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Sample records for rt env shiv

  1. Production of Mucosally Transmissible SHIV Challenge Stocks from HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 01_AE env Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J.; Chang, Hui-Wen; Lee, Benjamin C.; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David; Boyd, Michael; Lavine, Christy L.; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Whitney, James B.; Seaman, Michael S.; Rolland, Morgane; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks are critical for preclinical testing of vaccines, antibodies, and other interventions aimed to prevent HIV-1. A major unmet need for the field has been the lack of a SHIV challenge stock expressing circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE) env sequences. We therefore sought to develop mucosally transmissible SHIV challenge stocks containing HIV-1 CRF01_AE env derived from acutely HIV-1 infected individuals from Thailand. SHIV-AE6, SHIV-AE6RM, and SHIV-AE16 contained env sequences that were >99% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging. These viruses exhibited CCR5 tropism and displayed a tier 2 neutralization phenotype. These challenge stocks efficiently infected rhesus monkeys by the intrarectal route, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic viremia in a subset of animals. SHIV-AE16 was titrated for use in single, high dose as well as repetitive, low dose intrarectal challenge studies. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and other interventions targeted at preventing HIV-1 CRF01_AE infection. PMID:26849216

  2. A Potent Combination Microbicide that Targets SHIV-RT, HSV-2 and HPV

    PubMed Central

    Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Mizenina, Olga; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Zhang, Shimin; Levendosky, Keith; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Pugach, Pavel; Villegas, Guillermo; Ford, Brian E.; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Paglini, Gabriela; Teleshova, Natalia; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalent infection with human herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2) or human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Microbicides that target HIV as well as these sexually transmitted infections (STIs) may more effectively limit HIV incidence. Previously, we showed that a microbicide gel (MZC) containing MIV-150, zinc acetate (ZA) and carrageenan (CG) protected macaques against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-RT) infection and that a ZC gel protected mice against HSV-2 infection. Here we evaluated a modified MZC gel (containing different buffers, co-solvents, and preservatives suitable for clinical testing) against both vaginal and rectal challenge of animals with SHIV-RT, HSV-2 or HPV. MZC was stable and safe in vitro (cell viability and monolayer integrity) and in vivo (histology). MZC protected macaques against vaginal (p<0.0001) SHIV-RT infection when applied up to 8 hours (h) prior to challenge. When used close to the time of challenge, MZC prevented rectal SHIV-RT infection of macaques similar to the CG control. MZC significantly reduced vaginal (p<0.0001) and anorectal (p = 0.0187) infection of mice when 106 pfu HSV-2 were applied immediately after vaginal challenge and also when 5×103 pfu were applied between 8 h before and 4 h after vaginal challenge (p<0.0248). Protection of mice against 8×106 HPV16 pseudovirus particles (HPV16 PsV) was significant for MZC applied up to 24 h before and 2 h after vaginal challenge (p<0.0001) and also if applied 2 h before or after anorectal challenge (p<0.0006). MZC provides a durable window of protection against vaginal infection with these three viruses and, against HSV-2 and HPV making it an excellent candidate microbicide for clinical use. PMID:24740100

  3. MIV-150-Containing Intravaginal Rings Protect Macaque Vaginal Explants against SHIV-RT Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Louise A.; Barnable, Patrick; Mawson, Paul; Seidor, Samantha; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Cooney, Michael L.; Roberts, Kevin D.; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that intravaginal rings (IVRs) containing 100 mg of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 significantly protect macaques against a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus that expresses the HIV-1 HxB2 reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) when present before and after vaginal challenge. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the pharmacodynamics (PD) of MIV-150 in vaginal fluids (VF) and in ectocervical and vaginal tissues following 100-mg MIV-150 IVR exposure and to (ii) gain more insight whether pharmacokinetics (PK) of MIV-150 can predict PD. MIV-150 in VF collected at 1 day and 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection in vaginal biopsy specimens from untreated animals (not carrying IVRs) in a dose-dependent manner. Previous PK studies demonstrated a significant increase of ectocervical and vaginal tissue MIV-150 concentrations 14 days versus 1 day post-IVR insertion, with the highest increase in vaginal tissue. Therefore, we tested PD of MIV-150 in tissues 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion. Ex vivo SHIV-RT infection of vaginal, but not ectocervical, tissues collected 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion was significantly inhibited compared to infection at the baseline (prior to MIV-150 IVR exposure). No changes in vaginal and ectocervical tissue infection were observed after placebo IVR exposure. Overall, these data underscore the use of the ex vivo macaque explant challenge models to evaluate tissue and VF PK/PD of candidate microbicides before in vivo animal efficacy studies. The data support further development of MIV-150-containing IVRs. PMID:24614384

  4. A Novel Microbicide/Contraceptive Intravaginal Ring Protects Macaque Genital Mucosa against SHIV-RT Infection Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Ugaonkar, Shweta; Zhang, Shimin; Kizima, Larisa; Mizenina, Olga; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Cooney, Michael L; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Women need multipurpose prevention products (MPTs) that protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and provide contraception. The Population Council has developed a prototype intravaginal ring (IVR) releasing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 (M), zinc acetate (ZA), carrageenan (CG) and levonorgestrel (LNG) (MZCL IVR) to protect against HIV, HSV-2, HPV and unintended pregnancy. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZCL IVR in genital mucosa. First, macaque vaginal tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT in the presence of (i) MIV-150 ± LNG or (ii) vaginal fluids (VF); available from studies completed earlier) collected at various time points post insertion of MZCL and MZC IVRs. Then, (iii) MZCL IVRs (vs. LNG IVRs) were inserted in non-Depo Provera-treated macaques for 24h and VF, genital biopsies, and blood were collected and tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT. Infection was monitored with one step SIV gag qRT-PCR or p27 ELISA. MIV-150 (LCMS/MS, RIA), LNG (RIA) and CG (ELISA) were measured in different compartments. Log-normal generalized mixed linear models were used for analysis. LNG did not affect the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MIV-150 in vitro. MIV-150 in VF from MZC/MZCL IVR-treated macaques inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal mucosa in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). MIV-150 in vaginal tissue from MZCL IVR-treated animals inhibited ex vivo infection relative to baseline (96%; p<0.0001) and post LNG IVR group (90%, p<0.001). No MIV-150 dose-dependent protection was observed, likely because of high MIV-150 concentrations in all vaginal tissue samples. In cervical tissue, MIV-150 inhibited infection vs. baseline (99%; p<0.05). No cervical tissue was available for MIV-150 measurement. Exposure to LNG IVR did not change tissue infection level. These observations support further development of MZCL IVR as a multipurpose prevention technology to improve women's sexual and reproductive health. PMID:27428377

  5. A Novel Microbicide/Contraceptive Intravaginal Ring Protects Macaque Genital Mucosa against SHIV-RT Infection Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ugaonkar, Shweta; Zhang, Shimin; Kizima, Larisa; Mizenina, Olga; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Cooney, Michael L.; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Teleshova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Women need multipurpose prevention products (MPTs) that protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and provide contraception. The Population Council has developed a prototype intravaginal ring (IVR) releasing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 (M), zinc acetate (ZA), carrageenan (CG) and levonorgestrel (LNG) (MZCL IVR) to protect against HIV, HSV-2, HPV and unintended pregnancy. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZCL IVR in genital mucosa. First, macaque vaginal tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT in the presence of (i) MIV-150 ± LNG or (ii) vaginal fluids (VF); available from studies completed earlier) collected at various time points post insertion of MZCL and MZC IVRs. Then, (iii) MZCL IVRs (vs. LNG IVRs) were inserted in non-Depo Provera-treated macaques for 24h and VF, genital biopsies, and blood were collected and tissues were challenged with SHIV-RT. Infection was monitored with one step SIV gag qRT-PCR or p27 ELISA. MIV-150 (LCMS/MS, RIA), LNG (RIA) and CG (ELISA) were measured in different compartments. Log-normal generalized mixed linear models were used for analysis. LNG did not affect the anti-SHIV-RT activity of MIV-150 in vitro. MIV-150 in VF from MZC/MZCL IVR-treated macaques inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal mucosa in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). MIV-150 in vaginal tissue from MZCL IVR-treated animals inhibited ex vivo infection relative to baseline (96%; p<0.0001) and post LNG IVR group (90%, p<0.001). No MIV-150 dose-dependent protection was observed, likely because of high MIV-150 concentrations in all vaginal tissue samples. In cervical tissue, MIV-150 inhibited infection vs. baseline (99%; p<0.05). No cervical tissue was available for MIV-150 measurement. Exposure to LNG IVR did not change tissue infection level. These observations support further development of MZCL IVR as a multipurpose prevention technology to improve women’s sexual and reproductive health. PMID

  6. Fatal immunopathogenesis by SIV/HIV-1 (SHIV) containing a variant form of the HIV-1SF33 env gene in juvenile and newborn rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Luciw, P A; Mandell, C P; Himathongkham, S; Li, J; Low, T A; Schmidt, K A; Shaw, K E; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1999-10-10

    SIV/HIV-1 (SHIV) chimeric clones, constructed by substituting portions of the pathogenic molecular clone SIVmac239 with counterpart portions from HIV-1 clones, provide a means to analyze functions of selected HIV-1 genes in vivo in nonhuman primates. Our studies focused on SHIVSF33, which contains the vpu, tat, rev, and env genes of the cytopathic, T-cell line tropic clone HIV-1sf33 (subtype-B); this clone has a premature stop codon in the vpu gene. In three juvenile macaques inoculated intravenously with SHIVSF33, low-level persistent infection was established; no disease was observed for a period of >2 years. However, at approximately 16 months p.i., one of four SHIVSF33-infected juvenile macaques exhibited an increase in virus load, depletion of CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes, and other symptoms of simian AIDS (SAIDS). Virus recovered from this animal in the symptomatic stage was designated SHIVSF33a (A, adapted); this virus displayed multiple amino acid sequence changes throughout the HIV-1 env gene compared with the input SHIVSF33 clone. Additionally, a mutation in all clones from SHIVSF33a restored the open reading frame for the vpu gene. In vitro evaluations in tissue-culture systems revealed that SHIVSF33a replicated to higher levels and exhibited greater cytopathicity than SHIVSF33. Furthermore cloned env genes for SHIVSF33a were more fusogenic in a cell-fusion assay compared with the env gene of the SHIVSF33. Intravenous inoculation of SHIVsf33a into juvenile and newborn macaques resulted in a rapid decline in CD4(+) T cells to very low levels and development of a fatal AIDS-like disease. A cell-free preparation of this pathogenic chimeric virus also established persistent infection when applied to oral mucosal membranes of juvenile macaques and produced a fatal AIDS-like disease. These studies on pathogenic SHIVSF33a establish the basis for further investigations on the role of the HIV-1 env gene in virus adaptation and in mechanism

  7. Robust suppression of env-SHIV viremia in M. nemestrina by 3-drug ART is independent of timing of initiation during chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W; Younan, Patrick; Polacino, Patricia S; Maurice, Nicholas J; Miller, Hannah W; Prlic, Martin; Jerome, Keith R; Woolfrey, Ann E; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are an important model organism for studies of HIV pathogenesis and pre-clinical evaluation of anti-HIV therapies. The successful translation of NHP-derived data to clinically relevant anti-HIV studies will require better understanding of the viral strains and NHP species used, and their responses to existing antiretroviral therapies (ART). Methods Five pigtailed macaques (M. nemestrina) were productively infected with the SIV/HIV chimeric virus SHIV-1157ipd3N4 following intravenous challenge. After 8 or 27 weeks, ART (PMPA, FTC, Raltegravir) was initiated. Viral load, T-Cell counts, and production of SHIV-specific antibodies were monitored throughout the course of infection and ART. Results ART led to a rapid and sustained decrease in plasma viral load. Suppression of plasma viremia by ART was independent of the timing of initiation during chronic infection. Conclusions We present a new NHP model of HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy, which should prove applicable to multiple clinically relevant anti-HIV approaches. PMID:24025078

  8. Partial protection against multiple RT-SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge of rhesus macaques by a silicone elastomer vaginal ring releasing the NNRTI MC1220

    PubMed Central

    Fetherston, Susan M.; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Goldman, Laurie; Murphy, Diarmaid J.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Blois, Sylvain; La Colla, Paolo; Moore, John P.; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor MC1220 has potent in vitro activity against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). A liposome gel formulation of MC1220 has previously been reported to partially protect rhesus macaques against vaginal challenge with a simian HIV (SHIV). Here, we describe the pre-clinical development of an MC1220-releasing silicone elastomer vaginal ring (SEVR), including pharmacokinetic (PK) and efficacy studies in macaques. Methods In vitro release studies were conducted on SEVRs loaded with 400 mg of MC1220, using simulated vaginal fluid (SVF, n = 4) and 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (IPA/H2O, n = 4) as release media. For PK evaluation, SEVRs were inserted into adult female macaques (n = 6) for 30 days. Following a 1week washout period, fresh rings were placed in the same animals, which were then challenged vaginally with RT-SHIV162P3 once weekly for 4 weeks. Results SEVRs released 1.66 and 101 mg of MC1220 into SVF and IPA/H2O, respectively, over 30 days, the differential reflecting the low aqueous solubility of the drug. In macaque PK studies, MC1220 was consistently detected in vaginal fluid (peak 845 ng/mL) and plasma (peak 0.91 ng/mL). Kaplan–Meier analysis over 9weeks showed significantly lower infection rates for animals given MC1220-containing SEVRs than placebo rings (hazard ratio 0.20, P = 0.0037). Conclusions An MC1220-releasing SEVR partially protected macaques from vaginal challenge. Such ring devices are a practical method for providing sustained, coitally independent protection against vaginal exposure to HIV-1. PMID:23109186

  9. Persistence of Viral Reservoirs in Multiple Tissues after Antiretroviral Therapy Suppression in a Macaque RT-SHIV Model

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tamera; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; Mellors, John W.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2013-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can suppress HIV-1 replication sufficiently to eliminate measurable plasma viremia, infected cells remain and ensure viral recrudescence after discontinuation of ART. We used a macaque model of HIV-1/AIDS to evaluate the location of infected cells during ART. Twelve macaques were infected with RT-SHIVmne, a SIV containing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, conferring sensitivity to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Ten to fourteen weeks post-infection, 6 animals were treated with 3 or 4 antiretroviral drugs for 17-20 weeks; 6 control animals remained untreated. Viral DNA (vDNA) and RNA (vRNA) were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and at necropsy in multiple tissues by quantitative PCR and RT-PCR. The majority of virally infected cells were located in lymphoid tissues with variable levels in the gastrointestinal tract of both treated and untreated animals. Tissue viral DNA levels correlated with week 1 plasma viremia, suggesting that tissues that harbor proviral DNA are established within the first week of infection. PBMC vDNA levels did not correlate with plasma viremia or tissue levels of vDNA. vRNA levels were high in lymphoid and gastrointestinal tissues of the untreated animals; animals on ART had little vRNA expressed in tissues and virus could not be cultured from lymph node resting CD4+ cells after 17-20 weeks on ART, indicating little or no ongoing viral replication. Strategies for eradication of HIV-1 will need to target residual virus in ART suppressed individuals, which may not be accurately reflected by frequencies of infected cells in blood. PMID:24367650

  10. Generation of a neutralization-resistant CCR5 tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) molecular clone, a derivative of SHIV-89.6.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuki; Yoneda, Mai; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yuji; Kato, Fumihiro; Matsuura, Kanako; Kikukawa, Minako; Matsushita, Shuzo; Hishiki, Takayuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported that a new genetically diverse CCR5 (R5) tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) adapted to rhesus monkeys became more neutralization resistant to SHIV-infected plasma than did the parental SHIV-KS661 clone. Here, to clarify the significance of the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV in a macaque model, we initially investigated the precise neutralization phenotype of the SHIVs, including SHIV-MK38 molecular clones, using SHIV-MK38-infected plasma, a pooled plasma of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, soluble CD4 and anti-HIV-1 neutralizing mAbs, the epitopes of which were known. The results show that SHIV-KS661 had tier 1 neutralization sensitivity, but monkey-adapted R5 tropic SHIV-MK38 acquired neutralization resistance similar to that of tier 2 or 3 as a clone virus. Sequence analysis of the env gene suggested that the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV-MK38 was acquired by conformational changes in Env associated with the net charge and potential N-linked glycosylation sites. To examine the relationship between neutralization phenotype and stably persistent infection in monkeys, we performed in vivo rectal inoculation experiments using a SHIV-MK38 molecular clone. The results showed that one of three rhesus monkeys exhibited durable infection with a plasma viral load of 105 copies ml- 1 despite the high antibody responses that occurred in the host. Whilst further improvements are required in the development of a challenge virus, it will be useful to generate a neutralization-resistant R5 tropic molecular clone of the SHIV-89.6 lineage commonly used for vaccine development - a result that can be used to explore the foundation of AIDS pathogenesis.

  11. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  12. Development of sensitive single-round pol or env RT-PCR assays to screen for XMRV in multiple sample types

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Frank, Andrea; Leckie, Gregor; Hackett, John; Simmons, Graham; Busch, Michael; Abravaya, Klara

    2013-01-01

    The potential association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been much debated. To help resolve the potential role of XMRV in human disease, it is critical to develop sensitive and accurate reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR assays to screen for the virus. Single-round RT-PCR assays were developed on the automated m2000™ system for detection of the pol or env regions of XMRV in whole blood, plasma, urine cell pellets and urogenital swab samples. Assay performance was assessed by testing two blinded panels, one comprised of whole blood and the other of plasma spiked with serial dilutions of XMRV-infected tissue culture cells and supernatant, respectively, prepared by the Blood XMRV Scientific Research Working Group (SRWG). For both whole blood and plasma panel testing, the assays showed excellent specificity and sensitivity as compared to the other tests included in the SRWG phase I study. Analytical specificity of the assays was also evaluated. Neither pol nor env PCR assays detected a panel of potential cross-reactive microorganisms, although some cross-reaction was observed with mouse genomic DNA. Screening of 196 normal human blood donor plasma, 214 HIV-1 seropositive plasma, 20 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer specimens, 4 FFPE benign prostate specimens, 400 urine pellets from prostate cancer patients, 166 urine pellets from non-prostate cancer patients, and 135 cervical swab specimens, detected no samples as unequivocally XMRV positive. PMID:22057262

  13. Residual Viremia in an RT-SHIV Rhesus Macaque HAART Model Marked by the Presence of a Predominant Plasma Clone and a Lack of Viral Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Robert C.; Villalobos, Andradi; Bowen, Joanne H.; Adamson, Lourdes; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) significantly reduces HIV-1 replication and prevents progression to AIDS. However, residual low-level viremia (LLV) persists and long-lived viral reservoirs are maintained in anatomical sites. These reservoirs permit a recrudescence of viremia upon cessation of therapy and thus HAART must be maintained indefinitely. HIV-1 reservoirs include latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells and macrophages which may contribute to residual viremia. It has not been conclusively determined if a component of LLV may also be due to residual replication in cells with sub-therapeutic drug levels and/or long-lived chronically infected cells. In this study, RT-SHIVmac239 diversity was characterized in five rhesus macaques that received a five-drug HAART regimen [tenofovir, emtricitabine, zidovudine, amdoxovir, (A, C, T, G nucleoside analogs) and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor efavirenz]. Before maximal viral load suppression, longitudinal plasma viral RNA RT diversity was analyzed using a 454 sequencer. After suppression, LLV RT diversity (amino acids 65-210) was also assessed. LLV samples had viral levels less than our standard detection limit (50 viral RNA copies/mL) and few transient blips <200 RNA copies/mL. HAART was discontinued in three macaques after 42 weeks of therapy resulting in viral rebound. The level of viral divergence and the prevalence of specific alleles in LLV was similar to pre-suppression viremia. While some LLV sequences contained mutations not observed in the pre-suppression profile, LLV was not characterized by temporal viral evolution or apparent selection of drug resistance mutations. Similarly, resistance mutations were not detected in the viral rebound population. Interestingly, one macaque maintained a putative LLV predominant plasma clone sequence. Together, these results suggest that residual replication did not markedly contribute to LLV and that this model mimics the

  14. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  15. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  16. Protective efficacy of a global HIV-1 mosaic vaccine against heterologous SHIV challenges in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Seaman, Michael S; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E; Szinger, James J; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Korber, Bette T; Michael, Nelson L

    2013-10-24

    The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of such global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of infection following heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibodies, suggesting that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy for the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. PAPERCLIP:

  17. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Env V3 Elicits Neutralizing Antibody-Mediated Protection against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus with a Homologous but Not a Heterologous V3 Motif

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Kenji; Cecilia, Dayaraj; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Burda, Sherri; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Kaizu, Masahiko; Ando, Shuji; Okuda, Kenji; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Yamazaki, Shudo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Although the correlates of vaccine-induced protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not fully known, it is presumed that neutralizing antibodies (NAb) play a role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we examined immune responses elicited in rhesus macaques following vaccination with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing an HIV-1 Env V3 antigen (rBCG Env V3). We also determined the effect of vaccination on protection against challenge with either a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MN) or a highly pathogenic SHIV strain (SHIV-89.6PD). Immunization with rBCG Env V3 elicited significant levels of NAb for the 24 weeks tested that were predominantly HIV-1 type specific. Sera from the immunized macaques neutralized primary HIV-1 isolates in vitro, including HIV-1BZ167/X4, HIV-1SF2/X4, HIV-1CI2/X4, and, to a lesser extent, HIV-1MNp/X4, all of which contain a V3 sequence homologous to that of rBCG Env V3. In contrast, neutralization was not observed against HIV-1SF33/X4, which has a heterologous V3 sequence, nor was it found against primary HIV-1 R5 isolates from either clade A or B. Furthermore, the viral load in the vaccinated macaques was significantly reduced following low-dose challenge with SHIV-MN, and early plasma viremia was markedly decreased after high-dose SHIV-MN challenge. In contrast, replication of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD was not affected by vaccination in any of the macaques. Thus, we have shown that immunization with an rBCG Env V3 vaccine elicits a strong, type-specific V3 NAb response in rhesus macaques. While this response was not sufficient to provide protection against a pathogenic SHIV challenge, it was able to significantly reduce the viral load in macaques following challenge with a nonpathogenic SHIV. These observations suggest that rBCG vectors have the potential to deliver an appropriate virus immunogen for desirable immune elicitations. PMID:15650171

  18. An env gene derived from a primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate confers high in vivo replicative capacity to a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, K A; Li, J T; Voss, G; Lekutis, C; Tenner-Racz, K; Racz, P; Lin, W; Montefiori, D C; Lee-Parritz, D E; Lu, Y; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Letvin, N L

    1996-01-01

    To explore the roles played by specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes in determining the in vivo replicative capacity of AIDS viruses, we have examined the replication kinetics and virus-specific immune responses in rhesus monkeys following infection with two chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs). These viruses were composed of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 expressing HIV-1 env and the associated auxiliary HIV-1 genes tat, vpu, and rep. Virus replication was assessed during primary infection of rhesus monkeys by measuring plasma SIVmac p27 levels and by quantifying virus replication in lymph nodes using in situ hybridization. SHIV-HXBc2, which expresses the HIV-1 env of a T-cell-tropic, laboratory-adapted strain of HIV-1 (HXBc2), replicated well in rhesus monkey peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in vitro but replicated only to low levels when inoculated in rhesus monkeys. In contrast, SHIV-89.6 was constructed with the HIV-1 env gene of a T-cell- and macrophage-tropic clone of a patient isolate of HIV-1 (89.6). This virus replicated to a lower level in monkey PBL in vitro but replicated to a higher degree in monkeys during primary infection. Moreover, monkeys infected with SHIV-89.6 developed an inversion in the PBL CD4/CD8 ratio coincident with the clearance of primary viremia. The differences in the in vivo consequences of infection by these two SHIVs could not be explained by differences in the immune responses elicited by these viruses, since infected animals had comparable type-specific neutralizing antibody titers, proliferative responses to recombinant HIV-1 gp120, and virus-specific cytolytic effector T-cell responses. With the demonstration that a chimeric SHIV can replicate to high levels during primary infection in rhesus monkeys, this model can now be used to define genetic determinants of HIV-1 pathogenicity. PMID:8627800

  19. Anti-HIV IgA Isotypes: Differential Virion Capture and Inhibition of Transcytosis are Linked to Prevention of Mucosal R5 SHIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Jennifer D.; Sholukh, Anton M.; Mukhtar, Muhammad M.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Lakhashe, Samir K.; Kim, Mikyung; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Gupta, Sandeep; Forthal, Donald N.; Sattentau, Quentin; Villinger, Francois; Corti, Davide; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although passive immunization with anti-HIV-1 Env IgG1 neutralizing monoclonal Abs (nmAbs) prevented simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in rhesus monkeys (RMs), IgA nmAbs have not been tested. Here, we sought to determine whether human anti-HIV-1 dimeric (d)IgA1, dIgA2, and IgG1 differ in their ability to prevent mucosal R5 SHIV acquisition in RMs. Design DIgA1, dIgA2, and IgG1 versions of nmAb HGN194 were applied intrarectally (i.r.) in three RM groups 30 min before i.r. SHIV challenge. Methods After a control pharmacokinetic study showed that nmAb concentrations in rectal fluids over time were similar for all HGN194 isotypes, control and nmAb-treated animals were challenged i.r. with an R5 SHIV, and viral loads were monitored. Results Unexpectedly, dIgA1 provided the best protection in vivo – although all nmAbs showed similar neutralizing activity in vitro. Five out of the six dIgA1-treated RMs remained virus-free compared to only one out of six animals given dIgA2 (P=0.045 by log rank test) and two out of six RMs treated with IgG1 forms of the nmAb (P=0.12). Protection correlated significantly with virion capture activity by a given nmAb form, as well as inhibition of transcytosis of cell-free virus across an epithelial cell layer in vitro. Conclusions Our data imply that dIgA1-mediated capturing of virions in mucosal secretions and inhibition of transcytosis can provide significant prevention of lentiviral acquisition – over and above direct virus neutralization. Vaccine strategies that induce mucosal IgA, especially IgA1, should be developed as first-line of defense against HIV-1, a virus predominantly transmitted mucosally. PMID:23775002

  20. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  1. Incorporation of chimeric HIV-SIV-Env and modified HIV-Env proteins into HIV pseudovirions

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Gerard; Emerson, Vanessa; Holtkotte, Denise; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Pisch, Thorsten; Bosch, Valerie . E-mail: v.bosch@dkfz.de

    2007-05-10

    Low level incorporation of the viral glycoprotein (Env) into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles is a major drawback for vaccine strategies against HIV/AIDS in which HIV particles are used as immunogen. Within this study, we have examined two strategies aimed at achieving higher levels of Env incorporation into non-infectious pseudovirions (PVs). First, we have generated chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins containing the truncated C-terminal tail region of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239-Env767{sup stop}, which mediates strongly increased incorporation of SIV-Env into SIV particles. In a second strategy, we have employed a truncated HIV-Env protein (Env-Tr752{sup N750K}) which we have previously demonstrated to be incorporated into HIV virions, generated in infected T-cells, to a higher level than that of Wt-HIV-Env. Although the chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced increased levels of cell-cell fusion in comparison to Wt-HIV-Env, they did not exhibit increased incorporation into either HIV-PVs or SIV-PVs. Only Env-Tr752{sup N750K} exhibited significantly higher (threefold) levels of incorporation into HIV-PVs, an improvement, which, although not dramatic, is worthwhile for the large-scale preparation of non-infectious PVs for vaccine studies aimed at inducing Env humoral responses.

  2. Prevention of SHIV transmission by topical IFN-β treatment

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Pilch Cooper, Heather A.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit; Carias, Ann M.; Sips, Magdalena; Wang, Xiaolei; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sieg, Scott F.; Reich, Adrian; Wilkinson, Peter; Cameron, Mark J.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding vaginal and rectal HIV transmission and protective cellular and molecular mechanisms is critical for designing new prevention strategies, including those required for an effective vaccine. The determinants of protection against HIV infection are, however, poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggest that innate immune defenses may help protect mucosal surfaces from HIV transmission in highly exposed, uninfected subjects 1. More recent studies suggest that systemically administered type 1 interferon protects against simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques 2. Here we hypothesized that topically applied type 1 interferons might stimulate vaginal innate responses that could protect against HIV transmission. We therefore applied a recombinant human type 1 interferon (IFN-β) to the vagina of rhesus macaques and vaginally challenged them with pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). Vaginal administration of IFN-β resulted in marked local changes in immune cell phenotype, increasing immune activation and HIV coreceptor expression, yet provided significant protection from SHIV acquisition as interferon response genes (IRGs) were also upregulated. These data suggest that protection from vaginal HIV acquisition may be achieved by activating innate mucosal defenses. PMID:26838048

  3. Primate immune responses to HIV-1 Env formulated in the saponin-based adjuvant AbISCO-100 in the presence or absence of TLR9 co-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Paola; Sundling, Christopher; O'Dell, Sijy; Mascola, John R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based vaccines require adjuvants to achieve optimal responses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 agonists were previously shown to improve responses to protein-based vaccines, such as the Hepatitis B virus vaccine formulated in alum. Here, we used CpG-C together with the clinically relevant saponin-based adjuvant AbISCO-100/Matrix-M (AbISCO), to assess if TLR9 co-stimulation would quantitatively or qualitatively modulate HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-specific B and T cell responses in rhesus macaques. The macaques were inoculated with soluble Env trimers in AbISCO, with or without the addition of CpG-C, using an interval similar to the Hepatitis B virus vaccine. Following a comprehensive evaluation of antigen-specific responses in multiple immune compartments, we show that the Env-specific circulating IgG, memory B cells and plasma cells displayed similar kinetics and magnitude in the presence or absence of CpG-C and that there was no apparent difference between the two groups in the elicited HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers or antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Importantly, the control of SHIV viremia was significantly improved in animals from both Env-immunized groups relative to adjuvant alone controls, demonstrating the potential of AbISCO to act as a stand-alone adjuvant for Env-based vaccines. PMID:25762407

  4. Adapting SHIVs In Vivo Selects for Envelope-Mediated Interferon-α Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, David F.; Sharma, Amit; Humes, Daryl; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are able to establish persistent infection in their respective hosts despite a potent type-I interferon (IFN-I) response following transmission. A number of IFN-I-induced host factors that are able to inhibit lentiviral replication in vitro have been identified, and these studies suggest a role for IFN-induced factors as barriers to cross-species transmission. However, the ability of these factors to inhibit viral replication in vivo has not been well characterized, nor have the viral determinants that contribute to evasion or antagonism of the host IFN-I response. In this study, we hypothesized that the host IFN-I response serves as a strong selective pressure in the context of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infection of macaques and sought to identify the viral determinants that contribute to IFN-I resistance. We assessed the ability of SHIVs encoding HIV-1 sequences adapted by serial passage in macaques versus SHIVs encoding HIV sequences isolated directly from infected individuals to replicate in the presence of IFNα in macaque lymphocytes. We demonstrate that passage in macaques selects for IFNα resistant viruses that have higher replication kinetics and increased envelope content. SHIVs that encode HIV-1 sequences derived directly from infected humans were sensitive to IFNα –induced inhibition whereas SHIVs obtained after passage in macaques were not. This evolutionary process was directly observed in viruses that were serially passaged during the first few months of infection–a time when the IFNα response is high. Differences in IFNα sensitivity mapped to HIV-1 envelope and were associated with increased envelope levels despite similar mRNA expression, suggesting a post-transcriptional mechanism. These studies highlight critical differences in IFNα sensitivity between HIV-1 sequences in infected people and those used in SHIV models. PMID:27399306

  5. Adapting SHIVs In Vivo Selects for Envelope-Mediated Interferon-α Resistance.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David F; Sharma, Amit; Humes, Daryl; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-07-01

    Lentiviruses are able to establish persistent infection in their respective hosts despite a potent type-I interferon (IFN-I) response following transmission. A number of IFN-I-induced host factors that are able to inhibit lentiviral replication in vitro have been identified, and these studies suggest a role for IFN-induced factors as barriers to cross-species transmission. However, the ability of these factors to inhibit viral replication in vivo has not been well characterized, nor have the viral determinants that contribute to evasion or antagonism of the host IFN-I response. In this study, we hypothesized that the host IFN-I response serves as a strong selective pressure in the context of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infection of macaques and sought to identify the viral determinants that contribute to IFN-I resistance. We assessed the ability of SHIVs encoding HIV-1 sequences adapted by serial passage in macaques versus SHIVs encoding HIV sequences isolated directly from infected individuals to replicate in the presence of IFNα in macaque lymphocytes. We demonstrate that passage in macaques selects for IFNα resistant viruses that have higher replication kinetics and increased envelope content. SHIVs that encode HIV-1 sequences derived directly from infected humans were sensitive to IFNα -induced inhibition whereas SHIVs obtained after passage in macaques were not. This evolutionary process was directly observed in viruses that were serially passaged during the first few months of infection-a time when the IFNα response is high. Differences in IFNα sensitivity mapped to HIV-1 envelope and were associated with increased envelope levels despite similar mRNA expression, suggesting a post-transcriptional mechanism. These studies highlight critical differences in IFNα sensitivity between HIV-1 sequences in infected people and those used in SHIV models. PMID:27399306

  6. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  7. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women. PMID:25589631

  8. A combined oral contraceptive affects mucosal SHIV susceptibility factors in a pigtail macaque model

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Butler, Katherine; Ritter, Jana M.; Johnson, Ryan; Sanders, Jeanine; Powell, Nathaniel; Lathrop, George; Zaki, Sherif R.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Injectable hormonal contraception may increase women’s risk of HIV acquisition, and can affect biological risk factors in animal models of HIV. We established, for the first time, a model to investigate whether combined oral contraceptives (COC) alter SHIV susceptibility in macaques. Methods Seven pigtail macaques were administered a monophasic levonorgestrel (LNG)/ethinyl estradiol (EE) COC at 33% or 66% of the human dose for 60 days. Menstrual cycling, vaginal epithelial thickness and other SHIV susceptibility factors were monitored for a mean of 18 weeks. Results Mean vaginal epithelial thicknesses was 290.8 μm at baseline and 186.2 μm during COC (p=0.0141, Mann Whitney test). Vaginal pH decreased from 8.5 during to 6.5 post- treatment (0.0176 two-tailed t-test). Measured microflora was unchanged. Conclusions COC caused thinning of the vaginal epithelium and vaginal pH changes, which may increase SHIV susceptibility. 0.033 mg LNG + 0.0066 mg EE appeared effective in suppressing ovulation. PMID:25536296

  9. Viral outcome of simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-89.6P adapted to cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Borsetti, A; Baroncelli, S; Maggiorella, M T; Bellino, S; Moretti, S; Sernicola, L; Belli, R; Ridolfi, B; Farcomeni, S; Negri, D R M; Cafaro, A; Ensoli, B; Titti, F

    2008-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6P is considered to be one of the most pathogenic chimeric viruses in rhesus macaques. However, when crossing from one to another species of monkeys the pathogenicity of this virus may be affected. By using SHIV-89.6P(cy243), a virus obtained by passaging SHIV-89.6P in cynomolgus macaques, we investigated the dynamics of viral replication and the impact of the inoculum size (from 10 up to 50 monkey infectious dose) on the progression of the infection in 22 cynomolgus macaques. SHIV-89.6P(cy243 )caused massive depletion of CD4+ T-cells within 4 weeks of the inoculum, followed by an irreversible immune deficiency in a high proportion of the infected monkeys. This study demonstrates that SHIV-89.6P(cy243) is pathogenic in cynomolgus macaques and that the dynamics of the viral replication and the rate of clinical progression depend on the size of the inoculum. Our findings provide unique and relevant data, particularly with regard to the value of the in vivo titration used to select the most appropriate infectious dose to study the "virus-host" interplay.

  10. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi-Mao; Schutte, Robert J.; Pemble IV, Charles W.; Dennison, S. Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Montefiori, David C.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T.; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Moody, M. A.; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses. PMID:26237403

  11. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi -Mao; Schutte, Robert J.; Pemble IV, Charles W.; Dennison, S. Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Montefiori, David C.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T.; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J.; Letvin, Norman L.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Moody, M. A.; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  12. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; et al

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant regionmore » of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.« less

  13. Lentivirus-mediated Gene Transfer in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Impaired in SHIV-infected, ART-treated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Younan, Patrick M; Peterson, Christopher W; Polacino, Patricia; Kowalski, John P; Obenza, Willimark; Miller, Hannah W; Milless, Brian P; Gafken, Phil; DeRosa, Stephen C; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can reduce HIV viremia. We have developed an HIV/AIDS-patient model in Simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected pigtailed macaques that are stably suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART: raltegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir). Following SHIV infection and ART, animals undergo autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT) with lentivirally transduced cluster of differentiation (CD)34+ cells expressing the mC46 anti-HIV fusion protein. We show that SHIV+, ART-treated animals had very low gene marking levels after HSCT. Pretransduction CD34+ cells contained detectable levels of all three ART drugs, likely contributing to the low gene transfer efficiency. Following HSCT recovery and the cessation of ART, plasma viremia rebounded, indicating that myeloablative total body irradiation cannot completely eliminate viral reservoirs after autologous HSCT. The kinetics of recovery following autologous HSCT in SHIV+, ART-treated macaques paralleled those observed following transplantation of control animals. However, T-cell subset analyses demonstrated a high percentage of C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-expressing CD4+ T-cells after HSCT. These data suggest that an extended ART interruption time may be required for more efficient lentiviral transduction. To avoid complications associated with ART interruption in the context of high percentages of CD4+CCR5+T-cells after HSCT, the use of vector systems not impaired by the presence of residual ART may also be beneficial. PMID:25648264

  14. Lentivirus-mediated Gene Transfer in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Impaired in SHIV-infected, ART-treated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Younan, Patrick M; Peterson, Christopher W; Polacino, Patricia; Kowalski, John P; Obenza, Willimark; Miller, Hannah W; Milless, Brian P; Gafken, Phil; DeRosa, Stephen C; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can reduce HIV viremia. We have developed an HIV/AIDS-patient model in Simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected pigtailed macaques that are stably suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART: raltegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir). Following SHIV infection and ART, animals undergo autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT) with lentivirally transduced cluster of differentiation (CD)34(+) cells expressing the mC46 anti-HIV fusion protein. We show that SHIV(+), ART-treated animals had very low gene marking levels after HSCT. Pretransduction CD34(+) cells contained detectable levels of all three ART drugs, likely contributing to the low gene transfer efficiency. Following HSCT recovery and the cessation of ART, plasma viremia rebounded, indicating that myeloablative total body irradiation cannot completely eliminate viral reservoirs after autologous HSCT. The kinetics of recovery following autologous HSCT in SHIV(+), ART-treated macaques paralleled those observed following transplantation of control animals. However, T-cell subset analyses demonstrated a high percentage of C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-expressing CD4(+) T-cells after HSCT. These data suggest that an extended ART interruption time may be required for more efficient lentiviral transduction. To avoid complications associated with ART interruption in the context of high percentages of CD4(+)CCR5(+)T-cells after HSCT, the use of vector systems not impaired by the presence of residual ART may also be beneficial.

  15. Lentivirus-mediated Gene Transfer in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Impaired in SHIV-infected, ART-treated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Younan, Patrick M; Peterson, Christopher W; Polacino, Patricia; Kowalski, John P; Obenza, Willimark; Miller, Hannah W; Milless, Brian P; Gafken, Phil; DeRosa, Stephen C; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can reduce HIV viremia. We have developed an HIV/AIDS-patient model in Simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected pigtailed macaques that are stably suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART: raltegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir). Following SHIV infection and ART, animals undergo autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT) with lentivirally transduced cluster of differentiation (CD)34(+) cells expressing the mC46 anti-HIV fusion protein. We show that SHIV(+), ART-treated animals had very low gene marking levels after HSCT. Pretransduction CD34(+) cells contained detectable levels of all three ART drugs, likely contributing to the low gene transfer efficiency. Following HSCT recovery and the cessation of ART, plasma viremia rebounded, indicating that myeloablative total body irradiation cannot completely eliminate viral reservoirs after autologous HSCT. The kinetics of recovery following autologous HSCT in SHIV(+), ART-treated macaques paralleled those observed following transplantation of control animals. However, T-cell subset analyses demonstrated a high percentage of C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-expressing CD4(+) T-cells after HSCT. These data suggest that an extended ART interruption time may be required for more efficient lentiviral transduction. To avoid complications associated with ART interruption in the context of high percentages of CD4(+)CCR5(+)T-cells after HSCT, the use of vector systems not impaired by the presence of residual ART may also be beneficial. PMID:25648264

  16. SHIV-162P3 infection of rhesus macaques given maraviroc gel vaginally does not involve resistant viruses.

    PubMed

    Tsibris, Athe M N; Pal, Urboshi; Schure, Allison L; Veazey, Ronald S; Kunstman, Kevin J; Henrich, Timothy J; Klasse, P J; Wolinsky, Steven M; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Moore, John P

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) gels are effective at protecting rhesus macaques from vaginal SHIV transmission, but breakthrough infections can occur. To determine the effects of a vaginal MVC gel on infecting SHIV populations in a macaque model, we analyzed plasma samples from three rhesus macaques that received a MVC vaginal gel (day 0) but became infected after high-dose SHIV-162P3 vaginal challenge. Two infected macaques that received a placebo gel served as controls. The infecting SHIV-162P3 stock had an overall mean genetic distance of 0.294±0.027%; limited entropy changes were noted across the envelope (gp160). No envelope mutations were observed consistently in viruses isolated from infected macaques at days 14-21, the time of first detectable viremia, nor selected at later time points, days 42-70. No statistically significant differences in MVC susceptibilities were observed between the SHIV inoculum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] 1.87 nM) and virus isolated from the three MVC-treated macaques (MVC IC(50) 1.18 nM, 1.69 nM, and 1.53 nM, respectively). Highlighter plot analyses suggested that infection was established in each MVC-treated animal by one founder virus genotype. The expected Poisson distribution of pairwise Hamming Distance frequency counts was observed and a phylogenetic analysis did not identify infections with distinct lineages from the challenge stock. These data suggest that breakthrough infections most likely result from incomplete viral inhibition and not the selection of MVC-resistant variants.

  17. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  18. Tail-interacting protein TIP47 is a connector between Gag and Env and is required for Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Vergès, Sandra; Camus, Grégory; Blot, Guillaume; Beauvoir, Roxane; Benarous, Richard; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse

    2006-01-01

    The presence of the envelope glycoprotein Env in HIV-1 virions is essential for infectivity. To date, the molecular mechanism by which Env is packaged into virions has been largely unknown. Here, we show that TIP47 (tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa), which has been shown to interact with Env, also binds the MA (matrix) domain of HIV-1 Gag protein and that these three proteins form a ternary complex. Mutations in Gag that abrogate interaction with TIP47 inhibit Env incorporation and virion infectivity as well as colocalization between Gag and Env. We also show that TIP47 silencing impairs Env incorporation and infectivity and abolishes coimmunoprecipitation of Gag with Env. In contrast, overexpression of TIP47 increases Env packaging. Last, we demonstrate that TIP47 can interact simultaneously with Env and Gag. Taken together, our results show that TIP47 is a cellular cofactor that plays an essential role in Env incorporation, allowing the encounter and the physical association between HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins during the viral assembly process. PMID:17003132

  19. Tail-interacting protein TIP47 is a connector between Gag and Env and is required for Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vergès, Sandra; Camus, Grégory; Blot, Guillaume; Beauvoir, Roxane; Benarous, Richard; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse

    2006-10-01

    The presence of the envelope glycoprotein Env in HIV-1 virions is essential for infectivity. To date, the molecular mechanism by which Env is packaged into virions has been largely unknown. Here, we show that TIP47 (tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa), which has been shown to interact with Env, also binds the MA (matrix) domain of HIV-1 Gag protein and that these three proteins form a ternary complex. Mutations in Gag that abrogate interaction with TIP47 inhibit Env incorporation and virion infectivity as well as colocalization between Gag and Env. We also show that TIP47 silencing impairs Env incorporation and infectivity and abolishes coimmunoprecipitation of Gag with Env. In contrast, overexpression of TIP47 increases Env packaging. Last, we demonstrate that TIP47 can interact simultaneously with Env and Gag. Taken together, our results show that TIP47 is a cellular cofactor that plays an essential role in Env incorporation, allowing the encounter and the physical association between HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins during the viral assembly process.

  20. Biodegradation of Ether Pollutants by Pseudonocardia sp. Strain ENV478

    PubMed Central

    Vainberg, Simon; McClay, Kevin; Masuda, Hisako; Root, Duane; Condee, Charles; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium designated Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 was isolated by enrichment culturing on tetrahydrofuran (THF) and was screened to determine its ability to degrade a range of ether pollutants. After growth on THF, strain ENV478 degraded THF (63 mg/h/g total suspended solids [TSS]), 1,4-dioxane (21 mg/h/g TSS), 1,3-dioxolane (19 mg/h/g TSS), bis-2-chloroethylether (BCEE) (12 mg/h/g TSS), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (9.1 mg/h/g TSS). Although the highest rates of 1,4-dioxane degradation occurred after growth on THF, strain ENV478 also degraded 1,4-dioxane after growth on sucrose, lactate, yeast extract, 2-propanol, and propane, indicating that there was some level of constitutive degradative activity. The BCEE degradation rates were about threefold higher after growth on propane (32 mg/h/g TSS) than after growth on THF, and MTBE degradation resulted in accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol. Degradation of 1,4-dioxane resulted in accumulation of 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2HEAA). Despite its inability to grow on 1,4-dioxane, strain ENV478 degraded this compound for >80 days in aquifer microcosms. Our results suggest that the inability of strain ENV478 and possibly other THF-degrading bacteria to grow on 1,4-dioxane is related to their inability to efficiently metabolize the 1,4-dioxane degradation product 2HEAA but that strain ENV478 may nonetheless be useful as a biocatalyst for remediating 1,4-dioxane-contaminated aquifers. PMID:16885268

  1. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  2. The Recombinant Maize Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Transiently Reduces Viral Load in SHIV89.6 Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Au, Ka-Yee; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Gao, Liang-Min; Zhang, Xuan; Luo, Rong-Hua; Law, Sue Ka-Yee; Mak, Amanda Nga-Sze; Wong, Kam-Bo; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating the large ribosomal RNA and some are found to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. Maize ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) has an internal inactivation loop which is proteolytically removed for full catalytic activity. Here, we showed that the recombinant active maize RIP protected chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6-infected macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells from lysis ex vivo and transiently reduced plasma viral load in SHIV89.6-infected rhesus macaque model. No evidence of immune dysregulation and other obvious side-effects was found in the treated macaques. Our work demonstrates the potential development of maize RIP as an anti-HIV agent without impeding systemic immune functions. PMID:25606813

  3. T cell chemo-vaccination effects after repeated mucosal SHIV exposures and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N; Adams, Debra R; Youngpairoj, Ae S; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Qi; Cong, Mian-er; Aung, Wutyi; Mitchell, James; Otten, Ron; Hendry, R Michael; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2011-04-26

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with anti-viral drugs is currently in clinical trials for the prevention of HIV infection. Induction of adaptive immune responses to virus exposures during anti-viral drug administration, i.e., a "chemo-vaccination" effect, could contribute to PrEP efficacy. To study possible chemo-vaccination, we monitored humoral and cellular immune responses in nine rhesus macaques undergoing up to 14 weekly, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) rectal exposures. Six macaques concurrently received PrEP with intermittent, oral Truvada; three were no-PrEP controls. PrEP protected 4 macaques from infection. Two of the four showed evidence of chemo-vaccination, because they developed anti-SHIV CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells; SHIV-specific antibodies were not detected. Control macaques showed no anti-SHIV immune responses before infection. Chemo-vaccination-induced T cell responses were robust (up to 3,940 SFU/10(6) PBMCs), predominantly central memory cells, short-lived (≤22 weeks), and appeared intermittently and with changing specificities. The two chemo-vaccinated macaques were virus-challenged again after 28 weeks of rest, after T cell responses had waned. One macaque was not protected from infection. The other macaque concurrently received additional PrEP. It remained uninfected and T cell responses were boosted during the additional virus exposures. In summary, we document and characterize PrEP-induced T cell chemo-vaccination. Although not protective after subsiding in one macaque, chemo-vaccination-induced T cells warrant more comprehensive analysis during peak responses for their ability to prevent or to control infections after additional exposures. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring these responses in clinical PrEP trials and suggest that a combination of vaccines and PrEP potentially might enhance efficacy.

  4. Lymphocyte Activation during Acute Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6PD Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marianne; Waterman, Paul M.; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Brown, Charles; Trivedi, Parul; Horejsh, Douglas; Dykhuizen, Marta; Kitabwalla, Moiz; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Host-virus interactions control disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human beings and in nonhuman primates infected with simian or simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV). These interactions evolve rapidly during acute infection and are key to the mechanisms of viral persistence and AIDS. SHIV89.6PD infection in rhesus macaques can deplete CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes within 2 weeks after exposure and is a model for virulent, acute infection. Lymphocytes isolated from blood and tissues during the interval of acute SHIV89.6PD infection have lost the capacity to proliferate in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). T-cell unresponsiveness to mitogen occurred within 1 week after mucosal inoculation yet prior to massive CD4+ T-cell depletion and extensive virus dissemination. The lack of mitogen response was due to apoptosis in vitro, and increased activation marker expression on circulating T cells in vivo coincided with the appearance of PHA-induced apoptosis in vitro. Inappropriately high immune stimulation associated with rapid loss of mature CD4+ T cells suggested that activation-induced cell death is a mechanism for helper T-cell depletion in the brief period before widespread virus dissemination. Elevated levels of lymphocyte activation likely enhance SHIV89.6PD replication, thus increasing the loss of CD4+ T cells and diminishing the levels of virus-specific immunity that remain after acute infection. The level of surviving immunity may dictate the capacity to control virus replication and disease progression. We describe this level of immune competence as the host set point to show its pivotal role in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:10559340

  5. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanakaran, S; Shen, Tongye; Lynch, Rebecca M; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  6. Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Yankee, Thomas M. Sheffer, Darlene; Liu Zhengian; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Jia Fenglan; Chebloune, Yahia; Stephens, Edward B.; Narayan, Opendra

    2009-01-05

    Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, a live virus vaccine derived from SHIV{sub PPC}. Macaques were administered two inoculations of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years.

  7. Early short-term treatment with neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies halts SHIV infection in infant macaques.

    PubMed

    Hessell, Ann J; Jaworski, J Pablo; Epson, Erin; Matsuda, Kenta; Pandey, Shilpi; Kahl, Christoph; Reed, Jason; Sutton, William F; Hammond, Katherine B; Cheever, Tracy A; Barnette, Philip T; Legasse, Alfred W; Planer, Shannon; Stanton, Jeffrey J; Pegu, Amarendra; Chen, Xuejun; Wang, Keyun; Siess, Don; Burke, David; Park, Byung S; Axthelm, Michael K; Lewis, Anne; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Sacha, Jonah B; Haigwood, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested HIV-1-specific human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAbs) as a post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIVSF162P3. On days 1, 4, 7 and 10 after virus exposure, we injected animals subcutaneously with NmAbs and quantified systemic distribution of NmAbs in multiple tissues within 24 h after antibody administration. Replicating virus was found in multiple tissues by day 1 in animals that were not treated. All NmAb-treated macaques were free of virus in blood and tissues at 6 months after exposure. We detected no anti-SHIV T cell responses in blood or tissues at necropsy, and no virus emerged after CD8(+) T cell depletion. These results suggest that early passive immunotherapy can eliminate early viral foci and thereby prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs. PMID:26998834

  8. Early short-term treatment with neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies halts SHIV infection in newborn macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hessell, Ann J.; Jaworski, J. Pablo; Epson, Erin; Matsuda, Kenta; Pandey, Shilpi; Kahl, Christoph; Reed, Jason; Sutton, William F.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Cheever, Tracy A.; Barnette, Philip T.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Planer, Shannon; Stanton, Jeffrey J.; Pegu, Amarendra; Chen, Xuejun; Wang, Keyun; Siess, Don; Burke, David; Park, Byung S.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Lewis, Anne; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Graham, Barney S.; Mascola, John R.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested anti-HIV-1 human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAb) as post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with SHIVSF162P3. On days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after virus exposure, we injected animals subcutaneously with NmAbs and quantified systemic distribution of NmAbs in multiple tissues within 24 h following administration. Replicating virus was found in multiple tissues by day 1 in animals without treatment. All NmAb-treated macaques were free of virus in blood and tissues at 6 months post-exposure. We detected no anti-SHIV T cell responses in blood or tissues at necropsy, and no virus emerged following CD8+ T cell depletion. These results suggest early passive immunotherapy can eliminate early viral foci and thereby prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs. PMID:26998834

  9. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  10. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release.

    PubMed

    López, Claudia S; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. PMID:24971705

  11. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  12. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission.

  13. Estimating the impact of vaccination in acute SHIV-SIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy

    2008-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infects approxmately 0.5% of the world population, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A vaccine for HIV is urgently required, and a variety of vaccine modalities have been tested in animal models of infection. A number of these studies have shown protection in monkey models of infection, although the ability of the vaccine to protect appears to vary with the viral strain and animal model used. The recent failure of a large vaccine study in humans suggests that further understanding of the basic dynamics of infection and impact of vaccination are required, in order to understand the variable efficacy of vaccination in different infections. The dynamics of HIV infection have been studied in humans and in a variety of animal models. The standard model of infection has been used to estimate the basic reproductive ratio (R{sub 0}) of the virus, calculated from the growth rate of virus in acute infection. This method has not been useful in studying the effects of vaccination, since, in the vaccines developed so far, early growth rates of virus do not differ between control and vaccinated animals. Here, we use the standard model of viral dynamics to derive the reproductive ratio from the peak viral load and nadir of target cell numbers in acute infection. We apply this method to data from studies of vaccination in Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection and demonstrate that vaccination can reduce the reproductive ratio by 2.3 and 2 fold respectively. This method allows the comparison of vaccination efficacy amongst different viral strains and animal models in vivo.

  14. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  15. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Winton, James R.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea.

  16. Identification of the major capsid protein of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) and development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of ENV DNA.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Thompson, Rachel L; Gregg, Jacob L; Hart, Lucas M; Winton, James R; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a disease of marine and anadromous fish that is caused by the erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), which was recently identified as a novel member of family Iridoviridae by next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the ENV DNA polymerase grouped ENV with other erythrocytic iridoviruses from snakes and lizards. In the present study, we identified the gene encoding the ENV major capsid protein (MCP) and developed a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting this gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the MCP gene sequence supported the conclusion that ENV does not group with any of the currently described iridovirus genera. Because there is no information regarding genetic variation of the MCP gene across the reported host and geographic range for ENV, we also developed a second qPCR assay for a more conserved ATPase-like gene region. The MCP and ATPase qPCR assays demonstrated good analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity based on samples from laboratory challenges of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii The qPCR assays had similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity as light microscopy of stained blood smears for the presence of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. However, the qPCR assays may detect viral DNA early in infection prior to the formation of inclusion bodies. Both qPCR assays appear suitable for viral surveillance or as a confirmatory test for ENV in Pacific herring from the Salish Sea. PMID:27154315

  17. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Amandine Thiery, Maxime Lafond, Julie Barbeau, Benoit

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  18. Topical Delivery of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine from Pod-Intravaginal Rings Protects Macaques from Multiple SHIV Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Churchman, Scott A.; Yang, Flora; Dinh, Chuong T.; Mitchell, James M.; Zhang, Jining; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S.; Butkyavichene, Irina; McNicholl, Janet M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Baum, Marc M.; Smith, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Topical preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV has been marginally successful in recent clinical trials with low adherence rates being a primary factor for failure. Controlled, sustained release of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs may help overcome these low adherence rates if the product is protective for extended periods of time. The oral combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only FDA-approved ARV drug for HIV PrEP. A novel pod-intravaginal ring (IVR) delivering TDF and FTC at independently controlled rates was evaluated for efficacy at preventing SHIV162p3 infection in a rigorous, repeat low-dose vaginal exposure model using normally cycling female pigtailed macaques. Six macaques received pod-IVRs containing TDF (65 mg) and FTC (68 mg) every two weeks, and weekly vaginal exposures to 50 TCID50 of SHIV162p3 began one week after the first pod-IVR insertion. All pod-IVR-treated macaques were fully protected throughout the study (P = 0.0002, Log-rank test), whereas all control animals became infected with a median of 4 exposures to infection. The topical, sustained release of TDF and FTC from the pod-IVR maintained protective drug levels in macaques over four months of virus exposures. This novel and versatile delivery system has the capacity to deliver and maintain protective levels of multiple drugs and the protection observed here warrants clinical evaluation of this pod-IVR design. PMID:27275923

  19. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) susceptible to rimantadine

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Lisa M.; Pacyniak, Erik; Miller, Jean-Marie; Hill, M. Sarah; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-05-10

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIV{sub M2}) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIV{sub VpuA19H} replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. This SHIV{sub VpuA19H} virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIV{sub M2}. Electron microscopic examination of SHIV{sub VpuA19H}-infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the

  20. Direct Involvement of HERV-W Env Glycoprotein in Human Trophoblast Cell Fusion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Frendo, Jean-Louis; Olivier, Delphine; Cheynet, Valérie; Blond, Jean-Luc; Bouton, Olivier; Vidaud, Michel; Rabreau, Michèle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Mallet, François

    2003-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the product of the HERV-W env gene, a retroviral envelope protein also dubbed syncytin, is a highly fusogenic membrane glycoprotein inducing the formation of syncytia on interaction with the type D mammalian retrovirus receptor. In addition, the detection of HERV-W Env protein (Env-W) expression in placental tissue sections led us to propose a role for this fusogenic glycoprotein in placenta formation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the involvement of Env-W in the differentiation of primary cultures of human villous cytotrophoblasts that spontaneously differentiate by cell fusion into syncytiotrophoblasts in vitro. First, we observed that HERV-W env mRNA and glycoprotein expression are colinear with primary cytotrophoblast differentiation and with expression of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a marker of syncytiotrophoblast formation. Second, we observed that in vitro stimulation of trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation by cyclic AMP is also associated with a concomitant increase in HERV-W env and hCG mRNA and protein expression. Finally, by using specific antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that inhibition of Env-W protein expression leads to a decrease of trophoblast fusion and differentiation, with the secretion of hCG in culture medium of antisense oligonucleotide-treated cells being decreased by fivefold. Taken together, these results strongly support a direct role for Env-W in human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. PMID:12724415

  1. NMobTec-EnvEdu: M-Learning System for Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduced the implementation of a New Mobile Technologies and Environmental Education System (NMobTec-EnvEdu) designed for m-learning environments. The NMobTec-EnvEdu system has been developed to provide environmental education in a collaborative framework to undergraduate students through the Internet using mobile phones. The study…

  2. Planning for RtI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Jennifer; Antrim, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In 2004 the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act authorized funding for Response to Intervention (RtI) instruction in the United States. By 2011, 71 percent of school districts had adopted RtI (Institute of Education Sciences 2011). The goal of RtI is to provide personalized, just-in-time intervention in reading and math for students who…

  3. Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to LOX-1 Elicits Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Richert, Laura; Wagner, Ralf; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Bonnabau, Henri; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Jacobs, Bertram L; Kibler, Karen; Asbach, Benedikt; Kliche, Alexander; Salazar, Andres; Reed, Steve; Self, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Improved antigenicity against HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein is needed to elicit vaccine-induced protective immunity in humans. Here we describe the first tests in non-human primates (NHPs) of Env gp140 protein fused to a humanized anti-LOX-1 recombinant antibody for delivering Env directly to LOX-1-bearing antigen presenting cells, especially dendritic cells (DC). LOX-1, or 1ectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1, is expressed on various antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and is involved in promoting humoral immune responses. The anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 fusion protein was tested for priming immune responses and boosting responses in animals primed with replication competent NYVAC-KC Env gp140 vaccinia virus. Anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 vaccination elicited robust cellular and humoral responses when used for either priming or boosting immunity. Co-administration with Poly ICLC, a TLR3 agonist, was superior to GLA, a TLR4 agonist. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Env-specific T cell responses were elicited by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140, but in particular the CD4+ T cells were multifunctional and directed to multiple epitopes. Serum IgG and IgA antibody responses induced by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 against various gp140 domains were cross-reactive across HIV-1 clades; however, the sera neutralized only HIV-1 bearing sequences most similar to the clade C 96ZM651 Env gp140 carried by the anti-LOX-1 vehicle. These data, as well as the safety of this protein vaccine, justify further exploration of this DC-targeting vaccine approach for protective immunity against HIV-1. PMID:27077384

  4. Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to LOX-1 Elicits Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Richert, Laura; Wagner, Ralf; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Bonnabau, Henri; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yates, Nicole L.; LaBranche, Celia; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Kibler, Karen; Asbach, Benedikt; Kliche, Alexander; Salazar, Andres; Reed, Steve; Self, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Improved antigenicity against HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein is needed to elicit vaccine-induced protective immunity in humans. Here we describe the first tests in non-human primates (NHPs) of Env gp140 protein fused to a humanized anti-LOX-1 recombinant antibody for delivering Env directly to LOX-1-bearing antigen presenting cells, especially dendritic cells (DC). LOX-1, or 1ectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1, is expressed on various antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and is involved in promoting humoral immune responses. The anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 fusion protein was tested for priming immune responses and boosting responses in animals primed with replication competent NYVAC-KC Env gp140 vaccinia virus. Anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 vaccination elicited robust cellular and humoral responses when used for either priming or boosting immunity. Co-administration with Poly ICLC, a TLR3 agonist, was superior to GLA, a TLR4 agonist. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Env-specific T cell responses were elicited by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140, but in particular the CD4+ T cells were multifunctional and directed to multiple epitopes. Serum IgG and IgA antibody responses induced by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 against various gp140 domains were cross-reactive across HIV-1 clades; however, the sera neutralized only HIV-1 bearing sequences most similar to the clade C 96ZM651 Env gp140 carried by the anti-LOX-1 vehicle. These data, as well as the safety of this protein vaccine, justify further exploration of this DC-targeting vaccine approach for protective immunity against HIV-1. PMID:27077384

  5. Cytoplasmic sensing by the inner membrane histidine kinase EnvZ

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Yong Hwee; Gao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Hongfang; Kenney, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Two-component regulatory systems drive signal transduction in bacteria. The simplest of these employs a membrane sensor kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator. Environmental sensing is typically coupled to gene regulation. The histidine kinase EnvZ and its cognate response regulator OmpR regulate expression of outer membrane proteins (porins) in response to osmotic stress. We used hydrogen:deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to identify conformational changes in the cytoplasmic domain of EnvZ (EnvZc) that were associated with osmosensing. The osmosensor localized to a seventeen amino acid region of the four-helix bundle of the cytoplasmic domain and flanked the His243 autophosphorylation site. High osmolality increased autophosphorylation of His243, suggesting that these two events were linked. The transmembrane domains were not required for osmosensing, but mutants in the transmembrane domains altered EnvZ activity. A photoactivatable fusion protein composed of EnvZc fused to the fluorophore mEos2 (EnvZc-mEos2) was as capable as EnvZc in supporting OmpR-dependent ompF and ompC transcription. Over-expression of EnvZc reduced activity, indicating that the EnvZ/OmpR system is not robust. Our results support a model in which osmolytes stabilize helix one in the four-helix bundle of EnvZ by increased hydrogen bonding of the peptide backbone, increasing autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. The likelihood that additional histidine kinases use similar cytoplasmic sensing mechanisms is discussed. PMID:25937465

  6. Clustering and Mobility of HIV-1 Env at Viral Assembly Sites Predict Its Propensity To Induce Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Chan, Jany; Lambelé, Marie

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates virus attachment to and fusion with target cell membranes, and yet, while Env is still situated at the plasma membrane of the producer cell and before its incorporation into newly formed particles, Env already interacts with the viral receptor CD4 on target cells, thus enabling the formation of transient cell contacts that facilitate the transmission of viral particles. During this first encounter with the receptor, Env must not induce membrane fusion, as this would prevent the producer cell and the target cell from separating upon virus transmission, but how Env's fusion activity is controlled remains unclear. To gain a better understanding of the Env regulation that precedes viral transmission, we examined the nanoscale organization of Env at the surface of producer cells. Utilizing superresolution microscopy (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy [STORM]) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we quantitatively assessed the clustering and dynamics of Env upon its arrival at the plasma membrane. We found that Gag assembly induced the aggregation of small Env clusters into larger domains and that these domains were completely immobile. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env abrogated Gag's ability to induce Env clustering and restored Env mobility at assembly sites, both of which correlated with increased Env-induced fusion of infected and uninfected cells. Hence, while Env trapping by Gag secures Env incorporation into viral particles, Env clustering and its sequestration at assembly sites likely also leads to the repression of its fusion function, and thus, by preventing the formation of syncytia, Gag helps to secure efficient transfer of viral particles to target cells. PMID:23637402

  7. Induction of potent local cellular immunity with low dose X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} vaginal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tasca, Silvana; Tsai, Lily; Trunova, Nataliya; Gettie, Agegnehu; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Bohm, Rudolf; Chakrabarti, Lisa; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2007-10-10

    Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with varying doses of the CXCR4 (X4)-tropic SHIV{sub SF33A} isolate revealed a threshold inoculum for establishment of systemic virus infection and a dose dependency in overall viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion. While exposure to inoculum size of 1000 or greater 50% tissue infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) resulted in high viremia and precipitous CD4+ T cell loss, occult infection was observed in seven of eight macaques exposed to 500 TCID{sub 50} of the same virus. The latter was characterized by intermittent detection of low level virus with no evidence of seroconversion or CD4+ T cell decline, but with signs of an ongoing antiviral T cell immune response. Upon vaginal re-challenge with the same limiting dose 11-12 weeks after the first, classic pathogenic X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} infection was established in four of the seven previously exposed seronegative macaques, implying enhanced susceptibility to systemic infection with prior exposure. Pre-existing peripheral SIV gag-specific CD4+ T cells were more readily demonstrable in macaques that became systemically infected following re-exposure than those that were not. In contrast, early presence of circulating polyfunctional cytokine secreting CD8+ T cells or strong virus-specific proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes and in the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) following the first exposure was associated with protection from systemic re-infection. These studies identify the gut and lymphoid tissues proximal to the genital tract as sites of robust CD8 T lymphocyte responses that contribute to containment of virus spread following vaginal transmission.

  8. Systemic Dendritic Cell Mobilization Associated with Administration of FLT3 Ligand to SIV- and SHIV-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, R. Keith; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Reports indicate that myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs), which are key effector cells in host innate immune responses, can be infected with HIV-1 and are reduced in number and function during the chronic phase of HIV disease. Furthermore, it was recently demonstrated that a sustained loss of mDCs and pDCs occurs in SIV-infected macaques. Since loss of functional DC populations might impair innate immune responses to opportunistic microorganisms and neoplastic cells, we explored whether inoculation of naive and SIV- or SHIV-infected pigtailed macaques with the hematopoietic cytokine FLT3-ligand (FLT3-L) would expand the number of mDCs and pDCs in vivo. After the macaques received supraphysiologic doses of FLT3-L, mDCs, pDCs, and monocytes increased up to 45-fold in blood, lymph nodes, and bone marrow (BM), with DC expansion in the BM preceding mobilization in blood and lymphoid tissues. FLT3-L also increased serum levels of IL-12, at least transiently, and elicited higher surface expression of HLA-DR and the activation markers CD25 and CD69 on NK and T cells. During and after treatment of infected animals, APCs increased in number and were activated; however, CD4+ T cell numbers, virion RNA, and anti-SIV/SHIV antibody titers remained relatively stable, suggesting that FLT3-L might be a safe modality to expand DC populations and provide therapeutic benefit during chronic lentivirus infections. PMID:20001520

  9. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues.

  10. ALV-J GP37 Molecular Analysis Reveals Novel Virus-Adapted Sites and Three Tyrosine-Based Env Species

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianjun; Tian, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jialiang; Chen, Hongjun; Shao, Hongxia; Qin, Aijian

    2015-01-01

    Compared to other avian leukosis viruses (ALV), ALV-J primarily induces myeloid leukemia and hemangioma and causes significant economic loss for the poultry industry. The ALV-J Env protein is hypothesized to be related to its unique pathogenesis. However, the molecular determinants of Env for ALV-J pathogenesis are unclear. In this study, we compared and analyzed GP37 of ALV-J Env and the EAV-HP sequence, which has high homology to that of ALV-J Env. Phylogenetic analysis revealed five groups of ALV-J GP37 and two novel ALV-J Envs with endemic GP85 and EAV-HP-like GP37. Furthermore, at least 15 virus-adapted mutations were detected in GP37 compared to the EAV-HP sequence. Further analysis demonstrated that three tyrosine-based motifs (YxxM, ITIM (immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif) and ITAM-like (immune tyrosine-based active motif like)) associated with immune disease and oncogenesis were found in the cytoplasmic tail of GP37. Based on the potential function and distribution of these motifs in GP37, ALV-J Env was grouped into three species, inhibitory Env, bifunctional Env and active Env. Accordingly, 36.91%, 61.74% and 1.34% of ALV-J Env sequences from GenBank are classified as inhibitory, bifunctional and active Env, respectively. Additionally, the Env of the ALV-J prototype strain, HPRS-103, and 17 of 18 EAV-HP sequences belong to the inhibitory Env. And models for signal transduction of the three ALV-J Env species were predicted. Our findings and models provide novel insights for identifying the roles and molecular mechanism of ALV-J Env in the unique pathogenesis of ALV-J. PMID:25849207

  11. Characterisation of env and gag gene fragments of bovine leukemia viruses (BLVs) from cattle in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Feray; Oğuzoğlu, Tuba Çiğdem; Timurkan, Mehmet Ozkan; Karapınar, Zeynep

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the molecular characteristics of bovine leukemia viruses (BLVs) in Turkey. The variability of env and gag fragments of BLVs was examined using DNA from blood samples obtained for sequence analysis of BLVs in four cattle herds from three different geographical areas in Turkey. The env gene sequences were highly similar to those of Brasilian, Argentine, and Japanese BLV strains, while gag genes from Turkish BLV isolates showed greatest similarity to those of Iranian isolates. This paper is the first report on the partial characterisation of env and gag genetic fragments of BLVs from Turkey.

  12. Structure-Guided Redesign Increases the Propensity of HIV Env To Generate Highly Stable Soluble Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Guenaga, Javier; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; de Val, Natalia; Sharma, Shailendra K.; Carrette, Barbara; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to high viral diversity, an effective HIV-1 vaccine will likely require Envs derived from multiple subtypes to generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Soluble Env mimics, like the native flexibly linked (NFL) and SOSIP trimers, derived from the subtype A BG505 Env, form homogeneous, stable native-like trimers. However, other Env sequences, such as JRFL and 16055 from subtypes B and C, do so to a lesser degree. The high-resolution BG505 SOSIP crystal structures permit the identification and redesign of Env elements involved in trimer stability. Here, we identified structure trimer-derived (TD) residues that increased the propensity of the subtype B JRFL and subtype C 16055 Env sequences to form well-ordered, homogenous, and highly stable soluble trimers. The generation of these spike mimics no longer required antibody-based selection, positive or negative. Using the redesigned subtype B and C trimer representatives as respective foundations, we further stabilized the NFL TD trimers by engineering an intraprotomer disulfide linkage in the prebridging sheet, I201C-A433C (CC), that locks the gp120 in the receptor nontriggered state. We demonstrated that this disulfide pair prevented CD4 induced-conformational rearrangements in NFL trimers derived from the prototypic subtype A, B, and C representatives. Coupling the TD-based design with the engineered disulfide linkage, CC, increased the propensity of Env to form soluble highly stable spike mimics that are resistant to CD4-induced changes. These advances will allow testing of the hypothesis that such stabilized immunogens will more efficiently elicit neutralizing antibodies in small-animal models and primates. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 displays unprecedented global diversity circulating in the human population. Since the envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the target of neutralizing antibodies, Env-based vaccine candidates that address such diversity are needed. Soluble well-ordered Env mimics, typified by NFL

  13. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. PMID:26889025

  14. Immunization against HTLV-I with chitosan and tri-methylchitosan nanoparticles loaded with recombinant env23 and env13 antigens of envelope protein gp46.

    PubMed

    Amirnasr, Maryam; Fallah Tafti, Tannan; Sankian, Mojtaba; Rezaei, Abdorrahim; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    To prevent the spread of HTLV-I (Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), a safe and effective vaccine is required. To increase immune responses against the peptide antigens can be potentiated with polymer-based nanoparticles, like chitosan (CHT) and trimethylchitosan (TMC), as delivery system/adjuvant. CHT and TMC nanoparticles loaded with recombinant proteins (env23 & env13) of gp46 were prepared by direct coating of antigens with positively charged polymers. The size of CHT and TMC nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with each antigen was about 400 nm. The physical stability of NPs was followed for 4 weeks. Both formulations showed to be stable for about 15 days. The immunogenicity of NPs loaded with antigens was studied after nasal and subcutaneous immunization in mice. Three immunizations (7.5 μg antigen) were performed with 2 weeks intervals. Two weeks after the last booster dose, sera IgG subtypes were measured. After subcutaneous administration, for both nanoparticulate antigens, serum IgG1 and IgGtotal levels were higher than antigen solution (P < 0.001). After nasal administration, for env23, IgG2a levels and IgG2a/IgG1 ratio was significantly higher than groups with subcutaneous administration (P < 0.001). Both nanoparticles showed good immunoadjuvant potential. Env23 antigen was a better candidate for vaccination against HTLV-I, as it induced higher cellular immune responses, compared with env13. PMID:27235335

  15. Multilineage polyclonal engraftment of Cal-1 gene-modified cells and in vivo selection after SHIV infection in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Burke, Bryan P.; Polacino, Patricia; Norman, Krystin K.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bartlett, Jeffrey S.; Symonds, Geoff P.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have focused on gene therapy approaches to induce functional cure/remission of HIV-1 infection. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of the clinical grade anti-HIV lentiviral vector, Cal-1, in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Cal-1 animals exhibit robust levels of gene marking in myeloid and lymphoid lineages without measurable adverse events, suggesting that Cal-1 transduction and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells are safe, and lead to long-term, multilineage engraftment following myeloablative conditioning. Ex vivo, CD4+ cells from transplanted animals undergo positive selection in the presence of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). In vivo, Cal-1 gene-marked cells are evident in the peripheral blood and in HIV-relevant tissue sites such as the gastrointestinal tract. Positive selection for gene-marked cells is observed in blood and tissues following SHIV challenge, leading to maintenance of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell counts in a normal range. Analysis of Cal-1 lentivirus integration sites confirms polyclonal engraftment of gene-marked cells. Following infection, a polyclonal, SHIV-resistant clonal repertoire is established. These findings offer strong preclinical evidence for safety and efficacy of Cal-1, present a new method for tracking protected cells over the course of virus-mediated selective pressure in vivo, and reveal previously unobserved dynamics of virus-dependent T-cell selection. PMID:26958575

  16. Multilineage polyclonal engraftment of Cal-1 gene-modified cells and in vivo selection after SHIV infection in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christopher W; Haworth, Kevin G; Burke, Bryan P; Polacino, Patricia; Norman, Krystin K; Adair, Jennifer E; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have focused on gene therapy approaches to induce functional cure/remission of HIV-1 infection. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of the clinical grade anti-HIV lentiviral vector, Cal-1, in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Cal-1 animals exhibit robust levels of gene marking in myeloid and lymphoid lineages without measurable adverse events, suggesting that Cal-1 transduction and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells are safe, and lead to long-term, multilineage engraftment following myeloablative conditioning. Ex vivo, CD4+ cells from transplanted animals undergo positive selection in the presence of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). In vivo, Cal-1 gene-marked cells are evident in the peripheral blood and in HIV-relevant tissue sites such as the gastrointestinal tract. Positive selection for gene-marked cells is observed in blood and tissues following SHIV challenge, leading to maintenance of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell counts in a normal range. Analysis of Cal-1 lentivirus integration sites confirms polyclonal engraftment of gene-marked cells. Following infection, a polyclonal, SHIV-resistant clonal repertoire is established. These findings offer strong preclinical evidence for safety and efficacy of Cal-1, present a new method for tracking protected cells over the course of virus-mediated selective pressure in vivo, and reveal previously unobserved dynamics of virus-dependent T-cell selection. PMID:26958575

  17. Evidence for Early Local Viral Replication and Local Production of Antiviral Immunity upon Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6 Infection in Macaca nemestrina

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Larsen, Kay; Thompson, Jannelle; Stevens, Yvonne; Finn, Eric; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bosch, Marnix L.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is largely a result of heterosexual exposure, leading many investigators to evaluate mucosal vaccines for protection against intravaginal (i.vag.) transmission in macaque models of AIDS. Relatively little is known, however, about the dynamics of viral replication and the ensuing immune response following mucosal infection. We have utilized a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) to study the differences in viremia, CD4 T-cell percentages, and mucosal and systemic anti-SHIV humoral and cellular immune responses during primary infection of animals infected either intravenously (i.v.) or i.vag. Positive viral cocultures, peripheral blood mononuclear cell viral load peaks, and CD4 cell declines were delayed by 1 week in the i.vag. inoculated animals compared to the animals infected i.v., demonstrating delayed viral spreading to the periphery. In contrast, mucosal anti-SHIV antibody levels were greater in magnitude and arose more rapidly and mucosal CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced in the i.vag. group animals, whereas both the magnitudes and times of onset of systemic immune responses for the animals in the two groups did not differ. These observations demonstrate that compartmentalization of viral replication and induction of local antiviral immunity occur in the genital tract early after i.vag. but not i.v. inoculation. Induction of mucosal immunity to target this local, contained replication should be a goal in HIV vaccine development. PMID:11507204

  18. Phylogenetics of HIV-1 subtype G env: Greater complexity and older origins than previously reported.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Essomba, René G; Nindo, Frederick; Abrahams, Fatima; Nanfack, Aubin Joseph; Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Desire; Torimiro, Judith N; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Burgers, Wendy A; Martin, Darren P; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype G has played an early and central role in the emergent complexity of the HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) epidemic in central/west Africa. Here, we analysed new subtype G env sequences sampled from 8 individuals in Yaoundé, Cameroon during 2007-2010, together with all publically available subtype G-attributed full-length env sequences with known sampling dates and locations. We inferred that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the analysed subtype G env sequences most likely occurred in ∼1953 (95% Highest Posterior Density interval [HPD] 1939-1963): about 15 years earlier than previous estimates. We found that the subtype G env phylogeny has a complex structure including seven distinct lineages, each likely dating back to the late 1960s or early 1970s. Sequences from Angola, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo failed to group consistently in these lineages, possibly because they are related to more ancient sequences that are poorly sampled. The circulating recombinant form (CRF), CRF06_cpx env sequences but not CRF25_cpx env sequences are phylogenetically nested within the subtype G clade. This confirms that the CRF06_cpx env plausibly was derived through recombination from a subtype G parent, and suggests that the CRF25_cpx env was likely derived from an HIV-1M lineage related to the MRCA of subtype G that has remained undiscovered and may be extinct. Overall, this fills important gaps in our knowledge of the early events in the spread of HIV-1M. PMID:26190450

  19. Phylogenetics of HIV-1 subtype G env: Greater complexity and older origins than previously reported.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Essomba, René G; Nindo, Frederick; Abrahams, Fatima; Nanfack, Aubin Joseph; Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Desire; Torimiro, Judith N; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Burgers, Wendy A; Martin, Darren P; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1 subtype G has played an early and central role in the emergent complexity of the HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) epidemic in central/west Africa. Here, we analysed new subtype G env sequences sampled from 8 individuals in Yaoundé, Cameroon during 2007-2010, together with all publically available subtype G-attributed full-length env sequences with known sampling dates and locations. We inferred that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the analysed subtype G env sequences most likely occurred in ∼1953 (95% Highest Posterior Density interval [HPD] 1939-1963): about 15 years earlier than previous estimates. We found that the subtype G env phylogeny has a complex structure including seven distinct lineages, each likely dating back to the late 1960s or early 1970s. Sequences from Angola, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo failed to group consistently in these lineages, possibly because they are related to more ancient sequences that are poorly sampled. The circulating recombinant form (CRF), CRF06_cpx env sequences but not CRF25_cpx env sequences are phylogenetically nested within the subtype G clade. This confirms that the CRF06_cpx env plausibly was derived through recombination from a subtype G parent, and suggests that the CRF25_cpx env was likely derived from an HIV-1M lineage related to the MRCA of subtype G that has remained undiscovered and may be extinct. Overall, this fills important gaps in our knowledge of the early events in the spread of HIV-1M.

  20. Disparate Effects of Acute and Chronic Infection with SIVmac239 or SHIV-89.6P on Macaque Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, R. Keith; Fultz, Patricia N.

    2007-01-01

    Blood plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) contribute to both innate and adaptive immune responses by secreting high levels of IFN-α following acute bacterial and viral infections and indirectly by augmenting cell-mediated immunity. Cross-sectional studies have shown that the number of circulating pDCs in HIV patients, compared to that in uninfected individuals, is reduced. However, since the time of infection is usually unknown in HIV-infected patients, pDC-virus interactions that occur immediately after virus exposure are poorly understood. The current study investigated pDC dynamics during acute and chronic infections of macaques with either SIVmac239 or the pathogenic SIV-HIV chimera, SHIV-89.6P, as models for HIV infection. In three rhesus and three pig-tailed macaques infected intravenously with SIVmac239, the percentages of pDCs in blood declined 2- to 6-fold during the first 6 weeks after infection and remained depressed throughout the disease course. Surprisingly, no consistent, comparable decline in peripheral blood pDCs was observed in six macaques infected with SHIV-89.6P. In this latter group, percentages of pDCs did not correlate with CD4+ T cells, but there was an inverse relationship with viral load. In addition, when compared to naïve controls, the percentages of pDCs were reduced in spleens and peripheral lymph nodes of SIVmac239- but not SHIV-89.6P-infected animals that had progressed to AIDS. Proviral DNA was detected during the acute phase in pDCs isolated from macaques infected with either virus. These results imply that, even though macaque pDCs can be infected by both SIVmac239 and SHIV-89.6P, the subsequent effects on in vivo pathogenesis differ. The underlying mechanism(s) for these differences is unclear, but the selection of SIV or SHIV as a challenge virus might influence the outcome of some studies, such as those evaluating vaccines or the therapeutic efficacy of drugs. PMID:17490699

  1. Dose-dependent inhibition of Gag cellular immunity by Env in SIV/HIV DNA vaccinated macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Patel, Vainav; Jalah, Rashmi; Alicea, Candido; Reed, Steven; Sardesai, Niranjan; Berkower, Ira; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-01-01

    The induction of a balanced immune response targeting the major structural proteins, Gag and Env of HIV, is important for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The use of DNA plasmids expressing different antigens offers the opportunity to test in a controlled manner the influence of different vaccine components on the magnitude and distribution of the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we show that increasing amounts of env DNA results in greatly enhanced Env antibody titers without significantly affecting the levels of anti-Env cellular immune responses. Co-immunization with Env protein further increased antibody levels, indicating that vaccination with DNA only is not sufficient for eliciting maximal humoral responses against Env. In contrast, under high env:gag DNA plasmid ratio, the development of Gag cellular responses was significantly reduced by either SIV or HIV Env, whereas Gag humoral responses were not affected. Our data indicate that a balanced ratio of the 2 key HIV/SIV vaccine components, Gag and Env, is important to avoid immunological interference and to achieve both maximal humoral responses against Env to prevent virus acquisition and maximal cytotoxic T cell responses against Gag to prevent virus spread. PMID:26125521

  2. Characterization of the R572T point mutant of a putative cleavage site in human foamy virus Env.

    PubMed

    Bansal, A; Shaw, K L; Edwards, B H; Goepfert, P A; Mulligan, M J

    2000-03-01

    A putative cleavage site of the human foamy virus (HFV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) was altered. Transient env expression revealed that the R572T mutant Env was normally expressed and modified by asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chains. However, this single-amino-acid substitution was sufficient to abolish all detectable cleavage of the gp130 precursor polyprotein. Cell surface biotinylation demonstrated that the uncleaved mutant gp130 was transported to the plasma membrane. The uncleaved mutant protein was incapable of syncytium formation. Glycoprotein-driven virion budding, a unique aspect of HFV assembly, occurred despite the absence of Env cleavage. We then substituted the R572T mutant env into a replication-competent HFV molecular clone. Transfection of the mutant viral DNA into BHK-21 cells followed by viral titration with the FAB (foamy virus-activated beta-galactosidase expression) assay revealed that proteolysis of the HFV Env was essential for viral infectivity. Wild-type HFV Env partially complemented the defective virus phenotype. Taken together, these experimental results established the location of the HFV Env proteolytic site; the effects of cleavage on Env transport, processing, and function; and the importance of Env proteolysis for virus maturation and infectivity.

  3. Mucosal Immunization with Newcastle Disease Virus Vector Coexpressing HIV-1 Env and Gag Proteins Elicits Potent Serum, Mucosal, and Cellular Immune Responses That Protect against Vaccinia Virus Env and Gag Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Sunil K.; Manoharan, Vinoth; Bhattarai, Bikash; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newcastle disease virus (NDV) avirulent strain LaSota was used to coexpress gp160 Env and p55 Gag from a single vector to enhance both Env-specific and Gag-specific immune responses. The optimal transcription position for both Env and Gag genes in the NDV genome was determined by generating recombinant NDV (rNDV)-Env-Gag (gp160 located between the P and M genes and Gag between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Gag-Env (Gag located between the P and M genes and gp160 between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Env/Gag (gp160 followed by Gag located between the P and M genes), and rNDV-Gag/Env (Gag followed by gp160 located between the P and M genes). All the recombinant viruses replicated at levels similar to those seen with parental NDV in embryonated chicken eggs and in chicken fibroblast cells. Both gp160 and Gag proteins were expressed at high levels in cell culture, with gp160 found to be incorporated into the envelope of NDV. The Gag and Env proteins expressed by all the recombinants except rNDV-Env-Gag self-assembled into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus-like particles (VLPs). Immunization of guinea pigs by the intranasal route with these rNDVs produced long-lasting Env- and Gag-specific humoral immune responses. The Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses and Gag-specific humoral immune responses were higher in rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag than in the other recombinants. rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag were also more efficient in inducing cellular as well as protective immune responses to challenge with vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Env and Gag in mice. These results suggest that vaccination with a single rNDV coexpressing Env and Gag represents a promising strategy to enhance immunogenicity and protective efficacy against HIV. PMID:26199332

  4. Crystal structure, conformational fixation and entry-related interactions of mature ligand-free HIV-1 Env.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Do; Pancera, Marie; Acharya, Priyamvada; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Crooks, Emma T; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Guttman, Miklos; Ma, Xiaochu; Narpala, Sandeep; Soto, Cinque; Terry, Daniel S; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Ahlsen, Goran; Bailer, Robert T; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Druz, Aliaksandr; Hallen, Mark A; Harned, Adam; Kirys, Tatsiana; Louder, Mark K; O'Dell, Sijy; Ofek, Gilad; Osawa, Keiko; Prabhakaran, Madhu; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Stuckey, Jonathan; Thomas, Paul V; Tittley, Tishina; Williams, Constance; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Zhou; Donald, Bruce R; Lee, Lawrence K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Baxa, Ulrich; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Shapiro, Lawrence; Lee, Kelly K; Arthos, James; Munro, James B; Blanchard, Scott C; Mothes, Walther; Binley, James M; McDermott, Adrian B; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-07-01

    As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1-virion surface, trimeric Env is a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we present the structure of the ligand-free HIV-1-Env trimer, fix its conformation and determine its receptor interactions. Epitope analyses revealed trimeric ligand-free Env to be structurally compatible with broadly neutralizing antibodies but not poorly neutralizing ones. We coupled these compatibility considerations with binding antigenicity to engineer conformationally fixed Envs, including a 201C 433C (DS) variant specifically recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. DS-Env retained nanomolar affinity for the CD4 receptor, with which it formed an asymmetric intermediate: a closed trimer bound by a single CD4 without the typical antigenic hallmarks of CD4 induction. Antigenicity-guided structural design can thus be used both to delineate mechanism and to fix conformation, with DS-Env trimers in virus-like-particle and soluble formats providing a new generation of vaccine antigens.

  5. ENVE: a novel computational framework characterizes copy-number mutational landscapes in colorectal cancers from African American patients.

    PubMed

    Varadan, Vinay; Singh, Salendra; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Markowitz, Sanford D; Willis, Joseph E; Guda, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Reliable detection of somatic copy-number alterations (sCNAs) in tumors using whole-exome sequencing (WES) remains challenging owing to technical (inherent noise) and sample-associated variability in WES data. We present a novel computational framework, ENVE, which models inherent noise in any WES dataset, enabling robust detection of sCNAs across WES platforms. ENVE achieved high concordance with orthogonal sCNA assessments across two colorectal cancer (CRC) WES datasets, and consistently outperformed a best-in-class algorithm, Control-FREEC. We subsequently used ENVE to characterize global sCNA landscapes in African American CRCs, identifying genomic aberrations potentially associated with CRC pathogenesis in this population. ENVE is downloadable at https://github.com/ENVE-Tools/ENVE. PMID:26269717

  6. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Glenn, Jolene A.; Winton, James R.; Batts, William N.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  7. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, Eveline J; Glenn, Jolene A; Winton, James R; Batts, William N; Gregg, Jacob L; Hershberger, Paul K

    2014-11-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  8. Antibody to gp41 MPER alters functional properties of HIV-1 Env without complete neutralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur S; Leaman, Daniel P; Zwick, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design.

  9. Antibody to gp41 MPER Alters Functional Properties of HIV-1 Env without Complete Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Arthur S.; Leaman, Daniel P.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design. PMID:25058619

  10. Combinatorial hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and vaccination reduces viral pathogenesis following SHIV89.6P-challenge.

    PubMed

    Younan, P M; Polacino, P; Kowalski, J P; Hu, S-L; Kiem, H-P

    2015-12-01

    Development of curative approaches for HIV-1 infected patients requires novel approaches aimed at eliminating viral reservoirs and replacing potential target cells with infection-resistant immune cell populations. We have previously shown that autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with lentiviral vectors encoding the mC46-fusion inhibitor results in a significant reduction in viral pathogenesis following challenge with the highly pathogenic dual tropic, SHIV89.6P strain. In this study, we used a combinatorial approach in which following engraftment of genetically modified HSCs, pigtailed macaques were vaccinated with a previously developed vaccinia-based vaccine expressing SIV-Gag, Pol. Using this dual therapy approach, lower viremia was detected in both the acute and chronic phase of disease with levels reaching near the lower limits of detection. In comparison with macaques receiving HSCT only, the combination approach resulted in a further log decrease in plasma viremia. Similar to our previous studies, positive selection of all CD4(+) T-cell subsets was observed; however, higher gene-modified CD4(+) T-cell levels were observed during the chronic phase when vaccination was included suggesting that combining vaccination with HSCT may lower the necessary threshold for achieving viremic control. PMID:26355737

  11. Inside the Envelope: Endogenous Retrovirus-K Env as a Biomarker and Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Manghera, Mamneet; Douville, Renée N.

    2015-01-01

    Due to multiple ancestral human retroviral germ cell infections, the modern human genome is strewn with relics of these infections, termed endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). ERV expression has been silenced due to negative selective pressures and genetic phenomena such as mutations and epigenetic silencing. Nonetheless, select ERVs have retained the capacity to be damaging to their host when reawakened. Much of the current research on the ERVK Env protein strongly suggests a causal or contributive role in the pathogenesis of various cancers, autoimmune and infectious diseases. Additionally, there is a small body of research suggesting that ERVK Env has been domesticated for use in placental development, akin to the ERVW syncytin. Though much is left to ascertain, the innate immune response to ERVK Env expression has been partially characterized and appears to be due to a region located in the transmembrane domain of the Env protein. In this review, we aim to highlight ERVK Env as a biomarker for inflammatory conditions and explore its use as a future therapeutic target for cancers, HIV infection and neurological disease. PMID:26617584

  12. Biodegradation of Bis(2-Chloroethyl) Ether by Xanthobacter sp. Strain ENV481▿

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Schaefer, Charles E.; Vainberg, Simon; Steffan, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of bis(2-chloroethyl) ether (BCEE) was observed to occur in two bacterial strains. Strain ENV481, a Xanthobacter sp. strain, was isolated by enrichment culturing of samples from a Superfund site located in the northeastern United States. The strain was able to grow on BCEE or 2-chloroethylethyl ether as the sole source of carbon and energy. BCEE degradation in strain ENV481 was facilitated by sequential dehalogenation reactions resulting in the formation of 2-(2-chloroethoxy)ethanol and diethylene glycol (DEG), respectively. 2-Hydroxyethoxyacetic acid was detected as a product of DEG catabolism by the strain. Degradation of BCEE by strain ENV481 was independent of oxygen, and the strain was not able to grow on a mixture of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes, other prevalent contaminants at the site. Another bacterial isolate, Pseudonocardia sp. strain ENV478 (S. Vainberg et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5218-5224, 2006), degraded BCEE after growth on tetrahydrofuran or propane but was not able to grow on BCEE as a sole carbon source. BCEE degradation by strain ENV478 appeared to be facilitated by a monooxygenase-mediated O-dealkylation mechanism, and it resulted in the accumulation of 2-chloroacetic acid that was not readily degraded by the strain. PMID:17873075

  13. Cleavage-independent HIV-1 Env trimers engineered as soluble native spike mimetics for vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; de Val, Natalia; Bale, Shridhar; Guenaga, Javier; Tran, Karen; Feng, Yu; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Ward, Andrew B.; Wyatt, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Viral glycoproteins mediate entry by pH-activated or receptor-engaged activation and exist in metastable pre-fusogenic states that may be stabilized by directed rational design. As recently reported, the conformationally fixed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers in the pre-fusion state (SOSIP) display molecular homogeneity and structural integrity at relatively high levels of resolution. However, the SOSIPs necessitate full Env precursor cleavage, which requires endogenous furin over-expression. Here, we developed an alternative strategy using flexible peptide covalent linkage of Env subdomains to produce soluble, homogeneous and cleavage-independent Env mimics, called native flexibly linked (NFL) trimers, as vaccine candidates. This simplified design avoids the need for furin co-expression and, in one case, antibody affinity purification to accelerate trimer scale-up for preclinical and clinical applications. We have successfully translated the NFL design to multiple HIV-1 subtypes, establishing the potential to become a general method of producing native-like, well-ordered Env trimers for HIV-1 or other viruses. PMID:25892233

  14. Cleavage-independent HIV-1 Env trimers engineered as soluble native spike mimetics for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; de Val, Natalia; Bale, Shridhar; Guenaga, Javier; Tran, Karen; Feng, Yu; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2015-04-28

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry by pH-activated or receptor-engaged activation and exist in metastable pre-fusogenic states that may be stabilized by directed rational design. As recently reported, the conformationally fixed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers in the pre-fusion state (SOSIP) display molecular homogeneity and structural integrity at relatively high levels of resolution. However, the SOSIPs necessitate full Env precursor cleavage, which requires endogenous furin overexpression. Here, we developed an alternative strategy using flexible peptide covalent linkage of Env subdomains to produce soluble, homogeneous, and cleavage-independent Env mimics, called native flexibly linked (NFL) trimers, as vaccine candidates. This simplified design avoids the need for furin co-expression and, in one case, antibody affinity purification to accelerate trimer scale-up for preclinical and clinical applications. We have successfully translated the NFL design to multiple HIV-1 subtypes, establishing the potential to become a general method of producing native-like, well-ordered Env trimers for HIV-1 or other viruses.

  15. Characterization of the env gene in avian oncoviruses by heteroduplex mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, S F; Lai, M M; Vogt, P K

    1978-01-01

    The genome of ring-necked pheasant virus, an avian oncovirus, is largely homologous to the genomes of chicken oncoviruses except for a specific nonhomology in env, the gene coding for the surface glycoprotein of the virion (J. Tal, D. J. Fujita, S. Kawai, H. E. Varmus, and J. M. Bishop, J. Virol. 21:497--505, 1977). We have used this nonhomology between ring-necked pheasant virus and chicken oncoviruses in electron microscopic studies of heteroduplex molecules. The env-specific region of nonhomology is 1.5 to 1.7 kilobases in length. Its 3' boundary is located 0.6 to 0.7 kilobases from the 3' end of the genome in transformation-defective viruses and 2.5 kilobases from the 3' end in nondefective avian sarcoma viruses. Comparison of several strains of avian oncoviruses shows that the 3' half of this env region is conserved, while the 5' half is more diverged. A small area at the very 3' end of env also shows divergence between different avian oncoviruses. We found no evidence for the presence of a previously unrecognized gene between env and src. An electrophoretic comparison of the glycoproteins from various avian oncoviruses shows that those of ring-necked pheasant virus and Chinese quail virus differ in molecular weight from the glycoproteins of the chicken oncoviruses. Images PMID:212588

  16. Complex determinants of macrophage tropism in env of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Ringler, D J; Kodama, T; Desrosiers, R C

    1992-04-01

    Macrophage-tropic virus variants evolved during the course of infection of individual rhesus monkeys with cloned, non-macrophagetropic simian immunodeficiency virus. Specific changes in the envelope gene (env) were found to be primarily responsible for the dramatic increase in the ability of the virus to replicate in macrophages. Cloned viruses differing at nine amino acid positions in env exhibited a more than 100-fold difference in replicative capacity for primary cultures of rhesus monkey alveolar macrophages. At least five of the nine amino acid changes contributed to macrophage tropism. These determinants were distributed across the full length of env, including both the gp120 and gp41 products of the env gene. Furthermore, the emergence of macrophagetropic variants in vivo was associated with specific pathologic manifestations in which the macrophage is the major infected cell type. Thus, major determinants of macrophage tropism reside in env, they can be complex in nature, and the presence of macrophage-tropic virus variants in vivo can influence the disease course and disease manifestations.

  17. Parenteral Administration of Capsule Depolymerase EnvD Prevents Lethal Inhalation Anthrax Infection.

    PubMed

    Negus, David; Vipond, Julia; Hatch, Graham J; Rayner, Emma L; Taylor, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    Left untreated, inhalation anthrax is usually fatal. Vegetative forms of Bacillus anthracis survive in blood and tissues during infection due to elaboration of a protective poly-γ-D-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule that permits uncontrolled bacterial growth in vivo, eventually leading to overwhelming bacillosis and death. As a measure to counter threats from multidrug-resistant strains, we are evaluating the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of the PDGA depolymerase EnvD, a stable and potent enzyme which rapidly and selectively removes the capsule from the surface of vegetative cells. Repeated intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg recombinant EnvD (rEnvD) to mice infected with lethal doses of B. anthracis Ames spores by inhalation prevented the emergence of symptoms of anthrax and death; all animals survived the 5-day treatment period, and 70% survived to the end of the 14-day observation period. In contrast to results in sham-treated animals, the lungs and spleen of rEnvD-dosed animals were free of gross pathological changes. We conclude that rEnvD has potential as an agent to prevent the emergence of inhalation anthrax in infected animals and is likely to be effective against drug-resistant forms of the pathogen.

  18. Increased susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics and decreased porin content caused by envB mutations of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Oppezzo, O J; Avanzati, B; Antón, D N

    1991-01-01

    Isogenic derivatives carrying envB6, envB9, or envB+ alleles were obtained from a strain of Salmonella typhimurium that was partially resistant to mecillinam, a beta-lactam antibiotic specific for penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2). Testing of the isogenic strains with several antibacterial agents demonstrated that envB mutations either increased resistance (mecillinam) or did not affect the response (imipemen) to beta-lactams that act primarily on PBP 2, while susceptibilities to beta-lactams that act on PBP 1B, PBP 3, or both were increased. Furthermore, the susceptibilities of envB strains to hydrophobic compounds such as rifampin, novobiocin, or chloramphenicol were not modified, even though their susceptibilities to deoxycholate and crystal violet were enhanced. Outer cell membranes of envB mutants presented a 50% reduction in protein content compared with that of the isogenic envB+ strains, and OmpF and OmpD porins were particularly affected by the reduction. No alteration in the amount or pattern of periplasmic proteins was noticed, and lipopolysaccharides from envB mutants appeared to be normal by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. By using derivatives that produced a plasmid-encoded beta-lactamase, it was demonstrated that envB cells are slightly less permeable to cephalothin than envB+ bacteria are. It is concluded that the high susceptibility of envB mutants to beta-lactams is due to the increased effectiveness of the antibiotics on PBP 1B, PBP 3, or both. Images PMID:1656857

  19. [VLP vaccines and effects of HIV-1 Env protein modifications on their antigenic properties].

    PubMed

    Vzorov, A N; Compans, R W

    2016-01-01

    An ideal protective HIV-1 vaccine can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of preventing HIV transmission. The strategies of designing vaccines include generation of soluble recombinant proteins which mimic the native Env complex and are able to enhance the immunogenicity of gp120. Recent data indicate that the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein has multiple functions, which can affect the early steps of infection, as well as viral assembly and antigenic properties. Modifications in the CT can be used to induce conformational changes in functional regions of gp120 and to stabilize the trimeric structure, avoiding immune misdirection and induction of non-neutralizing antibody responses. Env-trimers with modified CTs in virus-like particles (VLPs) are able to induce antibodies with broad spectrum neutralizing activity and high avidity and have the potential for developing an effective vaccine against HIV. PMID:27414779

  20. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  1. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hicar, Mark D.; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection. PMID:27411063

  2. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U; Kalams, Spyros A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection. PMID:27411063

  3. Direct evidence for intracellular anterograde co-transport of M-PMV Gag and Env on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lara E.; Clark, Jasmine; Grznarova, Petra; Wen, Xiaoyun; LaCasse, Rachel; Ruml, Tomas; Spearman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular transport of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) assembled capsids from the pericentriolar region to the plasma membrane (PM) requires trafficking of envelope glycoprotein (Env) to the assembly site via the recycling endosome. However, it is unclear if Env-containing vesicles play a direct role in trafficking capsids to the PM. Using live cell microscopy, we demonstrate, for the first time, anterograde co-transport of Gag and Env. Nocodazole disruption of microtubules had differential effects on Gag and Env trafficking, with pulse-chase assays showing a delayed release of Env-deficient virions. Particle tracking demonstrated an initial loss of linear movement of GFP-tagged capsids and mCherry-tagged Env, followed by renewed movement of Gag but not Env at 4 h post-treatment. Thus, while delayed capsid trafficking can occur in the absence of microtubules, efficient anterograde transport of capsids appears to be mediated by microtubule-associated Env-containing vesicles. PMID:24418544

  4. Avian sarcoma virus gag and env gene structural protein precursors contain a common amino-terminal sequence.

    PubMed

    Ficht, T A; Chang, L J; Stoltzfus, C M

    1984-01-01

    The initiation site for translation of the avian sarcoma virus glycoprotein precursor, Pr63env, has been determined by analyzing the amino-terminal peptides of Pr63env and the polyprotein precursor Pr76gag encoded by the viral gag gene. The acceptor splice junction used to form the env gene mRNA has also been identified. Hybrid-selected virus-specific mRNAs were translated in vitro in the presence of either L-[35S]methionine to label at every methionine residue or L-[35S]methionine-tRNAMeti to label specifically at the amino-terminal methionine residues. Tryptic peptide maps of Pr63env labeled at every methionine residue contain all of the peptides, plus one additional peptide, present in the map of Pr57env, a nonglycosylated env-encoded polypeptide of molecular weight 57,000 immunoprecipitated from tunicamycin-treated cells. Specific amino-terminal labeling of the in vitro-synthesized polypeptides showed that the peptide missing from Pr57env corresponds to the amino-terminal tryptic peptide of Pr63env, which is removed in vivo as part of the amino-terminal signal peptide. Comparison of the amino-terminal tryptic peptides of Pr63env and Pr76gag showed that they are identical. In contrast, the chymotryptic amino-terminal peptides of Pr76gag and Pr63env are not identical. The location of the acceptor-splice junction in the env mRNA of the Prague A strain of avian sarcoma virus was determined by mung bean nuclease mapping to be at nucleotide 5,078. Fusion of the gag and env gene sequences during splicing results in use of the same AUG codon to initiate synthesis of Pr76gag and Pr63env. This sequence is contained within the 397-nucleotide 5' terminal leader that is spliced to the body of the env mRNA. The possible significance of these results for the regulation of avian sarcoma virus synthesis and translation is discussed.

  5. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Center, Rob J.; Gonelli, Christopher; Muller, Brian; Mackenzie, Charlene; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F. J.

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs) capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env) that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both neutralising and non

  6. Characterization of alpha-defensins plasma levels in Macaca fascicularis and correlations with virological parameters during SHIV89.6Pcy11 experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Negri, Donatella R M; Rovetto, Claudia; Belli, Roberto; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Catone, Stefania; Michelini, Zuleika; Borghi, Martina; Leone, Pasqualina; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heeney, Jonathan; Cara, Andrea

    2007-02-01

    Alpha-defensins have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro and may contribute to the overall control of viral replication in vivo. In the present work, we quantitatively measured the levels of alpha-defensins in the plasma of healthy and experimentally SHIV-infected Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus monkeys), an animal model of AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine development. Characterization of physiological plasma alpha-defensins levels was performed in 12 healthy monkeys following longitudinal analysis using an alpha-defensins ELISA kit currently validated for macaque use. Subsequently, alpha-defensins levels were quantitatively measured in 23 cynomolgus monkeys during titration protocols following both the mucosal and systemic routes of infection with the pathogenic SHIV89.6P(cy11). A significant increase in plasma alpha-defensins levels was consistently observed at early time points in all infected animals, regardless of the infection route. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between viral replication and levels of alpha-defensins during the acute phase of infection. Interestingly, in the animals infected through the mucosal route, alpha-defensins levels remained significantly higher at later time points, up to 19 weeks from the infection, while in cynomolgus infected intravenously, alpha-defensins levels returned to baseline levels by 4 weeks from infection, suggesting that the different route of infection may differently activate the innate immune response.

  7. CD4(+) T Cells Modified by the Endoribonuclease MazF Are Safe and Can Persist in SHIV-infected Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Saito, Naoki; Chono, Hideto; Shibata, Hiroaki; Ageyama, Naohide; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-06-10

    MazF, an endoribonuclease encoded by Escherichia coli, specifically cleaves the ACA (adenine-cytosine-adenine) sequence of single-stranded RNAs. Conditional expression of MazF under the control of the HIV-1 LTR promoter rendered CD4(+) T cells resistant to HIV-1 replication without affecting cell growth. To investigate the safety, persistence and efficacy of MazF-modified CD4(+) T cells in a nonhuman primate model in vivo, rhesus macaques were infected with a pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and transplanted with autologous MazF-modified CD4(+) T cells. MazF-modified CD4(+) T cells were clearly detected throughout the experimental period of more than 6 months. The CD4(+) T cell count values increased in all four rhesus macaques. Moreover, the transplantation of the MazF-modified CD4(+) T cells was not immunogenic, and did not elicit cellular or humoral immune responses. These data suggest that the autologous transplantation of MazF-modified CD4(+) T cells in the presence of SHIV is effective, safe and not immunogenic, indicating that this is an attractive strategy for HIV-1 gene therapy.

  8. CD4+ T Cells Modified by the Endoribonuclease MazF Are Safe and Can Persist in SHIV-infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Naoki; Chono, Hideto; Shibata, Hiroaki; Ageyama, Naohide; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    MazF, an endoribonuclease encoded by Escherichia coli, specifically cleaves the ACA (adenine–cytosine–adenine) sequence of single-stranded RNAs. Conditional expression of MazF under the control of the HIV-1 LTR promoter rendered CD4+ T cells resistant to HIV-1 replication without affecting cell growth. To investigate the safety, persistence and efficacy of MazF-modified CD4+ T cells in a nonhuman primate model in vivo, rhesus macaques were infected with a pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and transplanted with autologous MazF-modified CD4+ T cells. MazF-modified CD4+ T cells were clearly detected throughout the experimental period of more than 6 months. The CD4+ T cell count values increased in all four rhesus macaques. Moreover, the transplantation of the MazF-modified CD4+ T cells was not immunogenic, and did not elicit cellular or humoral immune responses. These data suggest that the autologous transplantation of MazF-modified CD4+ T cells in the presence of SHIV is effective, safe and not immunogenic, indicating that this is an attractive strategy for HIV-1 gene therapy. PMID:24914931

  9. Env sequence determinants in CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 subtype C

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nina H.; Becerril, Carlos; Giguel, Francoise; Novitsky, Vladimir; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Lockman, Shahin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Sagar, Manish

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) CXCR4-using virus is isolated infrequently and is poorly characterized. Understanding HIV-1C env characteristics has implications for the clinical use of antiretrovirals that target viral entry. A total of 209 env clones derived from 10 samples with mixed CCR5-(R5), CXCR4-using (X4) or dual-tropic HIV-1C were phenotyped for coreceptor usage. Intra-patient X4 and R5 variants generally formed distinct monophyletic phylogenetic clusters. X4 compared to R5 envs had significantly greater amino acid variability and insertions, higher net positive charge, fewer glycosylation sites and increased basic amino acid substitutions in the GPGQ crown. Basic amino acid substitution and/or insertion prior to the crown are highly sensitive characteristics for predicting X4 viruses. Chimeric env functional studies suggest that the V3 loop is necessary but often not sufficient to impart CXCR4 utilization. Our studies provide insights into the unique genotypic characteristics of X4 variants in HIV-1C. PMID:22954962

  10. Identification of HIV-1 Genitourinary Tract Compartmentalization by Analyzing the env Gene Sequences in Urine

    PubMed Central

    BLASI, Maria; CARPENTER, J. Harris; BALAKUMARAN, Bala; CARA, Andrea; GAO, Feng; KLOTMAN, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 persists indefinitely in memory CD4+ T cells and other long-lived cellular reservoirs despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our group had previously demonstrated that HIV-1 can establish a productive infection in renal epithelial cells and that the kidney represents a separate compartment for HIV-1 replication. Here, to better understand the viruses in this unique site, we genetically characterized and compared the viruses in blood and urine specimens from twenty-four HIV-1 infected subjects with detectable viremia. Design and Methods Blood and urine samples were obtained from 35 HIV-1 positive subjects. Single-genome amplification was performed on HIV-1 env RNA and DNA isolated from urine supernatants and urine derived cell pellets respectively, as well as from plasma and PBMC from the same individuals. Neighbor-joining trees were constructed under the Kimura 2-parameter mode. Results We amplified and sequenced the full-length HIV-1 envelope (env) gene from twelve of the twenty-four individuals, indicating that fifty percent (50%) of the viremic HIV-1 positive patients had viral RNA in their urine. Phylogenetic analysis of the env sequences from four subjects with more than fifteen urine-derived env sequences showed that the majority of the sequences from urine formed distinct cluster(s) independent of those PBMC and plasma-derived sequences, consistent with viral compartmentalization in the urine. Conclusions Our results suggest the presence of a distinct HIV compartment in the genitourinary tract. PMID:26372275

  11. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Mason, Rosemarie D; Welles, Hugh C; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Roederer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-2(7312A). This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  12. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Rosemarie D.; Welles, Hugh C.; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O’Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Roederer, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-27312A. This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  13. Env7p Associates with the Golgin Protein Imh1 at the trans-Golgi Network in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kongara Hanumantha; Ghosh, Swagata; Datta, Asis

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular dynamics is one of the very important aspects of cellular physiology, an imbalance of which leads to the disorders or diseases in higher eukaryotes. We report the functional characterization of a palmitoylated protein kinase from Candida albicans whose homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be involved in negative regulation of membrane fusion and was named Env7. However, the downstream target of this protein remains to be identified. Env7 in C. albicans (CaEnv7) could be isolated from the membrane fraction and localized to vesicular structures associated with the Golgi apparatus. Our work reports Env7 in C. albicans as a new player involved in maintaining the functional dynamics at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by interacting with two other TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1p and Arl1p. Direct interaction could be detected between Env7p and the golgin protein Imh1p. Env7 is itself phosphorylated (Env7p) and phosphorylates Imh1 in vivo. An interaction between Env7 and Imh1 is required for the targeted localization of Imh1. CaEnv7 has a putative palmitoylation site toward both N and C termini. An N-terminal palmitoylation-defective strain retains its ability to phosphorylate Imh1 in vitro. An ENV7 homozygous mutant showed compromised filamentation in solid media and attenuated virulence, whereas an overexpressed strain affected cell wall integrity. Thus, Env7 plays a subtle but important role at the level of multitier regulation that exists at the TGN. IMPORTANCE A multitier regulation exists at the trans-Golgi network in all higher organisms. We report a palmitoylated protein kinase, Env7, that functions at the TGN interface by interacting with two more TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1 and Arl1. Palmitoylation seems to be important for the specific localization. This study focuses on the involvement of a ubiquitous protein kinase, whose substrates had not yet been reported from any organism, as an upstream signaling component that

  14. Env7p Associates with the Golgin Protein Imh1 at the trans-Golgi Network in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kongara Hanumantha; Ghosh, Swagata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vesicular dynamics is one of the very important aspects of cellular physiology, an imbalance of which leads to the disorders or diseases in higher eukaryotes. We report the functional characterization of a palmitoylated protein kinase from Candida albicans whose homologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reported to be involved in negative regulation of membrane fusion and was named Env7. However, the downstream target of this protein remains to be identified. Env7 in C. albicans (CaEnv7) could be isolated from the membrane fraction and localized to vesicular structures associated with the Golgi apparatus. Our work reports Env7 in C. albicans as a new player involved in maintaining the functional dynamics at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by interacting with two other TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1p and Arl1p. Direct interaction could be detected between Env7p and the golgin protein Imh1p. Env7 is itself phosphorylated (Env7p) and phosphorylates Imh1 in vivo. An interaction between Env7 and Imh1 is required for the targeted localization of Imh1. CaEnv7 has a putative palmitoylation site toward both N and C termini. An N-terminal palmitoylation-defective strain retains its ability to phosphorylate Imh1 in vitro. An ENV7 homozygous mutant showed compromised filamentation in solid media and attenuated virulence, whereas an overexpressed strain affected cell wall integrity. Thus, Env7 plays a subtle but important role at the level of multitier regulation that exists at the TGN. IMPORTANCE A multitier regulation exists at the trans-Golgi network in all higher organisms. We report a palmitoylated protein kinase, Env7, that functions at the TGN interface by interacting with two more TGN-resident proteins, namely, Imh1 and Arl1. Palmitoylation seems to be important for the specific localization. This study focuses on the involvement of a ubiquitous protein kinase, whose substrates had not yet been reported from any organism, as an upstream signaling

  15. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  16. Heparin binds to murine leukemia virus and inhibits Env-independent attachment and infection.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon J; Pizzato, Massimo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Devereux, Stephen

    2002-07-01

    Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including heparin, inhibit infection by murine leukemia virus (MLV). We now show that this is due to inhibition of virus attachment independent of the interaction between viral envelope proteins (Env) and their cellular receptors. Heparin blocked the binding of both Env-deficient and amphotropic MLV (MLV-A) particles to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, CHO cells which lack the amphotropic retroviral receptor Pit-2, and CHO cells transfected with Pit-2 (CHO-Pit-2). Heparin also inhibited the transduction of NIH 3T3 cells by MLV-A over a similar concentration range. This effect was observed within 15 min of exposure to retrovirus. Preloading target cells with heparin had no effect on transduction and both MLV-A and Env-deficient retrovirus bound efficiently to heparin-coated agarose beads, suggesting that heparin interacts with the virus rather than the target cell. This requires both a strong negative charge and a specific structure since GAGs with different charge and carbohydrate composition inhibited virus infection variably. The specificity of GAG-virus interaction also depends on the producer cells, since virus packaged by murine GP+EnvAM12 cells was 1,000-fold more sensitive to inhibition by chondroitin sulfate A than was virus packaged by human FLYA13 packaging cells. No evidence for an interaction between MLV and cell surface proteoglycans was found, however, since the attachment of MLV-A and envelope-defective virus to proteoglycan-deficient CHOpgsA-745 cells was similar to that seen with both wild-type and CHO-Pit-2 cells. Although the molecular mechanism is unclear, this study presents evidence that Env receptor-independent attachment is an important step in MLV infection.

  17. Identification of EnvC and Its Cognate Amidases as Novel Determinants of Intrinsic Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Tamiko; Yeo, Won-Sik; Bae, Taeok

    2016-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are an essential part of the innate immune system. Some Gram-negative enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica, show intrinsic resistance to CAMPs. However, the molecular basis of intrinsic resistance is poorly understood, largely due to a lack of information about the genes involved. In this study, using a microarray-based genomic technique, we screened the Keio collection of 3,985 Escherichia coli mutants for altered susceptibility to human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP-1) and identified envC and zapB as novel genetic determinants of intrinsic CAMP resistance. In CAMP killing assays, an E. coli ΔenvCEc or ΔzapBEc mutant displayed a distinct profile of increased susceptibility to both LL-37 and HNP-1. Both mutants, however, displayed wild-type resistance to polymyxin B and human β-defensin 3 (HBD3), suggesting that the intrinsic resistance mediated by EnvC or ZapB is specific to certain CAMPs. A corresponding Salmonella ΔenvCSe mutant showed similarly increased CAMP susceptibility. The envC mutants of both E. coli and S. enterica displayed increased surface negativity and hydrophobicity, which partly explained the increased CAMP susceptibility. However, the ΔenvCEc mutant, but not the ΔenvCSe mutant, was defective in outer membrane permeability, excluding this defect as a common factor contributing to the increased CAMP susceptibility. Animal experiments showed that the Salmonella ΔenvCSe mutant had attenuated virulence. Taken together, our results indicate that the role of envC in intrinsic CAMP resistance is likely conserved among Gram-negative enteric bacteria, demonstrate the importance of intrinsic CAMP resistance for full virulence of S. enterica, and provide insight into distinct mechanisms of action of CAMPs. PMID:26810659

  18. Genetic shift of env V3 loop viral sequences in patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder during antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Christian; Müller, Oliver; Thordsen, Ingo; Schreiber, Michael; Methner, Axel

    2013-12-01

    The development of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) involves the adaptation of viral sequences coding for the V3 loop of the env protein. The plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may contain viral populations from various cellular sources and with differing pathogenicity. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may alter the relative abundance of these viral populations, leading to a genetic shift. We characterized plasma and CNS viral populations prior to and during cART and relate the findings to viral elimination kinetics and the clinical phenotype. Longitudinal plasma and CSF samples of five chronically infected HIV patients, four of whom had HAND, and one seroconverter were analyzed for V3 sequences by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. In the chronically infected patients, pre-cART plasma and CSF viral sequences were different irrespective of viral elimination kinetics and clinical phenotype. cART induced replacement of plasma viral populations in all subjects. CSF viral populations underwent a clear genetic shift in some patients but remained stable in others. This was not dependent on the presence of HAND. The genetic shift of CSF V3 sequences was absent in the two subjects whose CSF viral load initially increased during cART. In one patient, pre- and post-treatment CSF sequences were closely related to the post-treatment plasma sequences, suggesting a common cellular source. We found heterogeneous patterns of genetic compartmentalization and genetic shift over time. Although these did not closely match viral elimination kinetics and clinical phenotype, the results imply different patterns of the dynamics and relative contribution of compartment-specific virus populations in chronic HIV infection.

  19. Implementing RtI with Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth, Ed.; Johnsen, Susan K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Implementing RtI With Gifted Students" shares how RtI can fit within the framework of gifted education programming models. This edited book will serve as a reference guide for those interested in learning more about RtI and how it might be effectively implemented to meet the needs of all gifted students. Chapters contributed by top gifted…

  20. ENV7 and YCK3, which encode vacuolar membrane protein kinases, genetically interact to impact cell fitness and vacuole morphology.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Surya P; Gharakhanian, Editte

    2014-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles serve as a model for membrane fusion and fission. Yck3, a vacuolar membrane kinase, has been implicated in regulation of vacuole fusion. Recently, we established Env7 as another vacuolar membrane protein kinase with similar but nonredundant function to Yck3. Here, we report that native Env7 localizes to the vacuole independent of Yck3, where as its phosphorylation is YCK3 dependent. We also show that env7Δyck3Δ double mutant exhibits severely compromised fitness, altered cell size and bud vacuoles, and F-class vacuolar morphology. Our results establish negative genetic interactions between ENV7 and YCK3 and suggest cooperative roles for the two conserved genes in regulation of membrane dynamics. Such genetic buffering supports a critical role for membrane flux in global cell fitness.

  1. Reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    RT-PCR is commonly used to test for genetic diseases and to characterize gene expression in various tissue types, cell types, and over developmental time courses. This serves as a form of expression profiling, but typically as a candidate approach. RT-PCR is also commonly used to clone cDNAs for further use with other molecular biology techniques (e.g., see Oligo(dT)-primed RT-PCR isolation of polyadenylated RNA degradation intermediates and Circularized RT-PCR (cRT-PCR): analysis of RNA 5' ends, 3' ends, and poly(A) tails).

  2. Comprehensive Characterization of the Transmitted/founder env Genes from a Single MSM Cohort in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Huang, Xiaojie; Cai, Fangping; Vandergrift, Nathan; Xin, Ruolei; Meng, Zhefeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Chunlai; Xu, Xiaoning; Montefiori, David C; Gao, Feng; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The men having sex with men (MSM) population has become one of major risk groups for HIV-1 infection in China. However, the epidemiological patterns, function of the env genes, and autologous and heterologous neutralization activity in the same MSM population have not been systematically characterized. Methods The env gene sequences were obtained by the single genome amplification (SGA). The time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was estimated for each genotype using the Bayesian MCMC approach. Coreceptor usage was determined in NP-2 cells. Neutralization was analyzed using Env pseudoviruses in TZM-bl cells. Results We have obtained 547 full-length env gene sequences by SGA from 30 acute/early HIV-1-infected individuals in the Beijing MSM cohort. Three genotypes (Subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF07_BC) were identified and 20% of the individuals were infected with multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. The tight clusters of the MSM sequences regardless of geographic origins indicated nearly exclusive transmission within the MSM population and limited number of introductions. The tMRCA for each genotype was 10-15 years after each was first introduced in China. Disparate preferences for coreceptor usages among three genotypes might lead to the changes in percentage of different genotypes in the MSM population over time. The genotype-matched and -mismatched neutralization activity varied among the three genotypes. Conclusions Identification of unique characteristics for transmission, coreceptor usage, neutralization profile and epidemic patterns of HIV-1 is critical for the better understanding of transmission mechanisms, development of preventive strategies, and evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the MSM population in China. PMID:25886933

  3. Trimeric HIV-1-Env Structures Define Glycan Shields from Clades A, B, and G.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Soto, Cinque; Lemmin, Thomas; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Rui; Thomas, Paul V; Wagh, Kshitij; Zhou, Tongqing; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Bylund, Tatsiana; Choi, Chang W; Davison, Jack R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Joyce, M Gordon; Kwon, Young Do; Pancera, Marie; Taft, Justin; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Shivatare, Sachin S; Shivatare, Vidya S; Lee, Chang-Chun D; Wu, Chung-Yi; Bewley, Carole A; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Connors, Mark; Crispin, Max; Baxa, Ulrich; Korber, Bette T; Wong, Chi-Huey; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) trimer is covered by a glycan shield of ∼90 N-linked oligosaccharides, which comprises roughly half its mass and is a key component of HIV evasion from humoral immunity. To understand how antibodies can overcome the barriers imposed by the glycan shield, we crystallized fully glycosylated Env trimers from clades A, B, and G, visualizing the shield at 3.4-3.7 Å resolution. These structures reveal the HIV-1-glycan shield to comprise a network of interlocking oligosaccharides, substantially ordered by glycan crowding, that encase the protein component of Env and enable HIV-1 to avoid most antibody-mediated neutralization. The revealed features delineate a taxonomy of N-linked glycan-glycan interactions. Crowded and dispersed glycans are differently ordered, conserved, processed, and recognized by antibody. The structures, along with glycan-array binding and molecular dynamics, reveal a diversity in oligosaccharide affinity and a requirement for accommodating glycans among known broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the glycan-shielded trimer.

  4. Aerobic Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine by the Propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425▿

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H.; McClay, Kevin R.; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [14C]NDMA to 14CO2, growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  5. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  6. Aerobic biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine by the propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H; McClay, Kevin R; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [(14)C]NDMA to (14)CO(2), growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  7. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120–gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120–gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  8. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  9. Aerobic biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine by the propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H; McClay, Kevin R; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [(14)C]NDMA to (14)CO(2), growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation.

  10. Antibody potency relates to the ability to recognize the closed, pre-fusion form of HIV Env

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-02-01

    HIV’s envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for neutralizing antibodies. The structures of many broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in complex with truncated Env subunits or components have been reported. However, their interaction with the intact Env trimer, and the structural determinants that underlie neutralization resistance in this more native context are less well understood. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange to examine the interactions between a panel of bNAbs and native-like Env trimers (SOSIP.664 trimers). Highly potent bNAbs cause only localized effects at their binding interface, while the binding of less potent antibodies is associated with elaborate changes throughout the trimer. In conjunction with binding kinetics, our results suggest that poorly neutralizing antibodies can only bind when the trimer transiently samples an open state. We propose that the kinetics of such opening motions varies among isolates, with Env from neutralization-sensitive viruses opening more frequently than Env from resistant viruses.

  11. Expression of the env gene from the avian endogenous retrovirus ALVE and regulation by miR-155.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuming; Zhu, Wenqi; Chen, Shihao; Liu, Yangyang; Sun, Zhen; Geng, Tuoyu; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Bo; Song, Chengyi; Qin, Aijian; Cui, Hengmi

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are important retroelements that reside in host genomes. However, ERV expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) and MSB1 cells infected with Marek's disease virus (MDV) exhibited significantly increased expression of env from the endogenous retrovirus ALVE. In contrast, env expression was significantly lower in CEF and MSB1 cells infected with exogenous avian leukosis virus J (ALVJ) at the early infection stage. Furthermore, env was found to be ubiquitously expressed in various chicken tissues, with high expression in certain tissues at 2 days of age and low levels in most tissues, including immune organs (thymus, spleen and bursa) as well as the brain and heart, at 35 days of age. Sequence analysis revealed miR-155 target sites in env transcripts, which was verified using a firefly luciferase reporter assay, and treatment with miR-155 agomir significantly decreased levels of env transcripts in MSB1 and CEF cells. Together, these findings suggest that the env gene from the endogenous retrovirus ALVE is regulated by miR-155. PMID:27016933

  12. Crystal structure, conformational fixation, and entry-related interactions of mature ligand-free HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young Do; Pancera, Marie; Acharya, Priyamvada; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Crooks, Emma T.; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M. Gordon; Guttman, Miklos; Ma, Xiaochu; Narpala, Sandeep; Soto, Cinque; Terry, Daniel S.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Ahlsen, Goran; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Hallen, Mark A.; Harned, Adam; Kirys, Tatsiana; Louder, Mark K.; O’Dell, Sijy; Ofek, Gilad; Osawa, Keiko; Prabhakaran, Madhu; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.E.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Thomas, Paul V.; Tittley, Tishina; Williams, Constance; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Zhou; Donald, Bruce R.; Lee, Lawrence K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Baxa, Ulrich; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Shapiro, Lawrence; Lee, Kelly K.; Arthos, James; Munro, James B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Mothes, Walther; Binley, James M.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1-virion surface, trimeric Env is a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we present the structure of the ligand-free HIV-1-Env trimer, fix its conformation, and determine its receptor interactions. Epitope analyses revealed trimeric ligand-free Env to be structurally compatible with broadly neutralizing antibodies, but not poorly neutralizing ones. We coupled these compatibility considerations with binding antigenicity to engineer conformationally fixed Envs, including a 201C-433C (DS) variant, specifically recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. DS-Env retained nanomolar affinity for the CD4 receptor, with which it formed an asymmetric intermediate: a closed trimer bound by a single CD4 without the typical antigenic hallmarks of CD4 induction. Antigenicity-guided structural design can thus be used both to delineate mechanism and to fix conformation, with DS-Env trimers in virus-like particle and soluble formats providing a new generation of vaccine antigens. PMID:26098315

  13. HIV-1 Nef responsiveness is determined by Env variable regions involved in trimer association and correlates with neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2013-11-14

    HIV-1 Nef and the unrelated murine leukemia virus glycoGag similarly enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virions. We now show that the effects of Nef and glycoGag are similarly determined by variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 that control Env trimer association and neutralization sensitivity. Whereas neutralization-sensitive X4-tropic Env proteins conferred high responsiveness to Nef and glycoGag, particles bearing neutralization-resistant R5-tropic Envs were considerably less affected. The profoundly different Nef/glycoGag responsiveness of a neutralization-resistant and a neutralization-sensitive R5-tropic Env could be switched by exchanging their gp120 V1/V2 regions, which also switches their neutralization sensitivity. Within V1/V2, the same determinants governed Nef/glycoGag responsiveness and neutralization sensitivity, indicating that these phenotypes are mechanistically linked. The V1/V2 and V3 regions, which form an apical trimer-association domain, together determined the Nef and glycoGag responsiveness of an X4-tropic Env. Our results suggest that Nef and glycoGag counteract the inactivation of Env spikes with relatively unstable apical trimer-association domains.

  14. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Env7 is a novel serine/threonine kinase 16-related protein kinase and negatively regulates organelle fusion at the lysosomal vacuole.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Surya P; Ricarte, Florante; Cocca, Stephanie M; Gharakhanian, Editte

    2013-02-01

    Membrane fusion depends on conserved components and is responsible for organelle biogenesis and vesicular trafficking. Yeast vacuoles are dynamic structures analogous to mammalian lysosomes. We report here that yeast Env7 is a novel palmitoylated protein kinase ortholog that negatively regulates vacuolar membrane fusion. Microscopic and biochemical studies confirmed the localization of tagged Env7 at the vacuolar membrane and implicated membrane association via the palmitoylation of its N-terminal Cys13 to -15. In vitro kinase assays established Env7 as a protein kinase. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Env7 alanine-proline-glutamic acid (APE) motif Glu269 to alanine results in an unstable kinase-dead allele that is stabilized and redistributed to the detergent-resistant fraction by interruption of the proteasome system in vivo. Palmitoylation-deficient Env7C13-15S is also kinase dead and mislocalizes to the cytoplasm. Microscopy studies established that env7Δ is defective in maintaining fragmented vacuoles during hyperosmotic response and in buds. ENV7 function is not redundant with a similar role of vacuolar membrane kinase Yck3, as the two do not share a substrate, and ENV7 is not a suppressor of yck3Δ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses strongly support ENV7 as an ortholog of the gene encoding human STK16, a Golgi apparatus protein kinase with undefined function. We propose that Env7 function in fusion/fission dynamics may be conserved within the endomembrane system.

  16. A Native-Like SOSIP.664 Trimer Based on an HIV-1 Subtype B env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Ringe, Rajesh; Yasmeen, Anila; de Val, Natalia; Derking, Ronald; Kim, Helen J.; Korzun, Jacob; Golabek, Michael; de los Reyes, Kevin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant trimeric mimics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike should expose as many epitopes as possible for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) but few, if any, for nonneutralizing antibodies (non-NAbs). Soluble, cleaved SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A strain BG505 approach this ideal and are therefore plausible vaccine candidates. Here, we report on the production and in vitro properties of a new SOSIP.664 trimer derived from a subtype B env gene, B41, including how to make this protein in low-serum media without proteolytic damage (clipping) to the V3 region. We also show that nonclipped trimers can be purified successfully via a positive-selection affinity column using the bNAb PGT145, which recognizes a quaternary structure-dependent epitope at the trimer apex. Negative-stain electron microscopy imaging shows that the purified, nonclipped, native-like B41 SOSIP.664 trimers contain two subpopulations, which we propose represent an equilibrium between the fully closed and a more open conformation. The latter is different from the fully open, CD4 receptor-bound conformation and may represent an intermediate state of the trimer. This new subtype B trimer adds to the repertoire of native-like Env proteins that are suitable for immunogenicity and structural studies. IMPORTANCE The cleaved, trimeric envelope protein complex is the only neutralizing antibody target on the HIV-1 surface. Many vaccine strategies are based on inducing neutralizing antibodies. For HIV-1, one approach involves using recombinant, soluble protein mimics of the native trimer. At present, the only reliable way to make native-like, soluble trimers in practical amounts is via the introduction of specific sequence changes that confer stability on the cleaved form of Env. The resulting proteins are known as SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers, and the current paradigm is based on the BG505 subtype A env gene. Here, we describe the

  17. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  18. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  19. A Small Molecule, Which Competes with MAdCAM-1, Activates Integrin α4β7 and Fails to Prevent Mucosal Transmission of SHIV-SF162P3.

    PubMed

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Goode, Diana; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Wilk, Jolanta; Frank, Ines; Byrareddy, Siddappa; Arthos, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Zydowsky, Thomas; Gettie, Agegnehu; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission is inefficient. However, certain viral and host characteristics may play a role in facilitating HIV acquisition and systemic expansion. Cells expressing high levels of integrin α4β7 have been implicated in favoring the transmission process and the infusion of an anti-α4β7 mAb (RM-Act-1) prior to, and during a repeated low-dose vaginal challenge (RLDC) regimen with SIVmac251 reduced SIV acquisition and protected the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) in the macaques that acquired SIV. α4β7 expression is required for lymphocyte trafficking to the gut lamina propria and gut inductive sites. Several therapeutic strategies that target α4β7 have been shown to be effective in treating inflammatory conditions of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To determine if blocking α4β7 with ELN, an orally available anti-α4 small molecule, would inhibit SHIV-SF162P3 acquisition, we tested its ability to block MAdCAM-1 (α4β7 natural ligand) and HIV-gp120 binding in vitro. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of ELN after oral and vaginal delivery in macaques. Twenty-six macaques were divided into 3 groups: 9 animals were treated with ELN orally, 9 orally and vaginally and 8 were used as controls. All animals were challenged intra-vaginally with SHIV-SF162P3 using the RLDC regimen. We found that ELN did not protect macaques from SHIV acquisition although it reduced the SHIV-induced inflammatory status during the acute phase of infection. Notably, integrins can exist in different activation states and, comparing the effect of ELN and the anti-α4β7 mAb RM-Act-1 that reduced susceptibility to SIV infection, we determined that ELN induces the active conformation of α4β7, while RM-Act-1 inhibits its activation through an allosteric mechanism. These results suggest that inhibition of α4β7 activation may be necessary to reduce susceptibility to SIV/SHIV infection and highlight the complexity of anti

  20. A Small Molecule, Which Competes with MAdCAM-1, Activates Integrin α4β7 and Fails to Prevent Mucosal Transmission of SHIV-SF162P3

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Goode, Diana; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Wilk, Jolanta; Frank, Ines; Byrareddy, Siddappa; Arthos, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Zydowsky, Thomas; Gettie, Agegnehu; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission is inefficient. However, certain viral and host characteristics may play a role in facilitating HIV acquisition and systemic expansion. Cells expressing high levels of integrin α4β7 have been implicated in favoring the transmission process and the infusion of an anti-α4β7 mAb (RM-Act-1) prior to, and during a repeated low-dose vaginal challenge (RLDC) regimen with SIVmac251 reduced SIV acquisition and protected the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) in the macaques that acquired SIV. α4β7 expression is required for lymphocyte trafficking to the gut lamina propria and gut inductive sites. Several therapeutic strategies that target α4β7 have been shown to be effective in treating inflammatory conditions of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To determine if blocking α4β7 with ELN, an orally available anti-α4 small molecule, would inhibit SHIV-SF162P3 acquisition, we tested its ability to block MAdCAM-1 (α4β7 natural ligand) and HIV-gp120 binding in vitro. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of ELN after oral and vaginal delivery in macaques. Twenty-six macaques were divided into 3 groups: 9 animals were treated with ELN orally, 9 orally and vaginally and 8 were used as controls. All animals were challenged intra-vaginally with SHIV-SF162P3 using the RLDC regimen. We found that ELN did not protect macaques from SHIV acquisition although it reduced the SHIV-induced inflammatory status during the acute phase of infection. Notably, integrins can exist in different activation states and, comparing the effect of ELN and the anti-α4β7 mAb RM-Act-1 that reduced susceptibility to SIV infection, we determined that ELN induces the active conformation of α4β7, while RM-Act-1 inhibits its activation through an allosteric mechanism. These results suggest that inhibition of α4β7 activation may be necessary to reduce susceptibility to SIV/SHIV infection and highlight the complexity of anti

  1. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  2. Using CoRT Thinking in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchior, Timothy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of Edward de Bono's CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) program in English classes during the past five years at Memorial Junior High School in Valley Stream, New York. CoRT tools were used to analyze literary characters and plot development and to generate and organize ideas for writing assignments. (TE)

  3. Interinstrument Reliability of the RT3 Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the interinstrument reliability of six RT3 accelerometers for measuring physical activities. Each of the six healthy participants, mean age 36.1 years (SD 9.4), carried six RT3 accelerometers (same type and same producer) simultaneously placed ventrally at the waist belt. The participants performed three…

  4. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response.

  5. Env-Expressing Autologous T Lymphocytes Induce Neutralizing Antibody and Afford Marked Protection against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pistello, Mauro; Bonci, Francesca; Zabogli, Elisa; Conti, Francesca; Freer, Giulia; Maggi, Fabrizio; Stevenson, Mario; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of HIV and other lentiviruses possess neutralization and other protective epitopes, yet all attempts to induce protective immunity using Env as the only immunogen have either failed or afforded minimal levels of protection. In a novel prime-boost approach, specific-pathogen-free cats were primed with a plasmid expressing Env of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then boosted with their own T lymphocytes transduced ex vivo to produce the same Env and interleukin 15 (3 × 106 to 10 × 106 viable cells/cat). After the boost, the vaccinees developed elevated immune responses, including virus-neutralizing antibodies (NA). Challenge with an ex vivo preparation of FIV readily infected all eight control cats (four mock vaccinated and four naïve) and produced a marked decline in the proportion of peripheral CD4 T cells. In contrast, five of seven vaccinees showed little or no traces of infection, and the remaining two had reduced viral loads and underwent no changes in proportions of CD4 T cells. Interestingly, the viral loads of the vaccinees were inversely correlated to the titers of NA. The findings support the concept that Env is a valuable immunogen but needs to be administered in a way that permits the expression of its full protective potential. PMID:20130057

  6. Drosophila germline invasion by the endogenous retrovirus gypsy: involvement of the viral env gene.

    PubMed

    Pelisson, A; Mejlumian, L; Robert, V; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    2002-10-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is expressed at high levels in mutant flamenco female flies. Gypsy viral particles extracted from such flies can infect naive flamenco individuals raised in the presence of these extracts mixed into their food. This results in the integration of new proviruses into the germline genome. These proviruses can then increase their copy number by (1) expression in the flamenco female somatic cells, (2) transfer into the oocyte and (3) integration into the genome of the progeny. Surprisingly, unlike the infection observed in the feeding experiments, this strategy of endogenous proviral multiplication does not seem to involve the expression of the viral env gene. PMID:12225916

  7. A Val-25-to-Ile substitution in the envelope precursor polyprotein, gPr80env, is responsible for the temperature sensitivity, inefficient processing of gPr80env, and neurovirulence of ts1, a mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus TB.

    PubMed Central

    Szurek, P F; Yuen, P H; Ball, J K; Wong, P K

    1990-01-01

    ts1 is a neurovirulent spontaneous temperature-sensitive mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus TB which causes hindlimb paralysis in mice. Previously, it had been shown that the temperature-sensitive defect resided in the env gene. At the restrictive temperature, the envelope precursor polyprotein, gPr80env, is inefficiently processed intracellularly into two cleavage products, gp70 and Prp15E. This inefficient processing of gPr80env is correlated with neurovirulence. In this study, it was shown that a single amino acid substitution, Val-25----Ile in gPr80env, is responsible for the temperature sensitivity, inefficient processing of gPr80env at the restrictive temperature, and neurovirulence of ts1. At the restrictive temperature, a steady-state level of nonprocessed, endoglycosidase H-sensitive gPr80env remained in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells infected by ts1, but no endoglycosidase H-resistant gPr80env and only trace amounts of gp70 were detected in the infected cells. Since the host cell-encoded processing protease resides in the cis cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, inefficient processing of gPr80env at the restrictive temperature is most likely due to inefficient transport of gPr80env from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cis cisternae of the Golgi apparatus rather than due to misfolded gPr80env being a poor substrate for the processing protease at the restrictive temperature. Images PMID:2296075

  8. A novel TaqMan real-time PCR assay to estimate ex vivo human immunodeficiency virus type 1 fitness in the era of multi-target (pol and env) antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jan; Rangel, Hector R; Chakraborty, Bikram; Tadele, Mahlet; Martinez, Miguel A; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Marotta, Michael L; Mirza, Muneer; Ruiz, Lidia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Wrin, Terri; Petropoulos, Christos J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2003-08-01

    Despite numerous studies on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fitness, many key conceptual and technical questions are still unsolved. For example, the proper system to determine virus fitness of HIV-1 is still unknown. In this study, an assay was developed to estimate HIV-1 fitness based on growth competition experiments and TaqMan real-time PCR. This novel technique was compared with several methods (i.e. virus growth kinetics, growth competition/heteroduplex-tracking analysis and single-cycle replication capacity assay) in order to analyse the impact of various genomic regions and overall genetic background on virus fitness. HIV-1 primary isolates and three different sets of recombinant viruses [i.e. recombinant clones carrying protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT) or the 3' end of Gag, PR and RT (3'Gag/PR/RT), sequences amplified by PCR from the same primary isolates)] were evaluated. Here, it is demonstrated that, in spite of intrinsic differences, both growth competition/TaqMan and single-cycle replication assays detected a significant reduction in HIV-1 fitness as a consequence of drug-resistant mutations in pol. However, this new assay, based on HIV-1 isolates, may be useful to quantify replicative fitness in viruses from patients treated simultaneously with antiretroviral drugs targeting different genomic regions of HIV-1 (e.g. pol and env).

  9. Structural insights into key sites of vulnerability on HIV-1 Env and influenza HA.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Peter S; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are the surface glycoproteins responsible for viral entry into host cells, the first step in the virus life cycle necessary to initiate infection. These glycoproteins exhibit a high degree of sequence variability and glycosylation, which are used as strategies to escape host immune responses. Nonetheless, antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against these viruses have been isolated that have managed to overcome these barriers. Here, we review recent advances in the structural characterization of these antibodies with their viral antigens that defines a few sites of vulnerability on these viral spikes. These broadly neutralizing antibodies tend to focus their recognition on the sites of similar function between the two viruses: the receptor-binding site and membrane fusion machinery. However, some sites of recognition are unique to the virus neutralized, such as the dense shield of oligomannose carbohydrates on HIV-1 Env. These observations are discussed in the context of structure-based design strategies to aid in vaccine design or development of antivirals. PMID:23046130

  10. Structural insights into key sites of vulnerability on HIV-1 Env and influenza HA.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Peter S; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are the surface glycoproteins responsible for viral entry into host cells, the first step in the virus life cycle necessary to initiate infection. These glycoproteins exhibit a high degree of sequence variability and glycosylation, which are used as strategies to escape host immune responses. Nonetheless, antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against these viruses have been isolated that have managed to overcome these barriers. Here, we review recent advances in the structural characterization of these antibodies with their viral antigens that defines a few sites of vulnerability on these viral spikes. These broadly neutralizing antibodies tend to focus their recognition on the sites of similar function between the two viruses: the receptor-binding site and membrane fusion machinery. However, some sites of recognition are unique to the virus neutralized, such as the dense shield of oligomannose carbohydrates on HIV-1 Env. These observations are discussed in the context of structure-based design strategies to aid in vaccine design or development of antivirals.

  11. A Multivalent Clade C HIV-1 Env Trimer Cocktail Elicits a Higher Magnitude of Neutralizing Antibodies than Any Individual Component

    PubMed Central

    Bricault, Christine A.; Kovacs, James M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Yusim, Karina; Giorgi, Elena E.; Shields, Jennifer L.; Perry, James; Lavine, Christy L.; Cheung, Ann; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Gray, Glenda E.; Williamson, Carolyn; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Seaman, Michael S.; Korber, Bette T.; Chen, Bing

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) presents a formidable challenge to the generation of an HIV-1 vaccine. One strategy to address such sequence diversity and to improve the magnitude of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is to utilize multivalent mixtures of HIV-1 envelope (Env) immunogens. Here we report the generation and characterization of three novel, acute clade C HIV-1 Env gp140 trimers (459C, 405C, and 939C), each with unique antigenic properties. Among the single trimers tested, 459C elicited the most potent NAb responses in vaccinated guinea pigs. We evaluated the immunogenicity of various mixtures of clade C Env trimers and found that a quadrivalent cocktail of clade C trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs against a panel of tier 1A and 1B viruses than any single clade C trimer alone, demonstrating that the mixture had an advantage over all individual components of the cocktail. These data suggest that vaccination with a mixture of clade C Env trimers represents a promising strategy to augment vaccine-elicited NAb responses. IMPORTANCE It is currently not known how to generate potent NAbs to the diverse circulating HIV-1 Envs by vaccination. One strategy to address this diversity is to utilize mixtures of different soluble HIV-1 envelope proteins. In this study, we generated and characterized three distinct, novel, acute clade C soluble trimers. We vaccinated guinea pigs with single trimers as well as mixtures of trimers, and we found that a mixture of four trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs than any single trimer within the mixture. The results of this study suggest that further development of Env trimer cocktails is warranted. PMID:25540368

  12. Antigenic and 3D structural characterization of soluble X4 and hybrid X4-R5 HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is decorated with trimeric glycoprotein spikes that enable infection by engaging CD4 and a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. The variable loop 3 (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) is the main determinant for coreceptor usage. The predominant CCR5 using (R5) HIV-1 Env has been intensively studied in function and structure, whereas the trimeric architecture of the less frequent, but more cytopathic CXCR4 using (X4) HIV-1 Env is largely unknown, as are the consequences of sequence changes in and near V3 on antigenicity and trimeric Env structure. Results Soluble trimeric gp140 Env constructs were used as immunogenic mimics of the native spikes to analyze their antigenic properties in the context of their overall 3D structure. We generated soluble, uncleaved, gp140 trimers from a prototypic T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) X4 HIV-1 strain (NL4-3) and a hybrid (NL4-3/ADA), in which the V3 spanning region was substituted with that from the primary R5 isolate ADA. Compared to an ADA (R5) gp140, the NL4-3 (X4) construct revealed an overall higher antibody accessibility, which was most pronounced for the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), but also observed for mAbs against CD4 induced (CD4i) epitopes and gp41 mAbs. V3 mAbs showed significant binding differences to the three constructs, which were refined by SPR analysis. Of interest, the NL4-3/ADA construct with the hybrid NL4-3/ADA CD4bs showed impaired CD4 and CD4bs mAb reactivity despite the presence of the essential elements of the CD4bs epitope. We obtained 3D reconstructions of the NL4-3 and the NL4-3/ADA gp140 trimers via electron microscopy and single particle analysis, which indicates that both constructs inherit a propeller-like architecture. The first 3D reconstruction of an Env construct from an X4 TCLA HIV-1 strain reveals an open conformation, in contrast to recently published more closed structures from R5 Env. Exchanging the X4 V3 spanning region for that of R5 ADA did not alter the open

  13. Dense display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the lambda phage scaffold does not result in the generation of improved antibody responses to HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Mattiacio, Jonelle; Walter, Scott; Brewer, Matt; Domm, William; Friedman, Alan E.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The generation of strong, virus-neutralizing antibody responses to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a major goal in HIV-1 vaccine research. To try to enhance the Env-specific response, we displayed oligomeric gp140 on a virus-like scaffold provided by the lambda phage capsid. To do this, an in vitro complementation system was used to “decorate” phage particles with glycosylated, mammalian cell-derived envelope oligomers. We compared the immune response to lambda phage particles displaying HIV-1 Env to that elicited by soluble oligomeric gp140 in rabbits. Env-binding antibody titers were higher in animals that received oligomeric gp140 as compared to Env decorated phage particles, as were virus neutralizing antibody responses. The Env decorated phage particles were, however, able to efficiently boost a protein-primed humoral response to levels equivalent to those elicited by high-dose adjuvanted Env oligomers. These results show that display of HIV-1 envelope spikes on the bacteriophage lambda capsid does not result in an improved, Env-specific humoral immune response. PMID:21310193

  14. Protection against rectal transmission of an emtricitabine-resistant simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIV162p3M184V mutant by intermittent prophylaxis with Truvada.

    PubMed

    Cong, Mian-Er; Youngpairoj, Ae S; Zheng, Qi; Aung, Wutyi; Mitchell, James; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Hanson, Debra L; Hendry, R Michael; Dobard, Charles; Heneine, Walid; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2011-08-01

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada (emtricitabine [FTC] and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate [TDF]) is a novel HIV prevention strategy recently found to reduce HIV incidence among men who have sex with men. We used a macaque model of HIV transmission to investigate if Truvada maintains prophylactic efficacy against an FTC-resistant isolate containing the M184V mutation. Five macaques received a dose of Truvada 3 days before exposing them rectally to the simian/human immunodeficiency virus mutant SHIV162p3(M184V), followed by a second dose 2 h after exposure. Five untreated animals were used as controls. Virus exposures were done weekly for up to 14 weeks. Despite the high (>100-fold) level of FTC resistance conferred by M184V, all five treated animals were protected from infection, while the five untreated macaques were infected (P = 0.0008). Our results show that Truvada maintains high prophylactic efficacy against an FTC-resistant isolate. Increased susceptibility to tenofovir due to M184V and other factors, including residual antiviral activity by FTC and/or reduced virus fitness due to M184V, may all have contributed to the observed protection.

  15. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models.

    PubMed

    Boyapalle, Sandhya; Xu, Weidong; Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  16. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  17. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  18. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  19. From sensors to semantic web: the SemsorGrid4env project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, K.; Deroure, D.; Page, K.; Sadler, J.; Hutton, C.; Newman, R.; Roe, S.

    2009-12-01

    Sensor networks are producing large quantities of valuable data around the planet. However advances are needed in the information management of such systems in order to make it easier to find and obtain the data. This is particularly true of software systems or models which need to automatically find appropriate data sources. The SemsorGrid4Env project is a three year European project to develop an integrated information space where new sensor network data sources can be discovered using web technologies and semantic descriptions. Rapid development of decision support systems are being developed within the context of ocean monitoring for flood and fire warnings. These are based around large quantities of sensors around the southern coast of the UK as well as a new sensor network deployment in forests in Spain. This paper will describe the design of the system, data integration issues, mashups and semantic interfaces.

  20. Genetic Attributes of Blood-Derived Subtype-C HIV-1 tat and env in India and Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman, Myres W.; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Deshpande, Suprit; Ghate, Manisha; Espitia, Stephen; Grant, Igor; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Smith, Davey; Mehendale, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Genetic elements in HIV-1 subtype B tat and env are associated with neurotoxicity yet less is known about other subtypes. HIV-1 sub-type C tat and env sequences were analyzed to determine viral genetic elements associated with neurocognitive impairment in a large Indian cohort. Population-based sequences of HIV-1 tat (exon 1) and env (C2-V3 coding region) were generated from blood plasma of HIV-infected patients in Pune, India. Participants were classified as cognitively normal or impaired based on neuropsychological assessment. Tests for signature residues, positive and negative selection, entropy, and ambiguous bases were performed using tools available through Los Alamos National Laboratory (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov) and Datamonkey (http://www.datamonkey.org). HIV-1 subtype C tat and env sequences were analyzed for 155 and 160 participants, of which 34–36% were impaired. Two signature residues were unique to impaired participants in exon 1 of tat at codons 29 (arginine) and 68 (proline). Positive selection was noted at codon 29 among normal participants and at codon 68 in both groups. The signature at codon 29 was also a signature for low CD4+ (<200 cells/mm3) counts but remained associated with impairment after exclusion of those with low CD4+ counts. No unique genetic signatures were noted in env. In conclusion, two signature residues were identified in exon 1 of HIV-1 subtype C tat that were associated with neurocognitive impairment in India and not completely accounted for by HIV disease progression. These signatures support a linkage between diversifying selection in HIV-1 subtype C tat and neurocognitive impairment. PMID:24150902

  1. First-in-Human Evaluation of a Hexon Chimeric Adenovirus Vector Expressing HIV-1 Env (IPCAVD 002)

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Lindsey R.; Walsh, Stephen R.; Seaman, Michael S.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Tucker, Robert P.; Kleinjan, Jane A.; Gothing, Jon A.; Engelson, Brian A.; Carey, Brittany R.; Oza, Avinash; Bajimaya, Shringkhala; Peter, Lauren; Bleckwehl, Chelsea; Abbink, Peter; Pau, Maria G.; Weijtens, Mo; Kunchai, Meghan; Swann, Edith M.; Wolff, Mark; Dolin, Raphael; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype hexon chimeric adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) vector containing the hexon hypervariable regions of Ad serotype 48 (Ad48) and expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 EnvA. Methods. Forty-eight Ad5 and Ad48 seronegative, HIV-uninfected subjects were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation phase 1 study. Four groups of 12 subjects received 109 to 1011 viral particles (vp) of the Ad5HVR48.EnvA.01 vaccine (n = 10 per group) or placebo (n = 2 per group) at week 0 or weeks 0, 4, and 24. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. Results. Self-limited reactogenicity was observed after the initial immunization in the highest (1011 vp) dose group. Responses in vaccinees included Ad48 neutralizing antibody (nAb) titers higher than Ad5 nAb titers, EnvA-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers, and EnvA-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay responses, and these responses generally persisted at week 52. At week 28 in the 109, 1010, and 1011 vp 3-dose groups, geometric mean EnvA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers were 5721, 10 929, and 3420, respectively, and Ad48 nAb titers were a median of 1.7-fold higher than for Ad5. Conclusions. Ad5HVR48.ENVA.01 was safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic at all doses tested. Vector-elicited nAb responses were greater for Ad48 than Ad5, confirming that Ad-specific nAbs in humans are primarily, but not exclusively, directed against the hexon hypervariable regions. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00695877. PMID:24719474

  2. Macrophage entry mediated by HIV Envs from brain and lymphoid tissues is determined by the capacity to use low CD4 levels and overall efficiency of fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Elaine R.; Dunfee, Rebecca L.; Stanton, Jennifer; Bogdan, Derek; Taylor, Joann; Kunstman, Kevin; Bell, Jeanne E.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana . E-mail: dana_gabuzda@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-03-30

    HIV infects macrophages and microglia in the central nervous system (CNS), which express lower levels of CD4 than CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood. To investigate mechanisms of HIV neurotropism, full-length env genes were cloned from autopsy brain and lymphoid tissues from 4 AIDS patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Characterization of 55 functional Env clones demonstrated that Envs with reduced dependence on CD4 for fusion and viral entry are more frequent in brain compared to lymphoid tissue. Envs that mediated efficient entry into macrophages were frequent in brain but were also present in lymphoid tissue. For most Envs, entry into macrophages correlated with overall fusion activity at all levels of CD4 and CCR5. gp160 nucleotide sequences were compartmentalized in brain versus lymphoid tissue within each patient. Proline at position 308 in the V3 loop of gp120 was associated with brain compartmentalization in 3 patients, but mutagenesis studies suggested that P308 alone does not contribute to reduced CD4 dependence or macrophage-tropism. These results suggest that HIV adaptation to replicate in the CNS selects for Envs with reduced CD4 dependence and increased fusion activity. Macrophage-tropic Envs are frequent in brain but are also present in lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients with HAD, and entry into macrophages in the CNS and other tissues is dependent on the ability to use low receptor levels and overall efficiency of fusion.

  3. Unique N-linked glycosylation of CasBrE Env influences its stability, processing, and viral infectivity but not its neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Renszel, Krystal M; Traister, Russell S; Lynch, William P

    2013-08-01

    The envelope protein (Env) from the CasBrE murine leukemia virus (MLV) can cause acute spongiform neurodegeneration analogous to that induced by prions. Upon central nervous system (CNS) infection, Env is expressed as multiple isoforms owing to differential asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation. Because N-glycosylation can affect protein folding, stability, and quality control, we explored whether unique CasBrE Env glycosylation features could influence neurovirulence. CasBrE Env possesses 6/8 consensus MLV glycosylation sites (gs) but is missing gs3 and gs5 and contains a putative site (gs*). Twenty-nine mutants were generated by modifying these three sites, individually or in combination, to mimic the amino acid sequence in the nonneurovirulent Friend 57 MLV. Three basic viral phenotypes were observed: replication defective (dead; titer < 1 focus-forming unit [FFU]/ml), replication compromised (RC) (titer = 10(2) to 10(5) FFU/ml); and wild-type-like (WTL) (titer > 10(5) FFU/ml). Env protein was undetectable in dead mutants, while RC and WTL mutants showed variations in Env expression, processing, virus incorporation, virus entry, and virus spread. The newly introduced gs3 and gs5 sites were glycosylated, whereas gs* was not. Six WTL mutants tested in mice showed no clear attenuation in disease onset or severity versus controls. Furthermore, three RC viruses tested by neural stem cell (NSC)-mediated brainstem dissemination also induced acute spongiosis. Thus, while unique N-glycosylation affected structural features of Env involved in protein stability, proteolytic processing, and virus assembly and entry, these changes had minimal impact on CasBrE Env neurotoxicity. These findings suggest that the Env protein domains responsible for spongiogenesis represent highly stable elements upon which the more variable viral functional domains have evolved.

  4. Long-Term Central and Effector SHIV-Specific Memory T Cell Responses Elicited after a Single Immunization with a Novel Lentivector DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Moussa, Maha; Baccard-Longere, Monique; Villinger, François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of HIV acquisition and replication requires long lasting and effective immunity. Given the state of HIV vaccine development, innovative vectors and immunization strategies are urgently needed to generate safe and efficacious HIV vaccines. Here, we developed a novel lentivirus-based DNA vector that does not integrate in the host genome and undergoes a single-cycle of replication. Viral proteins are constitutively expressed under the control of Tat-independent LTR promoter from goat lentivirus. We immunized six macaques once only with CAL-SHIV-IN− DNA using combined intramuscular and intradermal injections plus electroporation. Antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored for 47 weeks post-immunization (PI). PBMCs were assessed directly ex vivo or after 6 and 12 days of in vitro culture using antigenic and/or homeostatic proliferation. IFN-γ ELISPOT was used to measure immediate cytokine secretion from antigen specific effector cells and from memory precursors with high proliferative capacity (PHPC). The memory phenotype and functions (proliferation, cytokine expression, lytic content) of specific T cells were tested using multiparametric FACS-based assays. All immunized macaques developed lasting peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses mainly against Gag and Nef antigens. During the primary expansion phase, immediate effector cells as well as increasing numbers of proliferating cells with limited effector functions were detected which expressed markers of effector (EM) and central (CM) memory phenotypes. These responses contracted but then reemerged later in absence of antigen boost. Strong PHPC responses comprising vaccine-specific CM and EM T cells that readily expanded and acquired immediate effector functions were detected at 40/47 weeks PI. Altogether, our study demonstrated that a single immunization with a replication-limited DNA vaccine elicited persistent vaccine-specific CM and EM CD8+ and CD4+ T cells with immediate and readily

  5. CD4-mimetic sulfopeptide conjugates display sub-nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity and protect macaques against a SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ariën, Kevin K.; Baleux, Françoise; Desjardins, Delphine; Porrot, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Michiels, Johan; Bouchemal, Kawthar; Bonnaffé, David; Bruel, Timothée; Schwartz, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Vanham, Guido; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The CD4 and the cryptic coreceptor binding sites of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are key to viral attachment and entry. We developed new molecules comprising a CD4 mimetic peptide linked to anionic compounds (mCD4.1-HS12 and mCD4.1-PS1), that block the CD4-gp120 interaction and simultaneously induce the exposure of the cryptic coreceptor binding site, rendering it accessible to HS12- or PS1- mediated inhibition. Using a cynomolgus macaque model of vaginal challenge with SHIV162P3, we report that mCD4.1-PS1, formulated into a hydroxyethyl-cellulose gel provides 83% protection (5/6 animals). We next engineered the mCD4 moiety of the compound, giving rise to mCD4.2 and mCD4.3 that, when conjugated to PS1, inhibited cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 with particularly low IC50, in the nM to pM range, including some viral strains that were resistant to the parent molecule mCD4.1. These chemically defined molecules, which target major sites of vulnerability of gp120, are stable for at least 48 hours in conditions replicating the vaginal milieu (37 °C, pH 4.5). They efficiently mimic several large gp120 ligands, including CD4, coreceptor or neutralizing antibodies, to which their efficacy compares very favorably, despite a molecular mass reduced to 5500 Da. Together, these results support the development of such molecules as potential microbicides. PMID:27721488

  6. Rectal Application of a Highly Osmolar Personal Lubricant in a Macaque Model Induces Acute Cytotoxicity but Does Not Increase Risk of SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Morris, Monica R.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Luo, Wei; Rose, Charles E.; Blau, Dianna M.; Tsegaye, Theodros; Zaki, Sherif R.; Garber, David A.; Jenkins, Leecresia T.; Henning, Tara C.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Hendry, R. Michael; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal lubricant use is common during anal intercourse. Some water-based products with high osmolality and low pH can damage genital and rectal tissues, and the polymer polyquaternium 15 (PQ15) can enhance HIV replication in vitro. This has raised concerns that lubricants with such properties may increase STD/HIV infection risk, although in vivo evidence is scarce. We use a macaque model to evaluate rectal cytotoxicity and SHIV infection risk after use of a highly osmolar (>8,000 mOsm/kg) water-based lubricant with pH of 4.4, and containing PQ15. Methods Cytotoxicity was documented by measuring inflammatory cytokines and epithelial tissue sloughing during six weeks of repeated, non-traumatic lubricant or control buffer applications to rectum and anus. We measured susceptibility to SHIVSF162P3 infection by comparing virus doses needed for rectal infection in twenty-one macaques treated with lubricant or control buffer 30 minutes prior to virus exposure. Results Lubricant increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and tissue sloughing while control buffer (phosphate buffered saline; PBS) did not. However, the estimated AID50 (50% animal infectious dose) was not different in lubricant- and control buffer-treated macaques (p = 0.4467; logistic regression models). Conclusions Although the test lubricant caused acute cytotoxicity in rectal tissues, it did not increase susceptibility to infection in this macaque model. Thus neither the lubricant-induced type/extent of inflammation nor the presence of PQ15 affected infection risk. This study constitutes a first step in the in vivo evaluation of lubricants with regards to HIV transmission. PMID:25853710

  7. Exclusive Decoration of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env with High-Mannose Type N-Glycans Is Not Compatible with Mucosal Transmission in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Christina B.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Cajic, Samanta; Nehlmeier, Inga; Neumann, Berit; Klippert, Antonina; Sauermann, Ulrike; Reichl, Udo; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Rapp, Erdmann; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope (Env) proteins are extensively decorated with N-glycans, predominantly of the high-mannose type. However, it is unclear how high-mannose N-glycans on Env impact viral spread. We show that exclusive modification of SIV Env with these N-glycans reduces viral infectivity and abrogates mucosal transmission, despite increasing viral capture by immune cell lectins. Thus, high-mannose N-glycans have opposed effects on SIV infectivity and lectin reactivity, and a balance might be required for efficient mucosal transmission. PMID:26355090

  8. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  9. MicroRT - Small animal conformal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Stojadinovic, S.; Low, D. A.; Hope, A. J.; Vicic, M.; Deasy, J. O.; Cui, J.; Khullar, D.; Parikh, P. J.; Malinowski, K. T.; Izaguirre, E. W.; Mutic, S.; Grigsby, P. W.

    2007-12-15

    A novel small animal conformal radiation therapy system has been designed and prototyped: MicroRT. The microRT system integrates multimodality imaging, radiation treatment planning, and conformal radiation therapy that utilizes a clinical {sup 192}Ir isotope high dose rate source as the radiation source (teletherapy). A multiparameter dose calculation algorithm based on Monte Carlo dose distribution simulations is used to efficiently and accurately calculate doses for treatment planning purposes. A series of precisely machined tungsten collimators mounted onto a cylindrical collimator assembly is used to provide the radiation beam portals. The current design allows a source-to-target distance range of 1-8 cm at four beam angles: 0 deg. (beam oriented down), 90 deg., 180 deg., and 270 deg. The animal is anesthetized and placed in an immobilization device with built-in fiducial markers and scanned using a computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or positron emission tomography scanner prior to irradiation. Treatment plans using up to four beam orientations are created utilizing a custom treatment planning system--microRTP. A three-axis computer-controlled stage that supports and accurately positions the animals is programmed to place the animal relative to the radiation beams according to the microRTP plan. The microRT system positioning accuracy was found to be submillimeter. The radiation source is guided through one of four catheter channels and placed in line with the tungsten collimators to deliver the conformal radiation treatment. The microRT hardware specifications, the accuracy of the treatment planning and positioning systems, and some typical procedures for radiobiological experiments that can be performed with the microRT device are presented.

  10. Life+ EnvEurope DEIMS - improving access to long-term ecosystem monitoring data in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliment, Tomas; Peterseil, Johannes; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pugnetti, Alessandra; Blankman, David

    2013-04-01

    Long-term ecological (LTER) studies aim at detecting environmental changes and analysing its related drivers. In this respect LTER Europe provides a network of about 450 sites and platforms. However, data on various types of ecosystems and at a broad geographical scale is still not easily available. Managing data resulting from long-term observations is therefore one of the important tasks not only for an LTER site itself but also on the network level. Exchanging and sharing the information within a wider community is a crucial objective in the upcoming years. Due to the fragmented nature of long-term ecological research and monitoring (LTER) in Europe - and also on the global scale - information management has to face several challenges: distributed data sources, heterogeneous data models, heterogeneous data management solutions and the complex domain of ecosystem monitoring with regard to the resulting data. The Life+ EnvEurope project (2010-2013) provides a case study for a workflow using data from the distributed network of LTER-Europe sites. In order to enhance discovery, evaluation and access to data, the EnvEurope Drupal Ecological Information Management System (DEIMS) has been developed. This is based on the first official release of the Drupal metadata editor developed by US LTER. EnvEurope DEIMS consists of three main components: 1) Metadata editor: a web-based client interface to manage metadata of three information resource types - datasets, persons and research sites. A metadata model describing datasets based on Ecological Metadata Language (EML) was developed within the initial phase of the project. A crosswalk to the INSPIRE metadata model was implemented to convey to the currently on-going European activities. Person and research site metadata models defined within the LTER Europe were adapted for the project needs. The three metadata models are interconnected within the system in order to provide easy way to navigate the user among the related

  11. Getting SMaRT in California

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-02-01

    With the year 2000 fast approaching, Waste Management`s Davis Street SMaRT Station in the San Francisco Bay Area is ramping up its yard and wood waste components to reach the magic 50% recycling figure required of california jurisdictions. Waste Management`s Davis Street Station in San Leandro, Calif., is in a growth spurt. Late last year the SMaRT facility--which stands for station for materials recycling and transfer--added 50 tph of yard and wood waste capacity, making it one of the largest facilities in the country that deal with organic wastes, and bringing the multimaterial facility to a total of more than 3,000 tpd of overall capacity.

  12. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  13. Genetic and neutralization sensitivity of diverse HIV-1 env clones from chronically infected patients in China.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Han, Xiaoxu; Shi, Xuanling; Zuo, Teng; Goldin, Mark; Chen, Dan; Han, Bing; Sun, Wei; Wu, Hao; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Linqi

    2011-04-22

    As HIV-1 continues to spread in China from traditional high risk populations to the general public, its genetic makeup has become increasingly complex. However, the impact of these genetic changes on the biological and neutralization sensitivity of the virus is unknown. The current study aims to characterize the genetic, biological, and neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 identified in China between 2004 and 2007. Based on a total of 107 full-length envelope genes obtained directly from the infected patients, we found that those viruses fell into three major genetic groups: CRF01_AE, subtype B', and subtype C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC/B'C. Pseudotyped viruses built upon the viable env genes have demonstrated their substantial variability in mediating viral entry and in sensitivity to neutralization by subtype-specific plasma pools and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAb). Many viruses are resistant to one or more bnmAb, including those known to have high potency against diverse viruses from outside China. Sequence and structural analysis has revealed several mechanisms by which these resistant viruses escape recognition from bnmAb. We believe that these results will help us to better understand the impact of genetic diversity on the neutralizing sensitivity of the viruses and to facilitate the design of immunogens capable of eliciting antibodies with potency and breadth similar to those of bnmAb. PMID:21325278

  14. Quantitative RT-PCR detection of hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in the Buffalo River and source water dams in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chigor, Vincent Nnamdigadi; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2012-11-01

    Human enteric viruses (HEntVs) are a major cause of water-related diseases. The prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), rotaviruses (RoV) and enteroviruses (EnV) in Buffalo River waters was assessed quantitatively over a period of 12 months (August 2010 to July 2011). Seventy-two samples were collected from six sites, including three dams, and concentrated using the adsorption-elution method. Viral RNA was extracted using a commercial kit, and the viruses were quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR). Two or more viruses were detected in 12.5% of the samples. HAV was detected in 43.1% of the samples and in significantly (p < 0.05) varying concentrations of 1.5 × 10(1)–1.9 × 10(5) genome copies/L compared to RoV and EnV, while RoVs were detected in 13.9% of samples, with concentrations ranging from 2.5 × 10(1)–2.1 × 10(3) genome copies/L, and EnV were detected in 9.7% of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 1.3 × 10(1)–8.6 × 10(1) genome copies/L. Only HAV was detected at all the sites, with the Bridle Drift Dam recording significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations. The presence of enteric viruses in Buffalo River may constitute public health risks and the incidence of HAV at all the sites could reflect both the epidemiological status of hepatitis A and HAV persistence in the water environments. PMID:23202829

  15. Quantitative RT-PCR detection of hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in the Buffalo River and source water dams in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chigor, Vincent Nnamdigadi; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2012-11-01

    Human enteric viruses (HEntVs) are a major cause of water-related diseases. The prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), rotaviruses (RoV) and enteroviruses (EnV) in Buffalo River waters was assessed quantitatively over a period of 12 months (August 2010 to July 2011). Seventy-two samples were collected from six sites, including three dams, and concentrated using the adsorption-elution method. Viral RNA was extracted using a commercial kit, and the viruses were quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR). Two or more viruses were detected in 12.5% of the samples. HAV was detected in 43.1% of the samples and in significantly (p < 0.05) varying concentrations of 1.5 × 10(1)–1.9 × 10(5) genome copies/L compared to RoV and EnV, while RoVs were detected in 13.9% of samples, with concentrations ranging from 2.5 × 10(1)–2.1 × 10(3) genome copies/L, and EnV were detected in 9.7% of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 1.3 × 10(1)–8.6 × 10(1) genome copies/L. Only HAV was detected at all the sites, with the Bridle Drift Dam recording significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations. The presence of enteric viruses in Buffalo River may constitute public health risks and the incidence of HAV at all the sites could reflect both the epidemiological status of hepatitis A and HAV persistence in the water environments.

  16. Proviral amplification of the Gypsy endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster involves env-independent invasion of the female germline.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, F; Teysset, L; Terzian, C; Prud'homme, N; Santamaria, P; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    1999-05-01

    Gypsy is an infectious endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. The gypsy proviruses replicate very efficiently in the genome of the progeny of females homozygous for permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. This replicative transposition is correlated with derepression of gypsy expression, specifically in the somatic cells of the ovaries of the permissive mothers. The determinism of this amplification was studied further by making chimeric mothers containing different permissive/restrictive and somatic/germinal lineages. We show here that the derepression of active proviruses in the permissive soma is necessary and sufficient to induce proviral insertions in the progeny, even if the F1 flies derive from restrictive germ cells devoid of active proviruses. Therefore, gypsy endogenous multiplication results from the transfer of some gypsy-encoded genetic material from the soma towards the germen of the mother and its subsequent insertion into the chromosomes of the progeny. This transfer, however, is not likely to result from retroviral infection of the germline. Indeed, we also show here that the insertion of a tagged gypsy element, mutant for the env gene, occurs at high frequency, independently of the production of gypsy Env proteins by any transcomplementing helper. The possible role of the env gene for horizontal transfer to new hosts is discussed. PMID:10228177

  17. Structures of HIV-1-Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M.; Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Jarosinski, Marissa C.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M.; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K.; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C.; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1-Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had only been determined with antibodies from a single donor, making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the co-crystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third. These V1V2-directed bNAbs utilized strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand, but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated protruding loops to develop early, with glycan interactions maturing over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested V1V2-directed bNAbs to form an ‘extended class’, for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class. PMID:26689967

  18. Prime-boost immunization schedules based on influenza virus and vaccinia virus vectors potentiate cellular immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus Env protein systemically and in the genitorectal draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, M Magdalena; Nájera, José Luis; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Guerra, Susana; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Esteban, Mariano

    2003-06-01

    Vaccines that elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses should be the choice to control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. We have previously shown that prime-boost immunizations with influenza virus Env and vaccinia virus (VV) WR Env recombinants induced an enhanced systemic CD8(+) T-cell response against HIV-1 Env antigen. In this report, we analyzed in BALB/c mice after priming with influenza virus Env the ability of two VV recombinants expressing HIV-1 Env B (VV WR Env and the highly attenuated modified VV Ankara [MVA] Env) to boost cellular immune responses in the spleen and in the lymph nodes draining the genital and rectal tracts. Groups of mice were primed by the intranasal route with 10(4) PFU of influenza virus Env and boosted 14 days later by the intraperitoneal or intranasal route with 10(7) PFU of MVA Env or VV WR Env, while the control group received two immunizations with influenza virus Env. We found that the combined immunization (Flu/VV) increased more than 60 times the number of gamma interferon-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to the Flu/Flu scheme. Significantly, boosting with MVA Env by the intraperitoneal route induced a response 1.25 or 2.5 times (spleen or genital lymph nodes) higher with respect to that found after the boost with VV WR Env. Mice with an enhanced CD8(+) T-cell response also had an increased Th1/Th2 ratio, evaluated by the cytokine pattern secreted following in vitro restimulation with gp160 protein and by the specific immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)/IgG1 ratio in serum. By the intranasal route recombinant WR Env booster gave a more efficient immune response (10 and 1.3 times in spleen and genital lymph nodes, respectively) than recombinant MVA Env. However, the scheme influenza virus Env/MVA Env increased four times the response in the spleen, giving a low but significant response in the genital lymph nodes compared with a single intranasal immunization with MVA Env. These results demonstrate that the combination

  19. Antiviral CD8+ T cells in the genital tract control viral replication and delay progression to AIDS after vaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaques immunized with virulence attenuated SHIV 89.6

    PubMed Central

    Genescà, M.; McChesney, M.B.; Miller, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Genescà M, McChesney MB, Miller CJ (Center for Comparative Medicine and California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA, USA). Antiviral CD8+ T cells in the genital tract control viral replication and delay progression to AIDS after vaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaques immunized with virulence attenuated SHIV 89.6 (Review). The recently failed clinical efficacy trial of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine that elicits antiviral CD8+ T-cell responses has emphasized the challenge of producing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/rhesus monkey model of AIDS, live-attenuated lentivirus ‘vaccines’ provide the best protection from uncontrolled viral replication and clinical disease after pathogenic SIV challenge. This review summarizes a recent series of studies in which we show that after vaginal SIV challenge of rhesus macaques immunized with an attenuated lentivirus protection from uncontrolled viral replication is primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells in the vaginal mucosa. Immunization with a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) results in a systemic infection that induces a moderate population of SIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells with cytolytic potential in the vaginal mucosa. Depletion of CD8+ T cells at the time of SIV challenge completely abrogates the protection mediated by prior infection with attenuated SHIV. Further after vaginal SIV challenge, the only significant expansion of SIV-specific T cells occurs in the vagina in these animals. No significant expansion of T-cell responses was observed in systemic lymphoid tissues. Thus, the presence of SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in the vagina on the day of vaginal SIV challenge and a modest expansion of local effector T cells is sufficient to stop uncontrolled SIV replication. It seems that T-cell based vaccine strategies that can elicit mucosal effector CD8+ T

  20. Defense-in-depth by mucosally administered anti-HIV dimeric IgA2 and systemic IgG1 mAbs: complete protection of rhesus monkeys from mucosal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Sholukh, Anton M; Watkins, Jennifer D; Vyas, Hemant K; Gupta, Sandeep; Lakhashe, Samir K; Thorat, Swati; Zhou, Mingkui; Hemashettar, Girish; Bachler, Barbara C; Forthal, Donald N; Villinger, Francois; Sattentau, Quentin J; Weiss, Robin A; Agatic, Gloria; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Heeney, Jonathan L; Ruprecht, Ruth M

    2015-04-21

    Although IgA is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin in humans, its role in preventing HIV-1 acquisition, which occurs mostly via mucosal routes, remains unclear. In our passive mucosal immunizations of rhesus macaques (RMs), the anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nmAb) HGN194, given either as dimeric IgA1 (dIgA1) or dIgA2 intrarectally (i.r.), protected 83% or 17% of the RMs against i.r. simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge, respectively. Data from the RV144 trial implied that vaccine-induced plasma IgA counteracted the protective effector mechanisms of IgG1 with the same epitope specificity. We thus hypothesized that mucosal dIgA2 might diminish the protection provided by IgG1 mAbs targeting the same epitope. To test our hypothesis, we administered HGN194 IgG1 intravenously (i.v.) either alone or combined with i.r. HGN194 dIgA2. We enrolled SHIV-exposed, persistently aviremic RMs protected by previously administered nmAbs; RM anti-human IgG responses were undetectable. However, low-level SIV Gag-specific proliferative T-cell responses were found. These animals resemble HIV-exposed, uninfected humans, in which local and systemic cellular immune responses have been observed. HGN194 IgG1 and dIgA2 used alone and the combination of the two neutralized the challenge virus equally well in vitro. All RMs given only i.v. HGN194 IgG1 became infected. In contrast, all RMs given HGN194 IgG1+dIgA2 were completely protected against high-dose i.r. SHIV-1157ipEL-p challenge. These data imply that combining suboptimal defenses at the mucosal and systemic levels can completely prevent virus acquisition. Consequently, active vaccination should focus on defense-in-depth, a strategy that seeks to build up defensive fall-back positions well behind the fortified frontline.

  1. Gene amplification and qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cerith; Filloux, Alain

    2014-01-01

    This chapter includes methods for the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Pseudomonas, and several specific tips for their successful application in this organism. The first part of the chapter includes methods for purifying genomic DNA from, and amplifying genes from, Pseudomonas, in addition to methods which describe how to prepare a cell lysate from Pseudomonas species for colony PCR reactions. The chapter continues with a switch in focus from DNA to RNA, describing methods for RNA isolation from Pseudomonas, cDNA generation, and finally q-RT-PCR to investigate relative changes in gene expression. PMID:24818925

  2. An Automated HIV-1 Env-Pseudotyped Virus Production for Global HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martina; Mazzotta, Angela S.; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A.; Montefiori, David C.; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays) confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. Conclusions An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell culture supernatant per

  3. Increasing hydrophobicity of residues in an anti-HIV-1 Env peptide synergistically improves potency.

    PubMed

    Leung, Michael Y K; Cohen, Fredric S

    2011-04-20

    T-20/Fuzeon/Enfuvirtide (ENF), a peptide inhibitor of HIV-1 infection, targets the grooves created by heptad repeat 2 (HR2) of Env's coiled-coil, but mutants resistant to ENF emerge. In this study, ENF-resistant mutants--V38A, N43D, N43D/S138A, Q40H/L45M--were combined with modified inhibitory peptides to identify what we believe to be novel ways to improve peptide efficacy. V38A did not substantially reduce infectivity, but was relatively resistant to inhibitory peptides. N43D was more resistant to inhibitory peptides than wild-type, but infectivity was reduced. The additional mutation S138A (N43D/S138A) increased infectivity and further reduced peptide inhibitory potency. It is concluded that S138A increased binding of HR2/ENF into grooves and that S138A compensated for electrostatic repulsion between N43D and HR2. The six-helix bundle structure indicated that E148A should increase hydrophobic interactions between the coiled-coil and peptide. Importantly, the modifications S138A and E148A in the same peptide retained potency against ENF-escape mutants. The double mutant's increase in potency was greater than the increases from the sum of S138A and E148A individually, showing that these two altered residues synergistically contributed to peptide binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry established that hydrophobic substitutions at positions S138 and E148 improved potency of inhibitory peptides against escape mutants by increasing enthalpic release of energy upon peptide binding.

  4. Single Amino Acid Substitution N659D in HIV-2 Envelope Glycoprotein (Env) Impairs Viral Release and Hampers BST-2 Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Dufrasne, François E.; Lombard, Catherine; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2016-01-01

    BST-2 or tetherin is a host cell restriction factor that prevents the budding of enveloped viruses at the cell surface, thus impairing the viral spread. Several countermeasures to evade this antiviral factor have been positively selected in retroviruses: the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) relies on the envelope glycoprotein (Env) to overcome BST-2 restriction. The Env gp36 ectodomain seems involved in this anti-tetherin activity, however residues and regions interacting with BST-2 are not clearly defined. Among 32 HIV-2 ROD Env mutants tested, we demonstrated that the asparagine residue at position 659 located in the gp36 ectodomain is mandatory to exert the anti-tetherin function. Viral release assays in cell lines expressing BST-2 showed a loss of viral release ability for the HIV-2 N659D mutant virus compared to the HIV-2 wild type virus. In bst-2 inactivated H9 cells, those differences were lost. Subtilisin treatment of infected cells demonstrated that the N659D mutant was more tethered at the cell surface. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments confirmed a direct molecular link between Env and BST-2 and highlighted an inability of the mutant to bind BST-2. We also tested a virus presenting a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminal part of Env, a cytoplasmic tail partial deletion that is spontaneously selected in vitro. Interestingly, viral release assays and FRET experiments indicated that a full Env cytoplasmic tail was essential in BST-2 antagonism. In HIV-2 infected cells, an efficient Env-mediated antagonism of BST-2 is operated through an intermolecular link involving the asparagine 659 residue as well as the C-terminal part of the cytoplasmic tail. PMID:27754450

  5. Enhanced cell surface expression, immunogenicity and genetic stability resulting from a spontaneous truncation of HIV Env expressed by a recombinant MVA

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, Linda S. Belyakov, Igor M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Moss, Bernard

    2008-03-15

    During propagation of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) encoding HIV 89.6 Env, a few viral foci stained very prominently. Virus cloned from such foci replicated to higher titers than the parent and displayed enhanced genetic stability on passage. Sequence analysis showed a single nucleotide deletion in the 89.6 env gene of the mutant that caused a frame shift and truncation of 115 amino acids from the cytoplasmic domain. The truncated Env was more highly expressed on the cell surface, induced higher antibody responses than the full-length Env, reacted with HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and mediated CD4/co-receptor-dependent fusion. Intramuscular (IM), intradermal (ID) needleless, and intrarectal (IR) catheter inoculations gave comparable serum IgG responses. However, intraoral (IO) needleless injector route gave the highest IgA in lung washings and IR gave the highest IgA and IgG responses in fecal extracts. Induction of CTL responses in the spleens of individual mice as assayed by intracellular cytokine staining was similar with both the full-length and truncated Env constructs. Induction of acute and memory CTL in the spleens of mice immunized with the truncated Env construct by ID, IO, and IR routes was comparable and higher than by the IM route, but only the IR route induced CTL in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Thus, truncation of Env enhanced genetic stability as well as serum and mucosal antibody responses, suggesting the desirability of a similar modification in MVA-based candidate HIV vaccines.

  6. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIV{sub KU2} infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    SciTech Connect

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-05

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-{gamma}-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV{sub KU2}. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-{gamma} production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-{gamma} producing CD4{sup +} cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies.

  7. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Design Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Participants Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. Setting The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. Results We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. Conclusion This technique can now be extended to the study

  8. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. As PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. PMID:24768348

  9. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Ekstroem, Maria; Wallin, Michael; Garoff, Henrik . E-mail: henrik.garoff@cbt.ki.se

    2007-04-25

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca{sup 2+} depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol.

  10. Further investigation of the target resistance penetration parameter Rt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.; Anderson, C. E.; Orphal, D. L.

    2000-04-01

    The quasi steady-state penetration of long rods into semi-infinite targets has been described by the modified Bernoulli equation (MBE) 1/2 ρp(V-U)2+Yp=1/2 ρtU2+Rt, where Rt is a material dependent parameter corresponding to target resistance to penetration. Rosenberg and Dekel (1994) investigated the dependence of Rt on target strength Yt and impact velocity V. They found an Rt(Yt) dependence similar to the one obtained from cavity expansion analysis, and a decreasing Rt(V) dependence. Following Rosenberg and Dekel, we use AUTODYN2D/EULER to investigate further the parameter Rt. We use a strengthless projectile (Yp=0), monitor the penetration velocity, and evaluate Rt from the MBE. We find that: 1) Rt goes to zero for Yt=0; 2) Rt increases with Yt by a somewhat weaker than linear relation; 3) Rt increases with V at high impact velocity; and 4) for low values of q=1/2 ρpV2/Yt, the turned projectile material interacts with the incoming projectile, and steady state is never reached, thus Rt is not defined.

  11. Position-specific automated processing of V3 env ultra-deep pyrosequencing data for predicting HIV-1 tropism

    PubMed Central

    Jeanne, Nicolas; Saliou, Adrien; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Dubois, Martine; Cazabat, Michelle; Nicot, Florence; Loiseau, Claire; Raymond, Stéphanie; Izopet, Jacques; Delobel, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor usage must be accurately determined before starting CCR5 antagonist-based treatment as the presence of undetected minor CXCR4-using variants can cause subsequent virological failure. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing of HIV-1 V3 env allows to detect low levels of CXCR4-using variants that current genotypic approaches miss. However, the computation of the mass of sequence data and the need to identify true minor variants while excluding artifactual sequences generated during amplification and ultra-deep pyrosequencing is rate-limiting. Arbitrary fixed cut-offs below which minor variants are discarded are currently used but the errors generated during ultra-deep pyrosequencing are sequence-dependant rather than random. We have developed an automated processing of HIV-1 V3 env ultra-deep pyrosequencing data that uses biological filters to discard artifactual or non-functional V3 sequences followed by statistical filters to determine position-specific sensitivity thresholds, rather than arbitrary fixed cut-offs. It allows to retain authentic sequences with point mutations at V3 positions of interest and discard artifactual ones with accurate sensitivity thresholds. PMID:26585833

  12. Model building and refinement of a natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env protein by high-resolution cryoEM

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Secretory and membrane proteins from mammalian cells undergo post-translational modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, which can result in a large number of possible glycoforms. This sample heterogeneity can be problematic for structural studies, particularly X-ray crystallography. Thus, crystal structures of heavily glycosylated proteins such as the HIV-1 Env viral spike protein have been determined by removing the majority of glycans. This step is most frequently carried out using Endoglycosidase H (EndoH) and requires that all expressed glycans be in the high-mannose form, which is often not the native glycoform. With significantly improved technologies in single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), we demonstrate that now it is possible to refine and build natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structures in solution to 4.36 Å resolution. At this resolution we can now analyze the complete epitope of a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb), PGT128, in the context of the trimer expressed with native glycans. PMID:26388028

  13. [Functional analysis of Grp and Iris, the gag and env domesticated errantivirus genes, in the Drosophila melanogaster genome].

    PubMed

    Makhnovskii, P A; Kuzmin, I V; Nefedova, L N; Kima, A I

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is the only invertebrate that contains endogenous retroviruses, which are called errantiviruses. Two domesticated genes, Grp and Iris, which originate from errantivirus gag and env, respectively, have been found in the D. melanogaster genome. The functions performed by the genes in Drosophila are still unclear. To identify the functions of domesticated gag and env in the D. melanogaster genome, expression of Iris and Grp was studied in strains differing by the presence or absence of the functional gypsy errantivirus. In addition, the expression levels were measured after injection of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, which activate different immune response pathways, and exposure to various abiotic stress factors. The presence of functional D. melanogaster retrovirus gypsy was found to increase the Grp expression level in somatic tissues of the carcass, while exerting no effect on the Iris expression level. Activation of the immune response in D. melanogaster by bacteria Bacillus cereus increased the Grp expression level and did not affect Iris expression. As for the effects of abiotic stress factors (oxidative stress, starvation, and heat and cold stress), the Grp expression level increased in response to starvation in D. melanogaster females, and the Iris expression level was downregulated in heat shock and oxidative stress. Based on the findings, Grp was assumed to play a direct role in the immune response in D. melanogaster; Iris is not involved in immune responses, but and apparently performs a cell function that is inhibited in stress.

  14. In-line alignment and Mg2+ coordination at the cleavage site of the env22 twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aiming; Košutić, Marija; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Frener, Marina; Santner, Tobias; Westhof, Eric; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes contain catalytic domains that accelerate site-specific cleavage/ligation of phosphodiester backbones. We report on the 2.9-Å crystal structure of the env22 twister ribozyme, which adopts a compact tertiary fold stabilized by co-helical stacking, double-pseudoknot formation and long-range pairing interactions. The U-A cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with the modeled 2′-O of U positioned for in-line attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5′ bond. Both an invariant guanosine and a Mg2+ are directly coordinated to the non-bridging phosphate oxygens at the U-A cleavage step, with the former positioned to contribute to catalysis and the latter to structural integrity. The impact of key mutations on cleavage activity identified an invariant guanosine that contributes to catalysis. Our structure of the in-line aligned env22 twister ribozyme is compared with two recently-reported twister ribozymes structures, which adopt similar global folds, but differ in conformational features around the cleavage site. PMID:25410397

  15. [Functional analysis of Grp and Iris, the gag and env domesticated errantivirus genes, in the Drosophila melanogaster genome].

    PubMed

    Makhnovskii, P A; Kuzmin, I V; Nefedova, L N; Kima, A I

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is the only invertebrate that contains endogenous retroviruses, which are called errantiviruses. Two domesticated genes, Grp and Iris, which originate from errantivirus gag and env, respectively, have been found in the D. melanogaster genome. The functions performed by the genes in Drosophila are still unclear. To identify the functions of domesticated gag and env in the D. melanogaster genome, expression of Iris and Grp was studied in strains differing by the presence or absence of the functional gypsy errantivirus. In addition, the expression levels were measured after injection of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, which activate different immune response pathways, and exposure to various abiotic stress factors. The presence of functional D. melanogaster retrovirus gypsy was found to increase the Grp expression level in somatic tissues of the carcass, while exerting no effect on the Iris expression level. Activation of the immune response in D. melanogaster by bacteria Bacillus cereus increased the Grp expression level and did not affect Iris expression. As for the effects of abiotic stress factors (oxidative stress, starvation, and heat and cold stress), the Grp expression level increased in response to starvation in D. melanogaster females, and the Iris expression level was downregulated in heat shock and oxidative stress. Based on the findings, Grp was assumed to play a direct role in the immune response in D. melanogaster; Iris is not involved in immune responses, but and apparently performs a cell function that is inhibited in stress. PMID:27414781

  16. Intercompartmental recombination of HIV-1 contributes to env intrahost diversity and modulates viral tropism and sensitivity to entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J P; Peters, Paul J; Caron, Catherine; Gonzalez-Perez, Maria Paz; Stones, Leanne; Ankghuambom, Chiambah; Pondei, Kemebradikumo; McClure, C Patrick; Alemnji, George; Taylor, Stephen; Sharp, Paul M; Clapham, Paul R; Ball, Jonathan K

    2011-06-01

    HIV-1 circulates within an infected host as a genetically heterogeneous viral population. Viral intrahost diversity is shaped by substitutional evolution and recombination. Although many studies have speculated that recombination could have a significant impact on viral phenotype, this has never been definitively demonstrated. We report here phylogenetic and subsequent phenotypic analyses of envelope genes obtained from HIV-1 populations present in different anatomical compartments. Assessment of env compartmentalization from immunologically discrete tissues was assessed utilizing a single genome amplification approach, minimizing in vitro-generated artifacts. Genetic compartmentalization of variants was frequently observed. In addition, multiple incidences of intercompartment recombination, presumably facilitated by low-level migration of virus or infected cells between different anatomic sites and coinfection of susceptible cells by genetically divergent strains, were identified. These analyses demonstrate that intercompartment recombination is a fundamental evolutionary mechanism that helps to shape HIV-1 env intrahost diversity in natural infection. Analysis of the phenotypic consequences of these recombination events showed that genetic compartmentalization often correlates with phenotypic compartmentalization and that intercompartment recombination results in phenotype modulation. This represents definitive proof that recombination can generate novel combinations of phenotypic traits which differ subtly from those of parental strains, an important phenomenon that may have an impact on antiviral therapy and contribute to HIV-1 persistence in vivo.

  17. Evaluation of humoral, mucosal, and cellular immune responses following co-immunization of HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins expressed by Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Khattar, Sunil K; Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Samal, Sweety; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Zhu, Xiaoping; Samal, Siba K

    2015-01-01

    The combination of multiple HIV antigens in a vaccine can broaden antiviral immune responses. In this study, we used NDV vaccine strain LaSota to generate rNDV (rLaSota/optGag) expressing human codon optimized p55 Gag protein of HIV-1. We examined the effect of co-immunization of rLaSota/optGag with rNDVs expressing different forms of Env protein gp160, gp120, gp140L [a version of gp140 that lacked cytoplasmic tail and contained complete membrane-proximal external region (MPER)] and gp140S (a version of gp140 that lacked cytoplasmic tail and distal half of MPER) on magnitude and breadth of humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses in guinea pigs and mice. Our results showed that inclusion of rLaSota/optGag with rNDVs expressing different forms of Env HIV Gag did not affect the Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses in guinea pigs and that the potent immune responses generated against Env persisted for at least 13 weeks post immunization. The highest Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses were observed with gp140S+optGag group. The neutralizing antibody responses against HIV strains BaL.26 and MN.3 induced by gp140S+optGag and gp160+optGag were higher than those elicited by other groups. Inclusion of Gag with gp160, gp140S and gp140L enhanced the level of Env-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells in mice. Inclusion of Gag with gp160 and gp140L also resulted in increased Env-specific CD4(+) T cells. The level of Gag-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells was also enhanced in mice immunized with Gag along with gp140S and gp120. These results indicate lack of antigen interference in a vaccine containing rNDVs expressing Env and Gag proteins.

  18. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D. Costin, M. Rattoni, B. Vienne, C. Vabre, A. Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  19. Complete sequence of the Rous sarcoma virus env gene: identification of structural and functional regions of its product.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E; Hill, E; Hardwick, M; Bhown, A; Schwartz, D E; Tizard, R

    1983-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of gp85 and gp37, the envelope glycoproteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), were determined. Alignment of these sequences with the amino acid sequence predicted from the complete nucleotide sequence of the Prague strain of RSV, subgroup C (PR-C), has allowed us to delineate the env gene-coding region of this virus. The coding sequences for gp85 and gp37 have been placed in an open reading frame that extends from nucleotide 5045 to nucleotide 6862 and predict sizes of 341 amino acids (36,962 molecular weight) for gp85 and 198 amino acids (21,566 molecular weight) for gp37. Carbohydrate makes a significant contribution to the observed molecular weights of these polypeptides--the amino acid sequence contains 14 potential glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in gp85 and two in gp37. Experiments aimed at estimating the number of carbohydrate side chains yielded results consistent with most or all of these sites being occupied. Although an initiation codon is located early (codon 4) in the open reading frame, it is likely that splicing yields an mRNA on which translation initiates at the same AUG as that of the gag gene to produce a nascent polypeptide in which gp85 is preceded by a 62-amino-acid-long leader peptide. This leader contains the hydrophobic sequence (signal sequence) necessary for translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum and is completely removed from the env gene product during translation. The polyprotein precursor, Pr95env, is cleaved to gp85 and gp37 at the carboxyl side of the basic sequence:-Arg-Arg-Lys-Arg-. gp85 is attached through a disulphide linkage to gp37, and although the positions of the cysteines involved in this linkage are not known, the presence of a 27-amino-acid-long hydrophobic region at the carboxy-terminus of gp37 is consistent with its role as a membrane anchor for the viral glycoprotein complex. The location of host range variable regions with respect to the possible tertiary structure of

  20. Yersinia pestis requires the 2-component regulatory system OmpR-EnvZ to resist innate immunity during the early and late stages of plague.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Angéline; Lemaître, Nadine; Titecat, Marie; Merchez, Maud; Deloison, Gaspard; Ricard, Isabelle; Pradel, Elizabeth; Marceau, Michaël; Sebbane, Florent

    2014-11-01

    Plague is transmitted by fleas or contaminated aerosols. To successfully produce disease, the causal agent (Yersinia pestis) must rapidly sense and respond to rapid variations in its environment. Here, we investigated the role of 2-component regulatory systems (2CSs) in plague because the latter are known to be key players in bacterial adaptation to environmental change. Along with the previously studied PhoP-PhoQ system, OmpR-EnvZ was the only one of Y. pestis' 23 other 2CSs required for production of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In vitro, OmpR-EnvZ was needed to counter serum complement and leukocytes but was not required for the secretion of antiphagocyte exotoxins. In vivo, Y. pestis lacking OmpR-EnvZ did not induce an early immune response in the skin and was fully virulent in neutropenic mice. We conclude that, throughout the course of Y. pestis infection, OmpR-EnvZ is required to counter toxic effectors secreted by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the tissues.

  1. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Nedd8 Activation Enzyme Exposes CD4-Induced Epitopes within Env on Cells Expressing HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Andrey; Stoneham, Charlotte; Lewinski, Mary K.; Mukim, Amey; Deshmukh, Savitha; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Spina, Celsa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Vpu decreases the exposure of epitopes within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) on the surface of infected cells by downregulating both BST2 and CD4. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting Vpu activity would increase the exposure of these epitopes and sensitize infected cells to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we treated cells with the Nedd8 activation enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924, which inhibits the cullin1-based ubiquitin ligase complex coopted by Vpu to degrade cellular targets. Treatment of HeLa cells with MLN4924 or expression of a dominant negative mutant of cullin1 inhibited the Vpu-mediated downregulation of CD4 but not the downregulation of BST2. NAE inhibition also increased the surface exposure of CD4-induced epitopes within Env on HEK293 cells containing an inducible HIV genome, on infected CEM T cells, and on infected primary T cells. In contrast, the Vpu-mediated downregulation of BST2 was substantially inhibited by MLN4924 only when T cells were treated with alpha interferon (IFN-α) to induce high levels of BST2 expression. As reported previously, the absence of vpu or nef and even more so the combined absence of these two genes sensitized infected cells to ADCC. However, NAE inhibition affected ADCC minimally. Paradoxically, even in infected, IFN-treated cells in which NAE inhibition substantially rescued the surface level of BST2, the surface level of Env detected with an antibody recognizing a CD4-independent epitope (2G12) was minimally increased. Mutation of the C-terminal Vpu residue W76, which supports the ability of Vpu to stimulate virion release by displacing BST2 from assembly sites on the plasma membrane by a cullin1-independent mechanism, increased the exposure of Env detected by 2G12 on infected T cells. Thus, inhibiting the displacement function of Vpu together with its ability to degrade CD4 and BST2 may be required to sensitize infected cells to ADCC. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic viruses encode gene

  2. Cocirculation of Two env Molecular Variants, of Possible Recombinant Origin, in Gorilla and Chimpanzee Simian Foamy Virus Strains from Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Léa; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Kazanji, Mirdad; Leroy, Eric; Njouom, Richard; Buseyne, Florence; Afonso, Philippe V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian foamy virus (SFV) is a ubiquitous retrovirus in nonhuman primates (NHPs) that can be transmitted to humans, mostly through severe bites. In the past few years, our laboratory has identified more than 50 hunters from central Africa infected with zoonotic SFVs. Analysis of the complete sequences of five SFVs obtained from these individuals revealed that env was the most variable gene. Furthermore, recombinant SFV strains, some of which involve sequences in the env gene, were recently identified. Here, we investigated the variability of the env genes of zoonotic SFV strains and searched for possible recombinants. We sequenced the complete env gene or its surface glycoprotein region (SU) from DNA amplified from the blood of (i) a series of 40 individuals from Cameroon or Gabon infected with a gorilla or chimpanzee foamy virus (FV) strain and (ii) 1 gorilla and 3 infected chimpanzees living in the same areas as these hunters. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the existence of two env variants among both the gorilla and chimpanzee FV strains that were present in zoonotic and NHP strains. These variants differ greatly (>30% variability) in a 753-bp-long region located in the receptor-binding domain of SU, whereas the rest of the gene is very conserved. Although the organizations of the Env protein sequences are similar, the potential glycosylation patterns differ between variants. Analysis of recombination suggests that the variants emerged through recombination between different strains, although all parental strains could not be identified. IMPORTANCE SFV infection in humans is a great example of a zoonotic retroviral infection that has not spread among human populations, in contrast to human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). Recombination was a major mechanism leading to the emergence of HIV. Here, we show that two SFV molecular envelope gene variants circulate among ape populations in Central Africa and that both

  3. Single-Chain Soluble BG505.SOSIP gp140 Trimers as Structural and Antigenic Mimics of Mature Closed HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Yongping; Sastry, Mallika; Zhang, Baoshan; Baxa, Ulrich; Chen, Rita E.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Lees, Christopher R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Schön, Arne; Van Galen, Joseph; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Harned, Adam; Pancera, Marie; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Cheng, Cheng; Freire, Ernesto; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to other type I fusion machines, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) requires proteolytic activation; specifically, cleavage of a gp160 precursor into gp120 and gp41 subunits creates an N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide and permits folding from an immature uncleaved state to a mature closed state. While the atomic-level consequences of cleavage for HIV-1 Env are still being determined, the uncleaved state is antigenically distinct from the mature closed state, and cleavage has been reported to be essential for mimicry of the mature viral spike by soluble versions of Env. Here we report the redesign of a current state-of-the-art soluble Env mimic, BG505.SOSIP, to make it cleavage independent. Specifically, we replaced the furin cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with Gly-Ser linkers of various lengths. The resultant linked gp120-gp41 constructs, termed single-chain gp140 (sc-gp140), exhibited different levels of structural and antigenic mimicry of the parent cleaved BG505.SOSIP. When constructs were subjected to negative selection to remove subspecies recognized by poorly neutralizing antibodies, trimers of high antigenic mimicry of BG505.SOSIP could be obtained; negative-stain electron microscopy indicated these to resemble the mature closed state. Higher proportions of BG505.SOSIP-trimer mimicry were observed in sc-gp140s with linkers of 6 or more residues, with a linker length of 15 residues exhibiting especially promising traits. Overall, flexible linkages between gp120 and gp41 in BG505.SOSIP can thus substitute for cleavage, and sc-gp140s that closely mimicked the vaccine-preferred mature closed state of Env could be obtained. IMPORTANCE The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target of virus-directed neutralizing antibody responses and a primary focus of vaccine design. Soluble mimics of Env have proven challenging to obtain and have been thought to require proteolytic cleavage into two-component subunits, gp120 and gp41

  4. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  5. Potential Of VIRAC* RT-32 And RT-16 Antennas To Serve As Satellite Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiders, M.; Trokss, J.; Elerts, M.

    2015-02-01

    The basic application of RT-32 and RT-16 parabolic antennas is radio astronomy observations, both the radio-telescopes have been upgraded with state-of-the art cryogenic receivers, and now a large-scale modernization of the infrastructure is underway. Since the radio-astronomical observations are not full-time activities, a research work has been done to clear up whether these antennas, besides the mentioned activities, can be used as a satellite ground station. The main goal of this added functionality is to make possible the use of the extremely high reception systems' figure-of-merit thus raising the satellite downlink data rates without increasing the on-board power consumption, which would be particularly important for developers of small satellites. In this paper, the progress in the research project is reported, which includes successful S-band satellite signal reception experiments and possible options as to integration of the related equipment into the system so that both functionalities could successfully coexist. Performance of the existing and the upgraded antenna positioning systems is estimated to determine if the latter are usable even for servicing low-Earth orbiting satellites. In addition, possible options are considered as to upgrading the system with automatic beam tracking capability, which would increase the antenna pointing accuracy even further.

  6. Recombinant Proapoptotic M. tuberculosis Generates CD8+ T-cell Responses Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Env and M. tuberculosis in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Uma Devi K; Larsen, Michelle H.; Kim, John; Porcelli, Steven A.; Jacobs, William R.; Fennelly, Glenn J.

    2009-01-01

    M. bovis BCG is an attractive vaccine vector against breast milk HIV transmission because it elicits Th1-type responses in newborns. However, BCG causes disease in HIV-infected infants. Genetically attenuated M. tuberculosis (Mtb) mutants represent a safer alternative for immunocompromised populations. In the current study, we compared the immunogenicity in mice of three different recombinant attenuated Mtb strains expressing an HIV envelope (Env) antigen construct. Two of these strains (ΔlysA ΔpanCD Mtb and ΔRD1 ΔpanCD Mtb) failed to induce significant levels of HIV Env-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In striking contrast, an HIV-1-Env-expressing attenuated ΔlysA Mtb containing a deletion in secA2, which encodes a virulence-related secretion system involved in evading adaptive immunity, generated consistently measurable Env-specific CD8+ T cell responses that were significantly greater than those observed after immunization with BCG expressing HIV Env. Similarly, another strain of ΔlysA ΔsecA2 Mtb expressing SIV Gag induced Gag- and Mtb-specific CD8+ T cells producing perforin or IFNγ, and Gag-specific CD4+ T cells producing IFNγ within 3 weeks after immunization in adult mice; in addition, IFNγ producing Gag-specific CD8+ T cells and Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells were observed in neonatal mice within 1 week of immunization. We conclude that ΔlysA ΔsecA2 Mtb is a promising vaccine platform to construct a safe combination HIV-TB vaccine for use in neonates. PMID:19808028

  7. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  8. Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Containing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype-E Envelope Gene: Persistent Infection, CD4+ T-Cell Depletion, and Mucosal Membrane Transmission in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Himathongkham, Sunee; Halpin, Nancy S.; Li, Jinling; Stout, Michael W.; Miller, Christopher J.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    The envelope (env) glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) determines several viral properties (e.g., coreceptor usage, cell tropism, and cytopathicity) and is a major target of antiviral immune responses. Most investigations on env have been conducted on subtype-B viral strains, prevalent in North America and Europe. Our study aimed to analyze env genes of subtype-E viral strains, prevalent in Asia and Africa, with a nonhuman primate model for lentivirus infection and AIDS. To this end, we constructed a simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 subtype-E (SHIV) recombinant clone by replacing the env ectodomain of the SHIV-33 clone with the env ectodomain from the subtype-E strain HIV-1CAR402, which was isolated from an individual in the Central African Republic. Virus from this recombinant clone, designated SHIV-E-CAR, replicated efficiently in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Accordingly, juvenile macaques were inoculated with cell-free SHIV-E-CAR by the intravenous or intravaginal route; virus replicated in these animals but did not produce hematological abnormalities. In an attempt to elicit the pathogenic potential of the recombinant clone, we serially passaged this viral clone via transfusion of blood and bone marrow through juvenile macaques to produce SHIV-E-P4 (fourth-passage virus). The serially passaged virus established productive infection and CD4+ T-cell depletion in juvenile macaques inoculated by either the intravenous or the intravaginal route. Determination of the coreceptor usage of SHIV-E-CAR and serially passaged SHIV-E-P4 indicated that both of these viruses utilized CXCR4 as a coreceptor. In summary, the serially passaged SHIV subtype-E chimeric virus will be important for studies aimed at developing a nonhuman primate model for analyzing the functions of subtype-E env genes in viral transmission and pathogenesis and for vaccine challenge experiments with macaques immunized with HIV-1 env antigens. PMID:10933692

  9. Response to Intervention (RtI) in Secondary Schools: A Comparison of the RtI Service Delivery Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler-Brooks, Pam L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative, collective case study researched how the Response to Intervention (RtI) service delivery model was used within the secondary educational environment in two Ohio schools. Areas researched included the type of professional development used to introduce and sustain RtI, the amount of administrative support, the use of universal…

  10. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA -loaded echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K

    2016-06-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (μtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the μtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The μtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 μm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5 % bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of μtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  11. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA -loaded echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K

    2016-06-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (μtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the μtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The μtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 μm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5 % bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of μtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes.

  12. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J.; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (µtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the µtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The µtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 µm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5%bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of µtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  13. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  14. Monitoring gene expression: quantitative real-time rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Elke M

    2013-01-01

    Two-step quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR), also known as real-time RT-PCR, kinetic RT-PCR, or quantitative fluorescent RT-PCR, has become the method of choice for gene expression analysis during the last few years. It is a fast and convenient PCR method that combines traditional RT-PCR with the phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorogenic primers. The detection of changes in fluorescence intensity during the reaction enables the user to follow the PCR reaction in real time.RT-qPCR comprises several steps: (1) RNA is isolated from target tissue/cells; (2) mRNA is reverse-transcribed to cDNA; (3) modified gene-specific PCR primers are used to amplify a segment of the cDNA of interest, following the reaction in real time; and (4) the initial concentration of the selected transcript in a specific tissue or cell type is calculated from the exponential phase of the reaction. Relative quantification or absolute quantification compared to standards that are run in parallel can be performed.This chapter describes the entire procedure from isolation of total RNA from liver and fatty tissues/cells to the use of RT-qPCR to study gene expression in these tissues. We perform relative quantification of transcripts to calculate the fold-difference of a certain mRNA level between different samples. In addition, tips for choosing primers and performing analyses are provided to help the beginner in understanding the technique.

  15. Measurement of RT amplitudes and wavelengths of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Gillespie, C.H.

    1997-10-16

    A laser drive plate, that is a dense solid plate drive by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) unstable, We have previously indicated that observed surface perturbation on the plate are probably R-T instabilities, initiated by the mode structure of the driving laser beam. Using a semi- transparent impact target viewed with a polarized Epi-Illuminated Confocal Streak Microscope, has allowed us to measure the amplitude and growth of the instability.

  16. Global RT-PCR and RT-qPCR Analysis of the mRNA Expression of the Human PTPome.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive comparative gene expression analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase superfamily members (PTPome) under cell- or tissue-specific growth conditions may help to define their individual and specific role in physiology and disease. Semi-quantitative and quantitative PCR are commonly used methods to analyze and measure gene expression. Here, we describe technical aspects of PTPome mRNA expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). We provide a protocol for each method consisting in reverse transcription followed by PCR using a global platform of specific PTP primers. The chapter includes aspects from primer validation to the setup of the PTPome RT-qPCR platform. Examples are given of PTP-profiling gene expression analysis using a human breast cancer cell line upon long-term or short-term treatment with cell signaling-activation agents. PMID:27514798

  17. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Env Trimer Immunization of Macaques and Impact of Priming with Viral Vector or Stabilized Core Protein▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mörner, Andreas; Douagi, Iyadh; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Sundling, Christopher; Dosenovic, Pia; O'Dell, Sijy; Dey, Barna; Kwong, Peter D.; Voss, Gerald; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Mascola, John R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is limited information about the quality of immune responses elicited by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env)-based immunogens in primates. Here we describe a comprehensive analysis of neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses obtained in cynomolgus macaques by three selected immunization regimens. We used the previously described YU2-based gp140 protein trimers administered in an adjuvant, preceded by two distinct priming strategies: either alphavirus replicon particles expressing matched gp140 trimers or gp120 core proteins stabilized in the CD4-bound conformation. The rationale for priming with replicon particles was to evaluate the impact of the expression platform on trimer immunogenicity. The stable core proteins were chosen in an attempt to expand selectively lymphocytes recognizing common determinants between the core and trimers to broaden the immune response. The results presented here demonstrate that the platform by which Env trimers were delivered in the priming (either protein or replicon vector) had little impact on the overall immune response. In contrast, priming with stable core proteins followed by a trimer boost strikingly focused the T-cell response on the core sequences of HIV-1 Env. The specificity of the T-cell response was distinctly different from that of the responses obtained in animals immunized with trimers alone and was shown to be mediated by CD4+ T cells. However, this regimen showed limited or no improvement in the neutralizing antibody responses, suggesting that further immunogen design efforts are required to successfully focus the B-cell response on conserved neutralizing determinants of HIV-1 Env. PMID:19004960

  19. HIV-1 neutralization profile and plant-based recombinant expression of actinohivin, an Env glycan-specific lectin devoid of T-cell mitogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Husk, Adam S; Barnett, Brian W; Pickel, Michelle M; Arntzen, Charles J; Montefiori, David C; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tanno, Kazunobu; Omura, Satoshi; Cao, Huyen; Mooney, Jason P; Hanson, Carl V; Tanaka, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    The development of a topical microbicide blocking the sexual transmission of HIV-1 is urgently needed to control the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. The actinomycete-derived lectin actinohivin (AH) is highly specific to a cluster of high-mannose-type glycans uniquely found on the viral envelope (Env). Here, we evaluated AH's candidacy toward a microbicide in terms of in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, potential side effects, and recombinant producibility. Two validated assay systems based on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMC) infection with primary isolates and TZM-bl cell infection with Env-pseudotyped viruses were employed to characterize AH's anti-HIV-1 activity. In hPMBCs, AH exhibited nanomolar neutralizing activity against primary viruses with diverse cellular tropisms, but did not cause mitogenicity or cytotoxicity that are often associated with other anti-HIV lectins. In the TZM-bl-based assay, AH showed broad anti-HIV-1 activity against clinically-relevant, mucosally transmitting strains of clades B and C. By contrast, clade A viruses showed strong resistance to AH. Correlation analysis suggested that HIV-1's AH susceptibility is significantly linked to the N-glycans at the Env C2 and V4 regions. For recombinant (r)AH expression, we evaluated a tobacco mosaic virus-based system in Nicotiana benthamiana plants as a means to facilitate molecular engineering and cost-effective mass production. Biochemical analysis and an Env-mediated syncytium formation assay demonstrated high-level expression of functional rAH within six days. Taken together, our study revealed AH's cross-clade anti-HIV-1 activity, apparent lack of side effects common to lectins, and robust producibility using plant biotechnology. These findings justify further efforts to develop rAH toward a candidate HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:20559567

  20. Level of education and multiple sclerosis risk after adjustment for known risk factors: The EnvIMS study

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnevik, Kjetil; Riise, Trond; Cortese, Marianna; Holmøy, Trygve; Kampman, Margitta T; Magalhaes, Sandra; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Wolfson, Christina; Pugliatti, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have found a higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) among people with a low level of education. This has been suggested to reflect an effect of smoking and lower vitamin D status in the social class associated with lower levels of education. Objective: The objective of this paper is to investigate the association between level of education and MS risk adjusting for the known risk factors smoking, infectious mononucleosis, indicators of vitamin D levels and body size. Methods: Within the case-control study on Environmental Factors In MS (EnvIMS), 953 MS patients and 1717 healthy controls from Norway reported educational level and history of exposure to putative environmental risk factors. Results: Higher level of education were associated with decreased MS risk (p trend = 0.001) with an OR of 0.53 (95% CI 0.41–0.68) when comparing those with the highest and lowest level of education. This association was only moderately reduced after adjusting for known risk factors (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44–0.83). The estimates remained similar when cases with disease onset before age 28 were excluded. Conclusion: These findings suggest that factors related to lower socioeconomic status other than established risk factors are associated with MS risk. PMID:26014605

  1. The Environmental-Data Automated Track Annotation (Env-DATA) System: Linking Animal Tracks with Environmental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, G.; Dodge, S.; Weinzierl, R.; Davidson, S. C.; Kays, R.; Douglas, D. C.; Brandes, D.; Bildstein, K.; Wikelski, M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of animals is strongly influenced by external factors in their surrounding environment such as weather, habitat types, and human land use. With the advances in positioning and sensor technologies, it is now possible to capture data of animal locations at high spatial and temporal granularities. Likewise, modern technology provides us with an increasing access to large volumes of environmental data, some of which changes on an hourly basis. Although there have been strong developments in computational methods for the analysis of movement in its environmental context, there remain challenges in efficiently linking the spatiotemporal locations of animals with the appropriate environmental conditions along their trajectories. To this end, our new Environmental-Data Automated Track Annotation (Env-DATA) system enhances Movebank, an open portal of animal tracking data, by automating access to environmental variables from global remote sensing, weather, and ecosystem products. The system automates the download and decryption of the data from open web resources of remote sensing and weather data, and provides several interpolation methods from the native grid resolution and structure to a global regular grid linked with the movement tracks in space and time. The system is open and free to any user with movement data. The aim is to facilitate new understanding and predictive capabilities of spatiotemporal patterns of animal movement in response to dynamic and changing environments from local to global scales. The system is illustrated with a series of case studies of pan-American migrations of turkey vultures, and foraging flights of Galapagos Albatross.

  2. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745

  3. Construction of infectious feline foamy virus genomes: cat antisera do not cross-neutralize feline foamy virus chimera with serotype-specific Env sequences.

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Alke, A; Bodem, J; Winkler, I G; Flower, R L; Pfrepper, K; Delius, H; Flügel, R M; Löchelt, M

    2000-01-01

    Full-length genomes of the feline foamy virus (FFV or FeFV) isolate FUV were constructed. DNA clone pFeFV-7 stably directed the expression of infectious FFV progeny virus indistinguishable from wild-type, uncloned FFV isolate FUV. The env and bel 1 genes of pFeFV-7 were substituted for by corresponding sequences of the FFV serotype 951 since previous studies implicated a defined part of FFV Env protein as responsible for serotype-specific differences in serum neutralization (I. G. Winkler, R. M. Flügel, M. Löchelt, and R. L. P. Flower, 1998. Virology 247: 144-151). Recombinant virus derived from chimeric plasmid pFeFV-7/951 containing the hybrid env gene and the parental clone pFeFV-7 were used for neutralization studies. By means of a rapid titration assay for FFV infectivity, we show that progeny virus derived from plasmid pFeFV-7 was neutralized by FUV- but not by 951-specific antisera, whereas pFeFV-7/951-derived chimeric virus was neutralized by 951-specific antisera only. Both recombinant proviruses will be useful for repeated delivery of foreign genes for therapeutic gene applications into cats.

  4. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-07-21

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7-20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT. PMID:27353199

  5. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D.; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-07-01

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7–20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT.

  6. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-07-21

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7-20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT.

  7. Efficacy of histotripsy combined with rt-PA in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Shekhar, Himanshu; Maxwell, Adam D.; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-07-01

    Histotripsy, a form of therapeutic ultrasound that uses the mechanical action of microbubble clouds for tissue ablation, is under development to treat chronic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We hypothesize that combining thrombolytic agents with histotripsy will enhance clot lysis. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes that entrain octafluoropropane microbubbles (OFP t-ELIP) were used in combination with highly shocked histotripsy pulses. Fully retracted porcine venous clots, with similar features of DVT occlusions, were exposed either to histotripsy pulses alone (peak negative pressures of 7-20 MPa), histotripsy and OFP t-ELIP, or histotripsy and rt-PA. Microbubble cloud activity was monitored with passive cavitation imaging during histotripsy exposure. The power levels of cavitation emissions from within the clot were not statistically different between treatment types, likely due to the near instantaneous rupture and destruction of OFP t-ELIP. The thrombolytic efficacy was significantly improved in the presence of rt-PA. These results suggest the combination of histotripsy and rt-PA could serve as a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DVT.

  8. Similar T-cell immune responses induced by group M consensus env immunogens with wild-type or minimum consensus variable regions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, E A; Camacho, Z T; Gao, F

    2010-05-01

    Consensus HIV-1 genes can decrease the genetic distances between candidate immunogens and field virus strains. To ensure the functionality and optimal presentation of immunologic epitopes, we generated two group-M consensus env genes that contain variable regions either from a wild-type B/C recombinant virus isolate (CON6) or minimal consensus elements (CON-S) in the V1, V2, V4, and V5 regions. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice were primed twice with CON6, CON-S, and subtype control (92UG37_A and HXB2/Bal_B) DNA and boosted with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV). Mean antibody titers against 92UG37_A, 89.6_B, 96ZM651_C, CON6, and CON-S Env protein were determined. Both CON6 and CON-S induced higher mean antibody titers against several of the proteins, as compared with the subtype controls. However, no significant differences were found in mean antibody titers in animals immunized with CON6 or CON-S. Cellular immune responses were measured by using five complete Env overlapping peptide sets: subtype A (92UG37_A), subtype B (MN_B, 89.6_B and SF162_B), and subtype C (Chn19_C). The intensity of the induced cellular responses was measured by using pooled Env peptides; T-cell epitopes were identified by using matrix peptide pools and individual peptides. No significant differences in T-cell immune-response intensities were noted between CON6 and CON-S immunized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In BALB/c mice, 10 and eight nonoverlapping T-cell epitopes were identified in CON6 and CON-S, whereas eight epitopes were identified in 92UG37_A and HXB2/BAL_B. In C57BL/6 mice, nine and six nonoverlapping T-cell epitopes were identified after immunization with CON6 and CON-S, respectively, whereas only four and three were identified in 92UG37_A and HXB2/BAL_B, respectively. When combined together from both mouse strains, 18 epitopes were identified. The group M artificial consensus env genes, CON6 and CON-S, were equally immunogenic in breadth and intensity for inducing humoral and cellular immune

  9. Nedd4-Mediated Increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env Proteins and Immunity following DNA-Vaccination of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation. PMID:24614057

  10. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Donna L; Sullivan, Vickie; Owen, S Michele; Curtis, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC) or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus. PMID:25993381

  11. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  12. Detection of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 using real time qRT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Al Rwahnih, Maher; Osman, Fatima; Sudarshana, Mysore; Uyemoto, Jerry; Minafra, Angelantonio; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Martelli, Giovanni; Rowhani, Adib

    2012-02-01

    Nine isolates of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 (GLRaV-7) from diverse geographical regions were sequenced to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. The coat protein (CP) and heat shock protein 70 homologue (HSP70h) genes of these nine isolates were sequenced. Sequences were then used to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. Sequence identity among these isolates ranged between 90 to 100% at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. One RT-PCR and two qRT-PCR assays were used to survey 86 different grapevines from the University of California, Davis Grapevine Virus Collection, the Foundation Plant Services collection and the USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Davis, CA with primers designed in conserved regions of the CP and HSP70h genes. Results revealed that qRT-PCR assays designed in the HSP70h gene was more sensitive (29.07% positives) than that designed in the CP gene (22.09% positives) and both qRT-PCR assays proved to be more sensitive than RT-PCR.

  13. Quantification of transcript levels with quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    Differential gene expression is a key factor driving phenotypic divergence. Determining when and where gene expression has diverged between organisms requires a quantitative method. While large-scale approaches such as microarrays or high-throughput mRNA sequencing can identify candidates, quantitative RT-PCR is the definitive method for confirming gene expression differences. Here, we describe the steps for performing qRT-PCR including extracting total RNA, reverse-transcribing it to make a pool of cDNA, and then quantifying relative expression of a few candidate genes using real-time or quantitative PCR.

  14. Bridging the gap between the KERNEL and RT-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hendra, R.G.

    1981-06-01

    A software package is proposed to allow users of the PL-11 language, and the LSI-11 KERNEL in general, to use their PL-11 programs under RT-11. Further, some general purpose extensions to the KERNEL are proposed that facilitate some number conversions and strong manipulations. A Floating Point Package of procedures to allow full use of the hardware floating point capability of the LSI-11 computers is proposed. Extensions to the KERNEL that allow a user to read, write and delete disc files in the manner of RT-11 is also proposed. A device directory listing routine is also included.

  15. RT-PCR detection of HIV in Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bosevska, Golubinka; Panovski, Nikola; Dokić, Eleni; Grunevska, Violeta

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to detect HIV RNA in seropositive patients using RT-PCR method and thus, to establish PCR methodology in the routine laboratory works. The total of 33 examined persons were divided in two groups: 1) 13 persons seropositive for HIV; and 2) 20 healthy persons - randomly selected blood donors that made the case control group. The subjects age was between 25 and 52 years (average 38,5). ELFA test for combined detection of HIV p24 antigen and anti HIV-1+2 IgG and ELISA test for detection of antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2, were performed for each examined person. RNA from the whole blood was extracted using a commercial kit based on salt precipitation. Detection of HIV RNA was performed using RT-PCR kit. Following nested PCR, the product was separated by electrophoresis in 1,5 % agarose gel. The result was scored positive if the band of 210bp was visible regardless of intensity. Measures of precaution were taken during all the steps of the work and HIV infected materials were disposed of accordingly. In the group of blood donors ELFA, ELISA and RT-PCR were negative. Assuming that prevalence of HIV infection is zero, the clinical specificity of RT-PCR is 100 %. The analytical specificity of RT-PCR method was tested against Hepatitis C and B, Human Papiloma Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Rubella Virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia trachomatis. None of these templates yielded amplicon. In the group of 13 seropositive persons, 33 samples were analyzed. HIV RNA was detected in 15 samples. ELISA and ELFA test were positive in all samples. Different aliquots of the samples were tested independently and showed the same results. After different periods of storing the RNA samples at -70 masculineC, RT-PCR reaction was identical to the one performed initially. The obtained amplicons were maintained frozen at -20 masculineC for a week and the subsequently performed electrophoresis was identical to the previous one. The reaction is

  16. HIV type 1 Env precursor cleavage state affects recognition by both neutralizing and nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Pancera, Marie; Phogat, Sanjay; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Guenaga, Javier; Robinson, James; Mascola, John; Wyatt, Richard T

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 is relatively resistant to antibody-mediated neutralization; however, rare antibodies to the exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and the transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, can neutralize a broad array of isolates. Two antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10, are directed against the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER); however, the kinetic neutralization signature of these antibodies remains unresolved. Previously, we reported that the fully cleaved, cell surface envelope glycoproteins (Env) derived from the primary isolate, JR-FL, are well recognized exclusively by gp120-directed neutralizing ligands and not by nonneutralizing gp120 antibodies. However, the gp120 nonneutralizing antibodies can recognize HIV spikes that are rendered fully cleavage defective by site-directed mutagenesis. Here, we extended such analysis to gp41 neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies and, relative to the rules of gp120-specific antibody recognition, we observed marked contrasts. Similar to gp120 recognition, the nonneutralizing gp41 cluster 1 or cluster 2 antibodies bound much more efficiently to cleavage-defective spikes when compared to their recognition of cleaved spikes. In contrast to gp120 neutralizing antibody recognition, the broadly neutralizing gp41 antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, like the nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, did not efficiently recognize the predominantly cleaved, primary isolate JR-FL spikes. However, if the spikes were rendered cleavage defective, recognition by both the neutralizing and nonneutralizing ligand markedly increased. CD4 interaction with the cleaved spikes markedly increased recognition by most nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, whereas such treatment had a minimal increase of 2F5 and 4E10 recognition. These data indicate again the profound influence that cleavage imposes on the quaternary packing of primary isolate spikes and have important implications for soluble trimer candidate immunogens. PMID:21158699

  17. HIV type 1 Env precursor cleavage state affects recognition by both neutralizing and nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Pancera, Marie; Phogat, Sanjay; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Guenaga, Javier; Robinson, James; Mascola, John; Wyatt, Richard T

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 is relatively resistant to antibody-mediated neutralization; however, rare antibodies to the exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and the transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, can neutralize a broad array of isolates. Two antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10, are directed against the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER); however, the kinetic neutralization signature of these antibodies remains unresolved. Previously, we reported that the fully cleaved, cell surface envelope glycoproteins (Env) derived from the primary isolate, JR-FL, are well recognized exclusively by gp120-directed neutralizing ligands and not by nonneutralizing gp120 antibodies. However, the gp120 nonneutralizing antibodies can recognize HIV spikes that are rendered fully cleavage defective by site-directed mutagenesis. Here, we extended such analysis to gp41 neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies and, relative to the rules of gp120-specific antibody recognition, we observed marked contrasts. Similar to gp120 recognition, the nonneutralizing gp41 cluster 1 or cluster 2 antibodies bound much more efficiently to cleavage-defective spikes when compared to their recognition of cleaved spikes. In contrast to gp120 neutralizing antibody recognition, the broadly neutralizing gp41 antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, like the nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, did not efficiently recognize the predominantly cleaved, primary isolate JR-FL spikes. However, if the spikes were rendered cleavage defective, recognition by both the neutralizing and nonneutralizing ligand markedly increased. CD4 interaction with the cleaved spikes markedly increased recognition by most nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, whereas such treatment had a minimal increase of 2F5 and 4E10 recognition. These data indicate again the profound influence that cleavage imposes on the quaternary packing of primary isolate spikes and have important implications for soluble trimer candidate immunogens.

  18. Diversity of full-length subtype E HIV type 1 env sequences in early seroconvertors from northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yu, X F; Wang, Z; Beyrer, C; Celentano, D D; Khamboonruang, C; Nelson, K

    1997-11-01

    Although both HIV-1 subtypes B and E have been identified from infected individuals in Thailand, subtype E is the main form of HIV currently circulating in the country. Full-length gp160 sequences were obtained from 2 early seroconverters from northern Thailand in a study to learn more about the HIV-1 sequences currently being transmitted among recently infected individuals. Subject A01021 was a female prostitute who tested negative for antibodies to HIV-1 in April 1993, then positive in July 1993. Subject E11429 was a male military conscript who tested negative for antibodies to HIV-1 in May 1993, then positive in November 1993. Uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from these two individuals in January 1994 and about 2500-bp segments containing the full-length gp160 gene were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the Expand high-fidelity PCR system. The nucleotide sequences of full-length gp120 from the subjects were subtype E based upon phylogenetic analysis. The gp120 sequences from the 2 seroconverters appeared more diverse than previously published subtype E HIV-1 sequences from Thailand. Overall, however, the subtype E HIV-1 gp120 sequences from Thailand were less diversified compared to the subtype E HIV-1 isolated from people with AIDS in the Central African Republic. Most of the observed amino acid variations were limited to the 5 variable regions in gp120. Therefore, vaccine strategies which elicit immune responses to the conserved regions of HIV-1 env protein will have a greater possibility of success.

  19. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted. PMID:26432912

  20. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  1. Minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Fang, G; Zhu, G; Burger, H; Keithly, J S; Weiser, B

    1998-12-01

    Recent developments have made it possible to reverse transcribe RNA and amplify cDNA molecules of > 10 kb in length, including the HIV-1 genome. To use long reverse transcription combined with polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to best advantage, it is necessary to determine the frequency of recombination during the combined procedure and then take steps to reduce it. We investigated the requirements for minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR of HIV-1 by experimenting with three different aspects of the procedure: conditions for RT, conditions for PCR, and the molar ratios of different templates. We used two distinct HIV-1 strains as templates and strain-specific probes to detect recombination. The data showed that strategies aimed at completing DNA strand synthesis and the addition of proofreading function to the PCR were most effective in reducing recombination during the combined procedure. This study demonstrated that by adjusting reaction conditions, the recombination frequency during RT-PCR can be controlled and greatly reduced.

  2. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  3. Efavirenz Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Infected with a Chimera of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Reverse Transcriptase from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Michael J.; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F.; North, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 ± 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz. PMID:15328115

  4. A Next-Generation Cleaved, Soluble HIV-1 Env Trimer, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, Expresses Multiple Epitopes for Broadly Neutralizing but Not Non-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Derking, Ronald; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Yasmeen, Anila; de Val, Natalia; Kim, Helen J.; Blattner, Claudia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Korzun, Jacob; Golabek, Michael; de los Reyes, Kevin; Ketas, Thomas J.; van Gils, Marit J.; King, C. Richter; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.; Moore, John P.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable but as yet unachieved property of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidate is the ability to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). One approach to the problem is to create trimeric mimics of the native envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike that expose as many bNAb epitopes as possible, while occluding those for non-neutralizing antibodies (non-NAbs). Here, we describe the design and properties of soluble, cleaved SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A transmitted/founder strain, BG505. These trimers are highly stable, more so even than the corresponding gp120 monomer, as judged by differential scanning calorimetry. They are also homogenous and closely resemble native virus spikes when visualized by negative stain electron microscopy (EM). We used several techniques, including ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to determine the relationship between the ability of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to bind the soluble trimers and neutralize the corresponding virus. In general, the concordance was excellent, in that virtually all bNAbs against multiple neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 Env were highly reactive with the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers, including quaternary epitopes (CH01, PG9, PG16 and PGT145). Conversely, non-NAbs to the CD4-binding site, CD4-induced epitopes or gp41ECTO did not react with the trimers, even when their epitopes were present on simpler forms of Env (e.g. gp120 monomers or dissociated gp41 subunits). Three non-neutralizing MAbs to V3 epitopes did, however, react strongly with the trimers but only by ELISA, and not at all by SPR and to only a limited extent by EM. These new soluble trimers are useful for structural studies and are being assessed for their performance as immunogens. PMID:24068931

  5. Analytical Jacobian Calculation in RT Model Including Polarization Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Ota, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse gas observing satellite "GOSAT" launched in January 2009 has been observing global distribution of CO2 and CH4. The TANSO-FTS mounted on GOSAT measures the two polarized components (called "P" and "S") of short wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectrum reflected from the earth's surface. In NIES, column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CO2 and CH4 (XCO2 and XCH4) are retrieved from SWIR spectra. However, the observed polarization information is not effectively utilized in the retrieval process due to the large computational cost of a vector RT model, instead the polarization synthesized spectra and a scalar RT model are used in the operational processing. An optical path length modification due to aerosol scattering is known as the major error source for XCO2 and XCH4 retrieval from SWIR spectra. Because the aerosol scattering changes polarization state of light, more accurate or additional aerosol information is expected by using the observed polarization spectra effectively in the retrieval process, which improves the retrieval accuracy of XCO2 and XCH4. In addition, for information content analysis, sensitivity analysis and error analysis, Jacobian matrix is important onto retrieval algorithm design before analyses for actual observed data. However, in the case of using RT model including polarization effect in retrieval process, the computational cost of Jacobian matrix calculations in maximum a posteriori retrieval is significantly large. Efficient calculation of analytical Jacobian is necessary. As a first step, we are implementing an analytical Jacobian calculation function to the vector RT model "Pstar". RT scheme of Pstar is based on hybrid method comprising the discrete ordinate and matrix operator methods. The reflection/transmission matrices and source vectors are obtained for each vertical layer through the discrete ordinate solution, and the vertically inhomogeneous system is constructed using the matrix operator method. Because the delta

  6. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized. PMID:27230835

  7. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized.

  8. Optics technology base R/T program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is studying a number of advanced optical systems concepts to achieve a variety of science mission goals. Most of these concepts require significant advancements in optics technology. An overview of the Optics Technology base R&T program is presented in outline form. The program structure contains six major program elements: optical materials and coatings, optics modeling, advanced optics fabrication, optical testing, wavefront sensing and control, and sensor optics technology.

  9. Peptide Triazole Inactivators of HIV-1 Utilize a Conserved Two-Cavity Binding Site at the Junction of the Inner and Outer Domains of Env gp120

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Rachna; Rashad, Adel A.; Li, Huiyuan; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D.; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    We used coordinated mutagenesis, synthetic design, and flexible docking to investigate the structural mechanism of Env gp120 encounter by peptide triazole (PT) inactivators of HIV-1. Prior results demonstrated that the PT class of inhibitors suppresses binding at both CD4 and coreceptor sites on Env and triggers gp120 shedding, leading to cell-independent irreversible virus inactivation. Despite these enticing anti-HIV-1 phenotypes, structural understanding of the PT–gp120 binding mechanism has been incomplete. Here we found that PT engages two inhibitor ring moieties at the junction between the inner and outer domains of the gp120 protein. The results demonstrate how combined occupancy of two gp120 cavities can coordinately suppress both receptor and coreceptor binding and conformationally entrap the protein in a destabilized state. The two-cavity model has common features with small molecule gp120 inhibitor binding sites and provides a guide for further design of peptidomimetic HIV-1 inactivators based on the PT pharmacophore. PMID:25860784

  10. Long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, env, and a region near the 5' LTR influence the pathogenic potential of recombinants between Rous-associated virus types 0 and 1.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D W; Blais, B P; Robinson, H L

    1988-01-01

    A series of recombinants between Rous-associated virus type 0 (RAV-0), RAV-1, and a replication-competent avian leukosis virus vector (RCAN) have been tested for disease potential in day-old inoculated K28 chicks. RAV-0 is a benign virus, whereas RAV-1 and RCAN induce lymphoma and a low incidence of a variety of other neoplasms. The results of the oncogenicity tests indicate that (i) the long terminal repeat regions of RAV-1 and RCAN play a major role in disease potential, (ii) subgroup A envelope glycoproteins are associated with a two- to fourfold higher incidence of lymphoma than subgroup E glycoproteins, and (iii) certain combinations of 5' viral and env sequences cause osteopetrosis in a highly context-dependent manner. Long terminal repeat and env sequences appeared to influence lymphomogenic potential by determining the extent of bursal infection within the first 2 to 3 weeks of life. This would suggest that bursal but not postbursal stem cells are targets for avian leukosis virus-induced lymphomogenesis. The induction of neutralizing antibody had no obvious influence on the incidence of lymphoma. PMID:2841495

  11. Viable but non-culturable state (VBNC) of Escherichia coli related to EnvZ under the effect of pH, starvation and osmotic stress in sea water.

    PubMed

    Darcan, Cihan; Ozkanca, Reşit; Idil, Onder; Flint, Ken P

    2009-01-01

    When exposed extreme environmental conditions such as sea water, bacteria have been shown different survival strategy for continue their life. One of this strategy known as viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state which is very important for nondifferiation bacteria. VBNC cells cause serious human health problems. Little is known, however, about the genetic mechanisms underlying the VBNC state. Under different environmental conditions, porins are important in the survival strategy of bacteria. EnvZ/OmpR work together as regulators of ompF and ompC gene expression. It is known that the EnvZ system has a role in VBNC state. In this study we tried to find out the viability of EnvZ, OmpC and OmpF mutant E. coli under stress effect of osmolarity, pH and starvation. Bacteria were suspended in filtered-autoclaved sea water microcosms and numbers determined over 25 day incubation periods by plate count (PC), direct viable count (DVC) and count of cells capable of respiration (RCC). As regard to results, alkaline pH affected E. coli more than acidic pH, which led to decline in number. On the contrary glycine betaine addition to sea water protected E. coli porin mutants and also reduced the death rate of bacteria. Under the effect of pH, osmotic stress and starvation stress, wild type E. coli and porin mutants entered a dormant state or became VBNC with the exception of MSZ31 (envZ mutant) E. coli cells which did not enter the VBNC state under the three tested stress conditions. This study is the first report to demonstrate that E. coli could not enter the VBNC state in the lack of EnvZ product under the stress of osmolarity, pH and starvation and the relationship between EnvZ and VBNC state are not affected by pH, osmolarity and starvation. PMID:20380141

  12. Vaginal transmission of chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Brosio, P; Lafaile, M; Li, J; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Miller, C J

    1996-01-01

    Chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that express the env genes derived from distinct HIV type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for the ability to infect rhesus macaques following intravaginal inoculation. SHIVs containing either the HIV-1 HXBc2 or the HIV-1 89.6 envelope glycoproteins were capable of replicating in intravenously inoculated rhesus macaques. However, intravaginal inoculation of animals with these two SHIVs resulted in infection only with the SHIV containing the HIV-1 89.6 glycoprotein. Thus, properties conferred by the envelope glycoproteins in the chimeric virus affect the ability of particular SHIVs to initiate a systemic infection following vaginal inoculation. These results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that the selection of specific viral variants occurs in the genital tracts of individuals exposed to HIV by sexual contact. PMID:8627782

  13. Applications of LANCE Data at SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Short term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Mission: Apply NASA and NOAA measurement systems and unique Earth science research to improve the accuracy of short term weather prediction at the regional/local scale. Goals: Evaluate and assess the utility of NASA and NOAA Earth science data and products and unique research capabilities to address operational weather forecast problems; Provide an environment which enables the development and testing of new capabilities to improve short term weather forecasts on a regional scale; Help ensure successful transition of new capabilities to operational weather entities for the benefit of society

  14. SMAP Data Assimilation at NASA SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay B.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center maintains a near-real- time run of the Noah Land Surface Model within the Land Information System (LIS) at 3-km resolution. Soil moisture products from this model are used by several NOAA/National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices for flood and drought situational awareness. We have implemented assimilation of soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Soil Moisture Active/ Passive (SMAP) satellites, and are now evaluating the SMAP assimilation. The SMAP-enhanced LIS product is planned for public release by October 2016.

  15. VLA radio upper limit on Type IIn Supernova 2007rt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Soderberg, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Poonam Chandra and Alicia Soderberg report on behalf of a larger collaboration: We observed a Type IIn supernova SN 2007rt (CBET 1148) with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the 8.46 GHz band on 2008, January 12.55 UT. The observations were taken for total duration of one hour in the VLA B-configuration. We do not detect any radio emission at the supernova position (CBET 1148). The flux density at the supernova position is 9 ± 27 uJy.

  16. A comparison of eclipsing binary models - Application to RT UMi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, L.; Russo, G.; Sollazzo, C.

    1981-03-01

    The computer models of Wood and Wilson-Devinney have been used to solve the light curve of RT UMi, an eclipsing binary with unknown mass function and a small value of the inclination angle. The system turns out to be a normal semi detached system, showing the inadequacy of the Russell and Merrill method in this limit case. The good agreement of the two solutions obtained enforces the validity of methods based on light curve synthesis, even in the absence of good starting parameters.

  17. Three Years of Starspots on RT AND: 1995 to 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckert, P. A.; Phillips, K.; Beaver, M. R.

    1997-05-01

    We report BVRI photometry from Mt. Laguna Observatory on RT Andromedae during either January or February of 1995, 1996, and 1997. Using the Information Limit Optimization Technique, we modeled the data to find the size and location of the starspots for each year. After removing the effects of the starspots, we performed clean fits for binary star parameters for the 1997 light curves, which were the most complete. For all three years, the data are best modeled with one mid latitude spot. We find a spot at a longitude of 117 degrees in 1995, 216 degrees in 1996, and 240 degrees in 1997. We find a spot radius of 12 degrees in 1995 and 1996 and 11 degrees in 1997. All the spot latitudes are either assumed to be 45 degrees or at 45 degrees to within the model errors. These results are consistent with previous work that finds data on RT And can be fit with a single spot in one of two Active Longitude Belts. The results of the clean fits are consistent with previous work. Ron Angione scheduled generous amounts of telescope time at Mt. Laguna Observatory. Financial support was provided by a Cottrell College Science Award of the Research Corporation, the AAS Small Grants Program, and the Western Carolina University Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics Program.

  18. Identification of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) env gene subtypes and comparison of the FIV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolutionary patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Sodora, D L; Shpaer, E G; Kitchell, B E; Dow, S W; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus associated with AIDS-like illnesses in cats. As such, FIV appears to be a feline analog of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A hallmark of HIV infection is the large degree of viral genetic diversity that can develop within an infected individual and the even greater and continually increasing level of diversity among virus isolates from different individuals. Our goal in this study was to determine patterns of FIV genetic diversity by focusing on a 684-nucleotide region encompassing variable regions V3, V4, and V5 of the FIV env gene in order to establish parallels and distinctions between FIV and HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Our data demonstrate that, like HIV-1, FIV can be separated into distinct envelope sequence subtypes (three are described here). Similar to that found for HIV-1, the pairwise sequence divergence within an FIV subtype ranged from 2.5 to 15.0%, whereas that between subtypes ranged from 17.8 to 26.2%. However, the high number of synonymous nucleotide changes among FIV V3 to V5 env sequences may also include a significant number of back mutations and suggests that the evolutionary distances among FIV subtypes are underestimated. Although only a few subtype B viruses were available for examination, the pattern of diversity between the FIV A and B subtypes was found to be significantly distinct; subtype B sequences had proportionally fewer mutations that changed amino acids, compared with silent changes, suggesting a more advanced state of adaptation to the host. No similar distinction was evident for HIV-1 subtypes. The diversity of FIV genomes within individual infected cats was found to be as high as 3.7% yet twofold lower than that within HIV-1-infected people over a comparable region of the env gene. Despite these differences, significant parallels between patterns of FIV evolution and HIV-1 evolution exist, indicating that a wide array of potentially divergent virus challenges need to be considered

  19. Comparison of the conventional multiplex RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manohar L; Anand, Siddharth P; Tikhe, Shamal A; Walimbe, Atul M; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive, specific and cost effective, having huge potential for patient management. In this study, the performance of an in-house developed conventional multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) and Luminex xTAG(®) RVP fast assay (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) for the detection of respiratory viruses was compared. A total 310 respiratory clinical specimens predominantly from pediatric patients, referred for diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 from August 2009 to March 2011 were tested to determine performance characteristic of the three methods. A total 193 (62.2%) samples were detected positive for one or more viruses by mRT-PCR, 175 (56.4%) samples by real time monoplex RT-PCR, and 138 (44.5%) samples by xTAG(®) RVP fast assay. The overall sensitivity of mRT-PCR was 96.9% (95% CI: 93.5, 98.8), rtRT-PCR 87.9% (95% CI: 82.5, 92.1) and xTAG(®) RVP fast was 68.3% (95% CI: 61.4, 74.6). Rhinovirus was detected most commonly followed by respiratory syncytial virus group B and influenza A/H1N1pdm09. The monoplex real time RT-PCR and in-house developed mRT-PCR are more sensitive, specific and cost effective than the xTAG(®) RVP fast assay.

  20. A comparative study of digital RT-PCR and RT-qPCR for quantification of Hepatitis A virus and Norovirus in lettuce and water samples.

    PubMed

    Coudray-Meunier, Coralie; Fraisse, Audrey; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-05-18

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of foodborne enteric viruses is classically achieved by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Recently, digital PCR (dPCR) was described as a novel approach to genome quantification without need for a standard curve. The performance of microfluidic digital RT-PCR (RT-dPCR) was compared to RT-qPCR for detecting the main viruses responsible for foodborne outbreaks (human Noroviruses (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV)) in spiked lettuce and bottled water. Two process controls (Mengovirus and Murine Norovirus) were used and external amplification controls (EAC) were added to examine inhibition of RT-qPCR and RT-dPCR. For detecting viral RNA and cDNA, the sensitivity of the RT-dPCR assays was either comparable to that of RT-qPCR (RNA of HAV, NoV GI, Mengovirus) or slightly (around 1 log10) decreased (NoV GII and MNV-1 RNA and of HAV, NoV GI, NoV GII cDNA). The number of genomic copies determined by dPCR was always from 0.4 to 1.7 log10 lower than the expected numbers of copies calculated by using the standard qPCR curve. Viral recoveries calculated by RT-dPCR were found to be significantly higher than by RT-qPCR for NoV GI, HAV and Mengovirus in water, and for NoV GII and HAV in lettuce samples. The RT-dPCR assay proved to be more tolerant to inhibitory substances present in lettuce samples. This absolute quantitation approach may be useful to standardize quantification of enteric viruses in bottled water and lettuce samples and may be extended to quantifying other human pathogens in food samples.

  1. Inactivation conditions for human Norovirus measured by an in situ capture-qRT-PCR Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major cause of epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Due to the inability to cultivate HuNoVs, it has been a challenge to determine their infectivity. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is widely used in detecting HuNoVs. However, qRT-PCR only detects the...

  2. Propidium monoazide reverse transcriptase PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus.

    PubMed

    Karim, Mohammad R; Fout, G Shay; Johnson, Clifford H; White, Karen M; Parshionikar, Sandhya U

    2015-07-01

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the public health significance of positive findings are limited. In this study, PMA RT-PCR and RT-qPCR assays were evaluated for selective detection of infectious poliovirus, murine norovirus (MNV-1), and Norwalk virus. Viruses were inactivated using heat, chlorine, and ultraviolet light (UV). Infectious and non-infectious viruses were treated with PMA before RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and heat and chlorine inactivated poliovirus. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and noninfectious murine norovirus only when inactivated by chlorine. However, PMA RT-PCR could not differentiate infectious Norwalk virus from virus particles rendered non-infectious by any treatment. PMA RT-PCR assay was not able to differentiate between infectious and UV inactivated viruses suggesting that viral capsid damage may be necessary for PMA to enter and bind to the viral genome. PMA RT-PCR on naked MNV-1 and Norwalk virus RNA suggest that PMA RT-PCR can be used to detect intact, potentially infectious MNV-1 and Norwalk viruses and can be used to exclude the detection of free viral RNA by PCR assay. PMID:25796356

  3. Meeting the Needs of Gifted Students within an RtI Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth; Hughes, Claire E.

    2009-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is sweeping the country, changing the way children's educational needs are recognized and met. RtI was introduced through special education legislation as part of IDEA 2004 and offered an alternative approach for identifying students with learning disabilities (Bender & Shores, 2007). RtI is designed to bring…

  4. The MuLV 4070A G541R Env mutation decreases the stability and alters the conformation of the TM ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William M. Zheng, Haiyan Cote, Marie L. Roth, Monica J.

    2008-02-05

    Virus-cell and cell-cell fusion events are affected by various properties of the fusogenic Env protein on the cell surface. The G541R mutation within the TM ectodomain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) 4070A arose by positive selection in viral passage and results in a reduction of cell-cell fusion events while maintaining viral titer. Size exclusion chromatography shows that the multimerization properties are similar among expressed wild-type and mutant ectodomain peptides. Circular dichroism measurements reveal decreased thermal stability of the G541R mutant as compared to wild type. The G541R mutant also renders the peptide more susceptible to Lys-C protease cleavage. The 42-114 monoclonal antibody does not bind to the G541R mutant peptides, suggesting a structural difference from wild type. These altered physical properties result in productive viral infection of G541R bearing virus with decreased syncytia.

  5. The MuLV 4070A G541R Env mutation decreases the stability and alters the conformation of the TM ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, William M.; Zheng, Haiyan; Coté, Marie L.; Roth, Monica J.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-cell and cell-cell fusion events are affected by various properties of the fusogenic Env protein on the cell surface. The G541R mutation within the TM ectodomain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) 4070A arose by positive selection in viral passage and results in a reduction of cell-cell fusion events while maintaining viral titer. Size exclusion chromatography shows that the multimerization properties are similar among expressed wild-type and mutant ectodomain peptides. Circular dichroism measurements reveal decreased thermal stability of the G541R mutant as compared to wild-type. The G541R mutant also renders the peptide more susceptible to Lys-C protease cleavage. The 42-114 monoclonal antibody does not bind to the G541R mutant peptides, suggesting a structural difference from wildtype. These altered physical properties result in productive viral infection of G541R bearing virus with decreased syncytia. PMID:17961622

  6. Early detection of dominant Env-specific and subdominant Gag-specific CD8+ lymphocytes in equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses using major histocompatibility complex class I/peptide tetrameric complexes.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Sharif, Amin; Ellis, Shirley A; Littke, Matt H; Leib, Steven R; McGuire, Travis C

    2005-08-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Measurement of equine CTL responses has relied on chromium-release assays, which do not allow accurate quantitation. Recently, the equine MHC class I molecule 7-6, associated with the ELA-A1 haplotype, was shown to present both the Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 EIAV CTL epitopes. In this study, 7-6/Gag-GW12 and 7-6/Env-RW12 MHC class I/peptide tetrameric complexes were constructed and used to analyze Gag-GW12- and Env-RW12-specific CTL responses in two EIAV-infected horses (A2164 and A2171). Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 tetramer-positive CD8+ cells were identified in nonstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as early as 14 days post-EIAV inoculation, and frequencies of tetramer-positive cells ranged from 0.4% to 6.7% of nonstimulated peripheral blood CD8+ cells during the 127-day study period. Although both horses terminated the initial viremic peak, only horse A2171 effectively controlled viral load. Neutralizing antibody was present during the initial control of viral load in both horses, but the ability to maintain control correlated with Gag-GW12-specific CD8+ cells in A2171. Despite Env-RW12 dominance, Env-RW12 escape viral variants were identified in both horses and there was no correlation between Env-RW12-specific CD8+ cells and control of viral load. Although Gag-GW12 CTL escape did not occur, a Gag-GW12 epitope variant arose in A2164 that was recognized less efficiently than the original epitope. These data indicate that tetramers are useful for identification and quantitation of CTL responses in horses, and suggest that the observed control of EIAV replication and clinical disease was associated with sustained CTL recognition of Gag-specific epitopes. PMID:15979679

  7. Most env and gag subtype A HIV-1 viruses circulating in West and West Central Africa are similar to the prototype AG recombinant virus IBNG.

    PubMed

    Montavon, C; Toure-Kane, C; Liegeois, F; Mpoudi, E; Bourgeois, A; Vergne, L; Perret, J L; Boumah, A; Saman, E; Mboup, S; Delaporte, E; Peeters, M

    2000-04-15

    The genetic subtype was identified in gag and env of 219 HIV-1-positive samples collected in different African countries, 44 from Senegal, 55 from Cameroon, 82 from Gabon, and 38 from Djibouti. In total, 20 (9.1%) samples had discordant subtypes between gag and env, 6 of 44 (13.9%) in Senegal, 4 of 55 (7.2%) in Cameroon, 1 of 38 (2.6%) in Djibouti, and 10 of 82 (12.1%) in Gabon. Subtypes A and G were predominantly involved in the recombination events. Phylogenetic tree analysis of gag showed that an important number of the A sequences form a distinct subcluster with the AG-IBNG prototype strain (a complex A/G mosaic virus): 27 of 32 (84.3%) in Senegal, 12 of 17 (70.6%) in Nigeria, 24 of 39 (61.5%) in Cameroon, and 38 of 70 (54.3%) in Gabon. Full-length genome analysis of 3 and additional sequences in pol for 10 such strains confirmed that they have a similar complex A/G mosaic genomic structure. These data suggest that in West Africa, most probably between 60% and 84% of the subtype A viruses are recombinant AG-IBNG viruses. This finding has potential implications on future vaccine, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. The actual and future role of these viruses in the global pandemic must be monitored in all new molecular epidemiologic studies, a discrimination between subtype A and AG-IBNG-like viruses is necessary. PMID:10866228

  8. Design and structure of two HIV-1 clade C SOSIP.664 trimers that increase the arsenal of native-like Env immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Hua, Yuanzi; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; de Taeye, Steven W.; Nieusma, Travis; Cupo, Albert; Yasmeen, Anila; Golabek, Michael; Pugach, Pavel; Klasse, P. J.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in the quest toward an HIV-1 vaccine is design of immunogens that can generate a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) response against the enormous sequence diversity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). We previously demonstrated that a recombinant, soluble, fully cleaved SOSIP.664 trimer based on the clade A BG505 sequence is a faithful antigenic and structural mimic of the native trimer in its prefusion conformation. Here, we sought clade C native-like trimers with comparable properties. We identified DU422 and ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimers as being appropriately thermostable (Tm of 63.4 °C and 62.7 °C, respectively) and predominantly native-like, as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy (EM). Size exclusion chromatography, ELISA, and surface plasmon resonance further showed that these trimers properly display epitopes for all of the major bnAb classes, including quaternary-dependent, trimer-apex (e.g., PGT145) and gp120/gp41 interface (e.g., PGT151) epitopes. A cryo-EM reconstruction of the ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimer complexed with VRC01 Fab against the CD4 binding site at subnanometer resolution revealed a striking overall similarity to its BG505 counterpart with expected local conformational differences in the gp120 V1, V2, and V4 loops. These stable clade C trimers contribute additional diversity to the pool of native-like Env immunogens as key components of strategies to induce bnAbs to HIV-1. PMID:26372963

  9. ENV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in HIV seronegative health care workers occupationally exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, L A; Sullivan, J; Berzofsky, J A; Clerici, M; Kessler, H A; Landay, A L; Shearer, G M

    1995-01-01

    Identification of the components of protective immunity are crucial for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine strategies. Analysis of HIV-specific responses in exposed but uninfected individuals might thus provide a unique resource to elucidate the components and correlates of protective immunity to HIV. In the present study we analyzed HIV-specific cytotoxic and helper T lymphocyte responses in health care workers (HCW) exposed to body fluids from HIV-positive individuals. HCW exposed to blood from HIV-negative individuals as well as healthy donors served as controls. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to HIV envelope (env) peptides were detected in 7/20 (35%) HCW exposed to HIV-positive blood and in none of the 20 health care workers exposed to uninfected blood or the seven healthy blood donors studied. HIV-specific CTL responses were detected only after in vitro stimulation, and were MHC class I restricted. No MHC class I restriction elements were uniformly identified among the different responders. 21/28 (75%) HCW exposed to contaminated blood responded to env as measured by IL-2 production to the peptides, in contrast to only 9/38 (24%) HCW exposed to HIV seronegative blood and 3/35 (9%) healthy blood donors. All the HIV exposed individuals were seronegative on repeated ELISA tests, and no evidence of infection was obtained by PCR analysis. These findings indicate that a single exposure to HIV can induce CTL immunity to HIV antigens, in the absence of other evidence of infection. Images PMID:7635981

  10. Defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors harboring gag, pol, and env genes can be used to rescue defective retrovirus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Savard, N; Cosset, F L; Epstein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A retroviral packaging transcription unit was constructed in which the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) gag-pol and env genes are expressed under the control of herpesvirus regulatory sequences. This transcription unit, lacking long terminal repeats, primer binding sites, and most of the retrovirus packaging signal but retaining both retroviral donor and acceptor splice sites, was cloned into a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon plasmid, and amplicon vectors (the gag-pol-env [GPE] vectors) were generated by using a defective HSV-1 vector as helper virus. The GPE vector population was used to infect human TE671 cells (ATCC CRL 8805), harboring a lacZ provirus (TE-lac2 cells), and supernatants of infected cells were collected and filtered at different times after infection. These supernatants were found to contain infectious ecotropic lacZ retroviral particles, as shown both by reverse transcription-PCR and by their ability to transduce a beta-galactosidase activity to murine NIH 3T3 cells but not to human TE671 cells. The titer of retroviral vectors released by GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells increased with the dose of infectious amplicon particles. Retrovirus vector production was inhibited by superinfection with helper virus, indicating that helper virus coinfection negatively interfered with retrovirus production. Induction of retrovirus vectors by GPE vectors was neutralized by anti-HSV-1 but not by anti-MoMLV antiserum, while transduction of beta-galactosidase activity to NIH 3T3 cells by supernatants of GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells was neutralized by anti-MoMLV antiserum. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 GPE amplicon vectors can rescue defective lacZ retrovirus vectors and suggest that they could be used as a sort of launching ramp to fire defective retrovirus vectors from within virtually any in vitro or in vivo cell type containing defective retroviral vectors. PMID:9094692

  11. Retrovirus vectors bearing jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Env transduce human cells by using a new receptor localized to chromosome 3p21.3.

    PubMed

    Rai, S K; DeMartini, J C; Miller, A D

    2000-05-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a type D retrovirus associated with a contagious lung tumor of sheep, ovine pulmonary carcinoma. Other than sheep, JSRV is known to infect goats, but there is no evidence of human infection. Until now it has not been possible to study the host range for JSRV because of the inability to grow this virus in culture. Here we show that the JSRV envelope protein (Env) can be used to pseudotype Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors and that such vectors can transduce human cells in culture. We constructed hybrid retrovirus packaging cells that express the JSRV Env and the MoMLV Gag-Pol proteins and can produce JSRV-pseudotype vectors at titers of up to 10(6) alkaline phosphatase-positive focus-forming units/ml. Using this high-titer virus, we have studied the host range for JSRV, which includes sheep, human, monkey, bovine, dog, and rabbit cells but not mouse, rat, or hamster cells. Considering the inability of the JSRV-pseudotype vector to transduce hamster cells, we used the hamster cell line-based Stanford G3 panel of whole human genome radiation hybrids to phenotypically map the JSRV receptor (JVR) gene within the p21.3 region of human chromosome 3. JVR is likely a new retrovirus receptor, as none of the previously identified retrovirus receptors localizes to the same position. Several chemokine receptors that have been shown to serve as coreceptors for lentivirus infection are clustered in the same region of chromosome 3; however, careful examination shows that the JSRV receptor does not colocalize with any of these genes. PMID:10775607

  12. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism 172K suppresses the effect of clinically relevant drug resistance mutations to both nucleoside and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T; Schuckmann, Matthew M; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-08-24

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT(172K)) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the k(cat)/K(m) values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT(172K) decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT(172K) results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT(172R) and RT(172K) bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  13. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Polymorphism 172K Suppresses the Effect of Clinically Relevant Drug Resistance Mutations to Both Nucleoside and Non-nucleoside RT Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T.; Schuckmann, Matthew M.; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT172K) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the kcat/Km values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT172K decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT172K results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT172R and RT172K bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  14. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  15. Comparative detection of rotavirus RNA by conventional RT-PCR, TaqMan RT-PCR and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tan, Hua; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus is one of the major viral pathogens leading to diarrhea. Diagnosis has been conducted by either traditional cultural, serological methods or molecular biology techniques, which include RT-PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). However, their differences regarding accuracy and sensitivity remain unknown. In this study, an in-house conventional RT-PCR assay and more importantly, an in-house real-time NASBA (RT-NASBA) were established, and compared with a commercial TaqMan RT-PCR assay. The results showed that all of these methods were able to detect and distinguish rotavirus from other diarrhea viruses with a 100% concordance rate during the course of an evaluation on 20 clinical stool samples. However, RT-NASBA was much quicker than the other two methods. More importantly, the limit of detection of RT-NASBA could reach seven copies per reaction and was one to two logs lower than that of conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-PCR. These results indicate that this in-house assay was more sensitive, and thus could be used as an efficient diagnosis tool for rotavirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison among three different assays for the detection of rotavirus. These findings would provide implication for the rational selection of diagnosis tool for rotavirus.

  16. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  17. Generation and Evaluation of Clade C Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Wen; Tartaglia, Lawrence J.; Whitney, James B.; Lim, So-Yon; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Lavine, Christy L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Williamson, Carolyn; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Kublin, James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a panel of mucosally transmissible simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge stocks from multiple virus clades would facilitate preclinical evaluation of candidate HIV-1 vaccines and therapeutics. The majority of SHIV stocks that have been generated to date have been derived from clade B HIV-1 env sequences from viruses isolated during chronic infection and typically required serial animal-to-animal adaptation for establishing mucosal transmissibility and pathogenicity. To capture essential features of mucosal transmission of clade C viruses, we produced a series of SHIVs with early clade C HIV-1 env sequences from acutely HIV-1-infected individuals from South Africa. SHIV-327c and SHIV-327cRM expressed env sequences that were 99.7 to 100% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging for mucosal infectivity. These challenge stocks infected rhesus monkeys efficiently by both intrarectal and intravaginal routes, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic setpoint viremia in 13 of 17 (76%) infected animals. The SHIV-327cRM challenge stock was also titrated for both single, high-dose intrarectal challenges and repetitive, low-dose intrarectal challenges in rhesus monkeys. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE We describe the development of two related clade C SHIV challenge stocks. These challenge stocks should prove useful for preclinical testing of vaccines and other interventions aimed at preventing clade C HIV-1 infection. PMID:25473043

  18. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  19. Experiments and simulations of RT and RM fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, P.; Gushkov, S.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the front. The experimental configuration consists on a unstable two layer system held by a removable plate in a box for the Rayleigh-Taylor fronts and shock tube high Mach number impulse across a density interface air/SF6. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages and its spectral, self-similar information. Most models of the turbulent mixing evolution generated by hydrodynamics instabilities do not include any dependence on initial conditions, but in many relevant physical problems this dependence is very important, for instance, in Inertial Confinement Fussion target implosion. We discuss simple initial conditions (such as a jet array versus a plate removal) with the aid of numerical models. The analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and of accelerated instabilities is presented locally, and seen to dominate the turbulent cascade mixing zone differently under different initial conditions. Fractal and neuron network analysis of Turbulent Mixing under RT and RM instabilities are presented comparing the different experiments and numerical simulations.

  20. Detection of HIV type 1 env subtypes A, B, C, and E in Asia using dried blood spots: a new surveillance tool for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cassol, S; Weniger, B G; Babu, P G; Salminen, M O; Zheng, X; Htoon, M T; Delaney, A; O'Shaughnessy, M; Ou, C Y

    1996-10-10

    Global surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes for genetic characterization is hampered by the biohazard of processing and the difficulties of shipping whole blood or cells from many developing country regions. We developed a technique for the direct automated sequencing of viral DNA from dried blood spot (DBS) specimens collected on absorbent paper, which can be mailed unrefrigerated in sturdy paper envelopes with low biohazard risk. DBS were collected nonrandomly from HIV-1-infected, mostly asymptomatic, patients in five Asian countries in 1991, and shipped via airmail or hand carried without refrigeration to Bangkok, and then transshipped to North America for processing. After more than 2 years of storage, including 6 months at ambient temperatures, proviral DNA in the DBS was amplified by nested PCR, and a 389-nucleotide segment of the C2-V3 env gene region was sequenced, from which 287 base pairs were aligned and subtyped by phylogenetic analysis with neighbor-joining and other methods. From southern India, there were 25 infections with subtype C and 2 with subtype A. From Myanmar (Burma), we identified the first subtype E infection, as well as six subtype BB, a distinct cluster within subtype B that was first discovered in Thailand and that has now appeared in China, Malaysia, and Japan. From southwest China, one BB was identified, while a "classical" B typical of North American and European strains was found in Indonesia. From Thailand, five DBS of ambiguous serotype were identified as three B, one BB, and one E. A blinded control serotype E specimen was correctly identified, but a serotype BB control was not tested. Most HIV-1 in southern India appears to be env subtype C, with rare A, as others have reported in western and northern India. The subtypes BB and E in Myanmar, and the BB in China, suggest epidemiological linkage with these subtypes in neighboring Thailand. DBS are a practical, economical technique for conducting large-scale molecular epidemiological

  1. ESCRIPT-RT: Reactive transport simulation in PYTHON using ESCRIPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Gross, L.; Georgiev, D.; Cleverley, J.

    2012-08-01

    We present ESCRIPT-RT, a new reactive transport simulation code for fully saturated porous media which is based on a finite element method (FEM) combined with three other components: (i) a Gibbs minimisation solver for equilibrium modelling of fluid-rock interactions, (ii) an equation of state for pure water to calculate fluid properties and (iii) a thermodynamically consistent material database to determine rocks' material properties. Using decoupling of most of the standard governing equations, this code solves sequentially for temperature, pressure, mass transport and chemical equilibrium. In contrast, pressure and Darcy flow velocities are solved as a coupled system. The reactive transport itself is performed using the masses of chemical elements instead of chemical species. In such way it requires less computing memory and time than the majority of other packages. The code is based on ESCRIPT, a parallelised platform which supports efficient stepwise simulation of realistic geodynamic scenarios at multiple scales. It is particularly suitable to analyse hydrothermal systems involving geometrically complex geological structures with strong permeability contrasts and subject to complex fluid-rock chemical interactions. The modular architecture of the code and its high level Python interface also provide flexibility for modellers who can easily modify or add new feedbacks between the different physical processes. In addition, the implemented abstract user interface allows geologists to run the code without knowledge of the underlying numerical implementation. As an example we show the simulation of hydrothermal gold precipitation in a granite-greenstone geological sequence, which illustrates the important coupling between thermal response and mass transfer to the localisation of gold.

  2. Potential impact of viral load and genetic makeup of HIV type 1 on mother-to-child transmission: characterization of env-C2V3C3 and nef sequences.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Elizabeth; Parreira, Ricardo; Tendeiro, Rita; Nunes, Baltazar; Castela, João; Soares, Isabel; Mouzinho, Ana; Reis, Eduarda; Paixão, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in terms of the molecular characterization of the env and nef genomic regions and quantification of maternal RNA viral loads. Assignment of viral subtype was achieved by direct sequencing of PCR 1172 products amplified from proviral DNA in 45 HIV-1-nontransmitting mothers (NTM), along with 13 pairs of HIV-1-transmitting mothers (TM) and their infected children (C). Analysis of the env C2V3C3 and nef sequences revealed that subtypes G and B, and their genetic combinations (AG, BG), accounted for over 84.5% of all viruses identified. The genetic structure form envA-nefG was the most commonly observed, with a lower frequency in the NTM (13.3%) compared to the TM (23.1%) group. A greater number of genetic forms was observed among NTM, namely the presence of sequences assigned to subtypes D and F, as well as the intergenetic A/J, and C/U, recombinant forms, along with a mosaic provirus with a complex putative envA-nefEGE genetic structure. No significant differences were found when RNA viral loads were evaluated as a function of the viral subtypes. Nevertheless, a relatively high quantification of HIV-1 RNA was obtained in the NTM group, emphasizing the importance of the compliance and effectiveness of therapeutic schemes to control viral replication and reduce the risk of HIV vertical transmission. V3 sequences displaying features associated with the R5 phenotype dominated in both groups. Both C2V3C3 and Nef's functional domains were conserved during HIV-1 vertical transmission.

  3. Cross-reactive lysis of human targets infected with prototypic and clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains by murine anti-HIV-1 IIIB env-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chada, S; DeJesus, C E; Townsend, K; Lee, W T; Laube, L; Jolly, D J; Chang, S M; Warner, J F

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of murine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB env cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to recognize and lyse HIV-1-infected cells, we have constructed a human cell line (Hu/Dd) expressing both the CD4 receptor and the murine H-2Dd major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein. This cell line can be productively infected with HIV-1 and can also function as a target for murine CD8+, class I MHC-restricted CTL directed against the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 IIIB. The ability of BALB/c anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL to specifically recognize and lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with divergent HIV-1 strains was tested by using both prototypic and clinical HIV-1 strains. CTL generated by immunization of mice with syngeneic cells expressing either the native or V3 loop-deleted (delta V3) envelope glycoprotein from HIV-1 IIIB were able to recognize and specifically lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with the HIV-1 prototypic isolates IIIB, MN, WMJ II, SF2, and CC as well as several HIV-1 clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that CTL determinants for HIV-1 env exist outside the hypervariable V3 region, anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL appear to recognize common determinants on diverse HIV-1 strains, and classification of HIV-1 strains based on neutralizing antibody reactivities does not appear to correspond to CTL recognition and lysis. The results suggest that the cell-mediated components of the immune system may have a broader recognition of divergent HIV-1 strains than do the humoral components. Images PMID:8497058

  4. The roles of SsrA-SsrB and OmpR-EnvZ in the regulation of genes encoding the Salmonella typhimurium SPI-2 type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Junkal; Beuzón, Carmen R; Ruiz-Albert, Javier; Holden, David W

    2003-09-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded by Salmonella typhimurium pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is expressed after bacterial entry into host cells. The SPI-2 TTSS secretes the translocon components SseBCD, which translocate across the vacuolar membrane a number of effector proteins whose action is required for intracellular bacterial replication. Several of these effectors, including SifA and SifB, are encoded outside SPI-2. The two-component regulatory system SsrA-SsrB, encoded within SPI-2, controls the expression of components of the SPI-2 TTSS apparatus as well as its translocated effectors. The expression of SsrA-B is in turn regulated by the OmpR-EnvZ two-component system, by direct binding of OmpR to the ssrAB promoter. Several environmental signals have been shown to induce in vitro expression of genes regulated by the SsrA-B or OmpR-EnvZ systems. In this work, immunoblotting and flow cytometry were used to analyse the roles of SsrA-B and OmpR-EnvZ in coupling different environmental signals to changes in expression of a SPI-2 TTSS translocon component (SseB) and two effector genes (sifA and sifB). Using single and double mutant strains the relative contribution of each regulatory system to the response generated by low osmolarity, acidic pH or the absence of Ca2+ was determined. SsrA-B was found to be essential for the induction of SPI-2 gene expression in response to each of these individual signals. OmpR-EnvZ was found to play a minor role in sensing these signals and to require a functional SsrA-B system to mediate their effect on SPI-2 TTSS gene expression.

  5. Complete epitopes for vaccine design derived from a crystal structure of the broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 8ANC195 in complex with an HIV-1 Env trimer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Deller, Marc C; Garces, Fernando; Sliepen, Kwinten; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV-1 envelope gp160 glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120 and gp41 heterodimers that mediates cell entry and is the primary target of the humoral immune response. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-1 have revealed multiple epitopes or sites of vulnerability, but mapping of most of these sites is incomplete owing to a paucity of structural information on the full epitope in the context of the Env trimer. Here, a crystal structure of the soluble BG505 SOSIP gp140 trimer at 4.6 Å resolution with the bNAbs 8ANC195 and PGT128 reveals additional interactions in comparison to previous antibody-gp120 structures. For 8ANC195, in addition to previously documented interactions with gp120, a substantial interface with gp41 is now elucidated that includes extensive interactions with the N637 glycan. Surprisingly, removal of the N637 glycan did not impact 8ANC195 affinity, suggesting that the antibody has evolved to accommodate this glycan without loss of binding energy. PGT128 indirectly affects the N262 glycan by a domino effect, in which PGT128 binds to the N301 glycan, which in turn interacts with and repositions the N262 glycan, thereby illustrating the important role of neighboring glycans on epitope conformation and stability. Comparisons with other Env trimer and gp120 structures support an induced conformation for glycan N262, suggesting that the glycan shield is allosterically modified upon PGT128 binding. These complete epitopes of two broadly neutralizing antibodies on the Env trimer can now be exploited for HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:26457433

  6. Potential impact of viral load and genetic makeup of HIV type 1 on mother-to-child transmission: characterization of env-C2V3C3 and nef sequences.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Elizabeth; Parreira, Ricardo; Tendeiro, Rita; Nunes, Baltazar; Castela, João; Soares, Isabel; Mouzinho, Ana; Reis, Eduarda; Paixão, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in terms of the molecular characterization of the env and nef genomic regions and quantification of maternal RNA viral loads. Assignment of viral subtype was achieved by direct sequencing of PCR 1172 products amplified from proviral DNA in 45 HIV-1-nontransmitting mothers (NTM), along with 13 pairs of HIV-1-transmitting mothers (TM) and their infected children (C). Analysis of the env C2V3C3 and nef sequences revealed that subtypes G and B, and their genetic combinations (AG, BG), accounted for over 84.5% of all viruses identified. The genetic structure form envA-nefG was the most commonly observed, with a lower frequency in the NTM (13.3%) compared to the TM (23.1%) group. A greater number of genetic forms was observed among NTM, namely the presence of sequences assigned to subtypes D and F, as well as the intergenetic A/J, and C/U, recombinant forms, along with a mosaic provirus with a complex putative envA-nefEGE genetic structure. No significant differences were found when RNA viral loads were evaluated as a function of the viral subtypes. Nevertheless, a relatively high quantification of HIV-1 RNA was obtained in the NTM group, emphasizing the importance of the compliance and effectiveness of therapeutic schemes to control viral replication and reduce the risk of HIV vertical transmission. V3 sequences displaying features associated with the R5 phenotype dominated in both groups. Both C2V3C3 and Nef's functional domains were conserved during HIV-1 vertical transmission. PMID:19886833

  7. Detection of immunoreactive epitopes in proteins encoded by gag, env, and pol genes of human T-lymphotropic virus type I using synthetic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslavtseva, N.G.; Kornilaeva, G.V.; Pashkova, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    Reactivity of 26 synthetic peptides that comprise 12 to 26 amino acid residues corresponding to segments of the p19 (gag), gp46 (env), and pol proteins (pol) of human T-lymphotropic virus type I toward 31 positive sera was studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Specific reactivity with high titers of antibodies (presented in reciprocal dilution values) was detected for the synthetic peptides corresponding to fragments 110-130 and 100-130 (titers up to 4050) of p19, 174-197 (up to 800), 186-201 (up to to 4050), 191-215 (up to 1350), 242-257 (up to 800), and 272-292 (up to 450) of gp46. Immunoreactivity of seven peptides, fragments of pol-proteins, was weak. New linear epitopes in the regions 145-158, 272-277, and 292-300 of gp46 were detected. In addition, location of the known linear epitopes in p19 and gp46 was refined on the basis of comparative study of overlapping peptides from these proteins. 25 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of env, gag, and tat genes of HIV type 1 detected among the injecting drug users in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Saha, M K; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2006-12-01

    A recent occurrence of HIV-1 seropositivity among a group of injecting drug users (IDUs) in Darjeeling, a hilly district in northern West Bengal, revealed overall 11.8% HIV seroprevalence. Our study based on env (C2-V3), gag (p24-p7), and tat (exon-1) genomic regions of HIV-1 detected among this population showed that Darjeeling IDU sequences belonged to subtype C. Interestingly, the IDU sequences from Darjeeling were again found to be closer to the C strains from Manipur, a northeastern state in India, which is linked to the Golden Triangle via the Manipur-Myanmar border, rather than the IDU C sequences from Nepal, a neighboring country of India. The outgroup reference strains from different sites of IDU-driven epidemics in the world like Russia, Vietnam, Thailand, and Spain belonged to the nonsubtype C group and formed separate clusters from the subtype C cluster in our analysis. These results indicate a rapid spread of HIV-1 by possible drug trafficking along international boundaries, which might also help in the invasion of HIV-1 among IDUs of Darjeeling through the Manipur-Myanmar border of India. PMID:17209773

  9. Paring Down HIV Env: Design and Crystal Structure of a Stabilized Inner Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Displaying a Major ADCC Target of the A32 Region.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, William D; Gohain, Neelakshi; Veillette, Maxime; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Orlandi, Chiara; Visciano, Maria L; Ebadi, Maryam; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-05-01

    Evidence supports a role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward transitional epitopes in the first and second constant (C1-C2) regions of gp120 (A32-like epitopes) in preventing HIV-1 infection and in vaccine-induced protection. Here, we describe the first successful attempt at isolating the inner domain (ID) of gp120 as an independent molecule that encapsulates the A32-like region within a minimal structural unit of the HIV-1 Env. Through structure-based design, we developed ID2, which consists of the ID expressed independently of the outer domain and stabilized in the CD4-bound conformation by an inter-layer disulfide bond. ID2 expresses C1-C2 epitopes in the context of CD4-triggered full-length gp120 but without any known neutralizing epitope present. Thus, ID2 represents a novel probe for the analysis and/or selective induction of antibody responses to the A32 epitope region. We also present the crystal structure of ID2 complexed with mAb A32, which defines its epitope.

  10. Surveillance technology for HIV-1 subtype C in Ethiopia: an env-based NASBA molecular beacon assay to discriminate between subcluster C and C'.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Workenesh; Baar, Michel P de; Goudsmit, Jaap; Kliphuis, Aletta; Tilahun, Tesfaye; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Wolday, Dawit; Abebe, Almaz; Mengistu, Yohannes; Pollakis, Georgios

    2005-12-01

    Forty-nine samples with known C2V3 sequences were used for the evaluation of an env-based molecular beacon assay to distinguish between the two genetic subclusters C and C' which characterize the HIV-1 epidemic in Ethiopia. Two subcluster C and two subcluster C' beacons targeting two different loci in the C2V3 region were developed. Using a three beacon-based (2C and 1C'=C prime), isothermal amplification assay, concordance with DNA sequencing was achieved for 43 (87.8%) samples. Sensitivity was 81.8% and specificity 97.4% for subcluster C beacons. For the subcluster C' beacon, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 87.5% was achieved. Five samples were ambiguous by sequencing of which two samples were subcluster C' by the beacon assay and one subcluster C. Two of the samples remained ambiguous with different beacon-pair combinations as well. From samples with a clear C or C' phylogeny by sequencing, three were undetected by the first-line beacon genotyping assay. Genotype ambiguity was resolved in the three samples using beacon pair combinations restricted to each targeted locus. The beacons were evaluated further in a panel including all HIV-1 subtypes. Four of five subtype C isolates were identified correctly, and no cross-reactivity was observed with other subtypes.

  11. The opgC gene is required for OPGs succinylation and is osmoregulated through RcsCDB and EnvZ/OmpR in the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Madec, Edwige; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Souche, Erika; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Lacroix, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are a family of periplasmic oligosaccharides found in the envelope of most Proteobacteria. They are required for virulence of zoo- and phyto-pathogens. The glucose backbone of OPGs is substituted by various kinds of molecules depending on the species, O-succinyl residues being the most widely distributed. In our model, Dickeya dadantii, a phytopathogenic bacteria causing soft rot disease in a wide range of plant species, the backbone of OPGs is substituted by O-succinyl residues in media of high osmolarity and by O-acetyl residues whatever the osmolarity. The opgC gene encoding a transmembrane protein required for the succinylation of the OPGs in D. dadantii was found after an in silico search of a gene encoding a protein with the main characteristics recovered in the two previously characterized OpgC of E. coli and R. sphaeroides, i.e. 10 transmembrane segments and one acyl-transferase domain. Characterization of the opgC gene revealed that high osmolarity expression of the succinyl transferase is controlled by both the EnvZ-OmpR and RcsCDB phosphorelay systems. The loss of O-succinyl residue did not affect the virulence of D. dadantii, suggesting that only the glucose backbone of OPGs is required for virulence. PMID:26790533

  12. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Wise, Megan C; Broderick, Kate E; Hutnick, Natalie; Goodman, Jonathan; Flingai, Seleeke; Yan, Jian; Bian, Chaoran B; Mendoza, Janess; Tingey, Colleen; Wilson, Christine; Wojtak, Krzysztof; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B

    2013-01-01

    An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP). However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted. PMID:24391921

  13. HIV-1 Env DNA Vaccine plus Protein Boost Delivered by EP Expands B- and T-Cell Responses and Neutralizing Phenotype In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Kar; Wise, Megan C.; Broderick, Kate E.; Hutnick, Natalie; Goodman, Jonathan; Flingai, Seleeke; Yan, Jian; Bian, Chaoran B.; Mendoza, Janess; Tingey, Colleen; Wilson, Christine; Wojtak, Krzysztof; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2013-01-01

    An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP). However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted. PMID:24391921

  14. Paring Down HIV Env: Design and Crystal Structure of a Stabilized Inner Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Displaying a Major ADCC Target of the A32 Region.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, William D; Gohain, Neelakshi; Veillette, Maxime; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Orlandi, Chiara; Visciano, Maria L; Ebadi, Maryam; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-05-01

    Evidence supports a role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward transitional epitopes in the first and second constant (C1-C2) regions of gp120 (A32-like epitopes) in preventing HIV-1 infection and in vaccine-induced protection. Here, we describe the first successful attempt at isolating the inner domain (ID) of gp120 as an independent molecule that encapsulates the A32-like region within a minimal structural unit of the HIV-1 Env. Through structure-based design, we developed ID2, which consists of the ID expressed independently of the outer domain and stabilized in the CD4-bound conformation by an inter-layer disulfide bond. ID2 expresses C1-C2 epitopes in the context of CD4-triggered full-length gp120 but without any known neutralizing epitope present. Thus, ID2 represents a novel probe for the analysis and/or selective induction of antibody responses to the A32 epitope region. We also present the crystal structure of ID2 complexed with mAb A32, which defines its epitope. PMID:27041594

  15. Specific sequences commonly found in the V3 domain of HIV-1 subtype C isolates affect the overall conformation of native Env and induce a neutralization-resistant phenotype independent of V1/V2 masking.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Aidy; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Lai, Zhong; Honnen, William; Zingman, Barry S; Sarlo, Julie; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Robinson, James E; Pinter, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to neutralization by antibodies commonly induced after infection or vaccination. This is generally attributed to masking of sensitive epitopes by the V1/V2 domain and/or glycans situated at various positions in Env. Here we identified a novel masking effect mediated by subtype C-specific V3 sequences that contributes to the V1/V2-independent and glycan-independent neutralization resistance of chimeric and primary Envs to antibodies directed against multiple neutralization domains. Positions at several conserved charged and hydrophobic sites in the V3 crown and stem were also shown to affect neutralization phenotype. These results indicated that substitutions typically present in subtype C and related V3 sequences influence the overall conformation of native Env in a way that occludes multiple neutralization targets located both within and outside of the V3 domain, and may reflect an alternative mechanism for neutralization resistance that is particularly active in subtype C and related isolates.

  16. Comparison of Second-Strand Transfer Requirements and RNase H Cleavages Catalyzed by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and E478Q RT

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Christine Smith; Roth, Monica J.

    2000-01-01

    Truncated tRNA-DNA mimics were examined in an in vitro assay for second-strand transfer during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription. Strand transfer in this system requires the progressive degradation of the RNA within the 18-mer tRNA-DNA (plus-strand strong stop DNA) intermediate to products approximately 8 nucleotides in length. The ability of the truncated substrates to substitute for directional processing by RNase H or reverse transcriptase (RT) was examined. Using wild-type HIV-1 RT, substrates which truncated the 5′ end of the tRNA primer by 6, 9, and 12 nucleotides (Δ6, Δ9, and Δ12, respectively) were recognized by RNase H and resulted in strand transfer. An overlap of 5 nucleotides between the acceptor and newly synthesized DNA template was sufficient for strand transfer. The mutant RT, E478Q correctly catalyzed the initial cleavage of the 18-mer tRNA-DNA mimic in the presence of Mn2+; however, no directional processing was observed. In contrast, no RNase H activity was observed with the Δ6, Δ9, and Δ12 substrates with E478Q RT in this strand transfer assay. However, when complemented with Escherichia coli RNase H, E478Q RT supported strand transfer with the truncated substrates. E478Q RT did cleave the truncated forms of the substrates, Δ6, Δ9, and Δ12, in a polymerase-independent assay. The size requirements of the substrates which were cleaved by the polymerase-independent RNase H activity of E478Q RT are defined. PMID:11000239

  17. Evaluation of reference genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize the viru...

  18. Perspectives on Culturally and Linguistically Responsive RtI Pedagogics through a Cultural and Linguistic Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montalvo, Ricardo; Combes, Bertina H.; Kea, Cathy D.

    2014-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) originates from national legislation and critical research of evidence-based practices for low performing students and students at-risk of failing or receiving special education services. RtI proactively facilitates culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD)…

  19. Propidium monoazide reverse transcription PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the publ...

  20. Effects of Contextual Similarity and Target-Repetition Proportion on Negative Priming in RT Distributional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Hutchison, Keith A.; Li, Yongna

    2011-01-01

    Participants' reaction time (RT) data in a prime-probe flanker task (e.g., ABA-CAC) were analyzed in terms of the characteristics of RT distribution to examine possible mechanisms that produce negative priming. When the prime and probe were presented in the same context and the proportion of repetition-target trials (TRP) was 0.33, negative…

  1. District-Level Considerations in Supporting and Sustaining RtI Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Edward P.; Freeman, Elizabeth Witter

    2012-01-01

    Although Response to Intervention (RtI) implementation efforts have been occurring in schools across the country for more than a decade, questions and concerns are emerging, as some schools are not observing significantly improved student achievement or behavior outcomes as expected. In the literature on RtI implementation, most authors indicate…

  2. RtI Characteristics Commonly Implemented in High Performing Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Mark Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 allowed schools to use a Response to Intervention (RtI) model as opposed to the discrepancy model to qualify students as learning disabled. The incorporation of the RtI model provided earlier interventions for students and reduced avoidance of special services and false diagnosis. With the success of…

  3. Thrombolytic efficacy and enzymatic activity of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Peng, Tao; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2015-08-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), that can encapsulate both recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles, are under development to improve the treatment of thrombo-occlusive disease. However, the enzymatic activity, thrombolytic efficacy, and stable cavitation activity generated by this agent has yet to be evaluated and compared to another established ultrasound-enhanced thrombolytic scheme. A spectrophotometric method was used to compare the enzymatic activity of the rt-PA incorporated into ELIP (t-ELIP) to that of rt-PA. An in vitro flow model was employed to measure the thrombolytic efficacy and dose of ultraharmonic emissions from stable cavitation for 120-kHz ultrasound exposure of three treatment schemes: rt-PA, rt-PA and the perfluorocarbon-filled microbubble Definity(®), and t-ELIP. The enzymatic activity of rt-PA incorporated into t-ELIP was 28 % that of rt-PA. Thrombolytic efficacy of t-ELIP or rt-PA and Definity(®) was equivalent when the dose of t-ELIP was adjusted to produce comparable enzymatic activity. Sustained bubble activity was nucleated from Definity but not from t-ELIP exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. These results emphasize the advantages of encapsulating a thrombolytic and the importance of incorporating an insoluble gas required to promote sustained, stable cavitation activity.

  4. Comparison of electron microscopy, ELISA, real time RT-PCR and insulated isothermal RT-PCR for the detection of Rotavirus group A (RVA) in feces of different animal species.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Mohamed A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    There is no gold standard for detection of Rotavirus Group A (RVA), one of the main causes of diarrhea in neonatal animals. Sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) assays are available for RVA but require submission of the clinical samples to diagnostic laboratories. Patient-side immunoassays for RVA protein detection have shown variable results, particularly with samples from unintended species. A sensitive and specific test for detection of RVA on the farm would facilitate rapid management decisions. The insulated isothermal RT-PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay works in a portable machine to allow sensitive and specific on-site testing. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate a commercially available RT-iiPCR assay for RVA detection in feces from different animal species. This assay was compared to an in-house rtRT-PCR assay and a commercially available rtRT-PCR kit, as well as an ELISA and EM for RVA detection. All three PCR assays targeted the well-conserved NSP5 gene. Clinical fecal samples from 108 diarrheic animals (mainly cattle and horses) were tested. The percentage of positive samples by ELISA, EM, in-house rtRT-PCR, commercial rtRT-PCR, and RT-iiPCR was 29.4%, 31%, 36.7%, 51.4%, 56.9%, respectively. The agreement between different assays was high (81.3-100%) in samples containing high viral loads. The sensitivity of the RT-iiPCR assay appeared to be higher than the commercially available rtRT-PCR assay, with a limit of detection (95% confidence index) of 3-4 copies of in vitro transcribed dsRNA. In conclusion, the user-friendly, field-deployable RT-iiPCR system holds substantial promise for on-site detection of RVA.

  5. Comparison of electron microscopy, ELISA, real time RT-PCR and insulated isothermal RT-PCR for the detection of Rotavirus group A (RVA) in feces of different animal species.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Mohamed A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    There is no gold standard for detection of Rotavirus Group A (RVA), one of the main causes of diarrhea in neonatal animals. Sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) assays are available for RVA but require submission of the clinical samples to diagnostic laboratories. Patient-side immunoassays for RVA protein detection have shown variable results, particularly with samples from unintended species. A sensitive and specific test for detection of RVA on the farm would facilitate rapid management decisions. The insulated isothermal RT-PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay works in a portable machine to allow sensitive and specific on-site testing. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate a commercially available RT-iiPCR assay for RVA detection in feces from different animal species. This assay was compared to an in-house rtRT-PCR assay and a commercially available rtRT-PCR kit, as well as an ELISA and EM for RVA detection. All three PCR assays targeted the well-conserved NSP5 gene. Clinical fecal samples from 108 diarrheic animals (mainly cattle and horses) were tested. The percentage of positive samples by ELISA, EM, in-house rtRT-PCR, commercial rtRT-PCR, and RT-iiPCR was 29.4%, 31%, 36.7%, 51.4%, 56.9%, respectively. The agreement between different assays was high (81.3-100%) in samples containing high viral loads. The sensitivity of the RT-iiPCR assay appeared to be higher than the commercially available rtRT-PCR assay, with a limit of detection (95% confidence index) of 3-4 copies of in vitro transcribed dsRNA. In conclusion, the user-friendly, field-deployable RT-iiPCR system holds substantial promise for on-site detection of RVA. PMID:27180038

  6. Potential Utility of the Real-Time TMPA-RT Precipitation Estimates in Streamflow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Fengge; Gao, Huilin; Huffman, George J.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the potential utility of the real-time Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA-RT) data for streamflow prediction, both through direct comparisons of TMPA-RT estimates with a gridded gauge product, and through evaluation of streamflow simulations over four tributaries of La Plata Basin (LPB) in South America using the two precipitation products. Our assessments indicate that the relative accuracy and the hydrologic performance of TMPA-RT-based streamflow simulations generally improved after February 2005. The improvements in TMPA-RT since 2005 are closely related to upgrades in the TMPA-RT algorithm in early February, 2005 which include use of additional microwave sensors (AMSR-E and AMSU-B) and implementation of different calibration schemes. Our work suggests considerable potential for hydrologic prediction using purely satellite-derived precipitation estimates (no adjustments by in situ gauges) in parts of the globe where in situ observations are sparse.

  7. RTC-Lite: Lightweight RT-Component for Distributed Embedded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Noriaki; Ohara, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Ohba, Kohtaro

    In the previous studies, the authors have studied a software platform for robotic system integration, and proposed a component based software platform called the RT-Middleware (RTM) and the RT-Component (RTC). In the networked robotic systems, such as an intelligent space or ambient intelligence, a lot of embedded devices are distributed and networked. In such systems, very light-weight middleware for microprocessors is needed. In this paper, a model based robotic system integration approach to realize interoperability between microprocessor based devices and conventional RT-Component based systems is proposed. Based on the scheme of the model driven way, a lightweight RT-Component named RTC-Lite is derived from the original RT-Component's abstract model, and it is implemented as a new platform specific definition for microprocessors. Finally, it is shown that the microprocessor based RTC and the conventional PC based RTC can be developed by the almost same manner, and interoperability can be realized.

  8. The effect of race and gender on patterns of rt-PA use within a population.

    PubMed

    Kleindorfer, Dawn; Schneider, Alexander; Kissela, Brett M; Woo, Daniel; Khoury, Jane; Alwell, Kathleen; Miller, Rosemary; Gebel, James; Szaflarski, Jerzy; Pancioli, Arthur; Jauch, Edward; Moomaw, Charles; Shukla, Rakesh; Broderick, Joseph P

    2003-01-01

    To date, there have been no population-based data published regarding the influence of the patient's demographic factors on rt-PA use. We present preliminary data regarding the effect of race and gender on patterns of rt-PA use in the pre-FDA approval era, in a population with demographic and socioeconomic characteristics similar to the United States. All ischemic strokes within a biracial population of 1.3 million were identified by review of all primary and secondary hospital ICD-9-CM codes 430-438 from July 1993 to June 1994 at all hospitals in the region. The number of patients treated with rt-PA or placebo as part of the blinded NINDS rt-PA trial, as well as demographic characteristics, were recorded and analyzed. There were a total of 1973 hospitalized ischemic strokes that occurred at a hospital participating in the NINDS rt-PA trial. Patients that received rt-PA were significantly younger than those that did not (mean age 67 v 72, respectively, P = .01). Of the 413 strokes that occurred in African Americans, 2.2% were treated with rt-PA vs. 2.6% of the 1560 non-African Americans. Women (2.0%) and men (3.0%) were equally likely to receive rt-PA. The single academic center was as likely to give rt-PA as the community medical centers. In the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky population, patterns of rt-PA use in 1993-94 did not appear to vary according to race or gender, or type of medical center. These findings may be in part because of the regionally-based method of stroke care delivery in the area.

  9. Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT) Arising From Ependymoma: A Type of AT/RT Secondarily Developing From Other Primary Central Nervous System Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nobusawa, Sumihito; Hirato, Junko; Sugai, Tsutomu; Okura, Naoki; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Yamada, Seiji; Ikota, Hayato; Nakazato, Yoichi; Yokoo, Hideaki

    2016-02-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare, aggressive, embryonal brain tumors that occur most frequently in very young children; they are characterized by rhabdoid cells and loss of INI1 protein nuclear expression. Here, we report the case of a 24-year-old man with a left frontal lobe tumor that was composed mainly of rhabdoid cells showing loss of INI1 nuclear reactivity and polyphenotypic immunohistochemical expression, with a small INI1-positive component of ependymoma. Array comparative genomic hybridization separately conducted for each histologically distinct component revealed 22 shared identical copy number alterations, including loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 22q containing the INI1 locus. Furthermore, we found the C11orf95-RELA fusion gene, the genetic hallmark of supratentorial ependymomas, not only in the ependymoma component but also in the AT/RT component by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, suggesting that the AT/RT cells secondarily progressed from the preexisting ependymoma cells. A second genetic inactivating event in the INI1 gene was not detected in the AT/RT component. There are several reported cases of AT/RT (or INI1-negative rhabdoid tumors) arising in the setting of other primary brain tumors (gangliogliomas, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas, and high-grade gliomas), but the present case PMID:26769252

  10. A novel detection system for the genetically modified canola (Brassica rapa) line RT73.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2010-12-01

    The herbicide-tolerant genetically modified Roundup Ready canola (Brassica napus) line RT73 has been approved worldwide for use in animal feed and human food. However, RT73 Brassica rapa lines derived from interspecific crosses with RT73 B. napus have not been approved in Japan. Here, we report on a novel system using individual kernel analyses for the qualitative detection of RT73 B. rapa in canola grain samples. We developed a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to discriminate B. napus and B. rapa DNA using scatter plots of the end-point analyses; this method was able to discriminate a group comprising B. rapa and Brassica juncea from a group comprising B. napus, Brassica carinata, and Brassica oleracea. We also developed a duplex real-time PCR method for the simultaneous detection of an RT73-specific sequence and an endogenous FatA gene. Additionally, a DNA-extraction method using 96-well silica-membrane plates was developed and optimized for use with individual canola kernels. Our detection system could identify RT73 B. rapa kernels in canola grain samples enabling the accurate and reliable monitoring of RT73 B. rapa contamination in canola, thus playing a role in its governmental regulation in Japan.

  11. rt-PA Thrombolysis in Acute Thromboembolic Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred; Salomonowitz, Erich; Wohlschlager, Helmut; Zwrtek, Karin; Boeck, Rudolf; Zwrtek, Ronald

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the results of rt-PA thrombolysis in the treatment of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the upper limb.Methods: Of 55 patients with demonstrated acute embolic arterial occlusion, rt-PA thrombolysis was performed on 40 occlusions in 38 patients (23 women with a mean age of 62 years, range 32-85 years; 15 men with a mean age of 65 years, range 32-92 years) according to the following design: 6 mg rt-PA/hr for 30 min, 3 mg rt-PA/hr for the next 30 min, 1 mg rt-PA/hr for 7 hr, and 0.4 mg rt-PA/hr until the end of lysis. Onset of symptoms varied from 1 to 14 days. Included were three isolated upper-arm occlusions, nine combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and 28 forearm and hand artery occlusions.Results: The overall success rate was 55%. The lysis results for isolated upper arm, combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and forearm and hand artery occlusions were 100%, 66%, and 46%, respectively. In eight patients surgical embolectomy had to be performed after failed thrombolysis. No amputation was required in the follow-up period. No lethal complications occurred.Conclusions: Interventional rt-PA treatment of proximal upper-extremity arterial occlusions may be performed with comparable success rates to surgical embolectomy and without severe complications. For distal occlusions the results are inferior to the success rates obtained with surgery.

  12. A high-speed, high-performance on-chip integrated reverse transcription (RT)-microchip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwanyong; Han, Nari; Choi, In-Hak; Han, Ki-Ho

    2013-02-01

    This report introduces an on-chip integrated reverse transcription (RT)-microchip, which includes two genetic functionalities of RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. In the RNA extraction compartment, RNA is extracted from peripheral blood lysate within 1 min, by lateral magnetophoresis using magnetic oligo-dT beads. The extracted RNA is then collected and used directly to produce cDNA in the cDNA synthesis microchamber, which is monolithically integrated with the RNA extraction compartment. To verify the superiority of the proposed RT-microchip, RT-PCR amplification was performed using cDNA harvested from the RT-microchip, and the results were compared with those obtained using typical RNA extraction methods such as a silica matrix column and magnetic oligo-dT beads. The RT-PCR amplification results using 100 μl of blood showed that the intensity of the bands in gel electrophoresis of the RT-microchip was 2-fold stronger than that of the silica matrix column and 2.65-fold stronger than that of the magnetic oligo-dT beads. The results demonstrate that the RT-microchip technique is the most sensitive of the tested methods.

  13. Development of RT-components for the M-3 Strawberry Harvesting Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tomoki; Tanaka, Motomasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Saito, Sadafumi; Sugano, Shigeki

    We are now developing the strawberry harvest robot called “M-3” prototype robot system under the 4th urgent project of MAFF. In order to develop the control software of the M-3 robot more efficiently, we innovated the RT-middleware “OpenRTM-aist” software platform. In this system, we developed 9 kind of RT-Components (RTC): Robot task sequence player RTC, Proxy RTC for image processing software, DC motor controller RTC, Arm kinematics RTC, and so on. In this paper, we discuss advantages of RT-middleware developing system and problems about operating the RTC-configured robotic system by end-users.

  14. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. Part III. Virus Detection by RT-qPCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Method 1615 measures enteroviruses and noroviruses present in environmental and drinking waters. The viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) from water sample concentrates is extracted and tested for enterovirus and norovirus RNA using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). V...

  15. Detection of Banana mild mosaic virus and Banana virus X by polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Acina, Isabelle; Lockhart, Benham E L; Candresse, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Viruses are important constraints to the movement and propagation of plant germplasm, especially for vegetatively propagated crops such as banana and plantain. Their control relies primarily on the use of virus-free plant material, whose production and certification requires sensitive and reliable detection methods. An existing polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR) assay was adapted to the detection of Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV) and Banana virus X, two Flexiviridae infecting Musa spp. PDO inosine-containing primers were found to be well suited to the detection of BanMMV, despite its high molecular diversity, but not to that of the highly conserved BVX, for which species-specific primers were designed. Sampling and sample processing steps were optimized in order to avoid nucleic acid purification prior to the reverse transcription step. A polyclonal anti-BanMMV antiserum was raised and successfully used for the immunocapture (IC) of BanMMV viral particles from leaf extracts, leading to the development of a PDO-IC-RT-nested PCR assay. Although the anti-BanMMV antiserum could to some extent recognize BVX viral particles, direct binding (DB) was shown to be a more efficient method for processing BVX-infected samples and a PDO-DB-RT-nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of BVX from leaf extracts. PMID:17280722

  16. Detection of Banana mild mosaic virus and Banana virus X by polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Acina, Isabelle; Lockhart, Benham E L; Candresse, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Viruses are important constraints to the movement and propagation of plant germplasm, especially for vegetatively propagated crops such as banana and plantain. Their control relies primarily on the use of virus-free plant material, whose production and certification requires sensitive and reliable detection methods. An existing polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR) assay was adapted to the detection of Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV) and Banana virus X, two Flexiviridae infecting Musa spp. PDO inosine-containing primers were found to be well suited to the detection of BanMMV, despite its high molecular diversity, but not to that of the highly conserved BVX, for which species-specific primers were designed. Sampling and sample processing steps were optimized in order to avoid nucleic acid purification prior to the reverse transcription step. A polyclonal anti-BanMMV antiserum was raised and successfully used for the immunocapture (IC) of BanMMV viral particles from leaf extracts, leading to the development of a PDO-IC-RT-nested PCR assay. Although the anti-BanMMV antiserum could to some extent recognize BVX viral particles, direct binding (DB) was shown to be a more efficient method for processing BVX-infected samples and a PDO-DB-RT-nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of BVX from leaf extracts.

  17. Transition and Evaluation of RGB Imagery to WFOs and National Centers by NASA SPoRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin K.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    MODIS Snow/Cloud and True Color RGB imagery has been used by SPoRT partners since 2004 to examine changes in surface features such as snow cover, vegetation, ocean color, fires, smoke plumes, and oil spills.

  18. NASA/SPoRt: GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew; Stano, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    SPoRT is using current capabilities of MODIS and VIIRS, combined with current GOES (i.e. Hybrid Imagery) to demonstrate mesoscale capabilities of future ABI instrument. SPoRT is transitioning RGBs from EUMETSAT standard "recipes" to demonstrate a method to more efficiently handle the increase channels/frequency of ABI. Challenges for RGB production exist. Internal vs. external production, Bit depth needed, Adding quantitative information, etc. SPoRT forming group to address these issues. SPoRT is leading efforts on the application of total lightning in operations and to educate users of this new capability. Training in many forms is used to support testbed activities and is a key part to the transition process.

  19. Ethidium monoazide does not inhibit RT-PCR amplification of nonviable avian influenza RNA.

    PubMed

    Graiver, David A; Saunders, Samuel E; Topliff, Christina L; Kelling, Clayton L; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L

    2010-03-01

    A critical obstacle to using PCR to quantify viral titers is the distinguishment of viable and nonviable genomic material. Pretreatments of ethidium monoazide (EMA) have been effective in preventing PCR amplification of DNA from nonviable bacteria. To test whether an EMA pretreatment could be used with RT-PCR to quantify viable RNA virions, avian influenza virus (AIV) survival was measured in water through 28d using cell culture titration and real-time RT-PCR with or without EMA pretreatment. Cell culture titration yielded significantly lower titers than both RT-PCR procedures, and there was no significant difference between RT-PCR results with or without EMA. Ineffective binding of EMA to AIV RNA may have allowed nonviable AIV RNA to amplify. Furthermore, since AIV inactivation may take place by means other than membrane disruption, any pretreatment distinguishing viable and nonviable AIV virions by membrane integrity may not be practical.

  20. Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Transitioning Satellite Data to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center located at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting testbed activities aimed at transitioning satellite products to National Weather Service operational end users for the last 10 years. SPoRT is a NASA/NOAA funded project that has set the bar for transition of products to operational end users through a paradigm of understanding forecast challenges and forecaster needs, displaying products in end users decision support systems, actively assessing the operational impact of these products, and improving products based on forecaster feedback. Aiming for quality partnerships rather than a large quantity of data users, SPoRT has become a community leader in training operational forecasters on the use of up-and-coming satellite data through the use of legacy instruments and proxy data. Traditionally, SPoRT has supplied satellite imagery and products from NASA instruments such as the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). However, recently, SPoRT has been funded by the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Grounds to accelerate the transition of selected imagery and products to help improve forecaster awareness of upcoming operational data from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). This presentation provides background on the SPoRT Center, the SPoRT paradigm, and some example products that SPoRT is excited to work with forecasters to evaluate.

  1. An economic evaluation of rt-PA locking solution in dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Manns, Braden J; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Tonelli, Marcello; Ravani, Pietro; LeBlanc, Martine; Dorval, Marc; Holden, Rachel; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Zimmerman, Deborah; Au, Flora; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent randomized trial, weekly recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), 1 mg per lumen, once per week, and twice-weekly heparin as a locking solution (rt-PA/heparin) resulted in lower risks of hemodialysis catheter malfunction and catheter-related bacteremia compared with thrice-weekly heparin (heparin alone). We collected detailed costs within this trial to determine how choice of locking solution would affect overall health care costs, including the cost of locking solutions and all other relevant medical costs over the course of the 6-month trial. Nonparametric bootstrap estimates were used to derive 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean cost differences between the treatment groups. The cost of the locking solution was higher in patients receiving rt-PA/heparin, but this was partially offset by lower costs for managing complications. Overall, the difference in unadjusted mean cost for managing patients with rt-PA/heparin versus heparin alone was Can$323 (95% CI, -$935 to $1581; P=0.62). When the costs were extrapolated over a 1-year time horizon using decision analysis, assuming ongoing rt-PA effectiveness, the overall costs of the strategies were similar. This finding was sensitive to plausible variation in the frequency and cost of managing patients with catheter-related bacteremia, and whether the benefit of rt-PA on catheter-related bacteremia was maintained in the long term. In summary, we noted no significant difference in the mean overall cost of an rt-PA/heparin strategy as a locking solution for catheters compared with thrice-weekly heparin. Cost savings due to a lower risk of hospitalization for catheter-related bacteremia partially offset the increased cost of rt-PA. PMID:25012176

  2. Factors That Improve RT-QuIC Detection of Prion Seeding Activity.

    PubMed

    Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Groveman, Bradley R; Campbell, Katrina J; Anson, Kelsie J; Manca, Matteo; Kraus, Allison; Caughey, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of prions is important in managing prion diseases. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay for prion seeding activity has been applied to many prion diseases and provides for specific antemortem diagnostic testing. We evaluated RT-QuIC's long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. Repeated assays of a single scrapie sample using multiple plate readers and recombinant prion protein (rPrP(Sen)) substrates gave comparable results. N-terminal truncated hamster rPrP(Sen) (residues 90-231) hastened both prion-seeded and prion-independent reactions but maintained a clear kinetic distinction between the two. Raising temperatures or shaking speeds accelerated RT-QuIC reactions without compromising specificity. When applied to nasal brushings from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, higher temperatures accelerated RT-QuIC kinetics, and the use of hamster rPrP(Sen) (90-231) strengthened RT-QuIC responses. Elongation of shaking periods reduced scrapie-seeded reaction times, but continuous shaking promoted false-positive reactions. Furthermore, pH 7.4 provided for more rapid RT-QuIC reactions than more acidic pHs. Additionally, we show that small variations in the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) significantly impacted the assay. Finally, RT-QuIC performed in multiplate thermoshakers followed by fluorescence readings in separate plate readers enhanced assay throughput economically. Collectively, these results demonstrate improved speed, efficacy and practicality of RT-QuIC assays and highlight variables to be optimized for future applications. PMID:27223300

  3. Factors That Improve RT-QuIC Detection of Prion Seeding Activity.

    PubMed

    Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Groveman, Bradley R; Campbell, Katrina J; Anson, Kelsie J; Manca, Matteo; Kraus, Allison; Caughey, Byron

    2016-05-23

    Rapid and sensitive detection of prions is important in managing prion diseases. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay for prion seeding activity has been applied to many prion diseases and provides for specific antemortem diagnostic testing. We evaluated RT-QuIC's long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. Repeated assays of a single scrapie sample using multiple plate readers and recombinant prion protein (rPrP(Sen)) substrates gave comparable results. N-terminal truncated hamster rPrP(Sen) (residues 90-231) hastened both prion-seeded and prion-independent reactions but maintained a clear kinetic distinction between the two. Raising temperatures or shaking speeds accelerated RT-QuIC reactions without compromising specificity. When applied to nasal brushings from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, higher temperatures accelerated RT-QuIC kinetics, and the use of hamster rPrP(Sen) (90-231) strengthened RT-QuIC responses. Elongation of shaking periods reduced scrapie-seeded reaction times, but continuous shaking promoted false-positive reactions. Furthermore, pH 7.4 provided for more rapid RT-QuIC reactions than more acidic pHs. Additionally, we show that small variations in the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) significantly impacted the assay. Finally, RT-QuIC performed in multiplate thermoshakers followed by fluorescence readings in separate plate readers enhanced assay throughput economically. Collectively, these results demonstrate improved speed, efficacy and practicality of RT-QuIC assays and highlight variables to be optimized for future applications.

  4. An economic evaluation of rt-PA locking solution in dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Manns, Braden J; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Tonelli, Marcello; Ravani, Pietro; LeBlanc, Martine; Dorval, Marc; Holden, Rachel; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Zimmerman, Deborah; Au, Flora; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent randomized trial, weekly recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), 1 mg per lumen, once per week, and twice-weekly heparin as a locking solution (rt-PA/heparin) resulted in lower risks of hemodialysis catheter malfunction and catheter-related bacteremia compared with thrice-weekly heparin (heparin alone). We collected detailed costs within this trial to determine how choice of locking solution would affect overall health care costs, including the cost of locking solutions and all other relevant medical costs over the course of the 6-month trial. Nonparametric bootstrap estimates were used to derive 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean cost differences between the treatment groups. The cost of the locking solution was higher in patients receiving rt-PA/heparin, but this was partially offset by lower costs for managing complications. Overall, the difference in unadjusted mean cost for managing patients with rt-PA/heparin versus heparin alone was Can$323 (95% CI, -$935 to $1581; P=0.62). When the costs were extrapolated over a 1-year time horizon using decision analysis, assuming ongoing rt-PA effectiveness, the overall costs of the strategies were similar. This finding was sensitive to plausible variation in the frequency and cost of managing patients with catheter-related bacteremia, and whether the benefit of rt-PA on catheter-related bacteremia was maintained in the long term. In summary, we noted no significant difference in the mean overall cost of an rt-PA/heparin strategy as a locking solution for catheters compared with thrice-weekly heparin. Cost savings due to a lower risk of hospitalization for catheter-related bacteremia partially offset the increased cost of rt-PA.

  5. Factors That Improve RT-QuIC Detection of Prion Seeding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Christina D.; Hughson, Andrew G.; Groveman, Bradley R.; Campbell, Katrina J.; Anson, Kelsie J.; Manca, Matteo; Kraus, Allison; Caughey, Byron

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of prions is important in managing prion diseases. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay for prion seeding activity has been applied to many prion diseases and provides for specific antemortem diagnostic testing. We evaluated RT-QuIC’s long-term consistency and varied multiple reaction parameters. Repeated assays of a single scrapie sample using multiple plate readers and recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) substrates gave comparable results. N-terminal truncated hamster rPrPSen (residues 90–231) hastened both prion-seeded and prion-independent reactions but maintained a clear kinetic distinction between the two. Raising temperatures or shaking speeds accelerated RT-QuIC reactions without compromising specificity. When applied to nasal brushings from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, higher temperatures accelerated RT-QuIC kinetics, and the use of hamster rPrPSen (90–231) strengthened RT-QuIC responses. Elongation of shaking periods reduced scrapie-seeded reaction times, but continuous shaking promoted false-positive reactions. Furthermore, pH 7.4 provided for more rapid RT-QuIC reactions than more acidic pHs. Additionally, we show that small variations in the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) significantly impacted the assay. Finally, RT-QuIC performed in multiplate thermoshakers followed by fluorescence readings in separate plate readers enhanced assay throughput economically. Collectively, these results demonstrate improved speed, efficacy and practicality of RT-QuIC assays and highlight variables to be optimized for future applications. PMID:27223300

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  7. Requirement of the single base insertion at the 3' end of the env-related gene of Friend spleen focus-forming virus for pathogenic activity and its effect on localization of the glycoprotein product (gp55).

    PubMed Central

    Amanuma, H; Watanabe, N; Nishi, M; Ikawa, Y

    1989-01-01

    In order to obtain evidence for the essential role of the single base insertion occurring at the 3' end of the env-related gene of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) encoding the leukemogenic glycoprotein (gp55) a mutant SFFV genome was constructed in which the segment of the gp55 gene of the polycythemia-inducing strain of SFFV containing the single base insertion and the 6-base-pair duplication was replaced by the corresponding sequence of the Friend murine leukemia virus env gene. The mutant SFFV-Friend murine leukemia virus complex did not induce symptoms of the erythroproliferative disease in adult DBA/2 mice. During passage through newborn DBA/2 mice, the mutant virus complex invariably gave rise to weakly pathogenic variant SFFVs. All of the variant SFFVs induced in adult DBA/2 mice a transient mild splenomegaly associated with normal or slightly low hematocrit value, and they produced gp55 with a molecular weight similar to that of gp55 of the wild-type SFFV. For the two isolates of variant SFFV, the 3' portion of the viral DNA intermediate containing the 3' portion of the gp55 gene was molecularly cloned. Nucleotide sequences of these biologically active cloned DNAs were determined and showed that the variant SFFV genomes arose from the mutant SFFV genome by regaining the single base insertion, indicating that the single base insertion is essential for the biological activity of gp55. Evidence is presented indicating that the single base insertion which causes a loss of the cytoplasmic domain of the env-related protein is not related to the localization of the further-glycosylated form of gp55 in the plasma membrane but is involved with the release of gp55 from cells. Images PMID:2552155

  8. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of three viruses in pear plants by a multiplex RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bingyu; Wang, Guoping; Ma, Xiaofang; Liu, Wenbin; Tang, Huihui; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Ni

    2014-02-01

    A multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for detection and differentiation of the Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), which are viruses frequently occurring in pear trees. Different combinations of mixed primer pairs were tested for their specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of the three viruses. Three primer pairs were used to amplify their fragments of 247bp, 358bp and 500bp, respectively. The primer pair for ASPV was designed in this work, while the primer pairs for ACLSV and ASGV were from previous reports. The sensitivity and specificity of the mRT-PCR assay for the three viruses were comparable to that of each uniplex RT-PCR. The mRT-PCR was applied successfully for the detection of three viruses in leaves of pear and apple plants, but was unreliable in the detection of ASGV in dormant barks. In conclusion, this mRT-PCR provides a useful tool for the routine and rapid detection and the differentiation of three pear viruses.

  9. Quantification of GPCR mRNA using real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Brattelid, Trond; Levy, Finn Olav

    2011-01-01

    Characterisation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mRNA expression under normal, different pharmacological and pathological conditions in experimental animal models and human tissue biopsies by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a valuable approach to understand the regulation of GPCR expression. RT-qPCR is specific and sensitive with a broad dynamic range, which allows precise quantification of mRNA species of interest. In addition to measuring the relative levels of mRNA in a tissue or changes in expression levels between groups of genes of interest, RT-qPCR is also used to identify splice variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of GPCRs. Even though RT-qPCR has become the standard method for quantification of gene expression, RT-qPCR is sensitive to RNA quality, assay design, normalisation approach and data analysis. This protocol is meant as a guide to RT-qPCR methodology with references to the best standard methods available at present.

  10. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Using RT3D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.; Clement, T P.

    2006-07-25

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a reactive transport code that can be applied to model solute fate and transport for many different purposes. This document specifically addresses application of RT3D for modeling related to evaluation and implementation of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). Selection of MNA as a remedy requires an evaluation process to demonstrate that MNA will meet the remediation goals. The U.S. EPA, through the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive 9200.4?17P, provides the regulatory context for the evaluation and implementation of MNA. In a complementary fashion, the context for using fate and transport modeling as part of MNA evaluation is described in the EPA?s technical protocol for chlorinated solvent MNA, the Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA, and in this document. The intent of this document is to describe (1) the context for applying RT3D for chlorinated solvent MNA and (2) the attenuation processes represented in RT3D, (3) dechlorination reactions that may occur, and (4) the general approach for using RT3D reaction modules (including a summary of the RT3D reaction modules that are available) to model fate and transport of chlorinated solvents as part of MNA or for combinations of MNA and selected types of active remediation.

  11. The SPoRT-WRF: Evaluating the Impact of NASA Datasets on Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Kozlowski, Danielle; Case, Jonathan; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) seeks to improve short-term, regional weather forecasts using unique NASA products and capabilities SPoRT has developed a unique, real-time configuration of the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)WRF (ARW) that integrates all SPoRT modeling research data: (1) 2-km SPoRT Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Composite, (2) 3-km LIS with 1-km Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVFs) (3) 45-km AIRS retrieved profiles. Transitioned this real-time forecast to NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) as deterministic model at Experimental Forecast Program (EFP). Feedback from forecasters/participants and internal evaluation of SPoRT-WRF shows a cool, dry bias that appears to suppress convection likely related to methodology for assimilation of AIRS profiles Version 2 of the SPoRT-WRF will premier at the 2012 EFP and include NASA physics, cycling data assimilation methodology, better coverage of precipitation forcing, and new GVFs

  12. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.; Sueoka, N.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP.

  13. Investigating the Decision-Making of Response to Intervention (RtI) Teams within the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thur, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure decision-making influences within RtI teams. The study examined the factors that influence school personnel involved in three areas of RtI: determining which RtI measures and tools teams select and implement (i.e. Measures and Tools), evaluating the data-driven decisions that are made based on the…

  14. The SPoRT-WRF: Evaluating the Impact of NASA Datasets on Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting entities, including a number of National Weather Service offices. SPoRT transitions real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. One challenge that forecasters face is applying convection-allowing numerical models to predict mesoscale convective weather. In order to address this specific forecast challenge, SPoRT produces real-time mesoscale model forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that includes unique NASA products and capabilities. Currently, the SPoRT configuration of the WRF model (SPoRT-WRF) incorporates the 4-km Land Information System (LIS) land surface data, 1-km SPoRT sea surface temperature analysis and 1-km Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) analysis, and retrieved thermodynamic profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The LIS, SST, and GVF data are all integrated into the SPoRT-WRF through adjustments to the initial and boundary conditions, and the AIRS data are assimilated into a 9-hour SPoRT WRF forecast each day at 0900 UTC. This study dissects the overall impact of the NASA datasets and the individual surface and atmospheric component datasets on daily mesoscale forecasts. A case study covering the super tornado outbreak across the Ce ntral and Southeastern United States during 25-27 April 2011 is examined. Three different forecasts are analyzed including the SPoRT-WRF (NASA surface and atmospheric data), the SPoRT WRF without AIRS (NASA surface data only), and the operational National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF (control with no NASA data). The forecasts are compared qualitatively by examining simulated versus observed radar reflectivity. Differences between the simulated reflectivity are further investigated using convective parameters along

  15. Variance to mean ratio, R(t), for poisson processes on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Goldman, N

    1994-09-01

    The ratio of expected variance to mean, R(t), of numbers of DNA base substitutions for contemporary sequences related by a "star" phylogeny is widely seen as a measure of the adherence of the sequences' evolution to a Poisson process with a molecular clock, as predicted by the "neutral theory" of molecular evolution under certain conditions. A number of estimators of R(t) have been proposed, all predicted to have mean 1 and distributions based on the chi 2. Various genes have previously been analyzed and found to have values of R(t) far in excess of 1, calling into question important aspects of the neutral theory. In this paper, I use Monte Carlo simulation to show that the previously suggested means and distributions of estimators of R(t) are highly inaccurate. The analysis is applied to star phylogenies and to general phylogenetic trees, and well-known gene sequences are reanalyzed. For star phylogenies the results show that Kimura's estimators ("The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution," Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1983) are unsatisfactory for statistical testing of R(t), but confirm the accuracy of Bulmer's correction factor (Genetics 123: 615-619, 1989). For all three nonstar phylogenies studied, attained values of all three estimators of R(t), although larger than 1, are within their true confidence limits under simple Poisson process models. This shows that lineage effects can be responsible for high estimates of R(t), restoring some limited confidence in the molecular clock and showing that the distinction between lineage and molecular clock effects is vital.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Moving from Batch to Field Using the RT3D Reactive Transport Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Gautam, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The public domain reactive transport code RT3D (Clement, 1997) is a general-purpose numerical code for solving coupled, multi-species reactive transport in saturated groundwater systems. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several modules of MT3DMS to simulate the advection and dispersion processes. RT3D employs the operator-split strategy which allows the code solve the coupled reactive transport problem in a modular fashion. The coupling between reaction and transport is defined through a separate module where the reaction equations are specified. The code supports a versatile user-defined reaction option that allows users to define their own reaction system through a Fortran-90 subroutine, known as the RT3D-reaction package. Further a utility code, known as BATCHRXN, allows the users to independently test and debug their reaction package. To analyze a new reaction system at a batch scale, users should first run BATCHRXN to test the ability of their reaction package to model the batch data. After testing, the reaction package can simply be ported to the RT3D environment to study the model response under 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional transport conditions. This paper presents example problems that demonstrate the methods for moving from batch to field-scale simulations using BATCHRXN and RT3D codes. The first example describes a simple first-order reaction system for simulating the sequential degradation of Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products. The second example uses a relatively complex reaction system for describing the multiple degradation pathways of Tetrachloroethane (PCA) and its daughter products. References 1) Clement, T.P, RT3D - A modular computer code for simulating reactive multi-species transport in 3-Dimensional groundwater aquifers, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Research Report, PNNL-SA-28967, September, 1997. Available at: http://bioprocess.pnl.gov/rt3d.htm.

  17. Protective efficacy of adenovirus/protein vaccines against SIV challenges in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Ackerman, Margaret E; Brown, Eric P; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin M; Nkolola, Joseph P; Liu, Jinyan; Shields, Jennifer; Parenteau, Lily; Whitney, James B; Abbink, Peter; Ng'ang'a, David M; Seaman, Michael S; Lavine, Christy L; Perry, James R; Li, Wenjun; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Lewis, Mark G; Chen, Bing; Wenschuh, Holger; Reimer, Ulf; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Handley, Scott A; Virgin, Herbert W; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Lorin, Clarisse; Voss, Gerald; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-07-17

    Preclinical studies of viral vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates have previously shown partial protection against neutralization-resistant virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector priming followed by purified envelope (Env) glycoprotein boosting. Rhesus monkeys primed with Ad26 vectors expressing SIVsmE543 Env, Gag, and Pol and boosted with AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H Env gp140 demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repeated, heterologous, intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repeated, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. These data demonstrate robust protection by Ad/Env vaccines against acquisition of neutralization-resistant virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. PMID:26138104

  18. Protective Efficacy of Adenovirus/Protein Vaccines Against SIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Brown, Eric P.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Liu, Jinyan; Shields, Jennifer; Parenteau, Lily; Whitney, James B.; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Lavine, Christy L.; Perry, James R.; Li, Wenjun; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Lewis, Mark G.; Chen, Bing; Wenschuh, Holger; Reimer, Ulf; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Handley, Scott A.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Lorin, Clarisse; Voss, Gerald; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies of viral vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates have previously shown partial protection against stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector priming followed by boosting with a purified envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Rhesus monkeys primed with Ad26 vectors expressing SIVsmE543 Env/Gag/Pol antigens and boosted with AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H Env gp140 demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. These data demonstrate robust protection by Ad/Env vaccines against acquisition of stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. PMID:26138104

  19. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    PubMed

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  20. Straightforward and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanderheyden, Katrien; De Smet, Els; Cuvelier, Claude A.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Fragmented RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a known obstacle to gene expression analysis. In this study, the impact of RNA integrity, gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification was quantified in terms of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) sensitivity by measuring 48 protein coding genes on eight duplicate cultured cancer cell pellet FFPE samples and twenty cancer tissue FFPE samples. More intact RNA modestly increased gene detection sensitivity by 1.6 fold (earlier detection by 0.7 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 0.593–0.850). Application of gene-specific priming instead of whole transcriptome priming during reverse transcription further improved RT-qPCR sensitivity by a considerable 4.0 fold increase (earlier detection by 2.0 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 1.73–2.32). Targeted cDNA preamplification resulted in the strongest increase of RT-qPCR sensitivity and enabled earlier detection by an average of 172.4 fold (7.43 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 6.83–7.05). We conclude that gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification are adequate methods for accurate and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE material. The presented methods do not involve expensive or complex procedures and can be easily implemented in any routine RT-qPCR practice. PMID:26898768

  1. Molecular analysis of dolphin morbillivirus: A new sensitive detection method based on nested RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Centelleghe, Cinzia; Beffagna, Giorgia; Zanetti, Rossella; Zappulli, Valentina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    Cetacean Morbillivirus (CeMV) has been identified as the most pathogenic virus for cetaceans. Over the past three decades, this RNA virus has caused several outbreaks of lethal disease in odontocetes and mysticetes worldwide. Isolation and identification of CeMV RNA is very challenging in whales because of the poor preservation status frequently shown by tissues from stranded animals. Nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (nested RT-PCR) is used instead of conventional RT-PCR when it is necessary to increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the reaction. This study describes a new nested RT-PCR technique useful to amplify small amounts of the cDNA copy of Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) when it is present in scant quantity in whales' biological specimens. This technique was used to analyze different tissues (lung, brain, spleen and other lymphoid tissues) from one under human care seal and seven cetaceans stranded along the Italian coastline between October 2011 and September 2015. A well-characterized, 200 base pair (bp) fragment of the dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV) haemagglutinin (H) gene, obtained by nested RT-PCR, was sequenced and used to confirm DMV positivity in all the eight marine mammals under study. In conclusion, this nested RT-PCR protocol can represent a sensitive detection method to identify CeMV-positive, poorly preserved tissue samples. Furthermore, this is also a rather inexpensive molecular technique, relatively easy to apply. PMID:27220282

  2. Molecular detection of Papaya meleira virus in the latex of Carica papaya by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marília Mendes Melo de; Tavares, Eder Torres; Silva, Felipe Rodrigues da; Marinho, Vera Lúcia de Almeida; Júnior, Manoel Teixeira Souza

    2007-12-01

    A RT-PCR assay was developed for early and accurate detection of Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) in the latex from infected papayas. The meleira disease is characterized by an excessive exudation of more fluidic latex from fruits, leaves and stems. This latex oxidises and gives the fruit a "sticky" texture. In the field, disease symptoms are seen almost exclusively on fruit. However, infected plants can be a source of virus for dissemination by insects. Primers specific for PMeV were designed based on nucleotide sequences of the viral dsRNA obtained using a RT-RAPD approach. When tested for RT-PCR amplification, one of these primers (C05-3') amplified a 669-nucleotide fragment using dsRNA obtained from purified virus particles as a template. The translated sequence of this DNA fragment showed a certain degree of similarity to the amino acid sequence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from other dsRNA viruses. When used as the single primer in two RT-PCR kits available commercially, primer C05-3' also amplified the DNA fragment from papaya latex of infected, but not from healthy plants. The RT-PCR-based method developed in this study could simplify early plant disease diagnosis, assist in monitoring the dissemination of the pathogen within and between fields, and assist in guiding plant disease management.

  3. Serum stimulates sodium uptake by rat papillary collecting duct cells (RtPC) in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Husted, R.F.; Stokes, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    RtPC play an important role in the regulation of sodium excretion by the kidney. RtPC were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured on filter-bottom cups in a serum-free medium for 5 days. For the next 24 hr the cells were grown either in S- or in Dulbecco's/F12 supplemented with 10% serum (S+). In 12 primary cultures, the transepithelial resistance (Rt) was significantly higher in S+ (118 +/- 12 ohm cm/sup 2/, n = 45) than in S- (74 +/- 13, n = 41). Short-circuit current was not different between the groups. Na uptake was measured from the apical solution after 60 sec exposure to isotope in a low Na (27 mM) Ringer (same cells as Rt). Despite the similar current, uptake was significantly higher in S+ than S-; 0.61 +/- 0.05 vs 0.23 +/- 0.04 nmol/cm/sup 2/. /sup 5/H-thymidine uptake was similar in S+ and S- indicating that differences in cell number did not account for the increased Na uptake. Supplementation of S- during the final 24 hr with indomethacin, aldosterone, vasopressin, adenosine, or hexamethylene bisacetamide did not significantly increase Na uptake. Thus, an unidentified serum factor increases Rt and Na uptake. The lack of correlation between current and Na uptake suggests that uptake occurs via an electroneutral mechanism.

  4. RT-PCR for detection of all seven genotypes of Lyssavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Morón, S; Avellón, A; Echevarría, J E

    2006-08-01

    The Lyssavirus genus includes seven species or genotypes named 1-7. Rabies genotypes correlate with geographical distribution and specific hosts. Co-circulation of different lyssaviruses, imported cases, and the presence of unknown viruses, such as Aravan, Khujand, Irkut and West Caucasian Bat Virus, make it necessary to use generic methods able to detect all lyssaviruses. Primer sequences were chosen from conserved regions in all genotypes in order to optimise a generic RT-PCR. Serial dilutions of 12 RNA extracts from all seven Lyssavirus genotypes were examined to compare the sensitivity of the RT-PCR standardised in this study with a published RT-PCR optimised for EBLV1 detection and capable of amplifying RNA from all seven lyssaviruses. All seven genotypes were detected by both RT-PCRs, however, the sensitivity was higher with the new version of the test. Twenty samples submitted for rabies diagnosis were tested by the new RT-PCR. Eight out of 20 samples from six dogs, one horse and one bat were found positive, in agreement with immunofluorescence results. Seven samples from terrestrial mammals were genotype 1 and one from a bat was genotype 5. In conclusion, this method can be used to complement immunofluorescence for the diagnosis of rabies, enabling the detection of unexpected lyssaviruses during rabies surveillance.

  5. The major histocompatibility complex of the rat,RT 1 : II. biochemical evidence for a complex genetic organization.

    PubMed

    Sporer, R; Black, G; Rigiero, C; Manson, L; Götze, D

    1978-12-01

    Recombinational analysis has shown that the rat MHC,RT1 is divided into two regions:RT1.A, which codes for class I (transplantation) antigens, andRT1.B, which controls the humoral immune response and proliferative response to allogeneic cells as well as the expression of class II (Ia) antigens. Serological and sequence studies suggest that there might be more than one antigen-coding locus within theRT1.A region. Results obtained by sequential immunoprecipitation reveal that both regions code for at least two gene products. By implication, theRT1 complex must therefore harbor at least four loci;RT1.A andD coding for class I glycoproteins (45,000 daltons); andRT1.B andE coding for class II (Ia) glycoproteins (35,000 and 28,000 daltons).

  6. Comparative evaluation of 'TaqMan' RT-PCR and RT-PCR ELISA for immunological monitoring of renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Paul J; Tan, Lam Chin; Sadek, Sami A; Howell, W Martin

    2003-01-01

    By sequentially monitoring cytokine gene expression (using RT-PCR ELISA technology) in peripheral blood cells of renal transplant recipients in the early post-operatively period we have shown that expression patterns correlate with clinical events, namely acute allograft rejection. This strategy may have the potential of predicting acute rejection prior to clinical detection. Unfortunately, the technique used was time consuming and only semi-quantitative and, therefore, not suitable for clinical application. In this study, we have sought to confirm the results of the early work using a real time quantitative RT-PCR technique ('TaqMan'), which may be applicable in the clinical laboratory. 'TaqMan' primers and probes were designed for Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 using Primer Express software. Cytokine gene expression for both cytokines was re-measured in stored cDNA samples from 27 non-rejectors and 14 patients experiencing an episode of biopsy proven acute rejection. Compared to pre-transplant levels, IL-4 gene expression fell significantly on post-operative days 2 and 7 before returning to baseline values by day 14 in the non-rejectors. In the rejectors, the initial significant fall was again seen, but with an earlier return to pre-transplant levels at the time of rejection diagnosis. This was followed by a further significant fall in levels 48 h after the initiation of anti-rejection therapy. These different patterns for rejectors and non-rejectors were seen using both techniques. For IL-10, gene expression increased significantly following transplantation throughout the study period when compared to baseline values. This pattern was seen using both techniques. In the rejectors, there were different patterns seen depending on the technique used. When using RT-PCR ELISA, the initial rise was again seen followed by a return to baseline values at the time of rejection diagnosis followed by a further significant rise in gene expression after the start of anti

  7. Eight-drug/radiation therapy program (MOPP/ABDV/RT) for advanced Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, D.J.; Myers, J.; Passe, S.

    1980-07-15

    Eighty-four evaluable patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease (Stages IIB, IIIA age > 35 or mixed cellularity or lymphocyte depletion histology, IIIB, IVA, and IVB) were treated with alternating monthly MOPP and Adriamycin, bleomycin, dacarbazine, and vinblastine (ABDV). Radiation therapy (RT), 2000 rads in two weeks, was given to areas of initial bulky disease in untreated patients. Complete remission (CR) rates were 80% for previously untreated, 65% for prior RT or minimal chemotherapy treated, and 50% for heavily pretreated patients. Among 49 previously untreated patients there were no primary treatment failures. The estimated two-year relapse rate for the CR group was 9%. The therapeutic effectiveness of this program may have been due to either or both of the following elements: (1) two non-cross-resistant drug combinations; (2) low dose adjuvant RT to initial sites of bulky disease. These early results are among the best reported for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease.

  8. In-flight demonstration of a Real-Time Flush Airdata Sensing (RT-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Davis, Roy J.; Fife, John Michael

    1995-01-01

    A prototype real-time flush airdata sensing (RT-FADS) system has been developed and flight tested at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This system uses a matrix of pressure orifices on the vehicle nose to estimate airdata parameters in real time using nonlinear regression. The algorithm is robust to sensor failures and noise in the measured pressures. The RT-FADS system has been calibrated using inertial trajectory measurements that were bootstrapped for atmospheric conditions using meteorological data. Mach numbers as high as 1.6 and angles of attack greater than 45 deg have been tested. The system performance has been evaluated by comparing the RT-FADS to the ship system airdata computer measurements to give a quantitative evaluation relative to an accepted measurement standard. Nominal agreements of approximately 0.003 in Mach number and 0.20 deg in angle of attack and angle of sideslip have been achieved.

  9. Inactivation conditions for human norovirus measured by an in situ capture-qRT-PCR method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2014-02-17

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis. Unfortunately, the inactivation parameters for HuNoV in clinical, food and environmental samples have not been established. Due to the inability to cultivate HuNoV in vitro, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is widely-used for detecting HuNoVs. However, qRT-PCR does not indicate viral infectivity. Our method employs histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as viral receptors/co-receptors and container-affixed capture agents to concentrate HuNoVs. The captured viruses are denatured and its genome is amplified in the same module by in situ capture qRT-PCR (ISC-qRT-PCR). Greater than three log10 reduction in the receptor-captured viral genomic signal (RCVGS) was observed when HuNoV was treated by heat at 72 °C for 4 min, by chlorine at a final concentration of 16 ppm in less than 1 min, and by UV irradiation at 1J/cm². Treatment of low-titer HuNoV (<10³ copies/sample) with 70% ethanol for 20 s reduced the RCVGS of HuNoV by two log10. However, ethanol had a limited effect on high-titer samples of HuNoV (>10³ copies/sample). The results demonstrate that ISC-qRT-PCR method could be used as an alternative method to measure encapsidated viral RNA and indirectly indicate the inactivation status of HuNoV caused by physical treatment such as heat, and chemical treatment such as chlorine, that damage the ability of the virus to bind to its receptor.

  10. Quantitative RT-PCR for titration of replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Ana L P; Rezende, Alexandre G; Jorge, Soraia A C; Wagner, Renaud; Pereira, Carlos A; Astray, Renato M

    2013-11-01

    Virus titration may constitute a drawback in the development and use of replication-defective viral vectors like Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The standardization and validation of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method for SFV titration is presented here. The qRT-PCR target is located within the nsp1 gene of the non-structural polyprotein SFV region (SFV RNA), which allows the strategy to be used for several different recombinant SFV constructs. Titer determinations were carried out by performing virus titration and infection assays with SFVs containing an RNA coding region for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results showed that the standardized qRT-PCR is applicable for different SFV constructs, and showed good reproducibility. To evaluate the correlation between the amount of functional SFV RNA in a virus lot and its infectivity in BHK-21 cell cultures, a temperature mediated titer decrease was performed and successfully quantitated by qRT-PCR. When used for cell infection at the same multiplicity of infection (MOI), the temperature treated SFV-RVGP samples induced the same levels of RVGP expression. Similarly, when different SFV-GFP lots with different virus titers, as accessed by qRT-PCR, were used for cell infection at the same MOI, the cultures showed comparable amounts of fluorescent cells. The data demonstrate a good correlation between the amount of virus used for infection, as measured by its SFV RNA, and the protein synthesis in the cells. In conclusion, the qRT-PCR method developed here is accurate and enables the titration of replication-defective SFV vectors, an essential aid for viral vector development as well as for establishment of production bioprocesses.

  11. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Paul R; Dimonte, Guy; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L; Dimonte, Guy; Dai, W; Kares, R. J.

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  12. [An electronic medical record information system of DICOM-RT module-based in radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Xia, Deguo; Zhou, Linghong; Lei, Li

    2012-06-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) is the clinical diagnosis, guiding intervention and digital medical service record of outpatient, hospital patients (or care object) in medical institution. And it is the complete, detailed clinical information resource which has produced and recorded in all previous medical treatments. Radiotherapy electronic medical records contain texts, images and graphics, therefore the information is more complicated. This paper proposes an EMR information system based on DICOM-RT standard, through the use of seven objects of DICOM-RT to achieve the information exchange and sharing between different systems, equipments, convenient radiotherapy treatment data management, improve the efficiency of radiation treatment.

  13. Real-time Periodic Processing of RT-middleware Utilizing Linux Standard Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Masaharu; Toda, Kengo; Hayashibara, Yasuo; Yamato, Hideaki; Furuta, Takayuki

    A new methodology of real-time periodic processing on RT-middleware based on the Linux standard functionalities is presented in this paper. The central of discussion is on the realization of real-time processing while keeping the reusability of software modules ensured by the RT-middleware framework as well as the portability provided by the Linux development mainstream. In order to show the validity of the proposed approach, two robot systems, including an omnidirectional electric wheelchair steered by haptic joystick, are presented and the discussion about the evaluation result follows from the view point of practicality.

  14. RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR methods for the detection of potato virus Y in potato leaves and tubers.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Tyler D B; Nie, Xianzhou; Singh, Mathuresh

    2015-01-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is a major threat to potato crops around the world. It is an RNA virus of the family Potyviridae, exhibiting many different strains that cause a range of symptoms in potato. ELISA detection of viral proteins has traditionally been used to quantify virus incidence in a crop or seed lot. ELISA, however, cannot reliably detect the virus directly in dormant tubers, requiring several weeks of sprouting tubers to produce detectable levels of virus. Nor can ELISA fully discriminate between the wide range of strains of the virus. Several techniques for directly detecting the viral RNA have been developed which allow rapid detection of PVY in leaf or tuber tissue, and that can be used to easily distinguish between different strains of the virus. Described in this chapter are several protocols for the extraction of RNA from leaf and tuber tissues, and three detection methods based upon reverse-transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). First described is a traditional two-step protocol with separate reverse transcription of viral RNA into cDNA, then PCR to amplify the viral cDNA fragment. Second described is a one-step RT-PCR protocol combining the cDNA production and PCR in one tube and one step, which greatly reduces material and labor costs for PVY detection. The third protocol is a real-time RT-PCR procedure which not only saves on labor but also allows for more precise quantification of PVY titre. The three protocols are described in detail, and accompanied with a discussion of their relative advantages, costs, and possibilities for cost-saving modifications. While these techniques have primarily been developed for large-scale screening of many samples for determining viral incidence in commercial fields or seed lots, they are also amenable to use in smaller-scale research applications.

  15. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  16. Near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy of RT/sub 2/Si/sub 2/ and RT/sub 2/Ge/sub 2/ compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, P.H.; Qi, B.; Liang, G.; Perez, I.; Lu, F.; Croft, M.

    1988-04-15

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements on 1:2:2 compounds of the form RT/sub 2/X/sub 2/ with R = Ce and Eu, T = a transition metal, and X = Si or Ge are presented. XANES measurements on each of the three sublattices are used to elucidate elements of the electronic structure of these compounds. In particular, the evidence for the strongly bonded T-X planes, the coupling of the Ce valence-state stability to the T-X planes, and the response of the X-p orbitals to varying transition-metal components are discussed.

  17. Why the CoRT and Instrumental Enrichment Thinking Skills Programs Will Not Improve Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibboney, Richard A.; Thrush, Allan L.

    The skills taught in the Cognitive Research Trust (CoRT) program and the Instrumental Enrichment (IE) program are unlikely to transfer to thinking in the regular curriculum. The exercises in these programs might be fun to do, but the thinking required is done outside the context of significant subject matter in the humanities and the sciences. The…

  18. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV. PMID:27444120

  19. Identification and evaluation of reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang; Xu, ZhiChao; Zhu, YingJie; Luo, HongMei; Qian, Jun; Ji, AiJia; Hu, YuanLei; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Song, JingYuan; Sun, Chao; Chen, ShiLin

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable technique for gene expression studies. The accuracy and reliability of qRT-PCR results depend on the stability of the reference genes used for gene normalization. Therefore, a systematic process of reference gene evaluation is needed. Ganoderma lucidum is a famous medicinal mushroom in East Asia. In the current study, 10 potential reference genes were selected from the G. lucidum genomic data. The sequences of these genes were manually curated, and primers were designed following strict criteria. The experiment was conducted using qRT-PCR, and the stability of each candidate gene was assessed using four commonly used statistical programs-geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and RefFinder. According to our results, PP2A was expressed at the most stable levels under different fermentation conditions, and RPL4 was the most stably expressed gene in different tissues. RPL4, PP2A, and β-tubulin are the most commonly recommended reference genes for normalizing gene expression in the entire sample set. The current study provides a foundation for the further use of qRT-PCR in G. lucidum gene analysis.

  20. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  1. Regional Data Assimilation of AIRS Profiles and Radiances at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Brad; Chou, Shih-hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Short Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center's mission to improve short-term weather prediction at the regional and local scale. It includes information on the cold bias in Weather Research and Forcasting (WRF), troposphere recordings from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and vertical resolution of analysis grid.

  2. Bone marrow micrometastasis detected by RT-PCR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Natsugoe, Shoji; Nakashima, Saburo; Nakajo, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masataka; Okumura, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Koki; Miyazono, Futoshi; Kijima, Fumio; Aridome, Kuniaki; Ishigami, Sumiya; Takao, Sonshin; Aikou, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    The clinical implications of bone marrow micrometastases (BMM) detected by RT-PCR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) have not been elucidated. We evaluated the relation between the presence of BMM, both before and after surgery, and clinicopathologic findings in patients with ESCC. Bone marrow samples from 48 patients with ESCC were obtained from the iliac crest before and after surgery. After total RNA was extracted from each bone marrow sample, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific RT-PCR was performed. BMM was detected by RT-PCR in 10 of the 48 patients. Four patients each had positive signals only before or only after surgery and 2 patients had positive signals both before and after surgery. There were no significant differences in clinicopathologic factors, including neoadjuvant therapy, between patients with BMM and without BMM. To date, the rates of recurrent disease in patients with BMM and without BMM are 80% (8/10) and 50% (19/38), respectively, a difference which is not significant. The 4-year survival rates of patients with BMM and without BMM are 10.0% and 47.3%, respectively. Recurrence and survival rates were poorer in patients with RT-PCR positivity, although the differences were not significant. A larger study is required to clarify the clinical impact of BMM.

  3. Wave Heating in Ion Cyclotron Ranges of Frequencies in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Mushiake, T.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma device RT-1 has been developed for the studies on magnetosphere and advanced fusion plasmas. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high confinement state. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. We reported that the local electron beta exceeded 1 in RT-1 plasmas. In such situation, the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Heating ions is expected to access high ion beta state and to improve the plasma confinement theoretically. Therefore the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. Based on the results of the TASK-WF2 code, the ∩ shape loop antenna was designed for a slow wave excitation, and was implemented in the RT-1. In the ICRF heating experiments, a base plasma was sustained by ECRH. We observed the clear increase in diamagnetic signals and impurity ion temperature (CIII) in helium plasmas at the neutral gas pressure of 3 mPa, if the ICRF power of 10 kW is comparable to the ECRH one. This result is the first time in a magnetosphere plasma device. The results related to the ICRF heating will be presented in detail. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Nos 23224014 and 24360384.

  4. The Practical Teaching of Thinking Using the CoRT Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bono, Edward

    1986-01-01

    The CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) is a five-step program in direct instruction of thinking skills which increase the number and diversity of ideas as well as help the individual establish goals, set priorities, improve interactions with others, and incorporate feeling into thinking. (DB)

  5. Use of topically applied rt-PA in the evacuation of extensive acute spinal subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Little, C P; Patel, N; Nagaria, J; Kumar, R; Nanra, J; Bolger, C M

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, usually confined to a few vertebral levels. When the haematoma extends over several spinal segments, surgical decompression is a major undertaking. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) has previously been used in a number of surgical procedures, but not in the setting of acute spinal subdural haematoma. A minimally invasive technique of decompression, using topical rt-PA, is presented in two patients with extensive spinal intradural haematoma. Two patients receiving long-term anticoagulation therapy presented with acute-onset back pain progressing to paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated spinal subdural haematomas extending over 15 vertebral levels in one patient and 12 in the other. An angiography catheter was introduced into the subdural space through a limited laminectomy. Thrombolysis and evacuation of haematoma was then achieved by intermittent irrigation of the subdural space with rt-PA, followed by saline lavage. Postoperative imaging demonstrated satisfactory decompression in both patients. There was significant improvement of neurological function in one patient. Topical application of rt-PA for spinal subdural haematoma allows evacuation of the haematoma through a limited surgical exposure. Decompression of the subdural space by this minimally invasive technique may be advantageous over extensive surgery by minimising surgical exposure, reducing postoperative pain and risk of neuronal injury. This technique may be useful in patients presenting with compression extending over several vertebral levels or poor surgical candidates. PMID:12920622

  6. Salmonella detection from chicken rinsate with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and RT-PCR validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical detection of bacteria has been approached in recent years as a bacteria detection method that can counter time restraints of traditional plating or the high reoccurring cost of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The goal of optical detection is to identify bacteria with spectral s...

  7. Padlock probe-mediated qRT-PCR for DNA computing answer determination.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fusheng; Frasch, Wayne D

    2011-06-01

    Padlock probe-mediated quantitative real time PCR (PLP-qRT-PCR) was adapted to quantify the abundance of sequential 10mer DNA sequences for use in DNA computing to identify optimal answers of traveling salesman problems. The protocol involves: (i) hybridization of a linear PLP with a target DNA sequence; (ii) PLP circularization through enzymatic ligation; and (iii) qRT-PCR amplification of the circularized PLP after removal of non-circularized templates. The linear PLP was designed to consist of two 10-mer sequence-detection arms at the 5' and 3' ends separated by a core sequence composed of universal PCR primers, and a qRT-PCR reporter binding site. Circularization of each PLP molecule is dependent upon hybridization with target sequence and high-fidelity ligation. Thus, the number of PLP circularized is determined by the abundance of target in solution. The amplification efficiency of the PLP was 98.7% within a 0.2 pg-20 ng linear detection range between thermal cycle threshold (C(t) value) and target content. The C(t) values derived from multiplex qRT-PCR upon three targets did not differ significantly from those obtained with singleplex assays. The protocol provides a highly sensitive and efficient means for the simultaneous quantification of multiple short nucleic acid sequences that has a wide range of applications in biotechnology.

  8. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV.

  9. DETECTION OF HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES IN STREAM WATER WITH RT-PCR AND CELL CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex RT-PCR method was used to measure virus occurrence at five stream water sites that span a range of hydroclimatic, water-quality, and land-use characteristics. The performance of the molecular method was evaluated in comparison to traditional cell culture and Escherich...

  10. Time and Frequency Synchronization on the Virac Radio Telescope RT-32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukovs, V.

    2016-04-01

    One of the main research directions of Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC) is radio astronomy and astrophysics. The instrumental base for the centre comprised two fully steerable parabolic antennas, RT-16 and RT-32 (i.e. with the mirror diameter of 16 m and 32 m). After long reconstruction, radio telescope RT-32 is currently equipped with the receiving and data acquisition systems that allow observing in a wide frequency range from 327 MHz to 9 GHz. New Antenna Control Unit (ACU) allows stable, fast and precise pointing of antenna. Time and frequency distribution service provide 5, 10 and 100 MHz reference frequency, 1PPS signals and precise time stamps by NTP protocol and in the IRIG-B format by coaxial cable. For the radio astronomical observations, main requirement of spatially Very Long Base Line Interferometric (VLBI) observations for the observatory is precise synchronization of the received and sampled data and linking to the exact time stamps. During October 2015, radio telescope RT-32 performance was tested in several successful VLBI experiments. The obtained results confirm the efficiency of the chosen methods of synchronization and the ability to reproduce them on similar antennas.

  11. A Comprehensive Approach to RtI: Embedding Universal Design for Learning and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basham, James D.; Israel, Maya; Graden, Janet; Poth, Rita; Winston, Markay

    2010-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) provides tiered levels of supports to all students and allows for increasingly more intensive and individualized instruction. Similarly, universal design for learning (UDL) addresses needs of students by proactively planning for instructional, environmental, and technology supports to allow all students to…

  12. SPoRT - An End-to-End R2O Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral observational data applications from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. SPoRT currently partners with several universities and other government agencies for access to real-time data and products, and works collaboratively with them and operational end users at 13 WFOs to develop and test the new products and capabilities in a "test-bed" mode. The test-bed simulates key aspects of the operational environment without putting constraints on the forecaster workload. Products and capabilities which show utility in the test-bed environment are then transitioned experimentally into the operational environment for further evaluation and assessment. SPoRT focuses on a suite of data and products from MODIS, AMSR-E, and AIRS on the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, and total lightning measurements from ground-based networks. Some of the observations are assimilated into or used with various versions of the WRF model to provide supplemental forecast guidance to operational end users. SPoRT is enhancing partnerships with NOAA / NESDIS for new product development and data access to exploit the remote sensing capabilities of instruments on the NPOESS satellites to address short term weather forecasting problems. The VIIRS and CrIS instruments on the NPP and follow-on NPOESS satellites provide similar observing capabilities to the MODIS and AIRS instruments on Terra and Aqua. SPoRT will be transitioning existing and new capabilities into the AWIIPS II environment to continue the continuity of its activities.

  13. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  14. Real-time RT-PCR for quantitation of hepatitis C virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hong; Lai, Jian Ping; Douglas, Steven D; Metzger, David; Zhu, Xian Hua; Ho, Wen Zhe

    2002-04-01

    A newly developed real-time RT-polymerase chain reaction assay for quantitation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in human plasma and serum was applied. A pair of primers and a probe (molecular beacon) were designed that are specific for the recognition of a highly conservative 5'-non-coding region (5'-NCR) in HCV genome. HCV real-time RT-PCR assay had a sensitivity of 1000 RNA copies per reaction, with a dynamic range of detection between 10(3) and 10(7) RNA copies. The coefficient variation of threshold cycle (Ct) values in intra- and inter-runs were less than 1.37 and 4.66%, respectively. The real-time RT-PCR assay on the HCV sero-positive samples yielded reproducible data, with less than 2.09% of the inter-assay variation. In order to determine its potential for clinical diagnosis, real-time RT-PCR was used to examine the HCV RNA levels in plasma from sero-positive and negative subjects, showing that the assay is highly sensitive and has specificity of 100%. It was demonstrated that the real-time RT-PCR was able to amplify HCV RNA in reference sera with seven genotypes (1A, 1B, 2B, 3A, 4, 5A and 6A) that include six major HCV genotypes circulated in the world. Since HCV is a major pathogen of post-transfusion and community-transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, this assay has a broad application for basic and clinical investigations.

  15. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. Part III. Virus Detection by RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Fout, G. Shay; Cashdollar, Jennifer L.; Griffin, Shannon M.; Brinkman, Nichole E.; Varughese, Eunice A.; Parshionikar, Sandhya U.

    2016-01-01

    EPA Method 1615 measures enteroviruses and noroviruses present in environmental and drinking waters. This method was developed with the goal of having a standardized method for use in multiple analytical laboratories during monitoring period 3 of the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule. Herein we present the protocol for extraction of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) from water sample concentrates and for quantitatively measuring enterovirus and norovirus concentrations using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Virus concentrations for the molecular assay are calculated in terms of genomic copies of viral RNA per liter based upon a standard curve. The method uses a number of quality controls to increase data quality and to reduce interlaboratory and intralaboratory variation. The method has been evaluated by examining virus recovery from ground and reagent grade waters seeded with poliovirus type 3 and murine norovirus as a surrogate for human noroviruses. Mean poliovirus recoveries were 20% in groundwaters and 44% in reagent grade water. Mean murine norovirus recoveries with the RT-qPCR assay were 30% in groundwaters and 4% in reagent grade water. PMID:26862985

  16. Association of lymph-node antigens with lower Gag-specific central-memory and higher Env-specific effector-memory CD8+ T-cell frequencies in a macaque AIDS model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Saori; Nomura, Takushi; Nakamura, Midori; Shiino, Teiichiro; Sato, Yuko; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Mizuta, Kazuta; Sakawaki, Hiromi; Miura, Tomoyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Naruse, Taeko K.; Kimura, Akinori; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells exert strong suppressive pressure on human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) replication. These responses have been intensively examined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) but not fully analyzed in lymph nodes (LNs), where interaction between CD8+ T cells and HIV/SIV-infected cells occurs. Here, we investigated target antigen specificity of CD8+ T cells in LNs in a macaque AIDS model. Analysis of virus antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the inguinal LNs obtained from twenty rhesus macaques in the chronic phase of SIV infection showed an inverse correlation between viral loads and frequencies of CD8+ T cells with CD28+ CD95+ central memory phenotype targeting the N-terminal half of SIV core antigen (Gag-N). In contrast, analysis of LNs but not PBMCs revealed a positive correlation between viral loads and frequencies of CD8+ T cells with CD28−CD95+ effector memory phenotype targeting the N-terminal half of SIV envelope (Env-N), soluble antigen. Indeed, LNs with detectable SIV capsid p27 antigen in the germinal center exhibited significantly lower Gag-N-specific CD28+ CD95+ CD8+ T-cell and higher Env-N-specific CD28−CD95+ CD8+ T-cell responses than those without detectable p27. These results imply that core and envelope antigen-specific CD8+ T cells show different patterns of interactions with HIV/SIV-infected cells. PMID:27452272

  17. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew; Stano, Geoffrey; Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT s activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  18. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, G.; Fuell, K.; Smith, M. R.; Stano, G. T.; Molthan, A.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT's activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  19. Further improvement and validation of MagMAX-96 AI/ND viral RNA isolation for efficient removal of RT-PCR inhibitors from cloacal swabs and tissues for rapid diagnosis of avian influenza virus by RT reverse transcription PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) is a high throughput molecular diagnostic test used for rapid detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) in clinical samples. However the performance of RRT-PCR can be adversely affected by RT-PCR inhibitors present in the sample. The tested commercial RNA extraction kits ...

  20. Evaluating the Impact of AIRS Observations on Regional Forecasts at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center collaborates with operational partners of different sizes and operational goals to improve forecasts using targeted projects and data sets. Modeling and DA activities focus on demonstrating utility of NASA data sets and capabilities within operational systems. SPoRT has successfully assimilated the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance and profile data. A collaborative project is underway with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) to use AIRS profiles to better understand the impact of AIRS radiances assimilated within Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) in hopes of engaging the operational DA community in a reassessment of assimilation methodologies to more effectively assimilate hyperspectral radiances.

  1. Extracellular vesicle microRNAs: biomarker discovery in various diseases based on RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, biomarker discovery based on extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs), especially exosome miRNAs, has drawn wide attention. While exosome isolation and identification technologies are increasingly sophisticated, the preanalytical process of exosome miRNAs seems to be no longer a crucial problem. Though next-generation sequencing, microarray and digital PCR have been recommended as good downstream analytical platforms for exosome miRNA quantification, they are still more constrained in clinical utility compared with RT-qPCR method at present. In this review, we will trace back to the origin and summarize current studies of biomarker discovery based on extracellular vesicle miRNAs, and provide an overview and latest developments of RT-qPCR-based data normalization, in order to further assist the development of translational medicine. PMID:26287938

  2. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  3. Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lareu, Ricky R.; Harve, Karthik S.; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-11-09

    The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

  4. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center Environmental Modeling System (EMS). The suite of SPoRT products for use in the EMS consists of a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite that includes a Lake Surface Temperature (LST) analysis over the Great Lakes, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent within the SST composite, a real-time Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This paper and companion poster describe each dataset and provide recent upgrades made to the SST, Great Lakes LST, GVF composites, and the real-time LIS runs.

  5. A rapid RT-PCR based method for the detection of BCR-ABL translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Sidorova JYu; Saltykova, L B; Lyschov, A A; Zaritskey AYu; Abdulkadyrov, K M; Blinov, M N

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To optimise a one step reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol for BCR-ABL chimaera detection. METHODS: Compared with published RT-PCR procedures, this novel approach has at least two advantages. First, the same enzyme is used for both reverse transcription and PCR. Second, amplification of the target (BCR-ABL chimaera) and control gene (ABL) is performed simultaneously in the same tube. RESULTS: On testing 40 chronic myelogenous leukaemia patients and 10 healthy donors there was a specificity for the newly developed technique. In addition, dilution experiments demonstrated that the protocol was highly sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested one step PCR strategy is a simple and reliable way to reveal BCR-ABL chimaeras. Images PMID:9497918

  6. RtI's Implementation and Collaborative Systems between General and Special Education in Two Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosteck, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated Response to Intervention (RtI) implementation in two Illinois middle schools and its impact on the collaborative relationship between general and special education teachers. The intended and unintended consequences of RtI implementation for general and special educators were examined. This qualitative research study was…

  7. Development of Virtual Airspace Simulation Technology - Real-Time (VAST-RT) Capability 2 and Experimental Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, R.; Ingram, C.; Jovic, S.; Alderete, J.; Brown, D.; Carpenter, D.; LaForce, S.; Panda, R.; Walker, J.; Chaplin, P.; Ballinger, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Airspace Simulation Technology - Real-Time (VAST-RT) Project, an element cf NASA's Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) Project, has been developing a distributed simulation capability that supports an extensible and expandable real-time, human-in-the-loop airspace simulation environment. The VAST-RT system architecture is based on DoD High Level Architecture (HLA) and the VAST-RT HLA Toolbox, a common interface implementation that incorporates a number of novel design features. The scope of the initial VAST-RT integration activity (Capability 1) included the high-fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation facilities located at NASA/Ames Research Center and medium fidelity pseudo-piloted target generators, such as the Airspace Traffic Generator (ATG) being developed as part of VAST-RT, as well as other real-time tools. This capability has been demonstrated in a gate-to-gate simulation. VAST-RT's (Capability 2A) has been recently completed, and this paper will discuss the improved integration of the real-time assets into VAST-RT, including the development of tools to integrate data collected across the simulation environment into a single data set for the researcher. Current plans for the completion of the VAST-RT distributed simulation environment (Capability 2B) and its use to evaluate future airspace capacity enhancing concepts being developed by VAMS will be discussed. Additionally, the simulation environment's application to other airspace and airport research projects is addressed.

  8. Selection and validation of endogenous reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis in leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is the most important tool in measuring levels of gene expression due to its accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity. However, the accuracy of qRT-PCR analysis strongly depends on transcript normalization using stably expressed reference gene...

  9. Misidentification of Bordetella bronchiseptica as Bordetella pertussis using a Newly Described RT-PCR Targeting the Pertactin Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently a real-time PCR (RT-PCT) assay based on sequence from the gene for pertactin was proposed for identification of Bordetella pertussis. Here we report that the B. pertussis pertactin gene sequence for the region encompassing the RT-PCR probe and primers is nearly identical to that of many B....

  10. Elementary Principals' Perception of Response to Intervention (RtI) Implementation in North Carolina: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptually, Response to Intervention (RtI) is a multi-tiered problem solving process rooted in special education yet designed as a framework for early and on-going instructional interventions for students across a continuum of academic need. In recent years, however, RtI has become an increasingly significant part of the discourse on school…

  11. NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Local Model Runs in the Environmental Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carcione, Brian; Wood, Lance; Maloney, Joseph; Estupinan, Jeral; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Blottman, Peter; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can be used to initialize local model runs within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). These real-time datasets consist of surface-based information updated at least once per day, and produced in a composite or gridded product that is easily incorporated into the WRF EMS. The primary goal for making these NASA datasets available to the WRF EMS community is to provide timely and high-quality information at a spatial resolution comparable to that used in the local model configurations (i.e., convection-allowing scales). The current suite of SPoRT products supported in the WRF EMS include a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. The SPoRT SST composite is a blend of primarily the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System data for non-precipitation coverage over the oceans at 2-km resolution. The composite includes a special lake surface temperature analysis over the Great Lakes using contributions from the Remote Sensing Systems temperature data. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ice Percentage product is used to create a sea-ice mask in the SPoRT SST composite. The sea-ice mask is produced daily (in-season) at 1.8-km resolution and identifies ice percentage from 0 100% in 10% increments, with values above 90% flagged as ice.

  12. A Simple Scoring System Predicting the Survival Time of Patients with Bone Metastases after RT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Yi; Li, Hui-Fang; Su, Meng; Lin, Rui-Fang; Chen, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Chang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop a scoring system to predict the survival time of patients with bone metastases after radiation therapy (RT). The scoring system can guide physicians to a better selection of appropriate treatment regimens. Materials and Methods The medical records of 125 patients with bone metastases treated with RT between January 2007 and September 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen potential prognostic factors were investigated: sex, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), type of primary tumor, resection of tumor before bone metastases, interval between primary tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA), lung metastases before bone metastases, liver metastases before bone metastases, brain metastases before bone metastases, stage, T, N, M, and degree of cellular differentiation. Results In an univariate analysis, 10 factors were significantly associated with survival time after bone metastasis: sex, KPS, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, CEA, lung metastases before bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. In a multivariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be significant: sex, KPS, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. The median survival of all patients with bone metastases after RT was 14.1 months. There were significant differences in the median survival of patients with bone metastases after RT of 4.9 months, 10.5 months, and 29.7 months in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion According to this scoring system, the survival time of patients after bone metastasis can be estimated. PMID:27438606

  13. Multiplex RT-PCR assay for the differential diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Downing, J. R.; Khandekar, A.; Shurtleff, S. A.; Head, D. R.; Parham, D. M.; Webber, B. L.; Pappo, A. S.; Hulshof, M. G.; Conn, W. P.; Shapiro, D. N.

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis has defined specific translocations associated with two of the most common small round cell tumors of childhood, t(11;22) in Ewing's sarcoma and t(2;13) in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. We and others have previously demonstrated the diagnostic utility of a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of the t(11;22) encoded EWS/FLI-1 chimeric message in Ewing's sarcoma. More recently, we have cloned the t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation and have shown that it results in the fusion of the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2 to FKHR, a novel member of the fork-head family of transcription factors on chromosome 13. To define the morphological spectrum of childhood sarcomas that express the t(2;13) encoded PAX3/FKHR chimeric message, we have performed RT-PCR analysis on samples from 44 primary pediatric sarcomas and 8 sarcoma cell lines. PAX3/FKHR chimeric messages were detected in 24 of 27 alveolar, 2 of 12 embryonal, and 0 of 1 pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma and in 1 of 2 ectomesenchymomas. In contrast, none of 8 Ewing's sarcomas or 2 undifferentiated sarcomas expressed this message. Chimeric transcripts were detected in all cases with cytogenetic evidence of the (2;13) translocation, and in each case the chimeric PAX3/FKHR message had the identical junction sequence, suggesting that genomic chromosome breaks were clustered in a single intron in both genes. By combining the PAX3/FKHR RT-PCR assay with primers for detection of the Ewing's sarcoma t(11;22) encoded EWS/FLI-1 chimeric transcript, we have developed a multiplex RT-PCR reaction that allows the rapid and accurate identification of either translocation in a biopsy sample. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7887445

  14. Efficient simulation of diffusion-based choice RT models on CPU and GPU.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Stijn; Meers, Kristof; Tuerlinckx, Francis

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present software for the efficient simulation of a broad class of linear and nonlinear diffusion models for choice RT, using either CPU or graphical processing unit (GPU) technology. The software is readily accessible from the popular scripting languages MATLAB and R (both 64-bit). The speed obtained on a single high-end GPU is comparable to that of a small CPU cluster, bringing standard statistical inference of complex diffusion models to the desktop platform.

  15. Bacterial reference genes for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR: survey and analysis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Danilo J P; Santos, Carolina S; Pacheco, Luis G C

    2015-09-01

    The appropriate choice of reference genes is essential for accurate normalization of gene expression data obtained by the method of reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In 2009, a guideline called the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) highlighted the importance of the selection and validation of more than one suitable reference gene for obtaining reliable RT-qPCR results. Herein, we searched the recent literature in order to identify the bacterial reference genes that have been most commonly validated in gene expression studies by RT-qPCR (in the first 5 years following publication of the MIQE guidelines). Through a combination of different search parameters with the text mining tool MedlineRanker, we identified 145 unique bacterial genes that were recently tested as candidate reference genes. Of these, 45 genes were experimentally validated and, in most of the cases, their expression stabilities were verified using the software tools geNorm and NormFinder. It is noteworthy that only 10 of these reference genes had been validated in two or more of the studies evaluated. An enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology classifications demonstrated that genes belonging to the functional categories of DNA Replication (GO: 0006260) and Transcription (GO: 0006351) rendered a proportionally higher number of validated reference genes. Three genes in the former functional class were also among the top five most stable genes identified through an analysis of gene expression data obtained from the Pathosystems Resource Integration Center. These results may provide a guideline for the initial selection of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in several different bacterial species.

  16. How Many Microorganisms Are Present? Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andy; Álvarez, Laura Acuña; Whitby, Corinne; Larsen, Jan

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a variation of conventional quantitative or real-time PCR, whereby mRNA is first converted into the complementary DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription, the cDNA is then subsequently quantified by qPCR. The use of mRNA as the initial template allows the quantification of gene transcripts, rather than gene copy numbers. mRNA is only produced by actively metabolising cells and is produced by its corresponding gene to provide a 'blueprint' in order for a cell to manufacture a specific protein. Conventional qPCR detects not only DNA present in actively metabolising cells but also inactive and dead cells. qRT-PCR has the advantage that only actively metabolising cells are detected, hence provides a more reliable measure of microbial activity in oilfield samples. When qRT-PCR is combined with primers and probes for specific genes, the activity of microbial processes important in the oilfield, such as sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and nitrate reduction can be monitored.

  17. Development of an improved RT-LAMP assay for detection of currently circulating rubella viruses.

    PubMed

    Abo, H; Okamoto, K; Anraku, M; Otsuki, N; Sakata, M; Icenogle, J; Zheng, Q; Kurata, T; Kase, T; Komase, K; Takeda, M; Mori, Y

    2014-10-01

    Rubella virus is the causative agent of rubella. The symptoms are usually mild, and characterized by a maculopapular rash and fever. However, rubella infection in pregnant women sometimes can result in the birth of infants with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Global efforts have been made to reduce and eliminate CRS. Although a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of rubella virus has been reported, the primers contained several mismatched nucleotides with the genomes of currently circulating rubella virus strains. In the present study, a new RT-LAMP assay was established. The detection limit of this assay was 100-1000PFU/reaction of viruses for all rubella genotypes, except for genotype 2C, which is not commonly found in the current era. Therefore, the new RT-LAMP assay can successfully detect all current rubella virus genotypes, and does not require sophisticated devices like TaqMan real-time PCR systems. This assay should be a useful assay for laboratory diagnosis of rubella and CRS.

  18. Regional blood-to-tissue transport in RT-9 brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Molnar, P; Blasberg, R G; Horowitz, M; Smith, B; Fenstermacher, J

    1983-06-01

    Regional blood-to-tissue transport, expressed as a unidirectional transfer rate constant (K), was measured in experimental RT-9 brain tumors using 14C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and quantitative autoradiographic techniques. The magnitude of K depends on the permeability, surface area, and blood flow of the tissue capillaries. The transfer rate constant was variable within tumor tissue (range 0.001 to 0.178 ml/gm/min) and depended on tumor size, location (intraparenchymal, meningeal, or choroid plexus associated), and to a lesser extent on necrosis and cyst formation. Brain adjacent to tumor had higher K values, particularly around larger tumors (0.004 to 0.014 ml/gm/min), than corresponding brain regions in the contralateral hemisphere (0.001 to 0.002 ml/gm/min). Estimates of the fractional extraction of AIB by intraparenchymal tumors were between 0.008 and 0.4 ml/gm/min. Values of fractional extraction in this range indicate that tumor capillaries are not freely permeable to this solute. The values of K measured with AIB in this study, for the most part, approximate the permeability-surface area product of tumor and brain capillaries. The experimental data suggest that the permeability-surface area characteristics of the microvasculature in small RT-9 tumors are similar to those of the host tissue, whereas the microvasculature of larger RT-9 tumors is influenced more by intrinsic tumor factors.

  19. SPoRT Participation in the GOES-R and JPSS Proving Grounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For the last several years, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project at has been working with the various algorithm working groups and science teams to demonstrate the utility of future operational sensors for GOES-R and the suite of instruments for the JPSS observing platforms. For GOES-R, imagery and products have been developed from polar-orbiting sensors such as MODIS and geostationary observations from SEVIRI, simulated imagery, enhanced products derived from existing GOES satellites, and data from ground-based observing systems to generate pseudo or proxy products for the ABI and GLM instruments. The suite of products include GOES-POES basic and RGB hybrid imagery, total lightning flash products, quantitative precipitation estimates, and convective initiation products. SPoRT is using imagery and products from VIIRS, CrIS, ATMS, and OMPS to show the utility of data and products from their operational counterparts on JPSS. The products include VIIRS imagery in swath form, the GOES-POES hybrid, a suite of RGB products including the air mass RGB using water vapor and ozone channels from CrIS, and several DNB products. Over a dozen SPoRT collaborative WFOs and several National Centers are involved in an intensive evaluation of the operational utility of these products.

  20. Development of a versatile and stable internal control system for RT-qPCR assays.

    PubMed

    Felder, Eva; Wölfel, Roman

    2014-11-01

    RT-qPCR, an established method for the detection of RNA viruses, requires internal RNA controls for the correct interpretation of PCR results. Robust and versatile RT-PCR controls can be achieved for example by packaging RNA into a virus-derived protein shell. In this study a MS2-based internal control system was developed, that allows stable and universal packing of different RNAs into non-infectious, non-lytic MS2-based viral like particles (VLPs). Two competitive internal controls for a hantavirus assay and a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) assay were cloned for the expression of VLPs. The expression of VLPs containing the RNA of interest could be induced with arabinose in Escherichia coli. The VLPs proved to be temperature resistant and could be frozen and thawed several times without degradation. Distinction of IC RNA from the target RNA was facilitated by a clear shift in the melting temperature or by specific hybridization signals. Furthermore, target and IC PCR amplification could be easily distinguished by their size in gel-electrophoretic analyses. Limits of detection were determined, demonstrating that the application of the IC did not reduce the sensitivity of the target RT-qPCR reactions. The system can be adapted to nearly any required sequence, resulting in a highly flexible method with broad range applications.

  1. Evaluation of the NexScreen and DrugCheck Waive RT urine drug detection cups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Nelson, Gordon J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Urine drug testing is an important tool that is commonly used to assess patient compliance with prescription regimens. Point-of-collection immunoassay devices allow for timely availability of laboratory test results to guide therapy during the same office visit. Two waived immunoassay-based urine drug screen cups were evaluated in this study. The NexScreen cup and the DrugCheck Waive RT cup claim to detect 10-12 drug classes of commonly used and/or abused drugs. This study included a sensitivity and precision challenge with 4-6 replicates at concentrations 0-150% of the manufacture's claimed cutoff, using drug-free urine spiked with purified reference standards. The stability of test results was evaluated by reading the results at intervals between five and 1,440 min. Specificity was evaluated by parallel comparison of pooled patients' specimens, representing 56 patients and 41 known drug compounds. When comparing results to validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results, false positives were observed in the NexScreen cups for benzodiazepine, methamphetamine, methadone, opiates and tricyclic antidepressant tests, but there were no false negatives. The DrugCheck Waive RT cups showed false negative results for barbiturates and opiates, but no false positives. Overall, the NexScreen cup demonstrated better sensitivity than claimed, whereas the sensitivity of the DrugCheck Waive RT cup did not meet claims.

  2. [Development of a real-time RT-PCR for detection of equine influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, S; Santschi, E; Gerber, V; Stalder, H P; Zanoni, R G

    2015-04-01

    Equine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease in horses caused by influenza A viruses. In this work a real-time RT-PCR for fast and sensitive diagnosis of equine influenza viruses (EIV) targeting a highly conserved region of the matrix gene was developed. In addition two RT-PCR methods for the amplification of large parts of the matrix- and HA gene were adapted for molecular-epidemiological characterization of viruses. The primers of the real-time RT-PCR had homologies of 99.4% to EIV- and 97.7% to all influenza A viral sequences, whereas the minor groove binder (MGB) probe showed homologies of 99.3% and 99.6%, respectively. These high values allow application of the assay for influenza viruses in other species. Using 20 equine, 11 porcine and 2 avian samples, diagnostic suitability of the assay was confirmed. High specificity for influenza viruses was shown both experimentally and by software simulation. The assay analytical sensitivity was at 10(2)-10(3) copies of RNA and 10(0)-10(1) copies of DNA, respectively. This allows virus detection also in circumstances of minor viral shedding. All amplified EIV sequences were classified phylogenetically within the known lineages. PMID:26757582

  3. Optimization of an EHR Mobile Application Using the UFuRT Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Amith, Muhammad; Loubser, Paul G.; Chapman, John; Zoker, Kaafoe C.; Rabelo Ferreira, Fred E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Drchrono is an Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) application designed specifically for the iPad. Described as portable, efficient and accessible anywhere, drchrono has several features that might be attractive to health care providers. However, EHRs have to conform to certain Federal Healthcare Information Technology Guidelines, which are evaluated in a series of 12 test procedures, defined by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). In this study, we evaluated Test Procedure for §170.302 (c) Maintain up-to-date problem list, in drchrono. The methodology for our evaluation was contained within Zhang’s unified framework for usability, using UFuRT, i.e. user, functional, representation and task analyses. Based upon the analysis, using Adobe Flex, we then designed a prototype that corrected or improved on perceived weaknesses in the functionality served by the test procedure. We applied the test procedure taxonomy to a prototypic modification of drchrono, and then repeated the UFuRT usability analysis. We also used a 14-item heuristic evaluation by each member of our informatics team. Our findings support a conclusion that UFuRT is a valuable tool to evaluate EHR usability and that an “up-to-date problem” list may be customized, according to healthcare provider preference. PMID:23304290

  4. Evaluation of reference genes for gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen fixing bacterium that has been shown to have various beneficial effects on plant growth and yield. Under normal conditions A. brasilense exists in a motile flagellated form, which, under starvation or stress conditions, can undergo differentiation into an encapsulated, cyst-like form. Quantitative RT-PCR can be used to analyse changes in gene expression during this differentiation process. The accuracy of quantification of mRNA levels by qRT-PCR relies on the normalisation of data against stably expressed reference genes. No suitable set of reference genes has yet been described for A. brasilense. Here we evaluated the expression of ten candidate reference genes (16S rRNA, gapB, glyA, gyrA, proC, pykA, recA, recF, rpoD, and tpiA) in wild-type and mutant A. brasilense strains under different culture conditions, including conditions that induce differentiation. Analysis with the software programs BestKeeper, NormFinder and GeNorm indicated that gyrA, glyA and recA are the most stably expressed reference genes in A. brasilense. The results also suggested that the use of two reference genes (gyrA and glyA) is sufficient for effective normalisation of qRT-PCR data.

  5. Investigation of Reference Genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for Gene Expression Analysis Using Quantitative RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue-jiao; Sun, Xiao-hong; Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Ying-jie; Hwang, Cheng-An; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize its virulence factors and understand the effect of environmental conditions on its pathogenicity. However, there is not a stable gene in V. parahaemolyticus that has been identified for use as a reference gene for qRT-PCR. This study evaluated the stability of 6 reference genes (16S rRNA, recA, rpoS, pvsA, pvuA, and gapdh) in 5 V. parahaemolyticus strains (O3:K6-clinical strain-tdh+, ATCC33846-tdh+, ATCC33847-tdh+, ATCC17802-trh+, and F13-environmental strain-tdh+) cultured at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 37 and 42°C). Stability values were calculated using GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and Delta CT algorithms. The results indicated that recA was the most stably expressed gene in the V. parahaemolyticus strains cultured at different temperatures. This study examined multiple V. parahaemolyticus strains and growth temperatures, hence the finding provided stronger evidence that recA can be used as a reference gene for gene expression studies in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:26659406

  6. Validation of reference genes for real-time quantitative RT-PCR studies in Talaromyces marneffei.

    PubMed

    Dankai, Wiyada; Pongpom, Monsicha; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2015-11-01

    Talaromyces marneffei (or Penicillium marneffei) is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause disseminated disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, especially in Southeast Asia. T. marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus. Typically, T. marneffei has an adaptive morphology. It grows in a filamentous form (mould) at 25°C and can differentiate to produce asexual spores (conidia). In contrast, at 37°C, it grows as yeast cells that divide by fission. This study aimed to validate a quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for gene expression analysis in T. marneffei. Analysis of relative gene expression by qRT-PCR requires normalization of data using a proper reference gene. However, suitable reference genes have not been identified in gene expression studies across different cell types or under different experimental conditions in T. marneffei. In this study, four housekeeping genes were selected for analysis: β-actin (act); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh); β-tubulin (benA) and 18S rRNA. Two analysis programs; BestKeeper and geNorm software tools were used to validate the expression of the candidate normalized genes. The results indicated that the actin gene was the one which was most stably expressed and was recommended for use as the endogenous control for gene expression analysis of all growth forms in T. marneffei by qRT-PCR under normal and stress conditions.

  7. Structures of HIV-1 RT-DNA complexes before and after incorporation of the anti-AIDS drug tenofovir.

    PubMed

    Tuske, Steve; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Clark, Arthur D; Ding, Jianping; Naeger, Lisa K; White, Kirsten L; Miller, Michael D; Gibbs, Craig S; Boyer, Paul L; Clark, Patrick; Wang, Gang; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Jerina, Donald M; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2004-05-01

    Tenofovir, also known as PMPA, R-9-(2-(phosphonomethoxypropyl)adenine, is a nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor. We have determined the crystal structures of two related complexes of HIV-1 RT with template primer and tenofovir: (i) a ternary complex at a resolution of 3.0 A of RT crosslinked to a dideoxy-terminated DNA with tenofovir-diphosphate bound as the incoming substrate; and (ii) a RT-DNA complex at a resolution of 3.1 A with tenofovir at the 3' primer terminus. The tenofovir nucleotide in the tenofovir-terminated structure seems to adopt multiple conformations. Some nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, including 3TC and AZT, have elements ('handles') that project beyond the corresponding elements on normal dNTPs (the 'substrate envelope'). HIV-1 RT resistance mechanisms to AZT and 3TC take advantage of these handles; tenofovir's structure lacks handles that could protrude through the substrate envelope to cause resistance.

  8. Universal Single-Probe RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Erik; Lesko, Birgitta; Lindegren, Gunnel; Ahlm, Clas; Söderholm, Sandra; Falk, Kerstin I.; Lagerqvist, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has become more prevalent in the last few decades. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms, and early diagnosis of dengue is important in preventing severe clinical complications associated with this disease and also represents a key factor in differential diagnosis. Here, we designed and validated a hydrolysis-probe-based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay that targets the genomes of dengue virus serotypes 1–4. Methodology/Principal Findings The primers and probe used in our RT-PCR assay were designed to target the 3′ untranslated region of all complete genome sequences of dengue virus available in GenBank (n = 3,305). Performance of the assay was evaluated using in vitro transcribed RNA, laboratory-adapted virus strains, external control panels, and clinical specimens. The linear dynamic range was found to be 104–1011 GCE/mL, and the detection limit was between 6.0×102 and 1.1×103 GCE/mL depending on target sequence. The assay did not cross-react with human RNA, nor did it produce false-positive results for other human pathogenic flaviviruses or clinically important etiological agents of febrile illnesses. We used clinical serum samples obtained from returning travelers with dengue-compatible symptomatology (n = 163) to evaluate the diagnostic relevance of our assay, and laboratory diagnosis performed by the RT-PCR assay had 100% positive agreement with diagnosis performed by NS1 antigen detection. In a retrospective evaluation including 60 archived serum samples collected from confirmed dengue cases 1–9 days after disease onset, the RT-PCR assay detected viral RNA up to 9 days after appearance of symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The validation of the RT-PCR assay presented here indicates that this technique can be a reliable diagnostic tool, and hence we suggest that it be introduced as the method of choice during the first 5 days of dengue symptoms. PMID:25522325

  9. Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Binding of NNRTI to HIV-1 RT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Lingling; Shen, Jianhua; Luo, Xiaomin; Cheng, Feng; Xu, Yechun; Chen, Kaixian; Arnold, Edward; Ding, Jianping; Jiang, Hualiang

    2003-06-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is the primary target for anti-AIDS chemotherapy. Nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) are very potent and most promising anti-AIDS drugs that specifically inhibit HIV-1 RT. The binding and unbinding processes of alpha-APA, an NNRTI, have been studied using nanosecond conventional molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results show that the unbinding process of alpha-APA consists of three phases based on the position of alpha-APA in relation to the entrance of the binding pocket. When alpha-APA is bound in the binding pocket, the hydrophobic interactions between HIV-1 RT and alpha-APA dominate the binding; however, the hydrophilic interactions (both direct and water-bridged hydrogen bonds) also contribute to the stabilizing forces. Whereas Tyr-181 makes significant hydrophobic interactions with alpha-APA, Tyr-188 forms a strong hydrogen bond with the acylamino group (N14) of alpha-APA. These two residues have very flexible side chains and appear to act as two ''flexible clamps'' discouraging alpha-APA to dissociate from the binding pocket. At the pocket entrance, two relatively inflexible residues, Val-179 and Leu-100, gauge the openness of the entrance and form the bottleneck of the inhibitor-unbinding pathway. Two special water molecules at the pocket entrance appear to play important roles in inhibitor recognition of binding and unbinding. These water molecules form water bridges between the polar groups of the inhibitor and the residues around the entrance, and between the polar groups of the inhibitor themselves. The water-bridged interactions not only induce the inhibitor to adopt an energetically favorable conformation so the inhibitor can pass through the pocket entrance, but also stabilize the binding of the inhibitor in the pocket to prevent the inhibitor's dissociation. The complementary steered molecular dynamics and conventional molecular dynamics simulation results strongly

  10. Biological subtyping of early breast cancer: a study comparing RT-qPCR with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Ralph M; Sihto, Harri; Isola, Jorma; Heikkilä, Päivi; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Auvinen, Päivi; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Jyrkkiö, Sirkku; Lakis, Sotiris; Schlombs, Kornelia; Laible, Mark; Weber, Stefan; Eidt, Sebastian; Sahin, Ugur; Joensuu, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    The biological subtype of breast cancer influences the selection of systemic therapy. Distinction between luminal A and B cancers depends on consistent assessment of Ki-67, but substantial intra-observer and inter-observer variability exists when immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used. We compared RT-qPCR with IHC in the assessment of Ki-67 and other standard factors used in breast cancer subtyping. RNA was extracted from archival breast tumour tissue of 769 women randomly assigned to the FinHer trial. Cancer ESR1, PGR, ERBB2 and MKI67 mRNA content was quantitated with an RT-qPCR assay. Local pathologists assessed ER, PgR and Ki-67 expression using IHC. HER2 amplification was identified with chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) centrally. The results were correlated with distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival (OS). qPCR-based and IHC-based assessments of ER and PgR showed good concordance. Both low tumour MKI67 mRNA (RT-qPCR) and Ki-67 protein (IHC) levels were prognostic for favourable DDFS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.42, 95 % CI 0.25-0.71, P = 0.001; and HR 0.56, 0.37-0.84, P = 0.005, respectively] and OS. In multivariable analyses, cancer MKI67 mRNA content had independent influence on DDFS (adjusted HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.29-0.89, P = 0.019) while Ki-67 protein expression had not any influence (P = 0.266) whereas both assessments influenced independently OS. Luminal B patients treated with docetaxel-FEC had more favourable DDFS and OS than those treated with vinorelbine-FEC when the subtype was defined by RT-qPCR (for DDFS, HR 0.52, 95 % CI 0.29-0.94, P = 0.031), but not when defined using IHC. Breast cancer subtypes approximated with RT-qPCR and IHC show good concordance, but cancer MKI67 mRNA content correlated slightly better with DDFS than Ki-67 expression. The findings based on MKI67 mRNA content suggest that patients with luminal B cancer benefit more from docetaxel-FEC than from vinorelbine-FEC. PMID:27220750

  11. RT-qPCR-based microneutralization assay for human cytomegalovirus using fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peden, Keith; Murata, Haruhiko

    2015-12-16

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of congenital infection that can result in serious disabilities in affected children. To facilitate HCMV vaccine development, a microscale neutralization assay based on reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was developed to quantify HCMV-neutralizing antibodies. Our approach relies on the generation of crude lysates from virus-infected cells that are amenable to direct analysis by RT-qPCR, thereby circumventing rate-limiting procedures associated with sample RNA extraction and purification. By serial passaging of the laboratory HCMV strain AD169 in epithelial cells (ARPE-19), a revertant virus with restored epithelial cell tropism, designated AD169(wt131), was obtained. AD169 and AD169(wt131) were evaluated in both epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and fibroblasts (MRC-5) by one-step RT-qPCR targeting the immediate-early gene IE1 transcript of HCMV. Expression kinetics indicated that RT-qPCR assessment could be conducted as early as 6h post-infection. Human serum samples (n=30) from healthy donors were tested for HCMV-specific IgG using a commercially available ELISA and for HCMV-neutralizing activity using our RT-qPCR-based neutralization assay. In agreement with the ELISA results, higher neutralizing activity was observed in the HCMV IgG seropositive group when compared with the HCMV IgG seronegative group. In addition, HCMV IgG seropositive human sera exhibited higher neutralizing titers using epithelial cells compared with using fibroblasts (geometric mean titers of 344 and 8 in ARPE-19 cells and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Our assay was robust to variation in input virus dose. In addition, a simple lysis buffer containing a non-ionic detergent was successfully demonstrated to be a less costly alternative to commercial reagents for cell-lysate preparation. Thus, our rapid HCMV neutralization assay may be a straightforward and flexible high-throughput tool for measuring antibody responses induced by vaccination

  12. Does the sex of acute stroke patients influence the effectiveness of rt-PA?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Women have been reported to show more frequent recanalization and better recovery after intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment for acute stroke compared with men. To investigate this we studied a series of stroke patients receiving IV rt-PA and undergoing acute transcranial doppler (TCD) examination. Methods Acute stroke patients received IV rt-PA and had acute TCD examination within 4 hours of symptom onset at 4 major stroke centers. TCD findings were interpreted using the Thrombolysis in Brain Ischemia (TIBI) flow grading system. The recanalization rates, and poor 3-month outcomes (modified Rankin scale >2) of men and women were compared using the chi-square test. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess sex as a predictor of recanalization and poor 3-month outcome after controlling for age, baseline NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), time to treatment, hypertension, and blood glucose. Results 369 patients had TCD examinations before or during IV rt-PA treatment. The 199 (53.9%) men and 170 (46.1%) women had mean ages of 67 ± 13 and 70 ± 14 years, respectively. The sexes did not differ significantly in baseline stroke severity, time to TCD examination, or time to thrombolysis. Of the men, 68 (34.2%) had complete recanalization, 58 (29.1%) had partial recanalization, and 73 (36.6%) had no recanalization. Of the women, 53 (31.2%) had complete recanalization, 46 (27%) had partial recanalization, and 71 (41.8%) had no recanalization (p = 0.6). Multiple regression analyses showed no difference between the sexes in recanalization rate, time to recanalization, or clinical outcome at 3 months. Conclusions In our study; sex is not a significant predictor of recanalization rate, time to recanalization or 3-month outcome in stroke patients following IV rt-PA. Trial registration Data from CLOTBUST trial Clinicaltrails.gov Identifier: NCT01240356. PMID:24669960

  13. The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas; Tomsick, Thomas; Khoury, Jane; Bean, Judy; del Zoppo, Gregory; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Woo, Daniel; Khatri, Pooja; Castaldo, John; Frey, James; Gebel, James; Kasner, Scott; Kidwell, Chelsea; Kwiatkowski, Thomas; Libman, Richard; Mackenzie, Richard; Scott, Phillip; Starkman, Sidney; Thurman, R. Jason

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multiple approaches are being studied to enhance the rate of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. Treatment of myocardial infarction with a combination of a reduced-dose fibrinolytic agent and a glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist has been shown to improve the rate of recanalization versus fibrinolysis alone. The combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) (CLEAR) stroke trial assessed the safety of treating acute ischemic stroke patients within 3 hours of symptom onset with this combination. Methods The CLEAR trial was a National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke–funded multicenter, double-blind, randomized, dose-escalation and safety study. Patients were randomized 3:1 to either low-dose rt-PA (tier 1=0.3 mg/kg, tier 2=0.45 mg/kg) plus eptifibatide (75 μg/kg bolus followed by 0.75 μg/kg per min infusion for 2 hours) or standard-dose rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours. Secondary analyses were performed regarding clinical efficacy. Results Ninety-four patients (40 in tier 1 and 54 in tier 2) were enrolled. The combination group of the 2 dose tiers (n=69) had a median age of 71 years and a median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 14, and the standard-dose rt-PA group (n=25) had a median age of 61 years and a median baseline NIHSS score of 10 (P=0.01 for NIHSS score). Fifty-two (75%) of the combination treatment group and 24 (96%) of the standard treatment group had a baseline modified Rankin scale score of 0 (P=0.04). There was 1 (1.4%; 95% CI, 0% to 4.3%) symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the combination group and 2 (8.0%; 95% CI, 0% to 19.2%) in the rt-PA–only arm (P=0.17). During randomization in tier 2, a review by the independent data safety monitoring board demonstrated that the safety

  14. Duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR for detection and discrimination of two distinct potyviruses naturally infecting sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid).

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ch V Subba; Sreenivasulu, P; Sekhar, G

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive duplex-immunocapture-RT-PCR (D-IC-RT-PCR) technique was developed for detection and discrimination of taxonomically distinct Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) that naturally infect sugarcane. D-IC-RT-PCR was performed using polyclonal antisera for capture of virions. Oligo 5'-d(T)18(AGC)-3' as a common reverse primer for both viruses and virus specific forward primers, 5'-AAGTGGTTAAACGCCTGTGG-3' and 5'-ATGTC(GA)AAGAA(GA)ATGCGCTTGC-3' were used for amplifying approximately 1400 and approximately 900 bp fragments of SCSMV and SCMV genomes, respectively from their 3' termini. To assess the applicability of the developed technique, 67 mosaic affected sugarcane samples were initially screened by direct antigen coating-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) followed by D-IC-RT-PCR. In DAC-ELISA, approximately 69% of tested samples were shown to be positive for presence of SCSMV, approximately 28% for SCMV and approximately 10% for both viruses. In D-IC-RT-PCR both viruses were detected up to the dilution of 10(-4). In D-IC-RT-PCR, approximately 76% of tested samples were found to be positive for SCSMV, approximately 37% for SCMV and approximately 16% for both viruses. The sequence analyses of D-IC-RT-PCR amplicons of 3 isolates of each virus revealed that the designed primers were virus-specific. The developed technique had potential application for sensitive parallel detection of two viruses in sugarcane.

  15. Rapid detection for primary screening of influenza A virus: microfluidic RT-PCR chip and electrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Kondoh, Kenji; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Koketsu, Ritsuko; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nagatani, Naoki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-05-21

    Rapid and definitive diagnosis is critical to the prevention of the spread of endemic human pathogenic viruses. Detection of variant specific genes by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has become a routine diagnostic test for accurate subtyping of RNA viruses, such as influenza. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a continuous-flow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic RT-PCR chip and disposable electrical printed (DEP) chips for rapid amplification and sensing of new influenza (AH1pdm) virus of swine-origin. The RT-PCR chip consisted of four zones: RT reaction zone, initial denaturation zone, thermal cycle zone for PCR (2-step PCR) and pressurizing-channel zone for preventing air-bubble formation. In order to measure electrochemical signals, methylene blue (MB), an electro-active DNA intercalator, was added to the RT-PCR mixture. The RT-PCR was completed within 15 min which was the total flow-through time from the inlet to the outlet, and the reduction signals from amplifications could be detected quickly on the DEP chip. The MB reduction current on the DEP chip with the amplicon significantly reduced compared to non-amplified controls. This microfluidic platform for rapid RT-PCR and the DEP chip for quick electrochemical sensing are suitable for integration, and have the potential to be a portable system for diagnostic tests.

  16. Rapid detection and high occurrence of porcine rotavirus A, B, and C by RT-qPCR in diagnostic samples.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Douglas; Homwong, Nitipong; Rossow, Kurt; Culhane, Marie; Goyal, Sagar; Collins, James; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are important cause of diarrhea in animals, including humans. Currently, rotavirus species A, B, C, E, and H (RVA-RVC, RVE, and RVH) have been identified in pigs. Traditionally, RVA has been considered the primary cause of diarrhea in pigs, and RVB and RVC had been described sporadically in pigs until recently. Qualitative porcine RVA, RVB, and RVC RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were designed and 7508 porcine diarrheic samples, submitted to University of Minnesota, were tested to estimate the percentage of RVA, RVB, and RVC over a period of approximately 2 years (from 2009 to 2011). The individual RVA and RVC RT-qPCR assays were multiplex into a single RT-qPCR while the RVB RT-qPCR assay remained as an individual RT-qPCR. In total, 83% of the samples were positive for RVA, RVB, or RVC. As expected, RVA was detected at the highest overall percentage (62%). However, 33% and 53% of the samples were positive for RVB and RVC, respectively, indicating that both RVB and RVC are also epidemiologically important in the swine population. RVC was most predominant in young pigs (1-20 days of age), while RVA and RVB were most predominant in ≥21 day old pigs. As diagnostic tools, the developed RT-qPCR assays could successfully discriminate among infecting RV species, which could lead to better surveillance and epidemiological studies for ultimately better prevention and control strategies.

  17. Rapid detection and high occurrence of porcine rotavirus A, B, and C by RT-qPCR in diagnostic samples.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Douglas; Homwong, Nitipong; Rossow, Kurt; Culhane, Marie; Goyal, Sagar; Collins, James; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are important cause of diarrhea in animals, including humans. Currently, rotavirus species A, B, C, E, and H (RVA-RVC, RVE, and RVH) have been identified in pigs. Traditionally, RVA has been considered the primary cause of diarrhea in pigs, and RVB and RVC had been described sporadically in pigs until recently. Qualitative porcine RVA, RVB, and RVC RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were designed and 7508 porcine diarrheic samples, submitted to University of Minnesota, were tested to estimate the percentage of RVA, RVB, and RVC over a period of approximately 2 years (from 2009 to 2011). The individual RVA and RVC RT-qPCR assays were multiplex into a single RT-qPCR while the RVB RT-qPCR assay remained as an individual RT-qPCR. In total, 83% of the samples were positive for RVA, RVB, or RVC. As expected, RVA was detected at the highest overall percentage (62%). However, 33% and 53% of the samples were positive for RVB and RVC, respectively, indicating that both RVB and RVC are also epidemiologically important in the swine population. RVC was most predominant in young pigs (1-20 days of age), while RVA and RVB were most predominant in ≥21 day old pigs. As diagnostic tools, the developed RT-qPCR assays could successfully discriminate among infecting RV species, which could lead to better surveillance and epidemiological studies for ultimately better prevention and control strategies. PMID:25194889

  18. A DICOM-RT radiation oncology ePR with decision support utilizing a quantified knowledge base from historical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Liu, Brent; Le, Anh; Law, Maria

    2008-03-01

    During the last 2 years we have been working on developing a DICOM-RT (Radiation Therapy) ePR (Electronic Patient Record) with decision support that will allow physicists and radiation oncologists during their decision-making process. This ePR allows offline treatment dose calculations and plan evaluation, while at the same time it compares and quantifies treatment planning algorithms using DICOM-RT objects. The ePR framework permits the addition of visualization, processing, and analysis tools, which combined with the core functionality of reporting, importing and exporting of medical studies, creates a very powerful application that can improve the efficiency while planning cancer treatments. Usually a Radiation Oncology department will have disparate and complex data generated by the RT modalities as well as data scattered in RT Information/Management systems, Record & Verify systems, and Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) which can compromise the efficiency of the clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997 [1,2]. However, they are not broadly used yet by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our attempt is to show a proof-of-concept that a DICOM-RT ePR system can be developed as a foundation to perform medical imaging informatics research in developing decision-support tools and knowledge base for future data mining applications.

  19. A DICOM-RT Based ePR radiation therapy information system for decision-support of brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. J.; Law, M.; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, L.

    2006-03-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. Various treatment options are available to the patient from Radiation Therapy to Stereotactic Radiosurgery and utilize different RT modalities. The disparate and complex data generated by the RT modalities along with related data scattered throughout the RT department in RT Information/Management systems, Record & Verify systems, and Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) compromise an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. By combining our past experience in medical imaging informatics research, DICOM-RT expertise, and system integration, our research involves using a brain tumor case model to show proof-of-concept that a DICOM-Standard electronic patient record (ePR) system can be developed as a foundation to perform medical imaging informatics research in developing decision-support tools and knowledge

  20. Effects of the protonation state in the interaction of an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid, Lys101, and a non nucleoside RT inhibitor, GW420867X.

    PubMed

    Galembeck, Sérgio E; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between an inhibitor and amino acids from a binding pocket could help not only to understand the nature of these interactions, but also to support the design of new inhibitors. In this paper, we explore the key interaction between a second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), GW420867X, and HIV-1 RT amino acid Lys101 (K101), by quantum mechanical methods. The neutral, protonated, and zwitterionic complexes of GW420867X-K101 were studied. The interaction energies were determined by SCS-MP2/def2-cc-pVQZ, and the electron density was analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced gradient analysis. A large increase in the interaction was observed with the tautomerization of neutral or neutral protonated species. The monomers interact by two medium-strength hydrogen bonds, one partially covalent and another noncovalent. There are some van der Waals intramolecular interactions that are topologically unstable. The nature of the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed using quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) at BLYP-D/TZ2P. PMID:24965933

  1. Multiplex RT-PCR-based detections of CEA, CK20 and EGFR in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsouma, Aikaterini; Aggeli, Chrysanthi; Lembessis, Panagiotis; Zografos, George N; Korkolis, Dimitris P; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Skondra, Maria; Pissimissis, Nikolaos; Tzonou, Anastasia; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To develop a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method detecting circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were collected from 88 CRC patients and 40 healthy individuals from the blood donors’ clinic and subsequently analyzed by multiplex RT-RCR for the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. The analysis involved determining the detection rates of CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts vs disease stage and overall survival. Median follow-up period was 19 mo (range 8-28 mo). RESULTS: Rates of CEA, CK20 and EGFR detection in CRC patients were 95.5%, 78.4% and 19.3%, respectively. CEA transcripts were detected in 3 healthy volunteer samples (7.5%), whereas all control samples were tested negative for CK20 and EGFR transcripts. The increasing number of positive detections for CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts in each blood sample was positively correlated with Astler-Coller disease stage (P < 0.001) and preoperative serum levels of CEA (P = 0.029) in CRC patients. Data analysis using Kaplan-Meier estimator documented significant differences in the overall survival of the different CRC patient groups as formed according to the increasing number of positivity for CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that multiplex RT-PCR assay can provide useful information concerning disease stage and overall survival of CRC patients. PMID:21157973

  2. Chemical composition and RT[sub NDT] determinations for Midland weld WF-70

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, R.L.; Miller, M.K. )

    1992-12-01

    The Heavy-Section Steal Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series has the objective to investigate the affects of radiation on the fracture toughness of the low-upper-shelf submerged-arc welds (B W designation WF-70) in the reactor pressure vessel of the canceled Midland Unit 1 nuclear plant. This report discusses determination of variations in chemical composition And reference temperature (RT[sub NDT]) throughout the welds. Specimens were machined from different sections and through thickness locations in both the beltline and nozzle course welds. The nil-ductility transition temperatures ranged from [minus]40 to [minus]60[degrees]C ([minus]40 and [minus]76[degrees]F) while the RT[sub NDT]S, controlled by the Charpy behavior, varied from [minus]20 to 37[degrees]C ([minus]4 to 99[degrees]F). The upper-shelf energies varied from 77 to 108 J (57 to 80 ft-lb). The combined data revealed a mean 41-J (30-ft-lb) temperature of [minus]8[degrees]C (17[degrees]F) with a mean upper-shelf energy of 88 J (65 ft-lb). The copper contents range from 0.21 to 0.34 wt % in the beltline weld and from 0.37 to 0.46 wt % in the nozzle course weld. Atom probe field ion microscope analyses indicated substantial depletion of copper in the matrix but no evidence of copper clustering. Statistical analyses of the Charpy and chemical composition results as well as interpretation of the ASME procedures for RT[sub NDT] determination are discussed.

  3. Sensitive and rapid RT-qPCR quantification of pathogenic Candida species in human blood.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    For accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of candidiasis, we developed a highly sensitive quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) system for five Candida species that have been reported to be the major causes of bloodstream fungal infection (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei), together with a system for all pathogenic Candida species. Cells of each fungal species spiked into human peripheral blood (PB) were specifically detected at a lower detection limit of 10(0) cell/1 mL PB by this system using the newly developed specific primer sets targeting 18S or 26S rRNA of the five Candida species, together with the existing group primer set. The total count of the five Candida spp. as the sum of those obtained by using the five species primer sets was equivalent to the count obtained by using the group primer set, indicating that the group set covered the major five Candida spp. in human blood with the same degree of accuracy as the species primer sets. The RT-qPCR counts of the Candida species were in good agreement with CFU counts obtained by their culture on CHROMagar™, with a lower detection limit of 10(0)cell/mL of PB. Candida rRNA molecules were stably stored for at least 7 days at 4°C by keeping the blood specimens in an RNA stabilizing reagent. These results strongly suggest that this sensitive system is useful for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Candida bloodstream infections.

  4. Development and application of an RT-PCR test for detecting avian nephritis virus.

    PubMed

    Todd, D; Trudgett, J; McNeilly, F; McBride, N; Donnelly, B; Smyth, V J; Jewhurst, H L; Adair, B M

    2010-06-01

    The development of a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for detecting avian nephritis virus (ANV) is described. Primers, which amplified a fragment of 182 base pairs (bp), were located in the conserved 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the genome. The limit of detection of the test was estimated to be approximately 18 viral copies using a 10-fold dilution series of in vitro transcribed RNA. Positive signals were produced with representative ANV samples, some of which were not detected by previously described RT-PCR tests for detecting ANV, but other avian astroviruses including chicken astrovirus isolates and duck hepatitis virus types 2 and 3 tested negative. When applied to gut content samples from UK, German and US broiler flocks with enteritis/growth problems, ANVs were detected by RT-PCR in 82/82 (100%) samples. ANVs were also detected in 80/96 (83%) pooled gut content samples from longitudinal surveys of four broiler flocks displaying below-average performance. Whereas all samples collected on day 0 from the surveys were negative for ANV, all samples collected at days 4/5, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 tested positive. Sequence determinations performed with amplicons produced with 14 field samples confirmed the ANV specificity of the test, while comparative and phylogenetic analyses based on 109-nucleotide 3'-UTR sequences demonstrated that the majority of ANVs investigated were more closely related to the serotype 2 ANV (accession number AB 046864) than to the serotype 1 ANV (accession number NC 003790).

  5. Effective detection of human noroviruses in Hawaiian waters using enhanced RT-PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hsin-I; Connell, Christina; Boehm, Alexandria B; Lu, Yuanan

    2011-11-15

    The current recreational water quality criteria using growth-based measurements of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration have their limitations for swimmer protection. To evaluate the possible use of enteric viruses as an improved indicator of human sewage contamination in recreational waters for enhanced health risk assessment, human norovirus (huNoV) was tested as a model in this study. To establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective huNoV detection in waters, 16 published and newly designed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) primer pairs specific for huNoV genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII) were comparatively evaluated side-by-side using single sources of huNoV RNA stock extracted from local clinical isolates. Under optimized conditions, these RT-PCR protocols shared a very different pattern of detection sensitivity for huNoV. The primer sets COG2F/COG2R and QNIF4/NV1LCR were determined to be the most sensitive ones for huNoV GII and GI, respectively, with up to 10(5)- and 10(6)-fold more sensitive as compared to other sets tested. These two sensitive protocols were validated by positive detection of huNoV in untreated and treated urban wastewater samples. In addition, these RT-PCR protocols enabled detection of the prevalence of huNoV in 5 (GI) and 10 (GII) of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of O'ahu, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing and sequence analysis. Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viral pathogens for environmental monitoring and argue the importance and essentiality for such monitoring activity to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21945082

  6. Genotyping and Classification of Tunisian Strains of Avian Reovirus using RT-PCR and RFLP Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kort, Ymene Hellal; Bourogâa, Hager; Gribaa, Latifa; Hassen, Jihene; Ghram, Abdelgelil

    2015-03-01

    Since 1998, avian reovirus (ARV) infection has been detected in broiler and breeding chicken flocks in Tunisia. The genotype of avian reoviruses was established using simple and rapid approaches. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) on both sigma C (σC) and sigma B (σB)-encoding genes followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were used to better characterize Tunisian isolated strains. The RT-PCR amplified fragments of 738 and 540 bp for σC- and σB-encoding genes, respectively, of 15 ARV Tunisian strains. DNA fragments amplified from S 1133 vaccine and isolated strains were digested with different restrictions enzymes. RFLP on the σC gene indicated that the field isolates and the S 1133 vaccine strain have identical profiles when separately digested with TaqI, PstI, DdeI, and HincII. Considering the σB gene, RFLP profiles were identical with RsaI, BclI, DpnII, and NciI restriction enzymes for all the strains. However, using MseI and AciI enzymes, it was shown that all tested isolates could be clearly distinguished from the vaccine strain. ARV strains could be classified in groups with strong relatedness. Strain-typing based on cleavage site results are in agreement with ARV clustering based on nucleotide sequences of both the σC and σB genes. RT-PCR-RFLP provides a simple and a rapid approach for genotyping ARV isolates, especially when a large number of isolates are being studied. Additionally, this approach may also determine whether a new variant strain has been introduced into a flock or if a given virus strain is being spread from one flock to another. PMID:26292528

  7. NASA/SPoRT's GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuell, K. K.; Jedlovec, G.; Molthan, A.; Stano, G. T.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports many activities within the GOES-R Proving Grounds (PG). These include the development of imagery from existing instrumentation as a proxy to future Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities on GOES-R. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments are used to provide a glimpse of the multi-spectral capabilities that will become the norm as the number of channels and data rate dramatically increase with GOES-R. The NOAA/NWS has plans to provide operational users with all ABI channels at the highest resolution. Data fusion of individual channels into composite red, green, and blue imagery products will assist the end user with this future wave of information. While increasing the efficiency in the operational use of ABI channels, these composites provide only qualitative information. Within the GOES-R PG, SPoRT and other partners are exploring ways to include quantitative information as part of the composite imagery. However, limitations in local hardware processing and/or data bandwidth for users of the GOES-R data stream are challenges to overcome. This presentation will discuss the creation of these composite images as well as possible solutions to address these processing challenges. In a similar manner the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) to be launched on GOES-R presents several data management challenges. The GLM is a pioneering instrument to quantify total lightning from a geostationary platform. The expected data frequency from the GLM is to be at a sub-minute interval. Users of such a data set may have little experience in handling such a rapid update of information. To assist users, SPoRT is working with the NWS to develop tools within the user's decision support system to allow tracking and analysis of total lightning from a storm-based perspective. This presentation will discuss the

  8. Progress curve analysis of qRT-PCR reactions using the logistic growth equation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meile; Udhe-Stone, Claudia; Goudar, Chetan T

    2011-01-01

    We present an alternate approach for analyzing data from real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) experiments by fitting individual fluorescence vs. cycle number (F vs. C) curves to the logistic growth equation. The best fit parameters determined by nonlinear least squares were used to compute the second derivative of the logistic equation and the cycle threshold, C(t), was determined from the maximum value of the second derivative. This C(t) value was subsequently used to determine ΔΔC(t) and the amplification efficiency, E(n), thereby completing the analysis on a qRT-PCR data set. The robustness of the logistic approach was verified by testing ~600 F vs. C curves using both new and previously published data sets. In most cases, comparisons were made between the logistic estimates and those from the standard curve and comparative C(t) methods. Deviations between the logistic and standard curve method ranged between 3-10% for C(t) estimates, 2-10% for ΔΔC(t) estimates, and 1-11% for E(n) estimates. The correlations between C(t) estimates from the logistic and standard curve methods were very high, often >0.95. When compared with five other established methods of qRT-PCR data analysis to predict initial concentrations of two genes encompassing a total of 500 F vs. C curves, the logistic estimates were of comparable accuracy. This reliable performance of the logistic approach comes without the need to construct standard curves which can be a laborious undertaking. Also, no a priori assumptions for E(n) are necessary while some other methods assume equal E(n) values for the reference and target genes, an assumption that is not universally valid. In addition, by accurately describing the data in the plateau region of the F vs. C curve, the logistic method overcomes the limitations of the sigmoidal curve fitting method. The streamlined nature of the logistic approach makes it ideal for complete automation on a variety of computing

  9. Challenges in Transitioning Research Data to Operations: The SPoRT Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedloved, Gary J.; Smith, Matt; McGrath, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. With the ever-broadening application of real-time high resolution satellite data from current EOS and planned NPP, JPSS, and GOES-R sensors to weather forecast problems, significant challenges arise in the acquisition, delivery, and integration of the new capabilities into the decision making process of the operational weather community. For polar orbiting sensors such as MODIS, AIRS, VIIRS, and CRiS, the use of direct broadcast ground stations is key to the real-time delivery of the data and derived products in a timely fashion. With the ABI on the geostationary GOES-R satellite, the data volume will likely increase by a factor of 5- 10 from current data streams. However, the high data volume and limited bandwidth of end user facilities presents a formidable obstacle to timely access to the data. This challenge can be addressed through the use of subsetting techniques, innovative web services, and the judicious selection of data formats. Many of these approaches have been implemented by SPoRT for the delivery of real-time products to NWS forecast offices and other weather entities. Once available in decision support systems like AWIPS II, these new data and products must be integrated into existing and new displays that allow for the integration of the data with existing operational products in these systems. SPoRT is leading the way in demonstrating this enhanced capability. This paper will highlight the ways SPoRT is overcoming many of the challenges presented by the enormous data volumes of

  10. SPoRT: Transitioning NASA and NOAA Experimental Data to the Operational Weather Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. With the ever-broadening application of real-time high resolution satellite data from current EOS, Suomi NPP, and planned JPSS and GOES-R sensors to weather forecast problems, significant challenges arise in the acquisition, delivery, and integration of the new capabilities into the decision making process of the operational weather community. For polar orbiting sensors such as MODIS, AIRS, VIIRS, and CRiS, the use of direct broadcast ground stations is key to the real-time delivery of the data and derived products in a timely fashion. With the ABI on the geostationary GOES-R satellite, the data volumes will likely increase by a factor of 5-10 from current data streams. However, the high data volume and limited bandwidth of end user facilities presents a formidable obstacle to timely access to the data. This challenge can be addressed through the use of subsetting techniques, innovative web services, and the judicious selection of data formats. Many of these approaches have been implemented by SPoRT for the delivery of real-time products to NWS forecast offices and other weather entities. Once available in decision support systems like AWIPS II, these new data and products must be integrated into existing and new displays that allow for the integration of the data with existing operational products in these systems. SPoRT is leading the way in demonstrating this enhanced capability. This paper will highlight the ways SPoRT is overcoming many of the challenges presented by the enormous data

  11. Evaluation of RT-PCR as a tool for diagnosis of secondary dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sa-ngasang, Areerat; Wibulwattanakij, Sasitorn; Chanama, Sumalee; O-rapinpatipat, Anantchai; A-nuegoonpipat, Atchareeya; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Kurane, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are serious illnesses in many tropical and subtropical countries. Laboratory tests are essential for the confirmation of dengue virus infection. In the present study, we examined the reliability of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the laboratory diagnosis of dengue, especially in secondary dengue virus infections. We defined the day when fever subsided as fever day 0. In primary dengue virus infection, the dengue viral genome was detected in all of the 7 samples which were collected on fever day -1 or earlier, in 3 of 4 samples on fever day 0, and in 1 of 2 samples on fever day 1. None of the samples collected on fever day 2 or later were positive by RT-PCR. In secondary dengue virus infection, the dengue viral genome was detected in all of the 28 samples which were collected on fever day -2 or earlier, in 25 of 26 on fever day -1, in 29 of 34 on fever day 0, and in 5 of 10 on fever days 1-2. None of the samples collected on fever day 3 or later were positive. Virus isolation and direct titration were attempted using the plasma samples. When the data of secondary infection cases were analyzed based on fever day, dengue viruses were isolated from all of the 5 samples which were collected on fever day -2 or earlier, in 5 of 13 samples on fever day -1, and in 4 of 22 on fever day 0, but were not isolated from any of the 4 samples collected on fever days 1-2. Viruses were directly detected in 7 of 11 samples on fever day -2 or earlier, in 4 of 13 on fever day -1, and in 1 of 16 on fever day 0. These results indicate that RT-PCR is more sensitive than virus isolation and direct virus titration for determining secondary dengue virus infection. The results also suggest that RT-PCR is a useful diagnostic test for confirmation of dengue virus infection in secondary infection as well as in primary infection, especially when plasma samples are collected before the fever subsides.

  12. The S2 VLBI Systems: DAS, RT/PT and Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, William T.; Bujold, Marc; Cannon, Wayne H.; Carlson, Brent R.; Dewdney, Peter E.; Feil, Georg H.; Newby, Paul; Novikov, Alexander; Popelar, Josef; Wietfeldt, Richard D.

    2000-01-01

    The S2 VLBI system synthesizes wide IF bandwidths by rapidly switching the local oscillator (LO) frequency in a small (1-4) number of baseband converters (BBC's). Data are recorded on video cassettes using an array of 8 VHS transports. Characteristics of the S2 Data Acquisition System (DAS), the S2 Record and Playback Terminals (RT and PT) and the S2 Correlator are summarized. The bandwidth synthesis (BWS) frequency switching sequence used in a series of system validation experiments is presented.

  13. NASA/SPoRT's GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew L.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports many activities within the GOES-R Proving Grounds (PG). These include the development of imagery from existing instrumentation as a proxy to future Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities on GOES-R. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments are used to provide a glimpse of the multi-spectral capabilities that will become the norm as the number of channels and data rate dramatically increase with GOES-R. The NOAA/NWS has plans to provide operational users with all ABI channels at the highest resolution. Data fusion of individual channels into composite red, green, and blue imagery products will assist the end user with this future wave of information. While increasing the efficiency in the operational use of ABI channels, these composites provide only qualitative information. Within the GOES-R PG, SPoRT and other partners are exploring ways to include quantitative information as part of the composite imagery. However, limitations in local hardware processing and/or data bandwidth for users of the GOES-R data stream are challenges to overcome. This presentation will discuss the creation of these composite images as well as possible solutions to address these processing challenges. In a similar manner the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) to be launched on GOES-R presents several data management challenges. The GLM is a pioneering instrument to quantify total lightning from a geostationary platform. The expected data frequency from the GLM is to be at a sub-minute interval. Users of such a data set may have little experience in handling such a rapid update of information. To assist users, SPoRT is working with the NWS to develop tools within the user fs decision support system to allow tracking and analysis of total lightning from a storm-based perspective. This presentation will discuss the

  14. Accurate RT-qPCR gene expression analysis on cell culture lysates

    PubMed Central

    Van Peer, Gert; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression quantification on cultured cells using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) typically involves an RNA purification step that limits sample processing throughput and precludes parallel analysis of large numbers of samples. An approach in which cDNA synthesis is carried out on crude cell lysates instead of on purified RNA samples can offer a fast and straightforward alternative. Here, we evaluate such an approach, benchmarking Ambion's Cells-to-CT kit with the classic workflow of RNA purification and cDNA synthesis, and demonstrate its good accuracy and superior sensitivity. PMID:22355736

  15. Untersuchung der Mira-Sterne RT Boo, TV Peg und VX Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Kerstin; Berthold, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The light-change of the Mira stars RT Boo, TV Peg and VX Aur was analyzed on three ways for a long time. In the first period I estimated the brightness of the variables on sky monitoring photo plates (red spectral range) from Sonneberg Observatory with Argelander¥s Method, in the last years I measured scanned photo plates with a photometry program and in addition I used visual observations from A.A.V.S.O. for the analysis. The behavior of the periods of the tree stars from 1965 to 2013 is described here.

  16. Using the SPoRT POES/GOES Hybrid Product in OCONUS Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matt; Fuell, Kevin; Nelson, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The SPoRT (Short-term Prediction and Research Transition) Program at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center has been providing unique NASA and NOAA data and techniques to partner Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) for ten years. Data are provided in the Decision Support System used by WFO forecasters: AWIPS. For the last couple of years, SPoRT has been producing the POES/GOES Hybrid. This suite of products combines the strength ofl5- minute animations of GOES imagery - providing temporal continuity, with the higher resolution, relatively random availability, of polar orbiting (POES) imagery data. The product was first introduced with only MODIS data from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, but recently the VIIRS instrument onboard the Suomi-NPP satellite was added, providing better high-resolution coverage. These products represent SPoRT's efforts to prepare for higher resolution, higher frequency GOES-R imagery - as well as helping to move VIIRS (JPSS) data into the mainstream of weather forecasting. SPoRT generates 5 products for this dataset: Visible, Longwave Infrared (11 micrometers), Shortwave IR (3.7 micrometers), Water Vapor (6.7 micrometers), and Fog (Difference of 11 micrometer and 3.7 micrometer channels). The Water Vapor hybrid product has a Red-Blue-Green image from MODIS inlaid, since it provides even more qualitative information than water vapor alone. Animated examples of the products will be shown in this presentation. While the resolution at nadir of GOES imagery is nominally Han (4km for IR channels), the inlaid polar orbiter imagery has a resolution of 250m (lkm for IR channels). This has tremendous application in the continental US. However, in high latitudes, since the usefulness of GOES degrades poleward rapidly, the contrast of GOES and POES data is stark. The consistent temporal nature of GOES, even though at a reduced resolution at high latitudes, provides basic situational awareness, but the introduction of polar data is very helpful in seeing

  17. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to Speed up Radiative Transfer (RT) Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natraj, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Multiple scattering RT calculations time-consuming. Need a speed improvement of about 1000 (for OCO)! Solution: Make use of redundancies in spectra. Correlated-k (Lacis and Wang, Lacis and Oinas, Goody et al, Fu and Liou) Problem: Assume that spectral variation of atmospheric optical properties spatially correlated at all points along optical path. High accuracy (HI) and 2-stream (2S) calculations have high correlation. Single scattering (SS) computations highly scenario-dependent, but not time consuming. Perform SS and 2S calculations at every wavelength. Perform small number of HI computations. Need to compute correction factor B at every wavelength.

  18. Development and comparison of the real-time amplification based methods--NASBA-Beacon, RT-PCR taqman and RT-PCR hybridization probe assays--for the qualitative detection of sars coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Pongtanapisit, Wiroj; Piroj, Wantanich; Srichunrasmi, Chutatip; Seesuai, Somying

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive and robust procedure for the qualitative detection of SARS coronavirus RNA. Three unique detection formats were developed for real-time RNA amplification assays: a post amplification detection step with a virus-specific internal capture probe based on Taqman (RT-PCR TaqMan assay), hybridization probe (RT-PCR hybridization probe assay) and a real-time assay with virus-specific molecular beacon probes (NASBA-Beacon assay). The analytical sensitivity or reproducibility of the test results among those three assays was compared. All assays yielded results by detecting SARS coronavirus targeting the BNI-1 region in less than 2 hours. RNA detection by all the formats was unaffected by the presence of human sputum. The limits of detection were at least 10 copies of input RNA for both RT-PCR formats (RT-PCR TaqMan and RT-PCR hybridization probe assays), while the NASBA-Beacon assay could detect as little as 1 copy per reaction, with high reproducibility of the coefficient of variation (CV) of <10. These results demonstrate that real-time NASBA provides a rapid and sensitive alternative to RT-PCR for the routine qualitative assay of sputum for SARS corona viral RNA detection.

  19. Multiplex RT-PCR method for the simultaneous detection of nine grapevine viruses.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Viral diseases are a serious pathological problem for grapevines, and in recent years the need for increasingly specific and rapid diagnostic methods for the selection of propagation materials has grown. Arabis mosaic virus, Grapevine fanleaf virus, Grapevine virus A, Grapevine virus B, Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus, Grapevine fleck virus, and Grapevine leafroll-associated viruses 1, 2, and 3 are nine of the most widespread viruses that naturally infect grapevines. A multiplex RT-PCR was developed for simultaneous detection of these nine grapevine viruses, in combination with a plant RNA internal control used as an indicator of the effectiveness of the reaction. One to ten fragments specific for the viruses and an internal control were simultaneously amplified from infected samples and identified by their specific molecular sizes in agarose gel. The protocol reported is an update of previously published protocols for RNA extraction and multiplex diagnosis of viruses. After several years of use and hundreds of samples tested, and following validation in several laboratories, this multiplex RT-PCR provides a reliable and rapid method for detecting grapevine viruses from a large number of samples.

  20. Pregnancies and menstrual function before and after combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy (TVPP) for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lacher, M.J.; Toner, K.

    1986-01-01

    The menstrual cycle, pregnancies, and offspring were evaluated before and after initial combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy with thiotepa, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (TVPP), in 34 women between the ages of 18 and 44 (median 26.5 years) treated for Stage II and Stage III Hodgkin's disease. The median range of follow-up is 83.1 months (range 40.5-140). After therapy 94.1% (32/34) continued to menstruate. Two of the four patients over the age of 35 ceased to menstruate. All patients under the age of 35 continued to menstruate (30/30). Age at the time of diagnosis was the only factor affecting change in menses with a significant probability (p = .001) that women greater than 30 years of age will experience some change in menstrual pattern. Seventeen pregnancies occurred in 12 women after therapy; 2 had 4 elective abortions; 10 delivered 12 children with normal physical development; 1 will deliver six months from now. Twelve of thirteen patients who wanted to become pregnant have conceived. The ability to become pregnant and deliver normal children after intensive treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy (RT/TVPP) was comparable to the patients' pretreatment record.

  1. Quantification of llama inflammatory cytokine mRNAs by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Konnai, Satoru; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-02-01

    We have developed a method by which llama cytokine mRNAs can be quantified using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Total RNA was extracted from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of llama, reverse transcribed to cDNA, and cytokine profiles for interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha were quantified by real-time PCR. The expressions of mRNAs of inflammatory cytokines IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha were upregulated upon stimulation with LPS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Incubation of PBMCs with 100 and 1,000 pg/ml of LPS for 3 to 6 hr resulted in the acceleration of the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines. Here, we describe a highly sensitive and reproducible method to quantify the transcription of llama cytokine mRNAs by real-time RT-PCR with the double-stranded DNA-binding dye SYBR Green I.

  2. Detection of tumor cell contamination in peripheral blood by RT-PCR in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Noh, Y H; Im, G; Ku, J H; Lee, Y S; Ahn, M J

    1999-12-01

    We analyzed the peripheral blood of patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer at different stages to assess the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which we used as an indicator for micrometastatic malignant cells. A total of 35 gastric, 24 colorectal, 4 esophageal and 4 biliary tract cancer patients and nine normal healthy subjects were studied. No CEA mRNA was detected in the nine normal healthy volunteers. CEA mRNA was detected in 100% (10/10) of metastatic, 33.3% (3/9) of early gastric cancer (EGC), and 18.8% (3/16) resectable gastric cancer patients, respectively. In colorectal cancer, 55.6% (5/9) of metastatic cancers were positive for CEA mRNA, and 26.7% (4/15) Duke stage B/C showed positive. One patient with stage III gastric cancer who was negative CEA mRNA initially and turned positive during follow-up, developed multiple bone metastasis one month later. Another stage III patient, who was positive for CEA mRNA, preoperatively revealed early relapse in two months. These results suggest that the identification of circulating tumor cells using RT-PCR for the detection of CEA mRNA is feasible and this analysis may be a promising tool for early detection of micrometastatic circulating malignant cells in patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  3. [Effectiveness of locoregional rt-PA lysis in acute leg and arm vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Perkmann, R; Neuhauser, B; Bodner, G; Tauscher, T; Fraedrich, G

    2001-06-01

    39 patients suffering from a thrombosis of the peripheral venous system were treated with a loco-regional lysis, using rt-PA. Two cycles of 40 mg rt-PA a day were applicated by means of a special drainage-management, using perforans veins. During lytic therapy, 20,000 to 30,000 IE of unfractionized heparin were additionally administered. Laboratory work including aPTT and fibrinogen measurement was performed every 8 hours. Additionally a phlebography was performed after 24 hours. Patients received an anticoagulative therapy using sintrom or marcumar the following 3 months. We obtained a successful thrombolysis without any major complications in 90%. Minor complications included 3 peripheral pulmonary embolisms. Duplex sonographic and plethysmographic follow up was performed in 25 patients one year after operation. In two patients with ankle edema insufficient valves at the popliteal vein were found with both diagnostic modalities. 23 patients showed no signs of insufficient valves neither clinically nor at duplex sonography and plethysmography. The locoregional lysis appears to be an effective method for the treatment of acute peripheral vein thrombosis.

  4. Defining suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis on intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sirakov, Maria; Borra, Marco; Cambuli, Francesca Maria; Plateroti, Michelina

    2013-07-01

    The study of the mammalian intestinal epithelium concerns several aspects of cellular and molecular biology. In fact, most of these studies aim to define molecular components or mechanisms related with the control of stemness and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in physiopathological conditions. It is worth mentioning that real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approaches are commonly used, but only a few studies are available regarding suitable reference genes to normalize gene expression data. The present study was designed to validate potential reference genes in freshly isolated proliferating or differentiated epithelial cells from the mouse intestine. We also extended our analysis to the IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells, as a promising model to study intestinal physiopathology in vitro. The stability of six potential reference genes (Hprt1, Ppia, Gapdh, Rplp0, Ppib, and Vil1) has been tested both in epithelial cells isolated from the mouse intestine and in the IEC6 cell line. The software programs-geNorm and Normfinder-were used to obtain an estimation of the expression stability of each gene and, by comparing the results, to identify the most suitable genes for RT-qPCR data normalization. These multiple approaches allowed us to select different suitable reference genes for the correct quantification of mRNAs depending on the differentiated or proliferative nature of the cells.

  5. Effective Alu Repeat Based RT-Qpcr Normalization in Cancer Cell Perturbation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; Pattyn, Filip; Van Peer, Gert; Beckers, Anneleen; De Brouwer, Sara; Kumps, Candy; Mets, Evelien; Van der Meulen, Joni; Rondou, Pieter; Leonelli, Carina; Mestdagh, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in gene expression levels, even of assumed reference genes. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of 11 commonly used reference genes as internal controls for normalization of 19 experiments that include neuroblastoma, T-ALL, melanoma, breast cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer cell lines subjected to various perturbations. Results The geNorm algorithm in the software package qbase+ was used to rank the candidate reference genes according to their expression stability. We observed that the stability of most of the candidate reference genes varies greatly in perturbation experiments. Expressed Alu repeats show relatively stable expression regardless of experimental condition. These Alu repeats are ranked among the best reference assays in all perturbation experiments and display acceptable average expression stability values (M<0.5). Conclusions We propose the use of Alu repeats as a reference assay when performing cancer cell perturbation experiments. PMID:23977142

  6. BVRI Photometry of nz Gem, HD 73017, HD 77247, RT Vir and 104 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Harrell, William L.

    We examined single channel differential BVRI photometry of the cool stars NZ Gem, HD 73017, HD 77247, RT Vir and 104 Her obtained by the first author with the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope with of order 100 observations taken over two or more years. Four of these stars are Small-Amplitude Red Variables (SARVs). The primary period of NZ Gem (M3 II-IIIs) is about 33.70 days. HD 77247, the shortest period barium star with spectral type K0, has a photometric period of about 82 days which is close to its binary period of 80.53 days. Its check star HD 73017, a non-variable in B, V and R, is variable in I due most likely to a previously unknown cooler companion. RT Vir (M8 III) is found to be a multiperiodic star whose observations are consistent with the 155 day primary period of Lebzelter & Hinkle (2002). 104 Her (M3 III) is also multiperiodic with a primary period of 21.48 days.

  7. RT Distributional Analysis of Cognitive Control-Related Brain Activity in First Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fassbender, Catherine; Scangos, Katie; Lesh, Tyler A.; Carter, Cameron S.

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in cognitive control are a defining feature of schizophrenia. Aspects of cognitive control include proactive control, the maintenance of task rules or goals to bias attention and maintain preparedness, and reactive control, the engagement of attention in reaction to changing cognitive demands. Proactive control is thought to be particularly impaired in schizophrenia. We sought to examine proactive and reactive control in schizophrenia, as measured by reaction time (RT) variability and especially long RTs, thought to represent lapses in proactive control, during the Stroop paradigm. Furthermore we sought to examine the neural underpinnings of lapses in proactive control and the subsequent engagement of reactive control in those with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls, using fMRI. We found that patients with schizophrenia displayed greater RT variability and more especially long RTs than controls, suggesting that proactive control is weaker in the schizophrenia compared with the control group. All participants engaged regions of the cognitive control network during long RTs, consistent with an engagement of reactive control following a failure in proactive control on these trials. The schizophrenia group, however, displayed significantly diminished activity in these regions compared to controls. Our results suggest increased failures in proactive but also impaired reactive control in schizophrenia compared to healthy subjects. PMID:24615691

  8. Microdroplet Sandwich Real-Time RT-PCR for Detection of Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Angione, Stephanie L.; Inde, Zintis; Beck, Christina M.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-01-01

    As demonstrated by the recent 2012/2013 flu epidemic, the continual emergence of new viral strains highlights the need for accurate medical diagnostics in multiple community settings. If rapid, robust, and sensitive diagnostics for influenza subtyping were available, it would help identify epidemics, facilitate appropriate antiviral usage, decrease inappropriate antibiotic usage, and eliminate the extra cost of unnecessary laboratory testing and treatment. Here, we describe a droplet sandwich platform that can detect influenza subtypes using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR). Using clinical samples collected during the 2010/11 season, we effectively differentiate between H1N1p (swine pandemic), H1N1s (seasonal), and H3N2 with an overall assay sensitivity was 96%, with 100% specificity for each subtype. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect viral loads as low as 104 copies/mL, which is two orders of magnitude lower than viral loads in typical infected patients. This platform performs diagnostics in a miniaturized format without sacrificing any sensitivity, and can thus be easily developed into devices which are ideal for small clinics and pharmacies. PMID:24066051

  9. Detection of African horse sickness virus in Culicoides imicola pools using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Tania; Liebenberg, Danica; Venter, Gert J; Mienie, Charlotte Ms; van Hamburg, Huib

    2016-06-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is an infectious, non-contagious arthropod-borne disease of equids, caused by the African horse sickness virus (AHSV), an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. It is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and thought to be the most lethal viral disease of horses. This study focused on detection of AHSV in Culicoides imicola (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) pools by the application of a RT-qPCR. Midges were fed on AHSV-infected blood. A single blood-engorged female was allocated to pools of unfed nulliparous female midges. Pool sizes varied from 1 to 200. RNA was extracted and prepared for RT-qPCR. The virus was successfully detected and the optimal pool size for the limit of detection of the virus was determined at a range between 1 to 25. Results from this investigation highlight the need for a standardized protocol for AHSV investigation in Culicoides midges especially for comparison among different studies and for the determination of infection rate. PMID:27232141

  10. NASA SPoRT Modeling and Data Assimilation Research and Transition Activities Using WRF, LIS and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blankenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    weather research and forecasting ===== The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has numerous modeling and data assimilation (DA) activities in which the WRF model is a key component. SPoRT generates realtime, research satellite products from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments, making the data available to NOAA/NWS partners running the WRF/EMS, including: (1) 2-km northwestern-hemispheric SST composite, (2) daily, MODIS green vegetation fraction (GVF) over CONUS, and (3) NASA Land Information System (LIS) runs of the Noah LSM over the southeastern CONUS. Each of these datasets have been utilized by specific SPoRT partners in local EMS model runs, with select offices evaluating the impacts using a set of automated scripts developed by SPoRT that manage data acquisition and run the NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package. SPoRT is engaged in DA research with the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter in LIS for soil moisture DA. Ongoing DA projects using GSI include comparing the impacts of assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances versus retrieved profiles, and an analysis of extra-tropical cyclones with intense non-convective winds. As part of its Early Adopter activities for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, SPoRT is conducting bias correction and soil moisture DA within LIS to improve simulations using the NASA Unified-WRF (NU-WRF) for both the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity and upcoming SMAP mission data. SPoRT has also incorporated real-time global GVF data into LIS and WRF from the VIIRS product being developed by NOAA/NESDIS. This poster will highlight the research and transition activities SPoRT conducts using WRF, NU-WRF, EMS, LIS, and GSI.

  11. In Vitro Examination of the Thrombolytic Efficacy of Desmoteplase and Therapeutic Ultrasound Compared with rt-PA.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Florian C; Wang, Zhihua; Schumacher, Sabrina; Ohlrich, Marcus; Kaps, Manfred; Menciassi, Arianna; Eggers, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study described here was to evaluate the thrombolytic efficacy of combined treatment with the fibrin-selective plasminogen activator desmoteplase (DSPA) and therapeutic ultrasound (sonothrombolysis [STL]) compared with conventional rt-PA (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator) treatment in vitro. Lysis rates were determined by the weight loss of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) clots treated with rt-PA (60 kU/mL) or DSPA (2 μg/mL) combined with pulsed wave ultrasound (2 MHz, 0.179 W/cm(2)). To reveal the individual effects of medication and ultrasound, lysis rates were also determined for DSPA monotherapy and for combined treatment with rt-PA and ultrasound. Clots solely placed in plasma served as the control group. Lysis increased significantly with rt-PA (26.5 ± 7.8%) and DSPA (30.5 ± 6%) compared with the control group (18.2 ± 5.9%) (each p < 0.001). DSPA lysis was more effective than rt-PA lysis (without STL: p = 0.015, with STL: p = 0.01). Combined treatment with DSPA and 2-MHz STL significantly exceeded rt-PA lysis (32.8% vs. 26.5%, p < 0.001). PMID:26349583

  12. Development of a real-time quantitative RT-PCR to detect REV contamination in live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luan, Huaibiao; Wang, Yixin; Li, Yang; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Based on the published Avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) whole genome sequence, primers and TaqMan probes were designed and synthesized, and the TaqMan probe fluorescence real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method for detecting the REV pol gene was established by optimizing the reaction conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that the qRT-PCR method had a sensitivity that was 1,000-fold higher than conventional PCR. Additionally, no amplification signals were obtained when we attempted to detect DNA or cDNA of ALV-A/B/J, MDV, CIAV, IBDV, ARV, NDV, AIV, or other viruses, suggesting a high specificity for our method. Various titers of REV were artificially "spiked" into the FPV and MDV vaccines to simulate REV contamination in attenuated vaccines to validate this qRT-PCR method. Our findings indicated that this qRT-PCR method could detect REV contamination at a dose of 1 TCID50/1,000 feathers, which was 10,000-fold more sensitive than the regular RT-PCR detection (10(4) TCID50/1000 feathers).

  13. Identification of viable Listeria species based on reverse transcription-multiplex PCR (RT-MPCR) and restriction digestion.

    PubMed

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the identification of viable Listeria species was developed based on reverse transcription-multiplex PCR (RT-MPCR) and restriction digestion. The targets for RT-MPCR were iap mRNAs whose genes are common to all Liseria species. A set of five primers was used in this study. Two of them were genus specific, and the other three were specific to L. monocytogenase, L. innocua, and L. grayi respectively. By RT-MPCR, L. monocytogenese, L. innocua, L. grayi, and a group of Listeria species, including L. ivanovii, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri, were specifically identified. To differentiate the latter three Listeria species, RT-MPCR products were subjected to digestion with HpaI and ScaI. The sensitivity of RT-MPCR in detecting Listeria species was determined to be 50 CFU/mL. RT-MPCR was found to discriminate between viable and nonviable cells and to detect viable Listeria species in a food model.

  14. Simple and fast classification of non-LTR retrotransposons based on phylogeny of their RT domain protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Tempel, Sébastien; Jurka, Jerzy

    2009-12-15

    Rapidly growing number of sequenced genomes requires fast and accurate computational tools for analysis of different transposable elements (TEs). In this paper we focus on a rapid and reliable procedure for classification of autonomous non-LTR retrotransposons based on alignment and clustering of their reverse transcriptase (RT) domains. Typically, the RT domain protein sequences encoded by different non-LTR retrotransposons are similar to each other in terms of significant BLASTP E-values. Therefore, they can be easily detected by the routine BLASTP searches of genomic DNA sequences coding for proteins similar to the RT domains of known non-LTR retrotransposons. However, detailed classification of non-LTR retrotransposons, i.e. their assignment to specific clades, is a slow and complex procedure that is not formalized or integrated as a standard set of computational methods and data. Here we describe a tool (RTclass1) designed for the fast and accurate automated assignment of novel non-LTR retrotransposons to known or novel clades using phylogenetic analysis of the RT domain protein sequences. RTclass1 classifies a particular non-LTR retrotransposon based on its RT domain in less than 10 min on a standard desktop computer and achieves 99.5% accuracy. RT1class1 works either as a stand-alone program installed locally or as a web-server that can be accessed distantly by uploading sequence data through the internet (http://www.girinst.org/RTphylogeny/RTclass1).

  15. Lamivudine-resistant rtL180M and rtM204I/V are persistently dominant during combination rescue therapy with entecavir and adefovir for hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; LIU, SHUANG; CHEN, YU; ZHENG, SUJUN; ZHOU, LI; LU, FENGMIN; DUAN, ZHONGPING

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir (ADV) sequential monotherapy was included in the 2005 Asia-Pacific guidelines for the management of patients with lamivudine (LAM) resistance. However, following the development of ADV resistance, the proportion of resistant variants during combined rescue therapy with ADV and entecavir (ETV) were unknown. The present study characterized the dynamics of resistant variants in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and LAM-resistant variants during antiviral therapy consisting of ADV monotherapy followed by ADV-ETV combination therapy. A total of 3 patients were selected from a cohort of 55 patients with CHB due to developing ADV resistance. The patients had been previously treated with LAM (100 mg daily) for 21–24 months. At the initiation of sequential monotherapy with ADV, LAM-resistant variants (rtM204V/I and rtL180M) were detected in the three patients. These patients developed ADV resistance during 19–30 months of ADV sequential monotherapy, and then switched their antiviral regimen to ADV-ETV combination therapy. During ADV monotherapy and ADV-ETV combination therapy, the patients were monitored every 3 months for the first year of therapy, and then every 6 months thereafter. A total of 30 serum samples were collected from the patients throughout the monitoring period. In total, 10 mutants that were associated with commonly-used antiviral drugs were detected by pyrosequencing. During ADV sequential monotherapy, LAM-resistant variants were gradually decreased, whereas ADV-resistant rtA181V/T and rtN236T variants gradually increased in the viral population. During 30–41 months of ADV-ETV combination therapy, viral load reduction was 2.59–3.28 log10 copies/ml; ADV-resistant variants rtA181T/V and rtN236T were undetectable following 11–24 months of combination therapy; and rtL180M and rtM204I/V remained dominant in the viral population. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that, in patients with LAM and ADV

  16. RT-qPCR Demonstrates Light-Dependent AtRBCS1A and AtRBCS3B mRNA Expressions in "Arabidopsis thaliana" Leaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ming-Mei; Li, Anna; Feissner, Robert; Ahmad, Talal

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is widely used in diagnosis and research to determine specific mRNA expressions in cells. As RT-qPCR applications increase, it is necessary to provide undergraduates hands-on experience of this modern technique. Here, we report a 3-week laboratory exercise using RT-qPCR to…

  17. The NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: Opportunities for Collaboration in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation slides include: The SPoRT Center, History and Future of SPoRT, Great Lakes Applications, Great Lakes Forecasting Issues, Applications to the WRF-EMS, Precipitation Science, Lake Effect Precipitation, Sensitivity to Microphysics, Exploring New Schemes, Opportunities for Collaboration, and SPoRT Research and Development.

  18. Helical Tomotherapy-Based STAT RT: Dosimetric Evaluation for Clinical Implementation of a Rapid Radiation Palliation Program

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Alyson; Dunlap, Neal; Sheng, Ke; Geezey, Constance; Turner, Benton; Blackhall, Leslie; Weiss, Geoffrey; Lappinen, Eric; Larner, James M.; Read, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy-based STAT radiation therapy (RT) uses an efficient software algorithm for rapid intensity-modulated treatment planning, enabling conformal radiation treatment plans to be generated on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans for CT simulation, treatment planning, and treatment delivery in one session. We compared helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT dosimetry with standard linac-based 3D conformal plans and standard helical tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry for palliative treatments of whole brain, a central obstructive lung mass, multilevel spine disease, and a hip metastasis. Specifically, we compared the conformality, homogeneity, and dose with regional organs at risk (OARs) for each plan as an initial step in the clinical implementation of a STAT RT rapid radiation palliation program. Hypothetical planning target volumes (PTVs) were contoured on an anthropomorphic phantom in the lung, spine, brain, and hip. Treatment plans were created using three planning techniques: 3D conformal on Pinnacle{sup 3}, helical tomotherapy, and helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT. Plan homogeneity, conformality, and dose to OARs were analyzed and compared. STAT RT and tomotherapy improved conformality indices for spine and lung plans (CI spine = 1.21, 1.17; CI lung = 1.20, 1.07, respectively) in comparison with standard palliative anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) treatment plans (CI spine = 7.01, CI lung = 7.30), with better sparing of heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. For palliative whole-brain radiotherapy, STAT RT and tomotherapy reduced maximum and mean doses to the orbits and lens (maximum/mean lens dose: STAT RT = 2.94/2.65 Gy, tomotherapy = 3.13/2.80 Gy, Lateral opposed fields = 7.02/3.65 Gy), with an increased dose to the scalp (mean scalp dose: STAT RT = 16.19 Gy, tomotherapy = 15.61 Gy, lateral opposed fields = 14.01 Gy). For bony metastatic hip lesions, conformality with both tomotherapy techniques (CI

  19. Intracellular flow cytometry may be combined with good quality and high sensitivity RT-qPCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandstedt, Mikael; Jonsson, Marianne; Asp, Julia; Dellgren, Göran; Lindahl, Anders; Jeppsson, Anders; Sandstedt, Joakim

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has become a well-established method for analysis of both intracellular and cell-surface proteins, while quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) is used to determine gene expression with high sensitivity and specificity. Combining these two methods would be of great value. The effects of intracellular staining on RNA integrity and RT-qPCR sensitivity and quality have not, however, been fully examined. We, therefore, intended to assess these effects further. Cells from the human lung cancer cell line A549 were fixed, permeabilized and sorted by FCM. Sorted cells were analyzed using RT-qPCR. RNA integrity was determined by RNA quality indicator analysis. A549 cells were then mixed with cells of the mouse cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1. A549 cells were identified by the cell surface marker ABCG2, while HL-1 cells were identified by intracellular cTnT. Cells were sorted and analyzed by RT-qPCR. Finally, cell cultures from human atrial biopsies were used to evaluate the effects of fixation and permeabilization on RT-qPCR analysis of nonimmortalized cells stored prior to analysis by FCM. A large amount of RNA could be extracted even when cells had been fixed and permeabilized. Permeabilization resulted in increased RNA degradation and a moderate decrease in RT-qPCR sensitivity. Gene expression levels were also affected to a moderate extent. Sorted populations from the mixed A549 and HL-1 cell samples showed gene expression patterns that corresponded to FCM data. When samples were stored before FCM sorting, the RT-qPCR analysis could still be performed with high sensitivity and quality. In summary, our results show that intracellular FCM may be performed with only minor impairment of the RT-qPCR sensitivity and quality when analyzing sorted cells; however, these effects should be considered when comparing RT-qPCR data of not fixed samples with those of fixed and permeabilized samples. PMID:26348124

  20. WE-G-17A-03: MRIgRT: Quantification of Organ Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanescu, T; Tadic, T; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an MRI-based methodology and tools required for the quantification of organ motion on a dedicated MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A three-room facility, consisting of a TrueBeam 6X linac vault, a 1.5T MR suite and a brachytherapy interventional room, is currently under commissioning at our institution. The MR scanner can move and image in either room for diagnostic and treatment guidance purposes. Methods: A multi-imaging modality (MR, kV) phantom, featuring programmable 3D simple and complex motion trajectories, was used for the validation of several image sorting algorithms. The testing was performed on MRI (e.g. TrueFISP, TurboFLASH), 4D CT and 4D CBCT. The image sorting techniques were based on a) direct image pixel manipulation into columns or rows, b) single and aggregated pixel data tracking and c) using computer vision techniques for global pixel analysis. Subsequently, the motion phantom and sorting algorithms were utilized for commissioning of MR fast imaging techniques for 2D-cine and 4D data rendering. MR imaging protocols were optimized (e.g. readout gradient strength vs. SNR) to minimize the presence of susceptibility-induced distortions, which were reported through phantom experiments and numerical simulations. The system-related distortions were also quantified (dedicated field phantom) and treated as systematic shifts where relevant. Results: Image sorting algorithms were validated for specific MR-based applications such as quantification of organ motion, local data sampling, and 4D MRI for pre-RT delivery with accuracy better than the raw image pixel size (e.g. 1 mm). MR fast imaging sequences were commissioning and imaging strategies were developed to mitigate spatial artifacts with minimal penalty on the image spatial and temporal sampling. Workflows (e.g. liver) were optimized to include the new motion quantification tools for RT planning and daily patient setup verification. Conclusion: Comprehensive methods were developed

  1. Transitioning NPOESS Data to Weather Offices: The SPoRT Paradigm with EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Real-time satellite information provides one of many data sources used by NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs) to diagnose current weather conditions and to assist in short-term forecast preparation. While GOES satellite data provides relatively coarse spatial resolution coverage of the continental U.S. on a 10-15 minute repeat cycle, polar orbiting imagery has the potential to provide snapshots of weather conditions at high-resolution in many spectral channels. Additionally, polar orbiting sounding data can provide additional information on the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere in data sparse regions of at asynoptic observation times. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project has demonstrated the utility of polar orbiting MODIS and AIRS data on the Terra and Aqua satellites to improve weather diagnostics and short-term forecasting on the regional and local scales. SPoRT scientists work directly forecasters at selected WFOS in the Southern Region (SR) to help them ingest these unique data streams into their AWIPS system, understand how to use the data (through on-site and distance learn techniques), and demonstrate the utility of these products to address significant forecast problems. This process also prepares forecasters for the use of similar observational capabilities from NPOESS operational sensors. NPOESS environmental data records (EDRs) from the Visible 1 Infrared Imager I Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrlS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instruments and additional value-added products produced by NESDIS will be available in near real-time and made available to WFOs to extend their use of NASA EOS data into the NPOESS era. These new data streams will be integrated into the NWs's new AWIPS II decision support tools. The AWIPS I1 system to be unveiled in WFOs in 2009 will be a JAVA-based decision support system which preserves the functionality of the existing systems and

  2. Development of universal primers for detection of potato carlaviruses by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xianzhou; Bai, Yanju; Molen, Teresa A; Desjardins, David C

    2008-05-01

    To facilitate efficient and accurate detection of potato-infecting carlaviruses, degenerated universal primers were designed based on conserved amino acid and nucleotide sequences. Two sense primers, Car-F1 and Car-F2, were based on the amino acid sequences "SNNMA" and "GLGVPTE", respectively, in the coat protein. The reverse primer, Car-R, which was located at the border of the nucleic acid binding protein gene and the 3' untranslated region, and dT-B, which was derived from the oligo-dT targeting the poly(A) tail, were selected. Successful application of fragments within the predicted size range of carlaviruses was obtained using Car-F1 paired with either Car-R or dT-B from tested carlaviruses (Potato virus S, M and latent) by RT-PCR. The Car-F2 failed to yield clear-cut fragments within the predicted size range when paired with either Car-R or dT-B in RT-PCR. However, a less degenerated version of the primer, Car-F2b, resulted in amplicons within the predicted size range when paired with either Car-R or dT-B. Sequencing of the tentative carlavirus-fragments resulting from Car-F1/Car-R and Car-F2b/dT-B proved their carlavirus-origin, thus indicating the high specificity of these primers. The sensitivity of Car-F1/Car-R or Car-F2b/Car-R mediated RT-PCR for the detection of carlavirus-infected potato tubers were assessed using composite samples containing one carlavirus-infected-potato-tuber RNA sample with up to 49 virus-free-potato-tuber RNA samples under the optimal annealing temperature. The target carlaviruses were detected readily from all composites, demonstrating a high sensitivity. The method was further evaluated using presumed virus-free or carlavirus-infected potatoes of several cultivars, and reliable results were obtained. PMID:18353450

  3. Detection of dermcidin for sweat identification by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Koichi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Fukushima, Hisayo; Watanabe, Ken; Yoshino, Mineo

    2010-01-30

    We evaluated the performance of real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays for detection of dermcidin (DCD) in sweat and body-fluid stains. DCD, a small antibiotic peptide secreted into human sweat, was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 7-day-old stains containing as small as 10 microL of sweat, and the assay showed high specificity when testing 7-day-old stains containing 30 microL of other body-fluid. ELISA using anti-human dermcidin mouse monoclonal antibody detected DCD sweat diluted up to approximately 10,000-fold and could specifically detect DCD in 10 microL of body-fluid stains. The performance of the two assays was tested during winter on samples that simulated forensic case samples: an undershirt and a sock worn for 20 h, a handkerchief used to wipe the brow several times within 12h, a cap and a cotton glove worn for 4h, and a white robe worn at intervals for 2 years. The result showed that the former assay detected DCD in all sites of the undershirt examined (armpit, back, and breast), and the latter gave a relatively high OD value in the armpit among the three sites. For the socks, although the latter assay gave very high OD values in both the center and toe of the foot sole, the former could not detect DCD in both of them. These results indicate that highly damp conditions, such as inside a shoe, might promote the degradation of mRNA in samples such as socks. In the other case samples, sweat was adequately detected by both assays. This study is the first demonstration of the use of real-time RT-PCR to sensitively identify sweat among body-fluid stains, and it confirmed that dermcidin was an excellent marker for sweat identification. In addition, the usefulness of ELISA was also verified. Positive sweat identification using these assays is expected to assist forensic practice.

  4. RSV Growth and Quantification by Microtitration and qRT-PCR Assays.

    PubMed

    Caidi, Hayat; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Haynes, Lia M

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering viral particles have been reported as important determinants of the course of viral infection, and they can markedly temper the virulence of the infection. Here, we describe a simple method, based on limiting dilution, for the removal of defective interfering particles from RSV. This method results in a high-titer viral preparation from both HEp-2 and Vero cell lines. We evaluated two concentrations of sucrose to stabilize the virus preparation, and demonstrate that RSV is stable when prepared and stored in 25 % sucrose at -152 °C. In addition, this chapter describes some commonly used methods of RSV titration, detection using microtitration and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and the use of immunostaining for antigenic characterization.

  5. Microhard MHX2420 Orbital Performance Evaluation Using RT Logic T400CS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TintoreGazulla, Oriol; Lombardi, Mark

    2012-01-01

    RT Logic allows simulation of Ground Station - satellite communications: Static tests have been successful. Dynamic tests have been performed for simple passes. Future dynamic tests are needed to simulate real orbit communications. Satellite attitude changes antenna gain. Atmospheric and rain losses need to be added. STK Plug-in will be the next step to improve the dynamic tests. There is a possibility of running longer simulations. Simulation of different losses available in the STK Plug-in. Microhard optimization: Effect of Microhard settings on the data throughput have been understood. Optimized settings improve data throughput for LEO communications. Longer hop intervals make transfer of larger packets more efficient (more time between hops in frequency). Use of FEC (Reed-Solomon) reduces the number of retransmissions for long-range or noisy communications.

  6. MMAC/PTEN gene expression in endometrial cancer: RT-PCR studies.

    PubMed

    Sobczuk, Anna; Smolarz, Beata; Romanowicz-Makowska, Hanna; Pertyński, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the MMAC/PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) gene are documented in cancers of the breast, prostate, ovary, colon, melanoma, glioblastoma, lymphoma and endometrium. In the present work MMAC/PTEN gene expression in women with endometrial adenocarcinoma (n=70) in RNA samples obtained from cancer tissue were investigated. Control DNA was obtained from 68 normal endometrial tissue. The MMAC/PTEN expression was determined by RT-PCR analysis. The expression of MMAC/PTEN gene in endometrial adenocarcinoma cases was significantly reduced compared to the expression in the normal samples (P < 0.05). Furthermore the s