotemporal locations of animals with the appropriate environmental conditions along their trajectories. To this end, our new Environmental-Data Automated Track Annotation (Env-DATA) system enhances Movebank, an open portal of animal tracking data, by automating access to environmental variables from global remote sensing, weather, and ecosystem products. The system automates the download and decryption of the data from open web resources of remote sensing and weather data, and provides several interpolation methods from the native grid resolution and structure to a global regular grid linked with the movement tracks in space and time. The system is open and free to any user with movement data. The aim is to facilitate new understanding and predictive capabilities of spatiotemporal patterns of animal movement in response to dynamic and changing environments from local to global scales. The system is illustrated with a series of case studies of pan-American migrations of turkey vultures, and foraging flights of Galapagos Albatross.

  9. env Sequences of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses from Chimpanzees in Cameroon Are Strongly Related to Those of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Group N from the Same Geographic Area

    PubMed Central

    Corbet, Sylvie; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Versmisse, Pierre; Delarue, Severine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Lewis, John; Brunak, Soren; Martin, Paul; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise; Simon, François; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise; Mauclere, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group N from Cameroon is phylogenetically close, in env, to the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) cpz-gab from Gabon and SIVcpz-US of unknown geographic origin. We screened 29 wild-born Cameroonian chimpanzees and found that three (Cam3, Cam4, and Cam5) were positive for HIV-1 by Western blotting. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that Cam3 and Cam5 belonged to Pan troglodytes troglodytes and that Cam4 belonged to P. t. vellerosus. Genetic analyses of the viruses together with serological data demonstrated that at least one of the two P. t. troglodytes chimpanzees (Cam5) was infected in the wild, and revealed a horizontal transmission between Cam3 and Cam4. These data confirm that P. t. troglodytes is a natural host for HIV-1-related viruses. Furthermore, they show that SIVcpz can be transmitted in captivity, from one chimpanzee subspecies to another. All three SIVcpz-cam viruses clustered with HIV-1 N in env. The full Cam3 SIVcpz genome sequence showed a very close phylogenetic relationship with SIVcpz-US, a virus identified in a P. t. troglodytes chimpanzee captured nearly 40 years earlier. Like SIVcpz-US, SIVcpz-cam3 was closely related to HIV-1 N in env, but not in pol, supporting the hypothesis that HIV-1 N results from a recombination event. SIVcpz from chimpanzees born in the wild in Cameroon are thus strongly related in env to HIV-1 N from Cameroon, demonstrating the geographic coincidence of these human and simian viruses and providing a further strong argument in favor of the origin of HIV-1 being in chimpanzees. PMID:10590144

  10. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  11. Independent variation and positive selection in env V1 and V2 domains within maternal-infant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, S L; Sleasman, J W; She, J X; Barrie, K A; Pomeroy, S M; Barrett, D J; Goodenow, M M

    1993-01-01

    Multiple targets for immune recognition and cellular tropism are localized to the V1 and V2 hypervariable regions in the amino portion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120env. We have assessed genetic diversity in env V1 and V2 hypervariable domains in vivo within epidemiologically related strains of HIV-1. Our strategy was to analyze longitudinal samples from two seropositive mothers and multiple children infected by perinatal transmission. Although the V1 and V2 domains are closely linked in the HIV-1 genome, nucleotide sequences in V1 and in V2 evolved independently in maternal-infant viruses in vivo. A high proportion of the nucleotide substitutions would introduce amino acid diversity in V1 and in V2. A significant excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions was identified in HIV-1 env V1 and V2 peptides in the mothers and in two older children but was not generally apparent in HIV-1 sequences in infants. An excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions indicated that there is positive selection for independent genetic variation in the V1 and V2 domains in vivo. It is likely that there are host responses to complex determinants in the V1 or V2 hypervariable domain of HIV-1 gp120. PMID:8510212

  12. Construction of infectious feline foamy virus genomes: cat antisera do not cross-neutralize feline foamy virus chimera with serotype-specific Env sequences.

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Alke, A; Bodem, J; Winkler, I G; Flower, R L; Pfrepper, K; Delius, H; Flügel, R M; Löchelt, M

    2000-01-05

    Full-length genomes of the feline foamy virus (FFV or FeFV) isolate FUV were constructed. DNA clone pFeFV-7 stably directed the expression of infectious FFV progeny virus indistinguishable from wild-type, uncloned FFV isolate FUV. The env and bel 1 genes of pFeFV-7 were substituted for by corresponding sequences of the FFV serotype 951 since previous studies implicated a defined part of FFV Env protein as responsible for serotype-specific differences in serum neutralization (I. G. Winkler, R. M. Flügel, M. Löchelt, and R. L. P. Flower, 1998. Virology 247: 144-151). Recombinant virus derived from chimeric plasmid pFeFV-7/951 containing the hybrid env gene and the parental clone pFeFV-7 were used for neutralization studies. By means of a rapid titration assay for FFV infectivity, we show that progeny virus derived from plasmid pFeFV-7 was neutralized by FUV- but not by 951-specific antisera, whereas pFeFV-7/951-derived chimeric virus was neutralized by 951-specific antisera only. Both recombinant proviruses will be useful for repeated delivery of foreign genes for therapeutic gene applications into cats.

  13. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D.; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-07-01

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7-20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT.

  14. Mutations in both env and gag genes are required for HIV-1 resistance to the polysulfonic dendrimer SPL2923, as corroborated by chimeric virus technology.

    PubMed

    Hantson, Anke; Fikkert, Valery; Van Remoortel, Barbara; Pannecouque, Chistophe; Cherepanov, Peter; Matthews, Barry; Holan, George; De Clercq, Erik; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Debyser, Zeger; Witvrouw, Myriam

    2005-01-01

    A drug-resistant NL4.3/SPL2923 strain has previously been generated by in vitro selection of HIV-1(NL4.3) in the presence of the polysulfonic dendrimer SPL2923 and mutations were reported in its gp120 gene (Witvrouw et al., 2000). Here, we further analysed the (cross) resistance profile of NL4.3/SPL2923. NL4.3/SPL2923 was found to contain additional mutations in gp41 and showed reduced susceptibility to SPL2923, dextran sulfate (DS) and enfuvirtide. To delineate to what extent the mutations in each env gene were accountable for the phenotypic (cross) resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923, the gp120-, gp41- and gp160-sequences derived from this strain were placed into a wild-type background using env chimeric virus technology (CVT). The cross resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923 towards DS was fully reproduced following gp160-recombination, while it was only partially reproduced following gp120- or gp41-recombination. The mutations in gp41 of NL4.3/SPL2923 were sufficient to reproduce the cross resistance to enfuvirtide. Unexpectedly, the reduced sensitivity towards SPL2923 was not fully reproduced after gp160-recombination. The search for mutations in NL4.3/SPL2923 in viral genes other than env revealed several mutations in the gene encoding the HIV p17 matrix protein (MA) and one mutation in the gene encoding the p24 capsid protein (CA). In order to analyse the impact of the gag mutations alone and in combination with the mutations in env on the phenotypic resistance towards SPL2923, we developed a novel p17- and p17/gp160-CVT. Phenotypic analysis of the NL4.3/SPL2923 p17- and p17/gp160-recombined strains indicated that the mutations in both env and gag have to be present to fully reproduce the resistance of NL4.3/SPL2923 towards SPL2923.

  15. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  16. Nedd4-Mediated Increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env Proteins and Immunity following DNA-Vaccination of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation. PMID:24614057

  17. [Detection of influenza virus (RT-PCR assay and others)].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2003-11-01

    Viral isolation is the conventional method for influenza virus diagnosis but it is less useful for immediate patient management. RT-PCR is the sensitive and rapid assay for the detection of respiratory viruses. Single step and multiplex RT-PCR is able to detect several viruses simultaneously in a single reaction. Real time PCR(TaqMan method) is able to detect the amplicon directly by release of a fluorescent reporter of the probe during the amplification reactions. This procedure can save time since it eliminates post-PCR processing steps. These RT-PCR methods should be useful for the accurate and rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection, especially severe cases such as pneumonia and encephalopathy.

  18. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  19. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  20. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  1. Improved Plasma Properties in RT-1 with a Levitated Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Watanabe, Sho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Junko

    2007-11-01

    Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) is a novel device to confine plasmas in a magnetosphere-like configuration generated by a superconducting internal conductor. The ring coil is excited with a permanent current of Ic=250kAT that is magnetically levitated in the chamber to minimize disturbances to the plasmas. The main scientific objective of RT-1 is to realize self-organized states of flowing plasmas with a very high beta value, where the thermal pressure of plasmas is balanced by the hydrodynamic pressure of a fast flow (S. M. Mahajan & Z. Yoshida, PRL 81, 4863 (1998), Z. Yoshida & S. M. Mahajan, PRL 88, 095001 (2002)). We have started a series of initial plasma experiments since 2006, and in this study, we focused on the improvements of plasma properties by the coil levitation. Hydrogen plasmas were generated by an 8.2GHz ECH system. When the coil was levitated, a line integrated electron density increased to ne=4x10^17m-2 and the peak density was close to the O-mode cut off density of the microwave. The beta value of the plasma was ˜3% and the pressure was mainly sustained by a high energy component of electrons. The magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 is also suitable for the confinement of non-neutral plasmas. Experiments on electron plasmas were conducted in RT-1 expanding the previous work in a normal conducting device.

  2. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted.

  3. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  4. CD4 down-modulation during infection of human T cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves independent activities of vpu, env, and nef.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B K; Gandhi, R T; Baltimore, D

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes vpu, env, and nef have all been implicated in modulating the levels of cell surface CD4 on infected cells. To quantitatively assess the relative contribution of each gene product to the regulation of CD4 during HIV infection of Jurkat T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we have developed an infectious HIV reporter system which expresses different combinations of these genes. To distinguish infected cells in the early or late stages of infection from uninfected cells, these viruses were designed to express human placental alkaline phosphatase with the kinetics of either early or late viral genes. Flow cytometry to detect placental alkaline phosphatase and CD4 in infected cells showed that vpu, env, and nef are independently capable of down-modulation of CD4. As predicted by their respective expression patterns, nef down-modulated CD4 rapidly during the early phase of virus infection whereas vpu and env functioned late in the infection. In both Jurkat cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a combination of the three genes was more efficient than any one or two genes, demonstrating that all three genes are required to achieve maximal CD4 down-modulation. In primary cells, down-modulation of CD4 was less efficient than in Jurkat cells and there was a stronger dependence on nef function for reducing cell surface CD4. HIV therefore has three genes that are able to independently down-modulate CD4; together, they can eliminate the bulk of cell surface CD4. PMID:8709227

  5. An adenovirus-simian immunodeficiency virus env vaccine elicits humoral, cellular, and mucosal immune responses in rhesus macaques and decreases viral burden following vaginal challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Buge, S L; Richardson, E; Alipanah, S; Markham, P; Cheng, S; Kalyan, N; Miller, C J; Lubeck, M; Udem, S; Eldridge, J; Robert-Guroff, M

    1997-01-01

    Six female rhesus macaques were immunized orally and intranasally at 0 weeks and intratracheally at 12 weeks with an adenovirus type 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr)-simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm env recombinant and at 24 and 36 weeks with native SIVmac251 gp120 in Syntex adjuvant. Four macaques received the Ad5hr vector and adjuvant alone; two additional controls were naive. In vivo replication of the Ad5hr wild-type and recombinant vectors occurred with detection of Ad5 DNA in stool samples and/or nasal secretions in all macaques and increases in Ad5 neutralizing antibody in 9 of 10 macaques following Ad administrations. SIV-specific neutralizing antibodies appeared after the second recombinant immunization and rose to titers > 10,000 following the second subunit boost. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies able to bind gp120 developed in nasal and rectal secretions, and SIV-specific IgGs were also observed in vaginal secretions and saliva. T-cell proliferative responses to SIV gp140 and T-helper epitopes were sporadically detected in all immunized macaques. Following vaginal challenge with SIVmac251, transient or persistent infection resulted in both immunized and control monkeys. The mean viral burden in persistently infected immunized macaques was significantly decreased in the primary infection period compared to that of control macaques. These results establish in vivo use of the Ad5hr vector, which overcomes the host range restriction of human Ads for rhesus macaques, thereby providing a new model for evaluation of Ad-based vaccines. In addition, they show that a vaccine regimen using the Ad5hr-SIV env recombinant and gp120 subunit induces strong humoral, cellular, and mucosal immunity in rhesus macaques. The reduced viral burden achieved solely with an env-based vaccine supports further development of Ad-based vaccines comprising additional viral components for immune therapy and AIDS vaccine development. PMID:9343211

  6. EarthEnv-DEM90: A nearly-global, void-free, multi-scale smoothed, 90m digital elevation model from fused ASTER and SRTM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Natalie; Regetz, James; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of DEM products are available to the public at no cost, though all are characterized by trade-offs in spatial coverage, data resolution, and quality. The absence of a high-resolution, high-quality, well-described and vetted, free, global consensus product was the impetus for the creation of a new DEM product described here, 'EarthEnv-DEM90'. This new DEM is a compilation dataset constructed via rigorous techniques by which ASTER GDEM2 and CGIAR-CSI v4.1 products were fused into a quality-enhanced, consistent grid of elevation estimates that spans ∼91% of the globe. EarthEnv-DEM90 was assembled using methods for seamlessly merging input datasets, thoroughly filling voids, and smoothing data irregularities (e.g. those caused by DEM noise) from the approximated surface. The result is a DEM product in which elevational artifacts are strongly mitigated from the input data fusion zone, substantial voids are filled in the northern-most regions of the globe, and the entire DEM exhibits reduced terrain noise. As important as the final product is a well defined methodology, along with new processing techniques and careful attention to final outputs, that extends the value and usability of the work beyond just this single product. Finally, we outline EarthEnv-DEM90 acquisition instructions and metadata availability, so that researchers can obtain this high-resolution, high-quality, nearly-global new DEM product for the study of wide-ranging global phenomena.

  7. Instruments of RT-2 experiment onboard CORONAS-PHOTON and their test and evaluation II: RT-2/CZT payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotoch, Tilak B.; Nandi, Anuj; Debnath, D.; Malkar, J. P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Madhav, Vaibhav P.; Sreekumar, S.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2011-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors are high sensitivity and high resolution devices for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopic studies. The new series of CZT detector modules (OMS40G256) manufactured by Orbotech Medical Solutions (OMS), Israel, are used in the RT-2/CZT payload onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The CZT detectors, sensitive in the energy range of 20 to 150 keV, are used to image solar flares in hard X-rays. Since these modules are essentially manufactured for commercial applications, we have carried out a series of comprehensive tests on these modules so that they can be confidently used in space-borne systems. These tests lead us to select the best three pieces of the `Gold' modules for the RT-2/CZT payload. This paper presents the characterization of CZT modules and the criteria followed for selecting the ones for the RT-2/CZT payload. The RT-2/CZT payload carries, along with three CZT modules, a high spatial resolution CMOS detector for high resolution imaging of transient X-ray events. Therefore, we discuss the characterization of the CMOS detector as well.

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) originates from the pro and pol open reading frames and requires the presence of RT-RNase H (RH) and RT-RH-integrase proteins for its activity.

    PubMed

    Trentin, B; Rebeyrotte, N; Mamoun, R Z

    1998-08-01

    The first description of an active form of a recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and subsequent predictions of its amino acid sequence and quaternary structure are reported here. By using amino acid alignment methods, the NH2 and COOH termini of the RT, RNase H (RH), and integrase (IN) domains of the Pol polyprotein were determined. The HTLV-1 RT seems to be unique since its NH2 terminus is probably encoded by the pro open reading frame (ORF) fused downstream, via a transframe peptide, to the polypeptide encoded by the pol ORF. The HTLV-1 Pol amino acid sequence was revealed to be highly similar to that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), particularly at the RT-RH hinge region. These two domains remain linked for RSV; this may also be the case for HTLV-1. In light of these results, RT, RT-RH, and RT-RH-IN genes were constructed and introduced into His-tagged protein expression vectors. The corresponding proteins were synthesized in vitro, and the DNA polymerase activities of different protein combinations were tested. Solely the RT-RH-RT-RH-IN combination was found to have a significant activity level. Velocity sedimentation analysis suggested that the HTLV-1 RT-RH and RT-RH-IN monomers are likely associated in an oligomeric structure, probably of the alpha3/beta type.

  9. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env.

    PubMed

    Heydarchi, Behnaz; Center, Rob J; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Gonelli, Christopher; Khoury, Georges; Mackenzie, Charlene; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Muller, Brian; Purcell, Damian

    2017-04-01

    We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection.

  10. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env

    PubMed Central

    Center, Rob J.; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection. PMID:27996375

  11. Efavirenz therapy in rhesus macaques infected with a chimera of simian immunodeficiency virus containing reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael J; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B; Pedersen, Niels C; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F; North, Thomas W

    2004-09-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 +/- 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz.

  12. Efavirenz Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Infected with a Chimera of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Reverse Transcriptase from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Michael J.; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F.; North, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 ± 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz. PMID:15328115

  13. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  14. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. IMPORTANCE The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. PMID:27807233

  15. Peptide Triazole Inactivators of HIV-1 Utilize a Conserved Two-Cavity Binding Site at the Junction of the Inner and Outer Domains of Env gp120

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Rachna; Rashad, Adel A.; Li, Huiyuan; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D.; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    We used coordinated mutagenesis, synthetic design, and flexible docking to investigate the structural mechanism of Env gp120 encounter by peptide triazole (PT) inactivators of HIV-1. Prior results demonstrated that the PT class of inhibitors suppresses binding at both CD4 and coreceptor sites on Env and triggers gp120 shedding, leading to cell-independent irreversible virus inactivation. Despite these enticing anti-HIV-1 phenotypes, structural understanding of the PT–gp120 binding mechanism has been incomplete. Here we found that PT engages two inhibitor ring moieties at the junction between the inner and outer domains of the gp120 protein. The results demonstrate how combined occupancy of two gp120 cavities can coordinately suppress both receptor and coreceptor binding and conformationally entrap the protein in a destabilized state. The two-cavity model has common features with small molecule gp120 inhibitor binding sites and provides a guide for further design of peptidomimetic HIV-1 inactivators based on the PT pharmacophore. PMID:25860784

  16. Cross-talk Suppression between the CpxA-CpxR and EnvZ-OmpR Two-Component Systems in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Siryaporn, Albert; Goulian, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria possess large numbers of two-component signaling systems, which are composed of histidine kinase-response regulator pairs. The high level of sequence similarity between some systems raises the possibility of undesired cross-talk between a histidine kinase and a non-cognate response regulator. Although molecular specificity ensures that phospho-transfer occurs primarily between correct partners, even a low level of inappropriate cross-talk could lead to unacceptable levels of noise or interference in signal transduction. To explore mechanisms that provide insulation against such interference, we have examined cross-talk between the histidine kinase CpxA and non-cognate response regulator OmpR in Escherichia coli. Our results show that there are two mechanisms that suppress cross-talk between these two proteins, which depend on the corresponding cognate partners CpxR and EnvZ and on the bifunctional nature of the histidine kinases CpxA and EnvZ. When cross-talk is detectable, we find it is independent of CpxA stimulus. We also show that cross-talk suppression leads to mutational robustness, i.e. it masks the effects of mutations that would otherwise lead to increased cross-talk. The mechanisms that provide insulation against interference described here may be applicable to many other two-component systems. PMID:18761686

  17. Different HIV-1 env frames: gp120 and ASP (antisense protein) biosynthesis, and theirs co-variation tropic amino acid signatures in X4- and R5-viruses.

    PubMed

    Dimonte, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Antisense protein (ASP) is the new actor of viral life of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) although proposed above 20 years ago. The asp ORF is into complementary strand of the gp120/gp41 junction of env gene. The ASP biological role remains little known. Knowing the Env markers of viral tropism, a dataset of sequences (660 strains) was used to analyze the hypothetical ASP involvement in CCR5 (R5) and/or CXCR4 (X4) co-receptor interaction. Preliminarily, prevalence of ASP and gp120V3 mutations was performed; following association among mutations were elaborate. The classical V3 tropic-signatures were confirmed, and 36 R5- and 22 X4-tropic ASP mutations were found. Moreover, by analyzing the ASP sequences, 36 out of 179 amino acid positions significantly associated with different co-receptor usage were found. Several statistically significant associations between gp120V3 and ASP mutations were observed. The dendrogram showed the existence of a cluster associated with R5-usage and a large cluster associated with X4-usage. These results show that gp120V3 and specific amino acid changes in ASP are associated together with CXCR4 and/or CCR5-usage. These findings implement previous observations on unclear ASP functions. J. Med. Virol. 89:112-122, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design.

  19. Type A influenza virus detection from horses by real-time RT-PCR and insulated isothermal RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-01-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is a highly contagious disease of horses caused by the equine influenza virus (EIV) H3N8 subtype. EI is the most important respiratory virus infection of horses and can disrupt major equestrian events and cause significant economic losses to the equine industry worldwide. Influenza H3N8 virus spreads rapidly in susceptible horses and can result in very high morbidity within 24-48 h after exposure to the virus. Therefore, rapid and accurate diagnosis of EI is critical for implementation of prevention and control measures to avoid the spread of EIV and to reduce the economic impact of the disease. The probe-based real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays targeting various EIV genes are reported to be highly sensitive and specific compared to the Directigen Flu A(®) test and virus isolation in embryonated hens' eggs. Recently, a TaqMan(®) probe-based insulated isothermal RT-PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for the detection of EIV H3N8 subtype has been described. These molecular based diagnostic assays provide a fast and reliable means of EIV detection and disease surveillance.

  20. Viable but non-culturable state (VBNC) of Escherichia coli related to EnvZ under the effect of pH, starvation and osmotic stress in sea water.

    PubMed

    Darcan, Cihan; Ozkanca, Reşit; Idil, Onder; Flint, Ken P

    2009-01-01

    When exposed extreme environmental conditions such as sea water, bacteria have been shown different survival strategy for continue their life. One of this strategy known as viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state which is very important for nondifferiation bacteria. VBNC cells cause serious human health problems. Little is known, however, about the genetic mechanisms underlying the VBNC state. Under different environmental conditions, porins are important in the survival strategy of bacteria. EnvZ/OmpR work together as regulators of ompF and ompC gene expression. It is known that the EnvZ system has a role in VBNC state. In this study we tried to find out the viability of EnvZ, OmpC and OmpF mutant E. coli under stress effect of osmolarity, pH and starvation. Bacteria were suspended in filtered-autoclaved sea water microcosms and numbers determined over 25 day incubation periods by plate count (PC), direct viable count (DVC) and count of cells capable of respiration (RCC). As regard to results, alkaline pH affected E. coli more than acidic pH, which led to decline in number. On the contrary glycine betaine addition to sea water protected E. coli porin mutants and also reduced the death rate of bacteria. Under the effect of pH, osmotic stress and starvation stress, wild type E. coli and porin mutants entered a dormant state or became VBNC with the exception of MSZ31 (envZ mutant) E. coli cells which did not enter the VBNC state under the three tested stress conditions. This study is the first report to demonstrate that E. coli could not enter the VBNC state in the lack of EnvZ product under the stress of osmolarity, pH and starvation and the relationship between EnvZ and VBNC state are not affected by pH, osmolarity and starvation.

  1. Co-regulation of polysaccharide production, motility, and expression of type III secretion genes by EnvZ/OmpR and GrrS/GrrA systems in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenting; Ancona, Veronica; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-02-01

    The EnvZ/OmpR and GrrS/GrrA systems, two widely distributed two-component systems in gamma-Proteobacteria, negatively control amylovoran biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora, and the two systems regulate motility in an opposing manner. In this study, we examined the interplay of EnvZ/OmpR and GrrS/GrrA systems in controlling various virulence traits in E. amylovora. Results showed that amylovoran production was significantly higher when both systems were inactivated, indicating that the two systems act as negative regulators and their combined effect on amylovoran production appears to be enhanced. In contrast, reduced motility was observed when both systems were deleted as compared to that of grrA/grrS mutants and WT strain, indicating that the two systems antagonistically regulate motility in E. amylovora. In addition, glycogen accumulation was much higher in envZ/ompR and two triple mutants than that of grrS/grrA mutants and WT strain, suggesting that EnvZ/OmpR plays a dominant role in regulating glycogen accumulation, whereas levan production was significantly lower in the grrS/grrA and two triple mutants as compared with that of WT and envZ/ompR mutants, indicating that GrrS/GrrA system dominantly controls levan production. Furthermore, both systems negatively regulated expression of three type III secretion (T3SS) genes and their combined negative effect on hrp-T3SS gene expression increased when both systems were deleted. These results demonstrated that EnvZ/OmpR and GrrS/GrrA systems co-regulate various virulence factors in E. amylovora by still unknown mechanisms or through different target genes, sRNAs, or proteins, indicating that a complex regulatory network may be involved, which needs to be further explored.

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-Specific T-Cell Responses Are Infrequently Detected in HIV-1-Infected Subjects Using Standard Peptide Matrix-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    John, Vivek M.; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Burgers, Peter C.; Luider, Theo M.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Yue, Feng-Yun; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific responses were detected. At these high peptide concentrations, we detected false-positive responses, three of which were mapped to an HIV-1 Gag peptide contaminant. Thus, HERV-K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected by 15mer peptide mapping. PMID:22205657

  3. Applications of LANCE Data at SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Short term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Mission: Apply NASA and NOAA measurement systems and unique Earth science research to improve the accuracy of short term weather prediction at the regional/local scale. Goals: Evaluate and assess the utility of NASA and NOAA Earth science data and products and unique research capabilities to address operational weather forecast problems; Provide an environment which enables the development and testing of new capabilities to improve short term weather forecasts on a regional scale; Help ensure successful transition of new capabilities to operational weather entities for the benefit of society

  4. SMAP Data Assimilation at NASA SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay B.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center maintains a near-real- time run of the Noah Land Surface Model within the Land Information System (LIS) at 3-km resolution. Soil moisture products from this model are used by several NOAA/National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices for flood and drought situational awareness. We have implemented assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Soil Moisture Active/ Passive (SMAP) satellites, and are now evaluating the SMAP assimilation. The SMAP-enhanced LIS product is planned for public release by October 2016.

  5. Recombination between feline leukemia virus subgroup B or C and endogenous env elements alters the in vitro biological activities of the viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, R; Ghosh, A K; Kumar, D V; Bachman, B A; Shibata, D; Roy-Burman, P

    1991-01-01

    An important question in feline leukemia virus (FeLV) pathogenesis is whether, as in murine leukemia virus infection, homologous recombination between the infecting FeLV and the noninfectious endogenous FeLV-like proviruses serves as a significant base for the generation of proximal pathogens. To begin an analysis of this issue, several recombinant FeLVs were produced by using two different approaches: (i) the regions of the viral envelope (env) gene of a cloned FeLV (subgroup B virus [FeLV-B], Gardner-Arnstein strain) and those of two different endogenous proviral loci were exchanged to create specific FeLV chimeras, and (ii) vectors containing endogenous env and molecularly cloned infectious FeLV-C (Sarma strain) DNA sequences were coexpressed by transfection in nonfeline cells to facilitate recombination. The results of these combined approaches showed that up to three-fourths of the envelope glycoprotein (gp70), beginning from the N-terminal end, could be replaced by endogenous FeLV sequences to produce biologically active chimeric FeLVs. The in vitro replication efficiency or cell tropism of the recombinants appeared to be influenced by the amount of gp70 sequences replaced by the endogenous partner as well as by the locus of origin of the endogenous sequences. Additionally, a characteristic biological effect, aggregation of feline T-lymphoma cells (3201B cell line), was found to be specifically induced by replicating FeLV-C or FeLV-C-based recombinants. Multiple crossover sites in the gp70 protein selected under the conditions used for coexpression were identified. The results of induced coexpression were also supported by rapid generation of FeLV recombinants when FeLV-C was used to infect the feline 3201B cell line that constitutively expresses high levels of endogenous FeLV-specific mRNAs. Furthermore, a large, highly conserved open reading frame in the pol gene of an endogenous FeLV provirus was identified. This observation, particularly in reference to

  6. Identification of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) env gene subtypes and comparison of the FIV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolutionary patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Sodora, D L; Shpaer, E G; Kitchell, B E; Dow, S W; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus associated with AIDS-like illnesses in cats. As such, FIV appears to be a feline analog of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A hallmark of HIV infection is the large degree of viral genetic diversity that can develop within an infected individual and the even greater and continually increasing level of diversity among virus isolates from different individuals. Our goal in this study was to determine patterns of FIV genetic diversity by focusing on a 684-nucleotide region encompassing variable regions V3, V4, and V5 of the FIV env gene in order to establish parallels and distinctions between FIV and HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Our data demonstrate that, like HIV-1, FIV can be separated into distinct envelope sequence subtypes (three are described here). Similar to that found for HIV-1, the pairwise sequence divergence within an FIV subtype ranged from 2.5 to 15.0%, whereas that between subtypes ranged from 17.8 to 26.2%. However, the high number of synonymous nucleotide changes among FIV V3 to V5 env sequences may also include a significant number of back mutations and suggests that the evolutionary distances among FIV subtypes are underestimated. Although only a few subtype B viruses were available for examination, the pattern of diversity between the FIV A and B subtypes was found to be significantly distinct; subtype B sequences had proportionally fewer mutations that changed amino acids, compared with silent changes, suggesting a more advanced state of adaptation to the host. No similar distinction was evident for HIV-1 subtypes. The diversity of FIV genomes within individual infected cats was found to be as high as 3.7% yet twofold lower than that within HIV-1-infected people over a comparable region of the env gene. Despite these differences, significant parallels between patterns of FIV evolution and HIV-1 evolution exist, indicating that a wide array of potentially divergent virus challenges need to be considered

  7. Preliminary Results of ICRH on the RT-1 Magnetospheric Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yoshihisa; Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Morikawa, Junji; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    The Ring Trap-1 device, which uses a levitating super-conducting magnet, has already achieved a stable confinement of high-beta plasma (βlocal > 0 . 7) by using ECRH(Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating). Now we are aiming to heat ions by the use of ICRH(Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) as a next phase of the RT-1 experiment. In the dipole configuration, the magnetic field strength (0.01-0.5 T) and the plasma density (ne ~1017m-3) are lower than in other plasma confinement devices. These features of the dipole plasma may generally result in low plasma loading impedance. Therefore we experimentally examined the loading impedance by the resonance method. In the experiment, a test antenna (φ260-300, 3 turns) was installed around the RT-1 center-stack (φ180). The RF frequency was 1 - 3 MHz and the RF input power was less than 200 mW. The observed loading impedance became higher when the RF frequency and the plasma density were increased. The maximum observed impedance was 17 Ω at 3 MHz and 0.6 Ω at 1 MHz. These dependences on the RF frequency and the plasma density agree with the preliminary calculation results. The detailed comparison between experiment and calculation will be presented.

  8. A comparative study of digital RT-PCR and RT-qPCR for quantification of Hepatitis A virus and Norovirus in lettuce and water samples.

    PubMed

    Coudray-Meunier, Coralie; Fraisse, Audrey; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-05-18

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of foodborne enteric viruses is classically achieved by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Recently, digital PCR (dPCR) was described as a novel approach to genome quantification without need for a standard curve. The performance of microfluidic digital RT-PCR (RT-dPCR) was compared to RT-qPCR for detecting the main viruses responsible for foodborne outbreaks (human Noroviruses (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV)) in spiked lettuce and bottled water. Two process controls (Mengovirus and Murine Norovirus) were used and external amplification controls (EAC) were added to examine inhibition of RT-qPCR and RT-dPCR. For detecting viral RNA and cDNA, the sensitivity of the RT-dPCR assays was either comparable to that of RT-qPCR (RNA of HAV, NoV GI, Mengovirus) or slightly (around 1 log10) decreased (NoV GII and MNV-1 RNA and of HAV, NoV GI, NoV GII cDNA). The number of genomic copies determined by dPCR was always from 0.4 to 1.7 log10 lower than the expected numbers of copies calculated by using the standard qPCR curve. Viral recoveries calculated by RT-dPCR were found to be significantly higher than by RT-qPCR for NoV GI, HAV and Mengovirus in water, and for NoV GII and HAV in lettuce samples. The RT-dPCR assay proved to be more tolerant to inhibitory substances present in lettuce samples. This absolute quantitation approach may be useful to standardize quantification of enteric viruses in bottled water and lettuce samples and may be extended to quantifying other human pathogens in food samples.

  9. Comparison of the conventional multiplex RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manohar L; Anand, Siddharth P; Tikhe, Shamal A; Walimbe, Atul M; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive, specific and cost effective, having huge potential for patient management. In this study, the performance of an in-house developed conventional multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) and Luminex xTAG(®) RVP fast assay (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) for the detection of respiratory viruses was compared. A total 310 respiratory clinical specimens predominantly from pediatric patients, referred for diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 from August 2009 to March 2011 were tested to determine performance characteristic of the three methods. A total 193 (62.2%) samples were detected positive for one or more viruses by mRT-PCR, 175 (56.4%) samples by real time monoplex RT-PCR, and 138 (44.5%) samples by xTAG(®) RVP fast assay. The overall sensitivity of mRT-PCR was 96.9% (95% CI: 93.5, 98.8), rtRT-PCR 87.9% (95% CI: 82.5, 92.1) and xTAG(®) RVP fast was 68.3% (95% CI: 61.4, 74.6). Rhinovirus was detected most commonly followed by respiratory syncytial virus group B and influenza A/H1N1pdm09. The monoplex real time RT-PCR and in-house developed mRT-PCR are more sensitive, specific and cost effective than the xTAG(®) RVP fast assay.

  10. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    SciTech Connect

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS.

  11. Reduced potency and incomplete neutralization of broadly neutralizing antibodies against cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 with transmitted founder Envs.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongru; Zony, Chati; Chen, Ping; Chen, Benjamin K

    2017-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated from HIV-1 patients and can potently block infection of a wide spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes. These antibodies define common epitopes shared by many viral isolates. While bNAbs potently antagonize infection with cell-free virus, inhibition of HIV-1 transmission from infected to uninfected CD4(+) T cells through virological synapses (VS), has been found to require greater amounts of antibody. In this study, we examined two well-studied molecular clones and two transmitted founder (T/F) viruses for their sensitivities to a panel of bNAbs in cell-free and cell-to-cell infection assays. We observed a relative resistance of cell-to-cell transmission to antibody neutralization that is reflected not only by reductions of antibody potency, but also by decreases in maximum neutralization capacity relative to cell-free infections. BNAbs targeting different epitopes exhibited incomplete neutralization against cell-associated virus with T/F Envs, which was not observed with cell-free form of the same virus. We further identified the membrane proximal internal tyrosine-based sorting motif as a determinant that can affect the incomplete neutralization of these T/F clones in cell-to-cell infection. These findings indicate that the signal that affects surface expression and/or internalization of Env from the plasma membrane can modulate the presentation of neutralizing epitopes on infected cells. These findings highlight that a fraction of virus can escape from high concentrations of antibody through cell-to-cell infection while maintaining sensitivity to neutralization in cell-free infection. The ability to fully inhibit cell-to-cell transmission may represent an important consideration in development of antibodies for treatment or prophylaxis.

  12. Mutations of a residue within the polyproline-rich region of Env alter the replication rate and level of cytopathic effects in chimeric avian retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin W; Barsov, Eugene V; Ferris, Andrea L; Hughes, Stephen H

    2005-08-01

    Previous attempts to extend the host range of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV)-based RCASBP vectors produced two viral vectors, RCASBP M2C (4070A) and RCASBP M2C (797-8), which replicate using the amphotropic murine leukemia virus 4070A Env protein (2). Both viruses were adapted to replicate efficiently in the avian cell line DF-1, but RCASBP M2C (4070A) caused extensive cytopathic effects (CPE) in DF-1 cells whereas RCASBP M2C (797-8) induced low levels of CPE. The two viruses differed only at amino acid 242 of the polyproline-rich region in the surface (SU) subunit of the Env protein. In RCASBP M2C (4070A), an isoleucine replaced the wild-type proline residue, whereas a threonine residue was found in RCASBP M2C (797-8). In the present study, we show that other amino acid substitutions at position 242 strongly influence the CPE and replication rate of the chimeric viruses. There was a correlation between the amount of unintegrated linear retroviral DNA present in infected DF-1 cells and the level of CPE. This suggests that there may be a role for superinfection in the CPE. The treatment of RCASBP M2C (4070A)-infected cells with dantrolene, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), reduced the amount of CPE seen during infection with the highly cytotoxic virus. Dantrolene treatment did not appear to affect virus production, suggesting that Ca2+ release from the ER had a role in the CPE caused by these viruses.

  13. Design and structure of two HIV-1 clade C SOSIP.664 trimers that increase the arsenal of native-like Env immunogens.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Hua, Yuanzi; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; de Taeye, Steven W; Nieusma, Travis; Cupo, Albert; Yasmeen, Anila; Golabek, Michael; Pugach, Pavel; Klasse, P J; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-09-22

    A key challenge in the quest toward an HIV-1 vaccine is design of immunogens that can generate a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) response against the enormous sequence diversity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). We previously demonstrated that a recombinant, soluble, fully cleaved SOSIP.664 trimer based on the clade A BG505 sequence is a faithful antigenic and structural mimic of the native trimer in its prefusion conformation. Here, we sought clade C native-like trimers with comparable properties. We identified DU422 and ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimers as being appropriately thermostable (Tm of 63.4 °C and 62.7 °C, respectively) and predominantly native-like, as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy (EM). Size exclusion chromatography, ELISA, and surface plasmon resonance further showed that these trimers properly display epitopes for all of the major bnAb classes, including quaternary-dependent, trimer-apex (e.g., PGT145) and gp120/gp41 interface (e.g., PGT151) epitopes. A cryo-EM reconstruction of the ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimer complexed with VRC01 Fab against the CD4 binding site at subnanometer resolution revealed a striking overall similarity to its BG505 counterpart with expected local conformational differences in the gp120 V1, V2, and V4 loops. These stable clade C trimers contribute additional diversity to the pool of native-like Env immunogens as key components of strategies to induce bnAbs to HIV-1.

  14. Avian influenza virus detection and quantitation by real-time RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) has been used for avian influenza virus (AIV) detection since the early 2000’s for routine surveillance, during outbreaks and for research. Some of the advantages of rRT-PCR are: high sensitivity, high specificity, rapid time-to-result, scalability, cost, and its inherentl...

  15. Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students within an RtI Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth; Hughes, Claire E.

    2009-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is sweeping the country, changing the way children's educational needs are recognized and met. RtI was introduced through special education legislation as part of IDEA 2004 and offered an alternative approach for identifying students with learning disabilities (Bender & Shores, 2007). RtI is designed to bring…

  16. Administrator Perceptions Regarding Pennsylvania's MTSS/RtII Framework and Gifted Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murin, Tricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Providing equitable education for all students is the responsibility of administrators, teachers, and parents. Even though the MTSS/RtII Framework has evolved from the RtI and RtII models, the basis is the same: intervening and identifying students' needs and analyzing data and programming instruction to meet all students' needs. Even though in…

  17. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-01

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ˜10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ˜50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  18. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  19. Design and development of the RT-2/CZT payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkar, J. P.; Tawde, Amit; Sreekumar, S.; Hingar, M. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Nandi, Anuj

    The RT-2/CZT spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads to be flown onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite in 2008. It is a collaborative experiment between TIFR, CSP, ISRO (India) and MEPhI (Russia). It is designed to study the solar hard X-ray flare phenomena in the energy range 20 keV - 120 keV using pixilated (2.5 mm times 2.5 mm) cadmium zinc telluride detector array. These detectors along with an image coding device like coded aperture mask (CAM) or fresnel zone plate (FZP) helps in to snap images (in medium X-ray energy ranges) of the solar flares. The design characteristics of this payload are discussed.

  20. Comparative detection of rotavirus RNA by conventional RT-PCR, TaqMan RT-PCR and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tan, Hua; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus is one of the major viral pathogens leading to diarrhea. Diagnosis has been conducted by either traditional cultural, serological methods or molecular biology techniques, which include RT-PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). However, their differences regarding accuracy and sensitivity remain unknown. In this study, an in-house conventional RT-PCR assay and more importantly, an in-house real-time NASBA (RT-NASBA) were established, and compared with a commercial TaqMan RT-PCR assay. The results showed that all of these methods were able to detect and distinguish rotavirus from other diarrhea viruses with a 100% concordance rate during the course of an evaluation on 20 clinical stool samples. However, RT-NASBA was much quicker than the other two methods. More importantly, the limit of detection of RT-NASBA could reach seven copies per reaction and was one to two logs lower than that of conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-PCR. These results indicate that this in-house assay was more sensitive, and thus could be used as an efficient diagnosis tool for rotavirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison among three different assays for the detection of rotavirus. These findings would provide implication for the rational selection of diagnosis tool for rotavirus.

  1. Ultrascaled AIN/GaN HEMT Technology for mm-wave RT Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    342. The best achieved sheet resistance is 128 ohm/sq. at RT and 40 ohm/sq. at 77 K. Shown in Figure 2.7 and 2.8 are the RT sheet resistance versus Ga...3C ’ o 1000 0 RT2DEG density (10𔃽 cm2) Figure 2.9. Plot of RT sheet resistance against 2DEC densities. The hluc and red zones indicate...the RT sheet resistance achieved in AlCa\\/Ca\\ and InAlN/AlN/Ga.\\ hetcrojunclions so far. 100 Temperature (K) Figure 2.in. Measured tempofalure

  2. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  4. Experiments and simulations of RT and RM fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, P.; Gushkov, S.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the front. The experimental configuration consists on a unstable two layer system held by a removable plate in a box for the Rayleigh-Taylor fronts and shock tube high Mach number impulse across a density interface air/SF6. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages and its spectral, self-similar information. Most models of the turbulent mixing evolution generated by hydrodynamics instabilities do not include any dependence on initial conditions, but in many relevant physical problems this dependence is very important, for instance, in Inertial Confinement Fussion target implosion. We discuss simple initial conditions (such as a jet array versus a plate removal) with the aid of numerical models. The analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and of accelerated instabilities is presented locally, and seen to dominate the turbulent cascade mixing zone differently under different initial conditions. Fractal and neuron network analysis of Turbulent Mixing under RT and RM instabilities are presented comparing the different experiments and numerical simulations.

  5. Zoonotic potential of the Clostridium difficile RT078 family in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Bo-Yang; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Wu, Ying-Chen; Lan, Po-Han; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Hung, Yuan-Pin; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. We have previously demonstrated that in southern Taiwan, severe C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) cases were due to the C. difficile RT 126 strain infection, indicating the arrival of an epidemic C. difficile clone in southern Taiwan. RT126 has a close genetic relationship with RT078. However, the RT078 family is the predominant strain of C. difficile in animals worldwide, particularly in swine. In this study, we surveyed C. difficile strains isolated from swine at several farms in Taiwan from August 2011 to March 2015. We found that all swine strains, namely RT078 (32.5%, 37 of 114), RT126 (28.9%, 33 of 114) and RT127 (37.7%, 43 of 114), belonged to the toxigenic RT078 family. All strains had high gyrA mutation rate (57.9%, 66/114), which was linked to quinolone resistance. Notably, Rep-PCR revealed that 3 RT078 animal strains had the same fingerprint as human RT078 clinical isolates; their phylogenic relationship was closely related to the whole gene sequences of tcdB, thus suggesting zoonotic potential for C. difficile infection in Taiwan.

  6. Diagnosis of Kyasanur forest disease by nested RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR and IgM capture ELISA.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Yadav, Pragya D; Mehla, Rajeev; Barde, Pradip V; Yergolkar, Prasanna N; Kumar, Sandeep R P; Thakare, Jyotsna P; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2012-12-01

    Kyasanur forest disease (KFD) is a zoonotic viral disease caused by infection by a Flavivirus, a member of the family Flaviviridae. KFD is a public health concern in the Karnataka State in southern India. Available conventional diagnostic tests such as virus isolation and serological tests, such as haemagglutination inhibition and complement fixation tests are time consuming. This study reports the development of a nested RT-PCR [nRT-PCR] and a TaqMan-based real-time RT-PCR and IgM antibodies capture ELISA [MAC-ELISA] for rapid and accurate diagnosis of suspected KFD cases. The nRT-PCR and the TaqMan-based real-time RT-PCR assays were developed using gene sequences of the NS-5/non-coding region. Both the assays detected KFD viral RNA in acute phase human serum samples and can provide early diagnosis of infection. Real-time RT-PCR was found to be more sensitive than nRT-PCR, which could detect 38 copies of KFDV RNA. MAC-ELISA was developed for the detection of recent infections. Although real-time RT-PCR and nRT-PCR require expensive reagents, expensive equipment and trained personnel, the developed MAC-ELISA can be used easily in the affected areas. These tests add to the existing diagnosis arsenal against haemorrhagic viruses that are prevalent in India. These assays will also help to extend our knowledge of the pathology of KFD virus and its associated clinical features, by measuring the viral titre during infection and at the time of seroconversion. Information, which is not available currently because of the lack of appropriate diagnostic methods. In addition, early laboratory diagnosis of KFDV infection will help in the application of appropriate control measures and management of KFD cases.

  7. A mini review of qRT-rtPCR technology application in uncovering the mechanism of food allergy and in the search for novel interventions.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Shaib, Houssam A; Ahmadieh, Diana M; Kumosani, Taha; Hamadeh, Shady K; Azhar, Esam; Harakeh, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This mini review targets the inclusion of recent selected citations, between the year 2006 and 2012, that implement the qRT-rtPCR technology in their experimental designs, targeting the uncovering of the mechanism of food allergy. In addition, this same technology was implemented in specific experimental designs, aiming at finding novel nutritional, herbal medicine, and tolerance interventions against food allergy. The approach of using qRT-rtPCR technology helped in studying the dynamics of transcription of cytokines and chemokines in intestinal dendritic cells of the experimental animals during the allergic reaction to food. The suppression of transcription of specific cytokines or chemokines by nutritional, herbal medicine, and tolerance interventions was instrumental in the search for finding novel remedies for this health condition, that was traditionally managed by avoidance of offending foods in the diet.

  8. Rapid detection of equine influenza virus H3N8 subtype by insulated isothermal RT-PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay using the POCKIT™ Nucleic Acid Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Tiwari, Ashish; Skillman, Ashley; Nam, Bora; Chambers, Thomas M; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Yang, Pai-Chun; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is an acute, highly contagious viral respiratory disease of equids. Currently, equine influenza virus (EIV) subtype H3N8 continues to be the most important respiratory pathogen of horses in many countries around the world. The need to achieve a rapid diagnosis and to implement effective quarantine and movement restrictions is critical in controlling the spread of EIV. In this study, a novel, inexpensive and user-friendly assay based on an insulated isothermal RT-PCR (iiRT-PCR) method on the POCKIT™, a field-deployable device, was described and validated for point-of-need detection of EIV-H3N8 in clinical samples. The newly established iiRT-PCR assay targeting the EIV HA3 gene was evaluated for its sensitivity using in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA, as well as ten-fold serial dilutions of RNA extracted from the prototype H3N8 strain A/equine/Miami/1/63. Inclusivity and exclusivity panels were tested for specificity evaluation. Published real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays targeting the NP and HA3 genes were used as the reference standards for comparison of RNA extracted from field strains and from nasal swab samples collected from experimentally infected horses, respectively. Limit of detection with a 95% probability (LoD95%) was estimated to be 11copies of IVT RNA. Clinical sensitivity analysis using RNA prepared from serial dilutions of a prototype EIV (Miami 1/63/H3N8) showed that the iiRT-PCR assay was about 100-fold more sensitive than the rRT-PCR assay targeting the NP gene of EIV subtype H3N8. The iiRT-PCR assay identified accurately fifteen EIV H3N8 strains and two canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 strains, and did not cross-react with H6N2, H7N7, H1N1 subtypes or any other equine respiratory viral pathogens. Finally, 100% agreement was found between the iiRT-PCR assay and the universal influenza virus type A rRT-PCR assay in detecting the EIV A/equine/Kentucky/7/07 strain in 56 nasal swab samples collected from experimentally inoculated

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of env, gag, and tat genes of HIV type 1 detected among the injecting drug users in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Saha, M K; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2006-12-01

    A recent occurrence of HIV-1 seropositivity among a group of injecting drug users (IDUs) in Darjeeling, a hilly district in northern West Bengal, revealed overall 11.8% HIV seroprevalence. Our study based on env (C2-V3), gag (p24-p7), and tat (exon-1) genomic regions of HIV-1 detected among this population showed that Darjeeling IDU sequences belonged to subtype C. Interestingly, the IDU sequences from Darjeeling were again found to be closer to the C strains from Manipur, a northeastern state in India, which is linked to the Golden Triangle via the Manipur-Myanmar border, rather than the IDU C sequences from Nepal, a neighboring country of India. The outgroup reference strains from different sites of IDU-driven epidemics in the world like Russia, Vietnam, Thailand, and Spain belonged to the nonsubtype C group and formed separate clusters from the subtype C cluster in our analysis. These results indicate a rapid spread of HIV-1 by possible drug trafficking along international boundaries, which might also help in the invasion of HIV-1 among IDUs of Darjeeling through the Manipur-Myanmar border of India.

  10. The opgC gene is required for OPGs succinylation and is osmoregulated through RcsCDB and EnvZ/OmpR in the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Madec, Edwige; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Souche, Erika; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Lacroix, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are a family of periplasmic oligosaccharides found in the envelope of most Proteobacteria. They are required for virulence of zoo- and phyto-pathogens. The glucose backbone of OPGs is substituted by various kinds of molecules depending on the species, O-succinyl residues being the most widely distributed. In our model, Dickeya dadantii, a phytopathogenic bacteria causing soft rot disease in a wide range of plant species, the backbone of OPGs is substituted by O-succinyl residues in media of high osmolarity and by O-acetyl residues whatever the osmolarity. The opgC gene encoding a transmembrane protein required for the succinylation of the OPGs in D. dadantii was found after an in silico search of a gene encoding a protein with the main characteristics recovered in the two previously characterized OpgC of E. coli and R. sphaeroides, i.e. 10 transmembrane segments and one acyl-transferase domain. Characterization of the opgC gene revealed that high osmolarity expression of the succinyl transferase is controlled by both the EnvZ-OmpR and RcsCDB phosphorelay systems. The loss of O-succinyl residue did not affect the virulence of D. dadantii, suggesting that only the glucose backbone of OPGs is required for virulence. PMID:26790533

  11. Sequence analysis of selected regions of the env (V3 loop and gp41) and gag (p7) reading frames of Ethiopian human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains.

    PubMed

    Ayehunie, S; Johansson, B; Sönnerborg, A; Zewdie, D W; Britton, S; Strannegård, O

    1993-01-01

    Amplified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products, corresponding to the V3 loop and gp41 of the env, and p7 of the gag region, from proviral DNA of several Ethiopian and Swedish HIV-1 strains were sequenced. Of the six amino acids (GPGRAF) that constitute the principal neutralizing determinant (PND) within the V3 loop, the Ethiopian isolates all showed two amino acid changes (GPGQTF). Four to five other substitutions were found in the amino acids flanking the PND. Substitution of alanine (A) for threonine (T) should result in a change in the predicted secondary structure, i.e., disappearance of a coil structure. Percentage similarity data on a stretch of 22 amino acids within the V3 loop showed a concordance of the Ethiopian HIV-1 isolates with the sequences of published macrophage-T-cell tropic HIV isolates. Additionally derived protein sequences in two other regions showed two common substitutions in p7 and one to two substitutions in gp41 compared to a recent consensus sequence. These changes are hitherto unique for the Ethiopian strains, and suggest the presence of a clustering of a divergent HIV-1 strain in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

  12. Paring Down HIV Env: Design and Crystal Structure of a Stabilized Inner Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Displaying a Major ADCC Target of the A32 Region.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, William D; Gohain, Neelakshi; Veillette, Maxime; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Orlandi, Chiara; Visciano, Maria L; Ebadi, Maryam; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-05-03

    Evidence supports a role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward transitional epitopes in the first and second constant (C1-C2) regions of gp120 (A32-like epitopes) in preventing HIV-1 infection and in vaccine-induced protection. Here, we describe the first successful attempt at isolating the inner domain (ID) of gp120 as an independent molecule that encapsulates the A32-like region within a minimal structural unit of the HIV-1 Env. Through structure-based design, we developed ID2, which consists of the ID expressed independently of the outer domain and stabilized in the CD4-bound conformation by an inter-layer disulfide bond. ID2 expresses C1-C2 epitopes in the context of CD4-triggered full-length gp120 but without any known neutralizing epitope present. Thus, ID2 represents a novel probe for the analysis and/or selective induction of antibody responses to the A32 epitope region. We also present the crystal structure of ID2 complexed with mAb A32, which defines its epitope.

  13. Complete epitopes for vaccine design derived from a crystal structure of the broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 8ANC195 in complex with an HIV-1 Env trimer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Deller, Marc C; Garces, Fernando; Sliepen, Kwinten; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV-1 envelope gp160 glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120 and gp41 heterodimers that mediates cell entry and is the primary target of the humoral immune response. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-1 have revealed multiple epitopes or sites of vulnerability, but mapping of most of these sites is incomplete owing to a paucity of structural information on the full epitope in the context of the Env trimer. Here, a crystal structure of the soluble BG505 SOSIP gp140 trimer at 4.6 Å resolution with the bNAbs 8ANC195 and PGT128 reveals additional interactions in comparison to previous antibody-gp120 structures. For 8ANC195, in addition to previously documented interactions with gp120, a substantial interface with gp41 is now elucidated that includes extensive interactions with the N637 glycan. Surprisingly, removal of the N637 glycan did not impact 8ANC195 affinity, suggesting that the antibody has evolved to accommodate this glycan without loss of binding energy. PGT128 indirectly affects the N262 glycan by a domino effect, in which PGT128 binds to the N301 glycan, which in turn interacts with and repositions the N262 glycan, thereby illustrating the important role of neighboring glycans on epitope conformation and stability. Comparisons with other Env trimer and gp120 structures support an induced conformation for glycan N262, suggesting that the glycan shield is allosterically modified upon PGT128 binding. These complete epitopes of two broadly neutralizing antibodies on the Env trimer can now be exploited for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  14. Potential impact of viral load and genetic makeup of HIV type 1 on mother-to-child transmission: characterization of env-C2V3C3 and nef sequences.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Elizabeth; Parreira, Ricardo; Tendeiro, Rita; Nunes, Baltazar; Castela, João; Soares, Isabel; Mouzinho, Ana; Reis, Eduarda; Paixão, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in terms of the molecular characterization of the env and nef genomic regions and quantification of maternal RNA viral loads. Assignment of viral subtype was achieved by direct sequencing of PCR 1172 products amplified from proviral DNA in 45 HIV-1-nontransmitting mothers (NTM), along with 13 pairs of HIV-1-transmitting mothers (TM) and their infected children (C). Analysis of the env C2V3C3 and nef sequences revealed that subtypes G and B, and their genetic combinations (AG, BG), accounted for over 84.5% of all viruses identified. The genetic structure form envA-nefG was the most commonly observed, with a lower frequency in the NTM (13.3%) compared to the TM (23.1%) group. A greater number of genetic forms was observed among NTM, namely the presence of sequences assigned to subtypes D and F, as well as the intergenetic A/J, and C/U, recombinant forms, along with a mosaic provirus with a complex putative envA-nefEGE genetic structure. No significant differences were found when RNA viral loads were evaluated as a function of the viral subtypes. Nevertheless, a relatively high quantification of HIV-1 RNA was obtained in the NTM group, emphasizing the importance of the compliance and effectiveness of therapeutic schemes to control viral replication and reduce the risk of HIV vertical transmission. V3 sequences displaying features associated with the R5 phenotype dominated in both groups. Both C2V3C3 and Nef's functional domains were conserved during HIV-1 vertical transmission.

  15. Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV-1 Individuals Infected by Subtypes B, F1, C or the B/Bbr Variant in Relation to the Genetics and Biochemical Characteristics of the env Gene

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Dalziza Victalina; Macieira, Karine Venegas; Grinsztejn, Beatriz Gilda Jegerhorn; Veloso dos Santos, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer

    2016-01-01

    Various HIV-1 env genetic and biochemical features impact the elicitation of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies in natural infections. Thus, we aimed to investigate cross-neutralizing antibodies in individuals infected with HIV-1 env subtypes B, F1, C or the B/Bbr variant as well as env characteristics. Therefore, plasma samples from Brazilian chronically HIV-1 infected individuals were submitted to the TZM-bl neutralization assay. We also analyzed putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGLs) and the size of gp120 variable domains in the context of HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in Brazil. We observed a greater breadth and potency of the anti-Env neutralizing response in individuals infected with the F1 or B HIV-1 subtypes compared with the C subtype and the variant B/Bbr. We observed greater V1 B/Bbr and smaller V4 F1 than those of other subtypes (p<0.005), however neither was there a correlation verified between the variable region length and neutralization potency, nor between PNLG and HIV-1 subtypes. The enrichment of W at top of V3 loop in weak neutralizing response viruses and the P in viruses with higher neutralization susceptibility was statistically significant (p = 0.013). Some other signatures sites were associated to HIV-1 subtype-specific F1 and B/Bbr samples might influence in the distinct neutralizing response. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution may lead to a distinct conformational exposure or load in the association domain of the trimer of gp120 and interfere with the induction power of the neutralizing response, which affects the sensitivity of the neutralizing antibody and has significant implications for vaccine design. PMID:27936047

  16. Specific sequences commonly found in the V3 domain of HIV-1 subtype C isolates affect the overall conformation of native Env and induce a neutralization-resistant phenotype independent of V1/V2 masking.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Aidy; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Lai, Zhong; Honnen, William; Zingman, Barry S; Sarlo, Julie; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robinson, James E; Pinter, Abraham

    2014-01-05

    Primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to neutralization by antibodies commonly induced after infection or vaccination. This is generally attributed to masking of sensitive epitopes by the V1/V2 domain and/or glycans situated at various positions in Env. Here we identified a novel masking effect mediated by subtype C-specific V3 sequences that contributes to the V1/V2-independent and glycan-independent neutralization resistance of chimeric and primary Envs to antibodies directed against multiple neutralization domains. Positions at several conserved charged and hydrophobic sites in the V3 crown and stem were also shown to affect neutralization phenotype. These results indicated that substitutions typically present in subtype C and related V3 sequences influence the overall conformation of native Env in a way that occludes multiple neutralization targets located both within and outside of the V3 domain, and may reflect an alternative mechanism for neutralization resistance that is particularly active in subtype C and related isolates.

  17. Perspectives on Culturally and Linguistically Responsive RtI Pedagogics through a Cultural and Linguistic Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montalvo, Ricardo; Combes, Bertina H.; Kea, Cathy D.

    2014-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) originates from national legislation and critical research of evidence-based practices for low performing students and students at-risk of failing or receiving special education services. RtI proactively facilitates culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD)…

  18. School Psychologists' Willingness to Implement RtI: The Role of Philosophical and Practical Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Chung-Hau; Denner, Peter R.; Bocanegra, Joel O.; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    After the change in IDEIA, different models of response to intervention (RtI) have been practiced widely in American school systems. School psychologists are in an important position to facilitate RtI practice and provide professional development in order to help their school systems successfully undergo this transformation. However, there is a…

  19. RtI's Implementation and Collaborative Systems between General and Special Education in Two Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosteck, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated Response to Intervention (RtI) implementation in two Illinois middle schools and its impact on the collaborative relationship between general and special education teachers. The intended and unintended consequences of RtI implementation for general and special educators were examined. This qualitative research study was…

  20. Relationships between Ongoing Professional Development and Educators' Perceived Skills Relative to RtI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Jose M.; March, Amanda L.; Tan, Sim Yin; Stockslager, Kevin M.; Brundage, Amber; Mccullough, Mollie; Sabnis, Sujay

    2016-01-01

    Widespread adoption of Response to Intervention (RtI) requires large numbers of educators to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to implement the model with fidelity. This study examined relationships between large-scale professional development on RtI and educators' perceived skills. Elementary educators (n = 4,283) from 34 pilot and 27…

  1. Propidium monoazide reverse transcription PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the publ...

  2. Effects of Contextual Similarity and Target-Repetition Proportion on Negative Priming in RT Distributional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Hutchison, Keith A.; Li, Yongna

    2011-01-01

    Participants' reaction time (RT) data in a prime-probe flanker task (e.g., ABA-CAC) were analyzed in terms of the characteristics of RT distribution to examine possible mechanisms that produce negative priming. When the prime and probe were presented in the same context and the proportion of repetition-target trials (TRP) was 0.33, negative…

  3. Evaluation of reference genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize the viru...

  4. Thrombolytic efficacy and enzymatic activity of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Peng, Tao; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2015-08-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), that can encapsulate both recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles, are under development to improve the treatment of thrombo-occlusive disease. However, the enzymatic activity, thrombolytic efficacy, and stable cavitation activity generated by this agent has yet to be evaluated and compared to another established ultrasound-enhanced thrombolytic scheme. A spectrophotometric method was used to compare the enzymatic activity of the rt-PA incorporated into ELIP (t-ELIP) to that of rt-PA. An in vitro flow model was employed to measure the thrombolytic efficacy and dose of ultraharmonic emissions from stable cavitation for 120-kHz ultrasound exposure of three treatment schemes: rt-PA, rt-PA and the perfluorocarbon-filled microbubble Definity(®), and t-ELIP. The enzymatic activity of rt-PA incorporated into t-ELIP was 28 % that of rt-PA. Thrombolytic efficacy of t-ELIP or rt-PA and Definity(®) was equivalent when the dose of t-ELIP was adjusted to produce comparable enzymatic activity. Sustained bubble activity was nucleated from Definity but not from t-ELIP exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. These results emphasize the advantages of encapsulating a thrombolytic and the importance of incorporating an insoluble gas required to promote sustained, stable cavitation activity.

  5. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA to identify four distinct species of tospovirus.

    PubMed

    Charoenvilaisiri, Saengsoon; Seepiban, Channarong; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Warin, Nuchnard; Luxananil, Plearnpis; Gajanandana, Oraprapai

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA was developed to detect and differentiate four tospovirus species found in Thailand, namely Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV), Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV), Tomato necrotic ringspot virus (TNRV), and Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV). In this system, nucleocapsid (N) gene fragments of four tospoviruses were simultaneously amplified and labeled with digoxigenin (DIG) in a single RT-PCR reaction using a pair of degenerate primers binding to the same conserved regions in all four tospovirus N genes. The DIG-labeled amplicons were distinguished into species by four parallel hybridizations to species-specific biotinylated probes in streptavidin-coated microtiter wells followed by ELISA detection using a peroxidase-conjugated anti-DIG antibody. Results indicated that the multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA assay could specifically identify each of these four tospoviruses without cross-reactivity between species or reactivity to healthy plant negative controls. Assay sensitivity was 10- to 1000-fold higher than conventional RT-PCR. When applied to naturally infected plants, all samples yielded concordant results between RT-PCR-ELISA and the reference RT-PCR. In conclusion, the multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA developed in this study has superior specificity, sensitivity, and high-throughput capacity compared to conventional RT-PCR and is an attractive alternative for the identification of different tospovirus species.

  6. RtI Characteristics Commonly Implemented in High Performing Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Mark Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 allowed schools to use a Response to Intervention (RtI) model as opposed to the discrepancy model to qualify students as learning disabled. The incorporation of the RtI model provided earlier interventions for students and reduced avoidance of special services and false diagnosis. With the success of…

  7. Comparison of electron microscopy, ELISA, real time RT-PCR and insulated isothermal RT-PCR for the detection of Rotavirus group A (RVA) in feces of different animal species.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Mohamed A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    There is no gold standard for detection of Rotavirus Group A (RVA), one of the main causes of diarrhea in neonatal animals. Sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) assays are available for RVA but require submission of the clinical samples to diagnostic laboratories. Patient-side immunoassays for RVA protein detection have shown variable results, particularly with samples from unintended species. A sensitive and specific test for detection of RVA on the farm would facilitate rapid management decisions. The insulated isothermal RT-PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay works in a portable machine to allow sensitive and specific on-site testing. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate a commercially available RT-iiPCR assay for RVA detection in feces from different animal species. This assay was compared to an in-house rtRT-PCR assay and a commercially available rtRT-PCR kit, as well as an ELISA and EM for RVA detection. All three PCR assays targeted the well-conserved NSP5 gene. Clinical fecal samples from 108 diarrheic animals (mainly cattle and horses) were tested. The percentage of positive samples by ELISA, EM, in-house rtRT-PCR, commercial rtRT-PCR, and RT-iiPCR was 29.4%, 31%, 36.7%, 51.4%, 56.9%, respectively. The agreement between different assays was high (81.3-100%) in samples containing high viral loads. The sensitivity of the RT-iiPCR assay appeared to be higher than the commercially available rtRT-PCR assay, with a limit of detection (95% confidence index) of 3-4 copies of in vitro transcribed dsRNA. In conclusion, the user-friendly, field-deployable RT-iiPCR system holds substantial promise for on-site detection of RVA.

  8. Potential Utility of the Real-Time TMPA-RT Precipitation Estimates in Streamflow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Fengge; Gao, Huilin; Huffman, George J.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the potential utility of the real-time Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA-RT) data for streamflow prediction, both through direct comparisons of TMPA-RT estimates with a gridded gauge product, and through evaluation of streamflow simulations over four tributaries of La Plata Basin (LPB) in South America using the two precipitation products. Our assessments indicate that the relative accuracy and the hydrologic performance of TMPA-RT-based streamflow simulations generally improved after February 2005. The improvements in TMPA-RT since 2005 are closely related to upgrades in the TMPA-RT algorithm in early February, 2005 which include use of additional microwave sensors (AMSR-E and AMSU-B) and implementation of different calibration schemes. Our work suggests considerable potential for hydrologic prediction using purely satellite-derived precipitation estimates (no adjustments by in situ gauges) in parts of the globe where in situ observations are sparse.

  9. Comparison of the RT3 Research Tracker and Tritrac R3D accelerometers.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Dale; Gotshall, Robert; McArthur, Trisha

    2003-10-01

    This study compared the RT3 Research Tracker accelerometer to the Tritrac R3D accelerometer in both laboratory and field settings and tested the hypothesis that the RT3 records higher physical activity counts and smaller standard deviations than the R3D. The RT3 is relatively new and untested and its concurrent validity with existing instruments and physical activity needs to be assessed before being used in research. In this study the RT3 had higher average recordings of physical activity counts in all of the nine testing situations than the R3D. However, in terms of agreement between the instruments, the RT3 might be 582 below or 1,236 above (activity counts) the R3D in assessing physical activity. These results do not establish that the RT3 is more consistently measuring higher physical activity counts than the R3D. Comparing vector magnitude with oxygen consumption and heart rate across the 0% grade testing conditions indicated that the RT3 and R3D are sensitive to changes in various intensities of level ambulation. When the 5%, 10%, and 15% grade on the treadmill protocols were analyzed, low correlations between oxygen consumption and heart rate with vector magnitude responses were found for both the RT3 and R3D. Differences in agreement between the RT3 and R3D did not vary in any systematic way over the range in testing conditions which substantiates that the RT3 and R3D accelerometers are sensitive on flat surfaces but are insensitive to changes in grade.

  10. Worldwide genetic features of HIV-1 Env α4β7 binding motif: the Local Dissemination Impact of the LDI tripeptide

    PubMed Central

    Hait, Sabrina H.; Soares, Esmeralda A.; Sprinz, Eduardo; Arthos, James; Machado, Elizabeth S.; Soares, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-1 gp120 binds to integrin α4β7, a homing receptor of lymphocytes to gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This interaction is mediated by the LDI/V tripeptide encoded in the V2-loop. This tripeptide mimics similar motifs in MAdCAM and VCAM, the natural ligands of α4β7. In this study we explored the association of V2-loop LDI/V mimotopes with transmission routes and patterns of disease progression in HIV-infected adult and pediatric patients. HIV-1 env sequences available in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database were included in the analyses. Methodology HIV-1 V2-loop sequences generated from infected adults and infants from South and Southeast Brazil, and also retrieved from the Los Alamos Database, were assessed for α4β7 binding tripeptide composition. Chi-Square/Fisher’s Exact test and Mann Whitney U-test were used for tripeptide comparisons. Shannon entropy was assessed for conservancy of the α4β7 tripeptide mimotope. Results We observed no association between the tripeptide composition or conservation and virus transmission route or disease progression. However, LDI was linked to successful epidemic dissemination of HIV-1 subtype C in South America, and further to other expanding non-B subtypes in Europe and Asia. In Africa, subtypes showing increased LDV prevalence evidenced an ongoing process of selection towards LDI expansion, an observation also extended to subtype B in the Americas and Western Europe. Conclusions The V2-loop LDI mimotope was conserved in HIV-1C from South America and other expanding subtypes across the globe, which suggests that LDI may promote successful dissemination of HIV at local geographic levels by means of increased transmission fitness. PMID:26569174

  11. Evaluation of moisture and heat transport in the fast-response building-resolving urban transport code QUIC EnvSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Kevin A.

    QUIC EnvSim (QES) is a complete building-resolving urban microclimate modeling system developed to rapidly compute mass, momentum, and heat transport for the design of sustainable cities. One of the more computationally intensive components of this type of modeling system is the transport and dispersion of scalars. In this paper, we describe and evaluate QESTransport, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) scalar transport model. QESTransport makes use of light-weight methods and modeling techniques. It is parallelized for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), utilizing NVIDIA's OptiX application programming interfaces (APIs). QESTransport is coupled with the well-validated QUIC Dispersion Modeling system. To couple the models, a new methodology was implemented to efficiently prescribe surface flux boundary conditions on both vertical walls and flat surfaces. In addition, a new internal boundary layer parameterization was introduced into QUIC to enable the representation of momentum advection across changing surface conditions. QESTransport is validated against the following three experimental test cases designed to evaluate the model's performance under idealized conditions: (i) flow over a step change in moisture, roughness, and temperature, (ii) flow over an isolated heated building, and (iii) flow through an array of heated buildings. For all three cases, the model is compared against published simulation results. QESTransport produces velocity, temperature, and moisture fields that are comparable to much more complex numerical models for each case. The code execution time performance is evaluated and demonstrates linear scaling on a single GPU for problem sizes up to 4.5 x 4.5 km at 5 m grid resolution, and is found to produce results at much better than real time for a 1.2 x 1.2 km section of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.

  12. Clinical investigation survival prediction in high-grade gliomas by MRI perfusion before and during early stage of RT

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue . E-mail: yuecao@med.umich.edu; Tsien, Christina I.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Junck, Larry; Haken, Randall ten; Ross, Brian D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow can predict the response of high-grade gliomas to radiotherapy (RT) by taking into account spatial heterogeneity and temporal changes in perfusion. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with high-grade gliomas underwent conformal RT, with magnetic resonance imaging perfusion before and at Weeks 1-2 and 3-4 during RT. Tumor perfusion was classified as high, medium, or low. The prognostic values of pre-RT perfusion and the changes during RT for early prediction of tumor response to RT were evaluated. Results: The fractional high-CBV tumor volume before RT and the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume were identified as predictors for survival (p = 0.01). Changes in tumor CBV during the early treatment course also predicted for survival. Better survival was predicted by a decrease in the fractional low-CBV tumor volume at Week 1 of RT vs. before RT, a decrease in the fractional high-CBV tumor volume at Week 3 vs. Week 1 of RT, and a smaller pre-RT fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging tumor volume (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Early temporal changes during RT in heterogeneous regions of high and low perfusion in gliomas might predict for different physiologic responses to RT. This might also open the opportunity to identify tumor subvolumes that are radioresistant and might benefit from intensified RT.

  13. A novel detection system for the genetically modified canola (Brassica rapa) line RT73.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2010-12-01

    The herbicide-tolerant genetically modified Roundup Ready canola (Brassica napus) line RT73 has been approved worldwide for use in animal feed and human food. However, RT73 Brassica rapa lines derived from interspecific crosses with RT73 B. napus have not been approved in Japan. Here, we report on a novel system using individual kernel analyses for the qualitative detection of RT73 B. rapa in canola grain samples. We developed a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to discriminate B. napus and B. rapa DNA using scatter plots of the end-point analyses; this method was able to discriminate a group comprising B. rapa and Brassica juncea from a group comprising B. napus, Brassica carinata, and Brassica oleracea. We also developed a duplex real-time PCR method for the simultaneous detection of an RT73-specific sequence and an endogenous FatA gene. Additionally, a DNA-extraction method using 96-well silica-membrane plates was developed and optimized for use with individual canola kernels. Our detection system could identify RT73 B. rapa kernels in canola grain samples enabling the accurate and reliable monitoring of RT73 B. rapa contamination in canola, thus playing a role in its governmental regulation in Japan.

  14. ScriptingRT: A Software Library for Collecting Response Latencies in Online Studies of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Thomas W.; Murteira, Carla; Collins, Elizabeth C.; Lopes, Diniz

    2013-01-01

    ScriptingRT is a new open source tool to collect response latencies in online studies of human cognition. ScriptingRT studies run as Flash applets in enabled browsers. ScriptingRT provides the building blocks of response latency studies, which are then combined with generic Apache Flex programming. Six studies evaluate the performance of ScriptingRT empirically. Studies 1–3 use specialized hardware to measure variance of response time measurement and stimulus presentation timing. Studies 4–6 implement a Stroop paradigm and run it both online and in the laboratory, comparing ScriptingRT to other response latency software. Altogether, the studies show that Flash programs developed in ScriptingRT show a small lag and an increased variance in response latencies. However, this did not significantly influence measured effects: The Stroop effect was reliably replicated in all studies, and the found effects did not depend on the software used. We conclude that ScriptingRT can be used to test response latency effects online. PMID:23805326

  15. rt-PA Thrombolysis in Acute Thromboembolic Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred; Salomonowitz, Erich; Wohlschlager, Helmut; Zwrtek, Karin; Boeck, Rudolf; Zwrtek, Ronald

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the results of rt-PA thrombolysis in the treatment of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the upper limb.Methods: Of 55 patients with demonstrated acute embolic arterial occlusion, rt-PA thrombolysis was performed on 40 occlusions in 38 patients (23 women with a mean age of 62 years, range 32-85 years; 15 men with a mean age of 65 years, range 32-92 years) according to the following design: 6 mg rt-PA/hr for 30 min, 3 mg rt-PA/hr for the next 30 min, 1 mg rt-PA/hr for 7 hr, and 0.4 mg rt-PA/hr until the end of lysis. Onset of symptoms varied from 1 to 14 days. Included were three isolated upper-arm occlusions, nine combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and 28 forearm and hand artery occlusions.Results: The overall success rate was 55%. The lysis results for isolated upper arm, combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and forearm and hand artery occlusions were 100%, 66%, and 46%, respectively. In eight patients surgical embolectomy had to be performed after failed thrombolysis. No amputation was required in the follow-up period. No lethal complications occurred.Conclusions: Interventional rt-PA treatment of proximal upper-extremity arterial occlusions may be performed with comparable success rates to surgical embolectomy and without severe complications. For distal occlusions the results are inferior to the success rates obtained with surgery.

  16. Closed-form expressions for the Dirac-Coulomb radial rt integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessis, N.; Bessis, G.; Roux, D.

    1985-10-01

    A novel procedure is devised in order to obtain closed-form expressions of the Dirac-Coulomb radial rt integrals in terms of the Dirac energy ɛ=\\{1+Z2α2/[v+(k2-Z2 α2)1/2]2\\}-1/2, where v=n-||k||, and of the Dirac quantum number k=(-1)j+l+1/2(j+(1/2)). In this procedure, well adapted for symbolic computation, the fundamental array of the rt radial integrals is obtained from the rt-1 array.

  17. rt-PA with Antithrombotic Therapies in a Case with Capsular Warning Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuseya, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Miyuki; Matsuda, Eri; Takada, Kozue; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Fujitake, Junko; Nakaya, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of capsular warning syndrome (CWS) that was successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). A 70-year-old woman had repeated stereotyped transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) of right hemiparesis and dysarthria. After hospitalization, argatroban, aspirin, and cilostazol were started but were ineffective. Thirteen hours after the first episode of TIAs, severe symptoms occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed acute infarctions in the internal capsule to corona radiata, so we used rt-PA. Since then, the TIAs have not occurred, and the symptoms have considerably improved. This case suggests that rt-PA might be effective and safe for use in treating CWS. PMID:28202868

  18. Pyruvate minimizes rtPA toxicity from in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Winters, Ali; Xie, Luokun; Mallet, Robert T; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2013-09-12

    Clinical application of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) for stroke is limited by hemorrhagic transformation, which narrows rtPA's therapeutic window. In addition, mounting evidence indicates that rtPA is potentially neurotoxic if it traverses a compromised blood brain barrier. Here, we demonstrated that pyruvate protects cultured HT22 neuronal and primary microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with primary astrocytes from oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation stress and rtPA cytotoxicity. After 3 or 6h OGD, cells were reoxygenated with 11mmol/L glucose±pyruvate (8mmol/L) and/or rtPA (10µg/ml). Measured variables included cellular viability (calcein AM and annexin-V/propidium iodide), reactive oxygen species (ROS; mitosox red and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate), NADPH, NADP(+) and ATP contents (spectrophotometry), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activities (gelatin zymography), and cellular contents of MMP2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP2), and phosphor-activation of anti-apoptotic p70s6 kinase, Akt and Erk (immunoblot). Pyruvate prevented the loss of HT22 cells after 3h OGD±rtPA. After 6h OGD, rtPA sharply lowered cell viability; pyruvate dampened this effect. Three hours OGD and 4h reoxygenation with rtPA increased ROS formation by about 50%. Pyruvate prevented this ROS formation and doubled cellular NADPH/NADP(+) ratio and ATP content. In endothelial cell monolayers, 3h OGD and 24h reoxygenation increased FITC-dextran leakage, indicating disruption of intercellular junctions. Although rtPA exacerbated this effect, pyruvate prevented it while sharply lowering MMP2/TIMP2 ratio and increasing phosphorylation of p70s6 kinase, Akt and Erk. Pyruvate protects neuronal cells and microvascular endothelium from hypoxia-reoxygenation and cytotoxic action of rtPA while reducing ROS and activating anti-apoptotic signaling. These results support the proposed use of pyruvate as an adjuvant to dampen the side effects of rt

  19. Development of RT-components for the M-3 Strawberry Harvesting Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tomoki; Tanaka, Motomasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Saito, Sadafumi; Sugano, Shigeki

    We are now developing the strawberry harvest robot called “M-3” prototype robot system under the 4th urgent project of MAFF. In order to develop the control software of the M-3 robot more efficiently, we innovated the RT-middleware “OpenRTM-aist” software platform. In this system, we developed 9 kind of RT-Components (RTC): Robot task sequence player RTC, Proxy RTC for image processing software, DC motor controller RTC, Arm kinematics RTC, and so on. In this paper, we discuss advantages of RT-middleware developing system and problems about operating the RTC-configured robotic system by end-users.

  20. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. Part III. Virus Detection by RT-qPCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Method 1615 measures enteroviruses and noroviruses present in environmental and drinking waters. The viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) from water sample concentrates is extracted and tested for enterovirus and norovirus RNA using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). V...

  1. RT-PCR and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RT-PCR/ESI-MS) for Identifying Acute Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Blyn, Lawrence; Rothman, Richard E.; Ramachandran, Padmini; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Ecker, David; Sampath, Rangarajan; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of respiratory viruses traditionally relies on culture or antigen detection.We aimed to demonstrate capacity of the RT-PCR/ESI-MS platform to identify clinical relevant respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples and compare the diagnostic performance characteristics relative to conventional culture- and antigen-based methods. A RT-PCR/ESI-MS respiratory virus surveillance kit designed to detect respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza types 1-4, adenoviridae types A-F, coronaviridae, human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus was evaluated using both mock-ups and frozen archived NPA (N=280), 95 of which were positive by clinical virology methods. RT-PCR/ESI-MS detected 74/95 (77.9%) known positive samples and identified an additional 13/185 (7%) from culture negative samples. Viruses that are non-detectable with conventional methods were also identified. Viral load was semi-quantifiable and ranged from 2,400 to >320,000copies/ml. Time to results was 8hrs. RT-PCR/ESI-MS showed promise in rapid detection of respiratory viruses, merits further evaluation for use in clinical settings. PMID:21251562

  2. Detection of Banana mild mosaic virus and Banana virus X by polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Acina, Isabelle; Lockhart, Benham E L; Candresse, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Viruses are important constraints to the movement and propagation of plant germplasm, especially for vegetatively propagated crops such as banana and plantain. Their control relies primarily on the use of virus-free plant material, whose production and certification requires sensitive and reliable detection methods. An existing polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR) assay was adapted to the detection of Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV) and Banana virus X, two Flexiviridae infecting Musa spp. PDO inosine-containing primers were found to be well suited to the detection of BanMMV, despite its high molecular diversity, but not to that of the highly conserved BVX, for which species-specific primers were designed. Sampling and sample processing steps were optimized in order to avoid nucleic acid purification prior to the reverse transcription step. A polyclonal anti-BanMMV antiserum was raised and successfully used for the immunocapture (IC) of BanMMV viral particles from leaf extracts, leading to the development of a PDO-IC-RT-nested PCR assay. Although the anti-BanMMV antiserum could to some extent recognize BVX viral particles, direct binding (DB) was shown to be a more efficient method for processing BVX-infected samples and a PDO-DB-RT-nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of BVX from leaf extracts.

  3. Discrimination of infectious hepatitis A viruses by propidium monoazide real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gloria; Elizaquível, Patricia; Aznar, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    The discrimination of infectious and inactivated viruses remains a key obstacle when using quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) to quantify enteric viruses. In this study, propidium monoazide (PMA) and RNase pretreatments were evaluated for the detection and quantification of infectious hepatitis A virus (HAV). For thermally inactivated HAV, PMA treatment was more effective than RNase treatment for differentiating infectious and inactivated viruses, with HAV titers reduced by more than 2.4 log(10) units. Results showed that combining 50 μM of PMA and RT-qPCR selectively quantify infectious HAV in media suspensions. Therefore, PMA treatment previous to RT-qPCR detection is a promising alternative to assess HAV infectivity.

  4. Enabling Hierarchical View of RxNorm with NDF-RT Drug Classes

    PubMed Central

    Palchuk, Matvey B.; Klumpenaar, Michael; Jatkar, Tarang; Zottola, Ralph J.; Adams, William G.; Abend, Aaron H.

    2010-01-01

    NDF-RT is the proposed source of drug classification information. We set out to construct a hierarchy of NDF-RT drug classes and RxNorm medications and evaluate it on medication records data. NDF-RT and RxNorm are distributed in different file formats, require different tools to manipulate and linking the two into a hierarchy is a non-trivial exercise. Medication data in RxNorm from two institutions was constrained by the hierarchy. Only 37% of records from one and 65% from another institution were accessible. We subsequently enriched the RxNorm mapping in NDF-RT by exploiting relationships between concepts for branded and generic drugs. Coverage improved dramatically to 93% for both institutions. To improve usability of the resulting hierarchy, we grouped clinical drugs by corresponding clinical drug form. PMID:21347044

  5. Enabling Hierarchical View of RxNorm with NDF-RT Drug Classes.

    PubMed

    Palchuk, Matvey B; Klumpenaar, Michael; Jatkar, Tarang; Zottola, Ralph J; Adams, William G; Abend, Aaron H

    2010-11-13

    NDF-RT is the proposed source of drug classification information. We set out to construct a hierarchy of NDF-RT drug classes and RxNorm medications and evaluate it on medication records data. NDF-RT and RxNorm are distributed in different file formats, require different tools to manipulate and linking the two into a hierarchy is a non-trivial exercise. Medication data in RxNorm from two institutions was constrained by the hierarchy. Only 37% of records from one and 65% from another institution were accessible. We subsequently enriched the RxNorm mapping in NDF-RT by exploiting relationships between concepts for branded and generic drugs. Coverage improved dramatically to 93% for both institutions. To improve usability of the resulting hierarchy, we grouped clinical drugs by corresponding clinical drug form.

  6. CYCLIC VARIATIONS OF ORBITAL PERIOD AND LONG-TERM LUMINOSITY IN CLOSE BINARY RT ANDROMEDAE

    SciTech Connect

    Manzoori, Davood

    2009-12-15

    Solutions of standard VR light curves for the eclipsing binary RT And were obtained using the PHOEBE program (ver. 0.3a). Absolute parameters of the stellar components were then determined, enabling them to be positioned on the mass-luminosity diagram. Times of minima data ({sup O} - C curve) were analyzed using the method of Kalimeris et al. A cyclic variation in the orbital period and brightness, with timescales of about 11.89 and 12.50 yr were found, respectively. This is associated with a magnetic activity cycle modulating the orbital period of RT And via the Applegate mechanism. To check the consistency of the Applegate model, we have estimated some related parameters of the RT And system. The calculated parameters were in accordance with those estimated by Applegate for other similar systems, except B, the subsurface magnetic field of which shows a rather high value for RT And.

  7. Detection of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea by RT-LAMP assay.

    PubMed

    Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Seok Ryel; Park, Myung-Ae; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2011-10-01

    The viral diseases have been the serious problem in salmonid farming, and rainbow trout is not an exception. In this study, routine surveys were conducted for detecting of viruses in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Korea during 2009-2010. Head kidneys from individual fish were employed for virus detection by using a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were the target viruses in this study. 53.5% (46/86) were found to be IPNV-positive, while IHNV and VHSV showed RT-LAMP negative during examination for 2 years. Ten IPNV-positive samples were randomly selected for viral isolation and the cells showing CPEs were subjected to RT-LAMP, RT-PCR, and direct sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the rainbow trout isolate has high similarity homologies with the VR-299 strain, as previously described.

  8. NASA/SPoRt: GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew; Stano, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    SPoRT is using current capabilities of MODIS and VIIRS, combined with current GOES (i.e. Hybrid Imagery) to demonstrate mesoscale capabilities of future ABI instrument. SPoRT is transitioning RGBs from EUMETSAT standard "recipes" to demonstrate a method to more efficiently handle the increase channels/frequency of ABI. Challenges for RGB production exist. Internal vs. external production, Bit depth needed, Adding quantitative information, etc. SPoRT forming group to address these issues. SPoRT is leading efforts on the application of total lightning in operations and to educate users of this new capability. Training in many forms is used to support testbed activities and is a key part to the transition process.

  9. Transition and Evaluation of RGB Imagery to WFOs and National Centers by NASA SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin K.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    MODIS Snow/Cloud and True Color RGB imagery has been used by SPoRT partners since 2004 to examine changes in surface features such as snow cover, vegetation, ocean color, fires, smoke plumes, and oil spills.

  10. Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Transitioning Satellite Data to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center located at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting testbed activities aimed at transitioning satellite products to National Weather Service operational end users for the last 10 years. SPoRT is a NASA/NOAA funded project that has set the bar for transition of products to operational end users through a paradigm of understanding forecast challenges and forecaster needs, displaying products in end users decision support systems, actively assessing the operational impact of these products, and improving products based on forecaster feedback. Aiming for quality partnerships rather than a large quantity of data users, SPoRT has become a community leader in training operational forecasters on the use of up-and-coming satellite data through the use of legacy instruments and proxy data. Traditionally, SPoRT has supplied satellite imagery and products from NASA instruments such as the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). However, recently, SPoRT has been funded by the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Grounds to accelerate the transition of selected imagery and products to help improve forecaster awareness of upcoming operational data from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). This presentation provides background on the SPoRT Center, the SPoRT paradigm, and some example products that SPoRT is excited to work with forecasters to evaluate.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  12. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Using RT3D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.; Clement, T P.

    2006-07-25

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a reactive transport code that can be applied to model solute fate and transport for many different purposes. This document specifically addresses application of RT3D for modeling related to evaluation and implementation of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). Selection of MNA as a remedy requires an evaluation process to demonstrate that MNA will meet the remediation goals. The U.S. EPA, through the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive 9200.4?17P, provides the regulatory context for the evaluation and implementation of MNA. In a complementary fashion, the context for using fate and transport modeling as part of MNA evaluation is described in the EPA?s technical protocol for chlorinated solvent MNA, the Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA, and in this document. The intent of this document is to describe (1) the context for applying RT3D for chlorinated solvent MNA and (2) the attenuation processes represented in RT3D, (3) dechlorination reactions that may occur, and (4) the general approach for using RT3D reaction modules (including a summary of the RT3D reaction modules that are available) to model fate and transport of chlorinated solvents as part of MNA or for combinations of MNA and selected types of active remediation.

  13. PpRT1: the first complete gypsy-like retrotransposon isolated in Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Rocheta, Margarida; Cordeiro, Jorge; Oliveira, M; Miguel, Célia

    2007-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a complete retrotransposon sequence, named PpRT1, from the genome of Pinus pinaster. PpRT1 is 5,966 bp long and is closely related to IFG7 gypsy retrotransposon from Pinus radiata. The long terminal repeats (LTRs) have 333 bp each and show a 5.4% sequence divergence between them. In addition to the characteristic polypurine tract (PPT) and the primer binding site (PBS), PpRT1 carries internal regions with homology to retroviral genes gag and pol. The pol region contains sequence motifs related to the enzymes protease, reverse transcriptase, RNAseH and integrase in the same typical order known for Ty3/gypsy-like retrotransposons. PpRT1 was extended from an EST database sequence indicating that its transcription is occurring in pine tissues. Southern blot analyses indicate however, that PpRT1 is present in a unique or a low number of copies in the P. pinaster genome. The differences in nucleotide sequence found between PpRT1 and IFG7 may explain the strikingly different copy number in the two pine species genome. Based on the homologies observed when comparing LTR region among different gypsy elements we propose that the highly conserved LTR regions may be useful to amplify other retrotransposon sequences of the same or close retrotransposon family.

  14. The SPoRT-WRF: Evaluating the Impact of NASA Datasets on Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Kozlowski, Danielle; Case, Jonathan; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) seeks to improve short-term, regional weather forecasts using unique NASA products and capabilities SPoRT has developed a unique, real-time configuration of the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)WRF (ARW) that integrates all SPoRT modeling research data: (1) 2-km SPoRT Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Composite, (2) 3-km LIS with 1-km Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVFs) (3) 45-km AIRS retrieved profiles. Transitioned this real-time forecast to NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) as deterministic model at Experimental Forecast Program (EFP). Feedback from forecasters/participants and internal evaluation of SPoRT-WRF shows a cool, dry bias that appears to suppress convection likely related to methodology for assimilation of AIRS profiles Version 2 of the SPoRT-WRF will premier at the 2012 EFP and include NASA physics, cycling data assimilation methodology, better coverage of precipitation forcing, and new GVFs

  15. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of three viruses in pear plants by a multiplex RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bingyu; Wang, Guoping; Ma, Xiaofang; Liu, Wenbin; Tang, Huihui; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Ni

    2014-02-01

    A multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for detection and differentiation of the Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), which are viruses frequently occurring in pear trees. Different combinations of mixed primer pairs were tested for their specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of the three viruses. Three primer pairs were used to amplify their fragments of 247bp, 358bp and 500bp, respectively. The primer pair for ASPV was designed in this work, while the primer pairs for ACLSV and ASGV were from previous reports. The sensitivity and specificity of the mRT-PCR assay for the three viruses were comparable to that of each uniplex RT-PCR. The mRT-PCR was applied successfully for the detection of three viruses in leaves of pear and apple plants, but was unreliable in the detection of ASGV in dormant barks. In conclusion, this mRT-PCR provides a useful tool for the routine and rapid detection and the differentiation of three pear viruses.

  16. Potent, Persistent Induction and Modulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques Primed with Ad5hr-Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) env/rev, gag, and/or nef Vaccines and Boosted with SIV gp120

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L. Jean; Malkevitch, Nina; Pinczewski, Joel; Venzon, David; Lou, Yuanmei; Peng, Bo; Munch, Cindy; Leonard, Melissa; Richardson, Ersell; Aldrich, Kristine; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    Immunity elicited by multicomponent vaccines delivered by replication-competent Ad5hr-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) recombinants was systematically investigated. Rhesus macaques were immunized mucosally at weeks 0 and 12 with Ad5hr-SIVsmH4 env/rev, with or without Ad5hr-SIVmac239 gag or Ad5hr-SIVmac239 nef, or with all three recombinants. The total Ad5hr dosage was comparably adjusted among all animals with empty Ad5hr-ΔE3 vector. The macaques were boosted with SIV gp120 in monophosphoryl A-stable emulsion adjuvant at 24 and 36 weeks. Controls received Ad5hr-ΔE3 vector or adjuvant only. By ELISPOT analysis, all four SIV gene products elicited potent cellular immune responses that persisted 42 weeks post-initial immunization. Unexpectedly, modulation of this cellular immune response was observed among macaques receiving one, two, or three Ad5hr-SIV recombinants. Env responses were significantly enhanced throughout the immunization period in macaques immunized with Ad5hr-SIV env/rev plus Ad5hr-SIV gag and tended to be higher in macaques that also received Ad5hr-SIV nef. Macaques primed with all three recombinants displayed significant down-modulation in numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells specific for SIV Nef, and the Env- and Gag-specific responses were also diminished. Modulation of antibody responses was not observed. Down-modulation was seen only during the period of Ad5hr-recombinant priming, not during subunit boosting, although SIV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells persisted. The effect was not attributable to Ad5hr replication differences among immunization groups. Vaccine delivery via replication-competent live vectors, which can persistently infect new cells and continuously present low-level antigen, may be advantageous in overcoming competition among complex immunogens for immune recognition. Effects of current multicomponent vaccines on individual immune responses should be evaluated with regard to future vaccine design. PMID

  17. Investigating the Decision-Making of Response to Intervention (RtI) Teams within the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thur, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure decision-making influences within RtI teams. The study examined the factors that influence school personnel involved in three areas of RtI: determining which RtI measures and tools teams select and implement (i.e. Measures and Tools), evaluating the data-driven decisions that are made based on the…

  18. The SPoRT-WRF: Evaluating the Impact of NASA Datasets on Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting entities, including a number of National Weather Service offices. SPoRT transitions real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. One challenge that forecasters face is applying convection-allowing numerical models to predict mesoscale convective weather. In order to address this specific forecast challenge, SPoRT produces real-time mesoscale model forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that includes unique NASA products and capabilities. Currently, the SPoRT configuration of the WRF model (SPoRT-WRF) incorporates the 4-km Land Information System (LIS) land surface data, 1-km SPoRT sea surface temperature analysis and 1-km Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) analysis, and retrieved thermodynamic profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The LIS, SST, and GVF data are all integrated into the SPoRT-WRF through adjustments to the initial and boundary conditions, and the AIRS data are assimilated into a 9-hour SPoRT WRF forecast each day at 0900 UTC. This study dissects the overall impact of the NASA datasets and the individual surface and atmospheric component datasets on daily mesoscale forecasts. A case study covering the super tornado outbreak across the Ce ntral and Southeastern United States during 25-27 April 2011 is examined. Three different forecasts are analyzed including the SPoRT-WRF (NASA surface and atmospheric data), the SPoRT WRF without AIRS (NASA surface data only), and the operational National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF (control with no NASA data). The forecasts are compared qualitatively by examining simulated versus observed radar reflectivity. Differences between the simulated reflectivity are further investigated using convective parameters along

  19. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  20. Moving from Batch to Field Using the RT3D Reactive Transport Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Gautam, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The public domain reactive transport code RT3D (Clement, 1997) is a general-purpose numerical code for solving coupled, multi-species reactive transport in saturated groundwater systems. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several modules of MT3DMS to simulate the advection and dispersion processes. RT3D employs the operator-split strategy which allows the code solve the coupled reactive transport problem in a modular fashion. The coupling between reaction and transport is defined through a separate module where the reaction equations are specified. The code supports a versatile user-defined reaction option that allows users to define their own reaction system through a Fortran-90 subroutine, known as the RT3D-reaction package. Further a utility code, known as BATCHRXN, allows the users to independently test and debug their reaction package. To analyze a new reaction system at a batch scale, users should first run BATCHRXN to test the ability of their reaction package to model the batch data. After testing, the reaction package can simply be ported to the RT3D environment to study the model response under 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional transport conditions. This paper presents example problems that demonstrate the methods for moving from batch to field-scale simulations using BATCHRXN and RT3D codes. The first example describes a simple first-order reaction system for simulating the sequential degradation of Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products. The second example uses a relatively complex reaction system for describing the multiple degradation pathways of Tetrachloroethane (PCA) and its daughter products. References 1) Clement, T.P, RT3D - A modular computer code for simulating reactive multi-species transport in 3-Dimensional groundwater aquifers, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Research Report, PNNL-SA-28967, September, 1997. Available at: http://bioprocess.pnl.gov/rt3d.htm.

  1. Proteins of Rous-associated virus 61, an avian retrovirus: common precursor for glycoproteins gp85 and gp35 and use of pactamycin to map translational order of proteins in the gag, pol, and env genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shealy, D J; Rueckert, R R

    1978-01-01

    Cells infected by Rous-associated virus 61 (RAV-61) contained a precursor-like protein, pr90, that was specifically precipitated by antiserum directed against envelope glycoproteins, gp85 and gp35. Tryptic peptide mapping showed that pr90 contained tryptic sequences of both gp85 and gp35. Pactamycin mapping experiments indicated that the two glycoproteins are translated from the env-mRNA in the order (5') gp85--gp35. The pactamycin mapping experiments also indicated a translational order of p10--(p27, p12)--p15 for the gag proteins; this agreement with the order previously reported from tryptic mapping studies on precursor pr76 of avian myeloblastosis virus implied that the stoichiometry of the core proteins was unchanged when virions were assembled in the presence of pactamycin. The reverse transcriptase proteins, unlike those of the env and gag genes, fell on the right side of the pactamycin map. This result is in accord with the idea that most, if not all, of the reverse transcriptase protein is translated by read-through of the gag(pol) message rather than by translation of a hypothetical pol-mRNA devoted solely to synthesis of that protein. Images PMID:77910

  2. Molecular detection of Papaya meleira virus in the latex of Carica papaya by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marília Mendes Melo de; Tavares, Eder Torres; Silva, Felipe Rodrigues da; Marinho, Vera Lúcia de Almeida; Júnior, Manoel Teixeira Souza

    2007-12-01

    A RT-PCR assay was developed for early and accurate detection of Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) in the latex from infected papayas. The meleira disease is characterized by an excessive exudation of more fluidic latex from fruits, leaves and stems. This latex oxidises and gives the fruit a "sticky" texture. In the field, disease symptoms are seen almost exclusively on fruit. However, infected plants can be a source of virus for dissemination by insects. Primers specific for PMeV were designed based on nucleotide sequences of the viral dsRNA obtained using a RT-RAPD approach. When tested for RT-PCR amplification, one of these primers (C05-3') amplified a 669-nucleotide fragment using dsRNA obtained from purified virus particles as a template. The translated sequence of this DNA fragment showed a certain degree of similarity to the amino acid sequence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from other dsRNA viruses. When used as the single primer in two RT-PCR kits available commercially, primer C05-3' also amplified the DNA fragment from papaya latex of infected, but not from healthy plants. The RT-PCR-based method developed in this study could simplify early plant disease diagnosis, assist in monitoring the dissemination of the pathogen within and between fields, and assist in guiding plant disease management.

  3. Numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence with complex acceleration history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Dimonte, Guy; Andrews, Malcolm

    2007-11-01

    Complex acceleration histories of an RT unstable interface are important in validating turbulent mix models. Of particular interest are alternating stages of acceleration and deceleration, since the the associated demixing is a discriminating test of such models. We have performed numerical simulations of a turbulent RT mixing layer subjected to two stages of acceleration separated by a stage of deceleration. The profile was chosen from earlier Linear Electric Motor experiments with which we compare our results. The acceleration phases produce classical RT unstable growth (t^2) with growth rates comparable to earlier results of turbulent RT simulations. The calculations are challenging as dominant bubbles become shredded as they reverse direction in response to the reversal in g, placing increased demands on numerical resolution. The shredding to small scales is accompanied by a peaking of the molecular mixing during the RT stable stage. In general, we find that simulations agree with experiments when initialized with broadband initial perturbations, but not for an annular shell. Other effects such as the presence of surface tension in the LEM experiments (but not in our simulations) further complicate this picture.

  4. The major histocompatibility complex of the rat,RT 1 : II. biochemical evidence for a complex genetic organization.

    PubMed

    Sporer, R; Black, G; Rigiero, C; Manson, L; Götze, D

    1978-12-01

    Recombinational analysis has shown that the rat MHC,RT1 is divided into two regions:RT1.A, which codes for class I (transplantation) antigens, andRT1.B, which controls the humoral immune response and proliferative response to allogeneic cells as well as the expression of class II (Ia) antigens. Serological and sequence studies suggest that there might be more than one antigen-coding locus within theRT1.A region. Results obtained by sequential immunoprecipitation reveal that both regions code for at least two gene products. By implication, theRT1 complex must therefore harbor at least four loci;RT1.A andD coding for class I glycoproteins (45,000 daltons); andRT1.B andE coding for class II (Ia) glycoproteins (35,000 and 28,000 daltons).

  5. Inhibition of T24 and RT4 Human Bladder Cancer Cell Lines by Heterocyclic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Feng; Wang, Kai; Guo, Feng-Fu; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is a major widespread tumor of the genitourinary tract. Around 30% of patients with superficial cancers develop invasive and metastatic pathology. Material/Methods Some new heterocyclic 4-methyl coumarin derivatives were designed using molecular modeling studies to evaluate their potential against bladder cancer lines T24 and RT-4. The designed compounds that showed good binding affinity to T24 and RT4 were synthesized, with excellent yield. The synthesized compounds after structural evaluation were further evaluated for their antiproliferative activity by cell viability assay, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis assay. Results The compound BC-14 exhibited the best cytotoxicity against T24 cells, but were not highly active against RT4 cells. Conclusions The results of the present study may suggest the selectivity pattern of the synthesized compounds. These results should be explored further with chemical modification for other cancer types. PMID:28260746

  6. In-flight demonstration of a Real-Time Flush Airdata Sensing (RT-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Davis, Roy J.; Fife, John Michael

    1995-01-01

    A prototype real-time flush airdata sensing (RT-FADS) system has been developed and flight tested at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This system uses a matrix of pressure orifices on the vehicle nose to estimate airdata parameters in real time using nonlinear regression. The algorithm is robust to sensor failures and noise in the measured pressures. The RT-FADS system has been calibrated using inertial trajectory measurements that were bootstrapped for atmospheric conditions using meteorological data. Mach numbers as high as 1.6 and angles of attack greater than 45 deg have been tested. The system performance has been evaluated by comparing the RT-FADS to the ship system airdata computer measurements to give a quantitative evaluation relative to an accepted measurement standard. Nominal agreements of approximately 0.003 in Mach number and 0.20 deg in angle of attack and angle of sideslip have been achieved.

  7. Retinal safety of intravitreal rtPA in healthy rats and under excitotoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Daruich, Alejandra; Parcq, Jérôme; Delaunay, Kimberley; Naud, Marie-Christine; Le Rouzic, Quentin; Picard, Emilie; Crisanti, Patricia; Vivien, Denis; Berdugo, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intravitreal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is used off-label for the surgical management of submacular hemorrhage, a severe complication of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. rtPA is approved for coronary and cerebral thrombolysis. However, in ischemic stroke rtPA is known to increase excitotoxic neural cell death by interacting with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. We therefore investigated the retinal toxicity of rtPA in healthy rats and in a model of NMDA-induced retinal excitotoxicity. Methods First, rtPA at three different doses (2.16 µg/5 µl, 0.54 µg/5 µl, and 0.27 µg/5 µl) or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%) was injected intravitreally in healthy rat eyes. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed at 24 h or 7 days. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled apoptotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were counted on flatmounted retinas at 24 h or 7 days. Next, NMDA + vehicle or NMDA + rtPA (0.27 µg/5 µl) was injected intravitreally to generate excitotoxic conditions. Apoptotic annexin V-FITC-labeled RGCs and surviving Brn3a-labeled RGCs were quantified on flatmounted retinas and radial sections, 18 h after treatment. Results In healthy rat eyes, the number of apoptotic RGCs was statistically significantly increased 24 h after the administration of rtPA at the highest dose (2.16 µg/5 µl; p = 0.0250) but not at the lower doses of 0.54 and 0.27 µg/5 µl (p = 0.36 and p = 0.20), compared to vehicle. At day 7, there was no difference in the apoptotic RGC count between the rtPA- and vehicle-injected eyes (p = 0.70, p = 0.52, p = 0.11). ERG amplitudes and implicit times were not modified at 24 h or 7 days after injection of any tested rtPA doses, compared to the baseline. Intravitreal administration of NMDA induced RGC death, but under these excitotoxic conditions, coadministration of rtPA did not increase the number of dead RGCs (p = 0.70). Similarly, the number of surviving RGCs on the flatmounted retinas and

  8. Detection and identification of infectious bronchitis virus by RT-PCR in Iran.

    PubMed

    Homayounimehr, Alireza; Pakbin, Ahmad; Momayyez, Reza; Fatemi, Seyyedeh Mahsa Rastegar

    2016-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) causes severe diseases in poultry with significant economic consequences to the poultry industry in Iran. The aim of this study was the detection and identification of IBV by reverse transcription(RT)-PCR in Iran. Ten IB virus strains were detected by testing trachea, cecal tonsil, and kidney tissues collected from broiler and layer farms in Iran. In order to detect infectious bronchitis virus, an optimized RT-PCR was used. Primers targeting the conserved region of known IBV serotypes were used in the RT-PCR assay. Primers selectively detecting Massachusetts and 793/B type IB viruses were designed to amplify the S1 gene of the virus and used in the nested PCR test. Our findings indicate the circulation of at least three genotypes of IB viruses (Massachusetts, 793/B, and variant 2) among poultry flocks.

  9. Absolute and Relative Contraindications to IV rt-PA for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the contraindications to the administration of intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) originated as exclusion criteria in major stroke trials. These were derived from expert consensus for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) trial. Despite the fact that the safety and efficacy of IV rtPA has been repeatedly confirmed in large international observational studies over the past 20 years, most patients with acute ischemic stroke disappointingly still do not receive thrombolytic treatment. Some of the original exclusion criteria have proven to be unnecessarily restrictive in real-world clinical practice. It has been suggested that application of relaxed exclusion criteria might increase the IV thrombolysis rate up to 20% with comparable outcomes to thrombolysis with more conventional criteria. We review the absolute and relative contraindications to IV rtPA for acute ischemic stroke, discussing the underlying rationale and evidence supporting these exclusion criteria. PMID:26288669

  10. Generation and characterization of a Tet-On (rtTA-M2) transgenic rat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The tetracycline-inducible gene regulation system is a powerful tool that allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of target transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. Several tetracycline-inducible transgenic mouse models have been described with ubiquitous or tissue-specific expression of tetracycline-transactivator (tTA), reverse tetracycline-transactivator (rtTA) or Tet repressor (TetR). Here we describe a Tet-On transgenic rat that ubiquitously expresses rtTA-M2 driven by the murine ROSA 26 promoter. Results The homozygous rat line (ROSA-rtTA-M2) generated by lentiviral vector injection, has a single integration site and was derived from the offspring of a genetic mosaic founder with multiple transgene integrations. The rtTA-M2 transgene integrated into an intron of a putative gene on chromosome 2 and does not appear to affect the tissue-specificity or expression of that gene. Fibroblasts from the ROSA-rtTA-M2 rats were transduced with a TetO7/CMV-EGFP lentivirus and exhibited doxycycline dose-dependent expression of the EGFP reporter transgene, in vitro. In addition, doxycycline-inducible EGFP expression was observed, in vivo, when the TetO7/CMV-EGFP lentivirus was injected into testis, kidney and muscle tissues of ROSA-rtTA-M2 rats. Conclusions This conditional expression rat model may have application for transgenic overexpression or knockdown studies of gene function in development, disease and gene therapy. PMID:20158911

  11. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) for diagnosis of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Grover, Naveen; Sharma, Ajay; Khan, Inam Danish; Kishore, Jugal

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging public health problem causing serious morbidity and mortality in tropical developing countries. Early, sensitive and specific diagnosis is paramount for clinical decision making. Currently available diagnostic tests are limited in scope and utility. This study highlights applicability of RT-LAMP in dengue diagnosis. Methods 100 dengue confirmed cases, 100 dengue negative cases and 79 healthy negative controls from dengue epidemic between Sep 2009 to Jul 2011 were included. Dengue cases were profiled using WHO guidelines 2006, haematological and biochemical parameters evaluated and diagnosed using NS1 antigen, IgM and IgG enzyme immunoassay, RT-PCR and RT-LAMP. Positive cases were serotyped, genotyped and various tests were compared. Results Mean haematocrit, PT, PTT, platelet count, activated lymphocytes, serum fibrinogen, transaminases, bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, protein and sodium were significantly elevated in DHF/DSS as compared to DF. NS1 antigen, RT-PCR and RT-LAMP were sensitive during 1–3 days while μ-capture IgM EIA was specific after 5–7 days of initial infection. DEN-1 genotype III was predominant. Conclusion Deranged haematocrit and liver function tests are indicators of the severity of the disease. RT-LAMP is rapid, cost effective, highly sensitive and specific qualitative and quantitative technique which can detect dengue infection in both early and intermediary stages when NS1 antigen titres are not in the detectable range and the IgM antibody titres have just started to rise. Its superiority over existing techniques, amenability for automation and promising utility in low resource healthcare setups and field conditions raise it as the new gold standard for dengue diagnosis. PMID:24600118

  12. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the tegument protein RT10 from Raillietina tetragona.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Li, Haiyun

    2014-03-01

    Tegument antigens of tapeworm play an important role in modulation of host response and parasite survival. Characterizing appropriate antigens for parasite infection diagnosis and vaccination is rational and could have both economic and epidemiological significance in poultry industry. In the present study, a major protoscolex homologue (named RT10) of Echinococcus and Taenia spp. was amplified from Raillietina tetragona cestode. The RT10 cDNA was 1,877 bp long containing an open reading frame of 1,683 bp nucleotides, which encoded a deduced protein of 560 amino acids with an isoelectric point of 6.33. Secondary structure analysis demonstrated that RT10 was both hydrophilic and antigenic, and possessed N-terminal FERM domain and C-terminal ERM domain, respectively. With the same structural properties of previously reported antigens from Echinococcus and Taenia spp., RT10 tegument antigen had a more than 82% similarity in nucleotide level with initially reported antigens from Echinococcus and Taenia spp., and a more than 83% similarity in protein level, with the highest similarity of 85.2% to Taenia antigen H17g. In addition, phylogenetic analysis illustrated a high consistency between different genus antigens and evolutionary branching. Although the detailed function of RT10 is still unknown, the high sequence conservation and structural similarity to formerly identified tegument antigens from Echinococcus and Taenia spp. suggested that RT10 may play a similar role as the previous reported antigens between cestode and host. It is significant to clarify the antigenic and serodiagnostic characteristics in the subsequent work.

  13. Quantitative RT-PCR for titration of replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Ana L P; Rezende, Alexandre G; Jorge, Soraia A C; Wagner, Renaud; Pereira, Carlos A; Astray, Renato M

    2013-11-01

    Virus titration may constitute a drawback in the development and use of replication-defective viral vectors like Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The standardization and validation of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method for SFV titration is presented here. The qRT-PCR target is located within the nsp1 gene of the non-structural polyprotein SFV region (SFV RNA), which allows the strategy to be used for several different recombinant SFV constructs. Titer determinations were carried out by performing virus titration and infection assays with SFVs containing an RNA coding region for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results showed that the standardized qRT-PCR is applicable for different SFV constructs, and showed good reproducibility. To evaluate the correlation between the amount of functional SFV RNA in a virus lot and its infectivity in BHK-21 cell cultures, a temperature mediated titer decrease was performed and successfully quantitated by qRT-PCR. When used for cell infection at the same multiplicity of infection (MOI), the temperature treated SFV-RVGP samples induced the same levels of RVGP expression. Similarly, when different SFV-GFP lots with different virus titers, as accessed by qRT-PCR, were used for cell infection at the same MOI, the cultures showed comparable amounts of fluorescent cells. The data demonstrate a good correlation between the amount of virus used for infection, as measured by its SFV RNA, and the protein synthesis in the cells. In conclusion, the qRT-PCR method developed here is accurate and enables the titration of replication-defective SFV vectors, an essential aid for viral vector development as well as for establishment of production bioprocesses.

  14. [Detection and subgrouping of respiratory syncytial virus RNA by real-time RT-PCR].

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hajime; Tanaka, Toshimitsu; Mizumura, Ayano; Kitahashi, Tomoko

    2012-09-01

    The TaqMan-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR assay we developed uses specific probes to identify respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to distinguish RSV subgroups A (RSV-A) and B (RSV-B). We selected conserved regions of the F gene as assay targets and designed new primers and TaqMan MGB probes to detect RSV-A and B. RSV-A and B control plasmids confirmed real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) reactivity whose efficiency was 2.5 x 10(1) to 2.5 x 10(7) copies/tube. The assay detection limit was 10 to 10(2) times higher than that of the conventional RT-PCR assay and was equal to the nested PCR assay. No cross-reactions occurred against other respiratory viruses, including influenza virus, metapneumovirus, measles virus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus, echovirus, mumps virus, parainfluenza virus, and rhinovirus. Of 154 clinical specimens derived from subjects with acute respiratory infection and tested by using both real-time RT-PCR and nested PCR, 40 were RSV-positive in both assays. Of these, 25 were identified as RSV-A and 15 as RSV-B by both assays. There was 100% concordance in RSV subgroup identification between real-time RT-PCR and nested PCR assays. These results indicate that our real-time RT-PCR assay can be used for rapid detection, quantitative analysis and subgrouping of RSV-A and RSV-B.

  15. SOFT-RT: Software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPx code.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Telma Cristina Ferreira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2016-11-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the SOFT-RT which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The SOFT-RT performs a full three-dimensional renderization of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk (OIR), and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, SOFT-RT can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. SOFT-RT is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the SOFT-RT IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general-purpose Monte Carlo transport code-MCNP-to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding OIR. Computational simulations is running on MCNPx. The normalized dose results are exported to the SOFT-RT output-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol.

  16. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    1 Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Vipin K. Rastogi1, Tu-chen Cheng1, Lisa Collins1 and Jennifer Bagley2 1...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B.pseudomallei 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...risk. There is currently no real - time PCR assay for detection of both of these pathogens. Primers and probes corresponding to specific genomic regions

  17. Profiling structured product labeling with NDF-RT and RxNorm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Structured Product Labeling (SPL) is a document markup standard approved by Health Level Seven (HL7) and adopted by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a mechanism for exchanging drug product information. The SPL drug labels contain rich information about FDA approved clinical drugs. However, the lack of linkage to standard drug ontologies hinders their meaningful use. NDF-RT (National Drug File Reference Terminology) and NLM RxNorm as standard drug ontology were used to standardize and profile the product labels. Methods In this paper, we present a framework that intends to map SPL drug labels with existing drug ontologies: NDF-RT and RxNorm. We also applied existing categorical annotations from the drug ontologies to classify SPL drug labels into corresponding classes. We established the classification and relevant linkage for SPL drug labels using the following three approaches. First, we retrieved NDF-RT categorical information from the External Pharmacologic Class (EPC) indexing SPLs. Second, we used the RxNorm and NDF-RT mappings to classify and link SPLs with NDF-RT categories. Third, we profiled SPLs using RxNorm term type information. In the implementation process, we employed a Semantic Web technology framework, in which we stored the data sets from NDF-RT and SPLs into a RDF triple store, and executed SPARQL queries to retrieve data from customized SPARQL endpoints. Meanwhile, we imported RxNorm data into MySQL relational database. Results In total, 96.0% SPL drug labels were mapped with NDF-RT categories whereas 97.0% SPL drug labels are linked to RxNorm codes. We found that the majority of SPL drug labels are mapped to chemical ingredient concepts in both drug ontologies whereas a relatively small portion of SPL drug labels are mapped to clinical drug concepts. Conclusions The profiling outcomes produced by this study would provide useful insights on meaningful use of FDA SPL drug labels in clinical applications through

  18. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Paul R; Dimonte, Guy; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L; Dimonte, Guy; Dai, W; Kares, R. J.

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  19. Real-time Periodic Processing of RT-middleware Utilizing Linux Standard Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Masaharu; Toda, Kengo; Hayashibara, Yasuo; Yamato, Hideaki; Furuta, Takayuki

    A new methodology of real-time periodic processing on RT-middleware based on the Linux standard functionalities is presented in this paper. The central of discussion is on the realization of real-time processing while keeping the reusability of software modules ensured by the RT-middleware framework as well as the portability provided by the Linux development mainstream. In order to show the validity of the proposed approach, two robot systems, including an omnidirectional electric wheelchair steered by haptic joystick, are presented and the discussion about the evaluation result follows from the view point of practicality.

  20. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  1. Padlock probe-mediated qRT-PCR for DNA computing answer determination

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fusheng; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    Padlock probe-mediated quantitative real time PCR (PLP-qRT-PCR) was adapted to quantify the abundance of sequential 10mer DNA sequences for use in DNA computing to identify optimal answers of traveling salesman problems. The protocol involves: (i) hybridization of a linear PLP with a target DNA sequence; (ii) PLP circularization through enzymatic ligation; and (iii) qRT-PCR amplification of the circularized PLP after removal of non-circularized templates. The linear PLP was designed to consist of two 10-mer sequence-detection arms at the 5′ and 3′ ends separated by a core sequence composed of universal PCR primers, and a qRT-PCR reporter binding site. Circularization of each PLP molecule is dependent upon hybridization with target sequence and high-fidelity ligation. Thus, the number of PLP circularized is determined by the abundance of target in solution. The amplification efficiency of the PLP was 98.7% within a 0.2 pg–20 ng linear detection range between thermal cycle threshold (Ct value) and target content. The Ct values derived from multiplex qRT-PCR upon three targets did not differ significantly from those obtained with singleplex assays. The protocol provides a highly sensitive and efficient means for the simultaneous quantification of multiple short nucleic acid sequences that has a wide range of applications in biotechnology. PMID:21691417

  2. Policy Implications at the State and District Level with RtI for Gifted students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elissa F.; Abernethy, Sherry H.

    2009-01-01

    As a field, gifted education does not endorse any one approach to serving students because of the range of student abilities and resulting concomitant diverse needs. Therefore, service delivery in gifted education is still heavily teacher dependent. Yet, many of the components of Response to Intervention (RtI) are employed in gifted education,…

  3. Identification and evaluation of reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang; Xu, ZhiChao; Zhu, YingJie; Luo, HongMei; Qian, Jun; Ji, AiJia; Hu, YuanLei; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Song, JingYuan; Sun, Chao; Chen, ShiLin

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable technique for gene expression studies. The accuracy and reliability of qRT-PCR results depend on the stability of the reference genes used for gene normalization. Therefore, a systematic process of reference gene evaluation is needed. Ganoderma lucidum is a famous medicinal mushroom in East Asia. In the current study, 10 potential reference genes were selected from the G. lucidum genomic data. The sequences of these genes were manually curated, and primers were designed following strict criteria. The experiment was conducted using qRT-PCR, and the stability of each candidate gene was assessed using four commonly used statistical programs-geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and RefFinder. According to our results, PP2A was expressed at the most stable levels under different fermentation conditions, and RPL4 was the most stably expressed gene in different tissues. RPL4, PP2A, and β-tubulin are the most commonly recommended reference genes for normalizing gene expression in the entire sample set. The current study provides a foundation for the further use of qRT-PCR in G. lucidum gene analysis.

  4. Liquid phase fluorescence in situ RT-PCR analysis for gene expression analysis in woody stems.

    PubMed

    Gray-Mitsumune, M; Abe, H; Takahashi, J; Sundberg, B; Mellerowicz, E J

    2004-01-01

    We explore a rapid in situ RT-PCR protocol for gene expression studies in woody stem tissues. In situ RT-PCR was performed using fluorescent dye-conjugated nucleic acid and the fluorescence signals derived from target RNAs were detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The signal to background ratio was greatly enhanced by performing two rounds of PCR reactions, first without the fluorescent dye and second with the dye. Using this protocol, we obtained strong gene-specific signals in secondary stem tissues. The signals were PCR-dependent, as shown by the lack of cytoplasmic signals in the tissue sections in which either DNA polymerase or primers were omitted from PCR reactions, and were RNA-dependent, as shown by great reduction of cytoplasmic signals when sections were treated with RNase before RT reactions. To verify our protocol, transcript localization of the rbcS gene was examined in secondary stems of hybrid aspen ( Populus tremula L. x tremuloides Michx.) and compared to the chlorophyll autofluorescence signal. The in situ RT-PCR signals form the rbcS gene and chlorophyll autofluorescence co-localized in the same cell types. The signal was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis of isolated RNA from the cambium and developing xylem, thus confirming the validity of the protocol. Some difficulties of in situ transcript localization and the interpretation of the signal distribution in the secondary tissues are discussed.

  5. Chapter 6: Response to Intervention (RtI) and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Bruce, Andrew; Lloyd, John Wills

    2012-01-01

    We review the concept of response to intervention (RtI) as it is being applied to emotional and behavioral disorders (EDB) in the early part of the 21st century, examining how it differs from and incorporates features of other approaches to addressing those problems, including pre-referral interventions, applied behavior analysis, functional…

  6. DETECTION OF HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES IN STREAM WATER WITH RT-PCR AND CELL CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex RT-PCR method was used to measure virus occurrence at five stream water sites that span a range of hydroclimatic, water-quality, and land-use characteristics. The performance of the molecular method was evaluated in comparison to traditional cell culture and Escherich...

  7. Salmonella detection from chicken rinsate with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and RT-PCR validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical detection of bacteria has been approached in recent years as a bacteria detection method that can counter time restraints of traditional plating or the high reoccurring cost of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The goal of optical detection is to identify bacteria with spectral s...

  8. Validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis in Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Daniella Duarte Villarinho; Vidal, Marcia Soares; Baldani, José Ivo; Simoes-Araujo, Jean Luiz

    2016-08-01

    The RT-qPCR technique needs a validated set of reference genes for ensuring the consistency of the results from the gene expression. Expression stabilities for 9 genes from Herbaspirillum seropedicae, strain HRC54, grown with different carbon sources were calculated using geNorm and NormFinder, and the gene rpoA showed the best stability values.

  9. Wave Heating in Ion Cyclotron Ranges of Frequencies in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Mushiake, T.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma device RT-1 has been developed for the studies on magnetosphere and advanced fusion plasmas. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high confinement state. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. We reported that the local electron beta exceeded 1 in RT-1 plasmas. In such situation, the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Heating ions is expected to access high ion beta state and to improve the plasma confinement theoretically. Therefore the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. Based on the results of the TASK-WF2 code, the ∩ shape loop antenna was designed for a slow wave excitation, and was implemented in the RT-1. In the ICRF heating experiments, a base plasma was sustained by ECRH. We observed the clear increase in diamagnetic signals and impurity ion temperature (CIII) in helium plasmas at the neutral gas pressure of 3 mPa, if the ICRF power of 10 kW is comparable to the ECRH one. This result is the first time in a magnetosphere plasma device. The results related to the ICRF heating will be presented in detail. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Nos 23224014 and 24360384.

  10. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  11. Real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For universal detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains by real time RT-PCR, a protocol was developed based on a set of primers and a Cy5-labeled TaqMan probe. This test included primers and a TET-labeled TaqMan probe selected on the mitochondrial nad5 gene for the simultaneous detection of ...

  12. Regional Data Assimilation of AIRS Profiles and Radiances at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Brad; Chou, Shih-hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Short Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center's mission to improve short-term weather prediction at the regional and local scale. It includes information on the cold bias in Weather Research and Forcasting (WRF), troposphere recordings from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and vertical resolution of analysis grid.

  13. Generic RT-PCR tests for detection and identification of tospoviruses.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mehraban, A; Westenberg, M; Verhoeven, J T J; van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Kormelink, R; Roenhorst, J W

    2016-07-01

    A set of tests for generic detection and identification of tospoviruses has been developed. Based on a multiple sequence alignment of the nucleocapsid gene and its 5' upstream untranslated region sequence from 28 different species, primers were designed for RT-PCR detection of tospoviruses from all recognized clades, i.e. the American, Asian and Eurasian clades, and from the small group of distinct and floating species. Pilot experiments on isolates from twenty different species showed that the designed primer sets successfully detected all species by RT-PCR, as confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplicons. In a final optimized design, the primers were applied in a setting of five RT-PCR tests. Seven different tospoviruses were successfully identified from diagnostic samples and in addition a non-described tospovirus species from alstroemeria plants. The results demonstrate that the newly developed generic RT-PCR tests provide a relevant tool for broad detection and identification of tospoviruses in plant quarantine and diagnostic laboratories.

  14. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV.

  15. Comparisons of quality of life for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after treatment with different RT technologies.

    PubMed

    Jang-Chun, L; Jing-Min, H; Yee-Min, J; Dai-Wei, L; Chang-Ming, C; Chun-Shu, L; Wen-Yen, H; Yu-Fu, S; Kuen-Tze, L; Chao-Yueh, F; Cheng-Hsiang, L; Hsing-Lung, C

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were determine the quality of life (QoL) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after treatment with different advanced technologies in radiotherapy (RT). A total of 150 patients with NPC were consecutively treated using curative RT in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Tri-service General Hospital in Taiwan. Data were collected prospectively from medical records and questionnaires. We used the Short-Form-36 (SF36) health survey questionnaire to evaluate general QoL, and a modified EORTC QLQH& N35 questionnaire to evaluate the correlation of xerostomia with QoL. The selection of RT methodology among two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was a significant factor for predicting difficulty of speech (P = 0.003), difficulty in chewing (P = 0.012), swallowing ability (P = 0.004), dry throat sensation during meals (P = 0.006) and the frequency of drinking water to maintain a moist mouth (P = 0.01). Our data suggest that the intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique plays a significant role in improving the QoL of NPC patients in our study.

  16. The Practical Teaching of Thinking Using the CoRT Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bono, Edward

    1986-01-01

    The CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) is a five-step program in direct instruction of thinking skills which increase the number and diversity of ideas as well as help the individual establish goals, set priorities, improve interactions with others, and incorporate feeling into thinking. (DB)

  17. Training for Generalization and Maintenance in RtI Implementation: Front-Loading for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Egan, Andrea M.; Kunkel, Amy K.; McComas, Jennifer; Peterson, Meredith M.; Rahn, Naomi L.; Wilson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is being implemented as a new initiative in PK-12 schools with increasing frequency. However, the model must be sustained at the school level, which is potentially difficult due to a number of challenges brought about by systems change. This article applied the Stokes and Baer (1977) framework for programming for…

  18. Minimally Invasive Surgery plus rt-PA for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Evacuation (MISTIE) Decreases Perihematomal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Mould, W. Andrew; Carhuapoma, J. Ricardo; Muschelli, John; Lane, Karen; Morgan, Timothy C; McBee, Nichol A; Bistran-Hall, Amanda J; Ullman, Natalie L; Vespa, Paul; Martin, Neil A; Awad, Issam; Zuccarello, Mario; Hanley, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Perihematomal edema (PHE) can worsen outcomes following ICH. Reports suggest that blood degradation products lead to PHE. We hypothesized that hematoma evacuation will reduce PHE volume and that treatment with rt-PA will not exacerbate it. Methods MISTIE II tested safety and efficacy of hematoma evacuation after ICH. We conducted a semi-automated, computerized volumetric analysis on CT to assess impact of hematoma removal on PHE and 2) effects of rt-PA on PHE. Volumetric analyses were performed on Baseline Stability (BLS) and End of Treatment (EOT) scans. Results Seventy-nine surgical and 39 medical patients from MISTIE II were analyzed. Mean hematoma volume at EOT was 19.6±14.5 cc for the surgical cohort and 40.7±13.9 cc for the medical cohort (p<0.001). Edema volume at EOT was lower for the surgical cohort: 27.7±13.3 cc than medical cohort: 41.7±14.6 cc (p<0.001). Graded effect of clot removal on PHE was observed when patients with >65%, 20-65%, and <20% ICH removed were analyzed (p<0.001). Positive correlation between PHE reduction and percent of ICH removed was identified (ρ=0.658; p<0.001). In the surgical cohort, 69 patients underwent surgical aspiration and rt-PA (S+rt-PA) while 10 underwent surgical aspiration only (SO). Both cohorts achieved similar clot reduction: S+rt-PA, 18.9±14.5 cc; and SO, 24.5±14.0 cc (p=0.26). Edema at EOT in S+rt-PA was 28.1±13.8 cc and 24.4±8.6 cc in SO (p=0.41). Conclusions Hematoma evacuation is associated with significant reduction in PHE. Furthermore, PHE does not appear to be exacerbated by rt-PA, making such neurotoxic effects unlikely when the drug is delivered to intracranial clot. Clinical Trial Registration Information URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00224770?term=MISTIE&rank=1 Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT00224770 PMID:23391763

  19. Stability indicating studies on NMITLI 118RT+ (standardized extract of withania somnifera dunal)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hafsa; Khandelwal, Kiran; Pachauri, Shakti Deep; Sanghwan, Rajender Singh; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Withania somnifera Dunal (Ashwagandha) is an Indian medicinal plant of great medicinal value; used in many clinically proven conditions. NMITLI-118RT+ is a candidate drug under a Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) networking project. It is a chemotype of W. somnifera's root extract, which has been used for the present study. Objectives: The present investigation aims to develop and validate a simple isocratic reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) system for the detection and estimation of Withanolide A (marker compound) and its analytical application for stability indicating studies on NMITLI-118RT+. Material and Methods: A validated RP-HPLC method for Withanolide A was established on a Waters HPLC system and the same was used on NMITLI-118RT+ for quantification and fingerprinting purposes, and for establishing forced degradation, isothermal stress tests, and drug-excipient testing protocols as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. Results: A validated method was established, which could detect the marker at a retention time of around 6.3 minutes, with a linearity range of 2-100 μg/mL, by varying the amounts of the said marker, which were estimated in four different batches of NMITLI-118RT+. Photostability as per ICH guidelines suggested a slight loss of the active constituent and maximum degradation was afforded with alkali followed by acid, and then peroxide, in the forced degradation studies. In the drug-excipient studies, the maximum amount of active constituent could be detected in the samples with ethyl cellulose and the least with hydroxy propyl cellulose. Conclusion: The method developed here was simple and rapid. The various stability indicating studies carried out in the present investigation would be useful for formulation development and were suggestive of deciding the recommended storage conditions for NMITLI-118RT+. PMID:25210308

  20. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  1. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ryan T; Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Gates, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  2. SPoRT - An End-to-End R2O Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral observational data applications from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. SPoRT currently partners with several universities and other government agencies for access to real-time data and products, and works collaboratively with them and operational end users at 13 WFOs to develop and test the new products and capabilities in a "test-bed" mode. The test-bed simulates key aspects of the operational environment without putting constraints on the forecaster workload. Products and capabilities which show utility in the test-bed environment are then transitioned experimentally into the operational environment for further evaluation and assessment. SPoRT focuses on a suite of data and products from MODIS, AMSR-E, and AIRS on the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, and total lightning measurements from ground-based networks. Some of the observations are assimilated into or used with various versions of the WRF model to provide supplemental forecast guidance to operational end users. SPoRT is enhancing partnerships with NOAA / NESDIS for new product development and data access to exploit the remote sensing capabilities of instruments on the NPOESS satellites to address short term weather forecasting problems. The VIIRS and CrIS instruments on the NPP and follow-on NPOESS satellites provide similar observing capabilities to the MODIS and AIRS instruments on Terra and Aqua. SPoRT will be transitioning existing and new capabilities into the AWIIPS II environment to continue the continuity of its activities.

  3. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. Part III. Virus Detection by RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Fout, G. Shay; Cashdollar, Jennifer L.; Griffin, Shannon M.; Brinkman, Nichole E.; Varughese, Eunice A.; Parshionikar, Sandhya U.

    2016-01-01

    EPA Method 1615 measures enteroviruses and noroviruses present in environmental and drinking waters. This method was developed with the goal of having a standardized method for use in multiple analytical laboratories during monitoring period 3 of the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule. Herein we present the protocol for extraction of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) from water sample concentrates and for quantitatively measuring enterovirus and norovirus concentrations using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Virus concentrations for the molecular assay are calculated in terms of genomic copies of viral RNA per liter based upon a standard curve. The method uses a number of quality controls to increase data quality and to reduce interlaboratory and intralaboratory variation. The method has been evaluated by examining virus recovery from ground and reagent grade waters seeded with poliovirus type 3 and murine norovirus as a surrogate for human noroviruses. Mean poliovirus recoveries were 20% in groundwaters and 44% in reagent grade water. Mean murine norovirus recoveries with the RT-qPCR assay were 30% in groundwaters and 4% in reagent grade water. PMID:26862985

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Norovirus Infection in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis by Rapid Immunochromatographic Test, RT-PCR and Real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Kumthip, Kattareeya; Khamrin, Pattara; Saikruang, Wilaiporn; Supadej, Kanittapon; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-03-02

    Immunochromatographic (IC) test for norovirus detection is a rapid and simple detection method. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of a recent version of R-Biopharm RIDA®QUICK Norovirus IC assay for norovirus detection in fecal specimens from children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis. Fecal specimens were tested by IC kit in comparison with gold standard reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR. The IC kit showed high sensitivity and specificity comparable with PCR-based methods. None of false positive and false negative was found and the assay did not cross-react with other gastroenteritis viruses. The IC assay could detect genogroup I.5 (GI.5) and a wide range of genotypes in the GII noroviruses including GII.3, GII.4, GII.6, GII.7, GII.14, GII.15, GII.21, and also newly emerging GII.17 norovirus. In conclusion, this norovirus IC kit could be an alternative choice for rapid screening or a quick diagnostic tool for norovirus detection in fecal specimens of acute gastroenteritis patients.

  5. C-terminal functional unit of Rapana thomasiana (marine snail, gastropod) hemocyanin isoform RtH1: isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Parvanova, Katja; Idakieva, Krassimira; Todinova, Svetla; Genov, Nicolay

    2003-09-23

    Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin (RtH) is a mixture of two hemocyanin (Hc) isoforms termed RtH1 and RtH2. Both subunit types are built up of eight functional units (FUs). The C-terminal functional unit (RtH1-h) of the Rapana Hc subunit 1 has been isolated by limited trypsinolysis of the subunit polypeptide chain. The oxy- and apo-forms of the unit are characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy. Upon excitation of RtH1-h at 295 or 280 nm, tryptophyl residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of the protein globule determine the fluorescence emission. This is confirmed by quenching experiments with acrylamide, cesium chloride and potassium iodide. The copper-dioxygen system at the binuclear active site quenches the indole emission of the oxy-RtH1-h. The removal of this system increases the fluorescence quantum yield and causes structural rearrangement of the microenvironment of the emitting tryptophyl residues in the apo-RtH1-h. The thermal stability of the apo-RtH1-h is characterized fluorimetrically by the "melting" temperature T(m) (65 degrees C) and by the transition temperature T(m) (83 degrees C) obtained by differential scanning calorimetry for oxy-RtH1-h. The results confirm the role of the copper-dioxygen complex for the stabilization of the Hc structure in solution.

  6. A comparison of in situ hybridisation, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-RT-PCR for the detection of canine distemper virus RNA in Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Hoyland, Judith A; Dixon, Janet A; Berry, Jacqueline L; Davies, Michael; Selby, Peter L; Mee, Andrew P

    2003-05-01

    Previous evidence implicating Paramyxoviruses in the aetiopathology of Paget's disease of bone has proved controversial. Whilst several groups have demonstrated Paramyxoviruses using techniques such as in situ hybridisation (ISH), reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and in situ-RT-PCR (IS-RT-PCR), others have found no evidence of viruses using only RT-PCR. To investigate this latter finding, we have now compared detection of canine distemper virus by ISH, RT-PCR (three different methods) and IS-RT-PCR, in 10 patients with Paget's disease, and samples of non-diseased bone from four patients. Canine distemper virus was detectable in six of the samples by ISH, but only in five of the samples by RT-PCR, using one of the methods. Neither of the other RT-PCR methods detected canine distemper virus. IS-RT-PCR demonstrated canine distemper virus in all 10 samples. There was no evidence of virus in the control samples. We have shown that the ability to detect canine distemper virus in bone is dependent on the technique used. IS-RT-PCR clearly showed that canine distemper virus was present in 100% of Pagetic samples, whereas canine distemper virus was only found in 60% by ISH and in 50% using one particular RT-PCR method. These results provide conclusive evidence that canine distemper virus is present within Pagetic bone, and provide a possible explanation for the failure of some groups to detect Paramyxovirus sequences. These findings also have wider implications for other studies investigating viral expression.

  7. Human T-cell leukemia virus type II nucleotide sequences between env and the last exon of tax/rex are not required for viral replication or cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Green, P L; Ross, T M; Chen, I S; Pettiford, S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) and bovine leukemia virus contain a region of approximately 600 nucleotides located 3' to the env gene and 5' to the last exon of the tax and rex regulatory genes. This region was originally termed nontranslated or untranslated (UT) since it did not appear to be expressed. Several studies have identified novel mRNAs in HTLV-I-, HTLV-II-, a bovine leukemia virus-infected cells that splice into open reading frames (ORFs) contained in the UT region and, thus, have the potential to produce proteins that might contribute to the biological properties of these viruses. The HTLV-II infectious molecular clone pH6neo has several ORFs in the UT region (nucleotides 6641 to 7213) and a large ORF which overlaps the third exon of tax/rex. To investigate the importance of these ORF-containing sequences on viral replication and transformation in cell culture, proviral clones containing deletions in UT (pH6neo delta UT) or a stop codon insertion mutation (pH6neoST) were constructed. Lymphoid cells were transfected with mutant proviral constructs, and stable cell clones, designated 729pH6neo delta UT and 729pH6neoST, were characterized. Viral protein production, reverse transcriptase activity, and the capacity to induce syncytia were indistinguishable from cells transfected with the wild-type clone. Finally, 729pH6neo delta UT- and 729pH6neoST-producer cells cocultured with primary blood T lymphocytes resulted in cellular transformation characteristic of HTLV. These results indicate that putative protein-coding sequences between env and the last exon of tax/rex are not required for viral replication or transformation in cell culture.

  8. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, G.; Fuell, K.; Smith, M. R.; Stano, G. T.; Molthan, A.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT's activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  9. RT-PSM, a real-time program for peptide-spectrum matching with statistical significance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Xiang; Gagné, Pierre; Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of complex biological peptide mixtures by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) produces a huge body of collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS spectra. Several methods have been developed for identifying peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) by assigning MS/MS spectra to peptides in a database. However, most of these methods either do not give the statistical significance of PSMs (e.g., SEQUEST) or employ time-consuming computational methods to estimate the statistical significance (e.g., PeptideProphet). In this paper, we describe a new algorithm, RT-PSM, which can be used to identify PSMs and estimate their accuracy statistically in real time. RT-PSM first computes PSM scores between an MS/MS spectrum and a set of candidate peptides whose masses are within a preset tolerance of the MS/MS precursor ion mass. Then the computed PSM scores of all candidate peptides are employed to fit the expectation value distribution of the scores into a second-degree polynomial function in PSM score. The statistical significance of the best PSM is estimated by extrapolating the fitting polynomial function to the best PSM score. RT-PSM was tested on two pairs of MS/MS spectrum datasets and protein databases to investigate its performance. The MS/MS spectra were acquired using an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a nano-electrospray ionization source. The results show that RT-PSM has good sensitivity and specificity. Using a 55,577-entry protein database and running on a standard Pentium-4, 2.8-GHz CPU personal computer, RT-PSM can process peptide spectra on a sequential, one-by-one basis in 0.047 s on average, compared to more than 7 s per spectrum on average for Sequest and X!Tandem, in their current batch-mode processing implementations. RT-PSM is clearly shown to be fast enough for real-time PSM assignment of MS/MS spectra generated every 3 s or so by a 3D ion trap or by a QqTOF instrument.

  10. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew; Stano, Geoffrey; Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT s activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  11. Further improvement and validation of MagMAX-96 AI/ND viral RNA isolation for efficient removal of RT-PCR inhibitors from cloacal swabs and tissues for rapid diagnosis of avian influenza virus by RT reverse transcription PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) is a high throughput molecular diagnostic test used for rapid detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) in clinical samples. However the performance of RRT-PCR can be adversely affected by RT-PCR inhibitors present in the sample. The tested commercial RNA extraction kits ...

  12. Comparison and evaluation of conventional RT-PCR, SYBR green I and TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assays for the detection of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinrong; Zhang, Tiansheng; Song, Deping; Huang, Tao; Peng, Qi; Chen, Yanjun; Li, Anqi; Zhang, Fanfan; Wu, Qiong; Ye, Yu; Tang, Yuxin

    2017-02-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) caused by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly contagious intestinal disease, resulting in substantial economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, three assays, namely a conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR and a TaqMan real-time RT-PCR targeting the highly conserved M gene of PEDV, were developed and evaluated. Then, the analytical specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility of these assays were determined and compared. The TaqMan real-time RT-PCR was 100-fold and 10,000-fold more sensitive than that of the SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR and the conventional RT-PCR, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of TaqMan real-time RT-PCR was 10 copies/μl of target gene and no cross amplification with other viruses tested was observed. With the features of high specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility, the TaqMan real-time RT-PCR established in this study could be a useful tool for clinical diagnosis, epidemiological surveys and outbreak investigations of PED.

  13. Multiplex RT-PCR detection of three common viruses infecting orchids.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raymond N; Dann, Alison L; Cross, Peter A; Wilson, Calum R

    2014-11-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection of three orchid viruses: cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV), odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV), and orchid fleck virus (OFV). Primers were used to amplify nucleocapsid protein gene fragments of 845 bp (ORSV), 505 bp (CymMV) and 160 bp (OFV). A 60-bp amplicon of plant glyceraldehyde-3-phophate dehydrogenase mRNA was included as an internal control against false negatives. The assay was validated against 31 collected plants from six orchid genera and compared with results obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RT-PCR assay proved more sensitive than TEM for detection of OFV.

  14. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  15. Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lareu, Ricky R.; Harve, Karthik S.; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-11-09

    The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

  16. Highly Specific Detection of Five Exotic Quarantine Plant Viruses using RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoseong; Cho, Won Kyong; Yu, Jisuk; Lee, Jong-Seung; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    To detect five plant viruses (Beet black scorch virus, Beet necrotic yellow vein virus, Eggplant mottled dwarf virus, Pelargonium zonate spot virus, and Rice yellow mottle virus) for quarantine purposes, we designed 15 RT-PCR primer sets. Primer design was based on the nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene, which is highly conserved within species. All but one primer set successfully amplified the targets, and gradient PCRs indicated that the optimal temperature for the 14 useful primer sets was 51.9°C. Some primer sets worked well regardless of annealing temperature while others required a very specific annealing temperature. A primer specificity test using plant total RNAs and cDNAs of other plant virus-infected samples demonstrated that the designed primer sets were highly specific and generated reproducible results. The newly developed RT-PCR primer sets would be useful for quarantine inspections aimed at preventing the entry of exotic plant viruses into Korea. PMID:25288934

  17. Evaluating the Impact of AIRS Observations on Regional Forecasts at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center collaborates with operational partners of different sizes and operational goals to improve forecasts using targeted projects and data sets. Modeling and DA activities focus on demonstrating utility of NASA data sets and capabilities within operational systems. SPoRT has successfully assimilated the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance and profile data. A collaborative project is underway with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) to use AIRS profiles to better understand the impact of AIRS radiances assimilated within Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) in hopes of engaging the operational DA community in a reassessment of assimilation methodologies to more effectively assimilate hyperspectral radiances.

  18. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center Environmental Modeling System (EMS). The suite of SPoRT products for use in the EMS consists of a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite that includes a Lake Surface Temperature (LST) analysis over the Great Lakes, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent within the SST composite, a real-time Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This paper and companion poster describe each dataset and provide recent upgrades made to the SST, Great Lakes LST, GVF composites, and the real-time LIS runs.

  19. WE-H-207B-02: MR-Driven RT Planning.

    PubMed

    Cao, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, steady progress has been made towards the implementation of MRI in external beam radiation therapy for processes ranging from treatment simulation to in-room guidance. Novel procedures relying mostly on MR data are currently implemented in the clinic. This session will cover topics such as (a) commissioning and quality control of the MR in-room imagers and simulators specific to RT, (b) treatment planning requirements, constraints and challenges when dealing with various MR data, (c) quantification of organ motion with an emphasis on treatment delivery guidance, and (d) MR-driven strategies for adaptive RT workflows. The content of the session was chosen to address both educational and practical key aspects of MR guidance.

  20. Selection of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of rat tissues under physiological and toxicological conditions.

    PubMed

    Svingen, Terje; Letting, Heidi; Hadrup, Niels; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    In biological research the analysis of gene expression levels in cells and tissues can be a powerful tool to gain insights into biological processes. For this, quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) is a popular method that often involve the use of constitutively expressed endogenous reference (or 'housekeeping') gene for normalization of data. Thus, it is essential to use reference genes that have been verified to be stably expressed within the specific experimental setting. Here, we have analysed the expression stability of 12 commonly used reference genes (Actb, B2m, Gapdh, Hprt, Pgk1, Rn18s, Rpl13a, Rps18, Rps29, Sdha, Tbp and Ubc) across several juvenile and adult rat tissues (liver, adrenal, prostate, fat pad, testis and ovaries), both under normal conditions and following exposure to various chemicals during development. Employing NormFinder and BestKeeper softwares, we found Hprt and Sdha to be amongst the most stable genes across normal and manipulated tissues, with several others also being suitable for most tissues. Tbp and B2m displayed highest variability in transcript levels between tissues and developmental stages. It was also observed that the reference genes were most unstable in liver and testis following toxicological exposure. For future studies, we propose the use of more than one verified reference gene and the continuous monitoring of their suitability under various experimental conditions, including toxicological studies, based on changes in threshold (Ct) values from cDNA samples having been reverse-transcribed from a constant input concentration of RNA.

  1. Differential regulation of expression of the MHC class II molecules RT1.B and RT1.D on rat B lymphocytes: effects of interleukin-4, interleukin-13 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, A; Schilder-Tol, E J; Chand, M A; Claessen, N; Lakkis, F G; Pascual, D W; Weening, J J; Aten, J

    1998-01-01

    Susceptibility to induction of both T helper 1- (Th1) and Th2-mediated autoimmunity is multifactorial and involves genetic linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotype. Brown Norway (BN) rats exposed to mercuric chloride develop a Th2-dependent systemic autoimmunity, whereas Lewis rats, which are highly susceptible to Th1-mediated autoimmunity, develop immune suppression after mercuric chloride exposure. Exposure to mercuric chloride is known to enhance B-lymphocyte expression of the MHC class II molecule RT1.B, predominantly in BN rats. We demonstrate that, in contrast, expression of RT1.D was unmodified on these B cells, whereas both RT1.B and RT1.D were up-regulated on epithelial cells. Regulation of B-cell MHC class II isotype expression was further studied in vitro, using BN rat lymph node (LN) cells. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) strongly enhanced B-cell expression of RT1.B (2.8-fold), whereas RT1.D expression was only slightly, although significantly, modified (1.2-fold). B cells from Lewis rats showed a similar IL-4-induced enhancement of RT1.B expression (2.5-fold), whereas, in contrast, RT1.D expression was unmodified. Exposure of LN cells from BN rats to interferon-gamma induced a moderate increase of B-cell MHC class II expression, predominantly of RT1.B. Strong and rapid enhancement of B-cell RT1.D expression was observed after stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin. Rat IL-13 did not modify B-cell MHC class II expression; however, it induced typical morphological changes in peritoneal macrophages. These experiments demonstrate isotype-specific and strain-dependent regulation of MHC class II expression on rat B lymphocytes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for the strain-dependent susceptibility for Th1- or Th2-mediated autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9536116

  2. Detection of Schmallenberg virus in different Culicoides spp. by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    De Regge, N; Deblauwe, I; De Deken, R; Vantieghem, P; Madder, M; Geysen, D; Smeets, F; Losson, B; van den Berg, T; Cay, A B

    2012-12-01

    To identify possible vectors of Schmallenberg virus (SBV), we tested pools containing heads of biting midges (Culicoides) that were caught during the summer and early autumn of 2011 at several places in Belgium by real-time RT-PCR. Pools of heads originating from following species: C. obsoletus complex, C. dewulfi and C. chiopterus were found positive, strongly indicating that these species are relevant vectors for SBV.

  3. Current MBDA R&T Effort on Ram/Scramjet and Detonation Wave Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    by a ceramic composite heat shield protecting from erosion and by a layer of insulation material were tested and solutions, able to sustain low...knowledge and preserve human and material investments in spite of the lack of new National or European R&T program [12] : • JAPHAR program (ONERA and DLR...stored in a high pressure bottle generally placed inside the tank. The transmission of the pressure to the fuel is done by an elastomeric bladder. A

  4. Efficient simulation of diffusion-based choice RT models on CPU and GPU.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Stijn; Meers, Kristof; Tuerlinckx, Francis

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present software for the efficient simulation of a broad class of linear and nonlinear diffusion models for choice RT, using either CPU or graphical processing unit (GPU) technology. The software is readily accessible from the popular scripting languages MATLAB and R (both 64-bit). The speed obtained on a single high-end GPU is comparable to that of a small CPU cluster, bringing standard statistical inference of complex diffusion models to the desktop platform.

  5. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  6. Bacterial reference genes for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR: survey and analysis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Danilo J P; Santos, Carolina S; Pacheco, Luis G C

    2015-09-01

    The appropriate choice of reference genes is essential for accurate normalization of gene expression data obtained by the method of reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In 2009, a guideline called the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) highlighted the importance of the selection and validation of more than one suitable reference gene for obtaining reliable RT-qPCR results. Herein, we searched the recent literature in order to identify the bacterial reference genes that have been most commonly validated in gene expression studies by RT-qPCR (in the first 5 years following publication of the MIQE guidelines). Through a combination of different search parameters with the text mining tool MedlineRanker, we identified 145 unique bacterial genes that were recently tested as candidate reference genes. Of these, 45 genes were experimentally validated and, in most of the cases, their expression stabilities were verified using the software tools geNorm and NormFinder. It is noteworthy that only 10 of these reference genes had been validated in two or more of the studies evaluated. An enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology classifications demonstrated that genes belonging to the functional categories of DNA Replication (GO: 0006260) and Transcription (GO: 0006351) rendered a proportionally higher number of validated reference genes. Three genes in the former functional class were also among the top five most stable genes identified through an analysis of gene expression data obtained from the Pathosystems Resource Integration Center. These results may provide a guideline for the initial selection of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in several different bacterial species.

  7. A host-based RT-PCR gene expression signature to identify acute respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zaas, Aimee K; Burke, Thomas; Chen, Minhua; McClain, Micah; Nicholson, Bradly; Veldman, Timothy; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Fowler, Vance; Rivers, Emanuel P; Otero, Ronny; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Voora, Deepak; Lucas, Joseph; Hero, Alfred O; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2013-09-18

    Improved ways to diagnose acute respiratory viral infections could decrease inappropriate antibacterial use and serve as a vital triage mechanism in the event of a potential viral pandemic. Measurement of the host response to infection is an alternative to pathogen-based diagnostic testing and may improve diagnostic accuracy. We have developed a host-based assay with a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) platform for classifying respiratory viral infection. We developed the assay using two cohorts experimentally infected with influenza A H3N2/Wisconsin or influenza A H1N1/Brisbane, and validated the assay in a sample of adults presenting to the emergency department with fever (n = 102) and in healthy volunteers (n = 41). Peripheral blood RNA samples were obtained from individuals who underwent experimental viral challenge or who presented to the emergency department and had microbiologically proven viral respiratory infection or systemic bacterial infection. The selected gene set on the RT-PCR TLDA assay classified participants with experimentally induced influenza H3N2 and H1N1 infection with 100 and 87% accuracy, respectively. We validated this host gene expression signature in a cohort of 102 individuals arriving at the emergency department. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR test was 89% [95% confidence interval (CI), 72 to 98%], and the specificity was 94% (95% CI, 86 to 99%). These results show that RT-PCR-based detection of a host gene expression signature can classify individuals with respiratory viral infection and sets the stage for prospective evaluation of this diagnostic approach in a clinical setting.

  8. NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Local Model Runs in the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carcione, Brian; Wood, Lance; Maloney, Joseph; Estupinan, Jeral; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Blottman, Peter; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can be used to initialize local model runs within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). These real-time datasets consist of surface-based information updated at least once per day, and produced in a composite or gridded product that is easily incorporated into the WRF EMS. The primary goal for making these NASA datasets available to the WRF EMS community is to provide timely and high-quality information at a spatial resolution comparable to that used in the local model configurations (i.e., convection-allowing scales). The current suite of SPoRT products supported in the WRF EMS include a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. The SPoRT SST composite is a blend of primarily the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System data for non-precipitation coverage over the oceans at 2-km resolution. The composite includes a special lake surface temperature analysis over the Great Lakes using contributions from the Remote Sensing Systems temperature data. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ice Percentage product is used to create a sea-ice mask in the SPoRT SST composite. The sea-ice mask is produced daily (in-season) at 1.8-km resolution and identifies ice percentage from 0 100% in 10% increments, with values above 90% flagged as ice.

  9. Looking beyond RtI Standard Treatment Approach: It's Not Too Late to Embrace the Problem-Solving Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Diane; Coughlin, Patricia Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    There are two approaches for providing Tier 2 interventions within Response to Intervention (RtI): standard treatment protocol (STP) and the problem-solving approach (PSA). This article describes the multi-tiered RtI prevention model being implemented across the United States through an analysis of these two approaches in reading instruction. It…

  10. Response to Intervention (RtI) Self-Efficacy among Elementary and Middle School General Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Tory Swearingen

    2012-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) integrates assessment and intervention within a school-wide, multi-level prevention system to maximize student achievement. RtI requires that educators collect ongoing information about student progress and provide instruction that aligns with that progress. By providing rigorous interventions prior to students…

  11. Misidentification of Bordetella bronchiseptica as Bordetella pertussis using a Newly Described RT-PCR Targeting the Pertactin Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently a real-time PCR (RT-PCT) assay based on sequence from the gene for pertactin was proposed for identification of Bordetella pertussis. Here we report that the B. pertussis pertactin gene sequence for the region encompassing the RT-PCR probe and primers is nearly identical to that of many B....

  12. Development of Virtual Airspace Simulation Technology - Real-Time (VAST-RT) Capability 2 and Experimental Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, R.; Ingram, C.; Jovic, S.; Alderete, J.; Brown, D.; Carpenter, D.; LaForce, S.; Panda, R.; Walker, J.; Chaplin, P.; Ballinger, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Airspace Simulation Technology - Real-Time (VAST-RT) Project, an element cf NASA's Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) Project, has been developing a distributed simulation capability that supports an extensible and expandable real-time, human-in-the-loop airspace simulation environment. The VAST-RT system architecture is based on DoD High Level Architecture (HLA) and the VAST-RT HLA Toolbox, a common interface implementation that incorporates a number of novel design features. The scope of the initial VAST-RT integration activity (Capability 1) included the high-fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation facilities located at NASA/Ames Research Center and medium fidelity pseudo-piloted target generators, such as the Airspace Traffic Generator (ATG) being developed as part of VAST-RT, as well as other real-time tools. This capability has been demonstrated in a gate-to-gate simulation. VAST-RT's (Capability 2A) has been recently completed, and this paper will discuss the improved integration of the real-time assets into VAST-RT, including the development of tools to integrate data collected across the simulation environment into a single data set for the researcher. Current plans for the completion of the VAST-RT distributed simulation environment (Capability 2B) and its use to evaluate future airspace capacity enhancing concepts being developed by VAMS will be discussed. Additionally, the simulation environment's application to other airspace and airport research projects is addressed.

  13. Middle School Teacher Satisfaction with Response to Intervention (RtI): An Assessment between Inception and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahedi, Karynn Jensen

    2010-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) is a multi-tiered process of monitoring student responses to remediation that is designed to help struggling learners succeed within the purview of regular education. Under the RtI model, students are referred to special education only after a series of documented interventions have been attempted. This study…

  14. Development of an improved RT-LAMP assay for detection of currently circulating rubella viruses.

    PubMed

    Abo, H; Okamoto, K; Anraku, M; Otsuki, N; Sakata, M; Icenogle, J; Zheng, Q; Kurata, T; Kase, T; Komase, K; Takeda, M; Mori, Y

    2014-10-01

    Rubella virus is the causative agent of rubella. The symptoms are usually mild, and characterized by a maculopapular rash and fever. However, rubella infection in pregnant women sometimes can result in the birth of infants with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Global efforts have been made to reduce and eliminate CRS. Although a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of rubella virus has been reported, the primers contained several mismatched nucleotides with the genomes of currently circulating rubella virus strains. In the present study, a new RT-LAMP assay was established. The detection limit of this assay was 100-1000PFU/reaction of viruses for all rubella genotypes, except for genotype 2C, which is not commonly found in the current era. Therefore, the new RT-LAMP assay can successfully detect all current rubella virus genotypes, and does not require sophisticated devices like TaqMan real-time PCR systems. This assay should be a useful assay for laboratory diagnosis of rubella and CRS.

  15. Mass scale screening of common arboviral infections by an affordable, cost effective RT-PCR method

    PubMed Central

    Taraphdar, Debjani; Sarkar, Arindam; Chatterjee, Shyamalendu

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a rapid, cost effective RT-PCR method for the mass scale diagnosis of such diseases at the viremia stage to find out the actual disease burden in that area. Methods For this purpose, cases with the history of only short febrile illness were considered. Thus 157 samples with the history of dengue/chikungunya like illness and only 58 samples with a history of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) were selected. Results Out of 157 samples, 42 and 74 were detected as dengue and chikungunya, respectively and out of 58 AES cases only 23 could be detected as Japanese encephalitis by this RT-PCR method. Conclusions This cost effective RT-PCR method can detect the total positive cases that remain undetected by ELISA method. Moreover, this method is capable to detect the viral RNA from patients' sera even after the appearance of IgM antibody at one fifth costs as compared with the other commercially available kits. PMID:23569876

  16. Development of a versatile and stable internal control system for RT-qPCR assays.

    PubMed

    Felder, Eva; Wölfel, Roman

    2014-11-01

    RT-qPCR, an established method for the detection of RNA viruses, requires internal RNA controls for the correct interpretation of PCR results. Robust and versatile RT-PCR controls can be achieved for example by packaging RNA into a virus-derived protein shell. In this study a MS2-based internal control system was developed, that allows stable and universal packing of different RNAs into non-infectious, non-lytic MS2-based viral like particles (VLPs). Two competitive internal controls for a hantavirus assay and a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) assay were cloned for the expression of VLPs. The expression of VLPs containing the RNA of interest could be induced with arabinose in Escherichia coli. The VLPs proved to be temperature resistant and could be frozen and thawed several times without degradation. Distinction of IC RNA from the target RNA was facilitated by a clear shift in the melting temperature or by specific hybridization signals. Furthermore, target and IC PCR amplification could be easily distinguished by their size in gel-electrophoretic analyses. Limits of detection were determined, demonstrating that the application of the IC did not reduce the sensitivity of the target RT-qPCR reactions. The system can be adapted to nearly any required sequence, resulting in a highly flexible method with broad range applications.

  17. Investigation of Reference Genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for Gene Expression Analysis Using Quantitative RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue-jiao; Sun, Xiao-hong; Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Ying-jie; Hwang, Cheng-An; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize its virulence factors and understand the effect of environmental conditions on its pathogenicity. However, there is not a stable gene in V. parahaemolyticus that has been identified for use as a reference gene for qRT-PCR. This study evaluated the stability of 6 reference genes (16S rRNA, recA, rpoS, pvsA, pvuA, and gapdh) in 5 V. parahaemolyticus strains (O3:K6-clinical strain-tdh+, ATCC33846-tdh+, ATCC33847-tdh+, ATCC17802-trh+, and F13-environmental strain-tdh+) cultured at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 37 and 42°C). Stability values were calculated using GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and Delta CT algorithms. The results indicated that recA was the most stably expressed gene in the V. parahaemolyticus strains cultured at different temperatures. This study examined multiple V. parahaemolyticus strains and growth temperatures, hence the finding provided stronger evidence that recA can be used as a reference gene for gene expression studies in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:26659406

  18. Optimization of an EHR mobile application using the UFuRT conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Amith, Muhammad; Loubser, Paul G; Chapman, John; Zoker, Kaafoe C; Rabelo Ferreira, Fred E R

    2012-01-01

    Drchrono is an Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) application designed specifically for the iPad. Described as portable, efficient and accessible anywhere, drchrono has several features that might be attractive to health care providers. However, EHRs have to conform to certain Federal Healthcare Information Technology Guidelines, which are evaluated in a series of 12 test procedures, defined by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). In this study, we evaluated Test Procedure for §170.302 (c) Maintain up-to-date problem list, in drchrono. The methodology for our evaluation was contained within Zhang's unified framework for usability, using UFuRT, i.e. user, functional, representation and task analyses. Based upon the analysis, using Adobe Flex, we then designed a prototype that corrected or improved on perceived weaknesses in the functionality served by the test procedure. We applied the test procedure taxonomy to a prototypic modification of drchrono, and then repeated the UFuRT usability analysis. We also used a 14-item heuristic evaluation by each member of our informatics team. Our findings support a conclusion that UFuRT is a valuable tool to evaluate EHR usability and that an "up-to-date problem" list may be customized, according to healthcare provider preference.

  19. Spatial Structures and Temporal Evolutions of High-Beta Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Zensho; Morikawa, Junji; Saitoh, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Masaya; Kawai, Yosuke

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) device can sustain an ultra high beta plasma in the artificial magnetosphere which is realized by the superconducting magnet levitated in the vacuum chamber. By optimizing the operation conditions, we have achieved the confinement of the high beta plasma whose diamagnetic signal is 4.0 mWb, which we estimate that the maximum local beta value exceeds 70%. In order to improve the estimate accuracy of the plasma pressure and to evaluate the temporal evolution of the pressure profiles, we have developed a fast Hall probe array in RT-1. In contrast to the existing magnetic measurement located outside the magnetic separatrix on the equatorial plane, the new system is installed from a bottom port of RT-1, close to the plasma boundary, is more sensitive to the pressure of the plasma near the dipole coil. We have observed not only an equilibrium structures of a stably generated plasma but also the time evolution of the pressure profile during the events which involve a change of the confined energy such as the ``afterglow'' or a mode transition.

  20. Evaluation of the NexScreen and DrugCheck Waive RT urine drug detection cups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Nelson, Gordon J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Urine drug testing is an important tool that is commonly used to assess patient compliance with prescription regimens. Point-of-collection immunoassay devices allow for timely availability of laboratory test results to guide therapy during the same office visit. Two waived immunoassay-based urine drug screen cups were evaluated in this study. The NexScreen cup and the DrugCheck Waive RT cup claim to detect 10-12 drug classes of commonly used and/or abused drugs. This study included a sensitivity and precision challenge with 4-6 replicates at concentrations 0-150% of the manufacture's claimed cutoff, using drug-free urine spiked with purified reference standards. The stability of test results was evaluated by reading the results at intervals between five and 1,440 min. Specificity was evaluated by parallel comparison of pooled patients' specimens, representing 56 patients and 41 known drug compounds. When comparing results to validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results, false positives were observed in the NexScreen cups for benzodiazepine, methamphetamine, methadone, opiates and tricyclic antidepressant tests, but there were no false negatives. The DrugCheck Waive RT cups showed false negative results for barbiturates and opiates, but no false positives. Overall, the NexScreen cup demonstrated better sensitivity than claimed, whereas the sensitivity of the DrugCheck Waive RT cup did not meet claims.

  1. Real-Time RT-PCR for the Detection of Lyssavirus Species

    PubMed Central

    Deubelbeiss, A.; Zahno, M.-L.; Zanoni, M.; Bruegger, D.; Zanoni, R.

    2014-01-01

    The causative agents of rabies are single-stranded, negative-sense RNA viruses in the genus Lyssavirus of Rhabdoviridae, consisting of twelve classified and three as yet unclassified species including classical rabies virus (RABV). Highly neurotropic RABV causes rapidly progressive encephalomyelitis with nearly invariable fatal outcome. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of rabies is highly relevant for public and veterinary health. Due to growing variety of the genus Lyssavirus observed, the development of suitable molecular assays for diagnosis and differentiation is challenging. This work focused on the establishment of a suitable real-time RT-PCR technique for rabies diagnosis as a complement to fluorescent antibody test and rabies tissue culture infection test as gold standard for diagnosis and confirmation. The real-time RT-PCR was adapted with the goal to detect the whole spectrum of lyssavirus species, for nine of which synthesized DNA fragments were used. For the detection of species, seven probes were developed. Serial dilutions of the rabies virus strain CVS-11 showed a 100-fold higher sensitivity of real-time PCR compared to heminested RT-PCR. Using a panel of thirty-one lyssaviruses representing four species, the suitability of the protocol could be shown. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences obtained by heminested PCR allowed correct classification of all viruses used. PMID:26464934

  2. Assessment of brain reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rydbirk, Rasmus; Folke, Jonas; Winge, Kristian; Aznar, Susana; Pakkenberg, Bente; Brudek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of gene expression levels by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has for many years been the favourite approach for discovering disease-associated alterations. Normalization of results to stably expressed reference genes (RGs) is pivotal to obtain reliable results. This is especially important in relation to neurodegenerative diseases where disease-related structural changes may affect the most commonly used RGs. We analysed 15 candidate RGs in 98 brain samples from two brain regions from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy patients. Using RefFinder, a web-based tool for evaluating RG stability, we identified the most stable RGs to be UBE2D2, CYC1, and RPL13 which we recommend for future RT-qPCR studies on human brain tissue from these patients. None of the investigated genes were affected by experimental variables such as RIN, PMI, or age. Findings were further validated by expression analyses of a target gene GSK3B, known to be affected by AD and PD. We obtained high variations in GSK3B levels when contrasting the results using different sets of common RG underlining the importance of a priori validation of RGs for RT-qPCR studies. PMID:27853238

  3. SPoRT Participation in the GOES-R and JPSS Proving Grounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For the last several years, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project at has been working with the various algorithm working groups and science teams to demonstrate the utility of future operational sensors for GOES-R and the suite of instruments for the JPSS observing platforms. For GOES-R, imagery and products have been developed from polar-orbiting sensors such as MODIS and geostationary observations from SEVIRI, simulated imagery, enhanced products derived from existing GOES satellites, and data from ground-based observing systems to generate pseudo or proxy products for the ABI and GLM instruments. The suite of products include GOES-POES basic and RGB hybrid imagery, total lightning flash products, quantitative precipitation estimates, and convective initiation products. SPoRT is using imagery and products from VIIRS, CrIS, ATMS, and OMPS to show the utility of data and products from their operational counterparts on JPSS. The products include VIIRS imagery in swath form, the GOES-POES hybrid, a suite of RGB products including the air mass RGB using water vapor and ozone channels from CrIS, and several DNB products. Over a dozen SPoRT collaborative WFOs and several National Centers are involved in an intensive evaluation of the operational utility of these products.

  4. How Many Microorganisms Are Present? Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andy; Álvarez, Laura Acuña; Whitby, Corinne; Larsen, Jan

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a variation of conventional quantitative or real-time PCR, whereby mRNA is first converted into the complementary DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription, the cDNA is then subsequently quantified by qPCR. The use of mRNA as the initial template allows the quantification of gene transcripts, rather than gene copy numbers. mRNA is only produced by actively metabolising cells and is produced by its corresponding gene to provide a 'blueprint' in order for a cell to manufacture a specific protein. Conventional qPCR detects not only DNA present in actively metabolising cells but also inactive and dead cells. qRT-PCR has the advantage that only actively metabolising cells are detected, hence provides a more reliable measure of microbial activity in oilfield samples. When qRT-PCR is combined with primers and probes for specific genes, the activity of microbial processes important in the oilfield, such as sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and nitrate reduction can be monitored.

  5. RT-PCR is a more accurate diagnostic tool for detection of BCR-ABL rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnbauer, B.A.; Allen, A.P.; McGrath, S.D.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) or genomic Southern hybridization for clonal gene rearrangement (GSH-R) has provided very specific identification of BCR-ABL gene rearrangement. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is diagnostic for patterns of BCR-ABL expression which are undetected by GSH-R and/or Ph1 and provides increased sensitivity both at diagnosis and in detection of minimal residual leukemia. Fifty-three specimens (of 150 tested from 119 consecutive leukemia patients) were RT-PCR positive for BCR-ABL gene expression confirmed by hybridization of PCR products with b{sub 3}a{sub 2}, b{sub 2}a{sub 2}, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} junction-specific oligonucleotides. In 6 cases of CML with GSH-R{sup {minus}}at diagnosis, RT-PCR provided specific BCR-ABL identification. Deletion of BCR regions, low mitotic index, or e{sub 1}a{sub 2} expression caused failure to detect GSH-R or Ph1 translocation.

  6. Vapor phase epitaxy growth of CdTe epilayers for RT x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovergine, Nico; Mancini, A. M.; Prete, P.; Cola, Adriano; Tapfer, Leander

    2000-11-01

    We report on the growth of thick CdTe layers on ZnTe/(100) GaAs hybrid substrates by the novel H2 transport vapor phase epitaxy (H2T-VPE) method. High crystalline quality (100)-oriented CdTe single crystal epilayers can be fabricated under atmospheric pressure and at growth temperatures (TD) in the 600 - 800 degree Celsius interval. Double crystal X-ray diffraction measurements performed on epilayers thicker than 30 micrometer show CdTe (400) peaks with FWHM < 59 arcsec. Samples grown under optimized conditions exhibit mirror-like surfaces. Nominally undoped epilayers grown < 650 degrees Celsius are p-type and low resistive, but they turn n-type above 650 degrees Celsius, as a result of donor (likely Ga) diffusion from the substrate. RT resistivities ((rho) ) approximately 106 (Omega) (DOT)cm are obtained for 675 degrees Celsius < TD < 700 degrees Celsius, but (rho) decreases for higher temperatures and thinner samples. Layers grown under these conditions show RT electron concentrations in the 1014 - 1011 cm-3 range. The detection capability of H2T-VPE grown CdTe is demonstrated by time- of-flight measurements performed at RT on Au/n-CdTe/n+- GaAs diode structures under reverse bias conditions. The present results show the potentials of H2T-VPE for the growth of detector-grade CdTe.

  7. Optimization of an EHR Mobile Application Using the UFuRT Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Amith, Muhammad; Loubser, Paul G.; Chapman, John; Zoker, Kaafoe C.; Rabelo Ferreira, Fred E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Drchrono is an Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) application designed specifically for the iPad. Described as portable, efficient and accessible anywhere, drchrono has several features that might be attractive to health care providers. However, EHRs have to conform to certain Federal Healthcare Information Technology Guidelines, which are evaluated in a series of 12 test procedures, defined by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). In this study, we evaluated Test Procedure for §170.302 (c) Maintain up-to-date problem list, in drchrono. The methodology for our evaluation was contained within Zhang’s unified framework for usability, using UFuRT, i.e. user, functional, representation and task analyses. Based upon the analysis, using Adobe Flex, we then designed a prototype that corrected or improved on perceived weaknesses in the functionality served by the test procedure. We applied the test procedure taxonomy to a prototypic modification of drchrono, and then repeated the UFuRT usability analysis. We also used a 14-item heuristic evaluation by each member of our informatics team. Our findings support a conclusion that UFuRT is a valuable tool to evaluate EHR usability and that an “up-to-date problem” list may be customized, according to healthcare provider preference. PMID:23304290

  8. A DICOM-RT based ePR radiation therapy information system for managing brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Law, Maria; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, Lawrence

    2005-04-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. One such system, the Cyberknife, is a radiation treatment system that utilizes image-guided information to control a multi-jointed, six degrees of freedom, robotic arm to deliver precise and required radiation dose to the tumor site of a cancer patient. The image-guided system is capable of tracking the lesion orientations with respect to the patient"s position throughout the treatment process. This is done by correlating live radiographic images with pre-operative, CT and MR imaging information to determine relative patient and tumor position repeatedly over the course of the treatment. The disparate and complex data generated by the Cyberknife system along with related data is scattered throughout the RT department compromising an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our research, tightly

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study of HIV-1 RT-DNA-Nevirapine Complexes Explains NNRTI Inhibition, and Resistance by Connection Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, R.S.K.; Arnold, Eddy; Das, Kalyan

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme that is targeted by nucleoside analogs (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs). NNRTIs are allosteric inhibitors of RT, and constitute an integral part of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen. Under selective pressure, HIV-1 acquires resistance against NNRTIs primarily by selecting mutations around the NNRTI pocket. Complete RT sequencing of clinical isolates revealed that spatially distal mutations arising in connection and the RNase H domain also confer NNRTI resistance and contribute to NRTI resistance. However, the precise structural mechanism by which the connection domain mutations confer NNRTI resistance is poorly understood. We performed 50-ns MD simulations, followed by essential dynamics, free-energy landscape analyses and network analyses of RT-DNA, RT-DNA-nevirapine, and N348I/T369I mutant RT-DNA-nevirapine complexes. MD simulation studies revealed altered global motions and restricted conformational landscape of RT upon nevirapine binding. Analysis of protein structure network parameters demonstrated a dissortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA complex and an assortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA-nevirapine complex suggesting enhanced rigidity of RT upon nevirapine binding. The connection subdomain mutations N348I/T369I did not induce any significant structural change; rather, these mutations modulate the conformational dynamics and alter the long-range allosteric communication network between the connection subdomain and NNRTI pocket. Insights from the present study provide a structural basis for the biochemical and clinical findings on drug resistance caused by the connection and RNase H mutations. PMID:24174331

  10. Universal Single-Probe RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Erik; Lesko, Birgitta; Lindegren, Gunnel; Ahlm, Clas; Söderholm, Sandra; Falk, Kerstin I.; Lagerqvist, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has become more prevalent in the last few decades. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms, and early diagnosis of dengue is important in preventing severe clinical complications associated with this disease and also represents a key factor in differential diagnosis. Here, we designed and validated a hydrolysis-probe-based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay that targets the genomes of dengue virus serotypes 1–4. Methodology/Principal Findings The primers and probe used in our RT-PCR assay were designed to target the 3′ untranslated region of all complete genome sequences of dengue virus available in GenBank (n = 3,305). Performance of the assay was evaluated using in vitro transcribed RNA, laboratory-adapted virus strains, external control panels, and clinical specimens. The linear dynamic range was found to be 104–1011 GCE/mL, and the detection limit was between 6.0×102 and 1.1×103 GCE/mL depending on target sequence. The assay did not cross-react with human RNA, nor did it produce false-positive results for other human pathogenic flaviviruses or clinically important etiological agents of febrile illnesses. We used clinical serum samples obtained from returning travelers with dengue-compatible symptomatology (n = 163) to evaluate the diagnostic relevance of our assay, and laboratory diagnosis performed by the RT-PCR assay had 100% positive agreement with diagnosis performed by NS1 antigen detection. In a retrospective evaluation including 60 archived serum samples collected from confirmed dengue cases 1–9 days after disease onset, the RT-PCR assay detected viral RNA up to 9 days after appearance of symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The validation of the RT-PCR assay presented here indicates that this technique can be a reliable diagnostic tool, and hence we suggest that it be introduced as the method of choice during the first 5 days of dengue symptoms. PMID:25522325

  11. The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas; Tomsick, Thomas; Khoury, Jane; Bean, Judy; del Zoppo, Gregory; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Woo, Daniel; Khatri, Pooja; Castaldo, John; Frey, James; Gebel, James; Kasner, Scott; Kidwell, Chelsea; Kwiatkowski, Thomas; Libman, Richard; Mackenzie, Richard; Scott, Phillip; Starkman, Sidney; Thurman, R. Jason

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multiple approaches are being studied to enhance the rate of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. Treatment of myocardial infarction with a combination of a reduced-dose fibrinolytic agent and a glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist has been shown to improve the rate of recanalization versus fibrinolysis alone. The combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) (CLEAR) stroke trial assessed the safety of treating acute ischemic stroke patients within 3 hours of symptom onset with this combination. Methods The CLEAR trial was a National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke–funded multicenter, double-blind, randomized, dose-escalation and safety study. Patients were randomized 3:1 to either low-dose rt-PA (tier 1=0.3 mg/kg, tier 2=0.45 mg/kg) plus eptifibatide (75 μg/kg bolus followed by 0.75 μg/kg per min infusion for 2 hours) or standard-dose rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours. Secondary analyses were performed regarding clinical efficacy. Results Ninety-four patients (40 in tier 1 and 54 in tier 2) were enrolled. The combination group of the 2 dose tiers (n=69) had a median age of 71 years and a median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 14, and the standard-dose rt-PA group (n=25) had a median age of 61 years and a median baseline NIHSS score of 10 (P=0.01 for NIHSS score). Fifty-two (75%) of the combination treatment group and 24 (96%) of the standard treatment group had a baseline modified Rankin scale score of 0 (P=0.04). There was 1 (1.4%; 95% CI, 0% to 4.3%) symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the combination group and 2 (8.0%; 95% CI, 0% to 19.2%) in the rt-PA–only arm (P=0.17). During randomization in tier 2, a review by the independent data safety monitoring board demonstrated that the safety

  12. Development and implementation of the quality control panel of RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR for avian influenza A (H5N1) surveillance network in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) have been indispensable methods for influenza surveillance, especially for determination of avian influenza. The movement of testing beyond reference lab introduced the need of quality control, including the implementation of an evaluation system for validating personal training and sample proficiency testing. Methods We developed a panel with lysates of seasonal influenza virus (H1N1, H3N2 and B), serials of diluted H5N1 virus lysates, and in-vitro transcribed H5 hemaglutinin (HA) and an artificial gene RNAs for RT-PCR and rRT-PCR quality control assessment. The validations of stability and reproducibility were performed on the panel. Additionally, the panel was implemented to assess the detection capability of Chinese human avian influenza networks. Results The panel has relatively high stability and good reproducibility demonstrated by kappa's tests. In the implementation of panel on Chinese human avian influenza networks, the results suggested that there were a relatively low number of discrepancies for both concise and reproducibility in Chinese avian influenza virus net works. Conclusions A quality control panel of RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR for avian influenza A (H5N1) surveillance network was developed. An availably statistical data, which are used to assess the detection capability of networks on avian influenza virus (H5N1), can be obtained relatively easily through implementation of the panel on networks. PMID:21406119

  13. Duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR for detection and discrimination of two distinct potyviruses naturally infecting sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid).

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ch V Subba; Sreenivasulu, P; Sekhar, G

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR (D-IC-RT-PCR) technique was developed for detection and discrimination of taxonomically distinct Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) that naturally infect sugarcane. D-IC-RT-PCR was performed using polyclonal antisera for capture of virions. Oligo 5'-d(T)18(AGC)-3' as a common reverse primer for both viruses and virus specific forward primers, 5'-AAGTGGTTAAACGCCTGTGG-3' and 5'-ATGTC(GA)AAGAA(GA)ATGCGCTTGC-3' were used for amplifying approximately 1400 and approximately 900 bp fragments of SCSMV and SCMV genomes, respectively from their 3' termini. To assess the applicability of the developed technique, 67 mosaic affected sugarcane samples were initially screened by direct antigen coating-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) followed by D-IC-RT-PCR. In DAC-ELISA, approximately 69% of tested samples were shown to be positive for presence of SCSMV, approximately 28% for SCMV and approximately 10% for both viruses. In D-IC-RT-PCR both viruses were detected up to the dilution of 10(-4). In D-IC-RT-PCR, approximately 76% of tested samples were found to be positive for SCSMV, approximately 37% for SCMV and approximately 16% for both viruses. The sequence analyses of D-IC-RT-PCR amplicons of 3 isolates of each virus revealed that the designed primers were virus-specific. The developed technique had potential application for sensitive parallel detection of two viruses in sugarcane.

  14. Fast detection of Southern tomato virus by one-step transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP).

    PubMed

    Elvira-González, L; Puchades, A V; Carpino, C; Alfaro-Fernandez, A; Font-San-Ambrosio, M I; Rubio, L; Galipienso, L

    2017-03-01

    Southern tomato virus (STV) is a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus belonging to genus Amalgavirus (family Amalgamaviridae) which has been detected in tomato plants showing stunting, fruit discoloration and size reduction. A one-step reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for the detection of STV in total RNA or sap extracts (obtained just by grinding in buffer) from STV-infected tomato plants by using a set of three primers pairs which were designed to the sequence of the STV putative coat protein. Amplification products were visualized by gel electrophoresis or direct staining of DNA. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was identical to that of the conventional RT-PCR and less affected by the presence of polymerase inhibitors. STV was detected by RT-LAMP in different tomato tissues, i.e. leaves, roots, fruits and seeds. Also the virus was successfully detected by RT-LAMP from sap extracts obtained from field tomato plants whereas conventional RT-PCR did not. Results of this work show that RT-LAMP is a specific, rapid and cheap procedure to detect STV and it could be implemented on field surveys and sanitation programs.

  15. Rapid detection and high occurrence of porcine rotavirus A, B, and C by RT-qPCR in diagnostic samples.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Douglas; Homwong, Nitipong; Rossow, Kurt; Culhane, Marie; Goyal, Sagar; Collins, James; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are important cause of diarrhea in animals, including humans. Currently, rotavirus species A, B, C, E, and H (RVA-RVC, RVE, and RVH) have been identified in pigs. Traditionally, RVA has been considered the primary cause of diarrhea in pigs, and RVB and RVC had been described sporadically in pigs until recently. Qualitative porcine RVA, RVB, and RVC RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were designed and 7508 porcine diarrheic samples, submitted to University of Minnesota, were tested to estimate the percentage of RVA, RVB, and RVC over a period of approximately 2 years (from 2009 to 2011). The individual RVA and RVC RT-qPCR assays were multiplex into a single RT-qPCR while the RVB RT-qPCR assay remained as an individual RT-qPCR. In total, 83% of the samples were positive for RVA, RVB, or RVC. As expected, RVA was detected at the highest overall percentage (62%). However, 33% and 53% of the samples were positive for RVB and RVC, respectively, indicating that both RVB and RVC are also epidemiologically important in the swine population. RVC was most predominant in young pigs (1-20 days of age), while RVA and RVB were most predominant in ≥21 day old pigs. As diagnostic tools, the developed RT-qPCR assays could successfully discriminate among infecting RV species, which could lead to better surveillance and epidemiological studies for ultimately better prevention and control strategies.

  16. Stability and Reproducibility Underscore Utility of RT-QuIC for Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Maria; Schmitz, Matthias; Karch, André; Mitrova, Eva; Kuhn, Franziska; Schroeder, Bjoern; Raeber, Alex; Varges, Daniela; Kim, Yong-Sun; Satoh, Katsuya; Collins, Steven; Zerr, Inga

    2016-04-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) allows the amplification of miniscule amounts of scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent studies applied the RT-QuIC methodology to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnosing human prion diseases. However, to date, there has not been a formal multi-centre assessment of the reproducibility, validity and stability of RT-QuIC in this context, an indispensable step for establishment as a diagnostic test in clinical practice. In the present study, we analysed CSF from 110 prion disease patients and 400 control patients using the RT-QuIC method under various conditions. In addition, "blinded" ring trials between different participating sites were performed to estimate reproducibility. Using the previously established cut-off of 10,000 relative fluorescence units (rfu), we obtained a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 99%. The multi-centre inter-laboratory reproducibility of RT-QuIC revealed a Fleiss' kappa value of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.40-1.00) indicating an almost perfect agreement. Moreover, we investigated the impact of short-term CSF storage at different temperatures, long-term storage, repeated freezing and thawing cycles and the contamination of CSF with blood on the RT-QuIC seeding response. Our data indicated that the PrP(Sc) seed in CSF is stable to any type of storage condition but sensitive to contaminations with blood (>1250 erythrocytes/μL), which results in a false negative RT-QuIC response. Fresh blood-contaminated samples (3 days) can be rescued by removal of erythrocytes. The present study underlines the reproducibility and high stability of RT-QuIC across various CSF storage conditions with a remarkable sensitivity and specificity, suggesting RT-QuIC as an innovative and robust diagnostic method.

  17. The Cost-Effectiveness of Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (RT-CGM) in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fonda, Stephanie J.; Graham, Claudia; Munakata, Julie; Powers, Julia M.; Price, David; Vigersky, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This analysis models the cost-effectiveness of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) using evidence from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that demonstrated RT-CGM reduced A1C, for up to 9 months after using the technology, among patients with type 2 diabetes not on prandial insulin. RT-CGM was offered short-term and intermittently as a self-care tool to inform patients’ behavior. Method: The analyses projected lifetime clinical and economic outcomes for RT-CGM versus self-monitoring of blood glucose by fingerstick only. The base-case analysis was consistent with the RCT (RT-CGM for 2 weeks on/1 week off over 3 months). A scenario analysis simulated outcomes of an RT-CGM “refresher” after the active intervention of the RCT. Analyses used the IMS CORE Diabetes Model and were conducted from a US third-party payer perspective, including direct costs obtained from published sources and inflated to 2011 US dollars. Costs and health outcomes were discounted at 3% per annum. Results: Life expectancy (LE) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) from RT-CGM were 0.10 and 0.07, with a cost of $653/patient over a lifetime. Incremental LE and QALE from a “refresher” were 0.14 and 0.10, with a cost of $1312/patient over a lifetime, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $9319 and $13 030 per LY and QALY gained. Conclusions: RT-CGM, as a self-care tool, is a cost-effective disease management option in the US for people with type 2 diabetes not on prandial insulin. Repeated use of RT-CGM may result in additional cost-effectiveness. PMID:26843480

  18. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) for the treatment of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD).

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S; Rodriguez, M; Lafuente, A; Mateos, P; Mehta, J; Singhal, S; Saso, R; Tait, D; Treleaven, J G; Powles, R L

    1999-04-01

    Seventeen patients who developed hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) with or without heparin. rtPA was started a median of 13 days post transplant (range 4-35). All patients received rtPA at a dose of 10 mg/day as a starting dose, and 12 patients also received heparin (1500 U bolus; then 100 U/kg/day as a continuous i.v. infusion). The median number of days of rtPA therapy was 2.5 (1-12). The median total serum bilirubin level was 116 mmol/l (range 63-194) at the beginning of treatment. Six patients showed a response to rtPA treatment (29%). It was observed that by day 2 of rtPA therapy, bilirubin levels in responders showed a downwards trend as compared to those in nonresponders. In all except one patient this response was observed after two doses of rtPA. Seven out of the 11 non-responders had a past history of liver dysfunction, compared with none of the responders. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of day of onset of liver dysfunction, manifestations of disease, maximum bilirubin and creatinine levels, and day of commencing treatment. No patient experienced severe hemorrhagic complications during therapy. Four responders survived for more than 100 days compared to none of the non-responders. Probability of survival was 33% at day 100. It is difficult to unequivocally establish the role of rtPA in the treatment of VOD. The importance of bilirubin levels on days 2 or 3 of therapy in predicting outcome should be established, as should the optimum dose of rtPA and optimum duration of therapy.

  19. A DICOM-RT radiation oncology ePR with decision support utilizing a quantified knowledge base from historical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Liu, Brent; Le, Anh; Law, Maria

    2008-03-01

    During the last 2 years we have been working on developing a DICOM-RT (Radiation Therapy) ePR (Electronic Patient Record) with decision support that will allow physicists and radiation oncologists during their decision-making process. This ePR allows offline treatment dose calculations and plan evaluation, while at the same time it compares and quantifies treatment planning algorithms using DICOM-RT objects. The ePR framework permits the addition of visualization, processing, and analysis tools, which combined with the core functionality of reporting, importing and exporting of medical studies, creates a very powerful application that can improve the efficiency while planning cancer treatments. Usually a Radiation Oncology department will have disparate and complex data generated by the RT modalities as well as data scattered in RT Information/Management systems, Record & Verify systems, and Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) which can compromise the efficiency of the clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997 [1,2]. However, they are not broadly used yet by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our attempt is to show a proof-of-concept that a DICOM-RT ePR system can be developed as a foundation to perform medical imaging informatics research in developing decision-support tools and knowledge base for future data mining applications.

  20. Efficacy of Vitrectomy Combined with Subretinal rtPA Injection with Gas or Air Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Waizel, M; Todorova, M G; Rickmann, A; Blanke, B R; Szurman, P

    2017-01-31

    Background Functional and anatomical outcome after vitrectomy with rtPA combined with gas or air tamponade. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of pseudophakic patients treated with subretinal rtPA and gas or air tamponade. The primary endpoint was displacement of haemorrhage six months after surgery. The secondary endpoints were visual acuity (BCVA), haemorrhage diameter (MHD) and central macular thickness (CMT), as measured by SD-OCT. Results 53 of 85 eyes were pseudophakic. 27 of these eyes were treated with air tamponade and 26 with gas tamponade. For patients with air tamponade, the mean BCVA improved from 20/530 to 20/355 (p = 0.01). MHD and CMT decreased from 6386 ± 2281 µm to 3805 ± 2397 µm (p < 0.001) and 895 ± 592 µm to 532 ± 386 µm (p < 0.001), respectively. For patients with gas tamponade, the mean BCVA improved only slightly, from 20/471 to 20/394 (p = 0.17). MHD and CMT exhibited statistically significant decreases from 6759 ± 1773 µm to 3525 ± 1548 µm (p < 0.001) and 1089 ± 587 µm to 537 ± 251 µm (p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions Vitrectomy with subretinal rtPA injection has strong functional and anatomical effects on submacular haemorrhages with both gas and air tamponade.

  1. Evaluating L1CAM expression in human endometrial cancer using qRT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Notaro, Sara; Reimer, Daniel; Duggan-Peer, Michaela; Fiegl, Heidi; Wiedermair, Annamarie; Rössler, Julia; Altevogt, Peter; Marth, Christian; Zeimet, Alain Gustave

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of endometrial carcinoma (EC) still needs improvement of risk assessment. Recently, L1CAM immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluation showed a unique value to predict the outcome of early EC. However IHC results are often conflicting for lack of inter-laboratory standardisation. Methods Here, as a proof of concept and to increase reproducibility we assayed eighty-two EC and 26 normal endometrium samples for L1CAM expression (L1CAMEXP) via qRT-PCR. The IHC evaluation was performed in 50 cancer samples. Moreover, we aimed to substantiate the in-vitro findings of L1CAM regulation through its promoter methylation (L1CAMMET), miR-34a expression and miR-34a promoter methylation. DNA methylation was assessed with MethyLight PCR technique. Results High overall concordant results between IHC and RT-PCR evaluations were found. L1CAMEXP was detected in 11% of cancer specimens. These positive cancers exhibited a worse DFS (p=0.032) and OS (p=0.016) in a multivariate COX-regression model. L1CAMEXP predicted distant failure (p=0.007) and L1CAMMET predicted risk-reduction of lymph-node involvement (p=0.005). Inverse correlations between L1CAMEXP and L1CAMMET (p=0.004) and between L1CAMEXP and miR-34a expression (p=0.002) were found. Conclusions In conclusion qRT-PCR analysis is a reliable approach to evaluate L1CAM status in EC and L1CAMEXP was highly predictive for distant failure and poor outcome, confirming the large IHC-based studies. Interestingly, L1CAMMET was able to assess the risk of pelvic lymph-node involvement. Especially the latter finding has to be confirmed in larger prospective series. PMID:27233077

  2. Sensitive and rapid RT-qPCR quantification of pathogenic Candida species in human blood.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    For accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of candidiasis, we developed a highly sensitive quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) system for five Candida species that have been reported to be the major causes of bloodstream fungal infection (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei), together with a system for all pathogenic Candida species. Cells of each fungal species spiked into human peripheral blood (PB) were specifically detected at a lower detection limit of 10(0) cell/1 mL PB by this system using the newly developed specific primer sets targeting 18S or 26S rRNA of the five Candida species, together with the existing group primer set. The total count of the five Candida spp. as the sum of those obtained by using the five species primer sets was equivalent to the count obtained by using the group primer set, indicating that the group set covered the major five Candida spp. in human blood with the same degree of accuracy as the species primer sets. The RT-qPCR counts of the Candida species were in good agreement with CFU counts obtained by their culture on CHROMagar™, with a lower detection limit of 10(0)cell/mL of PB. Candida rRNA molecules were stably stored for at least 7 days at 4°C by keeping the blood specimens in an RNA stabilizing reagent. These results strongly suggest that this sensitive system is useful for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Candida bloodstream infections.

  3. Comparing protocols for preparation of DNA-free total yeast RNA suitable for RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Del Aguila, Eduardo M; Dutra, Marcio B; Silva, Joab T; Paschoalin, Vânia MF

    2005-01-01

    Background Preparation of RNA free from DNA is a critical step before performing RT-PCR assay. Total RNA isolated from several sources, including those obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using routine methodologies are frequently contaminated with DNA, which can give rise to amplification products that mimic the amplicons expected from the RNA target. Results We investigated the efficiency of two DNase I based protocols for eliminating DNA contaminations from RNA samples obtained from yeast cells. Both procedures are very efficient in eliminating DNA contamination from RNA samples and entail three main steps, which involve treating of RNA samples with DNase I, inhibition of the enzyme by EDTA and its subsequent inactivation at 65°C. The DNase I treated samples were further purified with phenol: chloroform followed by precipitation with ice-cold ethanol (protocol I) or, alternatively, they were directly used in RT-PCR reactions (protocol II). Transcripts from ACT1, PDA1, CNA1, CNA2, TPS1 and TPS2 analyzed after each treatment showed that all mRNAs tested can be amplified if total RNA was extracted and purified after DNase I treatment, however, only TPS1, TPS2 and ACT1 mRNAs were amplified without extraction/purification step. Conclusion Although more laborious and requiring a higher initial amount of material, the inclusion of an extraction and purification step allows to prepare RNA samples that are free from DNA and from low molecular contaminants and can be applied to amplify any Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA by RT-PCR. PMID:15833107

  4. Approaches to strategic research and technology (R&T) analysis and road mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankins, John C.

    2002-07-01

    Increasingly, the timely and successful incorporation of innovative technologies into new systems is a critical factor in their success or failure. This is true for both commercial and government space missions. In addition, continuing progress in methodologies that may enable the effective identification of long-term technology needs and opportunities—and the guidance of ongoing research and technology (R&T) programs to address them—is vital to progress in space exploration and commercial development. NASA's long-standing use of technology readiness levels (TRLs) is one such approach. These technology discipline-independent metrics provide a valuable tool in technology management at all levels in an organization. However, TRLs provide only the basic guideposts for R&T management: information on the current and desired level of maturity of a technology for a particular application. In order to succeed over the longer term, additional methodologies are needed, including those which allow the identification of anticipated uncertainty in planned R&T programs, as well as approaches that permit the identification of overall technology-derived uncertainty in future space systems developments. This paper provides a preliminary discussion of this critical subject, including an overview of the history and the current practices of the TRL approach. In addition, the paper presents a recently-formulated strategic technology management approach that attempts to address the question of uncertainty in technology development and applications: the Integrated Technology Analysis Methodology (ITAM). The paper concludes with a discussion of a future directions for space technology management, and how these tools might be used to facilitate coordination and discussions in an international setting.

  5. Thrombolytic treatment (alteplase; rt-Pa) in acute massive pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Adem; Ozkaya, Sevket; Atas, Ali Ekber; Ulu, Esra Kayahan; Kitapci, Ilknur; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) often decompensate suddenly, and once hemodynamic compromise has developed, mortality is extremely high. Currently, thrombolytic therapy for PE is still controversial. We retrospectively evaluated 34 patients with PE between January 2010 and December 2013 in the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical Park Samsun Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. The demographic and disease characteristics of patients who received thrombolytic treatment were retrospectively analyzed. The female to male ratio was 19/15 and the mean age was 63.1±13.2 years. PE diagnosis was made using echocardiography (64.7%) or contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography with echocardiography (32.4%). Twenty-two (64.7%) patients went into the cardiopulmonary arrest due to massive PE and 17 (50%) patients recovered without sequelae. Eleven (32.4%) patients were diagnosed with massive PE during cardiopulmonary arrest with clinical and echocardiographic findings. Alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rt-PA]) was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and four (36.3%) patients responded and survived without sequelae. The complications of rt-PA treatment were hemorrhage in five (14.7%) patients and allergic reactions in two (5.9%) patients. There was no mortality due to rt-PA treatment complications. In conclusion, mortality due to massive PE is much more than estimated and alteplase can be used safely in patients with massive PE. This thrombolytic treatment was not associated with any fatal hemorrhage complication. If there is any sign of acute PE, echocardiography should be used during cardiopulmonary arrest/instability. Alteplase should be given to patients with suspected massive PE.

  6. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative RT-PCR in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Dominic; Bandner-Risch, Doris; Perttunen, Hilja; Schmied, Wolfram; Porras, Carlos; Ceballos, Francisco; Rodriguez-Losada, Noela; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and congenital aortic valve malformations are frequent causes of ascending aortic aneurysms. The molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation under these circumstances are not well understood. Reference genes for gene activity studies in aortic tissue that are not influenced by aortic valve morphology and its hemodynamic consequences, aortic dilatation, hypertension, or antihypertensive medication are not available so far. This study determines genes in ascending aortic tissue that are independent of these parameters. Tissue specimens from dilated and undilated ascending aortas were obtained from 60 patients (age ≤70 years) with different morphologies of the aortic valve (tricuspid undilated n = 24, dilated n = 11; bicuspid undilated n = 6, dilated n = 15; unicuspid dilated n = 4). Of the studied individuals, 36 had hypertension, and 31 received ACE inhibitors or AT1 receptor antagonists. The specimens were obtained intraoperatively from the wall of the ascending aorta. We analyzed the expression levels of 32 candidate reference genes by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Differential expression levels were assessed by parametric statistics. The expression analysis of these 32 genes by RT-qPCR showed that EIF2B1, ELF1, and PPIA remained constant in their expression levels in the different specimen groups, thus being insensitive to aortic valve morphology, aortic dilatation, hypertension, and medication with ACE inhibitors or AT1 receptor antagonists. Unlike many other commonly used reference genes, the genes EIF2B1, ELF1, and PPIA are neither confounded by aortic comorbidities nor by antihypertensive medication and therefore are most suitable for gene expression analysis of ascending aortic tissue. PMID:23326585

  7. Custom RT-qPCR-array for glaucoma filtering surgery prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana Maria; Acera, Arantxa

    2017-01-01

    Excessive subconjunctival scarring is the main reason of failure of glaucoma filtration surgery. We analyzed conjunctival and systemic gene expression patterns after non penetrating deep sclerectomy (NPDS). To find expression patterns related to surgical failure and their correlation with the clinical outcomes. This study consisted of two consecutive stages. The first was a prospective analysis of wound-healing gene expression profile of six patients after NPDS. Conjunctival samples and peripheral blood samples were collected before and 15, 90,180, and 360 days after surgery. In the second stage, we conducted a retrospective analysis correlating the late conjunctival gene expression and the outcome of the NPDS for 11 patients. We developed a RT-qPCR Array for 88 key genes associated to wound healing. RT-qPCR Array analysis of conjunctiva samples showed statistically significant differences in 29/88 genes in the early stages after surgery, 20/88 genes between 90 and 180 days after surgery, and only 2/88 genes one year after surgery. In the blood samples, the most important changes occurred in 12/88 genes in the first 15 days after surgery. Correspondence analyses (COA) revealed significant differences between the expression of 20/88 genes in patients with surgical success and failure one year after surgery. Different expression patterns of mediators of the bleb wound healing were identified. Examination of such patterns might be used in surgery prognosis. RT-qPCR Array provides a powerful tool for investigation of differential gene expression wound healing after glaucoma surgery. PMID:28358901

  8. A DICOM-RT Based ePR radiation therapy information system for decision-support of brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. J.; Law, M.; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, L.

    2006-03-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. Various treatment options are available to the patient from Radiation Therapy to Stereotactic Radiosurgery and utilize different RT modalities. The disparate and complex data generated by the RT modalities along with related data scattered throughout the RT department in RT Information/Management systems, Record & Verify systems, and Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) compromise an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. By combining our past experience in medical imaging informatics research, DICOM-RT expertise, and system integration, our research involves using a brain tumor case model to show proof-of-concept that a DICOM-Standard electronic patient record (ePR) system can be developed as a foundation to perform medical imaging informatics research in developing decision-support tools and knowledge

  9. A new method to synthesize competitor RNAs for accurate analyses by competitive RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, O

    1997-12-03

    A method to synthesize competitor RNAs as internal standards for competitive RT-PCR is improved by using the long accurate PCR (LA-PCR) technique. Competitor templates synthesized by the new method are almost the same in length, and possibly in secondary structure, as target mRNAs to be quantified except that they include the short deletion within the segments to be amplified. This allows the reverse transcription to be achieved with almost the same efficiency from both target mRNAs and competitor RNAs. Therefore, more accurate quantification can be accomplished by using such competitor RNAs.

  10. Monitoring of wild birds for Newcastle disease virus in Switzerland using real time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Camenisch, Glauco; Bandli, Risch; Hoop, Richard

    2008-07-01

    Wild birds are considered to be the natural reservoir of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV; avian paramyxovirus-1) causing New-castle disease, and are o