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Sample records for rubans amorphes mg

  1. Is Mg-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate a homogeneous mixture of amorphous magnesium carbonate and amorphous calcium carbonate?

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Lin, Cang-Jie; Huang, Shing-Jong; Chan, Jerry C C

    2016-10-04

    We find two types of carbonate ions in Mg stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC), whose short-range orders are identical to those of ACC and amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC). Mg-ACC comprises a homogeneous mixture of the nano-clusters of ACC and AMC. Their relative amount varies systematically at different pH.

  2. Effect of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior of crystalline Mg/amorphous Mg-Al nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Yang, Song; Yu-Long, Li

    2016-02-01

    The effects of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior in crystalline/amorphous (C/A) Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites under tensile loading are investigated using the molecular dynamics simulation method. The sample with an initial crack of orientation [0001] is considered here. For the nano-monocrystal Mg, the crack growth exhibits brittle cleavage. However, for the C/A Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites, the ‘double hump’ behavior can be observed in all the stress-strain curves regardless of the amorphous lamella thickness. The results indicate that the amorphous lamella plays a critical role in the crack deformation, and it can effectively resist the crack propagation. The above mentioned crack deformation behaviors are also disclosed and analyzed in the present work. The results here provide a strategy for designing the high-performance hexagonal-close-packed metal and alloy materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372256 and 11572259), the 111 Project (Grant No. B07050), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-12-1046), and the Program for New Scientific and Technological Star of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2012KJXX-39).

  3. Mg-based amorphous alloys for decolorization of azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changqin; Zhu, Zhengwang; Zhang, Haifeng

    The authors recently found that Mg-based amorphous ribbons had a prominent effect on the decolorization of azo dyes. Direct Blue 2B and Acid Orange II solutions of 100 mg/L could be decolorized nearly completely by the ribbons within 30 min. Decolorization mechanism was discussed briefly, and kinetic analysis based on the experimental data indicated that physical adsorption and reductive degradation for the azo dye solutions mediated by Mg63Cu16.8Ag11.2Er9 amorphous ribbons could proceed in an elegant and rapid manner. This new finding seems attractive, valuable and promising for the raw effluent generated by textile dye manufacturing company in the future.

  4. Preparation and properties of amorphous MgB2/MgO superstructures: Model disordered superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemons, W.; Steiner, M. A.; Koster, G.; Blank, D. H. A.; Beasley, M. R.; Kapitulnik, A.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a unique method for fabricating MgB2/MgO multilayers and demonstrate the potential for using them as a new model for disordered superconductors. In this approach, we control the annealing of the MgB2 to yield an interesting new class of disordered (amorphous) superconductors with relatively high transition temperatures. The multilayers appear to exhibit quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity with controlled anisotropy. We discuss the properties of the multilayers as the thickness of the components of the bilayers vary.

  5. A discussion on decay of discharge capacity for amorphous Mg-Ni-Nd hydrogen storage alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Wu, D. C.; Li, Lu; Huang, L. J.

    Amorphous Mg-Ni-Nd alloys were prepared by melt-spun technique and their discharge capacity was measured. Microstructure of amorphous ribbons after different charge-discharge cycles was observed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The structure evolution of amorphous (Mg 60Ni 25) 90Nd 10 alloy during the charge-discharge cycles was investigated in detail. Experimental results showed that the structure evolution of amorphous ribbon was responsible for the decay of discharge capacity. During the charge-discharge cycles of amorphous (Mg 60Ni 25) 90Nd 10 alloy, NdMg 2Ni 9 phase appeared after four cycles and Mg 2Ni phase appeared after six cycles. After 20 cycles the stable phases Mg 2Ni, α-Mg and Nd 2H 5 were present and the former NdMg 2Ni 9 phase disappeared. With crystallization of amorphous ribbon, the discharge capacity of amorphous (Mg 60Ni 25) 90Nd 10 alloy dropped off. After 10 cycles the curve of discharge capacity tended to be smooth.

  6. Experimental 25Mg and 13C NMR and Computational Modeling Studies of Amorphous Mg-Ca Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Saharay, M.; Bowers, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of synthetic Mg-Ca amorphous carbonates (AMC-ACC) provides direct, element specific structural information about these complicated phases. The 13C, 25Mg, and 43Ca resonances are typically broad and span the chemical shift ranges of all the crystalline polymorphs in the Ca-Mg-CO3-H2O system. In a fashion similar to our previous analysis of 43Ca NMR results for ACC,1 here we integrate new experimental 13C and 25Mg spectra obtained at 20T for samples with Mg/(Ca+Mg) ratios from x=0 to x=1 with quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters of the crystalline phases using CASTEP calculations, simulations of the spectra using the SIMPSON software, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. XRD and 13C NMR results are in general agreement with the one-phase/two-phase model of ACC-AMC derived from thermochemical work by others.2 13C-NMR spectra of amorphous materials having intermediate compositions can not be completely fit by mechanical mixing of ACC and AMC end members—requiring a degree of Ca/Mg solid solution. Amorphous samples in two-phase region crystallize to assemblages of dolomite-like (x~0.5) and hydromagnesite-like (x~1) defective structures, but we also observe aragonite co-nucleation in the presence of excess water, indicative of a more complex evolution. While 43Ca NMR of X-ray amorphous materials shows featureless, symmetric, Gaussian line shapes, the large quadrupole moment of 25Mg gives rise to superposition of several quadrupolar line shapes representing different local structural environments. Singularities of static Mg spectra are best explained by local environments similar to nequehonite, hydromagnesite, and landsfordite. The spectra can not exclude minor contributions from anhydrous phases dolomite, huntite, and magnesite. Additional sites having very large quadrupolar coupling and/or site asymmetry are not explained by any known reference phases. CITATIONS (1) Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O

  7. Boron segregation in crystallized MgO/amorphous-Co40Fe40B20 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, C. Y.; Ohkubo, T.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.

    2008-08-01

    We have investigated the crystallization process of an amorphous Co40Fe40B20 ribbon and a MgO/amorphous-Co40Fe40B20 thin film to simulate the segregation of B in the magnetic tunneling junctions that use CoFeB ferromagnetic electrodes and a MgO tunneling barrier. Both types of samples show the same crystallization sequence: a primary crystallization of bcc-FeCo from an amorphous precursor followed by boride crystallization at a higher annealing temperature. Three-dimensional atom probe analysis has shown that very little boron is dissolved in the bcc-FeCo crystals (˜1 at. %). A transmission electron microscopy observation of an annealed MgO/Co40Fe40B20 bilayer thin film has shown clear evidence of MgO serving as heterogeneous nucleation sites for bcc-FeCo grains. Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy has shown strong boron segregation at the MgO/FeCo interface after the crystallization of the MgO/amorphous-Co40Fe40B20 bilayer film.

  8. Preparation and properties of amorphous MgB2/MgO superstructures: A new model disordered superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Siemons, W.

    2010-04-05

    In this paper we introduce a novel method for fabricating MgB{sub 2}/MgO multilayers and demonstrate the potential for using them as a new model for disordered superconductors. In this approach we control the annealing of the MgB{sub 2} to yield an interesting new class of disordered (amorphous) superconductors with relatively high transition temperatures. The multilayers appear to exhibit quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity with controlled anisotropy. We discuss the properties of the multilayers as the thickness of the components of the bilayers vary.

  9. First-principles study of crystalline and amorphous AlMgB{sub 14}-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Turchi, P. E. A.; Veprek, S.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances

    2016-05-28

    We report first-principles investigations of crystalline and amorphous boron and M1{sub x}M2{sub y}X{sub z}B{sub 14−z} (M1, M2 = Al, Mg, Li, Na, Y; X = Ti, C, Si) phases (so-called “BAM” materials). Phase stability is analyzed in terms of formation energy and dynamical stability. The atomic configurations as well as the electronic and phonon density states of these phases are compared. Amorphous boron consists of distorted icosahedra, icosahedron fragments, and dioctahedra, connected by an amorphous network. The presence of metal atoms in amorphous BAM materials precludes the formation of icosahedra. For all the amorphous structures considered here, the Fermi level is located in the mobility gap independent of the number of valence electrons. The intra-icosahedral vibrations are localized in the range of 800 cm{sup −1}, whereas the inter-icosahedral vibrations appear at higher wavenumbers. The amorphization leads to an enhancement of the vibrations in the range of 1100–1250 cm{sup −1}. The mechanical properties of BAM materials are investigated at equilibrium and under shear and tensile strain. The anisotropy of the ideal shear and tensile strengths is explained in terms of a layered structure of the B{sub 12} units. The strength of amorphous BAM materials is lower than that of the crystalline counterparts because of the partial fragmentation of the boron icosahedra in amorphous structures. The strength enhancement found experimentally for amorphous boron-based films is very likely related to an increase in film density, and the presence of oxygen impurities. For crystalline BAM materials, the icosahedra are preserved during elongation upon tension as well as upon shear in the (010)[100] slip system.

  10. First-principles study of crystalline and amorphous AlMgB14-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Turchi, P. E. A.; Veprek, S.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances

    2016-05-01

    We report first-principles investigations of crystalline and amorphous boron and M1xM2yXzB14-z (M1, M2 = Al, Mg, Li, Na, Y; X = Ti, C, Si) phases (so-called "BAM" materials). Phase stability is analyzed in terms of formation energy and dynamical stability. The atomic configurations as well as the electronic and phonon density states of these phases are compared. Amorphous boron consists of distorted icosahedra, icosahedron fragments, and dioctahedra, connected by an amorphous network. The presence of metal atoms in amorphous BAM materials precludes the formation of icosahedra. For all the amorphous structures considered here, the Fermi level is located in the mobility gap independent of the number of valence electrons. The intra-icosahedral vibrations are localized in the range of 800 cm-1, whereas the inter-icosahedral vibrations appear at higher wavenumbers. The amorphization leads to an enhancement of the vibrations in the range of 1100-1250 cm-1. The mechanical properties of BAM materials are investigated at equilibrium and under shear and tensile strain. The anisotropy of the ideal shear and tensile strengths is explained in terms of a layered structure of the B12 units. The strength of amorphous BAM materials is lower than that of the crystalline counterparts because of the partial fragmentation of the boron icosahedra in amorphous structures. The strength enhancement found experimentally for amorphous boron-based films is very likely related to an increase in film density, and the presence of oxygen impurities. For crystalline BAM materials, the icosahedra are preserved during elongation upon tension as well as upon shear in the (010)[100] slip system.

  11. Atomic simulation of mechanical behavior of Mg in a super-lattice of nanocrystalline Mg and amorphous Mg-Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H. Y.; An, M. R.; Li, Y. L. Deng, Q.

    2014-12-07

    The mechanical properties of a super-lattice architecture composed of nanocrystalline Mg and Mg-Al amorphous alloy are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The results indicate that deformation mechanism of nanocrystalline Mg is obviously affected by the amorphous boundary spacing and temperature. The strength of the material increases with the decrease of amorphous boundary spacing, presenting a Hall-Petch effect at both 10 K and 300 K. A stress platform and following stiffness softening, as well as a linear strengthening in the plastic stage, are observed when the amorphous boundary spacing below 8.792 nm at 10 K. The implying reason may be that the amorphous boundary acts as the dislocations emission and absorption source. However, the second stress peak is not observed for the models at 300 K. Instead, the flow stress in plastic stage is a nearly constant value. The simulation demonstrates the emergence of the new grain, accompanied by the deformation twins and stacking faults associated with the plastic behaviors at 300 K. The general conclusions derived from this work may provide a guideline for the design of high-performance hexagonal close-packed metals.

  12. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ(aq) 26 Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  13. Electrode properties and the dehydrogenation process of amorphous Mg-Ni-La alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lin-Jun; Wang, Yan-Xin; Wu, Dong-Chang; Tang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Ji-Xian; Huang, Zhen; Jiao, Ji-Qing; Liu, Jing-Quan

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous Mg-Ni-La hydrogen-storage alloys were prepared by melt-spinning. The phase structures of the ribbons before and after charge/discharge cycling were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, respectively. The effects of different contents of La are discussed on the basis of discharge-capacity, the morphology, limiting current density and electrochemical impedance spectra of the Mg-Ni-La electrodes. The Mg65Ni27La8 alloy exhibits the best reaction kinetics performance, the lowest contact resistance and a maximum discharge capacity of 582 mAh g-1 at room temperature. The non-isothermal dehydrogenation process of Mg65Ni27La8 alloy was analyzed in detail by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The experimental results showed a maximum 4.0 wt.% of released hydrogen at a heating rate of 5 °C min-1. The non-isothermal dehydrogenation process of the alloy can be divided in two steps, corresponding to the dehydrogenation of amorphous phase (1.45 wt.% H) and Mg2NiH4 (2.55 wt.% H), respectively. It indicated that the amorphous structure was a key factor to achieve high discharge capacity and good cycling stability.

  14. Magnetism of Amorphous and Nano-Crystallized Dc-Sputter-Deposited MgO Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeva, Sreekanth K.; Fan, Jincheng; Biswas, Anis; Sreelatha, K.S.; Belova, Lyubov; Rao, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a systematic study of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) in pristine MgO thin films in their amorphous and nano-crystalline states. The as deposited dc-sputtered films of pristine MgO on Si substrates using a metallic Mg target in an O2 containing working gas atmosphere of (N2 + O2) are found to be X-ray amorphous. All these films obtained with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) ~10% to 80% while maintaining the same total pressure of the working gas are found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. The room temperature saturation magnetization (MS) value of 2.68 emu/cm3 obtained for the MgO film deposited in PO2 of 10% increases to 9.62 emu/cm3 for film deposited at PO2 of 40%. However, the MS values decrease steadily for further increase of oxygen partial pressure during deposition. On thermal annealing at temperatures in the range 600 to 800 °C, the films become nanocrystalline and as the crystallite size grows with longer annealing times and higher temperature, MS decreases. Our study clearly points out that it is possible to tailor the magnetic properties of thin films of MgO. The room temperature ferromagnetism in MgO films is attributed to the presence of Mg cation vacancies.

  15. Reactive wetting of amorphous silica by molten Al-Mg alloys and their interfacial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Laixin; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Qichuan

    2016-07-01

    The reactive wetting of amorphous silica substrates by molten Al-Mg alloys over a wide composition range was studied using a dispensed sessile drop method in a flowing Ar atmosphere. The effects of the nominal Mg concentration and temperature on the wetting and interfacial microstructures were discussed. The initial contact angle for pure Al on the SiO2 surface was 115° while that for pure Mg was 35° at 1073 K. For the Al-Mg alloy drop, it decreased with increasing nominal Mg concentration. The reaction zone was characterized by layered structures, whose formation was primarily controlled by the variation in the alloy concentration due to the evaporation of Mg and the interfacial reaction from the viewpoint of thermodynamics as well as by the penetration or diffusion of Mg, Al and Si from the viewpoint of kinetics. In addition, the effects of the reaction and the evaporation of Mg on the movement of the triple line were examined. The spreading of the Al-Mg alloy on the SiO2 surface was mainly attributed to the formation of Mg2Si at the interface and the recession of the triple line to the diminishing Mg concentration in the alloy.

  16. Effect of amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} on hydriding and dehydriding behavior of Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, D.; Ordonez, S.; Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C.; Serafini, D.; Rojas, P.A.; Aguilar, C.; Tapia, P.

    2011-04-15

    Composite Mg{sub 2}Ni (25 wt.%) amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} was prepared by mechanical milling starting with nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni and amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders, by using a SPEX 8000 D mill. The morphological and microstructural characterization of the powders was performed via scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydriding characterization of the composite was performed via a solid gas reaction method in a Sievert's-type apparatus at 363 K under an initial hydrogen pressure of 2 MPa. The dehydriding behavior was studied by differential thermogravimetry. On the basis of the results, it is possible to conclude that amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} improved the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics of Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy upon cycling. A tentative rationalization of experimental observations is proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields} First study of the hydriding behavior of composite Mg{sub 2}Ni (25 wt.%) amorphous Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50}. {yields} Microstructural characterization of composite material using XRD and SEM was obtained. {yields} An improved effect of Mg{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} on the Mg{sub 2}Ni hydriding behavior was verified. {yields} The apparent activation energy for the hydrogen desorption of composite was obtained.

  17. A kinetic study of hydrous alteration of amorphous MgSiO smokes - Implications for cometary particles and chondrite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert; Nuth, Joseph A.; Donn, Bertram

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the rate of hydrous alteration of amorphous Mg-SiO smokes are reported as a function of temperature, as inferred by observing changes in the infrared spectra of these materials. It is shown that under the conditions reported for the nucleus of Comet Halley, based on measurements made by the Vega and Giotto missions, amorphous, anhydrous Mg-SiO smokes would become hydrated within several weeks in the dusty regolith observed on the surface. However, if such grains were released in 'jets' or from loose ice fragments, then previously amorphous grains would retain their anhydrous nature. Similarly, brief periods of aqueous activity on meteorite parent bodies would convert amorphous, fine-grained material to hydrated phyllosilicates much more rapidly than coarse mineral grains. A kinetic model might therefore be developed to explain the observed textural relationships in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites such as Mokoia, where amorphous phyllosilicates are intimately associated with coarse anhydrous grains.

  18. On the amorphization behavior and hydrogenation performance of high-energy ball-milled Mg{sub 2}Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Hongchao; Hou, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Tiebang Hu, Rui; Li, Jinshan; Xue, Xiangyi

    2013-06-15

    Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy was prepared by high energy ball-milling starting with polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni which was prepared with the help of a metallurgy method by using a SPEX 8000D mill. The microstructural and phase structure characterization of the prepared materials was performed via scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stabilities were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The apparent activation energies were determined by means of the Kissinger method. The first and second crystallization reactions take place at ∼ 255 °C and ∼ 410 °C, and the corresponding activation energy of crystallization is E{sub a1} = 276.9 and E{sub a2} = 382.4 kJ/mol, respectively. At 3 MPa hydrogen pressure and 250 °C, the hydrogen absorption capacities of crystalline, partially and fully amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy are 2.0 wt.%, 3.2 wt.% and 3.5 wt.% within 30 min, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: We mainly focus on the amorphization behavior of crystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in the high energy ball-milling process and the crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in a follow-up heating process. The relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties is established and explained by models. - Highlights: • Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni has been obtained by high energy ball milling the as-cast alloy. • The amorphization behavior of polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni is presented. • The crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy is illustrated. • Establish the relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties.

  19. Intrinsic nanostructural domains: Possible origin of weaklinkless superconductivity in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Prabhakar, O.; Tan, T. T.; Sun, C. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Soltanian, S.; Horvat, J.; Dou, S. X.

    2002-07-01

    Smooth modulation structure of Mg-B alloy in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B was studied. It indicates that the MgB2 formed possibly in spinodal decomposition, thus resulting in MgB2 nanodomains. It was found that the nanodomains with small angle boundaries of atomic-scale width were distributed within the subgrains that constitute the clusters in MgB2 grains. This nanostructural characteristic may be intrinsic in the quenched reaction product of Mg and amorphous B. It makes the nanodomain boundaries not act as barriers to the current percolation path, thus exhibiting no weak-link problem in the MgB2.

  20. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel

    PubMed Central

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg2+ ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth. PMID:27617291

  1. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of Mg-based amorphous alloys and their use for decolorization of Azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Wang, W. H.

    2014-06-01

    Mg-based alloys are light weight and have wide range of applications in the automotive industry. These alloys are widely used because of their very attractive physical and mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The properties and applications can be further improved by changing the nature of materials from crystalline to amorphous. In this study, melt spun ribbons (MSRs) of Mg70Zn25Ca5 Mg68Zn27Ca5 alloys were prepared by melt spinning technique by using 3-4N pure metals. Characterization of the samples was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDAX). Microstructural investigations were conducted by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as optical and stereo scan microscopy techniques. DSC results showed multistage crystallization. Activation energy was found to be 225 kJ/mol by Kissinger method indicating good thermal stability against crystallization. XRD, DSC, SEM and EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) results are agreed very well. In order to study decolorization, the MSRs of Mg70Zn25Ca5 Mg68Zn27Ca5 alloys were treated repeatedly with various azo dyes at room temperature. In order to compare the results, MSRs of amorphous Zr- and Ni-based metallic glasses were also treated. Reaction of MSRs with azo dyes results in their decolorization in a few hours. Decolorization of azo dyes takes place by introducing amorphous MSRs which results in breaking the -N=N- bonds that exist in dye contents. It is concluded that Mg-based alloys are useful for paint and dye industries and will be beneficial to control water pollution. Comparison of results showed that Mg-based alloys are more efficient than Zr- and Ni-based amorphous alloys for decolorization of azo dyes.

  3. Atomic structure of amorphous Mg40Cu35Ti25 alloy: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to model amorphous Mg40Cu35Ti25 and its local structural packing are investigated using a variety of analyzing techniques. Cu-atoms commonly form 12 fold coordinated clusters and some of which are perfect or defective types icosahedrons, implying an icosohedral short range order around Cu atoms. Mg and Ti atoms, on the other hand, favor to structure in higher coordinated polyhedrons. The coordination number of Ti atoms is slightly less than Mg atoms. The immiscibility effect between Ti and Mg is reflected by a low fraction of Mg-Ti bonding in the model. The atomic packing of Mg40Cu35Ti25 appears to be noticeably different from that of Mg-Cu-X (X=Y and Gd) metallic glasses even though all these materials exhibit primarily the same type of bonding natures.

  4. Characterization of oxide layers on amorphous Mg-based alloys by Auger electron spectroscopy with sputter depth profiling.

    PubMed

    Baunack, S; Subba Rao, R V; Wolff, U

    2003-04-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Mg-Y-TM-[Ag] (TM: Cu, Ni), prepared by melt spinning, were subjected to electrochemical investigations. Oxide layers formed anodically under potentiostatic control in different electrolytes were investigated by AES and sputter depth profiling. Problems and specific features of characterization of the composition of oxide layers and amorphous ternary or quaternary Mg-based alloys have been investigated. In the alloys the Mg(KL(23)L(23)) peak exhibits a different shape compared to that in the pure element. Analysis of the peak of elastically scattered electrons proved the absence of plasmon loss features, characteristic of pure Mg, in the alloy. A different loss feature emerges in Mg(KL(23)L(23)) and Cu(L(23)VV). The system Mg-Y-TM-[Ag] suffers preferential sputtering. Depletion of Mg and enrichment of TM and Y are found. This is attributed mainly to the preferential sputtering of Mg. Thickness and composition of the formed oxide layer depend on the electrochemical treatment. After removing the oxide by sputtering the concentration of the underlying alloy was found to be affected by the treatment.

  5. Biogenic nanospheres of amorphous carbonated Ca-Mg phosphate within the periostracum of the green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Gangsheng

    2014-12-01

    Recently there is increasing evidence that the shell biomineralization proceeds via an amorphous precursor route. Therefore, the search for and investigation of amorphous biominerals in bivalve shells are of great importance and interest. Here, using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), we investigate the microstructure and mineralogy of the periostracum in Perna viridis. We find that: (1) the periostracum has three layers, of which the inner and outer layer are of proteins, while the middle layer is mineralized with nanospheres of amorphous biominerals; (2) the nanospheres are of amorphous carbonated Ca-Mg phosphate (ACCP), where the CO3(2)(-)/PO4(3)(-) weight ratio is estimated to be ∼0.3, and the Ca/P and Ca/Mg atomic ratio is ∼1.4 and 1.6, respectively; (3) the nanospheres, with a diameter of 43-106nm, are found to assemble into spherules with a diameter of 160-500nm, which are further organized into parallel microlayers separated by the proteins; and (4) the nanospheres are assumed to function as the pH stabilizer to facilitate the shell's initial mineralization. Finally, we expect that these findings will advance our understanding of the shell's biomineralization process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrathin IBAD MgO films for epitaxial growth on amorphous substrates and sub-50 nm membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Siming; Antonakos, C.; Bordel, C.; ...

    2016-11-07

    Here, a fabrication process has been developed for high energy ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) biaxial texturing of ultrathin (~1 nm) MgO films, using a high ion-to-atom ratio and post-deposition annealing instead of a homoepitaxial MgO layer. These films serve as the seed layer for epitaxial growth of materials on amorphous substrates such as electron/X-ray transparent membranes or nanocalorimetry devices. Stress measurements and atomic force microscopy of the MgO films reveal decreased stress and surface roughness, while X-ray diffraction of epitaxial overlayers demonstrates the improved crystal quality of films grown epitaxially on IBAD MgO. The process simplifies the synthesis ofmore » IBAD MgO, fundamentally solves the “wrinkle” issue induced by the homoepitaxial layer on sub-50 nm membranes, and enables studies of epitaxial materials in electron/X-ray transmission and nanocalorimetry.« less

  7. A comparison of amorphous calcium carbonate crystallization in aqueous solutions of MgCl2 and MgSO4: implications for paleo-ocean chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mei; Zhao, Yanyang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Zuozhen; Yan, Huaxiao; Sun, Bin; Meng, Ruirui; Zhuang, Dingxiang; Li, Dan; Liu, Binwei

    2017-07-01

    Based on the terminology of "aragonite seas" and "calcite seas", whether different Mg sources could affect the mineralogy of carbonate sediments at the same Mg/Ca ratio was explored, which was expected to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. In this work, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was prepared by direct precipitation in anhydrous ethanol and used as a precursor to study crystallization processes in MgSO4 and MgCl2 solutions having different concentrations at 60 °C (reaction times 240 and 2880 min). Based on the morphology of the aragonite crystals, as well as mineral saturation indices and kinetic analysis of geochemical processes, it was found that these crystals formed with a spherulitic texture in 4 steps. First, ACC crystallized into columnar Mg calcite by nearly oriented attachment. Second, the Mg calcite changed from columnar shapes into smooth dumbbell forms. Third, the Mg calcite transformed into rough dumbbell or cauliflower-shaped aragonite forms by local dissolution and precipitation. Finally, the aragonite transformed further into spherulitic radial and irregular aggregate forms. The increase in Ca2+ in the MgSO4 solutions compared with the MgCl2 solutions indicates the fast dissolution and slow precipitation of ACC in the former solutions. The phase transition was more complete in the 0.005 M MgCl2 solution, whereas Mg calcite crystallized from the 0.005 M MgSO4 solution, indicating that Mg calcite could be formed more easily in an MgSO4 solution. Based on these findings, aragonite and Mg calcite relative to ACC could be used to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. Therefore, calcite seas relative to high-Mg calcite could reflect a low concentration MgSO4 paleo-ocean, while aragonite seas could be related to an MgCl2 or high concentration of MgSO4 paleo-ocean.

  8. AB Initi Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Amorphous Structure of Ca-Mg-Cu and Ca-Mg-Zn Alloys (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-26

    The Minerals , Metals & Materials Society and ASM International (outside the USA). The U.S. Government is joint author of the work and has the right...amorphous alloys. DOI: 10.1007/s11661-012-1406-z The Minerals , Metals & Materials Society and ASM International (outside the USA) 2012 I. INTRODUCTION...presence ofMRO in these alloys,[34,35] as well as the fluctuation in the atomic scattering cross-sections: the solutes , Cu, Zn and Mg, have larger neutron

  9. Crystallinity of YBCO thin films on an MgO substrate using an amorphous buffer layer deposited at a low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kudo, S.; Mukaida, M.; Ohshima, S.

    2002-10-01

    We have investigated crystallinity of YBCO films on an MgO substrate using an amorphous buffer layer. The evaluated films are obtained as follows: an amorphous YBCO buffer layer is deposited on the MgO substrate at a low temperature (200 °C); and then, an amorphous buffer layer is crystallized by the thermal annealing at a high temperature from 910 to 1030 °C; finally, main YBCO film is grown on the crystalline YBCO buffer layer over the MgO substrate. A significant improvement in the crystalline quality of the YBCO films was achieved, when amorphous buffer layers of 100 nm in thickness were crystallized by annealing temperature 950 °C and then annealing is continued for 1 h in air atmosphere. We confirmed that YBCO films grown on a well-crystallized buffer layer had better crystallinity than ones on bare MgO substrate, which has substantially large lattice mismatch.

  10. Record critical current density in bulk MgB2 using carbon-coated amorphous boron with optimum sintering conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, M.; Higuchi, M.; Diko, P.; Jirsa, M.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of a sintered bulk MgB2 material produced at an optimized sintering temperature with a varying content of carbon-encapsulated amorphous boron. A series of MgB2 bulks was prepared with 0%, 1.5%, 2.8%, 7.3%, 12% and 16.5% of carbon-encapsulated boron. In the samples with 12% of carbon-encapsulated boron, Mg and MgB2C2 formation was observed. Tc was around 38.4 K for the pure MgB2 and decreased with increasing carbon content up to 25 K for 16.5 % of carbon-encapsulated boron. The highest Jc values of 470 kA/cm2 and 310 kA/cm2, in the self-field and 1 T, respectively, were achieved at 20 K, in the MgB2 sample with 1.5% of carbon-encapsulated boron. It proved that the optimized sintering conditions together with the appropriate amount of the carbon-coated boron were able to bring critical current performance of bulk MgB2 material up to the level necessary for real technical applications.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Characteristics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Nd-Mg-Ni-Based NdMg12-Type Alloys Synthesized via Mechanical Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Shang, Hongwei; Hou, Zhonghui; Yuan, Zeming; Yang, Tai; Qi, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this study, Mg was partially substituted by Ni with the intent of improving the hydrogen storage kinetics performance of NdMg12-type alloy. Mechanical milling technology was adopted to fabricate the nanocrystalline and amorphous NdMg11Ni + x wt pct Ni ( x = 100, 200) alloys. The effects of Ni content and milling duration on the microstructures and hydrogen storage kinetics of as-milled alloys have been systematically investigated. The structures were characterized by XRD and HRTEM. The electrochemical hydrogen storage properties were tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. Moreover, the gaseous hydrogen storage properties were investigated by Sievert apparatus and a differential scanning calorimeter connected with a H2 detector. Hydrogen desorption activation energy of alloy hydrides was estimated by using Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. The results reveal that the increase of Ni content dramatically ameliorates the gaseous and electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics performance of the as-milled alloys. Furthermore, high rate discharge ability (HRD) reach the maximum value with the variation of milling time. The maximum HRDs of the NdMg11Ni + x wt pct Ni ( x = 100, 200) alloys are 80.24 and 85.17 pct. The improved gaseous hydrogen storage kinetics of alloys via increasing Ni content and milling time can be attributed to a decrease in the hydrogen desorption activation energy.

  12. Ultraviolet detecting properties of amorphous MgInO thin film phototransistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huiling; Bi, Xiaobin; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhou, Hang

    2015-12-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) detecting properties of Mg doped In2O3 (MgInO or MIO) bottom gate thin film transistors (TFTs) were investigated. The optical measurements show that the introduction of Mg dopants effectively widens the optical band gap of In2O3. The cutoff wavelength of MIO films is pushed to deep UV as Mg content increases. Fabricated MIO TFTs with high Mg content demonstrate appraisable UV detecting properties with a dark current of 10-14 A, a UV to visible rejection ratio of 103, a responsivity of 3.2 A/W (300 nm) and a cutoff wavelength of 320 nm, which can be put to good use in deep UV detection. The dynamic photo-response measurement shows that the persistent photo-conductivity (PPC) effect can be alleviated by imposing a transient positive gate pulse.

  13. Equation of State of Amorphous MgSiO3 and (MgFe)SiO3 to Lowermost Mantle Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinmyo, R.; Petitgirard, S.; Malfait, W.; Kupenko, I.; Rubie, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Melting phenomena have a crucial importance during the Earth's formation and evolution. For example, a deep magma ocean of 1000 km or more has lead to the segregation of the core. Tomographic images of the Earth reveal ultra-low velocity zones at the core-mantle boundary that may be due to the presence of dense magmas or remnant zones of a deep basal magma ocean [1]. Unfortunately, measurements of amorphous silicate density over the entire pressure regime of the mantle are scarce and the density contrast between solid and liquid are difficult to assess due to the lack of such data. Only few studies have reported density measurements of amorphous silicates at high-pressure, with limitation up to 60 GPa. High-pressure acoustic velocity measurements have been used to calculate the density of MgSiO3 glass up to 30 GPa [2] but exhibit a large discrepancy compared to recent calculations [3]. SiO2 glass was measured up to 55 GPa using the X-ray absorption method through the diamond anvils [4] and very recently, X-ray diffraction has been used to infer the density of basaltic melt up to 60 GPa [5]. Here we report density measurement of MgSiO3 glass up to 130 GPa and (MgFe)SiO3 glass up to 55 GPa using a novel variation of the X-ray absorption method. The sample contained in a beryllium gasket was irradiated with a micro-focus X-ray beam in two directions: perpendicular and parallel to the compression axis to obtain the absorption coefficient and density under pressure. Our data constrain the first experimental EoS for (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and the first EoS for MgSiO3 up to lowermost mantle pressures. Technical details and EoS parameters will be shown in the presentation. We will address the implications for melts in the deep Earth based on compressibility, bulk modulus and density contrasts between iron-free and iron-bearing glasses. [1] Labrosse S. et al. Nature 2007 [2] Sanchez-Valle C. et al. Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 2010 [3] Ghosh D. et al Am. Mineral. 2014 [4] Sato T. et al

  14. MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaoo, Naba K.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    The process-parameter-dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 ternary mixed-composite material were investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases, and process- dependent material composition of films were investigated through the use of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process-dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  15. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Ya-Chi; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC) and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C), was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  16. Biological Characteristics of the MG-63 Human Osteosarcoma Cells on Composite Tantalum Carbide/Amorphous Carbon Films

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Ya-Chi; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC) and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C), was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics. PMID:24760085

  17. Ultra-hard amorphous AlMgB14 films RF sputtered onto curved substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. M.; Putrolaynen, V. V.; Yuzvyuk, M. H.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, hard AlMgB14 (BAM) coatings were deposited for the first time by RF magnetron sputtering using a single stoichiometric ceramic target. High target sputtering power and sufficiently short target-to-substrate distance were found to be critical processing conditions. They enabled fabrication of stoichiometric in-depth compositionally homogeneous films with the peak values of nanohardness 88 GPa and Young’s modulus 517 GPa at the penetration depth of 26 nm and, respectively, 35 GPa and 275 GPa at 200 nm depth in 2 µm thick film (Grishin et al 2014 JETP Lett. 100 680). The narrow range of sufficiently short target-to-substrate distance makes impossible to coat non flat specimens. To achieve ultimate BAM films’ characteristics onto curved surfaces we developed two-step sputtering process. The first thin layer is deposited as a template at low RF power that facilitates a layered Frank van der Merwe mode growth of smooth film occurs. The next layer is grown at high RF target sputtering power. The affinity of subsequent flow of sputtered atoms to already evenly condensed template fosters the development of smooth film surface. As an example, we made BAM coating onto hemispherical 5 mm in diameter ball made from a hard tool steel and used as a head of a special gauge. Very smooth (6.6 nm RMS surface roughness) and hard AlMgB14 films fabricated onto commercial ball-shaped items enhance hardness of tool steel specimens by a factor of four.

  18. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg2Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang-Huan; Li, Bao-Wei; Ren, Hui-Ping; Li, Xia; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dong-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1) alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4) alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg2Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s) to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio (R5a) of the (x = 0.4) alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio (R20d) from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D) from 0.75 × 10−11 to 3.88 × 10−11 cm2/s and the limiting current density IL from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g. PMID:28879988

  19. In vitro metal ion release and biocompatibility of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy with/without gelatin coating.

    PubMed

    Chan, W Y; Chian, K S; Tan, M J

    2013-12-01

    Amorphous zinc-rich Mg-Zn-Ca alloys have exhibited good tissue compatibility and low hydrogen evolution in vivo. However, suboptimal cell-surface interaction on magnesium alloy surface observed in vitro could lead to reduced integration with host tissue for regenerative purpose. This study aims to improve cell-surface interaction of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy by coating a gelatin layer by electrospinning. Coated/uncoated alloys were immersed and extracted for 3 days under different CO2. The immersion results showed that pH and metal ion release in the alloy extracts were affected by gelatin coating and CO2, suggesting their roles in alloy biocorrosion and a mechanism has been proposed for the alloy-CO2 system with/without coating. Cytotoxicity results are evident that gelatin-coated alloy with 2-day crosslinking not only exhibited no indirect cytotoxicity, but also supported attachment of L929 and MG63 cell lines around/on the alloy with high viability. Therefore, amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy coated with gelatin by electrospinning technique provides a useful method to improve alloy biocompatibility.

  20. Radiation-induced amorphization of Ce-doped Mg2Y8(SiO4)6O2 silicate apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianren; Yao, Tiankai; Lian, Jie; Shen, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhili; Lu, Fengyuan

    2016-07-01

    Ce-doped Mg2Y8(SiO4)6O2 silicate apatite (Ce = 0.05 and 0.5) were irradiated with 1 MeV Kr2+ ion beam irradiation at different temperatures and their radiation response and the cation composition dependence of the radiation-induced amorphization were studied by in situ TEM. The two Ce-doped Mg2Y8(SiO4)6O2 silicate apatites are sensitive to ion beam induced amorphization with a low critical dose (0.096 dpa) at room temperature, and exhibits significantly different radiation tolerance at elevated temperatures. Ce concentration at the apatite AI site plays a critical role in determining the radiation response of this silicate apatite, in which the Ce3+ rich Mg2Y7.5Ce0.5(SiO4)6O2 displays lower amorphization susceptibility than Mg2Y7.95Ce0.05(SiO4)6O2 with a lower Ce3+ occupancy at the AI sites. The critical temperature (Tc) and activation energy (Ea) change from 667.5 ± 33 K and 0.162 eV of Mg2Y7.5Ce0.5(SiO4)6O2 to 963.6 ± 64 K and 0.206 eV of Mg2Y7.95Ce0.05(SiO4)6O2. We demonstrate that the radiation tolerance can be controlled by varying the chemical composition, and enhanced radiation tolerance is achieved by increasing the Ce concentration at the AI site.

  1. Production and Characterization of Bulk MgB2 Material made by the Combination of Crystalline and Carbon Coated Amorphous Boron Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    The object of this investigation is to reduce the cost of bulk production and in the same time to increase the critical current performance of bulk MgB2 material. High-purity commercial powders of Mg metal (99.9% purity) and two types of crystalline (99% purity) and 16.5 wt% carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders (98.5% purity) were mixed in a nominal composition of MgB2 to reduce the boron cost and to see the effect on the superconducting and magnetic properties. Several samples were produced mixing the crystalline boron and carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders in varying ratios (50:50, 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and synthesized using a single-step process using the solid state reaction around 800 °C for 3 h in pure argon atmosphere. The magnetization measurements exhibited a sharp superconducting transition temperature with T c, onset around 38.6 K to 37.2 K for the bulk samples prepared utilizing the mixture of crystalline boron and 16.5% carbon-coated amorphous boron. The critical current density at higher magnetic field was improved with addition of carbon-coated boron to crystalline boron in a ratio of 80:20. The highest self-field Jc around 215,000 A/cm2 and 37,000 A/cm2 were recorded at 20 K, self-field and 2 T for the sample with a ratio of 80:10. The present results clearly demonstrate that the bulk MgB2 performance can be improved by adding carbon-coated nano boron to crystalline boron, which will be attractive to reduce the cost of bulk MgB2 material for several industrial applications.

  2. Hierarchical Nanocomposite by Integrating Reduced Graphene Oxide and Amorphous Carbon with Ultrafine MgO Nanocrystallites for Enhanced CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2017-10-04

    Exploring efficient and low-cost solid sorbents is essential for carbon capture and storage. Herein, a novel class of high-performance CO2 adsorbent (rGO@MgO/C) is engineered based on controllable integration of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), amorphous carbon and MgO nanocrystallites. The optimized rGO@MgO/C nanocomposite exhibits remarkable CO2 capture capacity (up to 31.5 wt% at 27 °C, 1 bar CO2 and 22.5 wt% under the simulated flue gas), fast sorption rate and strong process durability. The enhanced capture capability of CO2 is the best among all the MgO-based sorbents reported so far. The high performance of this adsorbent can be ascribed to the hierarchical architecture and special physicochemical features, including the sheet-on-sheet sandwich-like structure, ultrathin nanosheets with abundant nanopores, large surface area, highly dispersed ultrafine MgO nanocrystallites (ca. 3 nm in size), together with the rGO sheet and in-situ generated amorphous carbon which serve as a dual carbon support and protectant to prevent MgO nanocrystallites from agglomeration. In addition, the CO2 uptake capacity at intermediate temperature (e.g., 350 °C) can be further improved by >3 times through alkali metal salt promotion treatment. This work provides a facile and effective strategy to engineer advanced graphene-based functional nanocomposites with rationally designed compositions and architectures for potential applications in the field of gas storage and separation.

  3. Formation of Amorphous Mg-Si Precipitates Mediated by Microbial Activity: A Recent Analogue For Understanding their Role in Microbialite Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacton, M.; Ariztegui, D.; Vasconcelos, C.; Barbarand, J.; Gorin, G. E.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Occurrence of amorphous Mg-Si precipitates has been reported in different environments, i.e., biofilms and microbialites, from acidic to alkaline conditions. They are always associated to microbial activity, while their authigenesis remains elusive. Although a biological factor is undoubtedly linked to their occurrence, different assumptions have been proposed in order to explain their role in the formation of sediments. Léveillé et al. (2002) and Souza-Egipsy et al. (2005) showed that a highly hydrated Mg-Si gel is mediated by EPS. They have been thought to be a precursor of some clays, e.g., kerolite (Léveillé et al., 2005) and dolomite (Bontognali et al., 2008). On the other hand, Arp et al. (2003) considered that they have precipitated after the dissolution of a primary carbonate mineral. They have been also demonstrated as an agent of preservation of cell walls enhancing fossilization in rocks: Mg-Si permineralization of cell walls was reported as a possible explanation for the preservation of green algae remains in subfossil freshwater microbialites (Arp et al., 2003) and cyanobacterial cell walls (Souza-Egipsy et al., 2005). From a physico-chemical point of view, little is known about the conditions required for Mg-Si complexation. For example, Kent and Kastner (1985) proposed that chemical Mg-hydroxysilicate precipitation is likely to occur in carbonate-containing siliceous sediments because the CaCO3 dissolution helps to maintain pH values near 8. However, other environments exhibit more acidic pH suggesting that the latter is not a fundamental parameter for the nucleation of Mg-Si precipitates. Modern microbial mats are excellent systems to study the processes leading to the formation of Mg-Si precipitates. Two samples from microbial mats retrieved at the hypersaline Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) were studied. One sample was studied after recovery without any further treatment, whereas an equivalent sample was placed in an anoxic chamber without light

  4. The 10 μm band in amorphous MgSiO3: the influence of medium-range structure, defects and thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Tang, C. C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Variations in the 10 μm amorphous silicate band profile between different environments have been variously attributed to differences in composition, grain processing or macroscopic constitution (e.g. compact versus aggregate grains). However the relationship with mineralogical structure has remained poorly defined. Aims: The relationship between the 10 μm band and medium-range (~2-20 Å) structure is investigated. Methods: Synchrotron X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy are used to relate changes in medium-range structure to changes in the 10 μm band profile for amorphous MgSiO3 annealed at temperatures leading up to crystallisation. Results: Raman and X-ray data show a build up of strain within the silicate network, which is released between ~400-550 °C, causing a relaxation of both the Si-O-Si bond angle and Si-O bond length. Decomposing the 10 μm band at each temperature step shows SiO3 is the initially dominant component and increases in proportion as other species become incorporated into the silicate structure. However at ~400 °C the proportion of SiO3 decreases as species with greater numbers of non-bridging oxygens form. The coincidence with strain release implies a breakup of larger tetrahedral structures. Conclusions: We identify a correspondence between the spectral response at 10 μm of amorphous MgSiO3 and the evolution of its structural state at medium-range distances. The dependence of the 10 μm band on medium-range structure may account for the hitherto poor correlation between composition and band behaviour, variations in the 10 μm band observed in other silicates of similar compositions, or, between observed bands in different astronomical settings.

  5. On the biodegradability, mechanical behavior, and cytocompatibility of amorphous Mg72 Zn23 Ca5 and crystalline Mg70 Zn23 Ca5 Pd2 alloys as temporary implant materials.

    PubMed

    Pellicer, E; González, S; Blanquer, A; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Nogués, C; Sort, J

    2013-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of almost fully amorphous Mg(72) Zn(23) Ca(5) and crystalline Mg(70) Zn(23) Ca(5) Pd(2) alloys during immersion in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS), as well as their cytocompatibility, are investigated in order to assess the feasibility of both materials as biodegradable implants. Though the crystalline Mg(70) Zn(23) Ca(5) Pd(2) sample shows lower wettability and more positive corrosion potential, this sample degrades much faster upon incubation in HBSS as a consequence of the formation of micro-galvanic couples between the nobler Pd-rich dendrites and the surrounding phases. After 22-h immersion, the concentration of Mg ions in the HBSS medium containing the Mg(70) Zn(23) Ca(5) Pd(2) sample is six times larger than for Mg(72) Zn(23) Ca(5) . Due to the Zn enrichment and the incipient porosity, the mechanical properties of the Mg(72) Zn(23) Ca(5) sample improve within the first stages of biodegradation (i.e., hardness increases while the Young's modulus decreases, thus rendering an enhanced wear resistance). Cytocompatibility studies reveal that neither Mg(72) Zn(23) Ca(5) nor Mg(70) Zn(23) Ca(5) Pd(2) are cytotoxic, although preosteoblast cell adhesion is to some extent precluded, particularly onto the surface of Mg(70) Zn(23) Ca(5) Pd(2) , because of the relatively high hydrophobicity. Because of their outstanding properties and their time-evolution, the use of the Pd-free alloy in temporary implants such as screws, stents, and sutures is envisioned.

  6. Energetic and structural studies of amorphous Ca[subscript 1-x]Mg[subscript x]CO[subscript 3]·nH[subscript 2]O (0 {less than] x [less than] 1))

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, A.V.; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Hu, Yandi; Jun, Young-Shin; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-07-25

    Early stage amorphous precursors provide a low energy pathway for carbonate mineralization. Many natural deposits of carbonate minerals and biogenic calcium carbonate (both amorphous and crystalline) include significant amounts of Mg. To understand the role of magnesium-containing amorphous precursors in carbonate mineralization, we investigated the energetics and structure of synthetic amorphous Ca-Mg carbonates with composition Ca{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (0 {le} x {le} 1) using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC with x = 1) is energetically more metastable than amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC with x = 0), but it is more persistent (crystallizing in months rather than days under ambient conditions), probably due to the slow kinetics of Mg{sup 2+} dehydration. The Ca{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (0 {le} x {le} 1) system forms a continuous X-ray amorphous series upon precipitation and all intermediate compositions are energetically more stable than a mixture of ACC and AMC, but metastable with respect to crystalline carbonates. The amorphous system can be divided into two distinct regions. For x = 0.00-0.47, thermal analysis is consistent with a homogeneous amorphous phase. The less metastable compositions of this series, with x = 0.0-0.2, are frequently found in biogenic carbonates. If not coincidental, this may suggest that organisms take advantage of this single phase low energy amorphous precursor pathway to crystalline biogenic carbonates. For x {le} 0.47, energetic metastability increases and thermal analysis hints at nanoscale heterogeneity, perhaps of a material near x = 0.5 coexisting with another phase near pure AMC (x = 1). The most hydrated amorphous phases, which occur near x = 0.5, are the least metastable, and may be precursors for dolomite formation.

  7. Network structure of SiO2 and MgSiO3 in amorphous and liquid States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mai Thi; Thuy Duong, Tran; Viet Huy, Nguyen; Van Hong, Nguyen

    2017-03-01

    Network structure of SiO2 and MgSiO3 at 300 K and 3200 K is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and visualization of simulation data. Structural organization of SiO2 and MgSiO3 is clarified via analysis the short range order (SRO) and intermediate range order (IRO). Network topology is determined via analyzing the bond between structural units, the cluster of structural units as well as spatial distribution of structural units. The polyamorphism as well as structural and dynamic heterogeneities are also discussed in this work.

  8. Highly improved hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics of the nanocrystalline and amorphous PrMg12-type alloys by mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Shang, H. W.; Li, Y. Q.; Yuan, Z. M.; Yang, T.; Zhao, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and amorphous PrMg11Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling. Effects of Ni content and milling duration on the structures, hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics of the as-milled alloys were investigated systematically. The structures were characterized by XRD and HRTEM. The hydrogen desorption activation energy was calculated by using Kissinger method. The results show that increasing Ni content dramatically improves the electrochemical discharge capacity of the as-milled alloys. Furthermore, the variation of milling time has a significant impact on the kinetics of the alloys. As the milling time increased, the high-rate discharge ability (HRD), gaseous hydrogen absorption capacity and hydrogenation rate increased at first but decreased finally, while the dehydrogenation rate always increased.

  9. Developpement d'une methode calorimetrique de mesure des pertes ac pour des rubans supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolez, Patricia

    Le travail de recherche effectue dans le cadre de ce projet de doctorat a permis la mise au point d'une methode de mesure des pertes ac destinee a l'etude des supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique. Pour le choix des principes de cette methode, nous nous sommes inspires de travaux anterieurs realises sur les supraconducteurs conventionnels, afin de proposer une alternative a la technique electrique, presentant lors du debut de cette these des problemes lies a la variation du resultat des mesures selon la position des contacts de tension sur la surface de l'echantillon, et de pouvoir mesurer les pertes ac dans des conditions simulant la realite des futures applications industrielles des rubans supraconducteurs: en particulier, cette methode utilise la technique calorimetrique, associee a une calibration simultanee et in situ. La validite de la methode a ete verifiee de maniere theorique et experimentale: d'une part, des mesures ont ete realisees sur des echantillons de Bi-2223 recouverts d'argent ou d'alliage d'argent-or et comparees avec les predictions theoriques donnees par Norris, nous indiquant la nature majoritairement hysteretique des pertes ac dans nos echantillons; d'autre part, une mesure electrique a ete realisee in situ dont les resultats correspondent parfaitement a ceux donnes par notre methode calorimetrique. Par ailleurs, nous avons compare la dependance en courant et en frequence des pertes ac d'un echantillon avant et apres qu'il ait ete endommage. Ces mesures semblent indiquer une relation entre la valeur du coefficient de la loi de puissance modelisant la dependance des pertes avec le courant, et les inhomogeneites longitudinales du courant critique induites par l'endommagement. De plus, la variation en frequence montre qu'au niveau des grosses fractures transverses creees par l'endommagement dans le coeur supraconducteur, le courant se partage localement de maniere a peu pres equivalente entre les quelques grains de matiere

  10. Pressure response of iron’s hyperfine parameters and solid state amorphism in (Mg0.87Fe0.13)SiO3 orthopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.

    2009-12-01

    Iron-bearing orthopyroxene (opx) is an abundant mineral in the Earth’s crust and upper mantle. Understanding its structural response to relevant mantle conditions will provide important information for seismological and dynamical modeling of this region. Even though X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out at high pressure on iron-bearing opx, the specific site behavior of iron in the complex opx crystal structure at relevant mantle conditions are less understood. Mössbauer spectroscopy allows one to uniquely probe the site-specific behavior of iron in solid materials by direct determination of iron’s hyperfine fields, namely its quadrupole splitting (QS) and isomer shift (IS). Therefore, it is especially suitable for the exploration of iron’s site-specific behaviors in opx. We loaded a synthetic 57Fe-enriched (Mg0.87Fe0.13)SiO3 powdered opx sample into a diamond anvil cell using NaCl as a pressure-transmitting medium. Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SMS) was carried out at Sector 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The data were collected up to 36 GPa at room temperature using stainless steel as a reference absorber to accurately constrain the isomer shifts of the M1 and M2 sites in opx. In addition, X-ray powder diffraction spectra were collected in Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The SMS spectra were analyzed with the CONUSS software package. We used a two-site model below 9 GPa and a one-site model at higher pressures to analyze the spectra. In the two-site model, very good agreement was obtained when compared with conventional Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements at ambient pressure. We observed a smooth increase of the QS of the M1 and M2 sites below 9 GPa. Above 9 GPa, the QS remained nearly constant, but the distribution of field gradients overlapped. At low pressures, the IS of the M1 and M2 are distinct but begin to merge at P > 9 GPa. Our observations are suggestive of one

  11. Wetting and reaction characteristics of crystalline and amorphous SiO2 derived rice-husk ash and SiO2/SiC substrates with Al-Si-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, A.; Pech-Canul, M. I.; Gutiérrez, C. A.; Soltani, N.

    2015-12-01

    A study of the wetting behavior of three substrate types (SiC, SiO2-derived RHA and SiC/SiO2-derived RHA) by two Al-Si-Mg alloys using the sessile drop method has been conducted, using amorphous and crystalline SiO2 in the experiment. Mostly, there is a transition from non-wetting to wetting contact angles, being the lowest θ values achieved with the alloy of high Mg content in contact with amorphous SiO2. The observed wetting behavior is attributed to the deposited Mg on the substrates. A strong diffusion of Si from the SiC/Amorphous RHA substrate into the metal drop explains the free Si segregated at the drop/substrate interface and drop surface. Although incorporation of both SiO2-derived RHA structures into the SiC powder compact substrates increases the contact angles in comparison with the SiC substrate alone, the still observed acute contact angles in RHA/SiC substrates make them promising for fabrication of composites with high volume fraction of reinforcement by the pressureless infiltration technique. The observed wetting characteristics, with decrease in surface tension and contact angles is explained by surface related phenomena. Based on contact angle changes, drop dimensions and surface tension values, as well as on the interfacial elemental mapping, and XRD analysis of substrates, some wetting and reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  12. Structural evolution, thermomechanical recrystallization and electrochemical corrosion properties of Ni-Cu-Mg amorphous coating on mild steel fabricated by dual-anode electrolytic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahab, M.; Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.

    2016-07-01

    The electrolytic Ni-Cu based alloy coating with admixed interfacial blend of Mg have been successfully prepared on mild steel substrate by dual anode electroplating processes over a range of applied current density and dwell time. The electrocodeposition of Ni-Cu-Mg coating was investigated in the presence of other bath additives. The influence of deposition current on surface morphology, adhesion behavior, preferred crystal orientation, surface topography and electrochemical activity of Ni-Cu-Mg alloy coating on mild steel were systematically examined. The thermal stability of the developed composite materials was examined via isothermal treatment. Scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS, X-ray diffraction, Atomic force microscope, micro-hardness tester and 3 μmetrohm Potentiostat/galvanostat were used to compare untreated and isothermally treated electrocodeposited composite. The induced activity of the Ni-Cu-Mg alloy changed the surface modification and results to crystal precipitation within the structural interface by the formation of Cu, Ni2Mg3 phase. The obtained results showed that the introduction of Mg particles in the plating bath generally modified the surface and brings an increase in the hardness and corrosion resistance of Ni-Cu-Mg layers fabricated. Equally, isothermally treated composites demonstrated an improved properties indicating 45% increase in the micro-hardness and 79.6% corrosion resistance which further showed that the developed composite is thermally stable.

  13. Study on glass-forming ability and hydrogen storage properties of amorphous Mg{sub 60}Ni{sub 30}La{sub 10−x}Co{sub x} (x = 0, 4) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Wang, Zhong-min Zhang, Huai-gang; Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Ji, Zi-jun; Deng, Jian-qiu; Zhou, Huai-ying

    2013-12-15

    Mg{sub 60}Ni{sub 30}La{sub 10−x}Co{sub x} (x = 0, 4) amorphous alloys were prepared by rapid solidification, using a melt-spinning technique. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry analysis were employed to measure their microstructure, thermal stability and glass-forming ability, and hydrogen storage properties were studied by means of PCTPro2000. Based on differential scanning calorimetry results, their glass-forming ability and thermal stability were investigated by Kissinger method, Lasocka curves and atomic cluster model, respectively. The results indicate that glass-forming ability, thermal properties and hydrogen storage properties in the Mg-rich corner of Mg–Ni–La–Co system alloys were enhanced by Co substitution for La. It can be found that the smaller activation energy (ΔΕ) and frequency factor (υ{sub 0}), the bigger value of B (glass transition point in Lasocka curves), and higher glass-forming ability of Mg–Ni–La–Co alloys would be followed. In addition, atomic structure parameter (λ), deduced from atomic cluster model is valuable in the design of Mg–Ni–La–Co system alloys with good glass-forming ability. With an increase of Co content from 0 to 4, the hydrogen desorption capacity within 4000 s rises from 2.25 to 2.85 wt.% at 573 K. - Highlights: • Amorphous Mg{sub 60}Ni{sub 30}La{sub 10−x}Co{sub x} (x = 0 and 4) alloys were produced by melt spinning. • The GFA and hydrogen storage properties were enhanced by Co substitution for La. • With an increase of Co content, the hydrogen desorption capacity rises at 573 K.

  14. In vitro synthesis of amorphous Mg-, Ca-, Sr- and Ba-carbonates: What do we learn about intracellular calcification by cyanobacteria?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, N.; Georgelin, T.; Jaber, M.; Lambert, J.-F.; Benzerara, K.

    2015-07-01

    Some cyanobacteria, including Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, which was isolated from Lake Alchichica (Mexico), can form intracellular carbonates. This contradicts the common paradigm that cyanobacterial calcification is always extracellular and suggests that calcification might be controlled by these cyanobacterial species. Intracellular carbonates have several peculiar characteristics: they are relatively small (between 60 and 500 nm), they are poorly crystalline, and they have Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios much higher than the solution in which the cells grow. It is therefore crucial to understand whether these unique features may indicate the involvement of specific biological processes. Here, in vitro abiotic syntheses were performed to synthesize Mg-, Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing carbonates with compositions, crystallinities and sizes close to those observed in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria. Precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopies coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction. The size and the poor crystallinity of cyanobacterial intracellular carbonates could be mimicked under these abiotic conditions. It was shown that similarly to Mg, elements such as Sr and Ba can favor stabilization of poorly crystalline carbonates. In contrast, the differential partitioning of Sr, Ba and Ca between the solution and the solids as observed in cyanobacteria could not be mimicked in vitro. This provides keys to a better understanding of biological processes involved in the formation of intracellular carbonates by some cyanobacteria, including the involvement of membrane transporters.

  15. Crystallization Experiments in the MgO-CO2-H2O system: Role of Amorphous Magnesium Carbonate Precursors in Magnesium Carbonate Hydrated Phases and Morphologies in Low Temperature Hydrothermal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampouras, Manolis; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2017-04-01

    Numerous forms of hydrated or basic magnesium carbonates occur in the complex MgO-CO2-H2O system. Mineral saturation states from low temperature hydrothermal fluids in Semail Ophiolite (Oman), Prony Bay (New Caledonia) and Lost City hydrothermal field (mid-Atlantic ridge) strongly indicate the presence of magnesium hydroxy-carbonate hydrates (e.g. hydromagnesite) and magnesium hydroxides (brucite). Study of formation mechanisms and morphological features of minerals forming in the MgO-CO2-H2O system could give insights into serpentinization-driven, hydrothermal, alkaline environments, which are related to early Earth conditions. Temperature, hydration degree, pH and fluid composition are crucial factors regarding the formation, coexistence and transformation of such mineral phases. The rate of supersaturation, on the other hand, is a fundamental parameter to understand nucleation and crystal growth processes. All these parameters can be examined in a solution using different crystallization techniques. In the present study, we applied different crystallization techniques to synthesize and monitor the crystallization of Mg-bearing carbonates and hydroxides under abiotic conditions. Various crystallization techniques (counter-diffusion, vapor diffusion and unseeded solution mixing) were used to screen the formation conditions of each phase, transformation processes and structural development. Mineral and textural characterization of the different synthesized phases were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled to dispersive energy spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS). Experimental investigation of the effect of pH level and silica content under variable reactant concentrations revealed the importance of Amorphous Magnesium Carbonate (AMC) in the formation of hydroxy-carbonate phases (hydromagnesite and dypingite). Micro-structural resemblance between AMC precursors and later stage crystalline phases highlights the

  16. Rubans Ag/Bi 2212 préparés par alternance de dépôts électrolytiques et de traitements thermiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, F.; Régnier, P.; Schmirgeld-Mignot, L.; Poissonnet, S.

    1998-02-01

    Ag/Bi 2212 tapes have been prepared by oxidation of 3.5 μm thick precusors deposited electrolytically in a sequential way on both sides of a 50 μm thick silver backing. As in the standard procedure known as "partial melting growth" our layers are partially melted, but because they are very thin they cannot be maintained in the melted state for more than a few minutes without de-wetting. Hence instead of cooling them slowly we quench them to room temperature after a short stay in the melted state and finally treat them just under the melting point of the Bi 2212. To optimize the process the microstructure of our samples was characterized at each stage of their preparation. Here down we start with a comparison between the standard procedure and our modified one. Next we present a correlation between the process and the microstructure from the one hand, and the microstructure and the electrical and magnetic properties from the other hand. At the present level of optimization, we produce on a regular basis samples which exhibit a critical current density of 30 000 A/cm^2 at 77 K and 300 000 A/cm^2 at 4.2 K. These values correspond to transport currents of respectively 6.3 and 63 A for specimens of 3 mm in width, with a substrate 7 times thicker than the 2 superconducting layers. Moreover, we have checked that the transport critical current is proportional to the width of the specimen, leading to 42 A at 77 K and 100 A at 63 K for specimens of 20 mm in width. Nous avons synthétisé par alternance de dépôts électrolytiques et de traitements thermiques des couches de Bi 2212 de 3,5~μm d'épaisseur sur les deux faces de rubans d'argent de 50~μ m d'épaisseur. Grâce à une succession de fusions partielles, la composition moyenne de nos couches s'homogénéise bien que les précurseurs soient déposés de façon séquentielle. Comme dans le procédé classique connu sous le vocable "partial melt growth", nous fondons nos précurseurs mais vue leur faible

  17. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  18. Effect of dolomite, magnesium oxide (MgO) and chalk (CaCO3) on in vitro fermentation of amorphous and crystalline cellulose and meadow hay using inoculum from sheep.

    PubMed

    Váradyová, Zora; Baran, Miroslav; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Siroka, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Some minerals can influence some biochemical parameters of rumen fermentation. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of different amounts (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 g) of dolomite and to compare the effect of dolomite, magnesium oxide (MgO) and chalk (CaCO3) upon the end products of rumen fermentation in vitro. Amorphous and crystalline cellulose as well as meadow hay were used as substrates and incubated with buffered rumen fluid in sealed fermentation bottles. In dependence on the amount of dolomite and the kind of substrate an inhibitory effect of dolomite on methane production was evident. Significant differences of methane production were found between the controls, crystalline cellulose and meadow hay with 0.5 g of dolomite. An increase of total gas production was observed for cellulose with both 0.25 and 0.5 g of dolomite and also for meadow hay with 0.5 g of dolomite. It can be concluded that there was a remarkable effect of dolomite on methane production and also a slight effect of magnesium oxide and chalk as compared to the effect of dolomite on the fermentation parameters of incubated substrates.

  19. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  20. Theory of amorphous ices

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2014-01-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens. PMID:24858957

  1. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  2. Tritium in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; O`Leary, S.K.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Shmadya, W.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary results on infrared and luminescence measurements of tritium incorporated amorphous silicon are reported. Tritium is an unstable isotope that readily substitutes hydrogen in the amorphous silicon network. Due to its greater mass, bonded tritium is found to introduce new stretching modes in the infrared spectrum. Inelastic collisions between the beta particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, and the amorphous silicon network, results in the generation of excess electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed.

  3. Trehalose amorphization and recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2008-10-13

    The stability of the amorphous trehalose prepared by using several procedures is presented and discussed. Amorphization is shown to occur by melting (T(m)=215 degrees C) or milling (room temperature) the crystalline anhydrous form TRE-beta. Fast dehydration of the di-hydrate crystalline polymorph, TRE-h, also produces an amorphous phase. Other dehydration procedures of TRE-h, such as microwave treatment, supercritical extraction or gentle heating at low scan rates, give variable fractions of the polymorph TRE-alpha, that undergo amorphization upon melting (at lower temperature, T(m)=130 degrees C). Additional procedures for amorphization, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying or evaporation of trehalose solutions, are discussed. All these procedures are classified depending on the capability of the undercooled liquid phase to undergo cold crystallization upon heating the glassy state at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (T(g)=120 degrees C). The recrystallizable amorphous phase is invariably obtained by the melt of the polymorph TRE-alpha, while other procedures always give an amorphous phase that is unable to crystallize above T(g). The existence of two different categories is analyzed in terms of the transformation paths and the hypothesis that the systems may exhibit different molecular mobilities.

  4. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  5. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  6. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  7. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  8. Etude par resistivite electrique du comportement d'un alliage amorphe Fe 40Ni 38Mo 4B 18 deforme par traction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Long Phan; Sacovy, Paulette; Delaplace, Jean

    1983-02-01

    Des rubans d'alliages amorphes Metglas du type Fe 40Ni 38Mo 4B 18 à l'état brut de trempe ont été déformés par traction à la température ambiante et l'on a suivi les variations de la résistance électrique des échantillons au cours de la déformation. Il ressort de ces essais que la déformation plastique qui est de l'ordre de 0.5% avant rupture ne se produit pas de faĉon homogène dans l'échantillon. Les mesures électriques effectuées au cours de la déformation mettent en évidence dans le domaine élastique un effet d'élastorésistance, relativement important ( K ≠ 1); elles montrent que dans le domaine plastique la déformation permanente des échantillons s'accompagne d'une diminution de la résistivité électrique du matériau. Deux hypothèses sont discutées pour expliquer cet effet inattendu, l'un qui fait appel à l'existence de volumes libres, l'autre qui suppose une cristallisation localisée du matériau sous l'effet de la contrainte.

  9. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  10. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  11. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  12. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  13. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  14. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  15. Amorphous metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Veazey, Chris; Johnson, William L.

    2003-01-01

    The bulk glass forming alloy Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is processed into a low-density amorphous metallic foam. Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is mixed with hydrated B2O3, which releases gas at elevated temperature and/or low pressure. Very homogeneous foams are achieved due to the high viscosity of the alloy even at its liquidus temperature. By processing at the liquidus temperature and decreasing the pressure to 10-2 mbar, well-distributed bubbles expand to foam the material. Foam densities as low as 1.4×103 kg/m3 were obtained, corresponding to a bubble volume fraction of 84%. The bubble diameter ranges between 2×10-4 and 1×10-3 m. Thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry confirms the amorphous nature of the foam. Furthermore, it reveals that the foam's thermal stability is comparable to the bulk material.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  17. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  18. Defects in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    this map with a similar plot of the experimental data. An experimental deformation data map for Pd-based amorphous al- loys is shown in fig. 10. In the...Masumoto. I Mat. Sci. 12 (1977) 1927, [IgI T M Ha.es. J. W Allen. J. Tauc . B. C. Giessen and J. J. Hauser. Phys. Re. Lett. 41 i197s) 1282 [191 J

  19. Pressure-Induced Polyamorphism and Formation of 'Aragonitic' Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Kalkan, Bora; Clark, Simon M.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2013-09-23

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) undergoes a reversible amorphous–amorphous phase transition at 10 GPa, adopting an aragonite-like local order. This result suggests a mechanism by which Mg2+—a cation with smaller ionic radius than Ca2+—modifies the local order of ACC to an aragonite-like order by helping to decrease the molar volume of the amorphous phase.

  20. The Stabilization of Amorphous Zopiclone in an Amorphous Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Milne, Marnus; Liebenberg, Wilna; Aucamp, Marique

    2015-10-01

    Zopiclone is a poorly soluble psychotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize an amorphous form of zopiclone as well as the characterization and performance of a stable amorphous solid dispersion. The amorphous form was prepared by the well-known method of quench-cooling of the melt. The solid dispersion was prepared by a solvent evaporation method of zopiclone, polyvinylpyrrolidone-25 (PVP-25), and methanol, followed by freeze-drying. The physico-chemical properties and stability of amorphous zopiclone and the solid dispersion was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), solubility, and dissolution studies. The zopiclone amorphous solid-state form was determined to be a fragile glass; it was concluded that the stability of the amorphous form is influenced by both temperature and water. Exposure of amorphous zopiclone to moisture results in rapid transformation of the amorphous form to the crystalline dihydrated form. In comparison, the amorphous solid dispersion proved to be more stable with increased aqueous solubility.

  1. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Zhidan; Yang, Liuxiang; Zeng, Qiaoshi; ...

    2017-08-22

    Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp3 bonds, purely sp3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on the recovered sample andmore » computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.« less

  2. THE IRRADIATION-INDUCED OLIVINE TO AMORPHOUS PYROXENE TRANSFORMATION PRESERVED IN AN INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLE

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2009-11-01

    Amorphization of crystalline olivine to glass with a pyroxene composition is well known from high-energy irradiation experiments. This report is on the first natural occurrence of this process preserved in a chondritic aggregate interplanetary dust particle. The Fe-rich olivine grain textures and compositions and the glass grain compositions delineate this transformation that yielded glass with Fe-rich pyroxene compositions. The average glass composition, (Mg, Fe){sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is a serpentine-dehydroxylate with O/Si = 3.56 +- 0.25, (Mg+Fe)/Si = 1.53 +- 0.24, and Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.74 +- 0.1. These measured atomic ratios match the ratios that have been proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains very well, albeit the measured Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio is lower than was proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains, Mg/(Mg+Fe) > 0.9.

  3. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.

    1991-08-01

    Divided roughly into two parts, the book describes the physical properties and device applications of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The first section is concerned with the atomic and electronic structure, and covers growth defects and doping and defect reactions. The emphasis is on the optical and electronic properties that result from the disordered structure. The second part of the book describes electronic conduction, recombination, interfaces, and multilayers. The special attribute of a-Si:H which makes it useful is the ability to deposit the material inexpensively over large areas, while retaining good semiconducting properties, and the final chapter discusses various applications and devices.

  4. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A. |; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  5. An electrochemical investigation of mechanical alloying of MgNi-based hydrogen storage alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Jun; Gasik, Michael

    The electrochemical properties of amorphous MgNi-based hydrogen storage alloys synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) were evaluated. The results show that these amorphous Mg 50Ni 50 alloys exhibit a higher discharge capacity and relatively good rate capacity at a suitable grinding time while their cycle life is very poor. In order to improve the cycle life, the surface of the amorphous Mg 50Ni 50 alloy was coated with Ti, Al and Zr in Spex 8000 mill/mixer and the coating effects were further investigated. Based on experimental results, two kinds of MgNi-based amorphous alloys are designed by substituting part of Mg in MgNi-based alloys by suitable elements. These alloys are then composed of four components. Thus, the cycle life of electrodes consisting of these quaternary amorphous alloys is greatly improved.

  6. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  7. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  9. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  10. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  11. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  12. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  14. The effect of Mg location on Co-Mg-Ru/γ-Al2O3 Fischer–Tropsch catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Gary B.; Ozkaya, Don; Enache, Dan I.; Ellis, Peter R.; Kelly, Gordon; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of Mg as a promoter of Co-Ru/γ-Al2O3 Fischer–Tropsch catalysts depends on how and when the Mg is added. When the Mg is impregnated into the support before the Co and Ru addition, some Mg is incorporated into the support in the form of MgxAl2O3+x if the material is calcined at 550°C or 800°C after the impregnation, while the remainder is present as amorphous MgO/MgCO3 phases. After subsequent Co-Ru impregnation MgxCo3−xO4 is formed which decomposes on reduction, leading to Co(0) particles intimately mixed with Mg, as shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The process of impregnating Co into an Mg-modified support results in dissolution of the amorphous Mg, and it is this Mg which is then incorporated into MgxCo3−xO4. Acid washing or higher temperature calcination after Mg impregnation can remove most of this amorphous Mg, resulting in lower values of x in MgxCo3−xO4. Catalytic testing of these materials reveals that Mg incorporation into the Co oxide phase is severely detrimental to the site-time yield, while Mg incorporation into the support may provide some enhancement of activity at high temperature. PMID:26755760

  15. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Amorphous and Ultradisperse Crystalline Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book sums up experimental and theoretical findings on amorphous and ultradisperse crystalline materials , massive and film types. Present-day... crystalline materials of metallic systems are presented. Emphasis is placed on inorganic film materials.

  17. Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter '2 Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys' with the content:

  18. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphization in forsterite by cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Durham, Philip; Du, Jincheng; Corrales, Louis R.; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2007-02-16

    We have examined cosmic ray interactions with silicate dust grains by simulating a thermal spike in a 1.25 million atom forsterite (Mg2SiO4) crystal with periodic boundaries. Spikes were generated by giving a kinetic energy of 1 or 2 eV to every atom within a cylinder of radius 1.73 nm along the [001] direction. An amorphous track of radius ~3 nm was produced for the 2 eV/atom case, but practically no amorphization was produced for 1 eV/atom because of effective dynamic annealing. Chemical segregation was not observed in the track. These results agree with recent experimental studies of ion irradiation effects in silicates, and indicate that cosmic rays can cause the amorphization of interstellar dust.

  20. Influence of irradiation spectrum and implanted ions on the amorphization of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    Polycrystalline Al2O3, magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4), MgO, Si3N4, and SiC were irradiated with various ions at 200-450 K, and microstructures were examined following irradiation using cross-section TEM. Amorphization was not observed in any of the irradiated oxide ceramics, despsite damage energy densities up to {similar_to}7 keV/atom (70 displacements per atom). On the other hand, SiC readily amorphized after damage levels of {similar_to}0.4 dpa at room temperature (RT). Si3N4 exhibited intermediate behavior; irradiation with Fe{sup 2+} ions at RT produced amorphization in the implanted ion region after damage levels of {similar_to}1 dpa. However, irradiated regions outside the implanted ion region did not amorphize even after damage levels > 5 dpa. The amorphous layer in the Fe-implanted region of Si3N4 did not appear if the specimen was simultaneoulsy irradiated with 1-MeV He{sup +} ions at RT. By comparison with published results, it is concluded that the implantation of certain chemical species has a pronounced effect on the amorphization threshold dose of all five materials. Intense ionizing radiation inhibits amorphization in Si3N4, but does not appear to significantly influence the amorphization of SiC.

  1. Non-Sink Dissolution Behavior and Solubility Limit of Commercial Tacrolimus Amorphous Formulations.

    PubMed

    Trasi, Niraj S; Purohit, Hitesh S; Wen, Hong; Sun, Dajun D; Taylor, Lynne S

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of drugs with low aqueous solubility are being formulated and marketed as amorphous solid dispersions because the amorphous form can generate a higher solubility compared to the crystalline solid. The amorphous solubility of a drug can be determined experimentally using various techniques. Most studies in this area investigate the drug in its pure form and do not evaluate any effects from other formulation ingredients. In this study, we use 6 marketed amorphous oral drug products, capsules containing 5 mg of tacrolimus, and various excipients, consisting of 1 innovator product and 5 generics. The amorphous solubility of tacrolimus was evaluated using different techniques and was compared to the crystalline solubility of the drug. Dissolution of the different products was conducted under non-sink conditions to compare the maximum achieved concentration with the amorphous solubility. Diffusion studies were performed to elucidate the maximum flux across a membrane and to evaluate whether there was any difference in the thermodynamic activity of the drug released from the formulation and the pure drug. The amorphous solubility of tacrolimus was found to be a factor of 35 higher than the crystalline solubility. The maximum concentration obtained after dissolution of the capsule contents in non-sink conditions was found to match the experimentally determined amorphous solubility of the pure drug. Furthermore, the membrane flux of tacrolimus following dissolution of the various formulations was found to be similar and maximized. This study demonstrates a link between key physicochemical properties (amorphous solubility) and in vitro formulation performance.

  2. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  3. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  4. Dental materials. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Cohen, Michael J; MacRenaris, Keith W; Pasteris, Jill D; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-13

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg(2+), F(-), and CO3(2-). However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg(2+) is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  5. Allotropic composition of amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrebov, S. G. Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    Using the concept of an inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines of the basic oscillators responsible for forming the spectrum, the experimental dependences of the dispersion of the imaginary part of permittivity are analyzed for amorphous carbon. It turned out that four types of oscillators contribute to this dependence. The first three types represent the electron transitions from the energy-spectrum ground state for {pi} and {sigma} electrons of amorphous carbon to an excited state. The fourth type is related to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by free charge carriers. The absolute values of squared plasma frequencies of oscillators are estimated, and, using them, the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms forming the amorphous-carbon skeleton is calculated. This estimate agrees closely with the theoretical predictions for amorphous carbon of the same density as the material under study. The dependence of the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms contained in amorphous hydrogenised carbon on annealing temperature is determined. The developed method is also applied to the analysis of the normalized curve for the light extinction in the interstellar medium. The contribution to the extinction of two varieties of interstellar matter is detected.

  6. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  7. Universal features of amorphous plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon.

  8. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  9. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  10. Universal features of amorphous plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon. PMID:28671191

  11. Universal features of amorphous plasticity.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Castellanos, David Fernandez; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-07-03

    Plastic yielding of amorphous solids occurs by power-law distributed deformation avalanches whose universality is still debated. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are hampered by limited statistical samples, and although existing stochastic models give precise exponents, they require strong assumptions about fixed deformation directions, at odds with the statistical isotropy of amorphous materials. Here, we introduce a fully tensorial, stochastic mesoscale model for amorphous plasticity that links the statistical physics of plastic yielding to engineering mechanics. It captures the complex shear patterning observed for a wide variety of deformation modes, as well as the avalanche dynamics of plastic flow. Avalanches are described by universal size exponents and scaling functions, avalanche shapes, and local stability distributions, independent of system dimensionality, boundary and loading conditions, and stress state. Our predictions consistently differ from those of mean-field depinning models, providing evidence that plastic yielding is a distinct type of critical phenomenon.

  12. Combustion synthesis of amorphous boron in a very-short-term magnesiothermic reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semnan, Masih; Jalaly, Maisam

    2016-11-01

    Nanosized amorphous boron powder was produced using mechanochemistry via a magnesiothermic reduction in a Mg/B2O3 system. High-energy ball milling was used to induce a mechanically induced self-sustaining reaction. Under severe milling conditions it was found that the ignition time for boron formation was only about 27 min of milling. In this study, the formation of boron and its amorphous nature is demonstrated by various characterizations.

  13. Ultrastable Amorphous Sb2Se3 Film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Yang; Huang, Quan; Wang, Bihan; Zheng, Xuerong; Ren, Yang; Yang, Wenge

    2017-08-31

    Increasing the thermostability of amorphous materials has been a long journey to improve their properties. The metastable nature of chalcogenide glasses limits their practical applications as an amorphous semiconductor in photovoltaic performance. Here, we report the formation and physical properties of ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 with an enhanced thermal stability compared to ordinary amorphous Sb2Se3 (ΔTx= 17 K). By in situ high temperature-high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, the difference in structure relaxation between ordinary and ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 was manifested by local structure evolution. Ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 showed the smallest surface roughness and highest refractive index, the mechanism behind was further discussed in terms of fast molecular mobility and molecular orientation during vapor deposition. Formation of ultrastable amorphous Sb2Se3 demonstrated a promising avenue to obtain novel functional amorphous semiconductor with modulated structure and property.

  14. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  15. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  16. Spontaneously intermixed Al-Mg barriers enable corrosion-resistant Mg/SiC multilayer coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Baker, Sherry L.; ...

    2012-07-24

    Magnesium/silicon carbide (Mg/SiC) has the potential to be the best-performing reflective multilayercoating in the 25–80 nm wavelength region but suffers from Mg-related corrosion, an insidious problem which completely degrades reflectance. We have elucidated the origins and mechanisms of corrosion propagation within Mg/SiC multilayers. Based on our findings, we have demonstrated an efficient and simple-to-implement corrosion barrier for Mg/SiC multilayers. In conclusion, the barrier consists of nanometer-scale Mg and Al layers that intermix spontaneously to form a partially amorphous Al-Mg layer and is shown to prevent atmospheric corrosion while maintaining the unique combination of favorable Mg/SiC reflective properties.

  17. Formation and Corrosion Resistance of Mg-Al Hydrotalcite Film on Mg-Gd-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Z. X.; Dong, Q. S.; Kong, S. X.; Zhang, X. B.; Xue, Y. J.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    An environment-friendly technique for depositing a Mg-Al hydrotalcite (HT) (Mg6Al2(OH)16-CO3ṡ4H2O) conversion film was developed to protect the Mg-Gd-Zn alloy from corrosion. The morphology and chemical compositions of the film were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. The electrochemical test and hydrogen evolution test were employed to evaluate the biocorrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Zn alloy coated with the Mg-Al HT film in the simulated body fluid (SBF). It was found that the formation of Mg-Al HT film was a transition from amorphous precursor to a crystalline HT structure. The HT film can effectively improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. It indicates that the process provides a promising approach to modify Mg-Gd-Zn alloy.

  18. Amorphous rare earth magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.; Lewis, L.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-08-01

    Gas atomization (GA) processing does not generally have a high enough cooling rate to produce the initial amorphous microstructure needed to obtain optimal magnetic properties in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B alloys. Phase separation and an underquenched microstructure result from detrimental {alpha}-Fe precipitation, and the resulting magnetic domain structure is very coarse. Additionally, there is a dramatic dependence of the magnetic properties on the cooling rate (and therefore the particle size) and the powders can be sensitive to environmental degradation. Alloy compositions designed just for GA (as opposed to melt spinning) are necessary to produce an amorphous structure that can be crystallized to result in a fine structure with magnetic properties which are independent of particle size. The addition of titanium and carbon to the melt has been found to change the solidification process sufficiently to result in an ``overquenched`` state in which most of the powder size fractions have an amorphous component. Crystallization with a brief heat treatment produces a structure which has improved magnetic properties, in part due to the ability to use compositions with higher Fe contents without {alpha}-Fe precipitation. Results from magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray analyses will be used to contrast the microstructure, domain structure, and magnetic properties of this new generation of amorphous powders with their multiphase predecessors.

  19. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  20. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  1. Optical absorption in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, S.K.; Zukotynski, S.; Perz, J.M.; Sidhu, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    The role that disorder plays in shaping the form of the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon is investigated. Disorder leads to a redistribution of states, which both reduces the Tauc gap and broadens the absorption tail. The observed relationship between the Tauc gap and the breadth of the absorption tail is thus explained.

  2. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  3. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  4. Electron microscopy observations of MgB 2 wire prepared by an internal Mg diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Y.; Kubota, Y.; Hata, S.; Ikeda, K.; Nakashima, H.; Matsumoto, A.; Togano, K.; Kumakura, H.

    2011-11-01

    Microstructure in a high-density MgB2 wire fabricated by an internal Mg diffusion (IMD) process has been investigated by electron microscopy imaging and analysis at different scales. In the IMD process, a pure Mg rod was used as Mg source, and nanosized SiC powders were mixed with amorphous B powders. In the case of a heat treatment at 640 °C for 1 h carried out after rolling and drawing processes, the wire has two microstructural features that degrade critical current density: uncrystallized zones composed mainly of unreacted B and SiC powders, and cracks partly filled with course Mg2Si crystals. Those cracks were formed in the uncrystallized zones as well as in crystallized MgB2 zones. It indicate that the cracks formed by the mechanical milling and drawing remain after the heat treatment.

  5. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  6. Topological Insulators in Amorphous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2017-06-01

    Much of the current understanding of topological insulators, which informs the experimental search for topological materials and systems, is based on crystalline band theory, where local electronic degrees of freedom at different crystal sites hybridize with each other in ways that produce nontrivial topology. Here we provide a novel theoretical demonstration of realizing topological phases in amorphous systems, as exemplified by a set of sites randomly located in space. We show this by constructing hopping models on such random lattices whose gapped ground states are shown to possess nontrivial topological nature (characterized by Bott indices) that manifests as quantized conductances in systems with a boundary. Our study adds a new dimension, beyond crystalline solids, to the search for topological systems by pointing to the promising possibilities in amorphous solids and other engineered random systems.

  7. Topological Insulators in Amorphous Systems.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Adhip; Shenoy, Vijay B

    2017-06-09

    Much of the current understanding of topological insulators, which informs the experimental search for topological materials and systems, is based on crystalline band theory, where local electronic degrees of freedom at different crystal sites hybridize with each other in ways that produce nontrivial topology. Here we provide a novel theoretical demonstration of realizing topological phases in amorphous systems, as exemplified by a set of sites randomly located in space. We show this by constructing hopping models on such random lattices whose gapped ground states are shown to possess nontrivial topological nature (characterized by Bott indices) that manifests as quantized conductances in systems with a boundary. Our study adds a new dimension, beyond crystalline solids, to the search for topological systems by pointing to the promising possibilities in amorphous solids and other engineered random systems.

  8. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed Central

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-01-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed. PMID:1056015

  9. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-06-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed.

  10. Bivalves build their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Soldati, A. L.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most common shell structures in the bivalve class is the prism and nacre structure. It is widely distributed amongst both freshwater and marine species and gives cultured pearls their sought-after lustre. In freshwater bivalves, both shell structures (prism and nacre) consist of aragonite. Formation of the shell form an amorphous precursor phase is a wide-spread strategy in biomineralization and presents a number of advantages for the organisms in the handling of the CaCO3 material. While there is already evidence that larval shells of some mollusk species use amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a transient precursor phase for aragonite, the use of this strategy by adult animals was only speculated upon. We present results from in-situ geochemistry, Raman spectroscopy and focused-ion beam assisted TEM on three species from two different bivalve families that show that remnants of ACC can be found in shells from adult species. We show that the amorphous phase is not randomly distributed, but is systematically found in a narrow zone at the interface between periostracum and prism layer. This zone is the area where spherulitic CaCO3- structures protrude from the inner periostracum to form the initial prisms. These observations are in accordance with our earlier results on equivalent structures in freshwater cultured pearls (Jacob et al., 2008) and show that the original building material for the prisms is amorphous calcium carbonate, secreted in vesicles at the inner periostracum layer. Quantitative temperature calibrations for paleoclimate applications using bivalve shells are based on the Mg-Ca exchange between inorganic aragonite (or calcite) and water. These calibrations, thus, do not take into account the biomineral crystallization path via an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor and are therefore likely to introduce a bias (a so-called vital effect) which currently is not accounted for. Jacob et al. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 5401-5415

  11. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  12. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy) materials: (i) metallic; (ii) thin films; (iii) organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv) amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids. PMID:28824158

  13. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  14. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  15. Amorphous-Amorphous Phase Separation in API/Polymer Formulations.

    PubMed

    Luebbert, Christian; Huxoll, Fabian; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2017-02-15

    The long-term stability of pharmaceutical formulations of poorly-soluble drugs in polymers determines their bioavailability and therapeutic applicability. However, these formulations do not only often tend to crystallize during storage, but also tend to undergo unwanted amorphous-amorphous phase separations (APS). Whereas the crystallization behavior of APIs in polymers has been measured and modeled during the last years, the APS phenomenon is still poorly understood. In this study, the crystallization behavior, APS, and glass-transition temperatures formulations of ibuprofen and felodipine in polymeric PLGA excipients exhibiting different ratios of lactic acid and glycolic acid monomers in the PLGA chain were investigated by means of hot-stage microscopy and DSC. APS and recrystallization was observed in ibuprofen/PLGA formulations, while only recrystallization occurred in felodipine/PLGA formulations. Based on a successful modeling of the crystallization behavior using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), the occurrence of APS was predicted in agreement with experimental findings.

  16. Co-Amorphous Combination of Nateglinide-Metformin Hydrochloride for Dissolution Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wairkar, Sarika; Gaud, Ram

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare a co-amorphous mixture (COAM) of Nateglinide and Metformin hydrochloride to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly soluble Nateglinide. Nateglinide (120 mg) and Metformin hydrochloride (500 mg) COAM, as a dose ratio, were prepared by ball-milling technique. COAMs were characterized for saturation solubility, amorphism and physicochemical interactions (X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)), SEM, in vitro dissolution, and stability studies. Solubility studies revealed a sevenfold rise in solubility of Nateglinide from 0.061 to 0.423 mg/ml in dose ratio of COAM. Solid-state characterization of COAM suggested amorphization of Nateglinide after 6 h of ball milling. XRPD and DSC studies confirmed amorphism in Nateglinide, whereas FTIR elucidated hydrogen interactions (proton exchange between Nateglinide and Metformin hydrochloride). Interestingly, due to low energy of fusion, Nateglinide was completely amorphized and stabilized by Metformin hydrochloride. Consequently, in vitro drug release showed significant increase in dissolution of Nateglinide in COAM, irrespective of dissolution medium. However, little change was observed in the solubility and dissolution profile of Metformin hydrochloride, revealing small change in its crystallinity. Stability data indicated no traces of devitrification in XRPD of stability sample of COAM, and % drug release remained unaffected at accelerated storage conditions. Amorphism of Nateglinide, proton exchange with Metformin hydrochloride, and stabilization of its amorphous form have been noted in ball-milled COAM of Nateglinide-Metformin hydrochloride, revealing enhanced dissolution of Nateglinide. Thus, COAM of Nateglinide-Metformin hydrochloride system is a promising approach for combination therapy in diabetic patients.

  17. The physics and applications of amorphous semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Madan, A.; Shaw, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    This is a treatise on the physics and applications of the new emerging technology of amorphous semiconductors. The authors focus upon research problems such as the optimization of device performance while also presenting the general physics of amorphous semiconductors. The first part of the book covers hydrogenated amorphous silicon type alloys, whose applications include inexpensive solar cells, thin film transistors, image scanners, electrophotography, optical recording, and gas sensors. The second part of the book discusses amorphous chalcogenides, whose applications include electrophotography, switching, and memory elements.

  18. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 {mu}m) and thick (>30{mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  20. Structural study of amorphous polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laridjani, M.; Pouget, J. P.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Epstein, A. J.

    1992-06-01

    Many materials, especially polymers, have a substantial volume fraction with no long range crystalline order. Through these regions are often termed amorphous, they frequently have a specific local order. We describe and use here a method, base on a non-energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, to obtain good quality interference functions and, by Fourier transform, radial distribution functions of the amorphous structure of polymers. We apply this approach to members of a family of electronic polymers of current interest : polyaniline emeraldine bases. We show that the local order exhibits significant differences in type I and type II materials, precipitated as salt and base respectively. These studies demonstrate the importance of sample preparation in evaluating the physical properties of polyaniline, and provide a structural origin for memory effects observed in the doping-dedoping processes. Beaucoup de matériaux, spécialement les polymères, ont une importante fraction de leur volume sans ordre cristallin à longue portée. Bien que ces régions soient souvent appelées amorphes, elles présentent fréquemment un ordre local caractéristique. Nous décrivons et utilisons dans ce papier une méthode, basée sur une technique de diffraction de rayons X non dispersive en énergie, pour obtenir des fonctions d'interférence de bonne qualité et, par transformée de Fourier, la fonction de distribution radiale des polymères amorphes. Nous appliquons cette technique à plusieurs éléments d'une même famille de polymères électroniques d'intérêt actuel : les polyanilines éméraldine bases. Nous montrons que l'ordre local présente d'appréciables différences dans les matériaux de type I et II, préparés respectivement sous forme de sel et de base. Cette étude démontre l'importance des conditions de préparation sur les propriétés physiques du polyaniline et donne une base structurale aux effets observés dans les processus de dopage-dédopage de

  1. Structure of Ca-Mg-Zn Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    can be described as a mixture of Mg- and Zn- centered clusters, with Ca dominating in the first coordination shell of these clusters. The coordination...simulation. The amorphous structure can be described as a mixture of Mg- and Zn- centered clusters, with Ca dominating in the first coordination...in mm). The presence of the ternary eutectic reaction provides a strong liquidus temperature gradient in the selected composition area, which leads

  2. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  3. Sol gel-fluorination synthesis of amorphous magnesium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Groß, Udo; Rüdiger, Stephan; Kemnitz, Erhard; Winfield, John M.

    2006-03-01

    The sol-gel fluorination process is discussed for the reaction of magnesium alkoxides with HF in non-aqueous solvents to give X-ray amorphous nano-sized magnesium fluoride with high surface areas in the range of 150-350 m 2/g (HS-MgF 2). The H2 type hysteresis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption BET-isotherms is indicative for mesoporous solids. A highly distorted structure causes quite high Lewis acidity, shown by NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3-TPD) and catalytic test reactions. XPS data of amorphous and conventionally crystalline MgF 2 are compared, both show octahedral coordination at the metal site. Thermal analysis, F-MAS NMR- and IR-spectroscopy give information on composition and structure of the precursor intermediate as well as of the final metal fluoride. The preparation of complex fluorides, M +MgF 3-, by the sol-gel route is reported. From the magnesium fluoride gel of the above process thin films for optical application are obtained by, e.g., spin coating.

  4. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  5. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  7. Amorphization of solids irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, V.; Dubinin, S.; Teploukhov, S.; Goshchitskii, B.

    2000-03-01

    The diffraction patterns of amorphous solids produced by both a conventional technique and fast neutron irradiation were systematized. It is shown for the first time that neutron radiation-modified solids belong to the group of amorphous substances of a distortion type.

  8. Evolution of the structure of amorphous ice: from low-density amorphous through high-density amorphous to very high-density amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Martonák, R; Donadio, D; Parrinello, M

    2005-04-01

    We report results of molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous ice for pressures up to 22.5 kbar. The high-density amorphous ice (HDA) as prepared by pressure-induced amorphization of I(h) ice at T=80 K is annealed to T=170 K at various pressures to allow for relaxation. Upon increase of pressure, relaxed amorphous ice undergoes a pronounced change of structure, ranging from the low-density amorphous ice at p=0, through a continuum of HDA states to the limiting very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA) regime above 10 kbar. The main part of the overall structural change takes place within the HDA megabasin, which includes a variety of structures with quite different local and medium-range order as well as network topology and spans a broad range of densities. The VHDA represents the limit to densification by adapting the hydrogen-bonded network topology, without creating interpenetrating networks. The connection between structure and metastability of various forms upon decompression and heating is studied and discussed. We also discuss the analogy with amorphous and crystalline silica. Finally, some conclusions concerning the relation between amorphous ice and supercooled water are drawn.

  9. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  10. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  11. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  12. Co amorphous systems: A product development perspective.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahul B; Thipparaboina, Rajesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-12-30

    Solubility is one of the major problems associated with most of the new chemical entities that can be reasonably addressed by drug amorphization. However, being a high-energy form, it usually tends to re-crystallize, necessitating new formulation strategies to stabilize amorphous drugs. Polymeric amorphous solid dispersion (PASD) is one of the widely investigated strategies to stabilize amorphous drug, with major limitations like limited polymer solubility and hygroscopicity. Co amorphous system (CAM), a new entrant in amorphous arena is a promising alternative to PASD. CAMs are multi component single phase amorphous solid systems made up of two or more small molecules that may be a combination of drugs or drug and excipients. Excipients explored for CAM preparation include amino acids, carboxylic acids, nicotinamide and saccharine. Advantages offered by CAM include improved aqueous solubility and physical stability of amorphous drug, with a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy. This review attempts to address different aspects in the development of CAM as drug products. Criterion for co-former selection, various methods involved in CAM preparation, characterization tools, stability, scale up and regulatory requirements for the CAM product development are discussed.

  13. Steps toward interstellar silicate mineralogy. V. Thermal Evolution of Amorphous Magnesium Silicates and Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, D.; Jäger, C.; Henning, Th.; Dorschner, J.; Mutschke, H.

    2000-12-01

    The thermally induced amorphous-to-crystalline transition has been studied for bulk sheets and micrometre-sized particles of magnesium silicate glass (MgSiO3), nanometre-sized amorphous magnesium silicate (MgSiO3 and Mg2SiO4 smokes) and amorphous silica particles (SiO2). Silicate glass was produced by the shock-quenching of melts. Samples of nanometre-sized smoke particles have been obtained by the laser ablation technique. Both the MgSiO3 and the Mg2SiO4 smokes have been found to consist of two particle species; particles of smaller size ranging in diametre from 10 nm to about 100 nm and bigger size ranging from a few 100 nm to almost 3 micrometres in diametre. Nanometre-sized particles have been shown to be depleted in magnesium whereas the micrometre-sized particles were found to be enriched in Mg. Generally, the particles are composed of nonstoichiometric magnesium silicates with compositions varying even inside of the particles. Frequently, the particles contained internal voids that are assumed to have been formed by thermal shrinkage or outgassing of the particles' interior during cooling. Annealing at 1000 K transformed the magnesium silicate smokes into crystalline forsterite (c-Mg2SiO4), tridymite (a crystalline modification of SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) according to the initial Mg/Si-ratio of the smoke. Crystallization took place within a few hours for the Mg2SiO4 smoke and within one day for the MgSiO3 smoke. The MgSiO3 glass evolved more slowly because crystallization started at the sample surface. It has been annealed at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1165 K. In contrast to the smoke samples, MgSiO3 glass crystallized as orthoenstatite (MgSiO3). Only after 50 hours of annealing at 1000 K, weak indications of forsterite and tridymite formation have been found in the X-ray diffraction spectra. At a temperature of 1000 K, amorphous silica nanoparticles showed distinctly lower rates of thermal evolution compared with the magnesium silicates

  14. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  15. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  16. Amorphization of sugar hydrates upon milling.

    PubMed

    Willart, J F; Dujardin, N; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2010-07-19

    The possibility to amorphize anhydrous crystalline sugars, like lactose, trehalose and glucose, by mechanical milling was previously reported. We test here the possibility to amorphize the corresponding crystalline hydrates: lactose monohydrate, trehalose dihydrate and glucose monohydrate using fully identical milling procedures. The results show that only the first hydrate amorphizes while the other two remain structurally invariant. These different behaviours are attributed to the plasticizing effect of the structural water molecules which can decrease the glass transition temperature below the milling temperature. The results reveal clearly the fundamental role of the glass transition in the solid-state amorphization process induced by milling, and they also explain why crystalline hydrates are systematically more difficult to amorphize by milling than their anhydrous counterpart. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction.

  17. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  18. Role of diffusion in amorphous-phase formation and crystallization of amorphous Ni--Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; de Reus, R.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Saris, F.W.

    1987-03-01

    The Ni--Zr system is examined as a representative system for the formation of an amorphous phase by diffusion and for the crystallization of an amorphous phase by diffusion. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) is used to show that the amorphous phase grows by bulk diffusion through the amorphous material rather than by short-circuit diffusion. Also, the HREM shows that the amorphous phase formed by diffusion appears to be the same as the vapor-deposited amorphous phase. A correlation between crystallization temperatures (T/sub x/) and the enthalpy of large-atom hole formation is given. This correlation predicts values of T/sub x/ that are lower than those predicted from the small-atom hole-formation model. The difference in hole-formation enthalpies for the large and small atoms is given as a criterion for amorphous-phase formation via diffusion.

  19. Supersolubilization and amorphization of a model basic drug, haloperidol, by interaction with weak acids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saumya; Parikh, Tapan; Sandhu, Harpreet K; Shah, Navnit H; Malick, A Waseem; Singhal, Dharmendra; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2013-06-01

    To present a novel approach of greatly enhancing aqueous solubility of a model weakly basic drug, haloperidol, by using weak acids that would not form salts with the drug and to attain physically stable form of amorphous drug by drying such aqueous solutions. Aqueous solubility of haloperidol in presence of increasing concentrations of four different weak organic acids (malic, tartaric, citric, fumaric) were determined. Several concentrated aqueous solutions with differing drug-to-acid molar ratios were dried in vacuum oven, and dried materials were characterized by DSC, powder XRD, dissolution testing, and stability study. Acids were selected such that they would not form salts with haloperidol. Haloperidol solubility increased greatly with increased concentrations of malic, tartaric and citric acids, reaching >300 mg/g of solution. In contrast to the haloperidol HCl aqueous solubility of 4 mg/g, this may be called supersolubilization. Fumaric acid did not cause such solubilization as it had low water solubility. Dried solids formed dispersions of amorphous haloperidol in acids that were either amorphous or partially crystalline. Amorphous haloperidol was physically stable and had better dissolution rate than HCl salt. A novel method of drug solubilization in aqueous media by acid-base interaction is presented. Physically stable amorphous systems of drugs may also be prepared by using this organic solvent-free approach.

  20. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  1. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  2. Biologically formed amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Steve; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Raz, Sefi; Addadi, Lia

    2003-01-01

    Many organisms from a wide variety of taxa produce amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), despite the fact that it is inherently unstable and relatively soluble in its pure state. These properties also make it difficult to detect and characterize ACC. Raman spectroscopy is a particularly useful method for investigating ACC because the sample can be examined wet, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis can provide detailed information on the short-range order. Other methods for characterizing ACC include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron and X-ray diffraction. Because of the difficulties involved, we suspect that ACC is far more widely distributed than is presently known, and a comparison of EXAFS spectra shows that different biogenic ACC phases have different short-range order structures. We also suspect that ACC fulfils many different functions, including as a transient precursor phase during the formation of crystalline calcium carbonate.

  3. Influence of excipients in comilling on mitigating milling-induced amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline pharmaceutical actives.

    PubMed

    Balani, Prashant N; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B H; Chan, Sui Yung

    2010-05-01

    The feasibility of using excipients to suppress the amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline salbutamol sulphate (SS) during milling was investigated. SS was subjected to ball-milling in the presence of alpha-lactose monohydrate (LAC), adipic acid (AA), magnesium stearate (MgSt), or polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC) were used to analyze the crystallinity of the milled mixtures. Comilling with crystalline excipients, LAC, AA, and MgSt proved effective in reducing the amorphization of SS. LAC, AA, or MgSt acting as seed crystals to induce recrystallization of amorphous SS formed by milling. During comilling, both SS and LAC turned predominantly amorphous after 45 min but transformed back to a highly crystalline state after 60 min. Amorphous content was below the detection limits of DVS (0.5%) and HSDSC (5%). Comilled and physical mixtures of SS and ALM were stored under normal and elevated humidity conditions. This was found to prevent subsequent changes in crystallinity and morphology of comilled SS:LAC as compared to significant changes in milled SS and physical mixture. These results demonstrate a promising application of comilling with crystalline excipients in mitigating milling induced amorphization of pharmaceutical actives.

  4. Energetic and structural studies of amorphous Ca1-xMgxCO3·nH2O (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, A. V.; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Hu, Yandi; Jun, Young-Shin; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    Early stage amorphous precursors provide a low energy pathway for carbonate mineralization. Many natural deposits of carbonate minerals and biogenic calcium carbonate (both amorphous and crystalline) include significant amounts of Mg. To understand the role of magnesium-containing amorphous precursors in carbonate mineralization, we investigated the energetics and structure of synthetic amorphous Ca-Mg carbonates with composition Ca1-xMgxCO3·nH2O (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC with x = 1) is energetically more metastable than amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC with x = 0), but it is more persistent (crystallizing in months rather than days under ambient conditions), probably due to the slow kinetics of Mg2+ dehydration. The Ca1-xMgxCO3·nH2O (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) system forms a continuous X-ray amorphous series upon precipitation and all intermediate compositions are energetically more stable than a mixture of ACC and AMC, but metastable with respect to crystalline carbonates. The amorphous system can be divided into two distinct regions. For x = 0.00-0.47, thermal analysis is consistent with a homogeneous amorphous phase. The less metastable compositions of this series, with x = 0.0-0.2, are frequently found in biogenic carbonates. If not coincidental, this may suggest that organisms take advantage of this single phase low energy amorphous precursor pathway to crystalline biogenic carbonates. For x ⩾ 0.47, energetic metastability increases and thermal analysis hints at nanoscale heterogeneity, perhaps of a material near x = 0.5 coexisting with another phase near pure AMC (x = 1). The most hydrated amorphous phases, which occur near x = 0.5, are the least metastable, and may be precursors for dolomite formation.

  5. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ming,, Douglas W.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, Iain; hide

    2013-01-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was calculated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiometry (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (approx 71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical composition are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be approx 0 wt.% in the amorphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because

  6. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  7. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  8. Origin of Magnetic Properties in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni-B Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann , IEEE Trans. on Magnetics MAG-15, 909 (1979). Also GE...Report 78CRD132. 2. "Formation and Magnetic Properties of Fe-B-Si Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. J. Becker, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann ...Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky and H. H. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys., to appear. Also GE Report 79CRD177. 4. "The Effect of Temperature on Magnetic

  9. Characterization of mechanical heterogeneity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Li, M. Z.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-07-01

    The structural geometry and size distribution of the local atomic rearrangements induced by external stress in amorphous solids are investigated by molecular dynamics studies. We find that the size distribution exhibits a generic power-law behavior and their structural geometry shows fractal feature. This indicates that the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids are self-organized during deformation. A simple theoretical model based on the interaction of the heterogeneous elastic field sources is proposed which predicts the power-law scaling and characterizes the properties of the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids.

  10. Laser irradiation to produce amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Titapiwatanakun, Varin; Tankul, Junlathip; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-11-30

    Using a high-power CO2 laser to irradiate powder beds, it was possible to induce phase transformation to the amorphous state. Irradiation of a model drug, indometacin, resulted in formation of a glass. Varying the settings of the laser (power and raster speed) was shown to change the physicochemical properties of the glasses produced and all irradiated glasses were found to be more stable than a reference glass produced by melt-quenching. Irradiation of a powder blend of paracetamol and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 was found to produce a solid amorphous dispersion. The results suggest that laser-irradiation might be a useful method for making amorphous pharmaceuticals.

  11. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  12. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  13. Amorphous to Amorphous Form Transitions of Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have combined Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and cryogenic techniques in an instrumental configuration that allows observing the structure of vapor deposited ice as it evolves during warmup. The ice is deposited in-situ inside an Hitachi H-500 H transmission electron microscope at a base pressure of 1-5 x 10(exp -7) torr on a thin amorphous carbon substrate at 15K or 86K and warmed up at a rate of 1-2 K/min. We find a progression of amorphous forms and well defined amorphous to amorphous transitions. Apart from the well known low-density form of ice, we confirm the presence of a high-density form and find a third amorphous form that coexists with cubic ice. We will report too on the amorphous to crystalline transition and the implications of these results for radical diffusion and gas retention observed in laboratory analog studies of interstellar and cometary ices.

  14. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  15. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  16. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  17. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  18. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  19. Amorphization strategy affects the stability and supersaturation profile of amorphous drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Yang, Yue; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-05-05

    Amorphous drug nanoparticles have recently emerged as a promising bioavailability enhancement strategy of poorly soluble drugs attributed to the high supersaturation solubility generated by the amorphous state and fast dissolution afforded by the nanoparticles. Herein we examine the effects of two amorphization strategies in the nanoscale, i.e., (1) molecular mobility restrictions and (2) high energy surface occupation, both by polymer excipient stabilizers, on the (i) morphology, (ii) colloidal stability, (iii) drug loading, (iv) amorphous state stability after three-month storage, and (v) in vitro supersaturation profiles, using itraconazole (ITZ) as the model drug. Drug-polyelectrolyte complexation is employed in the first strategy to prepare amorphous ITZ nanoparticles using dextran sulfate as the polyelectrolyte (ITZ nanoplex), while the second strategy employs pH-shift precipitation using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose as the surface stabilizer (nano-ITZ), with both strategies resulting in >90% ITZ utilization. Both amorphous ITZ nanoparticles share similar morphology (∼300 nm spheres) with the ITZ nanoplex exhibiting better colloidal stability, albeit at lower ITZ loading (65% versus 94%), due to the larger stabilizer amount used. The ITZ nanoplex also exhibits superior amorphous state stability, attributed to the ITZ molecular mobility restriction by electrostatic complexation with dextran sulfate. The higher stability, however, is obtained at the expense of slower supersaturation generation, which is maintained over a prolonged period, compared to the nano-ITZ. The present results signify the importance of selecting the optimal amorphization strategy, in addition to formulating the excipient stabilizers, to produce amorphous drug nanoparticles having the desired characteristics.

  20. Using containerless methods to develop amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Benmore, C J; Suthar, K J; Tamalonis, A J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Kondev, V; Yarger, J; Rey, C A; Byrn, S R

    2017-01-01

    Many pipeline drugs have low solubility in their crystalline state and require compounding in special dosage forms to increase bioavailability for oral administration. The use of amorphous formulations increases solubility and uptake of active pharmaceutical ingredients. These forms are rapidly gaining commercial importance for both pre-clinical and clinical use. Synthesis of amorphous drugs was performed using an acoustic levitation containerless processing method and spray drying. The structure of the products was investigated using in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction. Selected solvents for processing drugs were investigated using acoustic levitation. The stability of amorphous samples was measured using X-ray diffraction. Samples processed using both spray drying and containerless synthesis were compared. We review methods for making amorphous pharmaceuticals and present data on materials made by containerless processing and spray drying. It was shown that containerless processing using acoustic levitation can be used to make phase-pure forms of drugs that are known to be difficult to amorphize. The stability and structure of the materials was investigated in the context of developing and making clinically useful formulations. Amorphous compounds are emerging as an important component of drug development and for the oral delivery of drugs with low solubility. Containerless techniques can be used to efficiently synthesize small quantities of pure amorphous forms that are potentially useful in pre-clinical trials and for use in the optimization of clinical products. Developing new pharmaceutical products is an essential enterprise to improve patient outcomes. The development and application of amorphous pharmaceuticals to increase absorption is rapidly gaining importance and it provides opportunities for breakthrough research on new drugs. There is an urgent need to solve problems associated with making formulations that are both stable and that provide high

  1. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  2. Picosecond Electronic Relaxations In Amorphous Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauc, Jan

    1983-11-01

    Using the pump and probe technique the relaxation processes of photogenerated carriers in amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses in the time domain from 0.5 Ps to 1.4 ns have been studied. The results obtained on the following phenomena are reviewed: hot carrier thermalization in amorphous silicon; trapping of carriers in undoped a-Si:H; trapping of carriers in deep traps produced by doping; geminate recombination in As2S3-xSex glasses.

  3. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  6. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  7. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  8. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  9. Elemental composition of biomineralized amorphous mineral granules isolated from ants: correlation with ingested mineral particles from the soil.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Fabricia G; Keim, Carolina N; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel; Farina, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous mineral granules are formed by concentric mineral layers containing polyphosphate, pyrophosphate and/or orthophosphate and several metallic cations such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+). In this work, we analyzed amorphous mineral granules isolated from the ant species Camponotus abdominalis, Camponotus sp., Acromyrmex subterraneus and Pachycondyla marginata by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The elemental composition of the granules was compared to that of mineral particles, probably soil particles, to access the influence of the environment and of specific characteristics of each ant species in the elemental composition of the amorphous mineral granules. Both the granules and mineral particles presented Mg, Ca, Fe, and Zn in the four species. Additionally, Al tended to be present in both (or none) of the two types of material in a given ant species, suggesting that the aluminum found in the amorphous mineral granules could be derived from ingested soil particles. On the other hand, Sr was found in the amorphous mineral granules of some of the studied ant species, but not in the mineral particles. The fact that 3/4 of the elements found in the granules were found also in the mineral particles suggests that the mineral composition of the soil plays a fundamental role in the accumulation of some elements in the amorphous mineral granules of ants. These results suggest a major role of soil particles as a source of micronutrients for the four ant species.

  10. Theoretical modeling of charge trapping in crystalline and amorphous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicks, Oliver A.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-08-01

    The characteristics of intrinsic electron and hole trapping in crystalline and amorphous Al2O3 have been studied using density functional theory (DFT). Special attention was paid to enforcing the piece-wise linearity of the total energy with respect to electron number through the use of a range separated, hybrid functional PBE0-TC-LRC (Guidon et al 2009 J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5 3010) in order to accurately model the behaviour of localized states. The tuned functional is shown to reproduce the geometric and electronic structures of the perfect crystal as well as the spectroscopic characteristics of MgAl hole centre in corundum α-Al2O3. An ensemble of ten amorphous Al2O3 structures was generated using classical molecular dynamics and a melt and quench method and their structural characteristics compared with the experimental data. The electronic structure of amorphous systems was characterized using the inverse participation ratio method. Electrons and holes were then introduced into both crystalline and amorphous alumina structures and their properties calculated. Holes are shown to trap spontaneously in both crystalline and amorphous alumina. In the crystalline phase they localize on single O ion with the trapping energy of 0.38 eV. In amorphous phase, holes localize on two nearest neighbour oxygen sites with an average trapping energy of 1.26 eV, with hole trapping sites separated on average by about 8.0 Å. No electron trapping is observed in the material. Our results suggest that trapping of positive charge can be much more severe and stable in amorphous alumina rather than in crystalline samples.

  11. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Gellert, R.; Campbell, I.; Treiman, A. H.; Achilles, C.; Bristow, T.; Crisp, J. A.; McAdam, A.; Archer, P. D.; Sutter, B.; Rampe, E. B.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyrox-ene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was cal-culated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiome-try (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (~71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical compositon are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be~0 wt.% in the amporphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because the position

  12. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of an HIV-attachment inhibitor by nanosizing and amorphous formulation approaches.

    PubMed

    Fakes, Michael G; Vakkalagadda, Blisse J; Qian, Feng; Desikan, Sridhar; Gandhi, Rajesh B; Lai, Chiajen; Hsieh, Alice; Franchini, Miriam K; Toale, Helen; Brown, Jonathan

    2009-03-31

    BMS-488043 is an HIV-attachment inhibitor that exhibited suboptimal oral bioavailability upon using conventional dosage forms prepared utilizing micronized crystalline drug substance. BMS-488043 is classified as a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) Class-II compound with a poor aqueous solubility of 0.04mg/mL and an acceptable permeability of 178nm/s in the Caco2 cell-line model. Two strategies were evaluated to potentially enhance the oral bioavailability of BMS-488043. The first strategy targeted particle size reduction through nanosizing the crystalline drug substance. The second strategy aimed at altering the drug's physical form by producing an amorphous drug. Both strategies provided an enhancement in oral bioavailability in dogs as compared to a conventional formulation containing the micronized crystalline drug substance. BMS-488043 oral bioavailability enhancement was approximately 5- and 9-folds for nanosizing and amorphous formulation approaches, respectively. The stability of the amorphous coprecipitated drug prepared at different compositions of BMS-488043/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was evaluated upon exposure to stressed stability conditions of temperature and humidity. The drastic effect of exposure to humidity on conversion of the amorphous drug to crystalline form was observed. Additionally, the dissolution behavior of coprecipitated drug was evaluated under discriminatory conditions of different pH values to optimize the BMS-488043/PVP composition and produce a stabilized, amorphous BMS-488043/PVP (40/60, w/w) spray-dried intermediate (SDI), which was formulated into an oral dosage form for further development and evaluation.

  13. Inhibition effects of protein-conjugated amorphous zinc sulfide nanoparticles on tumor cells growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ying; Wang, Hua-Jie; Cao, Cui; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Bao-Qing; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2011-07-01

    In this article, a facile and environmentally friendly method was applied to fabricate BSA-conjugated amorphous zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the matrix. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicated that the stable and well-dispersed nanoparticles with the diameter of 15.9 ± 2.1 nm were successfully prepared. The energy dispersive X-ray, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrograph, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction measurements showed that the obtained nanoparticles had the amorphous structure and the coordination occurred between zinc sulfide surfaces and BSA in the nanoparticles. In addition, the inhibition effects of BSA-conjugated amorphous zinc sulfide nanoparticles on tumor cells growth were described in detail by cell viability analysis, optical and electron microscopy methods. The results showed that BSA-conjugated amorphous zinc sulfide nanoparticles could inhibit the metabolism and proliferation of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and the inhibition was dose dependent. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.36 mg/mL. Overall, this study suggested that BSA-conjugated amorphous zinc sulfide nanoparticles had the application potential as cytostatic agents and BSA in the nanoparticles could provide the modifiable site for the nanoparticles to improve their bioactivity or to endow them with the target function.

  14. Synthesis of Amorphous Alloy Nanoparticles by Thermal Plasma Jet in a Quenching Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-09-01

    Recently, amorphous alloy nanoparticles have received a great attention in various applications such as catalysts, compact and highly efficient transformers, electrode material for Li-ion batteries, etc. Several methods such as microwave heating, laser ablation, and sonification have been studied to synthesize amorphous metal nanoparticles. In the present work, a high velocity thermal plasma jet generated by an arc plasma torch was used to produce iron alloy nanoparticles from an amorphous raw material which was a spherical shaped powder with the mean size of 25 μm. In order to synthesize amorphous alloy nanoparticles, a quenching tube where cooling gas was injected in different axial positions. Alloy nanoparticles were produced in a relatively high input power of higher than 10 kW in a fixed powder feeding at 300 mg/min. The crystallinity of synthesized nanoparticles was decreased with increasing the quenching gas flow rate. The amorphous alloy nanoparticles were found when the quenching gas injection position was 200 mm away from the exit of the plasma torch with the highest quenching gas flow rate of 20 L/min. In the numerical analysis, the highest quenching rate was also expected at the same condition.

  15. Amorphous calcium (ortho)phosphates.

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-12-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphates (ACPs) represent a unique class of biomedically relevant calcium orthophosphate salts, having variable chemical but essentially identical glass-like physical properties, in which there is neither translational nor orientational long-range ordering of the atomic positions. Normally, ACPs are the first solid phases, precipitated after a rapid mixing of aqueous solutions containing ions of Ca(2+) and PO₄³⁻; however, other production techniques are known. Interestingly, ACPs prepared by wet-chemical techniques were found to have a relatively constant chemical composition over a relatively wide range of preparation conditions, which suggests the presence of a well-defined local structural unit, presumably with the structure of Ca₉(PO₄)₆ - so-called Posner cluster. However, the presence of similar clusters in ACPs produced by other techniques remains uncertain. All ACPs are thermodynamically unstable compounds and, unless stored in dry conditions or doped by stabilizers, spontaneously tend to transform to crystalline calcium orthophosphates, mainly to calcium apatites. This solution instability of ACPs and their easy transformation to crystalline phases are of a great biological relevance. Specifically, the initiating role ACPs play in matrix vesicle biomineralization raises the importance of ACPs from a mere laboratory curiosity to that of a key intermediate in skeletal calcification. In addition, due to significant chemical and structural similarities with calcified mammalian tissues, as well as excellent biocompatibility and bioresorbability, all types of ACPs are very promising candidates for the manufacture of artificial bone grafts. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the occurrence, preparation, composition, structure, major properties and biomedical applications of ACPs. To assist readers in looking for the specific details on ACPs, a great number of references have been collected and systematized. Copyright

  16. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer-Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo-Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann-Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  17. Atomic Structure of Ca40+xMg25Cu35-x Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Ca50Mg25Cu25 alloys forms three equally probable crystal phases, CaMg2 Cu2Mg and CaCu [5,6]. CaMg2 is a hexagonal Laves phase (space group P63/mmc...the first shell, and a Mg-centered (0,0,12,4) Friauf polyhedron with 12 Cu and 4 Mg atoms in the first shell. The CaCu phase has a primitive crystal...0,3,6,0) Cu-centered coordination polyhedron in the CaCu phase is also common in the studied amorphous structures. This (0,3,6,0) Cu-centered cluster is

  18. Determination of spin polarization of amorphous ferromagnet CoFeB by Point-Contact Andreev Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sunxiang; Chen, Tingyong; Chien, Chia-Ling

    2009-03-01

    Amorphous ferromagnet CoFeB plays a key role in spintronic devices. Larger tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is resulted when amorphous CoFeB is incorporated into either AlOx or MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) than those with CoFe. The critical switching current density in spin transfer torque devices with CoFeB as the free layer is significantly less than that with NiFe. The TMR of MgO-based MTJs are also noticeably different using Co20Fe60B20 and Co40Fe40B20. These phenomena indicate a substantial spin polarization of CoFeB, whose value and compositional dependence should be determined. We have recently determined the spin polarization of amorphous CoxFe80-xB20 (x=20, 40, 60) using the point-contact Andreev reflection technique [1]. The spin polarization of amorphous CoFeB has been found to be as high as 65%. In contrast to the large enhancement of TMR during crystallization of CoFeB in MgO-based MTJs, the spin polarization of crystallized CoFeB is in fact much reduced. Very recent theoretical studies [2] using density functional theory indicate an enhanced spin polarization in amorphous CoFeB, in good agreement with our measurements. [1] S. X. Huang et al., APL, 92, 242509 (2008). [2] P.V. Paluskar et al., PRL, 100, 057205 (2008).

  19. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and in-vitro cytocompatibility of amorphous β-tri-calcium magnesium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish S; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun; Banerjee, Ipsita; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-10-01

    Biphasic mixtures of crystalline β-tricalcium magnesium phosphate (β-TCMP) and an amorphous calcium magnesium phosphate have been synthesized and reported to support enhanced hMSC differentiation in comparison to β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) due to the release of increased amounts of bioactive ions. In the current study, completely amorphous β-TCMP has been synthesized which is capable of releasing increased amounts of Mg(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, rather than a biphasic mixture as earlier reported. The amorphous phase formed was observed to crystallize between temperatures of 400-600°C. The scaffolds prepared with amorphous β-TCMP were capable of supporting enhanced hMSC proliferation and differentiation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. However, a similar gene expression of mature osteoblast markers, OCN and COL-1, in comparison to biphasic β-TCMP was observed. To further study the role of Mg(2+) and PO4(3-) ions in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation, the capability of hMSCs to mineralize in growth media supplemented with Mg(2+) and PO4(3-) ions was studied. Interestingly, 5mM PO4(3-) supported mineralization while the addition of 5mM Mg(2+) to 5mM PO4(3-) inhibited mineralization. It was therefore concluded that the release of Ca(2+) ions from β-TCMP scaffolds also plays a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation on these scaffolds and it is noted that further work is required to more accurately determine the exact role of Mg(2+) in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  2. Novel Internal Friction of Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao

    1998-03-01

    Owing to the great sensitivity of the double-paddle oscillators, we have recently measured the low-temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon films (X. Liu, B. E. White, Jr., R. O. Pohl, E. Iwanizcko, K. M. Jones, A. H. Mahan, B. N. Nelson, R. S. Crandall, S. Veprek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 4418 (1997). While e-beam evaporation, sputtering, or Si^+ ion implantation produce a-Si films with similar tunneling states as in all amorphous solids, hydrogenated a-Si films with 1 at.% H prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition show no sign of any significant low energy excitations. This observation offers an exciting opportunity to study the structural origin of the low energy excitations common to amorphous solids. A possible explanation is that in the hydrogenated films the amorphous structure is closer to the fourfold coordinated continuous random network expected in amorphous Si, and thus the lattice is more constrained, resulting in the absence of tunneling states.

  3. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  4. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  5. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  6. IUE observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hjellming, M. S.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hunter, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Blue amorphous galaxies are star-forming, irregularlike systems which lack the spatially distinct OB stellar groups that are characteristic of most late-type galaxies. In order to better understand the nature of star-formation processes in these unusual galaxies, short-wavelength IUE spectra of the amorphous galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 have been obtained. It is found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star-formation rate inferred from new optical data. NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar populations. The UV spectra of these galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems in fact have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations are often homogeneous in their properties.

  7. Investigation of superconducting interactions and amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janocko, M. A.; Jones, C. K.; Gavaler, J. R.; Deis, D. W.; Ashkin, M.; Mathur, M. P.; Bauerle, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Research papers on superconducting interactions and properties and on amorphous materials are presented. The search for new superconductors with improved properties was largely concentrated on the study of properties of thin films. An experimental investigation of interaction mechanisms revealed no new superconductivity mechanism. The properties of high transition temperature, type 2 materials prepared in thin film form were studied. A pulsed field solenoid capable of providing fields in excess of 300 k0e was developed. Preliminary X-ray measurements were made of V3Si to determine the behavior of cell constant deformation versus pressure up to 98 kilobars. The electrical properties of amorphous semiconducting materials and bulk and thin film devices, and of amorphous magnetic materials were investigated for developing radiation hard, inexpensive switches and memory elements.

  8. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  9. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  10. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  11. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  12. The Phagocytosis and Toxicity of Amorphous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Knecht, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Methodology/Principal Findings Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37°C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both

  13. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis. PMID:25852562

  14. Perpendicular magnetization of CoFeB on top of an amorphous buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongseok; Jung, K. Y.; Joo, Sungjung; Jang, Youngjae; Hong, Jinki; Lee, B. C.; You, C. Y.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Rhie, K.

    2015-01-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was observed in sputtered FeZr/CoFeB/MgO multilayers. A thin paramagnetic amorphous FeZr layer was used as a buffer layer and perpendicular anisotropy was obtained by annealing the samples without an external magnetic field. The critical CoFeB thickness for perpendicular anisotropy was 1.8 nm; the anisotropy changes from out-of-plane to in-plane as the CoFeB thickness increases beyond this point. Perpendicular anisotropy was also enhanced when a Ta layer was capped on top of the MgO layer. The amorphous buffer provided better perpendicular anisotropy than previously reported Ta buffer, and it may be applied to perpendicular magnetization MRAM devices where good uniformity of tunnel junctions is required.

  15. Atomic Bond Deficiency Defects in Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aiwu; Shiflet, Gary J.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2012-10-01

    Atomic bond deficiency (BD) is considered to be characteristic structural defects in amorphous metals. They are the necessary feature of local atomic configurations that facilitate various atomic transports under different driving forces. Compared with vacancies in crystalline solids, they are "small" in terms of their formation energies, volume costs, and elementary steps involved in atomic transport. This article reviews the authors' recent efforts made to analyze how various local configurations containing BD are related to amorphous metal's unique characteristics, such as glass transition, diffusion, shear flow, and structural relaxation.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  17. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  18. Amorphous graphene: a realization of Zachariasen's glass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avishek; Wilson, Mark; Thorpe, M F

    2012-12-05

    Amorphous graphene is a realization of a two-dimensional Zachariasen glass as first proposed 80 years ago. Planar continuous random networks of this archetypal two-dimensional network are generated by two complementary simulation methods. In the first, a Monte Carlo bond switching algorithm is employed to systematically amorphize a crystalline graphene sheet. In the second, molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to quench from the high temperature liquid state. The two approaches lead to similar results as detailed here, through the pair distribution function and the associated diffraction pattern. Details of the structure, including ring statistics and angular distortions, are shown to be sensitive to preparation conditions, and await experimental confirmation.

  19. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Sabochick, M. J.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1994-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu4Ti3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed.

  20. Amorphous Insulator Films With Controllable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments described in report, amorphous hydrogenated carbon films grown at room temperature by low-frequency plasma deposition, using methane or butane gas. Films have unique array of useful properties; (a) adhere to wide variety of materials; (b) contain only carbon and hydrogen; (c) smooth and free of pinholes; (d) resistant to attack by moisture and chemicals; and (e) have high electric-breakdown strength and electrical resistivity. Two of optical properties and hardness of this film controlled by deposition conditions. Amorphous a-C:H and BN films used for hermetic sealing and protection of optical, electronic, magnetic, or delicate mechanical systems, and for semiconductor field dielectrics.

  1. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  2. Magnetic Phases in Amorphous Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Prosenjit

    In magnetic amorphous alloy with competiting exchange interactions, there exists a multicritical point (MCP) in the temperature (T) vs. concentration (x) phase diagram (x(,c), (theta)(,c)). In the present work, the static (equilibrium) magnetic response near the MCP is thoroughly investigated using low, d.c. fields (B(,a) < 10 Oe) in two systems of alloys: (I) Fe(,x)Ni(,75-x)P(,16)B(,6)Al(,3) and (II) Fe(,x)Ni(,80-x)P(,14)B(,6). From the measurements of the reversible magnetization M(x, T, B(,a)), the following notable results are found: (1) The phase diagram exhibits a non-montonic FM-SG transition line (i.e. T(,f)'s) in both the systems. (2) There is a dramatic change in the magnetic response as x goes across x(,c). (3) The magnetization collapses as M(,P) (TURN) (x - x(,c))('0.3(+OR-)0.1) when x (--->) x(,c)('+). (4) The peak susceptibility diverges as (chi)(,P) (TURN) (x(,c) - x)('-1.5(+OR-)0.2) when x (--->) x(,c)('-). (5) The results (2), (3), and (4) are highly suggestive of a percolation transition in the magnetic network at the critical concentration for ferromagnetism (i.e. x(,c)). (6) Dramatic changes in the transition temperatures and a perceptible shift in x(,c) are observed when normal boron is replaced by enriched boron ((TURN)100% B('11)) in the series (I) samples. (7) The non-linear susceptibility ((chi)(,H)) exhibits the expected divergence at T(,g) with 'universal' exponents in concentrated spin glasses. (8) In the latter, a divergence in the linear susceptibility ((chi)(,o)) is observed for the first time. This is attributed to the close proximity of the ferromagnetic phase at x(,c). The study of the irreversible moment M(,i) (x, T, B(,a)) reveals the following: (9) Depending on the various methods of preparation, it is possible to generate states with different values of M(,i) at low T, all of which are stable (metastable) in time. This implies non -ergodic behavior. (10) For re-entrants (x > x(,c)), the amount of freezing achieved viz. M

  3. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.

  4. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  5. Oxidation of Mg atomic monolayer onto silicon: A road toward MgOx/Mg2Si (11-1)/Si (100) heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpi, B.; Rochdi, N.; Daineche, R.; Bertoglio, M.; Girardeaux, C.; Baronnet, A.; Perrin-Toinin, J.; Bocquet, M.; Djafari Rouhani, M.; Hemeryck, A.; Vizzini, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface interfaces of thin magnesium oxide films elaborated onto Si(100)-(2 × 1) substrates were characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We report that a flat and highly homogeneous magnesium oxide with well-defined interfaces could be grown at room temperature (RT) by repeating alternate adsorption of Mg atomic monolayer and O2 on Si(100). RT oxidation process of the first Mg monolayer plays a crucial role as driving force allowing a partial decomposition of amorphous ultra-thin Mg2Si at the Mg/Si interface to form more magnesium oxide in the surface. This process induces crystallization of the interfacial Mg2Si thin film and then gives arise to an unexpected MgOx/Mg2Si(11-1)/Si(100) heterostructure. MgOx monolayer displays a band gap of about 6 eV and exhibits a weak RMS roughness on large areas.

  6. Role of Mg interlayers in Fe/Mg/MgO/Fe and Fe/Mg/MgO/Mg/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    -Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Fe- and -Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Mg/Fe- magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Mg interlayers are studied by first-principles calculation. An important role of the Mg interlayer is identified to be preserving the preferential transmission of the majority-spin states with \\Delta_1 symmetry, which dominate the spin-dependent electron transport of MTJs with MgO barrier. One layer of Mg at the electrode/barrier interface does not decrease the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio nearly as much as one layer of oxide. At certain Mg thickness case the TMR could be strongly influenced by the resonance tunneling states in minority-spin channel, these states are mainly raised from the quantum-well states formed in the Mg interlayer and coupled with interfacial resonance states which are very sensitive to the interface structures.

  7. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  8. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A; Frazier, Matthew J; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V; Marcus, Matthew A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2017-08-28

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed "vital effects," that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  9. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  10. Structural modeling of amorphous conducting carbon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Pati, Swapan K.; Subramanyam, S. V.

    1998-04-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films are prepared using plasma assisted polymerization process. SEM and TEM shows random aggregate of globular clusters of micron size inside the samples. Electrical measurements indicate a near metallic nature. A tendency of saturation of resistivity at low temperature is observed. From spectroscopic analysis we find some unusual features. Based on these observations a structural model of this carbon is proposed.

  11. Low temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Metcalf, Thomas; Jernigan, Glenn; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Kearney, Brian; Culberston, James

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunnelling systems (TLS), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. Using the double-paddle oscillator internal friction measurement technique, we have shown that TLS can be made to almost completely disappear in e-beam deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) as the growth temperature increased to 400°C. However, there is a mysterious broad maximum in internal friction at 2-3K, which we suspect to come from metallic contamination of our oscillators and is not related to a-Si. Our new result of a-Si, deposited in a different UHV system and on oscillators with a different type of metallic electrodes, confirms our suspicion. This lowers the upper bound of possible TLS content in a-Si, in terms of tunnelling strength, to below 10-6. Our results offer an encouraging opportunity to use growth temperature to improve the structure order of amorphous thin films and to develop high quality amorphous dielectrics for applications, such as in modern quantum devices. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  13. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  14. TRANSIENT AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN FORMING ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, Elia; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Lam, Raymond S.K.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, begins as a three-dimensional network of nanometer size mineral particles, suspended in a protein gel. This mineral network serves as a template for mature enamel formation. To further understand the mechanisms of enamel formation we characterized the forming enamel mineral at an early secretory stage using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectromicroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. We show that the newly formed enamel mineral is amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which eventually transforms into apatitic crystals. Interestingly, the size, shape and spatial organization of these amorphous mineral particles and older crystals are essentially the same, indicating that the mineral morphology and organization in enamel is determined prior to its crystallization. Mineralization via transient amorphous phases has been previously reported in chiton teeth, mollusk shells, echinoderm spicules and spines, and recent reports strongly suggest the presence transient amorphous mineral in forming vertebrate bones. The present finding of transient ACP in murine tooth enamel suggests that this strategy might be universal. PMID:19217943

  15. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya. PMID:28847944

  16. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  17. Amorphous Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; McGrail, B. Peter; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2009-07-06

    We show that molecular organic compounds with large accessible internal cavities, as part of their rigid molecular structure, display exceptional ability for gas storage and separation in the amorphous solid state. This finding suggests for the first time that long-range molecular order is not a prerequisite for organic molecules to be engineered as porous materials

  18. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  19. Amorphous silica-like carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A.; Bini, Roberto; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Scandolo, Sandro; Crichton, Wilson A.

    2006-06-01

    Among the group IV elements, only carbon forms stable double bonds with oxygen at ambient conditions. At variance with silica and germania, the non-molecular single-bonded crystalline form of carbon dioxide, phase V, only exists at high pressure. The amorphous forms of silica (a-SiO2) and germania (a-GeO2) are well known at ambient conditions; however, the amorphous, non-molecular form of CO2 has so far been described only as a result of first-principles simulations. Here we report the synthesis of an amorphous, silica-like form of carbon dioxide, a-CO2, which we call `a-carbonia'. The compression of the molecular phase III of CO2 between 40 and 48GPa at room temperature initiated the transformation to the non-molecular amorphous phase. Infrared spectra measured at temperatures up to 680K show the progressive formation of C-O single bonds and the simultaneous disappearance of all molecular signatures. Furthermore, state-of-the-art Raman and synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on temperature-quenched samples confirm the amorphous character of the material. Comparison with vibrational and diffraction data for a-SiO2 and a-GeO2, as well as with the structure factor calculated for the a-CO2 sample obtained by first-principles molecular dynamics, shows that a-CO2 is structurally homologous to the other group IV dioxide glasses. We therefore conclude that the class of archetypal network-forming disordered systems, including a-SiO2, a-GeO2 and water, must be extended to include a-CO2.

  20. Defect structure of ultrafine MgB{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Erdem, Emre E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Thomann, Ralf; Acar, Selçuk

    2014-11-17

    Defect structure of MgB{sub 2} bulk and ultrafine particles, synthesized by solid state reaction route, have been investigated mainly by the aid of X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer. Two different amorphous Boron (B) precursors were used for the synthesis of MgB{sub 2}, namely, boron 95 (purity 95%–97%, <1.5 μm) and nanoboron (purity >98.5%, <250 nm), which revealed bulk and nanosized MgB{sub 2}, respectively. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrate uniform and ultrafine morphology for nanosized MgB{sub 2} in comparison with bulk MgB{sub 2}. Powder X-ray diffraction data show that the concentration of the by-product MgO is significantly reduced when nanoboron is employed as precursor. It is observed that a significant average particle size reduction for MgB{sub 2} can be achieved only by using B particles of micron or nano size. The origin and the role of defect centers were also investigated and the results proved that at nanoscale MgB{sub 2} material contains Mg vacancies. Such vacancies influence the connectivity and the conductivity properties which are crucial for the superconductivity applications.

  1. Buried amorphous layers by electronic excitation in ion-beam irradiated lithium niobate: Structure and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, J.; Garcia-Navarro, A.; Garcia, G.; Agullo-Lopez, F.; Agullo-Rueda, F.; Garcia-Cabanes, A.; Carrascosa, M.

    2007-02-01

    The formation of buried heavily damaged and amorphous layers by a variety of swift-ion irradiations (F at 22 MeV, O at 20 MeV, and Mg at 28 MeV) on congruent LiNbO{sub 3} has been investigated. These irradiations assure that the electronic stopping power S{sub e}(z) is dominant over the nuclear stopping S{sub n}(z) and reaches a maximum value inside the crystal. The structural profile of the irradiated layers has been characterized in detail by a variety of spectroscopic techniques including dark-mode propagation, micro-Raman scattering, second-harmonic generation, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy/channeling. The growth of the damage on increasing irradiation fluence presents two differentiated stages with an abrupt structural transition between them. The heavily damaged layer reached as a final stage is optically isotropic (refractive index n=2.10, independent of bombarding ion) and has an amorphous structure. Moreover, it has sharp profiles and its thickness progressively increases with irradiation fluence. The dynamics under irradiation of the amorphous-crystalline boundaries has been associated with a reduction of the effective amorphization threshold due to the defects created by prior irradiation (cumulative damage). The kinetics of the two boundaries of the buried layer is quite different, suggesting that other mechanisms aside from the electronic stopping power should play a role on ion-beam damage.

  2. Calcium Carbonate Storage in Amorphous Form and Its Template-Induced Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T Y; Aizenberg, J

    2007-08-31

    Calcium carbonate crystallization in organisms often occurs through the transformation from the amorphous precursor. It is believed that the amorphous phase could be temporarily stabilized and stored, until its templated transition to the crystalline form is induced. Here we develop a bio-inspired crystallization strategy that is based on the above mechanism. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherulitic particles are formed and stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hydroxy-terminated alkanethiols on Au surface. The ACC is stored as a reservoir for ions and is induced to crystallize on command by introducing a secondary surface that is functionalized with carboxylic acid-terminated SAM. This secondary surface acts as a template for oriented and patterned nucleation. Various oriented crystalline arrays and micropatterned films are formed. We also show that the ACC phase can be doped with foreign ions (e.g. Mg) and organic molecules (e.g. dyes) and that these dopants later function as growth modifiers of calcite crystals and become incorporated into the crystals during the transformation process of ACC to calcite. We believe that our strategy opens the way of using a stabilized amorphous phase as a versatile reservoir system that can be converted in a highly controlled fashion to a crystalline form upon contacting the nucleating template.

  3. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  4. The MG Composite

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Ted M.; Conaway, Mark; Sanders, Donald B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the concurrent and construct validity and test-retest reliability in the practice setting of an outcome measure for myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: Eleven centers participated in the validation study of the Myasthenia Gravis Composite (MGC) scale. Patients with MG were evaluated at 2 consecutive visits. Concurrent and construct validities of the MGC were assessed by evaluating MGC scores in the context of other MG-specific outcome measures. We used numerous potential indicators of clinical improvement to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the MGC for detecting clinical improvement. Test-retest reliability was performed on patients at the University of Virginia. Results: A total of 175 patients with MG were enrolled at 11 sites from July 1, 2008, to January 31, 2009. A total of 151 patients were seen in follow-up. Total MGC scores showed excellent concurrent validity with other MG-specific scales. Analyses of sensitivities and specificities of the MGC revealed that a 3-point improvement in total MGC score was optimal for signifying clinical improvement. A 3-point improvement in the MGC also appears to represent a meaningful improvement to most patients, as indicated by improved 15-item myasthenia gravis quality of life scale (MG-QOL15) scores. The psychometric properties were no better for an individualized subscore made up of the 2 functional domains that the patient identified as most important to treat. The test-retest reliability coefficient of the MGC was 98%, with a lower 95% confidence interval of 97%, indicating excellent test-retest reliability. Conclusions: The Myasthenia Gravis Composite is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring clinical status of patients with myasthenia gravis in the practice setting and in clinical trials. PMID:20439845

  5. A Spinodal Decomposition Model for the Prediction of the Glass-Forming Ability of Ternary Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshed, Eyal; Bamberger, Menachem; Katsman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of two alloy systems, Mg-Y-La and Mg-Zn-Nd, was investigated using thermal and microstructural analysis. Rapid solidification was found to lead to microstructural refinement and partial amorphization of the most investigated alloys. The addition of Cu to the Mg-Y-La group was found to increase its tendency to undergo amorphization during rapid solidification, exemplified by the Mg86Y9.5Cu2.5La2 alloy exhibiting a pronounced crystallization peak in the differential scanning calorimetry trace. Two Mg-Zn-Nd alloys, Mg71Zn28Nd and Mg73.6Zn22.1Nd4.3, were found to exhibit significant amorphous behavior, with the former alloy being more amorphous than the latter. An innovative model predicting the GFA of alloys based on spinodal-like decomposition of supercooled alloys is formulated herein. New generalized thermo-kinetic criteria for spinodal decomposition of ternary alloys for time/space-correlated fluctuations were formulated. The time-dependent amplification factor of concentration fluctuations in ternary systems was found to provide adequate GFA evaluation for the compositions of both alloy systems: Mg-Y-La and Mg-Zn-Nd. The model was able to pinpoint the most amorphous alloy in each alloy system, and comparison between both systems pointed to Mg71Zn28Nd as having the best GFA, while also recognizing that it has a lower GFA than the widely known and highly glass-formable Mg65Cu25Y10 alloy. This model is expected to predict the GFA of any envisaged composition, thereby avoiding cumbersome trials.

  6. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  7. Effect of Viscosity on the Microformability of Bulk Amorphous Alloy in Supercooled Liquid Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Ming; Zhang Shihong; Wang Ruixue

    2010-06-15

    Previously published results have shown that viscosity greatly influences on the deformation behavior of the bulk amorphous alloy in supercooled liquid region during microforming process. And viscosity is proved to be a component of the evaluation index which indicating microformability. Based on the fluid flow theory and assumptions, bulk amorphous alloy can be regarded as the viscous materials with a certain viscosity. It is helpful to understand how the viscosity plays an important role in viscous materials with various viscosities by numerical simulation on the process. Analysis is carried out by linear state equation in FEM with other three materials, water, lubricant oil and polymer melt, whose viscosities are different obviously. The depths of the materials flow into the U-shaped groove during the microimprinting process are compared in this paper. The result shows that the deformation is quite different when surface tension effect is not considered in the case. With the lowest viscosity, water can reach the bottom of micro groove in a very short time. Lubricant oil and polymer melt slower than it. Moreover bulk amorphous alloys in supercooled liquid state just flow into the groove slightly. Among the alloys of different systems including Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based alloy, Pd-based alloy ranks largest in the depth. Mg-based alloy is the second. And Zr-based alloy is the third. Further more the rank order of the viscosities of the alloys is Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based. It agrees well with the results of calculation. Therefore viscosity plays an important role in the microforming of the bulk amorphous alloy in the supercooled liquid state.

  8. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, γ-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that γ-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  9. Encapsulation of tea tree oil by amorphous beta-cyclodextrin powder.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Meena; Ho, Thao M; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2017-04-15

    An innovative method to encapsulate tea tree oil (TTO) by direct complexation with solid amorphous beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was investigated. A β-CD to TTO ratio of 90.5:9.5 (104.9mg TTO/g β-CD) was used in all complexation methods. The encapsulation was performed by direct mixing, and direct mixing was followed by the addition of water (13-17% moisture content, MC) or absolute ethanol (1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 TTO:ethanol). The direct mixing method complexed the lowest amount of TTO (60.77mg TTO/g β-CD). Powder recrystallized using 17% MC included 99.63mg of TTO/g β-CD. The addition of ethanol at 1:2 and 1:3 TTO:ethanol ratios resulted in the inclusion of 94.3 and 98.45mg of TTO/g β-CD respectively, which was similar to that of TTO encapsulated in the conventional paste method (95.56mg TTO/g β-CD), suggesting an effective solid encapsulation method. The XRD and DSC results indicated that the amorphous TTO-β-CD complex was crystallized by the addition of water and ethanol.

  10. Amorphous-crystalline transition in thermoelectric NbO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Chen, Yen-Ting; Bliem, Pascal; Geyer, Richard W.

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory was employed to design enhanced amorphous NbO2 thermoelectrics. The covalent-ionic nature of Nb-O bonding is identical in amorphous NbO2 and its crystalline counterpart. However, the Anderson localisation occurs in amorphous NbO2, which may affect the transport properties. We calculate a multifold increase in the absolute Seebeck coefficient for the amorphous state. These predictions were critically appraised by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of sputtered amorphous and crystalline NbO2 thin films with the identical short-range order. The first-order phase transition occurs at approximately 550 °C, but amorphous NbO2 possesses enhanced transport properties at all temperatures. Amorphous NbO2, reaching  -173 μV K-1, exhibits up to a 29% larger absolute Seebeck coefficient value, thereby validating the predictions.

  11. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of In2O3 thin films, ranging from X-ray diffraction amorphous to highly crystalline, were grown on amorphous silica substrates using pulsed laser deposition by varying the film growth temperature. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the structure of amorphous In2O3 were investigated by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Hall transport measurement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS and MD results, a model of the amorphous oxide structure as a network of InOx polyhedra was constructed. Mechanisms for the transport properties observed in the crystalline, amorphous-to-crystalline, and amorphous deposition regions are presented, highlighting a unique structure–property relationship. PMID:25678743

  12. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  13. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-13

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  14. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.; Weber, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO{sub 2}) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO{sub 4}]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X{sub 10}(ZO{sub 4}){sub 6}(F,Cl,O){sub 2}]; the isometric pyrochlores [A{sub 1-2}B{sub 2}O{sub 6}(O,OH,F){sub 0-1p}H{sub 2}O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, {alpha}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}, and spinel (ccp), {gamma}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}.

  15. Pulsed laser micromachining of Mg-Cu-Gd bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsuan-Kai; Lee, Ching-Jen; Hu, Ting-Ting; Li, Chun-Han; Huang, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Micromachining of Mg-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is performed using two kinds of pulsed nanosecond lasers: a 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser and a 1064 nm infrared (IR) laser. Precision machining on the micrometer scale and the preservation of amorphous or short-range order characteristics are important for the application of BMGs in micro-electro-mechanical systems. A higher micromachining rate is achieved using the UV laser than using the IR laser due to a better absorption rate of the former by Mg-based BMGs and a higher photon energy. The cutting depth of Mg-based BMGs ranges from 1 to 80 μm depending on the laser parameters. By appropriate adjustment of the laser power and scan speed, successful machining of the Mg-based BMG with preservation of the amorphous phase is achieved after the laser irradiation process. Short-pulse laser cutting represents a suitable alternative for machining of micro components.

  16. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate in Biomineralization: Stable and Precursor Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, S.

    2003-12-01

    The biological formation of the crystalline polymorphs of calcium carbonate, aragonite and calcite, is widespread. The less stable polymorphs, vaterite and monohydrocalcite are also formed by some organisms. Surprisingly, the highly unstable phase, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), is formed by a variety of organisms from different phyla. Most of these are stable at least within the lifetime of the organism. The stable forms all have a stoichiometry of CaCO3.H2O. Despite the fact that they do not diffract X-rays. Studies of their short range order by EXAFS, reveal species specific variations in the number and distances of atoms that surround the calcium ion. Proteins extracted from stable biogenic ACC are able to stabilize the phase in vitro. ACC has also been identified as a transient precursor phase during the formation of the calcitic larval spicule of the sea urchin and the formation of the larval shell of a bivalve. The transient form has little or no water associated with the CaCO3. Preliminary EXAFS data suggest that the short range order of the sea urchin spicule transient ACC resembles calcite. Proteins extracted from these spicules are able to stabilize ACC provided Mg is present in the solution. As the mollusks and the echinoderms are on two different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, it is conceivable that the strategy of using ACC as a precursor phase at least for larval mineralization may be widespread. It has yet to be shown that it is used by adults of either phylum. The manner in which organisms precipitate, stabilize and destabilize if necessary, this highly metastable phase of calcium carbonate presents many fascinating and enigmatic questions, whose solutions could well contribute to a better understanding of basic processes in biomineralization. For more details and references, see Addadi, L., Raz, S. and Weiner, S. (2003). Taking advantage of disorder: Amorphous calcium carbonate and its roles in biomineralization. Adv. Mat.15, 959-970.

  17. Disappearance and Creation of Constrained Amorphous Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lu, Sharon X.

    1997-03-01

    We report observation of the disappearance and recreation of rigid, or constrained, amorphous phase by sequential thermal annealing. Tempera- ture modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) is used to study the glass transition and lower melting endotherm after annealing. Cold crystallization of poly(phenylene sulfide), PPS, at a temperature just above Tg creates an initial large fraction of rigid amorphous phase (RAP). Brief, rapid annealing to a higher temperature causes RAP almost to disappear completely. Subsequent reannealing at the original lower temperature restores RAP to its original value. At the same time that RAP is being removed, Tg decreases; when RAP is restored, Tg also returns to its initial value. The crystal fraction remains unaffected by the annealing sequence.

  18. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  19. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  20. Structural characterization of stable amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shibin; Kong, Guanglin; Wang, Yongqian; Sheng, Shuran; Liao, Xianbo

    2002-05-01

    A kind of hydrogenated diphasic silicon films has been prepared by a new regime of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in the region adjacent to the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline state. The photoelectronic and microstructural properties of the films have been investigated by the constant photocurrent method (CPM), Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Our experimental results and corresponding analyses showed that the diphasic films, incorporated with a subtle boron compensation, could gain both the fine photosensitivity and high stability, provided the crystalline fraction ( f) was controlled in the range of 0< f<0.3. When compared with the conventional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), the diphasic films are more ordered and robust in the microstructure, and have a less clustered phase in the Si-H bond configurations.

  1. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  2. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGES

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; ...

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaoticmore » behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.« less

  3. Breakdown of elasticity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco

    2016-12-01

    What characterizes a solid is the way that it responds to external stresses. Ordered solids, such as crystals, exhibit an elastic regime followed by a plastic regime, both understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the response of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges upon decreasing temperature, as a phase transition, where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all nonlinear elastic moduli diverge and standard elasticity theory no longer holds. Below the transition, the response to deformation becomes history- and time-dependent.

  4. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.

  5. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Jaana Saranya; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shutthanandan, V.; Varga, Tamas; Flynn, Brendan T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2012-06-12

    Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the effect of deposition and post annealing conditions on film structure, composition, surface contamination, and thin film transistor (TFT) device performance. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the ZTO films remain amorphous even after annealing to 600 °C. We found that the bulk Zn:Sn ratio of the sputter deposited films were slightly tin rich compared to the composition of the ceramic sputter target, and there was a significant depletion of zinc at the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also indicated that residual surface contamination depended strongly on the sample post-annealing conditions where water, carbonate and hydroxyl species were absorbed to the surface. Electrical characterization of ZTO films, using TFT test structures, indicated that mobilities as high as 17 cm2/Vs could be obtained for depletion mode devices.

  6. Application of amorphous brush-plated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    1994-02-01

    The results obtained during industrial trials have shown that the service life of hot work dies can be increased by 33 to 180% using the brush plating technique to prepare amorphous coatings. The coatings possess a much higher hardness, lower friction coefficient at room and elevated temperatures, good scale resistance in addition to higher surface finish, compared to uncoated dies, and thus improve the tribological performance of the dies. In this work, a study of the crystallization process, its kinetics, and the hardness variations of the coatings has been made. According to the data obtained, it can be considered that the main reason for the success of amorphous brush-plated coatings is that, during the operation, crystallization and precipitation takes place instantaneously, which results in a strong secondary hardening effect, thus leading to an increase in the red hardness of the surface layers of dies, therefore ensuring higher thermal wear resistance of the dies.

  7. Study of an amorphous alloy core transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafalski, A.; Frost, D. C.

    1994-05-01

    Amorphous core transformers (ACT) have become a technological and commercial reality and there are an estimated 400,000 units installed worldwide [1]. Their applications reflect changes in buying practices, where the efficiency evaluation is an important factor in the purchasing decision for distribution transformers. Use of the total ownership cost (TOC) concept facilities the selection of a transformer on the basis of its performance. This concept is used in this paper to investigate the feasibility of applying a distribution ACT in Western Australian (WA). A 10 kVA ACT, evaluated by the TOC method, was compared with a traditional silicon iron core transformer of the same rating. The cost of amorphous metal (relative to alternative materials), the distribution load profile, and the values of capitalised loss costs are factors which affect the cost effectiveness of ACTs.

  8. Computer models for amorphous silicon hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1990-02-01

    A procedure for generating fully coordinated model structures appropriate to hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors is described. The hydrogen is incorporated into an amorphous matrix using a bond-switching process similar to that proposed by Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, which ensures that fourfold coordination is preserved. After each inclusion of hydrogen, the structure is relaxed using a finite-temperature Monte Carlo algorithm. The method is applied to a-Si:H at various hydrogen concentrations. The resulting model structures are found to be in excellent agreement with recent neutron-scattering measurements on a sample with 12 at. % H. Our prescription, which is essentially nonlocal, allows great flexibility and can easily be extended to related systems.

  9. New transformations between crystalline and amorphous ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Chen, L. C.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    High-pressure optical and spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain directly the ice I(h) - hda-ice transformation in a diamond-anvil cell, and the stability of the amorphous form is examined as functions of pressure and temperature. It is demonstrated that hda-ice transforms abruptly at 4 GPa and 77 K to a crystalline phase close in structure to orientationally disordered ice-VII and to a more highly ordered, ice-VIII-like structure at higher temperatures. This is the first time that an amorphous solid is observed to convert to a crystalline solid at low temperatures by compression alone. Phase transitions of this type may be relevant on icy planetary satellites, and there may also be implications for the high-pressure behavior of silica.

  10. Amorphous Magnetic Insulators for Microwave Device Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    magnetic characterization of amorphous BiFeO 3 films substituted with nonmagnetic perovskites, zinc ferrite, copper ferrite and calcium ferrite...G) Hu (Oe) AH (Oe) Tc (OC) (1-x) BiFeO 3 - x ABO3 AB = BaTi 200-1600 - -- 380-440 PbTi 100-450 - - 360-450 PbZr 400-3800 - - 440-490 (1-2x) BiFeO3 - x...II.B. BiFeO - ABO3 COMPOUNDS: Our studies show a ferrimagnetic character in the amorphous (a-) system (1-x) BiFeO3 - x ABO3 for x = 0.1 - 0.9. Here, AB0

  11. Phonon stop bands in amorphous superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblinger, O.; Mebert, J.; Dittrich, E.; Döttinger, S.; Eisenmenger, W.; Santos, P. V.; Ley, L.

    1987-06-01

    In periodically layered media the phonon-dispersion relation shows energy ranges in which phonon propagation is not possible. The existence of such phonon stop bands in crystalline superlattices has been observed in work by V. Narayanamurti, H. L. Störmer, M. A. Chin, A. C. Gossard, and W. Wiegman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 2012 (1979)]. In this Communication we report the observation of phonon stop bands in amorphous superlattices. The filter characteristic of these amorphous superlattices is much sharper than in the case of the crystalline superlattices studied earlier. The investigated superlattices have been prepared by alternating evaporation of Si and SiO2 layers as well as by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H films in a glow-discharge reactor.

  12. Thermoluminescence characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo, T. R.; Tenorio, L. O.; Nieto, J. A.; Salgado, M. B.; Estrada, A. M. S.; Furetta, C.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports the experimental results concerning the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconium oxide (a-Zr:H) powder prepared by the sol-gel method. The advantages of this method are the homogeneity and the purity of the gels associated with a relatively low sintering temperature. Hydrogenated amorphous powder was characterized by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The main TL characteristics investigated were the TL response as a function of the absorbed dose, the reproducibility of the TL readings and the fading. The undoped a-Zr:H powder presents a TL glow curve with two peaks centered at 150 and 260 degrees C, respectively, after beta irradiation. The TL response a-Zr:H as a function of the absorbed dose showed a linear behavior over a wide range. The results presented open the possibility to use this material as a good TL dosimeter.

  13. Application of amorphous carbon based materials as antireflective coatings on crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, D. S.; Côrtes, A. D. S.; Oliveira, M. H.; Motta, E. F.; Viana, G. A.; Mei, P. R.; Marques, F. C.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the investigation of the potential application of different forms of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) as an antireflective coating for crystalline silicon solar cells. Polymeric-like carbon (PLC) and hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) was deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. Those three different amorphous carbon structures were individually applied as single antireflective coatings on conventional (polished and texturized) p-n junction crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to their optical properties, good results were also obtained for double-layer antireflective coatings based on PLC or ta-C films combined with different materials. The results are compared with a conventional tin dioxide (SnO2) single-layer antireflective coating and zinc sulfide/magnesium fluoride (ZnS/MgF2) double-layer antireflective coatings. An increase of 23.7% in the short-circuit current density, Jsc, was obtained using PLC as an antireflective coating and 31.7% was achieved using a double-layer of PLC with a layer of magnesium fluoride (MgF2). An additional increase of 10.8% was obtained in texturized silicon, representing a total increase (texturization + double-layer) of about 40% in the short-circuit current density. The potential use of these materials are critically addressed considering their refractive index, optical bandgap, absorption coefficient, hardness, chemical inertness, and mechanical stability.

  14. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  15. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  16. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  17. Ultrathin amorphous coatings on lunar dust grains.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J P; Duraud, J P; Durrieu, L; Jouret, C; Maurette, M; Meunier, R

    1972-02-18

    UItrathin amorphous coatings have been observed by high-voltage electron microscopy on micrometer-sized dust grains from the Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, and Luna 16 missions. Calibration experiments show that these coatings result from an "ancient" implantation of solar wind ions in the grains. This phenomenon has interdisciplinary applications concerning the past activity of the sun, the lunar albedo, the ancient lunar atmosphere and magnetic field, the carbon content of lunar soils, and lunar dynamic processes.

  18. Magnetic and magnetoelastic properties of amorphous ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chiriac, H.; Ciobotaru, I.; Mohorianu, S.

    1994-03-01

    A phenomenological model for the magnetic and magnetoelastic behavior of the field-annealed magnetostrictive ribbon is proposed. The basic hypothesis is that the magnetic domain coupling energy due to the inhomogeneity inherent to amorphous state is dependent on the reduced magnetization. The model takes into account the anisotropy energy, Zeeman energy, magnetoelastic energy and magnetic domain coupling energy. The magnetization, engineering magnetostriction and Young`s modulus are derived as continuous functions of the applied magnetic field and stress.

  19. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  20. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.

  1. Newtonian Flow in Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    2000-09-27

    Bulk amorphous alloys have many unique properties, e.g., superior strength and hardness, excellent corrosion resistance, reduced sliding friction and improved wear resistance, and easy formability in a viscous state. These properties, and particularly easy formability, are expected to lead to applications in the fields of near-net-shape fabrication of structural components. Whereas large tensile ductility has generally been observed in the supercooled liquid region in metallic glasses, the exact deformation mechanism, and in particular whether such alloys deform by Newtonian viscous flow, remains a controversial issue. In this paper, existing data are analyzed and an interpretation for the apparent controversy is offered. In addition, new results obtained from an amorphous alloy (composition: Zr-10Al-5TI-17.9Cu-14.6Ni, in at. %) are presented. Structural evolution during plastic deformation is particularly characterized. It is suggested that the appearance of non-Newtonian behavior is a result of the concurrent crystallization of the amorphous structure during deformation.

  2. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  3. Flocculated amorphous nanoparticles for highly supersaturated solutions.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Michal E; Paguio, Joseph C; Miller, Maria A; Williams Iii, Robert O; Johnston, Keith P

    2008-11-01

    To recover polymer-stabilized amorphous nanoparticles from aqueous dispersions efficiently by salt flocculation and to show that the particles redisperse and dissolve rapidly to produce highly supersaturated solutions. Nanoparticle dispersions of itraconazole stabilized by nonionic polymers were formed by antisolvent precipitation and immediately flocculated with sodium sulfate, filtered and dried. The size after redispersion in water, crystallinity, and morphology were compared with those for particles produced by spray drying and rapid freezing. Particle drug loading increased to approximately 90% after salt flocculation and removal of excess polymer with the filtrate. The formation of the flocs at constant particle volume fraction led to low fractal dimensions (open flocs), which facilitated redispersion in water to the original primary particle size of approximately 300 nm. Amorphous particles, which were preserved throughout the flocculation-filtration-drying process, dissolved to supersaturation levels of up to 14 in pH 6.8 media. In contrast, both spray dried and rapidly frozen nanoparticle dispersions crystallized and did not produce submicron particle dispersions upon addition to water, nor high supersaturation values. Salt flocculation produces large yields of high surface area amorphous nanoparticle powders that de-aggregate and dissolve rapidly upon redispersion in pH 6.8 media, for supersaturation levels up to 14.

  4. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  5. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  6. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  7. Computer model of tetrahedral amorphous diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjević, B. R.; Thorpe, M. F.; Wooten, F.

    1995-08-01

    We computer generate a model of amorphous diamond using the Wooten-Weaire method, with fourfold coordination everywhere. We investigate two models: one where four-membered rings are allowed and the other where the four-membered rings are forbidden; each model consisting of 4096 atoms. Starting from the perfect diamond crystalline structure, we first randomize the structure by introducing disorder through random bond switches at a sufficiently high temperature. Subsequently, the temperature is reduced in stages, and the topological and geometrical relaxation of the structure takes place using the Keating potential. After a long annealing process, a random network of comparatively low energy is obtained. We calculate the pair distribution function, mean bond angle, rms angular deviation, rms bond length, rms bond-length deviation, and ring statistics for the final relaxed structures. We minimize the total strain energy by adjusting the density of the sample. We compare our results with similar computer-generated models for amorphous silicon, and with experimental measurement of the structure factor for (predominantly tetrahedral) amorphous carbon.

  8. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  9. Mg/Fe FRACTIONATION IN CIRCUMSTELLAR SILICATE DUST INVOLVED IN CRYSTALLIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Takakura, T.; Chihara, H.; Koike, C.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2009-05-10

    Infrared astronomical observations of oxygen-rich young and evolved stars show that only magnesium-rich crystalline silicates exist in circumstellar regions, and iron, one of the most important dust-forming elements, is extremely depleted. The compositional characteristic of circumstellar crystalline silicates is fundamentally different from that of primitive extraterrestrial materials in our solar system, such as chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. Amorphous silicates are ubiquitous and abundant in space, and are a promising carrier of iron. However, since the first detection of crystalline silicates, there has been an unsolved inconsistency due to differing compositions of coexisting crystalline and amorphous phases, considering that amorphous silicates have been expected to be precursors of these crystals. Here we show the first experimental evidence that Fe-depleted olivine can be formed by crystallization via thermal heating of FeO-bearing amorphous silicates under subsolidus conditions. Mg/Fe fractionation involved in crystallization makes possible to coexist Mg-rich crystalline silicates with Fe-bearing amorphous silicates around stars.

  10. Solid-state amorphization of rebamipide and investigation on solubility and stability of the amorphous form.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xinnuo; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Tang, Peixiao; Xiao, Ying; Li, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Solid-state amorphization of crystalline rebamipide (RBM) was realized by ball milling and spray drying. The amorphous content of samples milled for various time was quantified using X-ray powder diffraction. Crystalline RBM and three amorphous RBM obtained by milling and spray drying were characterized by morphological analysis, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. The crystal structure of RBM was first determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, the solubility and dissolution rate of the RBM samples were investigated in different media. Results indicated that the solubility and the dissolution rates of spray-dried RBM-PVP in different media were highly improved compared with crystalline RBM. The physical stabilities of the three amorphous RBM were systematically investigated, and the stability orders under different storage temperatures and levels of relative humidity (RH) were both as follows: spray dried RBM < milled RBM < spray dried RBM-PVP. A direct glass-to-crystal transformation was induced under high RH, and the transformation rate rose with increasing RH. However, amorphous RBM could stay stable at RH levels lower than 57.6% (25 °C).

  11. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    PubMed

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  12. Constraints on abundance, composition, and nature of X-ray amorphous components of soils and rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, Erwin; McLennan, Scott M.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Cousin, Agnès.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of the three samples analyzed by Curiosity's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument during the first year of the Mars Science Laboratory mission—the Rocknest sand, and the John Klein and Cumberland drill fines, both extracted from the Sheepbed mudstone—show evidence for a significant amorphous component of unclear origin. We developed a mass balance calculation program that determines the range of possible chemical compositions of the crystalline and amorphous components of these samples within the uncertainties of mineral abundances derived from CheMin data. In turn, the chemistry constrains the minimum abundance of amorphous component required to have realistic compositions (all oxides ≥ 0 wt %): 21-22 wt % for Rocknest and 15-20 wt % for Cumberland, in good agreement with estimates derived from the diffraction patterns (~27 and ~31 wt %, respectively). Despite obvious differences between the Rocknest sand and the Sheepbed mudstone, the amorphous components of the two sites are chemically very similar, having comparable concentrations of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Cr2O3, FeOT, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5. MgO tends to be lower in Rocknest, although it may also be comparable between the two samples depending on the exact composition of the smectite in Sheepbed. The only unambiguous difference is the SO3 content, which is always higher in Rocknest. The observed similarity suggests that the two amorphous components share a common origin or formation process. The individual phases possibly present within the amorphous components include: volcanic (or impact) glass, hisingerite (or silica + ferrihydrite), amorphous sulfates (or adsorbed SO42-), and nanophase ferric oxides.

  13. Corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of biodegradable surgical magnesium alloy coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yunchang; Jiang, Jiang; Huo, Kaifu; Tang, Guoyi; Tian, Xiubo; Chu, Paul K

    2009-06-01

    The fast degradation rates in the physiological environment constitute the main limitation for the applications of surgical magnesium alloys as biodegradable hard-tissue implants. In this work, a stable and dense hydrogenated amorphous silicon coating (a-Si:H) with desirable bioactivity is deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy using magnetron sputtering deposition. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveal that the coating is mainly composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The hardness of the coated alloy is enhanced significantly and the coating is quite hydrophilic as well. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy is enhanced dramatically. In addition, the deterioration process of the coating in simulated body fluids is systematically investigated by open circuit potential evolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The cytocompatibility of the coated Mg is evaluated for the first time using hFOB1.19 cells and favorable biocompatibility is observed.

  14. Amorphous material of the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a morphologic and biochemical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Nagao, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    We performed morphologic studies on skin from seven patients with ALS and seven control subjects. By light microscopy, the wide spaces that separated collagen bundles reacted strongly with colloidal iron and alcian blue in ALS patients. Electron microscopy revealed markedly increased amorphous material that was positive for ruthenium red in the ground substance. These findings were not present in controls. Quantitative amino acid analysis showed that the amount of total amino acids (nmoles per mg dry weight) was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in ALS patients compared with that of controls, and there was a significant negative correlation between skin amino acid content and duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.83, p < 0.001). These morphologic findings and biochemical data indicate that the amorphous material, which is markedly increased in ALS skin, includes glycosaminoglycans.

  15. Amorphous material of the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a morphologic and biochemical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Nagao, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    We performed morphologic studies on skin from seven patients with ALS and seven control subjects. By light microscopy, the wide spaces that separated collagen bundles reacted strongly with colloidal iron and alcian blue in ALS patients. Electron microscopy revealed markedly increased amorphous material that was positive for ruthenium red in the ground substance. These findings were not present in controls. Quantitative amino acid analysis showed that the amount of total amino acids (nmoles per mg dry weight) was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in ALS patients compared with that of controls, and there was a significant negative correlation between skin amino acid content and duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.83, p < 0.001). These morphologic findings and biochemical data indicate that the amorphous material, which is markedly increased in ALS skin, includes glycosaminoglycans.

  16. Petrologic Constraints on Amorphous and Crystalline Magnesium Silicates: Dust Formation and Evolution in Selected Herbig Ae/Be Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and "amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry" around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting "astronomical nomenclature" and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the "Principle of Actualism" that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite ± tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  17. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite {+-} tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  18. Influence of irradiation spectrum and implanted ions on the amorphization of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-04-01

    Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics proposed for fusion energy applications due to the accompanying large volume change ({approx} 15% in SiC) and loss of strength. Ion beam irradiations at temperatures between 200 K and 450 K were used to examine the likelihood of amorphization in ceramics being considered for the structure (SiC) and numerous diagnostic and plasma heating systems (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in fusion energy systems. The microstructures were examined following irradiation using cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The materials in this study included ceramics with predominantly covalent bonding (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and predominantely ionic bonding (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO). The samples were irradiated with a variety of ion beams (including some simultaneous dual ion beam irradiations) in order to investigate possible irradiation spectrum effects. The ion energies were >0.5 MeV in all cases, so that the displacement damage effects could be examined in regions well separated from the implanted ion region.

  19. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  20. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  1. Crystallization inhibition of an amorphous sucrose system using raffinose.

    PubMed

    Leinen, K M; Labuza, T P

    2006-02-01

    The shelf life of pure amorphous sucrose systems, such as cotton candy, can be very short. Previous studies have shown that amorphous sucrose systems held above the glass transition temperature will collapse and crystallize. One study, however, showed that adding a small percent of another type of sugar, such as trehalose, to sucrose can extend the shelf life of the amorphous system by slowing crystallization. This study explores the hypothesis that raffinose increases the stability of an amorphous sucrose system. Cotton candy at 5 wt% raffinose and 95 wt% sucrose was made and stored at room temperature and three different relative humidities (%RH) 11%RH, 33%RH, and 43%RH. XRD patterns, and glass transition temperatures were obtained to determine the stability as a function of %RH. The data collected showed that raffinose slows sucrose crystallization in a low moisture amorphous state above the glass transition temperature and therefore improves the stability of amorphous sucrose systems.

  2. Crystallization inhibition of an amorphous sucrose system using raffinose*

    PubMed Central

    Leinen, K.M.; Labuza, T.P.

    2006-01-01

    The shelf life of pure amorphous sucrose systems, such as cotton candy, can be very short. Previous studies have shown that amorphous sucrose systems held above the glass transition temperature will collapse and crystallize. One study, however, showed that adding a small percent of another type of sugar, such as trehalose, to sucrose can extend the shelf life of the amorphous system by slowing crystallization. This study explores the hypothesis that raffinose increases the stability of an amorphous sucrose system. Cotton candy at 5 wt% raffinose and 95 wt% sucrose was made and stored at room temperature and three different relative humidities (%RH) 11%RH, 33%RH, and 43%RH. XRD patterns, and glass transition temperatures were obtained to determine the stability as a function of %RH. The data collected showed that raffinose slows sucrose crystallization in a low moisture amorphous state above the glass transition temperature and therefore improves the stability of amorphous sucrose systems. PMID:16421962

  3. The potential of high speed DSC (hyper-DSC) for the detection and quantification of small amounts of amorphous content in predominantly crystalline samples.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mark; Podluii, Kalyan; Shergill, Sukhraj; Buckton, Graham; Royall, Paul

    2004-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether it is possible to use hyper differential scanning calorimetry (HDSC) to detect and quantify low levels of amorphous content in samples that are mostly crystalline. HDSC uses scan rates that are much faster than conventional DSC, and consequently results in greater sensitivity. It was found that with every increase in scan rate it became easier to detect the glass transition (Tg) response. Scanning at 500 degrees C/min was possible and this gave such great sensitivity that very low sample mass (ca. 1 mg) could be used without any loss in detection of Tg. Mixtures of crystalline and amorphous (spray dried) lactose were prepared and scanned at 500 degrees C/min. It was observed that the Tg response was easily detected even for samples that contained 1.5% amorphous content when using very low samples mass. The view held at present is that DSC is not well suited to studies of amorphous content if the sample contains 10% or less of the amorphous material. The data generated here show that much better detection sensitivity is possible when using the rapid scan rates. As well as being able to detect the presence of very low amorphous contents it was also possible to obtain a quantification, as a linear response was obtained for the step height change in heat flow as a function of amorphous content. It was concluded that HDSC provides a method of obtaining a very fast assessment of the presence of amorphous form, the possibility to quantify this and the need to use a very low sample mass. The combination of speed, low sample mass and sensitivity makes this a very valuable technique for studies on partially amorphous samples.

  4. Dynamics of radiation-induced amorphization in intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R. ); Devanathan, R. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Meshii, M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    Recent progress in molecular-dynamics simulations of radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in intermetallic compounds and the relationship between amorphization and melting are discussed. By focusing on the mean-square static displacement, which provides a generic measure of energy stored in the lattice in the forms of chemical and topological disorder, a unified description of solid-state amorphization as a disorder-induced, isothermal melting process can be developed within the framework of a generalized Lindemann criterion.

  5. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF STRUCTURAL AMORPHOUS METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-04-10

    Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of a yttrium-containing amorphous metal, SAM1651. SAM1651 has a glass transition temperature of {approx}584 C, a recrystallization temperature of {approx}653 C, and a melting point of {approx}1121 C. The measured critical cooling rate for SAM1651 is {le} 80 K per second, respectively. The yttrium addition to SAM1651 enhances glass formation, as reported by Guo and Poon [2003]. The corrosion behavior of SAM1651 was compared with nickel-based Alloy 22 in electrochemical polarization measurements performed in several highly

  6. Switching in coplanar amorphous hydrogenated silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Asomoza, R.

    2000-01-01

    Switching has been observed in a wide variety of materials and devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has become one of the most important cases because of interest in neural network applications. Although there are many reports regarding this phenomenon, not all of the physical processes involved are still determined precisely. Therefore, some more experimental information is needed in order to achieve this task. Much of the behavior of the devices has been ascribed to the existence of a filamentary region which is produced after the first switching process, called forming. We observed this filamentary region in its full extension by producing forming in amorphous silicon devices with coplanar metallic contacts placed near each other (˜5 μm). The I-V characteristics, filament optical and atomic force microscopy images and chemical etching led us to correlate changes in resistance to metal inclusion into the amorphous film. There are two stages: the first is related to contact stabilization, the second to metal transport into the film bulk. Optical images show a permanent filamentary region after forming. AFM images of these filaments showed that they are formed essentially by material accumulation between the contacts. This material tends to get some atomic arrangement, becoming a polycrystalline solid. If the device was led to breakdown, such accumulation becomes either a hillock or a thin conducting channel connecting both contacts. In the case of a switching filament, the accumulation tends to be a chain of smaller hillocks along the conduction path. Metal from the contacts remains in the conduction path after forming and chemical etching indicated that it is placed near the path core. Before forming, a tunneling transport process can be ascribed to the non-ohmic behavior of the samples during the first stage of metallic inclusion.

  7. Irreversible Enthalpic Relaxation of Rigid Amorphous Fraction in Isotactic Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Cebe, Peggy

    2004-03-01

    The crystalline, rigid amorphous, and mobile amorphous fractions in isotactic polystyrene (iPS) were studied using: 1. quasi-isothermal temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) (i.e., with step-wise increase of temperature), and 2. regular TMDSC (i.e., with constant rate of temperature increase). The crystal fraction was determined from wide angle X-ray scattering and endotherm analysis; mobile amorphous fraction was determined from heat capacity measurements at the glass transition. The validity of a three-phase model for iPS (comprising crystals, mobile and rigid amorphous fractions) is confirmed by heat capacity measurements made during quasi-isothermal cold crystallization. At the same time, we prove the rigid amorphous fraction to be established at the crystallization temperature and not during subsequent cooling. The rigid amorphous fraction is thus stable below the crystallization temperature Tc, and relaxes at a temperature Ta, between Tc and the melting point of the lowest melting crystals. Upon relaxing, the rigid amorphous fraction undergoes a phase transition to mobile amorphous fraction. For cold-crystallized iPS the relaxation of the rigid amorphous fraction is found to be an enthalpy involved, non-reversible relaxation occurring before the melting of the crystals.

  8. Delivery of poorly soluble compounds by amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas W Y; Boersen, Nathan A; Hui, H W; Chow, S F; Wan, K Y; Chow, Albert H L

    2014-01-01

    Solid state manipulation by amorphous solid dispersion has been the subject of intensive research for decades due to their excellent potential for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement. The present review aims to highlight the latest advancement in this area, with focus on the fundamentals, characterization, formulation development and manufacturing of amorphous solid dispersions as well as the new generation amorphization technologies. Additionally, specific applications of amorphous solid dispersion in the formulation of herbal drugs or bioactive natural products are reviewed to reflect the growing interest in this relatively neglected area.

  9. Recent advances in co-amorphous drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Dengale, Swapnil Jayant; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-05-01

    Co-amorphous drug delivery systems have recently gained considerable interest in the pharmaceutical field because of their potential to improve oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs through drug dissolution enhancement as a result of the amorphous nature of the material. A co-amorphous system is characterized by the use of only low molecular weight components that are mixed into a homogeneous single-phase co-amorphous blend. The use of only low molecular weight co-formers makes this approach very attractive, as the amount of amorphous stabilizer can be significantly reduced compared with other amorphous stabilization techniques. Because of this, several research groups started to investigate the co-amorphous formulation approach, resulting in an increasing amount of scientific publications over the last few years. This study provides an overview of the co-amorphous field and its recent findings. In particular, we investigate co-amorphous formulations from the viewpoint of solid dispersions, describe their formation and mechanism of stabilization, study their impact on dissolution and in vivo performance and briefly outline the future potentials.

  10. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  11. Optical multilayers with an amorphous fluoropolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Lindsey, E.F.

    1994-07-01

    Multilayered coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, Teflon AF2400, together with other optical materials. A high reflector at 1064 run was made with ZnS and AF2400. An all-organic 1064-nm reflector was made from AF2400 and polyethylene. Oxide (HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}) compatibility was also tested. Each multilayer system adhered to itself. The multilayers were influenced by coating stress and unintentional temperature rises during PVD deposition.

  12. Tuning Metamaterials by using Amorphous Magnetic Microwires.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Dominguez, V; Garcia, M A; Marin, P; Hernando, A

    2017-08-24

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the possibility of tuning the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials with magnetic fields by incorporating amorphous magnetic microwires. The large permeability of these wires at microwave frequencies allows tuning the resonance of the metamaterial by using magnetic fields of the order of tens of Oe. We describe here the physical basis of the interaction between a prototypical magnetic metamaterial with magnetic microwires and electromagnetic waves plus providing detailed calculations and experimental results for the case of an array of Split Ring Resonators with Co-based microwires.

  13. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anup

    The general and practical inversion of diffraction data - producing a computer model correctly representing the material explored - is an important unsolved problem for disordered materials. Such modeling should proceed by using our full knowledge base, both from experiment and theory. In this dissertation, we introduce a robust method, Force-Enhanced Atomic Refinement (FEAR), which jointly exploits the power of ab initio atomistic simulation along with the information carried by diffraction data. As a preliminary trial, the method has been implemented using empirical potentials for amorphous silicon (a-Si) and silica ( SiO2). The models obtained are comparable to the ones prepared by the conventional approaches as well as the experiments. Using ab initio interactions, the method is applied to two very different systems: amorphous silicon (a-Si) and two compositions of a solid electrolyte memory material silver-doped GeSe3. It is shown that the method works well for both the materials. Besides that, the technique is easy to implement, is faster and yields results much improved over conventional simulation methods for the materials explored. It offers a means to add a priori information in first principles modeling of materials, and represents a significant step toward the computational design of non-crystalline materials using accurate interatomic interactions and experimental information. Moreover, the method has also been used to create a computer model of a-Si, using highly precise X-ray diffraction data. The model predicts properties that are close to the continuous random network models but with no a priori assumptions. In addition, using the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD) we explored the doping and transport in hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H with the most popular impurities: boron and phosphorous. We investigated doping for these impurities and the role of H in the doping process. We revealed the network motion and H hopping induced by

  15. Extremal model for amorphous media plasticity.

    PubMed

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Vandembroucq, Damien; Roux, Stéphane

    2002-11-04

    An extremal model for the plasticity of amorphous materials is studied in a simple two-dimensional antiplane geometry. The steady state is analyzed through numerical simulations. Long-range spatial and temporal correlations in local slip events are shown to develop, leading to nontrivial and highly anisotropic scaling laws. In particular, the plastic strain is shown to concentrate statistically over a region which tends to align perpendicular to the displacement gradient. By construction, the model can be seen as giving rise to a depinning transition, the threshold of which (i.e., the macroscopic yield stress) also reveals scaling properties reflecting the localization of the activity.

  16. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, T. M.

    1980-12-01

    Direct current magnetron sputtering was evaluated as a viable approach to producing amorphous SiH thin films for solar photovoltaic applications. It is shown that the optical and transport properties of these films are similar to those of rf diode sputtered material, but the photoresponse and, more importantly, Schottky diode performance are inferior to that already obtained by rd diode sputtering. In order to improve film morphology, ion bombardment was added to the deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy and SIMS measurements are discussed. Optical properties, transport, and photoconductivity of oxygen doped rf diode films are discussed.

  17. Caltech Center for Structural and Amorphous Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-10

    fracture resistance and subcritical-crack growth behavior in BMG’s and their composites. We have shown that hydrogen significantly increases the glass...Science des Materiaux , 2713], 2002 L. Shadowspeaker, M. B. Shah and R. Busch, "On the crystalline equilibrium phases of the Zr5 7 Nb 5 Cu 15 .4Ni12.6 A lI0...Lowhaphandu, L.A. Ludrosky, and J.J. Lewandowski "Fracture Resistance of Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Bulk Amorphous Alloy",, TMS-AIME Fall Meeting, Cincinnati, OH

  18. Thermally induced evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangolini, Filippo; Rose, Franck; Hilbert, James; Carpick, Robert W.

    2013-10-01

    The thermally induced structural evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films was investigated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for annealing temperatures up to 500 °C. A model for the conversion of sp3- to sp2-hybridized carbon in a-C:H vs. temperature and time was developed and applied to determine the ranges of activation energies for the thermally activated processes occurring. The energies are consistent with ordering and clustering of sp2 carbon, scission of sp3 carbon-hydrogen bonds and formation of sp2 carbon, and direct transformation of sp3- to sp2-hybridized carbon.

  19. Continuous synthesis of amorphous carbonated apatites.

    PubMed

    Tadic, D; Peters, F; Epple, M

    2002-06-01

    Amorphous carbonated hydroxyapatite was prepared by rapid mixing of aqueous solutions of a continuous computer-controlled reactor. The variation of the carbonate content in the solid product is possible by adjustment of the ratios of phosphate to carbonate in the initial solution. The principal reaction parameters (temperature, pH, stirrer speed, solution composition and supersaturation) are controlled and monitored. By controlling these processing parameters, a non-stoichiometric hydroxyapatite with fine-tuned crystallinity, morphology, and carbonate content can be reproducibly prepared. The higher solubility under the conditions of osteoclastic resorption was tested in vitro at constant pH (4.4).

  20. On the crystallization of amorphous germanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, F.; Komem, Y.; Bendayan, M.; Beserman, R.

    1993-06-01

    The incubation time for crystallization of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films, deposited by e-gun, was studied as a function of temperature between 150 and 500°C by means of both in situ transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of t0 follows an Arrhenius curve with an activation energy of 2.0 eV for free-sustained a-Ge films. In the case where the a-Ge films were on Si 3N 4 substrate, the activation energy of the incubation process was 1.3 eV.

  1. Optical multilayers with an amorphous fluoropolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Lindsey, Edward F.

    1994-09-01

    Multilayered coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, Teflon AF2400, together with other optical materials. A high reflector at 1064 nm was made with ZnS and AF2400. An all-organic 1064-nm reflector was made from AF2400 and polyethylene. Oxide (HfO2, SiO2) compatibility was also tested. Each multilayer system adhered to itself. The multilayers were influenced by coating stress and unintentional temperature rises during PVD deposition.

  2. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Kürüm, Ulaş; Yaglioglu, H. Gul; Elmali, Ayhan; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-06-01

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm-1 as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  3. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Salihoglu, Omer; Aydinli, Atilla; Kueruem, Ulas; Gul Yaglioglu, H.; Elmali, Ayhan

    2011-06-15

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm{sup -1} as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  4. Chemical elimination of amorphous carbon on amorphous carbon nanotubes and its electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojun; Jiang, Li; Fan, Chuangang; Lei, Jiangwei; Zheng, Mingdong

    2007-04-01

    Chemical elimination of amorphous carbon on amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) was for the first time investigated by different treatment processes. Electrochemical performance of the modified ACNTs/carbon paste electrode (ACNTs/CPE) was measured by cyclic voltammetry. Field emission scanning and transmission electron microscope (STEM) observation reveals that the diameter of ACNTs is in the range of 60-100 nm. The amorphous nature of ACNTs was proved by the result of Raman analysis. FT-IR spectra showed that it might be one of the low-cost ways to eliminate amorphous carbon on the surface of ACNTs to treat ACNTs with HNO 3 in microwave oven. Further oxidation in air would lead to the decrease of electron transfer rate on the ACNTs/CPE because OH groups on the wall of ACNTs were partly eliminated by oxidation in air. The results of cyclic voltammetry showed that ACNTs/CPE treated with HNO 3 in microwave oven has optimal peak in relation to the highest redox peak current.

  5. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Bish, David L.; Bristow, Thomas; Archer, Paul Douglas; Blake, David; Achilles, Cherie; Ming, Douglas W.; Vaniman, David; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  6. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-07

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  7. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2008-08-06

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  8. Cryoflotation: densities of amorphous and crystalline ices.

    PubMed

    Loerting, Thomas; Bauer, Marion; Kohl, Ingrid; Watschinger, Katrin; Winkel, Katrin; Mayer, Erwin

    2011-12-08

    We present an experimental method aimed at measuring mass densities of solids at ambient pressure. The principle of the method is flotation in a mixture of liquid nitrogen and liquid argon, where the mixing ratio is varied until the solid hovers in the liquid mixture. The temperature of such mixtures is in the range of 77-87 K, and therefore, the main advantage of the method is the possibility of determining densities of solid samples, which are instable above 90 K. The accessible density range (~0.81-1.40 g cm(-3)) is perfectly suitable for the study of crystalline ice polymorphs and amorphous ices. As a benchmark, we here determine densities of crystalline polymorphs (ices I(h), I(c), II, IV, V, VI, IX, and XII) by flotation and compare them with crystallographic densities. The reproducibility of the method is about ±0.005 g cm(-3), and in general, the agreement with crystallographic densities is very good. Furthermore, we show measurements on a range of amorphous ice samples and correlate the density with the d spacing of the first broad halo peak in diffraction experiments. Finally, we discuss the influence of microstructure, in particular voids, on the density for the case of hyperquenched glassy water and cubic ice samples prepared by deposition of micrometer-sized liquid droplets.

  9. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond’s widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  10. Emergent interparticle interactions in thermal amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, Oleg; Lerner, Edan; Pollack, Yoav G.; Procaccia, Itamar; Rainone, Corrado; Riechers, Birte

    2016-11-01

    Amorphous media at finite temperatures, be them liquids, colloids, or glasses, are made of interacting particles that move chaotically due to thermal energy, continuously colliding and scattering off each other. When the average configuration in these systems relaxes only at long times, one can introduce effective interactions that keep the mean positions in mechanical equilibrium. We introduce a framework to determine the effective force laws that define an effective Hessian that can be employed to discuss stability properties and the density of states of the amorphous system. We exemplify the approach with a thermal glass of hard spheres; these experience zero forces when not in contact and infinite forces when they touch. Close to jamming we recapture the effective interactions that at temperature T depend on the gap h between spheres as T /h [C. Brito and M. Wyart, Europhys. Lett. 76, 149 (2006), 10.1209/epl/i2006-10238-x]. For hard spheres at lower densities or for systems whose binary bare interactions are longer ranged (at any density), the emergent force laws include ternary, quaternary, and generally higher-order many-body terms, leading to a temperature-dependent effective Hessian.

  11. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  12. Emergent interparticle interactions in thermal amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, Oleg; Lerner, Edan; Pollack, Yoav G; Procaccia, Itamar; Rainone, Corrado; Riechers, Birte

    2016-11-01

    Amorphous media at finite temperatures, be them liquids, colloids, or glasses, are made of interacting particles that move chaotically due to thermal energy, continuously colliding and scattering off each other. When the average configuration in these systems relaxes only at long times, one can introduce effective interactions that keep the mean positions in mechanical equilibrium. We introduce a framework to determine the effective force laws that define an effective Hessian that can be employed to discuss stability properties and the density of states of the amorphous system. We exemplify the approach with a thermal glass of hard spheres; these experience zero forces when not in contact and infinite forces when they touch. Close to jamming we recapture the effective interactions that at temperature T depend on the gap h between spheres as T/h [C. Brito and M. Wyart, Europhys. Lett. 76, 149 (2006)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10238-x]. For hard spheres at lower densities or for systems whose binary bare interactions are longer ranged (at any density), the emergent force laws include ternary, quaternary, and generally higher-order many-body terms, leading to a temperature-dependent effective Hessian.

  13. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films obtained from rice husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, K. C.; Mukherjee, D.; Biswas, A. K.; Acharya, H. N.

    1991-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon ( a-Si: H) films were prepared by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of silanes generated by the acid hydrolysis of magnesium silicide (Mg 2Si) obtained from rice husk. The films were deposited at various substrate temperatures ( Ts) ranging from 430 to 520°C. The results show that the films have room temperature (294 K) dark conductivity (σ d) of the order of 10 -8 - 10 -10 (ohm-cm) -1 with single activation energy (Δ Ed) and the photoconductivity (σ ph) decreases with increase of Ts. Optical band gap ( Eopt) lies between 1.60-1.73 eV and hydrogen content ( CH) in the films is at best 8.3 at %. Au/ a-Si: H junction shows that it acts as a rectifier contact with Schottky barrier height ( VB) 0.69 eV. The films are contaminated by traces of impurities like Na, K, Al, Cl and O as revealed by secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analysis.

  14. Study of irradiation-induced amorphization in intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation-induced amorphization was studied in situ in the high voltage electron microscope interfaced to a tandem accelerator. Variation of elastic properties during irradiation was studied with Brillouin scattering spectroscopy, and its relation to amorphization were explored. Four important topics were investigated. (1) The temperature dependence of the critical dose for amorphization and its correlation with chemical disordering were studied in CuTi and Zr{sub 3}Al with 1-MeV electron irradiation from 10 to 295 K. Similar temperature dependence was observed in CuTi between the critical dose for amorphization and the chemical disordering rate. Chemical disordering is a major driving force for amorphization. The critical dose for amorphization of Zr{sub 3}Al was twenty times larger than that of CuTi and attributed to the differences in point defect mobility and ordering energy. (2) Projectile mass dependence of amorphization behavior was studied in CuTi irradiated with Ne{sup +},Kr{sup +},Xe{sup +}ions. The dose dependence of the amorphous volume fraction indicated that with increasing mass from Ne{sup +} to Kr{sup +} amorphization kinetics changes from the cascade overlap to the direct-impact amorphization. In relation to the kinetics variation, the critical temperature increased with increasing projectile mass and explained in terms of the thermal stability of the primary damage. (3) Effects of simultaneous and sequential irradiation with Kr+ and electrons were studied in CuTi and Zr{sub 3}Al. Both additive and retardation effects were observed depending on temperature and the electron-to-Kri dose rate ratio and explained as the interaction between point defects and cascade damages. (4) Study of elastic properties during Kr{sup +} irradiation revealed that in FeTi, a large dilation and shear modulus softening accompanied with chemical disordering preceded amorphization, but not observed in NiAl.

  15. A magnesium/amorphous silicon passivating contact for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Samundsett, Chris; Yan, Di; Allen, Thomas; Peng, Jun; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Xinyu; Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Among the metals, magnesium has one of the lowest work functions, with a value of 3.7 eV. This makes it very suitable to form an electron-conductive cathode contact for silicon solar cells. We present here the experimental demonstration of an amorphous silicon/magnesium/aluminium (a-Si:H/Mg/Al) passivating contact for silicon solar cells. The conduction properties of a thermally evaporated Mg/Al contact structure on n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) are investigated, achieving a low resistivity Ohmic contact to moderately doped n-type c-Si (˜5 × 1015 cm-3) of ˜0.31 Ω cm2 and ˜0.22 Ω cm2 for samples with and without an amorphous silicon passivating interlayer, respectively. Application of the passivating cathode to the whole rear surface of n-type front junction c-Si solar cells leads to a power conversion efficiency of 19% in a proof-of-concept device. The low thermal budget of the cathode formation, its dopant-less nature, and the simplicity of the device structure enabled by the Mg/Al contact open up possibilities in designing and fabricating low-cost silicon solar cells.

  16. Effects of graphene/silver nanohybrid additives on electrochemical properties of magnesium-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin-jun, Huang; Yan-xin, Wang; Zhen, Huang; Jian-guo, Tang; Yao, Wang; Ji-xian, Liu; Ji-qing, Jiao; Jing-quan, Liu; Belfiore, Laurence A.

    2014-12-01

    Amorphous Mg-Ni-La alloys for hydrogen storage are prepared by rapid solidification. Ag nanoparticles have been deposited onto graphene sheets to form graphene/Ag (G/A) nanocomposite through solvothermal method using ethylene glycol as solvent and reducing agent. The effects of surface modification of amorphous Mg-Ni-La alloy by introduction of different contents of G/A are systematically investigated by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, TEM and conventional electrochemical tests. The results show that the discharge capacity, cycle life, discharge potential characteristics and electrochemical kinetics of the electrodes are all improved. The surface modification enhances the electrocatalytic activity of the alloy and reduces the contact resistance of the electrodes. The Mg65Ni27La8 with 20 wt.% G/A electrode has the largest discharge capacity of 814.8 mAh g-1, which is 1.33 times that of the electrode without G/A, and the best electrochemical kinetics. Further increasing of G/A content will lead to the increase of contact resistance of the electrode, resulting in the degradation of electrode performance.

  17. CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-07-31

    Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have

  18. Biogenic Fish-gut Calcium Carbonate is a Stable Amorphous Phase in the Gilt-head Seabream, Sparus aurata

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Elizabeth; Weiner, Steve; Fine, Maoz

    2013-01-01

    The main source of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the ocean comes from the shells of calcifying planktonic organisms, but substantial amounts of CaCO3 are also produced in fish intestines. The precipitation of CaCO3 assists fish in intestinal water absorption and aids in whole body Ca2+ homeostasis. Here we report that the product formed in the intestinal lumen of the gilt-head seabream, Sparus aurata, is an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase. With FTIR spectroscopy and SEM imaging, our study shows that the fish-derived carbonates from S. aurata are maintained as a stable amorphous phase throughout the intestinal tract. Moreover, intestinal deposits contained up to 54 mol% Mg2+, the highest concentration yet reported in biogenic ACC. Mg is most likely responsible for stabilizing this inherently unstable mineral. The fish carbonates also displayed initial rapid dissolution when exposed to seawater, exhibiting a significant increase in carbonate concentration. PMID:23609008

  19. Comparison of bioavailability of amorphous versus crystalline itraconazole nanoparticles via pulmonary administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2010-05-01

    The effect of supersaturation on bioavailability of inhaled nebulized aerosols is compared for amorphous versus crystalline nanoparticulate dispersions. The nanocrystalline formulations of itraconazole (ITZ) were made by wet milling (i.e. Wet-milled ITZ), whereas amorphous nanostructured aggregates (ITZ/mannitol/lecithin=1:0.5:0.2, weight ratio) were made by an ultra-rapid freezing process (i.e. URF-ITZ). Dissolution tests revealed the extent of supersaturation was 4.7-times higher for URF-ITZ versus Wet-milled ITZ, though their dissolution rates were similar. The aerodynamic performances of both aqueous colloidal dispersions were comparable and suitable for deep lung delivery. Single-dose 24-h pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats following inhalation of the nebulized colloidal dispersions (equivalent to 20mgITZ/mL dispersion in 5mL) in a nose-only dosing apparatus. Lung depositions following inhalation were similar for both compositions. In systemic circulation, Wet-milled ITZ and URF-ITZ achieved C(max) of 50 and 180ng/mL at 2.7 and 4.0h, and AUC(0-24) of 662 and 2543ngh/mL, respectively, based on a one-compartmental analysis. Pulmonary delivery of the nanoparticulate amorphous ITZ composition resulted in significantly higher systemic bioavailability than for the nanocrystalline ITZ composition, as a result of the higher supersaturation that increased the permeation.

  20. Evaluation of Three Amorphous Drug Delivery Technologies to Improve the Oral Absorption of Flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Vialpando, Monica; Smulders, Stefanie; Bone, Scott; Jager, Casey; Vodak, David; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Verheyen, Loes; Backx, Katrien; Boeykens, Peter; Brewster, Marcus E; Ceulemans, Jens; Novoa de Armas, Hector; Van Geel, Katrien; Kesselaers, Emma; Hillewaert, Vera; Lachau-Durand, Sophie; Meurs, Greet; Psathas, Petros; Van Hove, Ben; Verreck, Geert; Voets, Marieke; Weuts, Ilse; Mackie, Claire

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates 3 amorphous technologies to improve the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of flubendazole (FLU). The selected approaches are (1) a standard spray-dried dispersion with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) E5 or polyvinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate 64, both with Vitamin E d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate; (2) a modified process spray-dried dispersion (MPSDD) with either HPMC E3 or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-M); and (3) confining FLU in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS). The physicochemical stability and in vitro release of optimized formulations were evaluated following 2 weeks of open conditions at 25°C/60% relative humidity (RH) and 40°C/75% RH. All formulations remained amorphous at 25°C/60% RH. Only the MPSDD formulation containing HPMCAS-M and 3/7 (wt./wt.) FLU/OMS did not crystallize following 40°C/75% RH exposure. The OMS and MPSDD formulations contained the lowest and highest amount of hydrolyzed degradant, respectively. All formulations were dosed to rats at 20 mg/kg in suspension. One FLU/OMS formulation was also dosed as a capsule blend. Plasma concentration profiles were determined following a single dose. In vivo findings show that the OMS capsule and suspension resulted in the overall highest area under the curve and Cmax values, respectively. These results cross-evaluate various amorphous formulations and provide a link to enhanced biopharmaceutical performance.

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of an amorphous solid dispersion tablet of elacridar.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Emilia; Verheijen, Remy B; Huitema, Alwin D R; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schellens, Jan H M; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Beijnen, Jos H; Steeghs, Neeltje

    2017-02-01

    Elacridar is an inhibitor of the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and is a promising absorption enhancer of drugs that are substrates of these drug-efflux transporters. However, elacridar is practically insoluble in water, resulting in low bioavailability which currently limits its clinical application. We evaluated the in vitro dissolution and clinical pharmacokinetics of a novel amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) tablet containing elacridar. The dissolution from ASD tablets was compared to that from a crystalline powder mixture in a USP type II dissolution apparatus. The pharmacokinetics of the ASD tablet were evaluated in an exploratory clinical study at oral doses of 25, 250, or 1000 mg in 12 healthy volunteers. A target Cmax was set at ≥ 200 ng/mL based on previous clinical data. The in vitro dissolution from the ASD tablet was 16.9 ± 3.7 times higher compared to that from a crystalline powder mixture. Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased linearly with dose over the explored range. The target Cmax of ≥ 200 ng/mL was achieved at the 1000-mg dose level. At this dose, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 326 ± 67 ng/mL and 13.4 ± 8.6 · 10(3) ng · h/mL, respectively. In summary, the ASD tablet was well tolerated, resulted in relevant pharmacokinetic exposure, and can be used for proof-of-concept clinical studies.

  2. On the viability of Mg extraction in MgMoN2: a combined experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Verrelli, R; Arroyo-de-Dompablo, M E; Tchitchekova, D; Black, A P; Frontera, C; Fuertes, A; Palacin, M R

    2017-09-25

    Layered MgMoN2 was prepared by solid state reaction at high temperature between Mo and Mg3N2 in N2 which represents a simple synthetic pathway compared to the previously reported method that used NaN3 as the nitrogen source. The crystal structure of MgMoN2 was studied by synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. The feasibility of oxidizing this compound and concomitantly extracting magnesium from the structure was assessed by both chemical and electrochemical approaches, using different protocols. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the oxidized samples do not exhibit any relevant difference with respect to that of the as prepared MgMoN2 and no differences in the cell parameters are deduced from Rietveld refinements. No hints pointing at the presence of any amorphous phase are observed either. These results are rationalized through DFT calculated energy barriers for Mg(2+) ion migration in MgMoN2.

  3. Magnesium-Aluminum-Zirconium Oxide Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahoo, N. K.; Shapiro, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, the process parameter dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al(2)O(3)-ZrO(2) ternary mixed-composite material have been investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases and process dependent material composition of films have been investigated through the use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction analysis and Energy Dispersive X- ray (EDX) analysis. EDX analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  4. Electric field modulation of thermopower for transparent amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Hirotaka; Nagao, Yuki; Koumoto, Kunihito; Takasaki, Yuka; Umemura, Tomonari; Kato, Takeharu; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the electronic density of states (DOS) around the conduction band bottom for state of the art transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors (TAOSs), InGaZnO4 and In2MgO4, we fabricated TAOS-based transparent thin film transistors (TTFTs) and measured their gate voltage dependence of thermopower (S). TAOS-based TTFTs exhibit an unusual S behavior. The |S|-value abruptly increases but then gradually decreases as Vg increases, clearly suggesting the antiparabolic shaped DOS is hybridized with the original parabolic shaped DOS around the conduction band bottom.

  5. Amorphous hollow carbon spheres synthesized using radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G. M.; Xu, Q.; Tian, H. W.; Wang, X.; Zheng, W. T.

    2008-10-01

    We report a method to synthesize amorphous hollow carbon spheres, with diameters ranging from 100 to 800 nm, which are dispersed among bent graphitized carbon nanotubes using radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition in mixed CH4/H2 gases. The products are characterized by techniques including scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that MgO and Ni nanoparticles together with hydrogen play important roles in the formation of the spheres. A possible formation mechanism for the carbon composites has been proposed.

  6. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    DOE PAGES

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; ...

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energymore » changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.« less

  7. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  8. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  9. Magnetic flux distribution in the amorphous modular transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczuk, B.; Koteras, D.

    2011-06-01

    3D magnetic fluxes in one-phase and three-phase transformers with amorphous modular cores have been studied. Scalar potentials were implemented for the 3D Finite Element field calculation. Due to the inability to simulate each thin amorphous layer, we introduced supplementary permeabilities along the main directions of magnetization. The calculated fluxes in the cores were tested on the prototypes.

  10. Thermodynamic properties and amorphization of Zr-Si melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, N. A.; Zaitsev, A. I.; Dunaev, S. F.; Shaposhnikov, N. G.

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the thermodynamic properties of Zr-Si liquid alloys and their propensity to amorphization is studied. The temperature-concentration dependences of the thermodynamic properties of melts are presented using the concept of associated solutions. It is shown that the range of amorphization coincides with the range of the predominant concentration of Zr3Si associative groups with low formation entropy.

  11. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  12. Addressing the amorphous content issue in quantitative phase analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. P.; Dreele, R. B. Von; Winburn, R.; Stephens, P. W.; Filliben, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    A novel method is used to determine the amorphous content in the certification of NIST standard reference material (SRM) 676a (corundum). Extrapolation of diffraction measurements from mixtures with Si powders of varying surface-to-volume ratio show that approximately 1% by weight of SRM 676a is amorphous.

  13. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  14. Effect of projectile mass on amorphization of CuTi

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1988-09-01

    Various intermetallic compounds are shown to be amorphized by electron and ion irradiations below a critical temperature. the critical temperature for amorphization is higher for ion irradiation than for electron irradiation. In the present work, the effect of projectile mass is studied in amorphization of CuTi with electron, Ne , Kr and Xe . The critical temperature was found to increase monotonically with projectile mass from 185K for electron to 543K for Kr and Xe . The kinetics of crystalline to amorphous transition was studied by measuring the integrated intensity of diffuse rings on electron diffraction patterns. The analysis of the results of this measurement by Gibbons model indicated that the direct amorphization occurs in a single damage zone with Kr , while overlapping of three damage zones is required for amorphization with Ne . In the light of these observations, the relation between the structure of irradiation damage and the crystalline to amorphous transition, and the projectile mass dependence of the critical temperature for irradiation-induced amorphization will be discussed. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  16. Optical conductivity of amorphous Ta and beta-Ta films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nestell, J. E., Jr.; Scoles, K. J.; Christy, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Tantalum films evaporated in high vacuum onto liquid-nitrogen-cooled substrates had an amorphous structure that persisted even after warming to room temperature. The optical conductivity (as well as the dc conductivity) of the amorphous films differed significantly from that of the bcc films.

  17. Amorphization of SiC under ion and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Hay, J. C.; Osborne, M. C.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents results on the microstructure and physical properties of SiC amorphized by both ion and neutron irradiation. Specifically, 0.56 MeV Si ions have been implanted in single crystal 6H-SiC from ambient through >200°C and the critical threshold for amorphization was measured as a function of the irradiation temperature. From a high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of the crystalline to amorphous transition region in these materials, elongated pockets of amorphous material oriented parallel to the free surface are observed. Single crystal 6H-SiC and hot pressed and sintered 6H and 3C SiC were neutron irradiated at approximately 70°C to a dose of ˜2.56 dpa causing complete amorphization. Property changes resulting from the crystal to amorphous transition in SiC include a density decrease of 10.8%, a hardness decrease from 38.7 to 21.0 GPa, and a decrease in elastic modulus from 528 to 292 GPa. Recrystallization of the amorphized, single crystal 6H-SiC appears to occur in two stages. In the temperature range of ˜800-1000°C, crystallites nucleate and slowly grow. In the temperature range of 1125-1150°C spontaneous nucleation and rapid growth of crystallites occur. It is further noted that amorphized 6H (alpha) SiC recrystallizes to highly faulted fcc (beta) SiC.

  18. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  19. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  20. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  1. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  2. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Nanointermetallic Phase Dispersed Al65Cu20Ti15 Amorphous Matrix Composite Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D.; Mitra, R.; Ojo, O. A.; Lojkowski, W.; Manna, I.

    2011-08-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline intermetallic phase dispersed amorphous matrix composite prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of mechanically alloyed Al65Cu20Ti15 amorphous powder in the temperature range 573 K to 873 K (300 °C to 600 °C) with 1.2 GPa pressure were studied. Phase identification by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microstructural investigation by transmission electron microscopy confirmed that sintering in this temperature range led to partial crystallization of the amorphous powder. The microstructures of the consolidated composites were found to have nanocrystalline intermetallic precipitates of Al5CuTi2, Al3Ti, AlCu, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 dispersed in amorphous matrix. An optimum combination of density (3.73 Mg/m3), hardness (8.96 GPa), compressive strength (1650 MPa), shear strength (850 MPa), and Young's modulus (182 GPa) were obtained in the composite hot isostatically pressed ("hipped") at 773 K (500 °C). Furthermore, these results were compared with those from earlier studies based on conventional sintering (CCS), high pressure sintering (HPS), and pulse plasma sintering (PPS). HIP appears to be the most preferred process for achieving an optimum combination of density and mechanical properties in amorphous-nanocrystalline intermetallic composites at temperatures ≤773 K (500 °C), while HPS is most suited for bulk amorphous alloys. Both density and volume fraction of intermetallic dispersoids were found to influence the mechanical properties of the composites.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Thin Film Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Benjamin S.

    Combining the absorption abilities of amorphous silicon and the electron transport capabilities of crystalline silicon would be a great advantage to not only solar cells but other semiconductor devices. In this work composite films were created using molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam deposition interchangeably as a method to create metallic precursors. Aluminum induced crystallization techniques were used to convert an amorphous silicon film with a capping layer of aluminum nanodots into a film composed of a mixture of amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. This layer was grown into the amorphous layer by cannibalizing a portion of the amorphous silicon material during the aluminum induced crystallization. Characterization was performed on films and metallic precursors utilizing SEM, TEM, ellipsometry and spectrophotometer.

  4. Mechanism of solid state amorphization of glucose upon milling.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, N; Willart, J F; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2013-02-07

    Crystalline α-glucose is known to amorphize upon milling at -15 °C while it remains structurally invariant upon milling at room temperature. We have taken advantage of this behavior to compare the microstructural evolutions of the material in both conditions in order to identify the essential microstructural features which drive the amorphization process upon milling. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and by powder X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that two different amorphization mechanisms occur upon milling: an amorphization at the surface of crystallites due to the mechanical shocks and a spontaneous amorphization of the crystallites as they reach a critical size, which is close to 200 Å in the particular case of α-glucose.

  5. Salt Fog Testing Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Day, S. Daniel; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are hard and highly corrosion resistant, which make them desirable for salt water and other applications. These alloys can be produced as powder and can be deposited as coatings on any surface that needs to be protected from the environment. It was of interest to examine the behavior of these amorphous alloys in the standard salt-fog testing ASTM B 117. Three different amorphous coating compositions were deposited on 316L SS coupons and exposed for many cycles of the salt fog test. Other common engineering alloys such as 1018 carbon steel, 316L SS and Hastelloy C-22 were also tested together with the amorphous coatings. Results show that amorphous coatings are resistant to rusting in salt fog. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated rust spots in one of the coatings. (authors)

  6. Picosecond amorphization of SiO2 stishovite under tension

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Masaaki; Ryuo, Emina; Yoshida, Kimiko; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    It is extremely difficult to realize two conflicting properties—high hardness and toughness—in one material. Nano-polycrystalline stishovite, recently synthesized from Earth-abundant silica glass, proved to be a super-hard, ultra-tough material, which could provide sustainable supply of high-performance ceramics. Our quantum molecular dynamics simulations show that stishovite amorphizes rapidly on the order of picosecond under tension in front of a crack tip. We find a displacive amorphization mechanism that only involves short-distance collective motions of atoms, thereby facilitating the rapid transformation. The two-step amorphization pathway involves an intermediate state akin to experimentally suggested “high-density glass polymorphs” before eventually transforming to normal glass. The rapid amorphization can catch up with, screen, and self-heal a fast-moving crack. This new concept of fast amorphization toughening likely operates in other pressure-synthesized hard solids. PMID:28508056

  7. Picosecond amorphization of SiO2 stishovite under tension.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Masaaki; Ryuo, Emina; Yoshida, Kimiko; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    It is extremely difficult to realize two conflicting properties-high hardness and toughness-in one material. Nano-polycrystalline stishovite, recently synthesized from Earth-abundant silica glass, proved to be a super-hard, ultra-tough material, which could provide sustainable supply of high-performance ceramics. Our quantum molecular dynamics simulations show that stishovite amorphizes rapidly on the order of picosecond under tension in front of a crack tip. We find a displacive amorphization mechanism that only involves short-distance collective motions of atoms, thereby facilitating the rapid transformation. The two-step amorphization pathway involves an intermediate state akin to experimentally suggested "high-density glass polymorphs" before eventually transforming to normal glass. The rapid amorphization can catch up with, screen, and self-heal a fast-moving crack. This new concept of fast amorphization toughening likely operates in other pressure-synthesized hard solids.

  8. Pressure-Induced Structural Transformation in Radiation-Amorphized Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin T.; Salje, E. K. H.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Tsiok, O. B.

    2007-03-30

    We study the response of a radiation-amorphized material to high pressure. We have used zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} amorphized by natural radiation over geologic times, and have measured its volume under high pressure, using the precise strain-gauge technique. On pressure increase, we observe apparent softening of the material, starting from 4 GPa. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we associate this softening with the amorphous-amorphous transformation accompanied by the increase of local coordination numbers. We observe permanent densification of the quenched sample and a nontrivial 'pressure window' at high temperature. These features point to a new class of amorphous materials that show a response to pressure which is distinctly different from that of crystals.

  9. Pressure-induced structural transformation in radiation-amorphized zircon.

    PubMed

    Trachenko, Kostya; Brazhkin, V V; Tsiok, O B; Dove, Martin T; Salje, E K H

    2007-03-30

    We study the response of a radiation-amorphized material to high pressure. We have used zircon ZrSiO4 amorphized by natural radiation over geologic times, and have measured its volume under high pressure, using the precise strain-gauge technique. On pressure increase, we observe apparent softening of the material, starting from 4 GPa. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we associate this softening with the amorphous-amorphous transformation accompanied by the increase of local coordination numbers. We observe permanent densification of the quenched sample and a nontrivial "pressure window" at high temperature. These features point to a new class of amorphous materials that show a response to pressure which is distinctly different from that of crystals.

  10. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L. Martin-Bragado, Ignacio; Claverie, Alain; Benistant, Francis

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  11. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Semiconductor device fabrication and characterization work indicates that construction of amorphous-Si photoconductive radiation detectors is feasible. Amorphous Si films are mechanically stable and adhere well to candidate electrode materials; form Schottky-type rectifying junctions with several electrode metals. Materials exist for forming ohmic contacts on amorphous-Si films. Fabrication facilities accessible to ARACOR produce material of nominal band-gap energy, dangling bond density, and dielectric constant. Modification of amorphous-Si conductivity is feasible and supports the construction of PIN devices. Significant photoconductive response is observed for both Schottky-type and PIN devices, with the latter providing superior performance. It is recommended that construction and experimental evaluation of prototype amorphous-Si radiation detectors be persued in Phase II.

  12. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  13. Amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A prepared with fine droplet drying process: Physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Moritani, Tatsuru; Morinaga, Tadahiko; Seto, Yoshiki; Sato, Hideyuki; Onoue, Satomi

    2017-03-15

    The present study aimed to develop an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of cyclosporine A (CsA) by a fine droplet drying (FDD) process for improvement in oral absorption of CsA. CsA and hydroxypropyl cellulose-SSL were dissolved in 1,4-dioxane, and the solution was powdered by the FDD process to obtain the ASD formulation of CsA (ASD/CsA). The ASD/CsA was characterized in terms of morphology, particle size distribution, crystallinity, dissolution behavior, physicochemical stability, and pharmacokinetic behavior in rats. The ASD/CsA was obtained in the form of uniform spherical particles, and the span factor was calculated to be ca. 0.4. CsA in the formulation existed in an amorphous state. The ASD/CsA exhibited a higher dissolution behavior of CsA than amorphous CsA, whereas storage of the ASD/CsA under accelerated conditions led to impairment in the dissolution behavior. The constant release of CsA from non-aged ASD/CsA was observed during dissolution testing. After oral administration of CsA samples (10mg-CsA/kg) in rats, the ASD/CsA showed a high and sustained plasma concentration of CsA as evidenced by a 18-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of CsA compared with amorphous CsA. From these findings, the FDD process might be an efficacious option for the ASD formulation of CsA with enhanced biopharmaceutics properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Amorphous Polymeric Drug Salts as Ionic Solid Dispersion Forms of Ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Mesallati, Hanah; Umerska, Anita; Paluch, Krzysztof J; Tajber, Lidia

    2017-07-03

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a poorly soluble drug that also displays poor permeability. Attempts to improve the solubility of this drug to date have largely focused on the formation of crystalline salts and metal complexes. The aim of this study was to prepare amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) by ball milling CIP with various polymers. Following examination of their solid state characteristics and physical stability, the solubility advantage of these ASDs was studied, and their permeability was investigated via parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA). Finally, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the ASDs were compared to those of CIP. It was discovered that acidic polymers, such as Eudragit L100, Eudragit L100-55, Carbopol, and HPMCAS, were necessary for the amorphization of CIP. In each case, the positively charged secondary amine of CIP was found to interact with carboxylate groups in the polymers, forming amorphous polymeric drug salts. Although the ASDs began to crystallize within days under accelerated stability conditions, they remained fully X-ray amorphous following exposure to 90% RH at 25 °C, and demonstrated higher than predicted glass transition temperatures. The solubility of CIP in water and simulated intestinal fluid was also increased by all of the ASDs studied. Unlike a number of other solubility enhancing formulations, the ASDs did not decrease the permeability of the drug. Similarly, no decrease in antibiotic efficacy was observed, and significant improvements in the MIC and MBC of CIP were obtained with ASDs containing HPMCAS-LG and HPMCAS-MG. Therefore, ASDs may be a viable alternative for formulating CIP with improved solubility, bioavailability, and antimicrobial activity.

  15. Tritiated amorphous silicon films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteski, Tome

    The do saddle-field glow discharge deposition technique has been used to bond tritium within an amorphous silicon thin film network using silane and elemental tritium in the glow discharge. The concentration of tritium is approximately 7 at. %. Minimal outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) at room temperature suggests that tritium is bonded stably. Tritium effusion only occurred at temperatures above the film's growth temperature. The radioactive decay of tritium results in the production of high-energy beta particles. Each beta particle can generate on average approximately 1300 electron-hole pairs in a-Si:H:T. Electrical conductivity of a-Si:H:T is shown to be due to a thermally activated process and due to the generation of excess carriers by the beta particles. p-i-n betavoltaic devices have been made with a-Si:H:T in the intrinsic (i-) region. The i-region consisted of either a-Si:H:T, or a thin section of a-Si:H:T (a Delta layer) sandwiched between undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The excess carriers generated in the i-region are separated by the device's built-in electric field. Short-circuit currents (Isc ), open-circuit voltages (Voc), and power have been measured and correlated to the generation of excess carriers in the i-region. Good devices were made at a substrate temperature of 250°C and relatively large flow rates of silane and tritium; this ensures that there are more monohydride bonds than dihydride bonds. Under dark conditions, Isc, and Voc have been found to decrease rapidly. This is consistent with the production of silicon neutral dangling bonds (5 x 1017cm-3 per day) from the loss of tritium due to its transmutation into helium. Dangling bonds reduce carrier lifetime and weaken the electric field in the i-region. The short-circuit current from Delta layer devices decreased more slowly and settled to higher values for narrower Delta layers. This is because the dangling bonds are

  16. Treatment for Myasthenia Gravis (MG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the plasma of the blood. The improvement in muscle strength may be striking, but is usually short-lived, ... MG, most patients will have improvement in their muscle strength. In some cases MG may go into remission ...

  17. Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structures and determine the binding energies of Mg(+) to a series of ligands. Mg(+) bonds electrostatically with benzene, acetone, H2, CO, and NH3 and a self-consistent-field treatment gives a good description of the bonding. The bonding in MgCN(+) and MgCH3(+) is largely covalent and a correlated treatment is required.

  18. Characteristics of amorphous kerogens fractionated from terrigenous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki

    1984-02-01

    A preliminary attempt to fractionate amorphous kerogens from terrigenous bulk kerogen by a benzene-water two phase partition method under acidic condition was made. Microscopic observation revealed that amorphous kerogens and structured kerogens were fractionated effectively by this method. Characteristics of the amorphous and structured kerogens fractionated by this method were examined by some chemical analyses and compared with those of the bulk kerogen and humic acid isolated from the same rock sample (Haizume Formation, Pleistocene, Japan). The elemental and infrared (IR) analyses showed that the amorphous kerogen fraction had the highest atomic H/C ratio and the lowest atomic N/C ratio and was the richest in aliphatic structures and carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups. Quantities of fatty acids from the saponification products of each geopolymer were in agreement with the results of elemental and IR analyses. Distribution of the fatty acids was suggestive that more animal lipids participate in the formation of amorphous kerogens because of the abundance of relatively lower molecular weight fatty acids (such as C 16 and C 18 acids) in saponification products of amorphous kerogens. On the other hand, although the amorphous kerogen fraction tends to be rich in aliphatic structures compared with bulk kerogen of the same rock samples, van Krevelen plots of elemental compositions of kerogens from the core samples (Nishiyama Oil Field, Tertiary, Japan) reveal that the amorphous kerogen fraction is not necessarily characterized by markedly high atomic H/C ratio. This was attributed to the oxic environment of deposition and the abundance of biodegraded terrestrial amorphous organic matter in the amorphous kerogen fraction used in this work.

  19. High-Density Amorphous Ice, the Frost on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1995-01-01

    Most water ice in the universe is in a form which does not occur naturally on Earth and of which only minimal amounts have been made in the laboratory. We have encountered this 'high-density amorphous ice' in electron diffraction experiments of low-temperature (T less than 30 K) vapor-deposited water and have subsequently modeled its structure using molecular dynamics simulations. The characteristic feature of high-density amorphous ice is the presence of 'interstitial' oxygen pair distances between 3 and 4 A. However, we find that the structure is best described as a collapsed lattice of the more familiar low-density amorphous form. These distortions are frozen in at temperatures below 38 K because, we propose, it requires the breaking of one hydrogen bond, on average, per molecule to relieve the strain and to restructure the lattice to that of low-density amorphous ice. Several features of astrophysical ice analogs studied in laboratory experiments are readily explained by the structural transition from high-density amorphous ice into low-density amorphous ice. Changes in the shape of the 3.07 gm water band, trapping efficiency of CO, CO loss, changes in the CO band structure, and the recombination of radicals induced by low-temperature UV photolysis all covary with structural changes that occur in the ice during this amorphous to amorphous transition. While the 3.07 micrometers ice band in various astronomical environments can be modeled with spectra of simple mixtures of amorphous and crystalline forms, the contribution of the high-density amorphous form nearly always dominates.

  20. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  1. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  2. Amorphous titania/carbon composite electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John T.; Jansen, Andrew; Joyce, Christopher D.

    2017-05-09

    An isolated salt comprising a compound of formula (H.sub.2X)(TiO(Y).sub.2) or a hydrate thereof, wherein X is 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), and Y is oxalate anion (C.sub.2O.sub.4.sup.-2), when heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of at least about 275.degree. C. to less than about 400.degree. C., decomposes to form an amorphous titania/carbon composite material comprising about 40 to about 50 percent by weight titania and about 50 to about 60 percent by weight of a carbonaceous material coating the titania. Heating the composite material at a temperature of about 400 to 500.degree. C. crystallizes the titania component to anatase. The titania materials of the invention are useful as components of the cathode or anode of a lithium or lithium ion electrochemical cell.

  3. Tailored magnetic anisotropy in an amorphous trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yu; Barsukov, I.; Raanaei, H.; Spasova, M.; Lindner, J.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    An amorphous Co68Fe24Zr8(3 nm)/Al70Zr30(3 nm)/Co68Fe24Zr8(3 nm) trilayer system has been investigated using in-plane and out-of-plane angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance at different frequencies. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial, retaining its value of (2.9 ± 0.1) × 103 J/m3 for each magnetic layer, whereas its direction was tailored independently in an arbitrary manner by applying an external magnetic field during the film deposition. The perpendicular anisotropy constant, supposed to reflect the interface quality, is nearly identical for both layers. Furthermore, the magnetic layers act independently upon each other due to the absence of interlayer coupling.

  4. Spectrometric characterization of amorphous silicon PIN detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A.; Ramírez, F. J.; Ortega, Y.; Estrada, M.; Cabal, A.; Cerdeira, A.; Díaz, A.

    2000-10-01

    During the last years, much interest has been dedicated to the use of amorphous silicon PIN diodes as particle and radiation detectors for medical applications. This work presents the spectrometric characterization of PECVD high deposition rate diodes fabricated at our laboratory, with thickness up to 17.5 μm. Results show that the studied devices detect the Am241 alpha particles and the medical X-rays generated by a mammograph model Senographe 700T from General Electric Possible reasons of the observed energy losses are discussed in the text. Using the SRIM2000 program, the transit of 5.5 MeV alpha particles through a diode was simulated, determining the optimum thickness for these particles to deposit their energy in the intrinsic layer of the diode.

  5. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  6. Thermomechanical behavior of amorphous tactic methacrylate polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiran, E.; Gillham, J. K.; Gipstein, E.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectra of amorphous stereoregular poly(methyl methacrylate)s and poly(t-butyl methacrylate)s with assigned microtacticities are presented and discussed. An intermolecular argument is invoked to account for the higher glass transition temperature of syndiotactic vis a vis isotactic PMMA, in spite of the higher density of the latter at 30 C. An argument is presented to show that the ratio of glassy-region relaxation temperature to glass transition temperature is not only a measure of the degree of coupling of the beta and glass transition processes, but also of the degree to which intermolecular factors influence these processes. The greater extent of the low-temperature irreversibilities observed in the thermomechanical spectra of poly(t-butyl methacrylate)s is attributed to the brittle character induced by the bulky side groups which presumably weaken cohesive forces.

  7. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Strauß, F. Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-07

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with {sup 29}Si/{sup nat}Si isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10{sup −19}–10{sup −20} m{sup 2}/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  8. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  9. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions. PMID:27876859

  10. Extracting Crystal Chemistry from Amorphous Carbon Structures.

    PubMed

    Deringer, Volker L; Csányi, Gábor; Proserpio, Davide M

    2017-03-08

    Carbon allotropes have been explored intensively by ab initio crystal structure prediction, but such methods are limited by the large computational cost of the underlying density functional theory (DFT). Here we show that a novel class of machine-learning-based interatomic potentials can be used for random structure searching and readily predicts several hitherto unknown carbon allotropes. Remarkably, our model draws structural information from liquid and amorphous carbon exclusively, and so does not have any prior knowledge of crystalline phases: it therefore demonstrates true transferability, which is a crucial prerequisite for applications in chemistry. The method is orders of magnitude faster than DFT and can, in principle, be coupled with any algorithm for structure prediction. Machine-learning models therefore seem promising to enable large-scale structure searches in the future.

  11. Thermal resistance between amorphous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanhe; Elsahati, Muftah; Liu, Jin; Richards, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticle-based materials have been used as thermal insulation in a variety of macroscale and microscale applications. In this work, we investigate the heat transfer between nanoparticles using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the total thermal resistance and thermal boundary resistance between adjacent amorphous silica nanoparticles. Numerical results are compared to interparticle resistances determined from experimental measurements of heat transfer across packed silica nanoparticle beds. The thermal resistance between nanoparticles is shown to increase rapidly as the particle contact radius decreases. More significantly, the interparticle resistance depends strongly on the forces between particles, in particular, the presence or absence of chemical bonds between nanoparticles. In addition, the effect of interfacial force strength on thermal resistance increases as the nanoparticle diameter decreases. The simulations results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results for 20 nm silica nanoparticles.

  12. Amorphous materials molded IR lens progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, A. R., Sr.; McCord, James; Timm, Ronald; Le Blanc, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    Amorphous Materials began in 2000 a joint program with Lockheed Martin in Orlando to develop molding technology required to produce infrared lenses from chalcogenide glasses. Preliminary results were reported at this SPIE meeting by Amy Graham1 in 2003. The program ended in 2004. Since that time, AMI has concentrated on improving results from two low softening glasses, Amtir 4&5. Both glasses have been fully characterized and antireflection coatings have been developed for each. Lenses have been molded from both glasses, from Amtir 6 and from C1 Core glass. A Zygo unit is used to evaluate the results of each molded lens as a guide to improving the molding process. Expansion into a larger building has provided room for five production molding units. Molded lens sizes have ranged from 8 mm to 136 mm in diameter. Recent results will be presented

  13. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-11-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions.

  14. Mechanism of boron diffusion in amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Salvatore; De Salvador, Davide; Bruno, Elena; Napolitani, Enrico; Pecora, Emanuele F; Boninelli, Simona; Priolo, Francesco

    2008-04-18

    We have elucidated the mechanism for B migration in the amorphous (a-) Si network. B diffusivity in a-Si is much higher than in crystalline Si; it is transient and increases with B concentration up to 2 x 10(20) B/cm(3). At higher density, B atoms in a-Si quickly precipitate. B diffusion is indirect, mediated by dangling bonds (DB) present in a-Si. The density of DB is enhanced by B accommodation in the a-Si network and decreases because of a-Si relaxation. Accurate data simulations allow one to extract the DB diffusivity, whose activation energy is 2.6 eV. Implications of these results are discussed.

  15. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed.

  16. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  17. Yield strain in shear banding amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Hentschel, H George E; Procaccia, Itamar

    2013-02-01

    In recent research it was found that the fundamental shear-localizing instability of amorphous solids under external strain, which eventually results in a shear band and failure, consists of a highly correlated array of Eshelby quadrupoles all having the same orientation and some density ρ. In this paper we calculate analytically the energy E(ρ,γ) associated with such highly correlated structures as a function of the density ρ and the external strain γ. We show that for strains smaller than a characteristic strain γ(Y) the total strain energy initially increases as the quadrupole density increases, but that for strains larger than γ(Y) the energy monotonically decreases with quadrupole density. We identify γ(Y) as the yield strain. Its value, derived from values of the qudrupole strength based on the atomistic model, agrees with that from the computed stress-strain curves and broadly with experimental results.

  18. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  19. Polarization Stability of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Su, J.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Harrison, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous polyimides containing polar functional groups have been synthesized and investigated for potential use as high temperature piezoelectric sensors. The thermal stability of the piezoelectric effect of one polyimide was evaluated as a function of various curing and poling conditions under dynamic and static thermal stimuli. First, the polymer samples were thermally cycled under strain by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 50 C to 200 C while the piezoelectric strain coefficient was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at an elevated temperature in air, and the isothermal decay of the remanent polarization was measured at room temperature as a function of time. Both conventional and corona poling methods were evaluated. This material exhibited good thermal stability of the piezoelectric properties up to 100 C.

  20. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Andrea; Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain; Powolny, François; Jarron, Pierre; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to -340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  1. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  2. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  3. Thermal Behavior of Phosphate Intercalated Mg/Al-LAYERED Double Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Akihiro; Kurashina, Masashi; Kanezaki, Eiji

    The thermal behavior of Mg and Al layered double hydroxide with interlayer hydrogen phosphate (abb. as Mg/Al-HPO4-LDH) is investigated below 1273 K by means of XRD, TG-DTA, SEM and FT-IR. The basal spacing of Mg/Al-HPO4-LDH decreases with increasing heating temperature stepwise in two stages; from 1.07 nm at 293 K to 0.85 nm at 333 K in the first stage and to 0.73 nm between 373 K and 443 K in the second one. The LDH becomes amorphous above 443 K until Mg3 (PO4)2, MgO and MgAl2O4 (spinel) appear at 1273 K. SEM images of the LDH show plate-like crystallites both before and after heating at 473 K.

  4. Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Gel in the Nakhlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of the nakhlite martian meteorites have revealed hydrothermal minerals present within the fractures of the olivine minerals and the mesostasis. The olivine fractures of the Lafayette nakhlite reveal variations with initial deposits of siderite on the fracture walls, followed by crystalline phyllosilicates (smectite), and finishing with a rapidly cooled amorphous silicate gel within the central regions of the fractures. The mesostasis fractures of Lafayette also contain a crystalline phyllosilicate (serpentine). The amorphous gel is the most abundant secondary phase within the fractures of the other nakhlites [1, 2]. By studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). BF studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED).

  5. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  6. Amorphous-amorphous transformation at high pressure in gallo-germanosilicate tetrahedral network glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, L.; Ferlat, G.; Itié, J.-P.; Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Aquilanti, G.

    2007-10-01

    We report the existence of structurally distinct amorphous states upon compression in sodium gallo-germanosilicate glasses. In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy provides clear evidence for a transition at high pressure to a more compact arrangement of atoms based on Ga and Ge octahedral sites. This study extends previous works on simple and open tetrahedral networks ( SiO2 and GeO2 ) by showing the compression behavior of stuffed (by Na cations) and mixed network glasses.

  7. Anomalous hopping conduction in nanocrystalline/amorphous composites and amorphous semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakalios, James; Bodurtha, Kent

    Composite nanostructured materials consisting of nanocrystals (nc) embedded within a thin film amorphous matrix can exhibit novel opto-electronic properties. Composite films are synthesized in a dual-chamber co-deposition PECVD system capable of producing nanocrystals of material A and embedding then within a thin film matrix of material B. Electronic conduction in composite thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) containing nc-germanium or nc-silicon inclusions, as well as in undoped a-Si:H, does not follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence, but rather is better described by an anomalous hopping expression (exp[-(To/T)3/4) , as determined from the ``reduced activation energy'' proposed by Zabrodskii and Shlimak. This temperature dependence has been observed in other thin film resistive materials, such as ultra-thin disordered films of Ag, Bi, Pb and Pd; carbon-black polymer composites; and weakly coupled Au and ZnO quantum dot arrays. There is presently no accepted theoretical understanding of this expression. The concept of a mobility edge, accepted for over four decades, appears to not be necessary to account for charge transport in amorphous semiconductors. Supported by NSF-DMR and the Minnesota Nano Center.

  8. Defects in Amorphous Silicon: Dynamics and Role on Crystallization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jung Hoon

    Defects play a crucial role in determining the properties of many materials of scientific and technological interest. With ion irradiation, it is possible to controllably inject defects, and thus carefully study the dynamics of defect creation and annihilation, as well as the effects such defect injection has on materials properties and phase transformations. Amorphous silicon is a model system for the study of amorphous solids characterized as continuous random networks. In hydrogenated form, it is an important material for semiconductor devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors. It is the aim of this thesis to elucidate the dynamics of defects in an amorphous silicon matrix, and the role such defects can play on crystallization of amorphous silicon. In the first chapter, the concept of a continuous random network that characterizes amorphous silicon is presented as an introduction to amorphous silicon. Structural relaxation, or annihilation of non-equilibrium defects in an amorphous matrix, is introduced. Also developed are the concept of the activation energy spectrum theory for structural relaxation of amorphous solids and the density of relaxation states. In the second chapter, the density of relaxation states for the structural relaxation of amorphous silicon is measured by measuring changes in electrical conductivity, using ion irradiation and thermal anneal to create and annihilate defects, respectively. A new quantitative model for defect creation and annihilation, termed the generalized activation energy spectrum theory, is developed in Chapter 3, and is found to be superior to previous models in describing defect dynamics in amorphous silicon. In Chapter 4, the effect of irradiation on the crystallization of amorphous silicon is investigated. It is found that irradiation affects crystallization even when the growth kinetics of crystal grains is unaffected, and that defects injected into amorphous matrix by irradiation probably play a role in

  9. AC susceptibility analysis on MgB2 bulk and Ti-sheathed wire superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiçek, Özlem; Yetiş, Hakan; Gencer, Ali

    2014-09-01

    We report a comparative study for bulk MgB2 superconductors and monofilamentary Ti/MgB2 wires as functions of the boron powder purity, average particle size of magnesium, and applied pressure. The structural and magnetic characterizations of the bulk samples were performed by means of XRD and AC susceptibility measurements, respectively. We found that the applied pressure did not cause any significant change on the onset transition temperature Tc,onset and transition width. This is also confirmed by the calculation of the lattice parameters. On the other hand, Tc,onset values were measured as 37.3 K, 38.0 K, and 38.6 K for the samples prepared from the precursor boron powders with purities of 95.2%, ⩾95%, and >98%, respectively. However Mg-particle size (Mg1: AlfaAesar Mg powder, avg. par. size: -325 mesh, purity: 99.8%; Mg2: SigmaAldrich Mg powder, avg. par. size: 20-230 mesh, purity: 98%) did not affect the Tc,onset but increasing the Mg particle size caused a significant broadening at the superconducting transition width for all precursor boron powder purity levels. Magnetization measurements showed that the critical current density of Ti/MgB2 wire prepared from AlfaAesar Mg powder (avg. par. size: -325 mesh) and Aldrich B powder (amorphous, purity ⩾ 95%) is greater than that of prepared by SigmaAldrich Mg powder (avg. par. size: 20-230 mesh) and Pavezyum B powder (amorphous, avg. par. size: 0,3 μm (max), purity > 98%) as 2.6 × 105 A/cm2 and 1.4 × 105 A/cm2 at T = 10 K and μ0H = 0.5 T, respectively. In addition, SigmaAldrich Mg and Pavezyum B wire sample has a lower pinning force, Fp, value at each temperature.

  10. On the structure of 30Mg and 32Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiavelli, A. O.; Crawford, H. L.

    2017-06-01

    We discuss a phenomenological picture consisting of two- and three-level mixing models to describe the low-lying 0+ states in 30Mg and 32Mg, respectively. Within this approach, self-consistent solutions exist that are in good agreement with the available experimental information. The inclusion of a third state, namely the neutrons 4p4h configuration, resolves the ‘puzzle’ that results from a two-level model interpretation of the 30Mg(t, p)32Mg reaction data, and at the same time provides a consistent interpretation of B(E2) strengths. Our analysis indicates a 30Mg ground-state dominated by the spherical (0p0h) component while 32Mg emerges naturally and robustly as dominated by deformed (2p2h and 4p4h configurations), at the 95% level.

  11. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution.

  12. Irradiation-induced amorphization of AlPO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeram, A. N.; Hobbs, L. W.; Bordes, N.; Ewing, R. C.

    1996-08-01

    AlPO 4, in the mineral form berlinite, is isostructural with α-quartz. We have investigated the irradiation-induced amorphization of hydrothermally-grown berlinite and found that — like quartz and other silicas but unlike most other phosphates — it undergoes solid-state radiolyis, with an efficiency fifty times that of quartz at room temperature, and amorphizes at an absorbed ionization dose of about 1 GGy. High-resolution TEM revealed that — unlike quartz in which small amorphous inclusions nucleate — electron-irradiated AlPO 4 proceeds uniformly to an aperiodic state, much as do cristobalite and tridymite, and 20 times faster. It was found also to amorphize under 1.5 MeV Kr + ion irradiation at a collisional energy density (10 eV/atom) similar to that for quartz and in keeping with the degree of structural freedom afforded by its tetrahedral network structure. The critical ion fluence for amorphization was found to increase by a factor of 5 between 300 and 600 K. Radial distribution functions derived from energy-filtered electron diffraction patterns from regions amorphized by electrons resemble those of electron-amorphized quartz with some additional features.

  13. Unveiling descriptors for predicting the bulk modulus of amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yuzuru

    2017-02-01

    Descriptors for the bulk modulus of amorphous carbon are investigated through the implementation of data mining where data sets are prepared using first-principles calculations. Data mining reveals that the number of bonds in each C atom and the density of amorphous carbon are found to be descriptors representing the bulk modulus. Support vector regression (SVR) within machine learning is implemented and descriptors are trained where trained SVR is able to predict the bulk modulus of amorphous carbon. An inverse problem, starting from the bulk modulus towards structural information of amorphous carbon, is performed and structural information of amorphous carbon is successfully predicted from the desired bulk modulus. Thus, treating several physics factors in multidimensional space allows for the prediction of physical phenomena. In addition, the reported approach proposes that "big data" can be generated from a small data set using machine learning if descriptors are well defined. This would greatly change how amorphous carbon would be treated and help accelerate further development of amorphous carbon materials.

  14. The 30Mg(t ,p )32Mg "puzzle" reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiavelli, A. O.; Crawford, H. L.; Campbell, C. M.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Fallon, P.; Jones, M. D.; Lee, I. Y.; Salathe, M.; Brown, B. A.; Poves, A.

    2016-11-01

    Background: Competing interpretations of the results of a 30Mg(t ,p )32Mg measurement populating the ground state and 02+ state in 32Mg, both limited to a two-state mixing description, have left an open question regarding the nature of the 32Mg ground state. Purpose: Inspired by recent shell-model calculations, we explore the possibility of a consistent interpretation of the available data for the low-lying 0+ states in 32Mg by expanding the description from two-level to three-level mixing. Methods: A phenomenological three-level mixing model of unperturbed 0p0h, 2p2h, and 4p4h states is applied to describe both the excitation energies in 32Mg and the transfer reaction cross sections. Results: Within this approach, self-consistent solutions exist that provide good agreement with the available experimental information obtained from the 30Mg(t ,p )32Mg reaction. Conclusion: The inclusion of the third state, namely the 4p4h configuration, resolves the "puzzle" that results from a two-levelmodel interpretation of the same data. In our analysis, the 32Mg ground state emerges naturally as dominated by intruder (2p2h and 4p4h) configurations, at the 95% level.

  15. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  16. On the Plasticity of Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie

    Mechanical behaviors of amorphous materials under external stress are central to various phenomena including earthquakes and landslides. Most amorphous materials possess a well defined yield stress when thermal fluctuations are negligible. Only when the shear stress is above the yield stress, the material can flow as a fluid, otherwise it deforms as a solid. There are accumulating evidences that the yielding transition between the flowing and solid phase is a critical phenomenon, and one evidence is the long ranged correlations of plastic strain during adiabatic shear. In spite of this, we still have not fully understood the associated critical exponents and their scaling relations. In the last decade, it has been widely accepted that the elementary rearrangements in amorphous solids are not well-defined topological defects as crystals, instead they are local irreversible rearrangements of a few particles, denoted as shear transformations. Because a single shear transformation changes the local arrangement of particles, it therefore generates an elastic stress field propagating over the whole system. The resulting changes in the local stresses in other regions of the system may in turn trigger more shear transformations. A central feature that complicates the yielding transition is the long range and anisotropic stress field generated by shear transformations. This peculiar interaction between shear transformations leads to two important characteristics: 1.the mechanical noises generated by plastic deformation are broadly distributed 2.those regions that are undergoing plastic deformation has equal probability to make other parts of the material to be more stable or more unstable, depending on the direction between them. In this thesis, we show that these two important factors leads to a singular density of shear transformations, P( x) xtheta at small x, where x is a local measure of stability, namely, the extra stress one needs to add locally to reach the elastic

  17. Charge transport in amorphous and tetragonal semiconducting YBaCuO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik-Butler, Z.; Shan, P. C.; Butler, D. P.; Jahanzeb, A.; Travers, C. M.; Kula, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    1997-06-01

    We have explored the charge transport mechanisms in six different YBaCuO semiconducting thin films in the temperature range of 70 K to room temperature. Two of the samples were deposited on LaAlO 3 substrate and were tetragonal with the composition of YBa 2Cu 3O 6.5 and YBa 2Cu 3O 6.3. The other four were amorphous as-deposited on Si substrate with and without a MgO buffer layer, and on an oxidized Si substrate with and without a MgO buffer layer. All tested films exhibited semiconductor-type resistance vs. temperature characteristics with increasing resistance as the temperature was decreased. Around room temperature all six samples had thermally activated transport characteristics that was interpreted as activation of hole-like carriers from localized states around the Fermi level to extended states. As the temperature was decreased, two tetragonal samples went through a transition to a variable range hopping-like conduction. The amorphous ones remained within the thermally-activated transport regime in the temperature range of 253 K to 318 K, with EA ≈ 0.2 eV.

  18. CFA Films in Amorphous Substrate: Structural Phase Induction and Magnetization Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, M. A.; Bohn, F.; Escobar, V. M.

    We report a systematic study of the structural and quasi-static magnetic properties, as well as of the dynamic magnetic response through MI effect, in Co2FeAl and MgO//Co2FeAl single layers and a MgO//Co2FeAl/Ag/Co2FeAl trilayered film, all grown onto an amorphous substrate. We present a new route to induce the crystalline structure in the Co2FeAl alloy and verify that changes in the structural phase of this material leads to remarkable modifications of the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, dynamic magnetic behavior. Considering the electrical and magnetic properties of the Co2FeAl, our results open new possibilities for technological applications of this full-Heusler alloy in rigid and flexible spintronic devices.

  19. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  20. Deuterium magnetic resonance studies in amorphous and crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzi, Raffaella

    Hydrogenation is essential for useful amorphous silicon films and devices. We used deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) to investigate the hydrogen microstructure in amorphous and crystalline silicon. DMR line shapes analyses and longitudinal relaxation time studies can distinguish silicon-bonded deuterons from molecular deuterons. Our comparisons between crystalline and amorphous silicon have yielded new perspectives on the characterization of molecular hydrogen sites including interstitial tetragonal T-sites, and microvoids. Quantitative analyses of DMR line shapes and spin populations show that the fraction of interstitially trapped molecular hydrogen increases with increasing photovoltaic quality of the films.

  1. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  2. Gold nanoparticles promote amorphous carbon to be ammonia gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hua-Shu; Ju, Shin-Pon; Sun, Shih-Jye; Chou, Hsiung; Chia, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    As gold-nanoparticles-embedded in amorphous carbon films the sp 3 carbon orbits near the interface will be partially transferred to sp 2. The Raman spectrum measurements as well as the molecular-dynamics simulations used the second reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential simulating the interatomic force between carbon atoms both confirm the orbital transformations. The amorphous carbon films are initially inert to gases, while the films embedded with gold nanoparticles exhibit the increase of resistance in ammonia atmosphere. Namely, gold-nanoparticles-embedded amorphous carbon films become the candidate for ammonia gas sensor materials.

  3. Structures of surface and interface of amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the surface structure, we performed molecular dynamics calculations of amorphous ice. The result shows that a low density layer, which forms a few hydrogen bonds with weaker strength, exists in the surface. Furthermore, the sintering processes were simulated to investigate the structure of grain boundary formed from the adsorption of two surfaces. The result indicates that a low density region exists in a boundary between amorphous ice grains. The structures of surface and interface of amorphous ice have important implications for adsorption, diffusion, and chemical reaction in ice grains of interstellar molecular clouds.

  4. Structural studies of several distinct metastable forms of amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Tulk, C A; Benmore, C J; Urquidi, J; Klug, D D; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2002-08-23

    Structural changes during annealing of high-density amorphous ice were studied with both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The first diffraction peak was followed from the high- to the low-density amorphous form. Changes were observed to occur through a series of intermediate forms that appear to be metastable at each anneal temperature. Five distinct amorphous forms were studied with neutron scattering, and many more forms may be possible. Radial distribution functions indicate that the structure evolves systematically between 4 and 8 angstroms. The phase transformations in low-temperature liquid water may be much more complex than currently understood.

  5. Amorphization of C-implanted Fe(Cr) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Sorensen, N.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    The amorphous phase formed by implanting C into Fe alloyed with Cr, which is prototype for the amorphous phase formed by implanting C into stainless steels, is compared to that formed by implanting C plus Ti into Fe and steels. The composition range of the phase has been examined; higher Cr and C concentrations are required than needed with Ti and C. The friction and wear benefits obtained by implanting stainless steels with C alone do not persist for the long durations and high wear loads found with Ti and C. However, the amorphous Fe-Cr-C alloys exhibits good aqueous corrosion resistance. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  6. Robust hydrophobic Fe-based amorphous coating by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Wu, Y.; Liu, L.

    2012-09-01

    Metallic surface is intrinsically hydrophilic due to its high surface energy. In this work, we present a different picture that highly hydrophobic metallic coatings could be directly fabricated by thermal spraying of Fe-based amorphous powders through the surface roughness control. These hydrophobic coatings are amorphous, exhibiting super-high hardness and excellent corrosion resistance. With low surface energy modification, the coatings become superhydrophobic and exhibit clearly self-cleaning effect. The present work opens a window for the applications of the amorphous coatings.

  7. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  8. Amorphous photonic crystals with only short-range order.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Zhan, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2013-10-04

    Distinct from conventional photonic crystals with both short- and long-range order, amorphous photonic crystals that possess only short-range order show interesting optical responses owing to their unique structural features. Amorphous photonic crystals exhibit unique light scattering and transport, which lead to a variety of interesting phenomena such as isotropic photonic bandgaps or pseudogaps, noniridescent structural colors, and light localization. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the study of amorphous photonic crystals are summarized, focusing on their unique optical properties, artificial fabrication, bionspiration, and potential applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nonaffinity in amorphous solids close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, Roberto; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    Nonaffinity is known to be an integral part of the response of amorphous solids. Its role is particularly relevant in particulate systems close to their jamming transition, where it dominates the elastic response. Thus, to determine the elastic properties of amorphous solids it is essential to rationalize the features of their nonaffine response. Via numerical simulations we investigate the relation between the non affine response and the vibrational properties of model amorphous materials. We show that, contrary to previous speculations, modes below the Boson peak are those mostly responsible for the nonaffine response.

  10. Control of carbonate alkalinity on Mg incorporation in calcite: Insights on the occurrence of high Mg calcites in diagenetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    High Mg calcites (HMC), with up to 25 mol % of Mg, are common features in early diagenetic environments and are frequently associated with bio-induced anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Such archives hold valuable information about the biogeochemical processes occurring in sedimentary environments in the geological past. Despite the frequency AOM-induced HMC observed in marine diagenetic settings and their potential role in dolomitization, only a minor number of experimental studies has been devoted on deciphering their formation conditions. Thus, in order to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of HMC induced by elevated carbonate ion concentrations, we precipitated HMC by computer controlled titration of a (Mg,Ca)Cl2 solution at different Mg/Ca ratios into a NaHCO3 solution under precisely defined physicochemical conditions (T = 25.00 ±0.03°C; pH = 8.3 ±0.1). The formation of carbonates was monitored at a high temporal resolution using in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. We identified two distinct mechanisms of HMC formation. In solutions with molar Mg/Ca ratios ≤ 1/8 calcium carbonate was precipitated as crystalline phases directly from homogeneous solution. In contrast, higher Mg/Ca ratios induced the formation of Mg-rich ACC (up to 10 mol % of Mg), which was subsequently transformed to HMC with up 20 mol % of Mg. Our experimental results highlight that the finally formed HMC has a higher Mg content than the ACC precursor phase. Considering experimental data for Mg containing ACC transformation to crystalline calcium carbonate from literature, the continuous enrichment of Mg in the precipitate throughout transformation of amorphous to crystalline CaCO3 most likely occurs due to the high carbonate alkalinity (DIC about 0.1 M) of our reactive solutions. The Mg incorporation into calcite lattice seems to be favored by intensive supply of carbonate ions as

  11. Amorphous Semiconductors: From Photocatalyst to Computer Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, Mayur

    Amorphous semiconductors are useful in many applications like solar cells, thin film displays, sensors, electrophotography, etc. The dissertation contains four projects. In the first three projects, semiconductor glasses which are a subset of amorphous semiconductors were studied. The last project is about exploring the strengths and constraints of two analysis programs which calculate the particle size information from experimental Small Angle X-ray Scattering data. By definition, glasses have a random atomic arrangement with no order beyond the nearest neighbor, but strangely there exists an Intermediate Range Order (IRO). The origin of IRO is still not clearly understood, but various models have been proposed. The signature of IRO is the First Sharp Diffraction Peak(FSDP) observed in x-ray and neutron scattering data. The FSDP of TiO 2 SiO2 glass photocatalyst with different Ti:Si ratio from SAXS data was measured to test the theoretical models. The experimental results along with its computer simulation results strongly supported one of two leading models. It was also found that the effect of doping IRO on TiO2 SiO2 is severe in mesoporous form than the bulk form. Glass semiconductors in mesoporous form are very useful photocatalysts due to their large specific surface area. Solar energy conversion of photocatalysts greatly depends on their bandgap, but very few photocatalysts have the optical bandgap covering the whole visible region of solar spectrum leading to poor efficiency. A physical method was developed to manipulate the bandgap of mesoporous photocatalysts, by using the anisotropic thermal expansion and stressed glass network properties of mesoporous glasses. The anisotropic thermal expansion was established by S/WAXS characterization of mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The residual stress in the glass network of mesoporous glasses was already known for an earlier work. The new method was initially applied on mesoporous TiPO4, and the results were

  12. Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jason Sven

    1995-01-01

    Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the

  13. Preparation and tableting of long-term stable amorphous rutin using porous silica.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qionghua; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2017-04-01

    Amorphous state of drugs increases the oral bioavailability, but typically faces physical stability problems. Amorphous rutin was generated and physically stabilized by encapsulating inside mesopores of porous AEROPERL® 300 Pharma and named as rutin CapsMorph® in this study. AEROPERL® 300 Pharma was loaded with rutin dissolved in DMSO containing Tween 80, and subsequently the solvent evaporated (wetness impregnation method). The loading process was monitored by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to confirm the amorphous state in AEROPERL® 300 Pharma. A loading of 20% of the rutin-AEROPERL® 300 Pharma mixture was obtained. The amorphous state proved to be stable over 2years of storage at room temperature. Due to the amorphous state and the nanosize of the rutin in the mesopores, the kinetic saturation solubility increased to about 4mg/ml (water, 0.1MHCl, pH 6.8PBS) compared to the maximum observed thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of rutin raw drug powder of only 74.48±1.42μg/ml in pH 6.8PBS (=increase by factor about 54). The dissolution velocity also increased distinctly, e.g. about 96.1% of rutin dissolution from CapsMorph® powder in water within 5min compared to less than 40% of raw drug powder after 3h. Tablets were produced with rutin CapsMorph®, raw drug powder and their dissolution velocity compared to a marketed product. About 83.0-95.6% were released from the rutin CapsMorph® tablet within 5min, compared to 42.7-52.5% from the marketed tablet after 3h (water, 0.1MHCl, pH 6.8PBS). After dissolution the supersaturation level of rutin CapsMorph® remained over about 2h, then solubility slowly reduced, but remained after 48h still multifold above the thermodynamic rutin solubility. This should be sufficient for many poorly soluble drugs to achieve a sufficient bioavailability. For optimal exploitation of the supersaturation, a multiple step release

  14. The Effect of Spatial Heterogeneities on Nucleation Kinetics in Amorphous Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ye

    The mechanical property of the Al based metallic glass could be enhanced significantly by introducing the high number density of Al-fcc nanocrystals (1021 ˜1023 m-3) to the amorphous matrix through annealing treatments, which motivates the study of the nucleation kinetics for the microstructure control. With the presence of a high number density (1025 m-3) of aluminum-like medium range order (MRO), the Al-Y-Fe metallic glass is considered to be spatially heterogeneous. Combining the classical nucleation theory with the structural configuration, a MRO seeded nucleation model has been proposed and yields theoretical steady state nucleation rates consistent with the experimental results. In addition, this model satisfies all the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints to be reasonable. Compared with the Al-Y-Fe system, the primary crystallization onset temperature decreases significantly and the transient delay time (tau) is shorter in the Al-Y-Fe-Pb(In) systems because the insoluble Pb and In nanoparticles in the amorphous matrix served as extrinsic spatial heterogeneity to provide the nucleation sites for Al-fcc precipitation and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the Pb-Al interface revealed a good wetting behavior between the Al and Pb nanoparticles. The study of the transient delay time (tau) could provide insight on the transport behavior during the nucleation and a more convenient approach to evaluate the delay time has been developed by measuring the Al-Y-Fe amorphous alloy glass transition temperature (Tg) shift with the increasing annealing time (tannealing) in FlashDSC. The break point in the Tg vs. log(tannealing) plot has been identified to correspond to the delay time by the TEM characterization. FlashDSC tests with different heating rates and different compositions (Al-Y-Fe-Pb and Zn-Mg-Ca-Yb amorphous alloys) further confirmed the break point and delay time relationship. The amorphous matrix composition and the

  15. Application of Laser Design of Amorphous Feco-Based Alloys for the Formation of Amorphous-Crystalline Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakova, I. E.; Glezer, A. M.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shelyakov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and fractographic features of change of FeCo-based amorphous alloy surfaces after laser treatment are studied in detail. Regimes of laser treatment that allow various degrees of crystallization of the examined alloys to be obtained, including thin (<1 •m) crystal layers on amorphous alloy surfaces, amorphous-crystalline composites, and completely crystalline alloys are adjusted. The Vickers hardness is estimated in zones of selective laser irradiation. The structure of the examined alloys attendant to the change of their mechanical properties is analyzed.

  16. Method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.; Zanzucchi, Peter J.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon by heating a portion of the glow discharge produced amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 365.degree. C. higher than the deposition temperature prior to etching. The etch rate of the exposed amorphous silicon is less than the unheated amorphous silicon.

  17. Excellent capability in degrading azo dyes by MgZn-based metallic glass powders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Hui; Chen, Ming-Wei; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V; Inoue, Akihisa; Perepezko, John H

    2012-01-01

    The lack of new functional applications for metallic glasses hampers further development of these fascinating materials. In this letter, we report for the first time that the MgZn-based metallic glass powders have excellent functional ability in degrading azo dyes which are typical organic water pollutants. Their azo dye degradation efficiency is about 1000 times higher than that of commercial crystalline Fe powders, and 20 times higher than the Mg-Zn alloy crystalline counterparts. The high Zn content in the amorphous Mg-based alloy enables a greater corrosion resistance in water and higher reaction efficiency with azo dye compared to crystalline Mg. Even under complex environmental conditions, the MgZn-based metallic glass powders retain high reaction efficiency. Our work opens up a new opportunity for functional applications of metallic glasses.

  18. Atomic Structure of Ca40+xMg25Cu35-x Metallic Glasses (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-21

    while solidification of Ca45Mg25Cu30 and Ca50Mg25Cu25 alloys forms three equally probable crystal phases, CaMg2 Cu2Mg and CaCu . 5,6 CaMg2 is a...The CaCu phase has a primitive crystal structure (space group P21/m, space group number 11) with lattice parameters a¼ 19.47 Å, b¼ 4.271 Å, c¼ 5.880...Cu-centered coordination polyhedron in the CaCu phase is also common in the studied amorphous structures. This (0,3,6,0) Cu-centered cluster is

  19. Excellent capability in degrading azo dyes by MgZn-based metallic glass powders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Hui; Chen, Ming-Wei; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Inoue, Akihisa; Perepezko, John H.

    2012-01-01

    The lack of new functional applications for metallic glasses hampers further development of these fascinating materials. In this letter, we report for the first time that the MgZn-based metallic glass powders have excellent functional ability in degrading azo dyes which are typical organic water pollutants. Their azo dye degradation efficiency is about 1000 times higher than that of commercial crystalline Fe powders, and 20 times higher than the Mg-Zn alloy crystalline counterparts. The high Zn content in the amorphous Mg-based alloy enables a greater corrosion resistance in water and higher reaction efficiency with azo dye compared to crystalline Mg. Even under complex environmental conditions, the MgZn-based metallic glass powders retain high reaction efficiency. Our work opens up a new opportunity for functional applications of metallic glasses. PMID:22639726

  20. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; ...

    2016-10-12

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. When using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, an unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45~50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. We also propose that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversionmore » calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C.« less

  1. First principles prediction of amorphous phases using evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Suhas; Gaur, Anshu; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2016-07-07

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory based electronic, ionic and cell relaxation, we re-investigate two well known amorphous semiconductors, namely silicon and indium gallium zinc oxide. We find that characteristic structural parameters like average bond length and bond angle are within ∼2% of those reported by ab initio MD calculations and experimental studies.

  2. Amorphous solid dispersions: Rational selection of a manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Teófilo; Marques, Sara; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous products and particularly amorphous solid dispersions are currently one of the most exciting areas in the pharmaceutical field. This approach presents huge potential and advantageous features concerning the overall improvement of drug bioavailability. Currently, different manufacturing processes are being developed to produce amorphous solid dispersions with suitable robustness and reproducibility, ranging from solvent evaporation to melting processes. In the present paper, laboratorial and industrial scale processes were reviewed, and guidelines for a rationale selection of manufacturing processes were proposed. This would ensure an adequate development (laboratorial scale) and production according to the good manufacturing practices (GMP) (industrial scale) of amorphous solid dispersions, with further implications on the process validations and drug development pipeline.

  3. Nitrogen assimilation from amorphous detritus by two coastal consumers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, Charlene; Alber, Merryl; Valiela, Ivan

    1991-08-01

    The food value of recognizable pieces of dead vegetation, morphous detritus, has been the focus of many studies in coastal systems. In contrast, the nutritional quality and formation process of amorphous detritus, aggregates of dissolved organic matter (DOM), is poorly studied. We created 15N-labelled aggregates from the leachate of four macrophytes, a marsh grass and three macroalgae common in New England coastal waters. We fed the labelled aggregates to two coastal consumers, the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio and the sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus. Fish and shrimp fed each of the labelled aggregates became labelled with 15N. This study provides direct evidence for nitrogen assimilation from amorphous detritus by marine consumers. In addition, fish fed amorphous marsh grass detritus assimilated 10-40 times more nitrogen from this detritus than from morphous grass detritus. Therefore, amorphous aggregates may be higher-quality food than morphous detrital fragments for coastal consumers.

  4. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  5. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process.

  6. Computer-assisted infrared spectra interpretation for amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavak, Hamide; Esen, Ramazan

    2005-12-01

    A computer program for the structural interpretation of the infrared (IR) spectra is developed and tested. The interpretation of the IR spectra is made by using an hybrid system which includes library search and rule-based interpretation methods together. The computer programs were written in Pascal Codes. The prototype IR library of silicon alloys includes amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiOx), amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) references. The known spectra of these compounds were fed into the system as an unknown samples. The performance of the developed program was evaluated on a test set of 157 spectra and the percentages of successful identification ranged between 78% and 99% for different alloys.

  7. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  8. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45˜50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C.

  9. Construction and characterization of amorphous-silicon test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.N.; Milgram, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The central goal of the project was to qualify amorphous silicon, a newly developed semiconductor material, as the basis for economical large-area photoconductive detectors of penetrating radiation. The thrust of the project was to establish the feasibility of constructing photoconductive amorphous-silicon devices whose electronic properties supported the radiation detection application. This issue of feasibility was successfully resolved by construction and experimental characterization of amorphous-silicon test pieces representative of the existing state-of-the-art. The focus of this work was the measurement of material electronic properties known to affect the performance of solid-state radiation detectors, and the investigation of candidate junction-device architectures. The construction and experimental evaluation of prototype radiation detectors based on amorphous silicon was beyond the scope of the current effort, and will form the core of work to be accomplished within a Phase II continuation of the project.

  10. First principles prediction of amorphous phases using evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Suhas; Gaur, Anshu; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory based electronic, ionic and cell relaxation, we re-investigate two well known amorphous semiconductors, namely silicon and indium gallium zinc oxide. We find that characteristic structural parameters like average bond length and bond angle are within ˜2% of those reported by ab initio MD calculations and experimental studies.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of wetting on modified amorphous silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jingchun; Liu, Shuyan; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-08-01

    The microscopic wetting of water on amorphous silica surfaces has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation/silanization were considered. It was observed that the hydrophobicity becomes enhanced with an increase in the degree of surface silanization. A continuous transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity can be attained for the amorphous silica surfaces through surface modification. From the simulation result, the contact angle can exceed 90° when surface silanization percentage is above 50%, showing a hydrophobic character. It is also found that when the percentage of surface silanization is above 70% on the amorphous silica surface, the water contact angle almost remains unchanged (110-120°). This phenomenon is a little different from the wetting behavior on smooth quartz plates in previous experimental report. This change in the wettability on modified amorphous silica surfaces can be interpreted in terms of the interaction between water molecules and the silica surfaces.

  12. Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    DOE PAGES

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; ...

    2016-07-13

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO2. Ultimately this suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less

  14. Stress originating from nanovoids in hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zumin; Flötotto, David; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    Structural inhomogeneities in the form of voids of nanometer sizes (nanovoids) have long been known to be present in hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors (Si, Ge). The physical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors can be pronouncedly influenced by the presence and characteristics of such nanovoids. In this work, by measuring in situ the intrinsic stress developments during deposition of pure, amorphous and of hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor (Si, Ge) thin films, under the same conditions in ultrahigh vacuum and on a comparative basis, a major source of tensile stress development could be ascribed to the occurrence of nanovoids in a-Si:H and a-Ge:H. The measurements allowed a quantitative evaluation of the surface stress acting along the surface of the nanovoids: 1.1-1.9 N/m for a-Si:H and 0.9-1.9 N/m for a-Ge:H.

  15. Structure and properties of an amorphous metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Goodwin, Andrew L; Dove, Martin T; Keen, David A; Tucker, Matthew G; Barney, Emma R; Soper, Alan K; Bithell, Erica G; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2010-03-19

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300 degrees C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400 degrees C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  16. Structure and Properties of an Amorphous Metal-Organic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Thomas D.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Barney, Emma R.; Soper, Alan K.; Bithell, Erica G.; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2010-03-01

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300°C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400°C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  17. Predicting Crystallization of Amorphous Drugs with Terahertz Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sibik, Juraj; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-08-03

    There is a controversy about the extent to which the primary and secondary dielectric relaxations influence the crystallization of amorphous organic compounds below the glass transition temperature. Recent studies also point to the importance of fast molecular dynamics on picosecond-to-nanosecond time scales with respect to the glass stability. In the present study we provide terahertz spectroscopy evidence on the crystallization of amorphous naproxen well below its glass transition temperature and confirm the direct role of Johari-Goldstein (JG) secondary relaxation as a facilitator of the crystallization. We determine the onset temperature Tβ above which the JG relaxation contributes to the fast molecular dynamics and analytically quantify the level of this contribution. We then show there is a strong correlation between the increase in the fast molecular dynamics and onset of crystallization in several chosen amorphous drugs. We believe that this technique has immediate applications to quantify the stability of amorphous drug materials.

  18. Fluorine-enhanced boron diffusion in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, J. M.; Robertson, L. S.; Jones, K. S.; Law, M. E.; Rendon, Mike; Bennett, Joe

    2003-05-01

    Silicon wafers were preamorphized with 70 keV Si+ at a dose of 1×1015atoms/cm2, generating a deep amorphous layer of 1800 Å. Implants of 500 eV 11B+, with and without 6 keV F+, followed at doses of 1×1015 atoms/cm2 and 2×1015 atoms/cm2, respectively. After annealing at 550 °C, secondary ion mass spectroscopy determined that the diffusivity of boron in amorphous silicon is significantly enhanced in the presence of fluorine. Ellipsometry and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicate the enhanced diffusion only occurs in the amorphous layer. Fluorine increases the boron diffusivity by approximately five orders of magnitude at 550 °C. It is proposed that the ability of fluorine to reduce the dangling bond concentration in amorphous silicon may reduce the formation energy for mobile boron, enhancing its diffusivity.

  19. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  20. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vapor Deposited Amorphous Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, A. I.; Li, J.-C.; Dong, S.; Bailey, I. F.; Eccleston, R. S.; Hahn, W.; Parker, S. F.

    1997-09-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra were measured for amorphous ice H2O and D2O produced by low-temperature and low-rate vapor deposition. The data show that the deposition produced the low-density amorphous form of ice, i.e., the high-density amorphous ice observed by x-ray [A. H. Narten, C. G. Venkatesh, and S. A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 64, 1106 (1976)] and electron diffraction [P. Jenniskens and D. F. Blake, Science 265, 753 (1994)] under similar conditions was not detected. This result was confirmed by separate neutron diffraction experiments. Vibrational spectra of the deposited amorphous ice were dissimilar to that of ice Ih/Ic, as was believed previously.

  1. Inversion of diffraction data for amorphous materials

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The general and practical inversion of diffraction data–producing a computer model correctly representing the material explored–is an important unsolved problem for disordered materials. Such modeling should proceed by using our full knowledge base, both from experiment and theory. In this paper, we describe a robust method to jointly exploit the power of ab initio atomistic simulation along with the information carried by diffraction data. The method is applied to two very different systems: amorphous silicon and two compositions of a solid electrolyte memory material silver-doped GeSe3. The technique is easy to implement, is faster and yields results much improved over conventional simulation methods for the materials explored. By direct calculation, we show that the method works for both poor and excellent glass forming materials. It offers a means to add a priori information in first-principles modeling of materials, and represents a significant step toward the computational design of non-crystalline materials using accurate interatomic interactions and experimental information. PMID:27652893

  2. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  3. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  4. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value in iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.

  5. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGES

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; ...

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  6. Relaxation in glassforming liquids and amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. A.; Ngai, K. L.; McKenna, G. B.; McMillan, P. F.; Martin, S. W.

    2000-09-01

    The field of viscous liquid and glassy solid dynamics is reviewed by a process of posing the key questions that need to be answered, and then providing the best answers available to the authors and their advisors at this time. The subject is divided into four parts, three of them dealing with behavior in different domains of temperature with respect to the glass transition temperature, Tg, and a fourth dealing with "short time processes." The first part tackles the high temperature regime T>Tg, in which the system is ergodic and the evolution of the viscous liquid toward the condition at Tg is in focus. The second part deals with the regime T˜Tg, where the system is nonergodic except for very long annealing times, hence has time-dependent properties (aging and annealing). The third part discusses behavior when the system is completely frozen with respect to the primary relaxation process but in which secondary processes, particularly those responsible for "superionic" conductivity, and dopart mobility in amorphous silicon, remain active. In the fourth part we focus on the behavior of the system at the crossover between the low frequency vibrational components of the molecular motion and its high frequency relaxational components, paying particular attention to very recent developments in the short time dielectric response and the high Q mechanical response.

  7. Crystalline and amorphous gold in chrysiasis.

    PubMed

    Benn, H P; von Gaudecker, B; Czank, M; Loeffler, H

    1990-01-01

    Skin biopsy specimens from five patients (three females and two males) treated parenterally with gold were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. X-ray microanalysis and electron diffraction were used to determine the dermal heavy metal content. Additional sections were stained for light microscopic examination. The amount of elemental gold administered to the patients over a period of years to alleviate rheumatoid arthritis lay between a minimum of 4.0 g and a maximum of 10.0 g. In one and the same patient dermal histiocytic gold aggregations in sun-exposed areas of skin displayed a different pattern and divergent physiochemical states from the gold deposits in non-UV-exposed skin, where aurosome-like amorphous formations are found in the cells of the upper dermis. Additional spherical particles are associated predominantly with phagolysosomes in melanophages beneath solar-irradiated epidermis. Convergent beam electron diffraction proves the crystalline nature of the spherical auriferous deposits. The occurrence of skin rash was not related to different physicochemical states of the precious metal.

  8. Inversion of diffraction data for amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The general and practical inversion of diffraction data-producing a computer model correctly representing the material explored-is an important unsolved problem for disordered materials. Such modeling should proceed by using our full knowledge base, both from experiment and theory. In this paper, we describe a robust method to jointly exploit the power of ab initio atomistic simulation along with the information carried by diffraction data. The method is applied to two very different systems: amorphous silicon and two compositions of a solid electrolyte memory material silver-doped GeSe3. The technique is easy to implement, is faster and yields results much improved over conventional simulation methods for the materials explored. By direct calculation, we show that the method works for both poor and excellent glass forming materials. It offers a means to add a priori information in first-principles modeling of materials, and represents a significant step toward the computational design of non-crystalline materials using accurate interatomic interactions and experimental information.

  9. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  10. Excimer laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yongbing; Xu Zhongyang; Wang Changan; Zhang Shaoqiang; An Chengwu; Li Xingjiao; Wan Xinheng; Ding Hui

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been crystallized by the irradiations of XeCl excimer laser. The crystallized films have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and conductivity measurements to clarify their morphologies, structure and electrical properties. The results show that a high conductive super thin layer is formed by a single pulse laser irradiation with the energy density of 75mJ/cm{sup 2}. The conductivity increases quickly at laser energy density threshold which decreases when the hydrogen in a-Si:H films is removed by pre-annealing. During crystallization process, oxygen atoms from the air ambient have been introduced into the films and such an introducing process is hindered by the hydrogen eruption. When the oxygen content is high enough, the carrier-transport mechanism includes thermionic emission (TE) and thermionic field emission (TFE) in the vicinity of room temperature, which is similar to semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon (SIPOS).

  11. Amorphous force transducers in ac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meydan, T.; Overshott, K. J.

    1982-11-01

    The high stress sensitivity and high yield stress properties of amorphous ribbon materials make them suitable for magnetic sensors and tranducer applications. Recently the authors have shown that ac systems eliminate the offset voltage and drift problems of the previously published dc systems. Further investigations proved that these transducers could be operated with a linear characteristic up to 1000 g in multiwrap toroidal configurations. The cause of the transducing behavior of the materials was proved to be variation of permeability with stress. It was previously suggested that the optimum operating frequency of the ac transducers is dependent on the physical configuration of the core. Further investigations have shown that the optimum operating frequency is linearly dependent on the amplitude of the input signal to the transducer. Double-core systems have been previously described in the literature where one core acts as a dummy core and the force is applied to the active core. The disadvantage of the double-core system is that aging of the active core changes the performance of the transducer by as much as 10%. A new system will be presented which uses an accurate analog memory to reduce the ageing effect to a fraction of one percent.

  12. An amorphous magnetic bimetallic sensor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, L.; Hašlar, V.; Závěta, K.; Pokorný, J.; Duhaj, P.; Polak, C.

    1995-11-01

    An amorphous bimetal ribbon consisting of magnetostrictive (Fe40Ni40B20) and nonmagnetostrictive (Co67Fe4Cr7Si8B12) layers was prepared by planar flow casting from a double-chamber crucible. The effect of applied tensile stress on hysteresis loops and the surface domain structures of the stress-relieved bimetal was investigated at room temperature. The hysteresis loops can be well explained by superpositions of hysteresis loops of the individual layers. Only the magnetostrictive layer is responsible for the influence of applied stress on magnetic behavior. At a certain stress, the magnetic anisotropy of the magnetostrictive layer abruptly changes from a hard-ribbon-axis to an easy-ribbon-axis type. This transition is accompanied by a change of domain structure and a sharp maximum of the coercive field. A simple model taking into account an interplay of the applied tensile stress with the compressive stress produced by thermal contraction after stress relief and/or by bending of the ribbon has been developed. The observed behavior can be well explained by the model.

  13. High-harmonic generation in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGES

    You, Yong Sing; Yin, Yanchun; Wu, Yi; ...

    2017-09-28

    High-harmonic generation in isolated atoms and molecules has been widely utilized in extreme ultraviolet photonics and attosecond pulse metrology. Recently, high-harmonic generation has been observed in solids, which could lead to important applications such as all-optical methods to image valance charge density and reconstruct electronic band structures, as well as compact extreme ultraviolet light sources. So far these studies are confined to crystalline solids; therefore, decoupling the respective roles of long-range periodicity and high density has been challenging. Here we report the observation of high-harmonic generation from amorphous fused silica. We also decouple the role of long-range periodicity by comparingmore » harmonics generated from fused silica and crystalline quartz, which contain the same atomic constituents but differ in long-range periodicity. These results advance current understanding of the strong-field processes leading to high-harmonic generation in solids with implications for the development of robust and compact extreme ultraviolet light sources.« less

  14. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  15. Relaxation in glassforming liquids and amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, C. A.; Ngai, K. L.; McKenna, G. B.; McMillan, P. F.; Martin, S. W.

    2000-09-15

    The field of viscous liquid and glassy solid dynamics is reviewed by a process of posing the key questions that need to be answered, and then providing the best answers available to the authors and their advisors at this time. The subject is divided into four parts, three of them dealing with behavior in different domains of temperature with respect to the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, and a fourth dealing with ''short time processes.'' The first part tackles the high temperature regime T>T{sub g}, in which the system is ergodic and the evolution of the viscous liquid toward the condition at T{sub g} is in focus. The second part deals with the regime T{approx}T{sub g}, where the system is nonergodic except for very long annealing times, hence has time-dependent properties (aging and annealing). The third part discusses behavior when the system is completely frozen with respect to the primary relaxation process but in which secondary processes, particularly those responsible for ''superionic'' conductivity, and dopart mobility in amorphous silicon, remain active. In the fourth part we focus on the behavior of the system at the crossover between the low frequency vibrational components of the molecular motion and its high frequency relaxational components, paying particular attention to very recent developments in the short time dielectric response and the high Q mechanical response. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  17. Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

  18. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  19. Physicochemical investigations and stability studies of amorphous gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Jondhale, Shital; Bhise, Satish; Pore, Yogesh

    2012-06-01

    Gliclazide (GLI), a poorly water-soluble antidiabetic, was transformed into a glassy state by melt quench technique in order to improve its physicochemical properties. Chemical stability of GLI during formation of glass was assessed by monitoring thin-layer chromatography, and an existence of amorphous form was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry. The glass transition occurred at 67.5°C. The amorphous material thus generated was examined for its in vitro dissolution performance in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). Surprisingly, amorphous GLI did not perform well and was unable to improve the dissolution characteristics compared to pure drug over entire period of dissolution studies. These unexpected results might be due to the formation of a cohesive supercooled liquid state and structural relaxation of amorphous form toward the supercooled liquid region which indicated functional inability of amorphous GLI from stability point of view. Hence, stabilization of amorphous GLI was attempted by elevation of T(g) via formation of solid dispersion systems involving comprehensive antiplasticizing as well as surface adsorption mechanisms. The binary and ternary amorphous dispersions prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (as antiplasticizer for elevation of T (g)) and Aerosil 200® and/or Sylysia® 350 (as adsorbent) in the ratio of 1:1:1 (w/w) using kneading and spray-drying techniques demonstrated significant enhancement in rate and extent of dissolution of drug initially. During accelerated stability studies, ternary systems showed no significant reduction in drug dissolution performance over a period of 3 months indicating excellent stabilization of amorphous GLI.

  20. Four phases of amorphous water: Simulations versus experiment.

    PubMed

    Brovchenko, Ivan; Oleinikova, Alla

    2006-04-28

    Multiplicity of the liquid-liquid phase transitions in supercooled water, first obtained in computer simulations [Brovchenko et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9473 (2003)], has got strong support from the recent experimental observation of the two phase transitions between amorphous ices [Loerting et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 025702 (2006)]. These experimental results allow assignment of the four amorphous water phases (I-IV) obtained in simulations to the three kinds of amorphous ices. Water phase I (rho approximately 0.90 gcm(3)) corresponds to the low-density amorphous ice, phase III (rho approximately 1.10 gcm(3)) to the high-density amorphous ice, and phase IV (rho approximately 1.20 gcm(3)) to the very-high-density amorphous ice. Phase II of model water with density rho approximately 1.00 gcm(3) corresponds to the normal-density water. Such assignment is confirmed by the comparison of the structural functions of the amorphous phases of model water and real water. In phases I and II the first and second coordination shells are clearly divided. Phase I consists mainly of the four coordinated tetrahedrally ordered water molecules. Phase II is enriched with molecules, which have tetrahedrally ordered four nearest neighbors and up six molecules in the first coordination shell. Majority of the molecules in phase III still have tetrahedrally ordered four nearest neighbors. Transition from phase III to phase IV is characterized by a noticeable drop of tetrahedral order, and phase IV consists mainly of molecules with highly isotropic angular distribution of the nearest neighbors. Relation between the structures of amorphous water phases, crystalline ices, and liquid water is discussed.

  1. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  2. Crystallization Behaviour of Amorphous Al-Ni-Nd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Goegebakan, Musa; Guendes, Alaaddin

    2007-04-23

    In this study, crystallization behaviour of rapidly solidified Al85Ni5Nd10 alloy has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Continuous heating DSC trace of amorphous Al85Ni5Nd10 alloy consisted of three exothermic peaks. This indicated that; crystallization of amorphous Al85Ni5Nd10 alloy during continous heating takes places in three stages. Before the first exothermic peak, a glass transition temperature was observed.

  3. Crystallization of Al-Co-Dy(Ho) amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V.; Petrova, S.; Svec, P., Sr.; Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Palitsina, A.

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Al92-xCo8Dy(Ho)x (x = 6 and 10 at.%) composition were produced by a standard planar flow casting method. Their kinetics of crystallization was studied by X-rays, DSC and electric resistivity. The phase composition was determined at each stage of crystallization. In order to increase the stability of amorphous state, use of alloy with high REM content and holmium is preferred to dysprosium.

  4. Crystallization of Al-Co-Dy(Ho) amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V.; Petrova, S.; Svec, P., Sr.; Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Palitsina, A.

    2017-04-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Al92- x Co8Dy(Ho) x ( x = 6 and 10 at.%) composition were produced by a standard planar flow casting method. Their kinetics of crystallization was studied by X-rays, DSC and electric resistivity. The phase composition was determined at each stage of crystallization. In order to increase the stability of amorphous state, use of alloy with high REM content and holmium is preferred to dysprosium.

  5. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  6. Unusual Thermal Stability of High-Entropy Alloy Amorphous Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-20

    1    REPORT Unusual Thermal Stability of High - Entropy Alloy Amorphous Structure Basic research for AOARD 114009 Award No. FA2386-11-1...stability of high - entropy alloy amorphous structure 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861114009 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jien-Wei...at least 3 h. If substrate effect could be eliminated, the crystallization temperature would be higher. 15. SUBJECT TERMS high entropy alloys 16

  7. Deformation-induced amorphization of Cu-Ti intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Askenazy, P.D.

    1992-12-31

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic Compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu{sub 35}Ti{sub 65} and Cu{sub 33.3}Ti{sub 66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, Which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi{sub 2} was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering is close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries cause by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of water sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plan-view and cross-sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas.

  8. Fluence dependent oscillatory amorphization and recrystallization in ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banu, Nasrin; Satpati, B.; Dev, B. N.

    2017-09-01

    Ion-beam-induced amorphization and recrystallization are well-known phenomena. At a constant ion flux, there is a substrate temperature TR such that, for T < TR the irradiation produces amorphization, whereas for T > TR, it produces recrystallization. However, both the processes do not happen at a given substrate temperature. Here we present a novel phenomenon of ion fluence dependent oscillatory amorphization and recrystallization in silicon at room temperature in a Si(5 nm)/Ni(15 nm)/Si system. Before the deposition of Ni on Si, a buffer Si layer was deposited on the Si substrate. Ion irradiation was carried out with 1 MeV Si+ ions in the fluence range 1 × 1014-3 × 1017 ions/cm2. At a fluence of 5 × 1016 ions/cm2, Si is amorphous up to a depth of ∼1.4 μm. However, at a fluence of 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 two narrow bands of recrystallized (rc) Si are formed within the amorphized Si. At 2 × 1017 ions/cm2 these rc-Si bands become amorphous again. At 3 × 1017 ions/cm2 the broader rc band reappears. This oscillatory amorphization/recrystallization behaviour is Ni-mediated. Energy dispersive X-ray map of Ni shows Ni accumulation at the top of the rc-Si bands. The top of the broader rc band is actually the buffer-Si/substrate-Si interface. TRIM simulation shows the appearance of a Ni-displacement-induced vacancy peak at the position of the narrow rc-Si band. Accumulation of Ni in these regions is associated with the recrystallization process. The Ni layer, with incorporation of Si, also passes through amorphization and recrystallization. At the highest fluence η-NiSi nanocrystals are formed in the Ni layer.

  9. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ghosh, Arup K.; Wiesmann, Harold J.; Rock, Edward B.; Lutz, III, Harry A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  10. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Wiesmann, H.J.; Rock, E.B.; Lutz, H.A. III

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700 to 2300/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  11. Synthesis of nano-sized amorphous boron powders through active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jilin; Gu, Yunle; Li, Zili; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed. Highlights: ► Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method. ► The morphology, particle size and purity of the samples could be effectively controlled via changing the endothermic rate. ► The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. ► The active dilution method could be further popularized and become a common approach to prepare various inorganic materials. - Abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 850 °C in a SHS furnace using Mg, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and KBH{sub 4} as raw materials. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission TEM (HRTEM). The boron powders demonstrated an average particle size of 50 nm with a purity of 95.64 wt.%. The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in the active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed.

  12. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of Mg-rich, Mg-poor and acid leached palygorskites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Xue, Jiyue; Polya, D A

    2007-02-01

    The FTIR spectra of pure magnesium-rich (Mg-rich) and magnesium-poor (Mg-poor) palygorskites, before and after short-term (<7 h) and long-term (360 h) acid leaching are presented here. Comparison of decomposition spectra of Mg-rich and Mg-poor palygorskites clearly shows that the absorption peaks related to pairs of octahedral cation differ depending on the octahedral site occupancy. Short-term acid leaching of palygorskites results in significant changes to FTIR absorption bands near 1200 and 790 cm-1. As the acid attack progresses, the band at 1200 cm-1 shifts to lower wavenumbers, whilst the band at 790 cm-1, which here is assigned to SiU-O-SiD symmetrical stretching vibration, shifts to higher wavelengths. Longer-term leaching of palygorskites results in the disappearance of 900-1200 cm-1 absorption bands, showing that the palygorskite has largely decomposed to amorphous silica. Assignments of several other bands have been made as follows: several vibrations relate to OH, i.e. 847 cm-1, hygroscopic water (1635 cm-1), Si-O vibrations 1100, 611-621, 470-481 cm-1, etc. appear in the FTIR spectra of 360 h acid leached palygorskite. Three bands near 1100, 611-621 and 470-481 cm-1 relate to Si-O vibration of an ideal hexagonal (Si2O5)n sheet.

  13. Inhibiting surface crystallization of amorphous indomethacin by nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tian; Sun, Ye; Li, Ning; de Villiers, Melgardt M; Yu, Lian

    2007-04-24

    An amorphous solid (glass) may crystallize faster at the surface than through the bulk, making surface crystallization a mechanism of failure for amorphous pharmaceuticals and other materials. An ultrathin coating of gold or polyelectrolytes inhibited the surface crystallization of amorphous indomethacin (IMC), an anti-inflammatory drug and model organic glass. The gold coating (10 nm) was deposited by sputtering, and the polyelectrolyte coating (3-20 nm) was deposited by an electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of cationic poly(dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA) and anionic sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) in aqueous solution. The coating also inhibited the growth of existing crystals. The inhibition was strong even with one layer of PDDA. The polyelectrolyte coating still permitted fast dissolution of amorphous IMC and improved its wetting and flow. The finding supports the view that the surface crystallization of amorphous IMC is enabled by the mobility of a thin layer of surface molecules, and this mobility can be suppressed by a coating of only a few nanometers. This technique may be used to stabilize amorphous drugs prone to surface crystallization, with the aqueous coating process especially suitable for drugs of low aqueous solubility.

  14. Amorphous drug delivery systems: molecular aspects, design, and performance.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Gupta, Piyush; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2004-01-01

    The biopharmaceutical properties-especially the solubility and permeability-of a molecule contribute to its overall therapeutic efficacy. The newer tools of drug discovery have caused a shift in the properties of drug-like compounds, resulting in drugs with poor aqueous solubility and permeability, which offer delivery challenges, thus requiring considerable pharmaceutical manning. The modulation of solubility is a more viable option for enhancing bioavailability than permeability, because of the lack of "safe" approaches to enhance the latter. Solid-state manipulation in general, and amorphization in particular, are preferred ways of enhancing solubility and optimizing delivery of poorly soluble drugs. This review attempts to address the diverse issues pertaining to amorphous drug delivery systems. We discuss the various thermodynamic phenomenon such as glass transition, fragility, molecular mobility, devitrification kinetics, and molecular-level chemical interactions that contribute to the ease of formation, the solubility advantage, and the stability of amorphous drugs. The engineering of pharmaceutical alloys by solubilizing and stabilizing carriers, commonly termed solid dispersions, provide avenues for exploiting the benefits of amorphous systems. Carrier properties, mechanisms of drug release, and study of release kinetics help to improve the predictability of performance. The review also addresses the various barriers in the design of amorphous delivery systems, use of amorphous form in controlled release delivery systems, and their in vivo performance.

  15. Wildfire hazard mapping: exploring site conditions in eastern US wildland—ruban interfaces

    Treesearch

    Matthew P. Peters; Louis R. Iverson; Stephen N. Matthews; Anantha M. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Wildfires are a serious threat for land managers and property owners, and over the last few decades this threat has expanded as a result of increased rural development. Most wildfires in the north-eastern US occur in the wildland—urban interface, those regions of intermingling urban and non-developed vegetated lands, where access to firefighting resources can...

  16. Laboratory simulations of thermal annealing in proto-planetary discs - II. Crystallization of enstatite from amorphous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droeger, J.; Burchard, M.; Lattard, D.

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous silicates of olivine and pyroxene composition are thought to be common constituents of circumstellar, interstellar, and interplanetary dust. In proto-planetary discs amorphous dust crystallize essentially as a result of thermal annealing. The present project aims at deciphering the kinetics of crystallization pyroxene in proto-planetary dust on the basis of experiments on amorphous thin films. The thin films are deposited on Si-wafers (111) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The thin films are completely amorphous, chemically homogeneous (on the MgSiO3 composition) and with a continuous and flat surface. They are subsequently annealed for 1 to 216 h at 1073K and 1098K in a vertical quench furnace and drop-quenched on a copper block. To monitor the progress of crystallization, the samples are characterized by AFM and SEM imaging and IR spectroscopy. After short annealing durations (1 to 12 h) AFM and SE imaging reveal small shallow polygonal features (diameter 0.5-1 μm; height 2-3 nm) evenly distributed at the otherwise flat surface of the thin films. These shallow features are no longer visible after about 3 h at 1098 K, resp. >12 h at 1073 K. Meanwhile, two further types of features appear small protruding pyramids and slightly depressed spherolites. The orders of appearance of these features depend on temperature, but both persist and steadily grow with increasing annealing duration. Their sizes can reach about 12 μm. From TEM investigations on annealed thin films on the Mg2SiO4 composition we know that these features represent crystalline sites, which can be surrounded by a still amorphous matrix (Oehm et al. 2010). A quantitative evaluation of the size of the features will give insights on the progress of crystallization. IR spectra of the unprocessed thin films show only broad bands. In contrast, bands characteristic of crystalline enstatite are clearly recognizable in annealed samples, e.g. after 12 h at 1078 K. Small bands can also be assigned to

  17. Optical properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing Qiu

    Carbon can be formed either as fully crystalline structures, such as diamond, graphite, and fullerene (C60). or as mostly amorphous structures, like amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H). A study was made of a-C:H films which had been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using CH4, H2 and Ar (or N2 for doping) gas mixtures. Each film exhibits unique physical, optical and electronic properties dependent upon the specific deposition parameters. The study is intended to extend our understanding of the properties of a-C:H films. Samples prepared by James Johnson, similar to those used in his previous studies (using mainly 4 separate sets of deposition parameters), were evaluated along with other samples which were unique to this study. Film preparation parameters were varied to allow an examination of the effects induced through the variation of deposition power level, partial substitution of nitrogen for methane in the deposition process gasses and post-deposition thermal annealing. The film optical properties were evaluated using combination of non-destructive test methods, including Raman scattering, photoluminescence (PL), optical absorption and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopies. Different PL responses at low temperature (6 K) were recorded for doped and/or annealed samples deriving from the main set of samples. Two new features at 564 and 637 nm of nitrogen doped films replaced the 597 and 703 nm of undoped films. For the first time, three Raman phonon peaks were observed in a nitrogen doped and annealed film. Additional FTIR data indicated that the third Raman phonon peak was associated with CH2 and CH3 bonding structures. The Raman scattering data contributed to an improved understanding of the two-phase (sp2, sp3) model developed by Robertson. Optical absorption measurements could only be obtained for the films deposited on fused quartz. All other measurements were made on films deposited on silicon, which is opaque in

  18. Enhanced cycling stability and high rate dischargeability of (La,Mg)2Ni7-type hydrogen storage alloys with (La,Mg)5Ni19 minor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Han, Shumin; Han, Da; Li, Yuan; Yang, Shuqin; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Yumeng

    2015-08-01

    The A2B7-type lanthanum (La)-magnesium (Mg)-nickel (Ni)-based alloy with single (La,Mg)2Ni7 phase and different amounts of (La,Mg)5Ni19 minor phase was obtained by step-wise sintering. The impact of (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase on the alloy's microstructure and electrochemical performance was subsequently studied. It was found that the average subunit volume in (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase is smaller than that in (La,Mg)2Ni7 phase, resulting in increases of strains inside the alloys and decreases of cell volumes. During battery charge/discharge, the (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase network scattered in the alloys relieves internal stress, alleviates pulverization and oxidation of the alloys, stabilizes the stacking structures against amorphization, and finally improves the cycling stability of the alloys. Furthermore, (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase with higher Ni content desorbs hydrogen ahead of (La,Mg)2Ni7 phase. The reduced hydrogen pressure in (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase can subsequently lead to the fast discharge of (La,Mg)2Ni7 phase, thus making a remarkable improvement in high rate dischargeability at 1500 mA g-1 from 46.2% to 58.9% with increasing (La,Mg)5Ni19 phase abundance from 0 to 37.4 wt.%. Therefore, it is believed that A2B7-type La-Mg-Ni-based alloys with A5B19-type minor phase are promising prototypes for high-power and long-lifetime nickel/metal hydride battery electrode materials.

  19. CYANATE ION IN COMPACT AMORPHOUS WATER ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Mate, Belen; Herrero, Victor J.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Moreno, Miguel A.; Escribano, Rafael; Fernandez-Torre, Delia; Gomez, Pedro C.

    2012-11-10

    The 4.62 {mu}m infrared (2164.5 cm{sup -1}) absorption band, observed in ice mantels toward many young stellar objects, has been mostly attributed to the {nu}{sub 3} (CN stretch) band of OCN{sup -} ions. We present in this work a spectroscopic study of OCN{sup -} ions embedded in compact amorphous ice in a range of concentrations and temperatures relevant to astronomical observations together with quantum mechanical calculations of the {nu}{sub 3} band of OCN{sup -} in various H{sub 2}O environments. The ice samples containing the ions are prepared through hyperquenching of liquid droplets of K{sup +}OCN{sup -} solutions on a substrate at 14 K. The {nu}{sub 3} OCN{sup -} band appears as a broad feature peaking at 4.64 {mu}m with a secondary maximum at 4.54 {mu}m and is much weaker than the corresponding peak in the liquid solution or in the solid salt. A similar weakening is observed for other OCN{sup -} absorption peaks at 7.66 {mu}m (2{nu}{sub 2}) and 8.20 {mu}m ({nu}{sub 1}). The theoretical calculations for the {nu}{sub 3} vibration lead to a range of frequencies spanning the experimentally observed width. This frequency spread could help explain the pronounced drop in the band intensity in the ice. The OCN{sup -} {nu}{sub 3} band in the present compact ices is also broader and much weaker than that reported in the literature for OCN{sup -} ions obtained by variously processing porous ice samples containing suitable neutral precursors. The results of this study indicate that the astronomical detection of OCN{sup -} in ice mantels could be significantly impaired if the ion is embedded in a compact water network.

  20. Amorphous solid dispersion of berberine with absorption enhancer demonstrates a remarkable hypoglycemic effect via improving its bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhaojie, Meng; Ming, Zhang; Shengnan, Wei; Xiaojia, Bi; Hatch, Grant M; Jingkai, Gu; Li, Chen

    2014-06-05

    Low oral bioavailability of berberine due to poor solubility and membrane permeability limits its clinical use for treatment of diabetes. We developed an amorphous solid dispersion of berberine with absorption enhancer sodium caprate, referred to as Huang-Gui Solid Dispersion (HGSD) preparations, and examined them for improvement of dissolution and oral bioavailability. HGSDs were prepared by solvent evaporation, and the formulations of amorphous solid dispersions were characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. According to in vitro solubility and dissolution studies, P9, the 9th production of HGSDs based on orthogonal test, was sorted out. Then pharmacokinetic behavior of P9 was evaluated by in vitro membrane permeation, in situ intestinal perfusion, and in vivo bioavailability in rats. Furthermore, the anti-diabetic effect of P9 was examined in a type 2 diabetic rat model. It was found that majority of berberine in P9 existed in an amorphous form, and its solubility and dissolution rate were significantly increased. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a 3-fold increase in in vitro membrane permeation, a 4-fold increase in in situ intestinal perfusion and a 5-fold increase in vivo bioavailability of P9 compared to berberine or berberine tablets. In addition, oral administration of P9 (100mg/kg) improved glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic rats compared to pure berberine (100mg/kg), berberine tablets (100mg/kg) or metformin (300 mg/kg) treatment. These findings indicate that P9 enhances oral bioavailability of berberine and may be a potential candidate drug for treatment of diabetes.