Science.gov

Sample records for rubisco activities properties

  1. Manipulation of Rubisco: the amount, activity, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Parry, M A J; Andralojc, P J; Mitchell, R A C; Madgwick, P J; Keys, A J

    2003-05-01

    Genetic modification to increase the specificity of Rubisco for CO(2) relative to O(2) and to increase the catalytic rate of Rubisco in crop plants would have great agronomic importance. The availability of three-dimensional structures of Rubisco at atomic resolution and the characterization of site-directed mutants have greatly enhanced the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of Rubisco. Considerable progress has been made in identifying natural variation in the catalytic properties of Rubisco from different species and in developing the tools for introducing both novel and foreign Rubisco genes into plants. The additional complexities of assembling copies of the two distinct polypeptide subunits of Rubisco into a functional holoenzyme in vivo (requiring sufficient expression, post-translational modification, interaction with chaperonins, and interaction with Rubisco activase) remain a major challenge. The consequences of changing the amount of Rubisco present in leaves have been investigated by the use of antisense constructs. The manipulation of genes encoding Rubisco activase has provided a means to investigate the regulation of Rubisco activity.

  2. Subunit interactions of Rubisco activase: polyethylene glycol promotes self-association, stimulates ATPase and activation activities, and enhances interactions with Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, M E

    1992-11-01

    The effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the enzymatic and physical properties of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase was examined. In the presence of PEG, Rubisco activase exhibited higher ATPase and Rubisco activating activities, concomitant with increased apparent affinity for ATP and Rubisco. Specific ATPase activity, which was dependent on Rubisco activase concentration, was also higher in the presence of Ficoll, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and bovine serum albumin. The ability of Rubisco activase to facilitate dissociation of the tight-binding inhibitor 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate from carbamylated Rubisco was also enhanced in the presence of PEG. Mixing experiments with Rubisco activase from two different sources showed that tobacco Rubisco activase, which exhibited little activation of spinach Rubisco by itself, was inhibitory when included with spinach Rubisco activase. Polyethylene glycol improved the ability of tobacco and a mixture of tobacco plus spinach Rubisco activase to activate spinach Rubisco. Estimates based on rate zonal sedimentation and gel-filtration chromatography indicated that the apparent molecular mass of Rubisco activase was two- to fourfold higher in the presence of PEG. The increase in apparent molecular mass was consistent with the propensity of solvent-excluding reagents like PEG to promote self-association of proteins. Likewise, the change in enzymatic properties of Rubisco activase in the presence of PEG and the dependence of specific activity on protein concentration resembled changes that often accompany self-association. For Rubisco activase, high concentrations of protein in the chloroplast stroma would provide an environment conducive to self-association and cause expression of properties that would enhance its ability to function efficiently in vivo.

  3. The activity of Rubisco's molecular chaperone, Rubisco activase, in leaf extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco frequently undergoes unproductive interactions with its sugar-phosphate substrate that stabilize active sites in an inactive conformation. Restoring catalytic competence to these sites requires the “molecular chiropractic” activity of Rubisco activase (activase). To make the study of activas...

  4. The plastid casein kinase 2 phosphorylates Rubisco activase at the Thr-78 site but is not essential for regulation of Rubisco activation state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is encoded by a single gene (At2g39730) that is alternatively spliced to form a large alpha-RCA and small beta-RCA isoform. The activity of Rubisco is controlled in res...

  5. Rubisco activity and regulation as targets for crop improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase) enables net carbon fixation through the carboxylation of RuBP. However, some characteristics of Rubisco make it surprisingly inefficient and compromise photosynthetic productivity. For example, Rubisco catalyses a wasteful reaction wit...

  6. Rubisco catalytic properties of wild and domesticated relatives provide scope for improving wheat photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Prins, Anneke; Orr, Douglas J; Andralojc, P John; Reynolds, Matthew P; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco is a major target for improving crop photosynthesis and yield, yet natural diversity in catalytic properties of this enzyme is poorly understood. Rubisco from 25 genotypes of the Triticeae tribe, including wild relatives of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), were surveyed to identify superior enzymes for improving photosynthesis in this crop. In vitro Rubisco carboxylation velocity (V c), Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (K c) and O2 (K o) and specificity factor (S c/o) were measured at 25 and 35 °C. V c and K c correlated positively, while V c and S c/o were inversely related. Rubisco large subunit genes (rbcL) were sequenced, and predicted corresponding amino acid differences analysed in relation to the corresponding catalytic properties. The effect of replacing native wheat Rubisco with counterparts from closely related species was analysed by modelling the response of photosynthesis to varying CO2 concentrations. The model predicted that two Rubisco enzymes would increase photosynthetic performance at 25 °C while only one of these also increased photosynthesis at 35 °C. Thus, under otherwise identical conditions, catalytic variation in the Rubiscos analysed is predicted to improve photosynthetic rates at physiological CO2 concentrations. Naturally occurring Rubiscos with superior properties amongst the Triticeae tribe can be exploited to improve wheat photosynthesis and crop productivity.

  7. Rubisco catalytic properties of wild and domesticated relatives provide scope for improving wheat photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Anneke; Orr, Douglas J.; Andralojc, P. John; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco is a major target for improving crop photosynthesis and yield, yet natural diversity in catalytic properties of this enzyme is poorly understood. Rubisco from 25 genotypes of the Triticeae tribe, including wild relatives of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), were surveyed to identify superior enzymes for improving photosynthesis in this crop. In vitro Rubisco carboxylation velocity (V c), Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (K c) and O2 (K o) and specificity factor (S c/o) were measured at 25 and 35 °C. V c and K c correlated positively, while V c and S c/o were inversely related. Rubisco large subunit genes (rbcL) were sequenced, and predicted corresponding amino acid differences analysed in relation to the corresponding catalytic properties. The effect of replacing native wheat Rubisco with counterparts from closely related species was analysed by modelling the response of photosynthesis to varying CO2 concentrations. The model predicted that two Rubisco enzymes would increase photosynthetic performance at 25 °C while only one of these also increased photosynthesis at 35 °C. Thus, under otherwise identical conditions, catalytic variation in the Rubiscos analysed is predicted to improve photosynthetic rates at physiological CO2 concentrations. Naturally occurring Rubiscos with superior properties amongst the Triticeae tribe can be exploited to improve wheat photosynthesis and crop productivity. PMID:26798025

  8. The regulatory properties of rubisco activase differ among species and affect photosynthetic induction during light transitions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco’s catalytic chaperone, Rubisco activase (Rca), uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to restore catalytic competence to Rubisco. In Arabidopsis, inhibition of Rca activity by ADP is fine-tuned by redox regulation of the a-isoform. To elucidate the mechanism for Rca regulation in species contai...

  9. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  10. In silico Identification of Ergosterol as a Novel Fungal Metabolite Enhancing RuBisCO Activity in Lycopersicum esculentum.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Joyeeta; Narad, Priyanka; Sengupta, Abhishek; Sharma, P D; Paul, P K

    2016-09-01

    RuBisCO (EC 4.1.1.39), a key enzyme found in stroma of chloroplast, is important for fixing atmospheric CO2 in plants. Alterations in the activity of RuBisCO could influence photosynthetic yield. Therefore, to understand the activity of the protein, knowledge about its structure is pertinent. Though the structure of Nicotiana RuBisCO has been modeled, the structure of tomato RuBisCO is still unknown. RuBisCO extracted from chloroplasts of tomato leaves was subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF followed by Mascot Search. The protein sequence based on gene identification numbers was subjected to in silico model construction, characterization and docking studies. The primary structure analysis revealed that protein was stable, neutral, hydrophilic and has an acidic pI. The result though indicates a 90 % homology with other members of Solanaceae but differs from the structure of Arabidopsis RuBisCO. Different ligands were docked to assess the activity of RuBisCO against these metabolite components. Out of the number of modulators tested, ergosterol had the maximum affinity (E = -248.08) with RuBisCO. Ergosterol is a major cell wall component of fungi and has not been reported to be naturally found in plants. It is a known immune elicitor in plants. The current study throws light on its role in affecting RuBisCO activity in plants, thereby bringing changes in the photosynthetic rate.

  11. Rubisco activity in guard cells compared with the solute requirement for stomatal opening. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Reckmann, U.; Scheibe, R.; Raschke, K. )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the ({sup 14}C) carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant.

  12. Photosynthetic Trichomes Contain a Specific Rubisco with a Modified pH-Dependent Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laterre, Raphaëlle; Remacle, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the most abundant enzyme in plants and is responsible for CO2 fixation during photosynthesis. This enzyme is assembled from eight large subunits (RbcL) encoded by a single chloroplast gene and eight small subunits (RbcS) encoded by a nuclear gene family. Rubisco is primarily found in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (C3 plants), bundle-sheath (C4 plants), and guard cells. In certain species, photosynthesis also takes place in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes, which are epidermal outgrowths (hairs) involved in the secretion of specialized metabolites. However, photosynthesis and, in particular, Rubisco have not been characterized in trichomes. Here, we show that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) trichomes contain a specific Rubisco small subunit, NtRbcS-T, which belongs to an uncharacterized phylogenetic cluster (T). This cluster contains RbcS from at least 33 species, including monocots, many of which are known to possess glandular trichomes. Cluster T is distinct from the cluster M, which includes the abundant, functionally characterized RbcS isoforms expressed in mesophyll or bundle-sheath cells. Expression of NtRbcS-T in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and purification of the full Rubisco complex showed that this isoform conferred higher Vmax and Km values as well as higher acidic pH-dependent activity than NtRbcS-M, an isoform expressed in the mesophyll. This observation was confirmed with trichome extracts. These data show that an ancient divergence allowed for the emergence of a so-far-uncharacterized RbcS cluster. We propose that secretory trichomes have a particular Rubisco uniquely adapted to secretory cells where CO2 is released by the active specialized metabolism. PMID:28250069

  13. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  14. Optimizing Rubisco and its regulation for greater resource use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Scales, Joanna C; Madgwick, Pippa J; Parry, Martin A J

    2015-09-01

    Rubisco catalyses the carboxylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), enabling net CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis. The properties and regulation of Rubisco are not optimal for biomass production in current and projected future environments. Rubisco is relatively inefficient, and large amounts of the enzyme are needed to support photosynthesis, requiring large investments in nitrogen. The competing oxygenation of RuBP by Rubisco decreases photosynthetic efficiency. Additionally, Rubisco is inhibited by some sugar phosphates and depends upon interaction with Rubisco activase (Rca) to be reactivated. Rca activity is modulated by the chloroplast redox status and ADP/ATP ratios, thereby mediating Rubisco activation and photosynthetic induction in response to irradiance. The extreme thermal sensitivity of Rca compromises net CO2 assimilation at moderately high temperatures. Given its central role in carbon assimilation, the improvement of Rubisco function and regulation is tightly linked with irradiance, nitrogen and water use efficiencies. Although past attempts have had limited success, novel technologies and an expanding knowledge base make the challenge of improving Rubisco activity in crops an achievable goal. Strategies to optimize Rubisco and its regulation are addressed in relation to their potential to improve crop resource use efficiency and climate resilience of photosynthesis.

  15. Substitutions at the opening of the Rubisco central solvent channel affect holoenzyme stability and CO2/O 2 specificity but not activation by Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, M Gloria; Genkov, Todor; Nogueira, Ana S; Salvucci, Michael E; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the initial step of carbon metabolism in photosynthesis. The holoenzyme comprises eight large subunits, arranged as a tetramer of dimers around a central solvent channel that defines a fourfold axis of symmetry, and eight small subunits, arranged as two tetramers at the poles of the axis. The phylogenetically divergent small-subunit loops between β-strands A and B form the entrance to the solvent channel. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ile-58 from each of the four small-subunit βA-βB loops defines the minimal diameter of the channel opening. To understand the role of the central solvent channel in Rubisco function, directed mutagenesis and transformation of Chlamydomonas were employed to replace Ile-58 with Ala, Lys, Glu, Trp, or three Trp residues (I58W3) to close the entrance to the channel. The I58E, I58K, and I58W substitutions caused only small decreases in photosynthetic growth at 25 and 35 °C, whereas I58W3 had a substantial effect at both temperatures. The mutant enzymes had decreased carboxylation rates, but the I58W3 enzyme had decreases in both carboxylation and CO2/O2 specificity. The I58E, I58W, and I58W3 enzymes were inactivated at lower temperatures than wild-type Rubisco, and were degraded at slower rates under oxidative stress. However, these mutant enzymes were activated by Rubisco activase at normal rates, indicating that the structural transition required for carboxylation is not affected by altering the solvent channel opening. Structural dynamics alone may not be responsible for these distant effects on the Rubisco active site.

  16. Rubisco, Rubisco activase, and global climate change.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Way, Danielle A; Kubien, David S

    2008-01-01

    Global warming and the rise in atmospheric CO(2) will increase the operating temperature of leaves in coming decades, often well above the thermal optimum for photosynthesis. Presently, there is controversy over the limiting processes controlling photosynthesis at elevated temperature. Leading models propose that the reduction in photosynthesis at elevated temperature is a function of either declining capacity of electron transport to regenerate RuBP, or reductions in the capacity of Rubisco activase to maintain Rubisco in an active configuration. Identifying which of these processes is the principal limitation at elevated temperature is complicated because each may be regulated in response to a limitation in the other. Biochemical and gas exchange assessments can disentangle these photosynthetic limitations; however, comprehensive assessments are often difficult and, for many species, virtually impossible. It is proposed that measurement of the initial slope of the CO(2) response of photosynthesis (the A/C(i) response) can be a useful means to screen for Rubisco activase limitations. This is because a reduction in the Rubisco activation state should be most apparent at low CO(2) when Rubisco capacity is generally limiting. In sweet potato, spinach, and tobacco, the initial slope of the A/C(i) response shows no evidence of activase limitations at high temperature, as the slope can be accurately modelled using the kinetic parameters of fully activated Rubisco. In black spruce (Picea mariana), a reduction in the initial slope above 30 degrees C cannot be explained by the known kinetics of fully activated Rubisco, indicating that activase may be limiting at high temperatures. Because black spruce is the dominant species in the boreal forest of North America, Rubisco activase may be an unusually important factor determining the response of the boreal biome to climate change.

  17. Development of an activity-directed selection system enabled significant improvement of the carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Liu, Guoxia; Zhang, Junli; Li, Yin

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic CO(2) fixation is the ultimate source of organic carbon on earth and thus is essential for crop production and carbon sequestration. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the first step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. However, the extreme low carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco makes it the most attractive target for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Extensive studies have focused on re-engineering a more efficient enzyme, but the effort has been impeded by the limited understanding of its structure-function relationships and the lack of an efficient selection system towards its activity. To address the unsuccessful molecular engineering of Rubisco, we developed an Escherichia coli-based activity-directed selection system which links the growth of host cell solely to the Rubisco activity therein. A Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Rubisco mutant with E49V and D82G substitutions in the small subunit was selected from a total of 15,000 mutants by one round of evolution. This mutant showed an 85% increase in specific carboxylation activity and a 45% improvement in catalytic efficiency towards CO(2). The small-subunit E49V mutation was speculated to influence holoenzyme catalysis through interaction with the large-subunit Q225. This interaction is conserved among various Rubisco from higher plants and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knowledge of these might provide clues for engineering Rubisco from higher plants, with the potential of increasing the crop yield.

  18. Changes of mesophyll and the rubisco activity in pea plants grown in clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamchuk, N. I.

    In earlier research, it was found that microgravity causes alteration of mesophyll cell parameters and dislication at the ultrastructural level (Kordyum et al., 1989, Nedukha et al., 1991, Kordyum, 1997, Adamchuk et al., 2002). Also, destruction of the fine structure of chloroplasts was reported by Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Kordyum et al. (1989), and Adamchuk et al. (1999). In addition, Abilov et al. (1986), Aliev et al. (1987), Brown et al. (1993) have discovered the decrease in starch volume. The objective of this work was to compare quantitative ultrastructural parameters of mesophyll cells (including properties of their chloroplasts) and the level of Rubisco activity detected in clinorotated and control plants of pea (Pisum sativum L.). Plants were grown for 12 days in the nutritional medium of Hogland on a clinostat (with 2 rev. min-1 speed of rotation) at a temperature of 23-25°C and illumination 230 μ mol per m-2s-1. The comparison of transversal cross-sections of leaves has revealed a significant increase of mesophyll cell volume and intercellular space under experimental conditions. This expansion of mesophyll cells has correlated with an increase of the number of chloroplasts. Essential ultrastructural changes have affected the total volume of thylakoids. Also, the value of the photosynthetic membranes development in the clinorotated plants was higher 17.11 ± 1.94 μ m3 then in control -- 12.65 ± 1.83 μ m3 due to extension of destacking thylakoids. Increase of the volume density of plastoglobuli in the clinorotated plants on the 1.63-fold suggested the effect of either greater accumulation of lipid or acceleration of chloroplasts senescence. Under influence of clinorotation, the partial volume of starch inclusions significantly decreased in the spongy mesophyll chloroplasts -- 10.46 ± 1.80 % to compare with control -- 31.34 ± 2.37 %. However, the clinorotation of plants resulted in an increase of the Rubisco activity. Intensities

  19. Photosynthesis and regulation of rubisco activity in net phytoplankton from Delaware Bay

    SciTech Connect

    MacIntyre, H.L.; Geider, R.J.; McKay, R.M.

    1996-10-01

    Net phytoplankton (>20 {mu}m) comprised 51 {plus_minus} 9% of the total chlorophyll (Chl) in a Skeletonema costatum-dominated spring bloom in Delaware Bay. The net phytoplankton had low C:N and high protein:carbohydrate ratios, indicating that their growth was nutrient-replete. Their photosynthetic responses were characterized by low specific absorption, low light-limited and light-saturated rates of photosynthesis, and high quantum yields, indicative of acclimation to low irradiance and internal self-shading. High fucoxanthin: Chl ratios also indicated low light acclimation, but high photoprotective xanthophyll: Chl ratios suggested a high capacity for photoprotective energy dissipation. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) could be activated and deactivated in response to changes in irradiance and was fully activated at the surface of the water column and fully deactivated in aphotic deep water. Maximum Rubisco activity was correlated with Rubisco content and bulk protein content of the phytoplankton and with light-saturated rates of photosynthesis measured in short (<20-min) incubations. Long (60-min) incubations caused a decrease in the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis, possibly because of feedback limitation. While feedback limitation is unlikely to occur in the water column it should be considered when estimating productivity in well-mixed waters from fixed light-depth incubations. 90 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Rubisco activase constrains the photosynthetic potential of leaves at high temperature and CO2.

    PubMed

    Crafts-Brandner, S J; Salvucci, M E

    2000-11-21

    Net photosynthesis (Pn) is inhibited by moderate heat stress. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we examined the effects of temperature on gas exchange and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation in cotton and tobacco leaves and compared the responses to those of the isolated enzymes. Depending on the CO(2) concentration, Pn decreased when temperatures exceeded 35-40 degrees C. This response was inconsistent with the response predicted from the properties of fully activated Rubisco. Rubisco deactivated in leaves when temperature was increased and also in response to high CO(2) or low O(2). The decrease in Rubisco activation occurred when leaf temperatures exceeded 35 degrees C, whereas the activities of isolated activase and Rubisco were highest at 42 degrees C and >50 degrees C, respectively. In the absence of activase, isolated Rubisco deactivated under catalytic conditions and the rate of deactivation increased with temperature but not with CO(2). The ability of activase to maintain or promote Rubisco activation in vitro also decreased with temperature but was not affected by CO(2). Increasing the activase/Rubisco ratio reduced Rubisco deactivation at higher temperatures. The results indicate that, as temperature increases, the rate of Rubisco deactivation exceeds the capacity of activase to promote activation. The decrease in Rubisco activation that occurred in leaves at high CO(2) was not caused by a faster rate of deactivation, but by reduced activase activity possibly in response to unfavorable ATP/ADP ratios. When adjustments were made for changes in activation state, the kinetic properties of Rubisco predicted the response of Pn at high temperature and CO(2).

  1. A nonradioactive assay method for determination of enzymatic activity of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco).

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Subhra; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and nonradioactive assay method for activity determination of Rubisco is described. The method is based on thin-layer chromatographic separation of 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) and D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). This assay method allows the quantitative determination of Rubisco activity. Rates of carbon dioxide fixation on RuBP determined by this method were comparable to those obtained independently by other methods. This assay method is reproducible and relatively free from interference.

  2. Growth response of Douglas-fir seedlings to nitrogen fertilization: importance of Rubisco activation state and respiration rates.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; Rose, Cathy L

    2005-08-01

    High foliar nitrogen concentration ([N]) is associated with high rates of photosynthesis and thus high tree productivity; however, at excessive [N], tree productivity is reduced. Reports of excessive [N] in the Douglas-fir forests of the Oregon Coast Range prompted this investigation of growth and needle physiological responses to increasing foliar N concentrations in 1-year-old Douglas-fir seedlings. After 1 year of N fertilization, total seedling biomass increased with each successive increase in N fertilizer concentration, except in the highest N fertilization treatment. Of the many physiological responses that were analyzed, only photosynthetic capacity (i.e., Vcmax), respiration rates and leaf specific conductance (KL) differed significantly between N treatments. Photosynthetic capacity showed a curvilinear relationship with foliar [N], reaching an apparent maximum rate when needle N concentrations exceeded about 12 mg g(-1). In vitro measurements of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity suggested that photosynthetic capacity was best related to activated, not total, Rubisco content. Rubisco activation state declined as foliar [N] increased, and based on its significant correlation (r2= 0.63) with foliar Mn:Mg ratios, it may be related to Mn inactivation of Rubisco. Respiration rates increased linearly as foliar N concentration increased (r2= 0.84). The value of K(L) also increased as foliar [N] increased, reaching a maximum when foliar [N] exceeded about 10 mg g(-1). Changes in K(L) were unrelated to changes in leaf area or sapwood area because leaf area to sapwood area ratios remained constant. Cumulative effects of the observed physiological responses to N fertilization were analyzed by modeling annual net CO2 assimilation (Anet) based on treatment specific values of Vcmax, dark respiration (Rdark) and KL. Estimates of Anet were highly correlated with measured total seedling biomass (r2= 0.992), suggesting that long-term, cumulative

  3. Crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, H. A.; Knight, S.; Curmi, P. M.; Andersson, I.; Cascio, D.; Sweet, R. M.; Brändén, C. I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco, complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) has been determined by molecular replacement, using the structure of activated spinach rubisco (Knight, S., Andersson, I., & Brändén, C.-I., 1990, J. Mol. Biol. 215, 113-160) as a model. The R-factor after refinement is 21.0% for 57,855 reflections between 9.0 and 2.7 A resolution. The local fourfold axis of the rubisco hexadecamer coincides with a crystallographic twofold axis. The result is that the asymmetric unit of the crystals contains half of the L8S8 complex (molecular mass 280 kDa in the asymmetric unit). The activated form of tobacco rubisco is very similar to the activated form of spinach rubisco. The root mean square difference is 0.4 A for 587 equivalent C alpha atoms. Analysis of mutations between tobacco and spinach rubisco revealed that the vast majority of mutations concerned exposed residues. Only 7 buried residues were found to be mutated versus 54 residues at or near the surface of the protein. The crystal structure suggests that the Cys 247-Cys 247 and Cys 449-Cys 459 pairs are linked via disulfide bridges. This pattern of disulfide links differ from the pattern of disulfide links observed in crystals of unactivated tobacco rubisco (Curmi, P.M.G., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 16980-16989) and is similar to the pattern observed for activated spinach tobacco. PMID:8358296

  4. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  5. Modified rubisco large subunit n-methyltransferase useful for targeting molecules to the active-site vicinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L [Lexington, KY

    2012-03-20

    The present invention generally relates to a modified Rubisco large subunit .sup..epsilon.N-Methyltransferase (Rubisco LSMT, or RLSMT). The present invention also relates to a modified RLSMT-carbonic anhydrase (RLSMT-CA). This modified RLSMT-CA improves the efficiency of the reduction of CO.sub.2 during photosynthesis, which may increase plant growth rates. The present invention also relates to nucleic acids encoding the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT. Also, the present invention relates to cells including the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, plants containing the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, and methods using compositions of the present invention. In addition, the present invention relates to antibodies conjugated to CA which may bind to Rubisco, and antibodies which bind a modified RLSMT-CA. The invention also relates to modified forms of the LS and SS of Rubisco where the modified forms are fusions with CA or biologically active fragments thereof. The present invention provides methods of altering Rubisco carboxylase activity and altering plant growth.

  6. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechanochemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and...

  7. Rubisco small subunits from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas complement Rubisco-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky; Leitão, Nuno; Orr, Douglas J; Meyer, Moritz T; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-04-01

    Introducing components of algal carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into higher plant chloroplasts could increase photosynthetic productivity. A key component is the Rubisco-containing pyrenoid that is needed to minimise CO2 retro-diffusion for CCM operating efficiency. Rubisco in Arabidopsis was re-engineered to incorporate sequence elements that are thought to be essential for recruitment of Rubisco to the pyrenoid, namely the algal Rubisco small subunit (SSU, encoded by rbcS) or only the surface-exposed algal SSU α-helices. Leaves of Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing 'pyrenoid-competent' chimeric Arabidopsis SSUs containing the SSU α-helices from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can form hybrid Rubisco complexes with catalytic properties similar to those of native Rubisco, suggesting that the α-helices are catalytically neutral. The growth and photosynthetic performance of complemented Arabidopsis rbcs mutants producing near wild-type levels of the hybrid Rubisco were similar to those of wild-type controls. Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing a Chlamydomonas SSU differed from wild-type plants with respect to Rubisco catalysis, photosynthesis and growth. This confirms a role for the SSU in influencing Rubisco catalytic properties.

  8. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    There is evidence suggesting that in plants changes in the photosynthetic source/sink balance are an important factor that regulates leaf photosynthetic rate through affects on the leaf carbohydrate status. However, to resolve the regulatory mechanism of leaf photosynthetic rate associated with photosynthetic source/sink balance, information, particularly on mutual relationships of experimental data that are linked with a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances, seems to be still limited. Thus, a variety of manipulations altering the plant source/sink ratio were carried out with soybean plants, and the mutual relationships of various characteristics such as leaf photosynthetic rate, carbohydrate content and the source/sink ratio were analyzed in manipulated and non-manipulated control plants. The manipulations were removal of one-half or all pods, removal of one-third or two-third leaves, and shading of one-third or one-half leaves with soybean plants grown for 8 weeks under 10 h light (24 degrees C) and 14 h darkness (17 degrees C). It was shown that there were significant negative correlations between source/sink ratio (dry weight ratio of attached leaves to other all organs) and leaf photosynthetic rate; source/sink ratio and activation ratio (percentage of initial activity to total activity) of Rubisco in leaf extract; leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and photosynthetic rate; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and activation ratio of Rubisco; amount of protein-bound ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) in leaf extract and leaf photosynthetic rate; and the amount of protein-bound RuBP and activation ratio of Rubisco. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between source/sink ratio and leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content; source/sink ratio and the amount of protein-bound RuBP; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and amount of protein-bound RuBP and the activation ratio of Rubisco and leaf photosynthetic rate

  9. Effect of CO sub 2 enrichment and high photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) on rubisco and PEP-case activities of in vitro cultured strawberry plants

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Y.; Beeson, R.; Gosselin, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Standard growing conditions in vitro (low light and CO{sub 2}) are not conducive to autotrophy. An experiment was conducted to improve photosynthesis in vitro in the hope of increasing survival in acclimatization. A factorial experiment was elaborated where CO{sub 2} and PPFD were supplied to in vitro cultured strawberry plants in the rooting stage. Activities of carboxylating enzymes were determined after 4 weeks of culture. The activities of non-activated and activated rubisco and PEP-Case were measured after extraction of the enzymes and a reaction with NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} followed by scintillation counting spectroscopy. High CO{sub 2} concentration significantly increased net assimilation rates (NAR) by 165% over the control for both 1650 and 3000 ppm CO{sub 2}. High PPFD only increased NAR by 12 and 35% for 150 and 250 {mu}mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} respectively over the control. Plants grown at 3000 ppm CO{sub 2} had the highest level of chlorophyll/g FW with 97% more than the control. The activity of PEP-Case was the highest at high light levels and high CO{sub 2} with rates of 1.65 for 1650 ppm versus 1.22 mmol CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl. h{sup {minus}1} at 250 {mu}mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}. There was no difference in PEP activity at low light levels. The rubisco activity was lower at 1650 and 3000 ppm CO{sub 2}. Increases in NAR correlate more closely to the PEP-Case than to Rubisco activity. Physiological significance of high activity of PEP-Case over rubisco will be discussed.

  10. Directed evolution of RuBisCO hypermorphs through genetic selection in engineered E.coli.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Monal R; Greene, Dina N; Woods, Kristen K; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2006-03-01

    The Calvin Cycle is the primary conduit for the fixation of carbon dioxide into the biosphere; ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) catalyzes the rate-limiting fixation step. Our goal is to direct the evolution of RuBisCO variants with improved kinetic and biophysical properties. The Calvin Cycle was partially reconstructed in Escherichia coli; the engineered strain requires the Synechococcus PCC6301 RuBisCO for growth in minimal media supplemented with a pentose. We randomly mutated the gene encoding the large subunit of RuBisCO (rbcL), co-expressed the resulting library with the small subunit (rbcS) and the Synechococcus PCC7492 phosphoribulokinase (prkA), and selected hypermorphic variants. The RuBisCO variants that evolved during three rounds of random mutagenesis and selection were over-expressed, and exhibited 5-fold improvement in specific activity relative to the wild-type enzyme. These results demonstrate a new strategy for the artificial selection of RuBisCO and other non-native metabolic enzymes.

  11. Characterization of the heterooligomeric red-type rubisco activase from red algae.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Nitin; Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2016-12-06

    The photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is inhibited by nonproductive binding of its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. Reactivation requires ATP-hydrolysis-powered remodeling of the inhibited complexes by diverse molecular chaperones known as rubisco activases (Rcas). Eukaryotic phytoplankton of the red plastid lineage contain so-called red-type rubiscos, some of which have been shown to possess superior kinetic properties to green-type rubiscos found in higher plants. These organisms are known to encode multiple homologs of CbbX, the α-proteobacterial red-type activase. Here we show that the gene products of two cbbX genes encoded by the nuclear and plastid genomes of the red algae Cyanidioschyzon merolae are nonfunctional in isolation, but together form a thermostable heterooligomeric Rca that can use both α-proteobacterial and red algal-inhibited rubisco complexes as a substrate. The mechanism of rubisco activation appears conserved between the bacterial and the algal systems and involves threading of the rubisco large subunit C terminus. Whereas binding of the allosteric regulator RuBP induces oligomeric transitions to the bacterial activase, it merely enhances the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis in the algal enzyme. Mutational analysis of nuclear and plastid isoforms demonstrates strong coordination between the subunits and implicates the nuclear-encoded subunit as being functionally dominant. The plastid-encoded subunit may be catalytically inert. Efforts to enhance crop photosynthesis by transplanting red algal rubiscos with enhanced kinetics will need to take into account the requirement for a compatible Rca.

  12. Diffusion and interactions of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the vicinity of the active site of Rubisco: Molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hendawy, Morad M.; Garate, José-Antonio; English, Niall J.; O'Reilly, Stephen; Mooney, Damian A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) at the molecular mechanical level and geometry optimisation at the quantum mechanical level have been performed to investigate the transport and fixation of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the cavity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or Rubisco. Multiple MD simulations have been carried out to study the diffusive behaviour of O2 and CO2 molecules from the Mg2+ cation in Rubisco at 298 K and 1 bar, being one step in the overall process of carboxylation/oxygenation in Rubisco. In addition to this work, in order to gain additional perspective on the role of chemical reaction rates and thermodynamics, oxygen, and carbon dioxide uptake mechanisms have also been investigated by the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The results indicate that the activation barrier for carboxylation is slightly lower than that of oxygenation. This agrees qualitatively with experimental findings, and rationalises the observed competition between both catalytic processes in nature. Finally, the longer-lived persistence of CO2 in the vicinity of the active centre (i.e., slower self-diffusion) may serve to explain, in part, why carboxylation is the more kinetically favoured on an overall basis compared to oxygenation.

  13. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  14. RUBISCO activity and photosynthetic capacity of planktonic photoautotrophs: results of the geochemical rate/RNA integration study (GRIST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, J.; Lopez, J.; Paul, J.; Kerkhof, L.

    2003-04-01

    A pilot field experiment for inter-calibration of biogeochemical and nucleic acid measurements was carried out at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station (RUMFS) at Tuckerton, NJ (19-25 July 2002) under the auspices of the US Department of Energy BIOMP program (Biotechnological Investigations - Ocean Margin Program. Sampling was carried out at the well-characterized Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) site centered on a sand ridge in 15 m of water offshore from RUMFS. The GRIST study aimed to assess the relationship between traditional rate measurements and those using gene-based methodologies as a quantitative basis for linking processes from the molecular to the global scale. We measured several biogeochemical processes involving C and N cycling concurrently with a suite of molecular approaches. We here report on the relationship between photosynthetic capacity of autotrophic plankton and gene activity of variants of the large subunit gene (rbcL) mRNA for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO), the enzyme responsible for primary C fixation during photosynthesis. Photosynthetic capacity over a diurnal cycle was quantified using a photosynthetron apparatus providing irradiance and temperature control, and gene products were concurrently quantified by PCR. Overall, photosynthetic capacity (PBmax) was found to be correlated to gene expression (r2 = 0.54). Relatively high correlations were found between PBmax and form 1D rbcL mRNA (r2 = 0.56) and between PBmax and real time PCR diatom rbcL mRNA (r2 = 0.51). Forms 1A and 1B showed lower but still significant correlations (0.38 and 0.42 respectively) to PBmax. Ratios of PBmax to rbcL mRNA ranged between 0.4 and 2.8 mg C/ng mRNA/h. Near-surface populations exhibited a relative maximum in the PBmax/mRNA ratio in the early afternoon but this relationship was not apparent in samples from 15 m depth.

  15. Evolving Methanococcoides burtonii archaeal Rubisco for improved photosynthesis and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Alonso, Hernan; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-03-01

    In photosynthesis Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyses the often rate limiting CO2-fixation step in the Calvin cycle. This makes Rubisco both the gatekeeper for carbon entry into the biosphere and a target for functional improvement to enhance photosynthesis and plant growth. Encumbering the catalytic performance of Rubisco is its highly conserved, complex catalytic chemistry. Accordingly, traditional efforts to enhance Rubisco catalysis using protracted "trial and error" protein engineering approaches have met with limited success. Here we demonstrate the versatility of high throughput directed (laboratory) protein evolution for improving the carboxylation properties of a non-photosynthetic Rubisco from the archaea Methanococcoides burtonii. Using chloroplast transformation in the model plant Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) we confirm the improved forms of M. burtonii Rubisco increased photosynthesis and growth relative to tobacco controls producing wild-type M. burtonii Rubisco. Our findings indicate continued directed evolution of archaeal Rubisco offers new potential for enhancing leaf photosynthesis and plant growth.

  16. Atomic resolution x-ray structure of the substrate recognition domain of higher plant rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid release of tight-binding inhibitors from dead-end Rubisco complexes requires the activity of Rubisco activase, an AAA+ ATPase that utilizes chemo-mechanical energy to catalyze the reactivation of Rubisco. Activase is thought to play a central role in coordinating the rate of CO2 fixation w...

  17. Purification of Rubisco Activase from Leaves or after Expression in Escherichia coli.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase is a molecular chaperone that modulates the activation state of Rubisco by catalyzing the ATP-dependent removal of tightly-bound inhibitory sugar-phosphates from Rubisco’s catalytic sites. This chapter reports methods developed for the purification of native and recombinant Rubisco...

  18. Exogenous sucrose supply changes sugar metabolism and reduces photosynthesis of sugarcane through the down-regulation of Rubisco abundance and activity.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Ana Karla Moreira; de Oliveira Martins, Marcio; Lima Neto, Milton Costa; Machado, Eduardo Caruso; Ribeiro, Rafael Vasconcelos; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes

    2015-05-01

    Photosynthetic modulation by sugars has been known for many years, but the biochemical and molecular comprehension of this process is lacking. We studied how the exogenous sucrose supplied to leaves could affect sugar metabolism in leaf, sheath and stalk and inhibit photosynthesis in four-month old sugarcane plants. Exogenous sucrose 50mM sprayed on attached leaves strongly impaired the net CO2 assimilation (PN) and decreased the instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (PN/Ci), suggesting that the impairment in photosynthesis was caused by biochemical restrictions. The photosystem II activity was also affected by excess sucrose as indicated by the reduction in the apparent electron transport rate, effective quantum yield and increase in non-photochemical quenching. In leaf segments, sucrose accumulation was related to increases in the activities of soluble acid and neutral invertases, sucrose synthase and sucrose phosphate synthase, whereas the contents of fructose increased and glucose slightly decreased. Changes in the activities of sucrose hydrolyzing and synthesizing enzymes in leaf, sheath and stalk and sugar profile in intact plants were not enough to identify which sugar(s) or enzyme(s) were directly involved in photosynthesis modulation. However, exogenous sucrose was able to trigger down-regulation in the Rubisco abundance, activation state and enzymatic activity. Despite the fact that PN/Ci had been notably decreased by sucrose, in vitro activity and abundance of PEPCase did not change, suggesting an in vivo modulation of this enzyme. The data reveal that sucrose and/or other derivative sugars in leaves inhibited sugarcane photosynthesis by down-regulation of Rubisco synthesis and activity. Our data also suggest that sugar modulation was not exerted by a feedback mechanism induced by the accumulation of sugars in immature sugarcane stalk.

  19. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  20. Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Berry, James O

    2008-01-01

    In leaves of most C(4) plants, ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) accumulates only in bundle sheath (bs) cells that surround the vascular centres, and not in mesophyll (mp) cells. It has been shown previously that in the C(4) dicots amaranth and Flaveria bidentis, post-transcriptional control of mRNA translation and stability mediate the C(4) expression patterns of genes encoding the large and small Rubisco subunits (chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS, respectively). Translational control appears to regulate bs cell-specific Rubisco gene expression during early dicot leaf development, while control of mRNA stability appears to mediate bs-specific accumulation of RbcS and rbcL transcripts in mature leaves. Post-transcriptional control is also involved in the regulation of Rubisco gene expression by light, and in response to photosynthetic activity. Transgenic and transient expression studies in F. bidentis provide direct evidence for post-transcriptional control of bs cell-specific RbcS expression, which is mediated by the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of the mRNA. Comparisons of Rubisco gene expression in these dicots and in the monocot maize indicates possible commonalities in the regulation of RbcS and rbcL genes in these divergent C(4) species. Now that the role of post-transcriptional regulation in C(4) gene expression has been established, it is likely that future studies of mRNA-protein interactions will address long-standing questions about the establishment and maintenance of cell type-specificity in these plants. Some of these regulatory mechanisms may have ancestral origins in C(3) species, through modification of pre-existing factors, or by the acquisition of novel C(4) processes.

  1. Temperature responses of Rubisco from Paniceae grasses provide opportunities for improving C3 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Ghannoum, Oula; Kapralov, Maxim V; Gunn, Laura H; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-11-28

    Enhancing the catalytic properties of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco is a target for improving agricultural crop productivity. Here, we reveal extensive diversity in the kinetic response between 10 and 37 °C by Rubisco from C3 and C4 species within the grass tribe Paniceae. The CO2 fixation rate (kcatc) for Rubisco from the C4 grasses with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) photosynthetic pathways was twofold greater than the kcatc of Rubisco from NAD-ME species across all temperatures. The declining response of CO2/O2 specificity with increasing temperature was less pronounced for PCK and NADP-ME Rubisco, which would be advantageous in warmer climates relative to the NAD-ME grasses. Modelled variation in the temperature kinetics of Paniceae C3 Rubisco and PCK Rubisco differentially stimulated C3 photosynthesis relative to tobacco above and below 25 °C under current and elevated CO2. Amino acid substitutions in the large subunit that could account for the catalytic variation among Paniceae Rubisco are identified; however, incompatibilities with Paniceae Rubisco biogenesis in tobacco hindered their mutagenic testing by chloroplast transformation. Circumventing these bioengineering limitations is critical to tailoring the properties of crop Rubisco to suit future climates.

  2. A coupled spectrophotometric assay for routine assessment of carbamylation and k@ of rubisco

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Butz, N.D. )

    1990-05-01

    We have developed methods to use the spectrophotometric assay for rubisco to determine k{sub cat} and carbamylation of rubisco in crude leaf extracts. In this assay, rubisco activity is coupled to NADH oxidation by PGA kinase and NADH dependent GAP dehydrogenase. The difficulty with this method in the past has been an initial lag in the observed signal, presumably because PGA must build up. This problem was solved by including high levels of ATP plus an ATP regenerating system and by using pH 8.0 for the assays. At higher pH the initial lag was observed, at lower pH, rubisco activity declined. The continuous spectrophotometric assay is particularly suited to studies of fallover, the loss of activity of rubisco during assay, and to studies of activation, the increase in activity as rubisco becomes carbamylated. the activity of rubisco measured immediately upon extraction compared to the activity after incubation with CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+} correlated well with the degree of carbamylation as determined by {sup 14}CABP/{sup 12}CABP competition experiments. Rubisco activity was reduced by binding CABP, and the number of active sites were estimated by extrapolation to zero activity. These data allow the calculation of k{sub cat}. These methods allow estimation of many important parameters of rubisco activity in less time than previous methods and without generation of any radioactive waste.

  3. Rapid inactivation of chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidase is responsible for oxidative modification to Rubisco in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Lang; Shen, Lin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Sheng, Ji-Ping

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the sensitive site of antioxidant systems in chloroplast under cadmium stress and its consequence on reactive oxygen species production and action, the sub-organellar localization of chloroplast superoxide dismutases (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbic peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) isoenzymes and changes of enzymes activities under cadmium stress were investigated in tomato seedlings. Two APX isoforms, one thylakoid-bound and one stromal, were detected. Cd at 50 microM induced a moderate increase of SOD activities but a rapid inactivation of both APX isoenzymes. APX inactivation was mainly related to the decrease of ascorbate concentration, as supported by in vitro treatment of exogenous ascorbate and APX kinetic properties under Cd stress. H2O2 accumulation in chloroplast, as a consequence of APX inactivation, was associated with a 60% loss of Rubisco (EC 4.1.1.39) activity, which could be partially accounted for by a 10% loss of Rubisco content. Protein oxidation assay found that the Rubisco large subunit was the most prominent carbonylated protein; the level of carbonylated Rubisco large subunit increased fivefold after Cd exposure. Thiol groups in the Rubisco large subunit were oxidized, as indicated by non-reducing electrophoresis. Treating crude extract with H2O2 resulted in a similar pattern of protein oxidation and thiols oxidation with that observed in Cd-treated plants. Our study indicates that APXs in the chloroplast is a highly sensitive site of antioxidant systems under Cd stress, and the inactivation of APX could be mainly responsible for oxidative modification to Rubisco and subsequent decrease in its activity.

  4. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  5. Widespread positive selection in the photosynthetic Rubisco enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Maxim V; Filatov, Dmitry A

    2007-01-01

    Background Rubisco enzyme catalyzes the first step in net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and photorespiratory carbon oxidation and is responsible for almost all carbon fixation on Earth. The large subunit of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene, which is widely used for reconstruction of plant phylogenies due to its conservative nature. Plant systematicists have mainly used rbcL paying little attention to its function, and the question whether it evolves under Darwinian selection has received little attention. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how common is positive selection in Rubisco among the phototrophs and where in the Rubisco structure does positive selection occur. Results We searched for positive selection in rbcL sequences from over 3000 species representing all lineages of green plants and some lineages of other phototrophs, such as brown and red algae, diatoms, euglenids and cyanobacteria. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis found the presence of positive selection in rbcL of most analyzed land plants, but not in algae and cyanobacteria. The mapping of the positively selected residues on the Rubisco tertiary structure revealed that they are located in regions important for dimer-dimer, intradimer, large subunit-small subunit and Rubisco-Rubisco activase interactions, and that some of the positively selected residues are close to the active site. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that despite its conservative nature, Rubisco evolves under positive selection in most lineages of land plants, and after billions of years of evolution Darwinian selection still fine-tunes its performance. Widespread positive selection in rbcL has to be taken into account when this gene is used for phylogenetic reconstructions. PMID:17498284

  6. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi N.; Heureux, Ana M.C.; Sharwood, Robert E.; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.; Morel, François M.M.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat c), oxygenation (k cat o), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23–68 µM), SC/O (57–116mol mol−1), and K O (413–2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat c for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1–3.7s−1), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat c for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  7. Rubisco small and large subunit N-methyltransferases. Bi- and mono-functional methyltransferases that methylate the small and large subunits of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Ying, Z; Mulligan, R M; Janney, N; Houtz, R L

    1999-12-17

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)is methylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal methionine of the processed form of the small subunit (SS), and at the epsilon-amino group of lysine-14 of the large subunit (LS) in some species. The Rubisco LS methyltransferase (LSMT) gene has been cloned and expressed from pea and specifically methylates lysine-14 of the LS of Rubisco. We determine here that both pea and tobacco Rubisco LSMT also exhibit (alpha)N-methyltransferase activity toward the SS of Rubisco, suggesting that a single gene product can produce a bifunctional protein methyltransferase capable of catalyzing both (alpha)N-methylation of the SS and (epsilon)N-methylation of the LS. A homologue of the Rubisco LSMT gene (rbcMT-S) has also been identified in spinach that is closely related to Rubisco LSMT sequences from pea and tobacco. Two mRNAs are produced from rbcMT-S, and both long and short forms of the spinach cDNAs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells and shown to catalyze methylation of the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal methionine of the SS of Rubisco. Thus, the absence of lysine-14 methylation in species like spinach is apparently a consequence of a monofunctional protein methyltransferase incapable of methylating Lys-14, with activity limited to methylation of the SS.

  8. A faster Rubisco with potential to increase photosynthesis in crops.

    PubMed

    Lin, Myat T; Occhialini, Alessandro; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A J; Hanson, Maureen R

    2014-09-25

    In photosynthetic organisms, D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the major enzyme assimilating atmospheric CO2 into the biosphere. Owing to the wasteful oxygenase activity and slow turnover of Rubisco, the enzyme is among the most important targets for improving the photosynthetic efficiency of vascular plants. It has been anticipated that introducing the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) from cyanobacteria into plants could enhance crop yield. However, the complex nature of Rubisco's assembly has made manipulation of the enzyme extremely challenging, and attempts to replace it in plants with the enzymes from cyanobacteria and red algae have not been successful. Here we report two transplastomic tobacco lines with functional Rubisco from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 (Se7942). We knocked out the native tobacco gene encoding the large subunit of Rubisco by inserting the large and small subunit genes of the Se7942 enzyme, in combination with either the corresponding Se7942 assembly chaperone, RbcX, or an internal carboxysomal protein, CcmM35, which incorporates three small subunit-like domains. Se7942 Rubisco and CcmM35 formed macromolecular complexes within the chloroplast stroma, mirroring an early step in the biogenesis of cyanobacterial β-carboxysomes. Both transformed lines were photosynthetically competent, supporting autotrophic growth, and their respective forms of Rubisco had higher rates of CO2 fixation per unit of enzyme than the tobacco control. These transplastomic tobacco lines represent an important step towards improved photosynthesis in plants and will be valuable hosts for future addition of the remaining components of the cyanobacterial CCM, such as inorganic carbon transporters and the β-carboxysome shell proteins.

  9. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Patrick M.; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C.; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A. J.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism. PMID:26790750

  10. Biochemical characterization of predicted Precambrian RuBisCO.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patrick M; Occhialini, Alessandro; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Andralojc, P John; Parry, Martin A J; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-01-21

    The antiquity and global abundance of the enzyme, RuBisCO, attests to the crucial and longstanding role it has played in the biogeochemical cycles of Earth over billions of years. The counterproductive oxygenase activity of RuBisCO has persisted over billions of years of evolution, despite its competition with the carboxylase activity necessary for carbon fixation, yet hypotheses regarding the selective pressures governing RuBisCO evolution have been limited to speculation. Here we report the resurrection and biochemical characterization of ancestral RuBisCOs, dating back to over one billion years ago (Gyr ago). Our findings provide an ancient point of reference revealing divergent evolutionary paths taken by eukaryotic homologues towards improved specificity for CO2, versus the evolutionary emphasis on increased rates of carboxylation observed in bacterial homologues. Consistent with these distinctions, in vivo analysis reveals the propensity of ancestral RuBisCO to be encapsulated into modern-day carboxysomes, bacterial organelles central to the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism.

  11. Co- and post-translational modifications in Rubisco: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Houtz, Robert L; Magnani, Roberta; Nayak, Nihar R; Dirk, Lynnette M A

    2008-01-01

    Both the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of Rubisco are subject to a plethora of co- and post-translational modifications. With the exceptions of LS carbamylation and SS transit sequence processing, the remaining modifications, including deformylation, acetylation, methylation, and N-terminal proteolytic processing of the LS, are still biochemically and/or functionally undefined although they are found in nearly all forms of Rubisco from vascular plants. A collection of relatively unique enzymes catalyse these modifications, and several have been characterized in other organisms. Some of the observed modifications in the LS and SS clearly suggest novel changes in enzyme specificity and/or activity, and others have common features with other co- and post-translationally modifying enzymes. With the possible exception of Lys14 methylation in the LS, processing of both the LS and SS of Rubisco is by default an ordered process sequentially leading up to the final forms observed in the holoenzyme. An overview of the nature of structural modifications in the LS and SS of Rubisco is presented, and, where possible, the nature of the enzymes catalysing these modifications (either through similarity with other known enzymes or through direct enzymological characterization) is described. Overall, there are a distinct lack of functional and mechanistic observations for modifications in Rubisco and thus represent many potentially productive avenues for research.

  12. Expanding knowledge of the Rubisco kinetics variability in plant species: environmental and evolutionary trends.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Kapralov, Maxim V; Andralojc, P John; Conesa, Miquel À; Keys, Alfred J; Parry, Martin A J; Flexas, Jaume

    2014-09-01

    The present study characterizes the kinetic properties of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from 28 terrestrial plant species, representing different phylogenetic lineages, environmental adaptations and photosynthetic mechanisms. Our findings confirm that past atmospheric CO(2)/O(2) ratio changes and present environmental pressures have influenced Rubisco kinetics. One evolutionary adaptation to a decreasing atmospheric CO(2)/O(2) ratio has been an increase in the affinity of Rubisco for CO(2) (Kc falling), and a consequent decrease in the velocity of carboxylation (kcat (c)), which in turn has been ameliorated by an increase in the proportion of leaf protein accounted by Rubisco. The trade-off between K(c) and k(cat)(c) was not universal among the species studied and deviations from this relationship occur in extant forms of Rubisco. In species adapted to particular environments, including carnivorous plants, crassulacean acid metabolism species and C(3) plants from aquatic and arid habitats, Rubisco has evolved towards increased efficiency, as demonstrated by a higher k(cat)(c)/K(c) ratio. This variability in kinetics was related to the amino acid sequence of the Rubisco large subunit. Phylogenetic analysis identified 13 residues under positive selection during evolution towards specific Rubisco kinetic parameters. This crucial information provides candidate amino acid replacements, which could be implemented to optimize crop photosynthesis under a range of environmental conditions.

  13. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Evans, Marc A.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol–1 Rubisco active sites s–1), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. PMID:26417023

  14. Hybrid Rubisco of tomato large subunits and tobacco small subunits is functional in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Webb, James; Huang, Yi-Hong; Lin, Li; Tang, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Aimin

    2011-03-01

    Biogenesis of functional ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in plants requires specific assembly in the chloroplast of the imported, cytosol-synthesized small subunits (SS) with the chloroplast-made large subunits (LS). Accumulating evidence indicates that chloroplasts (plastids) generally have a low tolerance for assembling foreign or modified Rubisco. To explore Rubisco engineering, we created two lines of transplastomic tobacco plants whose rbcL gene was replaced by tomato-derived rbcL: plant LLS2 with Rubisco composed of tobacco SS and Q437R LS and plant LLS4 with a hybrid Rubisco of tobacco SS and tomato LS (representing four substitutions of Y226F, A230T, S279T and Q437R from tobacco LS). Plant LLS2 exhibited similar phenotypes as the wild type. Plant LLS4 showed lower chlorophyll and Rubisco levels particularly in young emerging leaves, lower photosynthesis rates and biomass during early stages of development, but was able to reach reproductive maturity and somewhat wild type-like phenotype under ambient CO₂ condition. In vitro assays detected similar carboxylase activity and RuBP affinity in LLS2 and LLS4 plants as in wild type. Our studies demonstrated that tomato LS was sufficiently assembled with tobacco SS into functional Rubisco. The hybrid Rubisco of tomato LS and tobacco SS can drive photosynthesis that supports photoautotrophic growth and reproduction of tobacco plants under ambient CO₂ and light conditions. We discuss the effect of these residue substitutions on Rubisco activity and the possible attribution of chlorophyll deficiency to the in planta photosynthesis performance in the hybrid Rubisco plants.

  15. Temperature-sensitive rubisco mutant of Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Spreitzer, R.J.; Chastain, C.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant 68-4PP is a temperature-sensitive mutant that lacks photosynthetic ability at 35/sup 0/C, but is able to grow photosynthetically at 25/sup 0/C. Genetic analysis indicated that 68-4PP is a chloroplast mutant that is allelic with known Rubisco large-subunit structural-gene mutants, implying that 68-4PP also resulted from a mutation in the large-subunit gene. The 68-4PP mutant has about 35% of the wild-type level of Rubisco holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 25/sup 0/C, but it has less than 10% of normal holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 35/sup 0/C. However, (/sup 35/S)-sulfate pulse labeling showed that Rubisco subunits were synthesized at normal rates at both temperatures. More significantly, the ratio of carboxylase activity in the absence and presence of oxygen at a limiting CO/sub 2/ concentration (6.6 ..mu..M) was about 2.2 for the mutant enzyme, as compared to about 3.0 for the wild-type enzyme. The decreased ratio of the mutant enzyme is maternally inherited, indicating that this reduced oxygen sensitivity results from a mutation in chloroplast DNA. The authors have recently cloned the 68-4PP Rubisco large-subunit gene, and DNA sequencing is in progress.

  16. The differential response of photosynthesis to high temperature for a boreal and temperate Populus species relates to differences in Rubisco activation and Rubisco activase properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant inhibition of photosynthesis occurs at temperatures only a few degrees (less than or equal to 10 degrees Celsius) above the optimum, resulting in considerable loss of potential productivity. Most studies of heat stress have focused on crop or weedy annual plants, whereas similar studies...

  17. Functional metagenomic selection of RubisCOs from uncultivated bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A.; Witteveen, Briana; Dourado, Manuella N.; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2-dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of theGallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possessCO2/O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2-fixing enzymes not previously characterized.

  18. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) Gene Expression and Photosynthetic Activity in Nutrient-enriched Mesocosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M.; Davies, J. T.; Weston, K.; Crawford, D. W.; Purdie, D. A.

    1998-02-01

    The temporal variability in carbon dioxide fixation rates and the relative abundance ofrbcLSmRNA (encoding the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme, RubisCO) was determined for nutrient-stimulated populations of marine phytoplankton enclosed in diatom-dominated and coccolithophorid-dominated mesocosms. Both mesocosms were characterized by successive bloom events that were preceded by marked increases in the level of RubisCO gene expression. In general, maxima inrbcLmRNA abundance showed the strongest temporal covariation with peaks in the value of the photosynthetic parameter PBmax, the chlorophyll-specific maximum rate of CO2fixation. Somewhat looser temporal co-variations were observed between peaks in transcript levels and maxima in chlorophyll concentrations or phytoplankton biomass. The specific contribution of the haptophyteEmiliania huxleyito the overall level of gene expression in the diatom-dominated enclosure was investigated using an homologousrbcLgene probe. The results were compared to data obtained at lower hybridization stringency using a generalrbcLprobe originating from the oceanic cyanobacteriumSynechococcusWH8103. The comparative data suggest that, whereas diatoms made a substantial contribution to the mRNA signal during the initial part of the experiment, the contribution ofE. huxleyito the overall level of gene expression increased as the experiment progressed.

  19. Pyruvate is a by-product of Rubisco catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, T.J.; Kane, H.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The catalytic mechanism of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase (Rubisco) involves several enzyme-bound intermediates. The 2,3-enediol resulting from abstraction of the C-3 proton from RuBP, and the 6-carbon intermediate resulting from its carboxylation, are well established. However, the C-2 carbanion form of 3-phosphoglycerate, thought to be produced by scission of the bond between C-2 and C-3 of the gem-diol form of the 6-carbon intermediate, is less well documented. We have observed the formation of ({sup 14}C)pyruvate during catalysis by purified spinach Rubisco in the presence of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} to an extent of approximately 1% of the total {sup 14}C fixed at substrate saturation and pH 8. Pyruvate formation was also continuously measured spectrophotometrically in the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and NADH. No pyruvate was formed when 3-phosphoglycerate was substituted for RuBP or when Rubisco was inhibited by a reaction-intermediate analog. Pyruvate is the expected product of {beta}-elimination of the phosphoryl moiety of the acid carbanion, either at the active site or in solution after release from the enzyme. These observations establish the intermediacy of the carbanion species and provide yet another example of Rubisco's catalytic inefficiency.

  20. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone.

  1. Structure and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins having putative Rubisco activase function from Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is a very large, complex and one of the most abundant proteins in the world and comprises up to 50% of all soluble protein in plants. The activity of Rubisco, the enzyme that catalyzes CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis, is regulated by Rubisco activase (Rca). In the present study, we searched for hypothetical protein of Vitis vinifera which has putative Rubisco activase function. The Arabidopsis and tobacco Rubisco activase protein sequences were used as seed sequences to search against Vitis vinifera in UniprotKB database. The selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera were subjected to sequence, structural and functional annotation. Subcellular localization predictions suggested it to be cytoplasmic protein. Homology modelling was used to define the three-dimensional (3D) structure of selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera. Template search revealed that all the hypothetical proteins share more than 80% sequence identity with structure of green-type Rubisco activase from tobacco, indicating proteins are evolutionary conserved. The homology modelling was generated using SWISS-MODEL. Several quality assessment and validation parameters computed indicated that homology models are reliable. Further, functional annotation through PFAM, CATH, SUPERFAMILY, CDART suggested that selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera contain ATPase family associated with various cellular activities (AAA) and belong to the AAA+ super family of ring-shaped P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases. This study will lead to research in the optimization of the functionality of Rubisco which has large implication in the improvement of plant productivity and resource use efficiency.

  2. 2-Carboxy-D-arabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) phosphatase: evidence for a wider role in plant Rubisco regulation.

    PubMed

    Andralojc, Paul John; Madgwick, Pippa J; Tao, Yong; Keys, Alfred; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Loveland, Jane E; Jackson, Phil J; Willis, Antony C; Gutteridge, Steven; Parry, Martin A J

    2012-03-15

    The genes for CA1Pase (2-carboxy-D-arabinitol-1-bisphosphate phosphatase) from French bean, wheat, Arabidopsis and tobacco were identified and cloned. The deduced protein sequence included an N-terminal motif identical with the PGM (phosphoglycerate mutase) active site sequence [LIVM]-x-R-H-G-[EQ]-x-x-[WN]. The corresponding gene from wheat coded for an enzyme with the properties published for CA1Pase. The expressed protein lacked PGM activity but rapidly dephosphorylated 2,3-DPG (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) to 2-phosphoglycerate. DTT (dithiothreitol) activation and GSSG inactivation of this enzyme was pH-sensitive, the greatest difference being apparent at pH 8. The presence of the expressed protein during in vitro measurement of Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) activity prevented a progressive decline in Rubisco turnover. This was due to the removal of an inhibitory bisphosphate that was present in the RuBP (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate) preparation, and was found to be PDBP (D-glycero-2,3-pentodiulose-1,5-bisphosphate). The substrate specificity of the expressed protein indicates a role for CA1Pase in the removal of 'misfire' products of Rubisco.

  3. RubisCO of a nucleoside pathway known from Archaea is found in diverse uncultivated phyla in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, Kelly C; Castelle, Cindy J; Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; Brown, Christopher T; Wilkins, Michael J; Thomas, Brian C; Sharon, Itai; Williams, Kenneth H; Tabita, F Robert; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomic studies recently uncovered form II/III RubisCO genes, originally thought to only occur in archaea, from uncultivated bacteria of the candidate phyla radiation (CPR). There are no isolated CPR bacteria and these organisms are predicted to have limited metabolic capacities. Here we expand the known diversity of RubisCO from CPR lineages. We report a form of RubisCO, distantly similar to the archaeal form III RubisCO, in some CPR bacteria from the Parcubacteria (OD1), WS6 and Microgenomates (OP11) phyla. In addition, we significantly expand the Peregrinibacteria (PER) II/III RubisCO diversity and report the first II/III RubisCO sequences from the Microgenomates and WS6 phyla. To provide a metabolic context for these RubisCOs, we reconstructed near-complete (>93%) PER genomes and the first closed genome for a WS6 bacterium, for which we propose the phylum name Dojkabacteria. Genomic and bioinformatic analyses suggest that the CPR RubisCOs function in a nucleoside pathway similar to that proposed in Archaea. Detection of form II/III RubisCO and nucleoside metabolism gene transcripts from a PER supports the operation of this pathway in situ. We demonstrate that the PER form II/III RubisCO is catalytically active, fixing CO2 to physiologically complement phototrophic growth in a bacterial photoautotrophic RubisCO deletion strain. We propose that the identification of these RubisCOs across a radiation of obligately fermentative, small-celled organisms hints at a widespread, simple metabolic platform in which ribose may be a prominent currency. PMID:27137126

  4. Comparison of positional surfactant isomers for displacement of rubisco protein from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Onaizi, Sagheer A; Dimitrijev-Dwyer, Mirjana; Malcolm, Andrew S; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Dong, Chuchuan; Holt, Stephen A; Thomas, Robert K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2011-08-15

    Protein-surfactant interaction, which is a function of the protein and surfactant characteristics, is a common phenomenon in a wide range of industrial applications. In this work, we used rubisco, the most abundant protein in nature, as a model protein and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDOBS), one of the most widely used commercial surfactants, with two positional isomers (SDOBS-2 and SDOBS-6), as a model surfactant. We first examined the surface tension and the mechanical properties of interfacial mixed rubisco-SDOBS films adsorbed at the air-water interface. The concentration of rubisco in solution was fixed at 0.1 mg mL(-1) while the SDOBS concentration varied from 0 to 150 μM. Both the surface tension and the mechanical strength of the interfacial film decreased with increasing SDOBS concentration. Overall, the surface tension of a rubisco-SDOBS-6 mixture is lower than that of rubisco-SDOBS-2, while the mechanical strength of both systems is similar. Neutron reflection data suggest that rubisco protein is likely denatured at the interface. The populations of rubisco and SDOBS of the mixed systems at the interface were determined by combining non-deuterated and deuterated SDOBS to provide contrast variation. At a low surfactant concentration, SDOBS-6 has a stronger ability to displace rubisco from the air-water interface than SDOBS-2. However, when surfactant concentration reaches 50 μM, SDOBS-2 has a higher population than SDOBS-6, with more rubisco displaced from the interface. The results presented in this work suggest that the extent of protein displacement from the air-water interface, and hence the nature of the protein-surfactant interactions at the interface, are strongly affected by the position of surfactant isomerisation, which might allow the design of formulations for efficient removal of protein stains.

  5. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Nathan; Hazra, Suratna; Dunkle, Alison M; Salvucci, Michael E; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2013-01-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechano-chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and structural investigations of Rca have been hampered by its exceptional thermolability, high degree of size polydispersity and propensity towards subunit aggregation. In this work, we have characterized the thermal stability and self-association behavior of recombinant Rca preparations, and have developed ligand screening methods. Thermal denaturation profiles generated by circular dichroism indicate that creosote and tobacco short-form Rcas are the most stable proteins examined, with an estimated mid-point temperature of 45-47°C for protein denaturation. We demonstrate that ADP provides a higher degree of stabilization than ATP, that magnesium ions have a small stabilizing effect on ATP-bound, but a significant destabilizing effect on ADP-bound Rca, and that phosphate provides weak stabilization of the ADP-bound form of the protein. A dimeric species was identified by size-exclusion chromatography, suggesting that the two-subunit module may comprise the basic building block for larger assemblies. Evidence is provided that chromatographic procedures reflect non-equilibrium multimeric states. Dynamic light scattering experiments performed on nucleotide-bearing Rca support the notion that several larger, highly polydisperse assembly states coexist over a broad concentration range. No significant changes in aggregation are observed upon replacement of ADP with ATP. However, in the absence of nucleotides, the major protein population appears to consist of a monodisperse oligomer smaller than a hexamer.

  6. Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Xenie

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear factor, Maturation/stability of RbcL (MRL1), regulates the accumulation of the chloroplast rbcL gene transcript in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by stabilising the mRNA via its 5' UTR. An absence of MRL1 in algal mrl1 mutants leads to a complete absence of RuBisCO large subunit protein and thus a lack of accumulation of the RuBisCO holoenzyme. By complementing mrl1 mutants by random transformation of the nuclear genome with the MRL1 cDNA, different levels of rbcL transcript accumulate. We also observe that RuBisCO Large Subunit accumulation is perturbed. Complemented strains accumulating as little as 15% RuBisCO protein can grow phototrophically while RuBisCO in this range is limiting for phototrophic growth. We also observe that photosynthetic activity, here measured by the quantum yield of PSII, appears to be a determinant for phototrophic growth. In some strains that accumulate less RuBisCO, a strong production of reactive oxygen species is detected. In the absence of RuBisCO, oxygen possibly acts as the PSI terminal electron acceptor. These results show that random transformation of MRL1 into mrl1 mutants can change RuBisCO accumulation allowing a range of phototrophic growth phenotypes. Furthermore, this technique allows for the isolation of strains with low RuBisCO, within the range of acceptable photosynthetic growth and reasonably low ROS production. MRL1 is thus a potential tool for applications to divert electrons away from photosynthetic carbon metabolism towards alternative pathways.

  7. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  8. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Orr, Douglas J; Alcântara, André; Kapralov, Maxim V; Andralojc, P John; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-10-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally "better" compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale.

  9. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andralojc, P. John

    2016-01-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally “better” compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale. PMID:27342312

  10. Photosynthetic characterization of Rubisco transplantomic lines reveals alterations on photochemistry and mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Flexas, Jaume; Whitney, Spencer M

    2013-07-01

    Improving Rubisco catalysis is considered a promising way to enhance C3-photosynthesis and photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE) provided the introduced changes have little or no impact on other processes affecting photosynthesis such as leaf photochemistry or leaf CO2 diffusion conductances. However, the extent to which the factors affecting photosynthetic capacity are co-regulated is unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize the photochemistry and CO2 transport processes in the leaves of three transplantomic tobacco genotypes expressing hybrid Rubisco isoforms comprising different Flaveria L-subunits that show variations in catalysis and differing trade-offs between the amount of Rubisco and its activation state. Stomatal conductance (g s) in each transplantomic tobacco line matched wild-type, while their photochemistry showed co-regulation with the variations in Rubisco catalysis. A tight co-regulation was observed between Rubisco activity and mesophyll conductance (g m) that was independent of g s thus producing plants with varying g m/g s ratios. Since the g m/g s ratio has been shown to positively correlate with intrinsic WUE, the present results suggest that altering photosynthesis by modifying Rubisco catalysis may also be useful for targeting WUE.

  11. Rubisco activase is a key regulator of non-steady-state photosynthesis at any leaf temperature and, to a lesser extent, of steady-state photosynthesis at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; Masumoto, Chisato; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Makino, Amane

    2012-09-01

    The role of Rubisco activase in steady-state and non-steady-state photosynthesis was analyzed in wild-type (Oryza sativa) and transgenic rice that expressed different amounts of Rubisco activase. Below 25°C, the Rubisco activation state and steady-state photosynthesis were only affected when Rubisco activase was reduced by more than 70%. However, at 40°C, smaller reductions in Rubisco activase content were linked to a reduced Rubisco activation state and steady-state photosynthesis. As a result, overexpression of maize Rubisco activase in rice did not lead to an increase of the Rubisco activation state, nor to an increase in photosynthetic rate below 25°C, but had a small stimulatory effect at 40°C. On the other hand, the rate at which photosynthesis approached the steady state following an increase in light intensity was rapid in Rubisco activase-overexpressing plants, intermediate in the wild-type, and slowest in antisense plants at any leaf temperature. In Rubisco activase-overexpressing plants, Rubisco activation state at low light was maintained at higher levels than in the wild-type. Thus, rapid regulation by Rubisco activase following an increase in light intensity and/or maintenance of a high Rubisco activation state at low light would result in a rapid increase in Rubisco activation state and photosynthetic rate following an increase in light intensity. It is concluded that Rubisco activase plays an important role in the regulation of non-steady-state photosynthesis at any leaf temperature and, to a lesser extent, of steady-state photosynthesis at high temperature.

  12. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling

    PubMed Central

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species’ climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species’ growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species’ thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to

  13. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species' climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species' growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species' thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to realized

  14. Production and characterization of a specific rubisco monoclonal antibody, and its use in rubisco quantification during Zantedeschia aethiopica spathe development.

    PubMed

    Tavares, R M; Karmali, A; Clemente, A; Pais, M S

    1999-04-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was purified from leaves of Zantedeschia aethiopica and used to immunize female Balb/c mice. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised by hybridoma technology using Sp2/0 myeloma cells as fusion partner. A random selected IgG2a subclass MAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose CL-4B, with a recovery of 84.3% and it was apparently homogeneous on native PAGE. The monoclonality of the purified MAb was determined by IEF. The MAb was highly specific for Rubisco from leaves of Z. aethiopica as determined by Western blotting and was used to determine the concentration of Rubisco protein by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), at three distinct stages of Z. aethiopica spathe development and in the leaf. The results suggest de novo synthesis of Rubisco during the spathe regreening, which could explain, at least in part, the increase of photosynthetic activity observed during regreening.

  15. Synthesis of catalytically active form III ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in archaea.

    PubMed

    Finn, Michael W; Tabita, F Robert

    2003-05-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) catalyzes the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas to organic carbon; it is the key enzyme responsible for the bulk of organic matter found on earth. Until recently it was believed that there are only two forms of RubisCO, form I and form II. However, the recent completion of several genome-sequencing projects uncovered open reading frames resembling RubisCO in the third domain of life, the archaea. Previous work and homology comparisons suggest that these enzymes represent a third form of RubisCO, form III. While earlier work indicated that two structurally distinct recombinant archaeal RubisCO proteins catalyzed bona fide RubisCO reactions, it was not established that the rbcL genes of anaerobic archaea can be transcribed and translated to an active enzyme in the native organisms. In this report, it is shown not only that Methanococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and Methanosarcina barkeri possess open reading frames with the residues required for catalysis but also that the RubisCO protein from these archaea accumulates in an active form under normal growth conditions. In addition, the form III RubisCO gene (rbcL) from M. acetivorans was shown to complement RubisCO deletion strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Rhodobacter sphaeroides under both photoheterotrophic and photoautotrophic growth conditions. These studies thus indicate for the first time that archaeal form III RubisCO functions in a physiologically significant fashion to fix CO(2). Furthermore, recombinant M. jannaschii, M. acetivorans, and A. fulgidus RubisCO possess unique properties with respect to quaternary structure, temperature optima, and activity in the presence of molecular oxygen compared to the previously described Thermococcus kodakaraensis and halophile proteins.

  16. Adaptive signals in algal Rubisco reveal a history of ancient atmospheric carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Young, J. N.; Rickaby, R. E. M.; Kapralov, M. V.; Filatov, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant enzyme on the Earth and responsible for all photosynthetic carbon fixation, is often thought of as a highly conserved and sluggish enzyme. Yet, different algal Rubiscos demonstrate a range of kinetic properties hinting at a history of evolution and adaptation. Here, we show that algal Rubisco has indeed evolved adaptively during ancient and distinct geological periods. Using DNA sequences of extant marine algae of the red and Chromista lineage, we define positive selection within the large subunit of Rubisco, encoded by rbcL, to occur basal to the radiation of modern marine groups. This signal of positive selection appears to be responding to changing intracellular concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) triggered by physiological adaptations to declining atmospheric CO2. Within the ecologically important Haptophyta (including coccolithophores) and Bacillariophyta (diatoms), positive selection occurred consistently during periods of falling Phanerozoic CO2 and suggests emergence of carbon-concentrating mechanisms. During the Proterozoic, a strong signal of positive selection after secondary endosymbiosis occurs at the origin of the Chromista lineage (approx. 1.1 Ga), with further positive selection events until 0.41 Ga, implying a significant and continuous decrease in atmospheric CO2 encompassing the Cryogenian Snowball Earth events. We surmise that positive selection in Rubisco has been caused by declines in atmospheric CO2 and hence acts as a proxy for ancient atmospheric CO2. PMID:22232761

  17. Effect of season, needle age and elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and Rubisco acclimation in Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Urban, Otmar; Hrstka, Miroslav; Zitová, Martina; Holišová, Petra; Sprtová, Mirka; Klem, Karel; Calfapietra, Carlo; De Angelis, Paolo; Marek, Michal V

    2012-09-01

    While downward photosynthetic acclimation in response to elevated CO(2) (EC) is frequently accompanied by reduction in Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), the exact mechanism behind this decrease and its dynamics are not well understood. We comprehensively studied Rubisco adjustment to EC in coniferous Picea abies using an electrophoretic (protein content), spectrophotometric (initial (RA(initial)) and total (RA(total)) in vitro Rubisco activities), and gas-exchange (maximum carboxylation activity in vivo (V(Cmax))) techniques. With respect to differing carbon sink strength and nitrogen remobilization, we hypothesized greater acclimation of photosynthesis in one-year-old as compared to current-year needles and at the end than at the beginning of the vegetation season. EC treatment led to a decrease in V(Cmax) values in current-year needles, but the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)-limited rate of photosynthesis (J(max)) remained unaffected. Indeed, both V(Cmax) and J(max) were reduced by the EC treatment in one-year-old needles. The extent of photosynthetic acclimation in EC plants did not increase, however, during the vegetation season. EC decreased the activation state of Rubisco (RA(initial)/RA(total)) by 16% and 5% in current-year and one-year-old needles, respectively (averaged over the growing season). While during spring (short-term effect) EC treatment did not influence the Rubisco content per unit leaf area and decreased its specific activity (activity per unit Rubisco mass) in both needle age classes studied, exposure to EC during the entire vegetation season tended to reduce the Rubisco content while increasing its specific activity. Irrespective of CO(2) treatment and needle age, a hyperbolic-decay relationship was observed between Rubisco-specific activity and its content.

  18. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-11-16

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation.

  19. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:26567524

  20. Influence of exogenous application of glutathione on rubisco and rubisco activase in heavy metal-stressed tobacco plant grown in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jeong Ah; Narayanankutty, Damodaran Puthanveettil; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2013-01-01

    The effect of glutathione on the influences of heavy metals affecting rubisco and rubisco activase was studied in tobacco plants grown in vitro where the shoot explants of the tobacco plant cultured on MS medium under aseptic conditions and two explants were placed in the control, 0.1 mM GSH, 1 mM GSH, 0.2 mM Cd, 0.2 mM Cu, 0.2 mM Zn, and a mixture of Cd and GSH, Cu and GSH, Zn and GSH, respectively. The effect of GSH on the growth of the tobacco plant was minimal, but the heavy metals clearly retarded its growth. GSH recovered the growth retarded by heavy metals, and the concentration of GSH required to recover the growth differed depending on the heavy metals. The content of chlorophyll in the plant increased through GSH and Zn, and decreased through Cd and Cu. The chlorophyll content which decreased due to Cd and Cu was recovered by GSH, and the content which increased due to Zn was decreased by 1 mM GSH. The content of rubisco decreased due to GSH and heavy metals, and the content which decreased due to heavy metals was recovered by GSH, and when GSH was treated with Zn, the increased rate was maximum compared to other heavy metals. The activity of rubisco was increased due to GSH and heavy metals, and the activity increased by Cd and Zn decreased through GSH. In the case of Cu, the activity of GSH increased even more. There was no effect of GSH on the influences of heavy metals on the content and activity of rubisco activase. The activity of rubisco decreased by thiourea among six denaturing agents, and increased by l-cysteine, and in most cases the activity level was recorded as high. The activity of rubisco activase all decreased as a result of six denaturing agents, and the effect caused by EDTA and guanidine-HCl was the greatest, while the effect caused by l-cysteine and urea was minimal. PMID:24596504

  1. High substrate specificity factor ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from eukaryotic marine algae and properties of recombinant cyanobacterial RubiSCO containing "algal" residue modifications.

    PubMed

    Read, B A; Tabita, F R

    1994-07-01

    Marine algae play an important role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In this investigation, we have determined the substrate specificity factor of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from several marine chromophytic and rhodophytic algae. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity and all possessed significantly higher substrate specificity factors than the enzymes from terrestrial plants, green algae, or bacteria. There are substantial differences in the sequence in a helix 6 of the large subunit of these enzymes, which is intriguing since residues of this region had been previously shown to influence the ability of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase to discriminate between CO2 and O2, presumably by influencing the adjacent flexible loop 6 region. Sequence divergence at this and other key regions might contribute to the substantial differences in the substrate specificity factor of the chromophyte/rhodophyte enzyme. Initial studies on probing the basis for the high substrate specificity factor employed single amino acid substitutions in the recombinant cyanobacterial ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Residues in the vicinity of loop 6 were changed to reflect the corresponding residues in the chromophyte/rhodophyte large subunit. Some changes in the substrate specificity factor were noted, as were alterations in other important kinetic parameters. Since marine algae show little evidence of photorespiratory metabolism, the high substrate specificity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase is consistent with the physiology of these organisms. The results of this study provide further evidence that the properties of this enzyme may evolve or change according to the environment in which the host organism is found.

  2. Characterization of a barley Rubisco activase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.A.; Rundle, S.J.; Zielinski, R. )

    1990-05-01

    Barley Rubisco Activase (Rca) is a nuclear encoded chloroplast enzyme that activates Rubisco to catalytic competence. Rca mRNA accumulation in barley is light-regulated; the 5{prime}-flanking region of a highly expressed barley Rca gene (HvRca-1) contains several sequence motifs similar to those found in the promoter of other light-regulated, nuclear genes. We have characterized the cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1 by deletion analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of a cloned gene. These constructs have been assayed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays, as well as by DNA footprinting. Putative regulatory sequences detected in vitro have also been tested in vivo by constructing chimeric genes consisting of deletion mutant promoters fused to a promoterless {beta}-glucuronidase reporter gene. Comparison of results obtained from complimentary parallel in vitro and in vivo assays of identical promoter deletions have provided information on cis-acting regulatory regions of HvRca-1.

  3. Consequences of altering rubisco regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, Michael

    2013-12-31

    Research examined the thermal stability and propensity for aggregation of wild type and the C- and N-terminally modified forms of activase to determine if loss of activity under heat stress is dependent on protein aggregation. The results showed that 1) loss of activity at high temperature is independent of aggregation; 2) activase with both C- and N-terminal S-Tags are more susceptible to aggregation than wild type activase, 3) aggregation is highly dependent on the concentration of Mg2+ and 4) the ATP analog, ATPgammaS, protects against both thermal inactivation and aggregation.

  4. Variation in Rubisco and other photosynthetic parameters in the life cycle of Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangfan; Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Cells of Haematococcus pluvialis Flot. et Will were collected in four different growth phases. We quantified the initial and total enzyme activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) in crude extracts, and the relative expression of large-subunit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate caboxylase / oxygenase ( rbcL) mRNA. We measured the ratio of photosynthetic rate to respiration rate (P/R), maximal effective quantum yield of photosystem II ( F v/ F m), electron transport rate (ETR), actual photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light (PSII), and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Green vegetative cells were found to be in the most active state, with a relatively higher P/R ratio. These cells also displayed the lowest NPQ and the highest F v/ F m, ETR, and PSII, indicating the most effective PSII. However, both Rubisco activity and rbcL mRNA expression were the lowest measured. In orange resting cysts with relatively lower P/R and NPQ, Rubisco activity and rbcL expression reached a peak, while F v/ F m, ETR, and ΦPSII were the lowest measured. Taking into account the methods of astaxanthin induction used in industry, we suggest that Rubisco may participate in astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. A continuous and sufficient supply of a carbon source such as CO2 may therefore aid the large scale production of astaxanthin.

  5. Structural Changes Associated with the Acute Thermal Instability of Rubisco Activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibition of photosynthesis at moderately high temperatures has been linked to a decrease in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation. This decrease is thought to be a consequence of the thermal instability of Rubisco’s chaperone, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxyla...

  6. Role of Small Subunit in Mediating Assembly of Red-type Form I Rubisco

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jidnyasa; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the key enzyme involved in photosynthetic carbon fixation, converting atmospheric CO2 to organic compounds. Form I Rubisco is a cylindrical complex composed of eight large (RbcL) subunits that are capped by four small subunits (RbcS) at the top and four at the bottom. Form I Rubiscos are phylogenetically divided into green- and red-type. Some red-type enzymes have catalytically superior properties. Thus, understanding their folding and assembly is of considerable biotechnological interest. Folding of the green-type RbcL subunits in cyanobacteria is mediated by the GroEL/ES chaperonin system, and assembly to holoenzyme requires specialized chaperones such as RbcX and RAF1. Here, we show that the red-type RbcL subunits in the proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides also fold with GroEL/ES. However, assembly proceeds in a chaperone-independent manner. We find that the C-terminal β-hairpin extension of red-type RbcS, which is absent in green-type RbcS, is critical for efficient assembly. The β-hairpins of four RbcS subunits form an eight-stranded β-barrel that protrudes into the central solvent channel of the RbcL core complex. The two β-barrels stabilize the complex through multiple interactions with the RbcL subunits. A chimeric green-type RbcS carrying the C-terminal β-hairpin renders the assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco independent of RbcX. Our results may facilitate the engineering of crop plants with improved growth properties expressing red-type Rubisco. PMID:25371207

  7. Directed evolution of rubisco in Escherichia coli reveals a specificity-determining hydrogen bond in the form II enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Morell, Matthew; Whitney, Spencer M

    2007-12-11

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) occupies a critical position in photosynthetic CO2-fixation and consequently has been the focus of intense study. Crystal-structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis studies have met with limited success in engineering kinetic improvements to Rubisco, highlighting our inadequate understanding of structural constraints at the atomic level that dictate the enzyme's catalytic chemistry. Bioselection provides an alternative random mutagenic approach that is useful for identifying and elucidating imperceptible structure-function relationships. Using the dimeric Form II Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum, its gene (rbcM) was randomly mutated and introduced under positive selection into Escherichia coli cells metabolically engineered to be dependent on Rubisco to detoxify its substrate ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Thirteen colonies displaying improved fitness were isolated, and all were found to harbor mutations in rbcM at one of two codons, histidine-44 or aspartate-117, that are structurally adjacent amino acids located about 10 A from the active site. Biochemical characterization of the mutant enzymes showed the mutations reduced their CO2/O2 specificity by 40% and decreased their carboxylation turnover rate by 20-40%. Structural analyses showed histidine-44 and aspartate-117 form a hydrogen bond in R. rubrum Rubisco and that the residues are conserved among other Form II Rubiscos. This study demonstrated the utility of directed evolution in E. coli for identifying catalytically relevant residues (in particular nonobvious residues disconnected from active site residues) and their potential molecular interactions that influence Rubisco's catalytic chemistry.

  8. Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, Alessandro; Lin, Myat T; Andralojc, P John; Hanson, Maureen R; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-01-01

    Introducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism and a faster Rubisco enzyme from cyanobacteria into higher plant chloroplasts may improve photosynthetic performance by increasing the rate of CO2 fixation while decreasing losses caused by photorespiration. We previously demonstrated that tobacco plants grow photoautotrophically using Rubisco from Synechococcus elongatus, although the plants exhibited considerably slower growth than wild-type and required supplementary CO2 . Because of concerns that vascular plant assembly factors may not be adequate for assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco, prior transgenic plants included the cyanobacterial chaperone RbcX or the carboxysomal protein CcmM35. Here we show that neither RbcX nor CcmM35 is needed for assembly of active cyanobacterial Rubisco. Furthermore, by altering the gene regulatory sequences on the Rubisco transgenes, cyanobacterial Rubisco expression was enhanced and the transgenic plants grew at near wild-type growth rates, although still requiring elevated CO2 . We performed detailed kinetic characterization of the enzymes produced with and without the RbcX and CcmM35 cyanobacterial proteins. These transgenic plants exhibit photosynthetic characteristics that confirm the predicted benefits of introduction of non-native forms of Rubisco with higher carboxylation rate constants in vascular plants and the potential nitrogen-use efficiency that may be achieved provided that adequate CO2 is available near the enzyme.

  9. Mesophyll conductance to CO2 and Rubisco as targets for improving intrinsic water use efficiency in C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Flexas, J; Díaz-Espejo, A; Conesa, M A; Coopman, R E; Douthe, C; Gago, J; Gallé, A; Galmés, J; Medrano, H; Ribas-Carbo, M; Tomàs, M; Niinemets, Ü

    2016-05-01

    Water limitation is a major global constraint for plant productivity that is likely to be exacerbated by climate change. Hence, improving plant water use efficiency (WUE) has become a major goal for the near future. At the leaf level, WUE is the ratio between photosynthesis and transpiration. Maintaining high photosynthesis under water stress, while improving WUE requires either increasing mesophyll conductance (gm ) and/or improving the biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation-in which Rubisco properties play a key role, especially in C3 plants at current atmospheric CO2 . The goals of the present analysis are: (1) to summarize the evidence that improving gm and/or Rubisco can result in increased WUE; (2) to review the degree of success of early attempts to genetically manipulate gm or Rubisco; (3) to analyse how gm , gsw and the Rubisco's maximum velocity (Vcmax ) co-vary across different plant species in well-watered and drought-stressed conditions; (4) to examine how these variations cause differences in WUE and what is the overall extent of variation in individual determinants of WUE; and finally, (5) to use simulation analysis to provide a theoretical framework for the possible control of WUE by gm and Rubisco catalytic constants vis-à-vis gsw under water limitations.

  10. Characterization of heat-set gels from RuBisCO in comparison to those from other proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anneke H; Nieuwland, Maaike; de Jong, Govardus A H

    2014-11-05

    To anticipate a future shortage in functional proteins, it is important to study the functionality of new alternative protein sources. Native RuBisCO was extracted from spinach, and its gelation behavior was compared to other native proteins from animal and plant origins. Protein gels were analyzed for their mechanical gel properties during small and large deformation and for their microstructure. Heat-induced aggregation and network formation of RuBisCO resulted in gels with unique characteristics compared to, for example, whey protein and egg white protein. Having a very low critical gelling concentration and low denaturation temperature, RuBisCO readily forms a network with a very high gel strength (G', fracture stress), but upon deformation it has a brittle character (low critical strain, low fracture strain). This breakdown behavior can be explained by the dominant role of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonds between RuBisCO molecules during network formation and by the coarse microstructure. RuBisCO was shown to exhibit high potential as a functional ingredient giving opportunities for the design of new textures at low protein concentration.

  11. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  12. Structural and biochemical characterization of the C₃-C₄ intermediate Brassica gravinae and relatives, with particular reference to cellular distribution of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of its CO(2) compensation concentration, Brassica gravinae Ten. has been reported to be a C(3)-C(4) intermediate. This study investigated the structural and biochemical features of photosynthetic metabolism in B. gravinae. The cellular distribution of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was also examined in B. gravinae, B. napus L. (C(3)), Raphanus sativus L. (C(3)), and Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC. (C(3)-C(4)) by immunogold electron microscopy to elucidate Rubisco expression during the evolution from C(3) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate plants. The bundle sheath (BS) cells of B. gravinae contained centrifugally located chloroplasts as well as centripetally located chloroplasts and mitochondria. Glycine decarboxylase P-protein was localized in the BS mitochondria. Brassica gravinae had low C(4) enzyme activities and high activities of Rubisco and photorespiratory enzymes, suggesting that it reduces photorespiratory CO(2) loss by the glycine shuttle. In B. gravinae, the labelling density of Rubisco was higher in the mesophyll chloroplasts than in the BS chloroplasts. A similar cellular pattern was found in other Brassicaceae species. These data demonstrate that, during the evolution from C(3) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate plants, the intercellular pattern of Rubisco expression did not change greatly, although the amount of chloroplasts in the BS cells increased. It also appears that intracellular variation in Rubisco distribution may occur within the BS cells of B. gravinae.

  13. First crystal structure of Rubisco from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T C; Backlund, A; Bjorhall, K; Spreitzer, R J; Andersson, I

    2001-12-21

    The crystal structure of Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been determined to 1.4 A resolution. Overall, the structure shows high similarity to the previously determined structures of L8S8 Rubisco enzymes. The largest difference is found in the loop between beta strands A and B of the small subunit (betaA-betaB loop), which is longer by six amino acid residues than the corresponding region in Rubisco from Spinacia. Mutations of residues in the betaA-betaB loop have been shown to affect holoenzyme stability and catalytic properties. The information contained in the Chlamydomonas structure enables a more reliable analysis of the effect of these mutations. No electron density was observed for the last 13 residues of the small subunit, which are assumed to be disordered in the crystal. Because of the high resolution of the data, some posttranslational modifications are unambiguously apparent in the structure. These include cysteine and N-terminal methylations and proline 4-hydroxylations.

  14. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuimin; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL) and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS). Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution. PMID:26305355

  15. Functional hybrid rubisco enzymes with plant small subunits and algal large subunits: engineered rbcS cDNA for expression in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Meyer, Moritz; Griffiths, Howard; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2010-06-25

    There has been much interest in the chloroplast-encoded large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) as a target for engineering an increase in net CO(2) fixation in photosynthesis. Improvements in the enzyme would lead to an increase in the production of food, fiber, and renewable energy. Although the large subunit contains the active site, a family of rbcS nuclear genes encodes the Rubisco small subunits, which can also influence the carboxylation catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity of the enzyme. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, small subunits from spinach, Arabidopsis, and sunflower were assembled with algal large subunits by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the rbcS gene family. Foreign rbcS cDNAs were successfully expressed in Chlamydomonas by fusing them to a Chlamydomonas rbcS transit peptide sequence engineered to contain rbcS introns. Although plant Rubisco generally has greater CO(2)/O(2) specificity but a lower carboxylation V(max) than Chlamydomonas Rubisco, the hybrid enzymes have 3-11% increases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity and retain near normal V(max) values. Thus, small subunits may make a significant contribution to the overall catalytic performance of Rubisco. Despite having normal amounts of catalytically proficient Rubisco, the hybrid mutant strains display reduced levels of photosynthetic growth and lack chloroplast pyrenoids. It appears that small subunits contain the structural elements responsible for targeting Rubisco to the algal pyrenoid, which is the site where CO(2) is concentrated for optimal photosynthesis.

  16. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg{sup 2+} and 2

  17. Rubisco and PEP carboxylase responses to changing irradiance in a Brazilian Cerrado tree species, Qualea grandiflora Mart. (Vochysiaceae).

    PubMed

    Paulilo, M T; Besford, R T; Wilkins, D

    1994-02-01

    The activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase, Rubisco (E.C. 4.1.1.39) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, PEPc (E.C. 4.1.1.31), and concentrations of protein and chlorophyll were measured in extracts from cotyledons and first leaves of Qualea grandiflora Mart. (Vochysiaceae) seedlings after transfer from high-light (20 days at 320 micro mol m(-2) s(-1), PAR) to low-light (35 days at 120 micro mol m(-2) s(-1), PAR) conditions. When Tween 20 and glycerol were added to the extraction medium, Rubisco activities obtained for Qualea grandiflora were comparable to published values for several coniferous species and the broad-leaved species, Prunus avium L. Stella, grown in a similar light environment. Rubisco activity in cotyledons of Q. grandiflora grown in high light for 20 days and then transferred to low light for a further 35 days was similar to the activity in cotyledons of plants grown continuously in high light. However, the first leaf above the cotyledons showed a greater response to the change in irradiance; in high light, Rubisco activity of the first leaf was 1.8 times higher on a fresh weight basis and 2.7 times higher on an area basis than that of leaves transferred from high to low light. Fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration expressed on a unit leaf area basis were also higher in the high-light treatment. These responses to irradiance are indicative of a species adapted to growth in an unshaded habitat. The PEPc activity in leaves was 15% of Rubisco activity, which is typical of species with a C(3) photosynthetic pathway. The relatively slow growth rate of Q. grandiflora observed in these experiments could not be attributed to a low carboxylation capacity per unit leaf area.

  18. (Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Our first year's activities include: (1) completing a survey of the basic characteristics of activase gene expression in barley; and (2) isolating and structurally characterizing cDNA and genomic DNA sequences encoding activase from barley. Our goal was to determine whether activase mRNA and protein accumulation are coordinated with those of the rubisco subunits. We utilized the first leaves of barley as an experimental system for these studies because they can be used in two ways to study the expression of leaf genes: by following the naturally occurring differentiation of leaf cells, which occurs acropetally along the barley leaf; and by following the photomorphogenesis of etiolated barley seedlings. In the acropetal gradient of leaf cell differentiation, activase mRNA and mRNA and polypeptide expression is tightly coordinated with rubisco subunit mRNA and polypeptide expression. Although we have not measured their precise stoichiometry at each stage of leaf differentiation, activase protein is expressed at the level of about one polypeptide per rubisco holoenzyme in mature regions of the leaf. Coordination of the expression of activase mRNAs and polypeptides indicates that in the barley leaf gradient, activase gene expression is largely controlled at the level of transcription. However, translational controls may play a role in regulating activase expression on a short term basis.

  19. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  20. Directing the evolution of Rubisco and Rubisco activase: first impressions of a new tool for photosynthesis research.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Whitney, Spencer M

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade the practice of laboratory-directed protein evolution has become firmly established as a versatile tool in biochemical research by enabling molecular evolution toward desirable phenotypes or detection of novel structure-function interactions. Applications of this technique in the field of photosynthesis research are still in their infancy, but recently first steps have been reported in the directed evolution of the CO(2)-fixing enzyme Rubisco and its helper protein Rubisco activase. Here we summarize directed protein evolution strategies and review the progressive advances that have been made to develop and apply suitable selection systems for screening mutant forms of these enzymes that improve the fitness of the host organism. The goal of increasing photosynthetic efficiency of plants by improving the kinetics of Rubisco has been a long-term goal scoring modest successes. We discuss how directed evolution methodologies may one day be able to circumvent the problems encountered during this venture.

  1. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  2. Regulation of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Activase

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Suratna; Henderson, J. Nathan; Liles, Kevin; Hilton, Matthew T.; Wachter, Rebekka M.

    2015-01-01

    In many photosynthetic organisms, tight-binding Rubisco inhibitors are released by the motor protein Rubisco activase (Rca). In higher plants, Rca plays a pivotal role in regulating CO2 fixation. Here, the ATPase activity of 0.005 mm tobacco Rca was monitored under steady-state conditions, and global curve fitting was utilized to extract kinetic constants. The kcat was best fit by 22.3 ± 4.9 min−1, the Km for ATP by 0.104 ± 0.024 mm, and the Ki for ADP by 0.037 ± 0.007 mm. Without ADP, the Hill coefficient for ATP hydrolysis was extracted to be 1.0 ± 0.1, indicating noncooperative behavior of homo-oligomeric Rca assemblies. However, the addition of ADP was shown to introduce positive cooperativity between two or more subunits (Hill coefficient 1.9 ± 0.2), allowing for regulation via the prevailing ATP/ADP ratio. ADP-mediated activation was not observed, although larger amounts led to competitive product inhibition of hydrolytic activity. The catalytic efficiency increased 8.4-fold upon cooperative binding of a second magnesium ion (Hill coefficient 2.5 ± 0.5), suggesting at least three conformational states (ATP-bound, ADP-bound, and empty) within assemblies containing an average of about six subunits. The addition of excess Rubisco (24:1, L8S8/Rca6) and crowding agents did not modify catalytic rates. However, high magnesium provided for thermal Rca stabilization. We propose that magnesium mediates the formation of closed hexameric toroids capable of high turnover rates and amenable to allosteric regulation. We suggest that in vivo, the Rca hydrolytic activity is tuned by fluctuating [Mg2+] in response to changes in available light. PMID:26283786

  3. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  4. Effects of temperature on growth, photophysiology, Rubisco gene expression in Prorocentrum donghaiense and Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anglu; Ma, Zengling; Jiang, Keji; Li, Daoji

    2016-12-01

    To explore the effects of temperature changes on dinoflagellate bloom succession in the coastal waters of the East China Sea, changes in the growth, photophysiology, and Rubisco gene expression of Prorocentrum donghaiense and Karenia mikimotoi, two harmful algal species, were investigated at different temperatures (16 to 28°C). The maximal specific growth rate and the maximal mRNA expression of Rubisco gene in P. donghaiense and K. mikimotoi occurred at 20 and 24°C, respectively. The photosynthetic activity of P. donghaiense was generally stable, but K. mikimotoi photosynthesis increased when temperatures rose from 16 to 28°C. The effective photochemical efficiency ( F q ' / F m ' ) and the maximal relative electron transfer rate (rETRmax) of K. mikimotoi increased significantly with increasing temperature, and the lowest and highest values occurred at 16 and 28°C, respectively. It seems that P. donghaiense has higher photosynthetic capacity than K. mikimotoi due to its higher F q ' / F m ' , rETRmax, and photosynthetic efficiency (α). However, K. mikimotoi has a higher growth rate than P. donghaiense. These results suggest that the photosynthetic activity and genetic responses of dinoflagellates are species-dependent. It is likely that temperature changes affect species composition during blooms, leading to the observed patterns of bloom succession.

  5. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  6. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-12-31

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  7. Protein oligomerization monitored by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: self-assembly of rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Manas; Kuriata, Agnieszka M; Nathan Henderson, J; Salvucci, Michael E; Wachter, Rebekka M; Levitus, Marcia

    2012-09-05

    A methodology is presented to characterize complex protein assembly pathways by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We have derived the total autocorrelation function describing the behavior of mixtures of labeled and unlabeled protein under equilibrium conditions. Our modeling approach allows us to quantitatively consider the relevance of any proposed intermediate form, and K(d) values can be estimated even when several oligomeric species coexist. We have tested this method on the AAA+ ATPase Rubisco activase (Rca). Rca self-association regulates the CO(2) fixing activity of the enzyme Rubisco, directly affecting biomass accumulation in higher plants. However, the elucidation of its assembly pathway has remained challenging, precluding a detailed mechanistic investigation. Here, we present the first, to our knowledge, thermodynamic characterization of oligomeric states of cotton β-Rca complexed with Mg·ADP. We find that the monomer is the dominating species below 0.5 micromolar. The most plausible model supports dissociation constants of ∼4, 1, and 1 micromolar for the monomer-dimer, dimer-tetramer, and tetramer-hexamer equilibria, in line with the coexistence of four different oligomeric forms under typical assay conditions. Large aggregates become dominant above 40 micromolar, with continued assembly at even higher concentrations. We propose that under some conditions, ADP-bound Rca self-associates by forming spiral arrangements that grow along the helical axis. Other models such as the stacking of closed hexameric rings are also discussed.

  8. Role of the Rubisco small subunit. Final report for period May 1, 1997--April 30,2000

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, Robert J.

    2000-10-04

    CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} are mutually competitive at the active site of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rubisco contains two subunits, each present in eight copies. The 15-kD small subunit is coded by a family of nuclear RbcS genes. Until now, the role of the small subunit in Rubisco structure or catalytic efficiency is not known. Because of other work in eliminating the two RbcS genes in the green algo Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it is now possible to address questions about the structure-function relationships of the eukaryotic small subunit. There are three specific aims in this project: (1) Alanine scanning mutagenesis is being used to dissect the importance of the {beta}A/{beta}B loop, a feature unique to the eukaryotic small subunit. (2) Random mutagenesis is being used to identify additional residues or regions of the small subunit that are important for holoenzyme assembly and function. (3) Attempts are being made to express foreign small subunits in Chlamydomonas to examine the contribution of small subunits to holoenzyme assembly, catalytic efficiency, and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity.

  9. Isolation and antihypertensive effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from spinach Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjun; Marczak, Ewa D; Yokoo, Megumi; Usui, Hachiro; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2003-08-13

    Four new inhibitory peptides for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), that is, MRWRD, MRW, LRIPVA, and IAYKPAG, were isolated from the pepsin-pancreatin digest of spinach Rubisco with the use of HPLC. IC(50) values of individual peptides were 2.1, 0.6, 0.38, and 4.2 microM, respectively. MRW and MRWRD had an antihypertensive effect after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats. Maximal reduction occurred 2 h after oral administration of MRW, whereas MRWRD showed maximal decrease 4 h after oral administration at doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. IAYKPAG also exerted antihypertensive activity after oral administration at the dose of 100 mg/kg, giving a maximum decrease 4 h after oral administration. IAYKP, IAY, and KP, the fragment peptides of IAYKPAG, also exerted antihypertensive activity. LRIPVA [corrected] did not show any antihypertensive effect at a dose of 100 mg/kg despite its potent ACE-inhibitory activity.

  10. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  11. Engineering chloroplasts to improve Rubisco catalysis: prospects for translating improvements into food and fiber crops.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    494 I. 495 II. 496 III. 496 IV. 499 V. 499 VI. 501 VII. 501 VIII. 502 IX. 505 X. 506 507 References 507 SUMMARY: The uncertainty of future climate change is placing pressure on cropping systems to continue to provide stable increases in productive yields. To mitigate future climates and the increasing threats against global food security, new solutions to manipulate photosynthesis are required. This review explores the current efforts available to improve carbon assimilation within plant chloroplasts by engineering Rubisco, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation. Fixation of CO2 and subsequent cycling of 3-phosphoglycerate through the Calvin cycle provides the necessary carbohydrate building blocks for maintaining plant growth and yield, but has to compete with Rubisco oxygenation, which results in photorespiration that is energetically wasteful for plants. Engineering improvements in Rubisco is a complex challenge and requires an understanding of chloroplast gene regulatory pathways, and the intricate nature of Rubisco catalysis and biogenesis, to transplant more efficient forms of Rubisco into crops. In recent times, major advances in Rubisco engineering have been achieved through improvement of our knowledge of Rubisco synthesis and assembly, and identifying amino acid catalytic switches in the L-subunit responsible for improvements in catalysis. Improving the capacity of CO2 fixation in crops such as rice will require further advances in chloroplast bioengineering and Rubisco biogenesis.

  12. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  13. Characterization and expression of genes from the RubisCO gene cluster of the chemoautotrophic symbiont of Solemya velum: cbbLSQO.

    PubMed

    Schwedock, Julie; Harmer, Tara L; Scott, Kathleen M; Hektor, Harm J; Seitz, Angelica P; Fontana, Matthew C; Distel, Daniel L; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-09-01

    Chemoautotrophic endosymbionts residing in Solemya velum gills provide this shallow water clam with most of its nutritional requirements. The cbb gene cluster of the S. velum symbiont, including cbbL and cbbS, which encode the large and small subunits of the carbon-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant RubisCO had a high specific activity, approximately 3 micromol min(-1) mg protein (-1), and a KCO2 of 40.3 microM. Based on sequence identity and phylogenetic analyses, these genes encode a form IA RubisCO, both subunits of which are closely related to those of the symbiont of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent gastropod Alviniconcha hessleri and the photosynthetic bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. In the cbb gene cluster of the S. velum symbiont, the cbbLS genes were followed by cbbQ and cbbO, which are found in some but not all cbb gene clusters and whose products are implicated in enhancing RubisCO activity post-translationally. cbbQ shares sequence similarity with nirQ and norQ, found in denitrification clusters of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans. The 3' region of cbbO from the S. velum symbiont, like that of the three other known cbbO genes, shares similarity to the 3' region of norD in the denitrification cluster. This is the first study to explore the cbb gene structure for a chemoautotrophic endosymbiont, which is critical both as an initial step in evaluating cbb operon structure in chemoautotrophic endosymbionts and in understanding the patterns and forces governing RubisCO evolution and physiology.

  14. Diversity and expression of RubisCO genes in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake during the polar night transition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weidong; Ream, David C; Priscu, John C; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-06-01

    The autotrophic communities in the lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have generated interest since the early 1960s owing to low light transmission through the permanent ice covers, a strongly bimodal seasonal light cycle, constant cold water temperatures, and geographical isolation. Previous work has shown that autotrophic carbon fixation in these lakes provides an important source of organic matter to this polar desert. Lake Bonney has two lobes separated by a shallow sill and is one of several chemically stratified lakes in the dry valleys that support year-round biological activity. As part of an International Polar Year initiative, we monitored the diversity and abundance of major isoforms of RubisCO in Lake Bonney by using a combined sequencing and quantitative PCR approach during the transition from summer to polar winter. Form ID RubisCO genes related to a stramenopile, a haptophyte, and a cryptophyte were identified, while primers specific for form IA/B RubisCO detected a diverse autotrophic community of chlorophytes, cyanobacteria, and chemoautotrophic proteobacteria. Form ID RubisCO dominated phytoplankton communities in both lobes of the lake and closely matched depth profiles for photosynthesis and chlorophyll. Our results indicate a coupling between light availability, photosynthesis, and rbcL mRNA levels in deep phytoplankton populations. Regulatory control of rbcL in phytoplankton living in nutrient-deprived shallow depths does not appear to be solely light dependent. The distinct water chemistries of the east and west lobes have resulted in depth- and lobe-dependent variability in RubisCO diversity, which plays a role in transcriptional activity of the key gene responsible for carbon fixation.

  15. Diversity and Expression of RubisCO Genes in a Perennially Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake during the Polar Night Transition

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weidong; Ream, David C.; Priscu, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The autotrophic communities in the lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have generated interest since the early 1960s owing to low light transmission through the permanent ice covers, a strongly bimodal seasonal light cycle, constant cold water temperatures, and geographical isolation. Previous work has shown that autotrophic carbon fixation in these lakes provides an important source of organic matter to this polar desert. Lake Bonney has two lobes separated by a shallow sill and is one of several chemically stratified lakes in the dry valleys that support year-round biological activity. As part of an International Polar Year initiative, we monitored the diversity and abundance of major isoforms of RubisCO in Lake Bonney by using a combined sequencing and quantitative PCR approach during the transition from summer to polar winter. Form ID RubisCO genes related to a stramenopile, a haptophyte, and a cryptophyte were identified, while primers specific for form IA/B RubisCO detected a diverse autotrophic community of chlorophytes, cyanobacteria, and chemoautotrophic proteobacteria. Form ID RubisCO dominated phytoplankton communities in both lobes of the lake and closely matched depth profiles for photosynthesis and chlorophyll. Our results indicate a coupling between light availability, photosynthesis, and rbcL mRNA levels in deep phytoplankton populations. Regulatory control of rbcL in phytoplankton living in nutrient-deprived shallow depths does not appear to be solely light dependent. The distinct water chemistries of the east and west lobes have resulted in depth- and lobe-dependent variability in RubisCO diversity, which plays a role in transcriptional activity of the key gene responsible for carbon fixation. PMID:22492447

  16. Characterization of photosystem II photochemistry in transgenic tobacco plants with lowered Rubisco activase content.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zhang, Aihong; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2010-11-15

    Rubisco activase plays an important role in the regulation of CO(2) assimilation. However, it is unknown how activase regulates photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. To investigate the effects of Rubisco activase on PSII photochemistry, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with 50% (i7), 25% (i28), and 5% (i46) activase levels as compared to wild type plants by using a gene encoding tobacco activase for the RNAi construct. Both CO(2) assimilation and PSII activity were significantly reduced only in transgenic i28 and i46 plants, suggesting that activase deficiency led to decreased PSII activity. Flash-induced fluorescence kinetics indicated that activase deficiency resulted in a slow electron transfer between Q(A) (primary quinine electron acceptor of PSII) and Q(B) (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII). Thermoluminescence measurements revealed that activase deficiency induced a shift of S(2)Q(A)(-) and S(2)Q(B)(-) recombinations to higher temperatures in parallel, and a decrease in the intensities of the thermoluminescence emissions. Activase deficiency also dampened the period-four oscillation of the thermoluminescence B-band. Protein gel blot analysis showed that activase deficiency resulted in a significant decrease in the content of D1, D2, CP43, CP47, and PsbO proteins. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that activase deficiency induced a significant decrease in the number of grana stacks per chloroplast and discs per grana stack. Our results suggest that activase plays an important role in maintaining PSII function and chloroplast development.

  17. In Vivo Studies in Rhodospirillum rubrum Indicate That Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Catalyzes Two Obligatorily Required and Physiologically Significant Reactions for Distinct Carbon and Sulfur Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; North, Justin A; Sriram, Jaya; Evans, Bradley S; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-12-25

    All organisms possess fundamental metabolic pathways to ensure that needed carbon and sulfur compounds are provided to the cell in the proper chemical form and oxidation state. For most organisms capable of using CO2 as sole source of carbon, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes primary carbon dioxide assimilation. In addition, sulfur salvage pathways are necessary to ensure that key sulfur-containing compounds are both available and, where necessary, detoxified in the cell. Using knock-out mutations and metabolomics in the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, we show here that Rubisco concurrently catalyzes key and essential reactions for seemingly unrelated but physiologically essential central carbon and sulfur salvage metabolic pathways of the cell. In this study, complementation and mutagenesis studies indicated that representatives of all known extant functional Rubisco forms found in nature are capable of simultaneously catalyzing reactions required for both CO2-dependent growth as well as growth using 5-methylthioadenosine as sole sulfur source under anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Moreover, specific inactivation of the CO2 fixation reaction did not affect the ability of Rubisco to support anaerobic 5-methylthioadenosine metabolism, suggesting that the active site of Rubisco has evolved to ensure that this enzyme maintains both key functions. Thus, despite the coevolution of both functions, the active site of this protein may be differentially modified to affect only one of its key functions.

  18. In Vivo Studies in Rhodospirillum rubrum Indicate That Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Catalyzes Two Obligatorily Required and Physiologically Significant Reactions for Distinct Carbon and Sulfur Metabolic Pathways*♦

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Swati; North, Justin A.; Sriram, Jaya; Evans, Bradley S.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2015-01-01

    All organisms possess fundamental metabolic pathways to ensure that needed carbon and sulfur compounds are provided to the cell in the proper chemical form and oxidation state. For most organisms capable of using CO2 as sole source of carbon, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes primary carbon dioxide assimilation. In addition, sulfur salvage pathways are necessary to ensure that key sulfur-containing compounds are both available and, where necessary, detoxified in the cell. Using knock-out mutations and metabolomics in the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, we show here that Rubisco concurrently catalyzes key and essential reactions for seemingly unrelated but physiologically essential central carbon and sulfur salvage metabolic pathways of the cell. In this study, complementation and mutagenesis studies indicated that representatives of all known extant functional Rubisco forms found in nature are capable of simultaneously catalyzing reactions required for both CO2-dependent growth as well as growth using 5-methylthioadenosine as sole sulfur source under anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Moreover, specific inactivation of the CO2 fixation reaction did not affect the ability of Rubisco to support anaerobic 5-methylthioadenosine metabolism, suggesting that the active site of Rubisco has evolved to ensure that this enzyme maintains both key functions. Thus, despite the coevolution of both functions, the active site of this protein may be differentially modified to affect only one of its key functions. PMID:26511314

  19. Variation in Rubisco activase (RCAβ) gene promoters and expression in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deyue

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of Rubisco activase (RCA) gene regulation and altering its expression levels to optimize Rubisco activation may provide an approach to enhance plant productivity. However, the genetic mechanisms and the effect of RCA expression on phenotype are still unknown in soybean. This work analysed the expression of RCA genes and demonstrated that two RCA isoforms presented different expression patterns. Compared with GmRCAα, GmRCAβ was expressed at higher mRNA and protein levels. In addition, GmRCAα and GmRCAβ were positively correlated with chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and seed yield, suggesting that changes in expression of RCA has a potential applicability in breeding for enhanced soybean productivity. To identify the genetic factors that cause expression level variation of GmRCAβ, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping was combined with allele mining in a natural population including 219 landraces. The eQTL mapping showed that a combination of both cis- and trans-acting eQTLs might control GmRCAβ expression. As promoters can affect both cis- and trans-acting eQTLs by altering cis-acting regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites, this work subsequently focused on the promoter region of GmRCAβ. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the GmRCAβ promoter were identified and shown to correlate with expression level diversity. These SNPs were classified into two groups, A and B. Further transient expression showed that GUS expression driven by the group A promoter was stronger than that by the group B promoter, suggesting that promoter sequence types could influence gene expression levels. These results would improve understanding how variation within promoters affects gene expression and, ultimately, phenotypic diversity in natural populations. PMID:24170743

  20. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  1. Prospects for improving CO2 fixation in C3-crops through understanding C4-Rubisco biogenesis and catalytic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-06-01

    By operating a CO2 concentrating mechanism, C4-photosynthesis offers highly successful solutions to remedy the inefficiency of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco. C4-plant Rubisco has characteristically evolved faster carboxylation rates with low CO2 affinity. Owing to high CO2 concentrations in bundle sheath chloroplasts, faster Rubisco enhances resource use efficiency in C4 plants by reducing the energy and carbon costs associated with photorespiration and lowering the nitrogen investment in Rubisco. Here, we show that C4-Rubisco from some NADP-ME species, such as maize, are also of potential benefit to C3-photosynthesis under current and future atmospheric CO2 pressures. Realizing this bioengineering endeavour necessitates improved understanding of the biogenesis requirements and catalytic variability of C4-Rubisco, as well as the development of transformation capabilities to engineer Rubisco in a wider variety of food and fibre crops.

  2. Structure-Function Studies with the Unique Hexameric Form II Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) from Rhodopseudomonas palustris*

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Sriram; Chan, Sum; Perry, L. Jeanne; Tabita, F. Robert

    2014-01-01

    The first x-ray crystal structure has been solved for an activated transition-state analog-bound form II ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). This enzyme, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, assembles as a unique hexamer with three pairs of catalytic large subunit homodimers around a central 3-fold symmetry axis. This oligomer arrangement is unique among all known Rubisco structures, including the form II homolog from Rhodospirillum rubrum. The presence of a transition-state analog in the active site locked the activated enzyme in a “closed” conformation and revealed the positions of critical active site residues during catalysis. Functional roles of two form II-specific residues (Ile165 and Met331) near the active site were examined via site-directed mutagenesis. Substitutions at these residues affect function but not the ability of the enzyme to assemble. Random mutagenesis and suppressor selection in a Rubisco deletion strain of Rhodobacter capsulatus identified a residue in the amino terminus of one subunit (Ala47) that compensated for a negative change near the active site of a neighboring subunit. In addition, substitution of the native carboxyl-terminal sequence with the last few dissimilar residues from the related R. rubrum homolog increased the enzyme's kcat for carboxylation. However, replacement of a longer carboxyl-terminal sequence with termini from either a form III or a form I enzyme, which varied both in length and sequence, resulted in complete loss of function. From these studies, it is evident that a number of subtle interactions near the active site and the carboxyl terminus account for functional differences between the different forms of Rubiscos found in nature. PMID:24942737

  3. A new form of crystalline rubisco and the conversion to its common dodecahedral form.

    PubMed

    Kwanyuen, Prachuab; Allina, Sandra M; Weissinger, Arthur K; Wilson, Richard F

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new purification procedure that yields a new crystalline form of rubisco and has enabled us to completely remove this most abundant protein from tobacco leaf extract. The crystals formed within 48 h after refrigeration at 4 degrees C at pH 5.6. However, these crystals were not well-ordered crystals and lacked well-defined facets or edges. The remaining leaf extract (fraction 2 protein) was void of rubisco. Conversion of this new crystalline form of rubisco to its common dodecahedral form was achieved by dialysing the protein solution in Tris buffer at pH 8.0 or purified water. Since the molecular size of its large subunit of rubisco (55 kD) is similar to that of the papillomavirus capsid protein, L1 (57 kD), its complete removal from fraction 2-protein may facilitate the detection, purification, and recovery of the Li protein.

  4. Identification of Two bZIP Transcription Factors Interacting with the Promoter of Soybean Rubisco Activase Gene (GmRCAα)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyu; Du, Hongyang; Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Yang, Hui; Li, Yakai; Huang, Fang; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA), a key photosynthetic protein, catalyses the activation of Rubisco and thus plays an important role in photosynthesis. Although the RCA gene has been characterized in a variety of species, the molecular mechanism regulating its transcription remains unclear. Our previous studies on RCA gene expression in soybean suggested that expression of this gene is regulated by trans-acting factors. In the present study, we verified activity of the GmRCAα promoter in both soybean and Arabidopsis and used a yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system for screening a leaf cDNA expression library to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the GmRCAα promoter. Four basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TFs, GmbZIP04g, GmbZIP07g, GmbZIP1, and GmbZIP71, were isolated, and GmbZIP04g and GmbZIP07g were confirmed as able to bind to a 21-nt G-box-containing sequence. Additionally, the expression patterns of GmbZIP04g, GmbZIp07g, and GmRCAα were analyzed in response to abiotic stresses and during a 24-h period. Our study will help to advance elucidation of the network regulating GmRCAα transcription. PMID:27242832

  5. Comparison of the intrinsic disorder propensities of the RuBisCO activase enzyme from the motile and non-motile oceanic green microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sena, Lucia; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Green oceanic microalgae are efficient converters of solar energy into the biomass via the photosynthesis process, with the first step of carbon fixation in the photosynthesis being controlled by the enzyme ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), which is a large proteinaceous machine composed of large (L, 52 kDa) and small (S, 12 kDa) subunits arranged as a L8S8 hexadecamer that catalyzes the formation of 2 phosphoglyceric acid molecules from one ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) molecule and one of carbon dioxide (CO2) and that is considered as the most abundant protein on Earth. The catalytic efficiency of this protein is controlled by the RuBisCO activase (RCA) that interacts with RuBisCO and promotes the CO2 entrance to the active site of RuBisCO by removing RuBP. One of the peculiar features of RCA is the presence of functional disordered tails that might play a role in RCA-RuBisCO interaction. Based on their ability to move, microalgae are grouped into 2 major class, motile and non-motile. Motile microalgae have an obvious advantage over their non-motile counterparts because of their ability to actively migrate within the water column to find the most optimal environmental conditions. We hypothesizes that the RCA could be functionally different in the non-motile and motile microalgae. To check this hypothesis, we conducted a comparative computational analysis of the RCAs from the representatives of the non-motile (Ostreococcus tauri) and motile (Tetraselmis sp. GSL018) green oceanic microalgae.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 photorespiratory mutants maintain leaf carbon/nitrogen balance by reducing RuBisCO content and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Dellero, Younès; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Jossier, Mathieu; Hodges, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic and physiological analyses of glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (GGT1) mutants were performed at the global leaf scale to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their photorespiratory growth phenotype. Air-grown ggt1 mutants showed retarded growth and development, that was not observed at high CO2 (3000 μL L(-1) ). When compared to wild-type (WT) plants, air-grown ggt1 plants exhibited glyoxylate accumulation, global changes in amino acid amounts including a decrease in serine content, lower organic acid levels, and modified ATP/ADP and NADP(+) /NADPH ratios. When compared to WT plants, their net CO2 assimilation rates (An ) were 50% lower and this mirrored decreases in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) contents. High CO2 -grown ggt1 plants transferred to air revealed a rapid decrease of An and photosynthetic electron transfer rate while maintaining a high energetic state. Short-term (a night period and 4 h of light) transferred ggt1 leaves accumulated glyoxylate and exhibited low serine contents, while other amino acid levels were not modified. RuBisCO content, activity and activation state were not altered after a short-term transfer while the ATP/ADP ratio was lowered in ggt1 rosettes. However, plant growth and RuBisCO levels were both reduced in ggt1 leaves after a long-term (12 days) acclimation to air from high CO2 when compared to WT plants. The data are discussed with respect to a reduced photorespiratory carbon recycling in the mutants. It is proposed that the low An limits nitrogen-assimilation, this decreases leaf RuBisCO content until plants attain a new homeostatic state that maintains a constant C/N balance and leads to smaller, slower growing plants.

  7. Rubisco in marine symbiotic dinoflagellates: form II enzymes in eukaryotic oxygenic phototrophs encoded by a nuclear multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, R; Whitney, S M; Fowler, A; Yellowlees, D

    1996-01-01

    Genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were cloned from dinoflagellate symbionts (Symbiodinium spp) of the giant clam Tridacna gigas and characterized. Strikingly, Symbiodinium Rubisco is completely different from other eukaryotic (form I) Rubiscos: it is a form II enzyme that is approximately 65% identical to Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum (Rubisco forms I and II are approximately 25 to 30% identical); it is nuclear encoded by a multigene family; and the predominantly expressed Rubisco is encoded as a precursor polyprotein. One clone appears to contain a predominantly expressed Rubisco locus (rbcA), as determined by RNA gel blot analysis of Symbiodinium RNA and sequencing of purified Rubisco protein. Another contains an enigmatic locus (rbcG) that exhibits an unprecedented pattern of amino acid replacement but does not appear to be a pseudogene. The expression of rbcG has not been analyzed; it was detected only in the minor of two taxa of Symbiodinium that occur together in T. gigas. This study confirms and describes a previously unrecognized branch of Rubisco's evolution: a eukaryotic form II enzyme that participates in oxygenic photosynthesis and is encoded by a diverse, nuclear multigene family. PMID:8721755

  8. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis.

  9. Methane, oxygen, photosynthesis, rubisco and the regulation of the air through time.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Euan G; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2008-08-27

    Rubisco I's specificity, which today may be almost perfectly tuned to the task of cultivating the global garden, controlled the balance of carbon gases and O(2) in the Precambrian ocean and hence, by equilibration, in the air. Control of CO(2) and O(2) by rubisco I, coupled with CH(4) from methanogens, has for the past 2.9 Ga directed the global greenhouse warming, which maintains liquid oceans and sustains microbial ecology.Both rubisco compensation controls and the danger of greenhouse runaway (e.g. glaciation) put limits on biological productivity. Rubisco may sustain the air in either of two permissible stable states: either an anoxic system with greenhouse warming supported by both high methane mixing ratios as well as carbon dioxide, or an oxygen-rich system in which CO(2) largely fulfils the role of managing greenhouse gas, and in which methane is necessarily only a trace greenhouse gas, as is N(2)O. Transition from the anoxic to the oxic state risks glaciation. CO(2) build-up during a global snowball may be an essential precursor to a CO(2)-dominated greenhouse with high levels of atmospheric O(2). Photosynthetic and greenhouse-controlling competitions between marine algae, cyanobacteria, and terrestrial C3 and C4 plants may collectively set the CO(2) : O(2) ratio of the modern atmosphere (last few million years ago in a mainly glacial epoch), maximizing the productivity close to rubisco compensation and glacial limits.

  10. Effects of co-overexpression of the genes of Rubisco and transketolase on photosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuji; Kondo, Eri; Makino, Amane

    2017-03-01

    Metabolome analyses have indicated an accumulation of sedoheptulose 7-phosphate in transgenic rice plants with overproduction of Rubisco (Suzuki et al. in Plant Cell Environ 35:1369-1379, 2012. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2012.02494.x ). Since Rubisco overproduction did not quantitatively enhance photosynthesis even under CO2-limited conditions, it is suspected that such an accumulation of sedoheptulose 7-phosphate hampers the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. In the present study, the gene of transketolase, which is involved in the metabolism of sedoheptulose 7-phosphate, was co-overexpressed with the Rubisco small subunit gene in rice. Rubisco and transketolase were successfully overproduced in comparison with those in wild-type plants by 35-53 and 39-84 %, respectively. These changes in the amounts of the proteins were associated with those of the mRNA levels. However, the rate of CO2 assimilation under high irradiance and different [CO2] did not differ between co-overexpressed plants and wild-type plants. Thus, co-overproduction of Rubisco and transketolase did not improve photosynthesis in rice. Transketolase was probably not a limiting factor of photosynthesis as overproduction of transketolase alone by 80-94 % did not affect photosynthesis.

  11. Effect of Nd3+ ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hong, Fa-shui; Wu, Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang, Xue-guang; Hong, Cheng-jiao; Wu, Cheng; Gao, Feng-qing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Tao; Xie, Ya-ning; Xu, Jian-hua; Li, Zhong-rui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd(3+) treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89A, respectively.

  12. Rubisco without the Calvin cycle improves the carbon efficiency of developing green seeds.

    PubMed

    Schwender, Jörg; Goffman, Fernando; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2004-12-09

    Efficient storage of carbon in seeds is crucial to plant fitness and to agricultural productivity. Oil is a major reserve material in most seeds, and these oils provide the largest source of renewable reduced carbon chains available from nature. However, the conversion of carbohydrate to oil through glycolysis results in the loss of one-third of the carbon as CO2. Here we show that, in developing embryos of Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape), Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) acts without the Calvin cycle and in a previously undescribed metabolic context to increase the efficiency of carbon use during the formation of oil. In comparison with glycolysis, the metabolic conversion we describe provides 20% more acetyl-CoA for fatty-acid synthesis and results in 40% less loss of carbon as CO2. Our conclusions are based on measurements of mass balance, enzyme activity and stable isotope labelling, as well as an analysis of elementary flux modes.

  13. Distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems based on the analysis of RubisCO genotypes.

    PubMed

    Alfreider, Albin; Vogt, Carsten; Geiger-Kaiser, Margot; Psenner, Roland

    2009-04-01

    A molecular approach, based on the detection of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large subunit genes, was applied to investigate the distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems. DNA extracts from 48 sampling stations, including a variety of pristine and polluted, shallow and deep-subsurface groundwater samples obtained from Germany and Austria, served as a template for the PCR amplification of form I (cbbL) and form II (cbbM) large subunit RubisCO genes. The majority of the samples (>80%) contained two different forms of RubisCO. In 17 samples, all three forms of RubisCO were identified. PCR products from four selected groundwater habitats containing all three forms of RubisCO were used to construct clone libraries. Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 109 RubisCO-clone-inserts were subjected to sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. With the exception of a form IA RubisCO sequence cluster obtained from deep subsurface samples, which was identical to the RubisCO genes described for Ralstonia metallidurans CH34, most sequences were distantly related to a variety of RubisCO species in chemolithoautotrophic Proteobacteria. Several sequences occurred in isolated lineages. These findings suggest that autotrophic bacteria with the capability to assimilate CO2 via the Calvin Cycle pathway are widespread inhabitants of groundwater systems.

  14. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  15. Effect of atmospheric CO 2 enrichment on rubisco content in herbaceous species from high and low altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Rowan F.; Schäppi, Bernd; Körner, Christian

    Atmospheric CO 2 enrichment reduces Rubisco content in many species grown in controlled environments; however, relatively few studies have examined CO 2 effects on Rubisco content of plants grown in their natural habitat. We examined the response of Rubisco content to atmospheric CO 2 enrichment (600-680 μmol mol -1 in place of ppm) in 5 herbaceous species growing in a low altitude grassland (550 m) near Basel, Switzerland, and 3 herbaceous species from Swiss alpine grassland at 2470 m. At low elevation, the dominant grass Bromus erectus and the subdominant dicot Sanquisorba minor exhibited 20% to 25% reduction of Rubisco content following high CO 2 exposure; no CO 2 effect was observed in the subdominants Carex flacca, Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium repens. At the Alpine site, the subdominant grass Poa alpina maintained 27% less Rubisco content when grown at high CO 2 while the co-dominant forb Leontodon helveticus had 19% less Rubisco in high CO 2. Rubisco content was unaffected in the tundra dominant Carex curvula. Because the degree of Rubisco modulation was similar between high and low elevation sites, it does not appear that differences in local partial pressure of CO 2 (altitude) or differences in stress in general induce different patterns of modulation of photosynthetic capacity in response to high CO 2. In addition, the degree of Rubisco reduction (<30%) was less than might be indicated by the low biomass response to CO 2 enrichment previously observed at these sites. Thus, plants in Swiss lowland and alpine grassland appear to maintain greater Rubisco concentration and photosynthetic capacity than whole plants can effectively exploit in terms of harvestable biomass.

  16. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  17. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  18. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphatase carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  19. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxgenase large subunit .epsilon. n-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bishosphatase .epsilon. n-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltansferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  20. Expression of a foreign Rubisco small subunit in tobacco with reduced levels of the native protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA, ArRbcS3, for the small subunit of Rubisco from Amaranthus retroflexus (pigweed) was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the control of a strong leaf-specific Lhcb promoter. The coding region of the ArRbcS3 was fused to the plastid targeting sequence of the native tobacco rbcS to...

  1. Characterization of Rubisco activase genes in maize: an α-isoform gene functions alongside a β-isoform gene.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhitong; Zhang, Zhenliang; Deng, Dexiang; Chao, Maoni; Gao, Qingsong; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Zefeng; Bian, Yunlong; Hao, Derong; Xu, Chenwu

    2014-04-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) catalyzes the activation of Rubisco in vivo and plays a crucial role in regulating plant growth. In maize (Zea mays), only β-form RCA genes have been cloned and characterized. In this study, a genome-wide survey revealed the presence of an α-form RCA gene and a β-form RCA gene in the maize genome, herein referred to as ZmRCAα and ZmRCAβ, respectively. An analysis of genomic DNA and complementary DNA sequences suggested that alternative splicing of the ZmRCAβ precursor mRNA (premRNA) at its 3' untranslated region could produce two distinctive ZmRCAβ transcripts. Analyses by electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that ZmRCAα and ZmRCAβ encode larger and smaller polypeptides of approximately 46 and 43 kD, respectively. Transcriptional analyses demonstrated that the expression levels of both ZmRCAα and ZmRCAβ were higher in leaves and during grain filling and that expression followed a specific cyclic day/night pattern. In 123 maize inbred lines with extensive genetic diversity, the transcript abundance and protein expression levels of these two RCA genes were positively correlated with grain yield. Additionally, both genes demonstrated a similar correlation with grain yield compared with three C₄ photosynthesis genes. Our data suggest that, in addition to the β-form RCA-encoding gene, the α-form RCA-encoding gene also contributes to the synthesis of RCA in maize and support the hypothesis that RCA genes may play an important role in determining maize productivity.

  2. Description and applications of a rapid and sensitive non-radioactive microplate-based assay for maximum and initial activity of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Sulpice, Ronan; Tschoep, Hendrik; VON Korff, Maria; Büssis, Dirk; Usadel, Björn; Höhne, Melanie; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Altmann, Thomas; Stitt, Mark; Gibon, Yves

    2007-09-01

    D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyses the first step in photosynthetic carbon assimilation and represents the largest sink for nitrogen in plants. Improvement of its kinetic properties or the efficiency with which it is used in planta would benefit photosynthesis, nitrogen and water use efficiency, and yield. This paper presents a new non-radioactive microplate-based assay, which determines the product [3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA)] in an enzymic cycle between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase. High sensitivity permits use of highly diluted extracts, and a short reaction time to avoid problems due to fall-off. Throughput was several hundreds of samples per person per day. Sensitivity and convenience compared favourably with radioisotopic assays, which were previously used to assay Rubisco. Its use is illustrated in three applications. (1) Maximal and initial activities and the K(m) for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate were determined in raw extracts of leaves from several species. Similar values were obtained from those in the literature. (2) Diurnal changes were compared in rosettes of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis and the starchless pgm mutant. Despite these dramatic differences in carbon metabolism, Rubisco activity and activation were similar in both genotypes. (3) A preliminary association mapping study was performed with 118 Arabidopsis accessions, using 183 markers that probably cover approximately 3-8% of the total genome. At a P-value < 0.005, two, two and no quantitative trait loci (QTL) were found for Rubisco maximal activity, initial activity and activation state, respectively. Inspection of the genomic regions that span these markers revealed these QTL involved genes not previously implicated in the regulation of Rubisco expression or activity.

  3. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-01-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities. PMID:23569748

  4. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-04-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities.

  5. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)—The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K.; Rai, Gyanendra K.; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C.; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS—a novel approach toward development of “climate-smart” crop. PMID:27462325

  6. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  7. Distribution of RuBisCO genotypes along a redox gradient in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Giri, Bruno J; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-06-01

    Partial sequences of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (EC 4.1.1.39) genes were retrieved from samples taken along a redox gradient in alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, Calif. The form I gene (cbbL) was found in all samples, whereas form II (cbbM) was not retrieved from any of the samples. None of the RuBisCO sequences we obtained were closely related (nucleotide similarity, <90%) to sequences in the database. Some could be attributed to organisms isolated from the lake (Cyanobium) or appearing in enrichment cultures. Most (52%) of the sequences fell into in one clade, containing sequences that were identical to sequences retrieved from an enrichment culture grown with nitrate and sulfide, and another clade contained sequences identical to those retrieved from an arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing enrichment.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of two isoforms of Rubisco from Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S; Hough, E; Andersen, K

    1999-01-01

    Two different isoforms of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Alcaligenes eutrophus have been purified and crystallized. Both isoforms crystallize in space group P43212. Crystals of isoform I (unit-cell dimensions a = 112.0 and c = 402.7 A) diffract to 2.7 A, whereas isoform II (unit-cell dimensions a = 111.8 and c = 400.0 A) presently diffract to 3.2 A, using synchrotron radiation in both cases.

  9. Rubisco Mechanism: Dissection of the Enolization Partial Reaction. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F. C.

    2003-06-11

    To test experimentally, the prior theoretical deduction that active-site residue Lys166 of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase participates in the carboxylation step of overall catalysis, site-directed mutants and chemically rescued site-directed mutants were characterized by kinetics and product analysis. Although position-166 mutants are able to catalyze normal enolization of ribulose bisphosphate, the enediol intermediate does not undergo carboxylation but rather eliminates phosphate. Furthermore, the chemically rescued mutant (aminoethylation of the severely impaired Lys66Cys mutant) generates a highly active mimic, which displays an enhanced carboxylation/oxygenation partition ratio. These two distinct lines of experimentation document a crucial role of Lys166 in carboxylation and in discrimination between CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. To ascertain whether Lys166 functions as an acid or base in facilitation of enolization, the chemically rescued mutant bearing {sup 15}N was titrated by NM R. From pH 6.5-9.5, the amino group of Lys166 remains unprotonated, indicating that it promotes enolization by hydrogen bonding to the ketone group of the substrate.

  10. Detection of Rubisco and mycotoxins as potential contaminants of a plantibody against the hepatitis B surface antigen purified from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Geada, Déborah; Valdés, Rodolfo; Escobar, Arturo; Ares, Dulce M; Torres, Edel; Blanco, Reinaldo; Ferro, Williams; Dorta, Dayamí; González, Marcos; Alemán, María R; Padilla, Sigifredo; Gómez, Leonardo; Del Castillo, Norma; Mendoza, Otto; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Soria, Yordanka; Brito, José; Leyva, Alberto; Borroto, Carlos; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2007-10-01

    Antibodies have been one of the proteins widely expressed in tobacco plants for pharmaceutical purposes, which demand contaminant free preparations. Rubisco constitutes 40-60% of tobacco leaf soluble proteins; therefore it is the major potential protein contaminant of plantibodies, while mycotoxins are toxic compounds that could be introduced during the biomass production and post-harvest stages with important consequences to human health. The objective of this paper was to investigate whether Rubisco and mycotoxins are present in Plantibody HB-01 preparations used in the immunopurification of the hepatitis B surface antigen. Rubisco was purified from Nicotiana tabacum yielding 154 microg of protein per gram of leaves and purity over 95%. Among mouse monoclonal antibodies generated against this enzyme, the CBSS.Rub-2 was selected for its immunodetection. It recognizes a conserved sequential epitope of Rubisco large subunit with an affinity constant of 0.13 x 10(8)M(-1). Rubisco quantification limit was 1 microg spreading to the measurement of this contaminant less than 4% of plantibodies samples. Additionally, according to a Reverse Phase-HPLC used to measure the level of adventitiously introduced contaminants, it can be concluded that aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 were undetected in the purified Plantibody HB-01 samples.

  11. Metabolic indicators of drought stress tolerance in wheat: glutamine synthetase isoenzymes and Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltán; Németh, Edit; Guóth, Adrienn; Bona, Lajos; Wodala, Barnabás; Pécsváradi, Attila

    2013-06-01

    Drought stress has a considerable impact on the ecosystem and agriculture. Continuous water deficit induces early leaf senescence in plants. During this process, chloroplasts are degraded and photosynthesis drastically drops. The objective of this investigation was to look into the regulation of nitrogen and carbon metabolism during water deficit. Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; EC 4.1.1.39) and the total protein contents inform us of the sink-source relation in plants. Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) isoenzymes are good markers of plastid status (GS2) and the nitrogen metabolism (GS1). Tolerant and sensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes were tested, which are widely used in agriculture. The amount of protein, Rubisco and GS isoforms in leaves were measured during the grain filling period, as indicative traits that ultimately determine the onset and stage of senescence. The symptoms of senescence first appeared on the oldest and finally on the youngest leaves. Drought stress disrupted the sequentiality of senescence in the sensitive varieties. An untimely senescence appeared in flag leaves, earlier than in the older leaves. Total protein and Rubisco contents decreased and the GS2 isoenzyme declined considerably in the youngest leaves. In the tolerant varieties, however, these physiological parameters did not change under drought, only the sequential senescence of leaf levels accelerated in some cases compared to the control, well-watered plants. Our results revealed that GS is a good indicator of drought stress, which can be applied for the characterization of wheat cultivars in terms of drought stress tolerance.

  12. Diversity of RuBisCO and ATP citrate lyase genes in soda lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Olga L; Tourova, Tatjana P; Muyzer, Gerard; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Sorokin, Dimitry Y

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from six soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) and from hypersaline alkaline lakes of Wadi Natrun (Egypt) were analyzed for the presence of cbb and aclB genes encoding key enzymes Ci assimilation (RuBisCO in Calvin-Benson and ATP citrate lyase in rTCA cycles, respectively). The cbbL gene (RuBisCO form I) was found in all samples and was most diverse, while the cbbM (RuBisCO form II) and aclB were detected only in few samples and with a much lower diversity. The cbbL libraries from hypersaline lakes were dominated by members of the extremely haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing Ectothiorhodospiraceae, i.e. the chemolithotrophic Thioalkalivibrio and the phototrophic Halorhodospira. In the less saline soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, the cbbL gene comprised up to ten phylotypes with a domination of members of a novel phototrophic Chromatiales lineage. The cbbM clone libraries consisted of two major unidentified lineages probably belonging to chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria. One of them, dominating in the haloalkaline lakes from Wadi Natrun, was related to a cbbM phylotype detected previously in a hypersaline lake with a neutral pH, and another, dominating in lakes from the Kulunda Steppe, was only distantly related to the Thiomicrospira cluster. The aclB sequences detected in two samples from the Kulunda Steppe formed a single, deep branch in the Epsilonproteobacteria, distantly related to Arcobacter sulfidicus.

  13. Photonic properties of erbium activated coated microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jestin, Y.; Armellini, C.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Féron, P.; Ghisa, L.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Trebaol, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2008-02-01

    μA simple method based on the sol-gel technology has been developed to coat passive microspheres with an active coating. The microspheres were prepared by fusion of a standard telecom fiber with a dimension of about 200 μm and 400 μm and have been respectively dipped in a 70SiO II-30HfO II sol activated by 1 mol% and 0.1 mol% of erbium ions. Here we first report about the luminescence properties of a silica-hafnia coating doped with erbium ions and then whispering gallery mode spectra were analysed for different sphere diameters, thickness of coating and erbium concentration. The thickness of the coating has been chosen in order to support at least one whispering gallery mode at 1.5 μm.

  14. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Michael; Stec, Boguslaw

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) from the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystal forms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form being obtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization, preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phase transition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzyme belongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8) with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa. The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a single hexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phase transition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  15. Effect of ozone on degradation and mRNA levels of Rubisco in relation to potato leaf age

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, N.A.; Pell, E.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Leaf senescence is characterized by loss of the major photosynthetic enzyme, Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco). Exposure to ozone (O[sub 3]) is often associated with a premature decline in the quantity of this enzyme. Declines in Rubisco quantity could arise through inhibition of synthesis or enhancement of degradation. Several experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of O[sub 3] on these events in immature and mature leaves of potato. The effect of O[sub 3] on Rubisco synthesis was investigated indirectly by measuring the relative quantities of mRNA for the rubisco large (rbcL) and small (rbcS) subunits following a 5 hour exposure to 0.309 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] O[sup 3] or charcoal-filtered air. O[sup 3] treatment was associated with a significant loss in rbcS mRNA in immature and mature potato leaves sampled immediately following the exposure. After the O[sup 3] exposure, a set of plants was placed in the dark at 30 C for two days. Levels of rbcS mRNA declined rapidly during the first twelve hours of dark incubation, thus declines in Rubisco quantity following two days of dark incubation were ascribed to degradation. Enhanced degradation due to O[sub 3] during the dark incubation was observed in the mature leaves, but not in the immature leaves. We conclude that O[sub 3] can cause both inhibited synthesis and enhanced degradation of Rubisco, and the response in dependent on leaf age.

  16. Modelling ¹⁸O₂ and ¹⁶O₂ unidirectional fluxes in plants: II. analysis of rubisco evolution.

    PubMed

    André, Marcel J

    2011-02-01

    The studies of Rubisco characteristics observed during plant evolution show that the variation of the Rubisco specificity factor only improved by two times from cyanobacteria to modern C3 plants. However we note important variations of the ratio between the maximum rates of oxygenation and carboxylation (V(O)/V(C)). Modelling in vivo ¹⁸O₂ data in plant gas exchange shows that the oxygenation reaction of Rubisco plays a regulating role when the photochemical energy exceeds the carboxylation capacity. A protective index 'oxygenation capacity' is postulated, related to the ratio V(O)/V(C) of Rubisco, and hence to the sink energy effect of photorespiration. Analysing the trends of Rubisco parameters along the evolutionary scale, we show: (1) the increase of both V(C) and V(O); (2) the enhancement of CO₂ affinity; and (3) the rise in oxygenation capacity at the expense of the CO₂ specificity. Hence, the factors of evolutionary pressure have not only directed the enzyme towards a more efficient utilisation of CO₂, but mainly to positively use the unavoidable great loss of energy and assimilated carbon in the process of photorespiration. These observations reinforce the hypothesis of plant-atmosphere co-evolution and of the complex role of Rubisco, which seems to be selected to develop both better CO₂ affinity and oxygenation capacity. The latter increases the capacity of sink of photorespiration, in particular, during water stress or under high irradiance, the two conditions experienced by plants in terrestrial environments. These observations help to explain some handicaps of C4 plants, and the supremacy of CAM and C3 perennial higher plants in arid environments.

  17. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Jezek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomas

    2008-12-22

    The aim of this work was to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins using affinity chromatography. Ecdysteroids as insect hormones have been investigated thoroughly but their function and the mechanism of action in plants and other organisms is still unknown although ecdysteroids occur in some plants in a relatively large amount. Therefore, 20-hydroxyecdysone was immobilized on a polymeric carrier as a ligand for affinity chromatography in order to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins from the cytosolic extract of New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonoides). Non-specifically bound proteins were eluted with a rising gradient of concentration of sodium chloride, and 3% (v/v) acetic acid was used for the elution of the specifically bound proteins. Using this method, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was isolated. The influence of ecdysteroids on RuBisCO was further studied. Our results show that ecdysteroids are able to increase the yield of RuBisCO-mediated reaction in which CO(2) is fixed into organic matter by more than 10%.

  18. Changes in Rubisco activase gene expression and polypeptide content in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Bayramov, Shahniyar; Guliyev, Novruz

    2014-08-01

    Regulation of Rubisco (D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase (RCA) gene expression and polypeptide content were determined in Brachypodium distachyon leaves, stems and ear elements at different developmental stages under optimal growth conditions as well as under drought and salt stress conditions. B. distachyon leaf contains a much greater amount of Rubisco activase small (RCAS) isoform than the large one (RCAL) under optimal growth conditions. Increased levels of the RCAL isoform compared with the RCAS isoform were found in leaves and in green stems under salt and drought stress, respectively. Transcriptional levels of RCA are almost identical in different leaf positions. Short-term drought and salt stresses did not cause the impairment of RCA gene expression in early seedlings. But gradually increasing drought stress significantly decreased gene expression in early seedling samples. Amounts of the RCAS isoform were found to be more in different leaves of the plant compared with the RCAL isoform and their ratio was constant under normal condition. In green stems gene expression of RCA decreased under salt and drought stresses, although as it was in green leaves protein amounts of RCAL isoform increased compared with the RCAS isoform. All of the above described results clearly indicate that the accumulation of each RCA isoform is differentially regulated by developmental and environmental cues.

  19. The gene for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) small subunit relocated to the plastid genome of tobacco directs the synthesis of small subunits that assemble into Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S M; Andrews, T J

    2001-01-01

    To assess the extent to which a nuclear gene for a chloroplast protein retained the ability to be expressed in its presumed preendosymbiotic location, we relocated the RbcS gene for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) to the tobacco plastid genome. Plastid RbcS transgenes, both with and without the transit presequence, were equipped with 3' hepta-histidine-encoding sequences and psbA promoter and terminator elements. Both transgenes were transcribed abundantly, and their products were translated into small subunit polypeptides that folded correctly and assembled into the Rubisco hexadecamer. When present, either the transit presequence was not translated or the transit peptide was cleaved completely. After assembly into Rubisco, transplastomic small subunits were relatively stable. The hepta-histidine sequence fused to the C terminus of a single small subunit was sufficient for isolation of the whole Rubisco hexadecamer by Ni(2)+ chelation. Small subunits produced by the plastid transgenes were not abundant, never exceeding approximately 1% of the total small subunits, and they differed from cytoplasmically synthesized small subunits in their N-terminal modifications. The scarcity of transplastomic small subunits might be caused by inefficient translation or assembly.

  20. ATP binding and hydrolysis and autophosphorylation of CbbQ encoded by the gene located downstream of RubisCO genes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuhiro R; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2002-02-08

    CbbQ is encoded by the gene located downstream of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes (cbbLS) in the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus. The protein possesses two nucleotide-binding motifs in its amino acid sequence, and it posttranslationally activates RubisCO. We present ATP hydrolysis and binding of CbbQ. CbbQ releases P(i) from ATP only in the presence of Mg(2+). CbbQ interacts with an 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence or absence of Mg(2+). The interaction with Mg(2+) and/or a nucleotide induces a conformational change in CbbQ. Autophosphorylation of CbbQ occurs only in the absence of Mg(2+).

  1. Leaf Rubisco turnover in a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) mapping population: genetic variation, identification of associated QTL, and correlation with plant morphology and yield.

    PubMed

    Khaembah, Edith N; Irving, Louis J; Thom, Errol R; Faville, Marty J; Easton, H Sydney; Matthew, Cory

    2013-03-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that: (i) genetic variation in Rubisco turnover may exist in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.); (ii) such variation might affect nitrogen use efficiency and plant yield; and (iii) genetic control of Rubisco turnover might be amenable to identification by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. A set of 135 full-sib F1 perennial ryegrass plants derived from a pair cross between genotypes from the cultivars 'Grasslands Impact' and 'Grasslands Samson' was studied to test these hypotheses. Leaf Rubisco concentration at different leaf ages was measured and modelled as a log-normal curve described by three mathematical parameters: D (peak Rubisco concentration), G (time of D), and F (curve standard deviation). Herbage dry matter (DM) yield and morphological traits (tiller weight (TW), tiller number (TN), leaf lamina length (LL), and an index of competitive ability (PI)) were also measured. The progeny exhibited continuous variation for all traits. Simple correlation and principal component analyses indicated that plant productivity was associated with peak Rubisco concentration and not Rubisco turnover. Lower DM was associated with higher leaf Rubisco concentration indicating that Rubisco turnover effects on plant productivity may relate to energy cost of Rubisco synthesis rather than photosynthetic capacity. QTL detection by a multiple QTL model identified seven significant QTL for Rubisco turnover and nine QTL for DM and morphological traits. An indication of the genetic interdependence of DM and the measures of Rubisco turnover was the support interval overlap involving QTL for D and QTL for TN on linkage group 5 in a cluster involving QTL for DM and PI. In this region, alleles associated with increased TN, DM, and PI were associated with decreased D, indicating that this region may regulate Rubisco concentration and plant productivity via increased tillering. A second cluster involving QTL for LL, TN, PI and DM was found on

  2. Molecular characterization of a deep-sea methanotrophic mussel symbiont that carries a RuBisCO gene.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam Easa; Kaneko, Ryo; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    In our previous investigation on the genes of 1,5-ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO; EC 4.1.1.39) in deep-sea chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic endosymbioses, the gene encoding the large subunit of RuBisCO form I (cbbL) had been detected in the gill of a mussel belonging to the genus Bathymodiolus from a western Pacific back-arc hydrothermal vent. This study further examined the symbiont source of the RuBisCO cbbL gene along with the genes of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rDNA) and particulate methane monooxygenase (EC 1.14.13.25; pmoA) and probed for the presence of the ATP sulfurylase gene (EC 2.7.7.4; sopT). The 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that the mussel harbors a monospecific methanotrophic Gammaproteobacterium. This was confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the methanotrophic pmoA, while thiotrophic sopT was not amplified from the same symbiotic genome DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated simultaneous occurrence of the symbiont-specific 16S rDNA, cbbL and pmoA, but not sopT, in the mussel gill. This is the first molecular and visual evidence for a methanotrophic bacterial endosymbiont that bears the RuBisCO cbbL gene relevant to autotrophic CO(2) fixation.

  3. Quantification of bacterial RubisCO genes in soils by cbbL targeted real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Selesi, Drazenka; Pattis, Isabelle; Schmid, Michael; Kandeler, Ellen; Hartmann, Anton

    2007-06-01

    Soils harbor a high diversity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large subunit coding genes (cbbL). Real-time PCR was used to quantify this gene in differently managed agricultural soils and soil microhabitats. We developed primers and a TaqMan probe that target the "red-like" RubisCO gene cbbL. Primers and probe were developed based on cbbL sequences of selected bacterial pure cultures and of environmental clones. The amount of cbbL copies in the investigated soils were detected in the range of 6.8x10(6) to 3.4x10(7) "red-like" cbbL copies/g soil. The cbbL genes could be located entirely in the clay and silt fraction, while the coarse sand fractions revealed no detectable level of bacterial RubisCO genes. These results indicate that bacteria with RubisCO coding genes are numerous and widespread in soils, however the functional implication of this gene in soils is not yet clear.

  4. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  5. The unique pentagonal structure of an archaeal Rubisco is essential for its high thermostability.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Norihiro; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2002-08-30

    We have previously determined the crystal structure of a novel pentagonal ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Here we have carried out biochemical studies to identify the necessities and/or advantages of this intriguing pentagonal structure. The structure indicated the presence of three neighboring residues (Glu-63, Arg-66, and Asp-69), participating in ionic interactions within unique dimer-dimer interfaces. We constructed three single mutant proteins (E63S, R66S, and D69S) and one triple mutant protein (E63S/R66S/D69S) by replacing the charged residues with serine. The wild type (WT) and all mutant proteins were purified and subjected to gel permeation chromatography at various temperatures. WT and D69S proteins were decameric at all temperatures examined between 30 and 90 degrees C. The majority of E63S and R66S were decamers at 30 degrees C but were found to gradually disassemble with the elevation in temperature. E63S/R66S/D69S was found in a dimeric form even at 30 degrees C. An interesting correlation was found between the subunit assembly and thermostability of the proteins. Circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry analyses indicated that the denaturation temperatures of dimeric enzymes (E63S, R66S, and E63S/R66S/D69S) were approximately 95 degrees C, whereas those of the enzymes retaining a decameric structure (WT and D69S) were approximately 110 degrees C. Disassembly into tetramer or dimer units did not alter the slopes of the Arrhenius plots, indicating that the decameric structure had no effect on catalytic performance per se. The results indicate that the decameric assembly of Tk-Rubisco contributes to enhance the thermostability of the enzyme. Taking into account the growth temperature of strain KOD1 (65-100 degrees C), the decameric structure of Tk-Rubisco can be considered essential for the stable presence of the enzyme in the host cells

  6. ATP and magnesium promote cotton short-form ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase hexamer formation at low micromolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kuriata, Agnieszka M; Chakraborty, Manas; Henderson, J Nathan; Hazra, Suratna; Serban, Andrew J; Pham, Tuong V T; Levitus, Marcia; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2014-11-25

    We report a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) study of the assembly pathway of the AAA+ protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase (Rca), a ring-forming ATPase responsible for activation of inhibited Rubisco complexes for biological carbon fixation. A thermodynamic characterization of simultaneously populated oligomeric states appears critical in understanding Rca structure and function. Using cotton β-Rca, we demonstrate that apparent diffusion coefficients vary as a function of concentration, nucleotide, and cation. Using manual fitting procedures, we provide estimates for the equilibrium constants for the stepwise assembly and find that in the presence of ATPγS, the Kd for hexamerization is 10-fold lower than with ADP (∼0.1 vs ∼1 μM). Hexamer fractions peak at 30 μM and dominate at 8-70 μM Rca, where they comprise 60-80% of subunits with ATPγS, compared with just 30-40% with ADP. Dimer fractions peak at 1-4 μM Rca, where they comprise 15-18% with ATPγS and 26-28% with ADP. At 30 μM Rca, large aggregates begin to form that comprise ∼10% of total protein with ATPγS and ∼25% with ADP. FCS data collected on the catalytically impaired WalkerB-D173N variant in the presence of ATP provided strong support for these results. Titration with free magnesium ions lead to the disaggregation of larger complexes in favor of hexameric forms, suggesting that a second magnesium binding site with a Kd value of 1-3 mM mediates critical subunit contacts. We propose that closed-ring toroidal hexameric forms are stabilized by binding of Mg·ATP plus Mg2+, whereas Mg·ADP promotes continuous assembly to supramolecular aggregates such as spirals.

  7. Isolation and characterization of rubisco small subunit gene promoter from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shalini; Stasolla, Claudio; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Ayele, Belay T

    2015-01-01

    Choice of an appropriate promoter is critical to express target genes in intended tissues and developmental stages. However, promoters capable of directing gene expression in specific tissues and stages are not well characterized in monocot species. To identify such a promoter in wheat, this study isolated a partial sequence of the wheat small subunit of RuBisCO (TarbcS) promoter. In silico analysis revealed the presence of elements that are characteristic to rbcS promoters of other, mainly dicot, species. Transient expression of the TarbcS:GUS in immature wheat embryos and tobacco leaves but not in the wheat roots indicate the functionality of the TarbcS promoter fragment in directing the expression of target genes in green plant tissues.

  8. AtPAP2 modulates the import of the small subunit of Rubisco into chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renshan; Guan, Xiaoqian; Law, Yee-Song; Sun, Feng; Chen, Shuai; Wong, Kam Bo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arabidopsis thaliana purple acid phosphatase 2 (AtPAP2) is the only phosphatase that is dual-targeted to both chloroplasts and mitochondria. Like Toc33/34 of the TOC and Tom 20 of the TOM, AtPAP2 is anchored to the outer membranes of chloroplasts and mitochondria via a hydrophobic C-terminal motif. AtPAP2 on the mitochondria was previously shown to recognize the presequences of several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins and modulate the import of pMORF3 into the mitochondria. Here we show that AtPAP2 binds to the small subunit of Rubisco (pSSU) and that chloroplast import experiments demonstrated that pSSU was imported less efficiently into pap2 chloroplasts than into wild-type chloroplasts. We propose that AtPAP2 is an outer membrane-bound phosphatase receptor that facilitates the import of selected proteins into chloroplasts. PMID:27700374

  9. Isoleucine 309 acts as a C4 catalytic switch that increases ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) carboxylation rate in Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Sharwood, Robert E; Orr, Douglas; White, Sarah J; Alonso, Hernan; Galmés, Jeroni

    2011-08-30

    Improving global yields of important agricultural crops is a complex challenge. Enhancing yield and resource use by engineering improvements to photosynthetic carbon assimilation is one potential solution. During the last 40 million years C(4) photosynthesis has evolved multiple times, enabling plants to evade the catalytic inadequacies of the CO(2)-fixing enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). Compared with their C(3) ancestors, C(4) plants combine a faster rubisco with a biochemical CO(2)-concentrating mechanism, enabling more efficient use of water and nitrogen and enhanced yield. Here we show the versatility of plastome manipulation in tobacco for identifying sequences in C(4)-rubisco that can be transplanted into C(3)-rubisco to improve carboxylation rate (V(C)). Using transplastomic tobacco lines expressing native and mutated rubisco large subunits (L-subunits) from Flaveria pringlei (C(3)), Flaveria floridana (C(3)-C(4)), and Flaveria bidentis (C(4)), we reveal that Met-309-Ile substitutions in the L-subunit act as a catalytic switch between C(4) ((309)Ile; faster V(C), lower CO(2) affinity) and C(3) ((309)Met; slower V(C), higher CO(2) affinity) catalysis. Application of this transplastomic system permits further identification of other structural solutions selected by nature that can increase rubisco V(C) in C(3) crops. Coengineering a catalytically faster C(3) rubisco and a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism within C(3) crop species could enhance their efficiency in resource use and yield.

  10. Influence of form IA RubisCO and environmental dissolved inorganic carbon on the delta13C of the clam-chemoautotroph symbiosis Solemya velum.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen M; Schwedock, Julie; Schrag, Daniel P; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-12-01

    Many nutritive symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and invertebrates, such as Solemya velum, have delta(13)C values of approximately -30 to -35%, considerably more depleted than phytoplankton. Most of the chemoautotrophic symbionts fix carbon with a form IA ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO). We hypothesized that this form of RubisCO discriminates against (13)CO(2) to a greater extent than other forms. Solemya velum symbiont RubisCO was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. Enzyme from this recombinant system fixed carbon most rapidly at pH 7.5 and 20-25 degrees C. Surprisingly, this RubisCO had an epsilon-value (proportional to the degree to which the enzyme discriminates against (13)CO(2)) of 24.4 per thousand, similar to form IB RubisCOs, and higher than form II RubisCOs. Samples of interstitial water from S. velum's habitat were collected to determine whether the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) could contribute to the negative delta(13)C values. Solemya velum habitat DIC was present at high concentrations (up to approximately 5 mM) and isotopically depleted, with delta(13)C values as low as approximately -6%. Thus environmental DIC, coupled with a high degree of isotopic fractionation by symbiont RubisCO likely contribute to the isotopically depleted delta(13)C values of S. velum biomass, highlighting the necessity of considering factors at all levels (from environmental to enzymatic) in interpreting stable isotope ratios.

  11. Functional analysis of the rice rubisco activase promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Chen, Fan; Lu, Congming

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice rubisco activase promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Region conferring tissue specific and light inducible expression of Rca was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -58 to +43 bp region mediates tissue-specific expression of rice Rca. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light inducible expression of rice Rca is mediated by -297 to -58 bp region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the light inducible region. -- Abstract: To gain a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the rice rubisco activase (Rca) gene, variants of the Rca gene promoter (one full-length and four deletion mutants) fused to the coding region of the bacterial reporter gene {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) were introduced into Arabidopsis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our results show that a 340 bp fragment spanning from -297 to +43 bp relative to the transcription initiation site is enough to promote tissue-specific and light-inducible expression of the rice Rca gene as done by the full-length promoter (-1428 to +43 bp). Further deletion analysis indicated that the region conferring tissue-specificity of Rca expression is localized within a 105 bp fragment from -58 to +43 bp, while light-inducible expression of Rca is mediated by the region from -297 to -58 bp. Gel shift assays and competition experiments demonstrated that rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the fragment conferring light responsiveness at more than one binding site. This implies that multiple cis-elements may be involved in light-induced expression of the rice Rca gene. These works provide a useful reference for understanding transcriptional regulation mechanism of the rice Rca gene, and lay a strong foundation for further detection of related cis-elements and trans-factors.

  12. Whole-plant growth and N utilization in transgenic rice plants with increased or decreased Rubisco content under different CO2 partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Emi; Suzuki, Yuji; Makino, Amane

    2014-11-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) strongly limits photosynthesis at lower CO2 concentration [CO2] whereas [corrected] Rubisco limitation is cancelled by elevated [CO2]. Therefore, increase or reduction in Rubisco content by transformation with a sense or an antisense RBCS construct are expected to alter the biomass production under different CO2 levels. RBCS-sense (125% Rubisco of wild-type) and -antisense (35% Rubisco of wild-type) rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were grown for 63 days at three different CO2 levels: low [CO2] (28 Pa), normal [CO2] (40 Pa) and elevated [CO2] (120 Pa). The biomass of RBCS-sense plants was 32% and 15% greater at low [CO2] and normal [CO2] than that of the wild-type plants, respectively, but did not differ at elevated [CO2]. Conversely, the biomass of RBCS-antisense plants was the smallest at low [CO2]. Thus, overproduction of Rubisco was effective for biomass production at low [CO2]. Greater biomass production at low [CO2] in RBCS-sense plants was caused by an increase in the net assimilation rate, and associated with an increase in the amount of N uptake. Furthermore, Rubisco overproduction in RBCS-sense plants was also promoted at low [CO2]. Although it seems that low [CO2]-growth additionally stimulates the effect of RBCS overexpression, such a phenomenon observed at low [CO2] was mediated through an increase in total leaf N content. Thus, the dependence of the growth improvement in RBCS-sense rice on growth [CO2] was closely related to the degree of Rubisco overproduction which was accompanied not only by leaf N content but also by whole plant N content.

  13. Rubisco oligomers composed of linked small and large subunits assemble in tobacco plastids and have higher affinities for CO2 and O2.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer Michael; Kane, Heather Jean; Houtz, Robert L; Sharwood, Robert Edward

    2009-04-01

    Manipulation of Rubisco within higher plants is complicated by the different genomic locations of the large (L; rbcL) and small (S; RbcS) subunit genes. Although rbcL can be accurately modified by plastome transformation, directed genetic manipulation of the multiple nuclear-encoded RbcS genes is more challenging. Here we demonstrate the viability of linking the S and L subunits of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Rubisco using a flexible 40-amino acid tether. By replacing the rbcL in tobacco plastids with an artificial gene coding for a S40L fusion peptide, we found that the fusions readily assemble into catalytic (S40L)8 and (S40L)16 oligomers that are devoid of unlinked S subunits. While there was little or no change in CO2/O2 specificity or carboxylation rate of the Rubisco oligomers, their Kms for CO2 and O2 were reduced 10% to 20% and 45%, respectively. In young maturing leaves of the plastome transformants (called ANtS40L), the S40L-Rubisco levels were approximately 20% that of wild-type controls despite turnover of the S40L-Rubisco oligomers being only slightly enhanced relative to wild type. The reduced Rubisco content in ANtS40L leaves is partly attributed to problems with folding and assembly of the S40L peptides in tobacco plastids that relegate approximately 30% to 50% of the S40L pool to the insoluble protein fraction. Leaf CO2-assimilation rates in ANtS40L at varying pCO2 corresponded with the kinetics and reduced content of the Rubisco oligomers. This fusion strategy provides a novel platform to begin simultaneously engineering Rubisco L and S subunits in tobacco plastids.

  14. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  15. Interaction between potyvirus P3 and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) of host plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Zhaopeng; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2011-08-01

    The P3 protein encoded by Shallot yellow stripe virus onion isolate (SYSV-O) interacted in the Yeast Two-hybrid (Y2H) system and in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays with the large subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) protein that is encoded by the rbcL gene of its onion host. Dissection analysis by Y2H showed that the main part of SYSV P3 (amino acids 1-390) and onion RbcL (amino acids 1-137) were responsible for the interaction. The P3 proteins encoded by Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), Soybean mosaic virus Pinellia isolate (SMV-P), and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) also interacted with RbcL, suggesting that a P3/RbcL interaction might exist generally for potyviruses. An interaction between P3 of these potyviruses and the small subunit of RubisCO (RbcS) was also demonstrated. Moreover, the P3N-PIPO protein encoded by a newly identified open reading frame embedded within the P3 cistron also interacted with both RbcL and RbcS. It is possible that the potyvirus P3 protein affects the normal functions of RubisCO which thus contributes to symptom development.

  16. [Study on influence between activated carbon property and immobilized biological activated carbon purification effect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-zhi; Li, Wei-guang; He, Wen-jie; Han, Hong-da; Ding, Chi; Ma, Xiao-na; Qu, Yan-ming

    2006-10-01

    By means of immobilizing five kinds of activated carbon, we studied the influence between the chief activated carbon property items and immobilized bioactivated carbon (IBAC) purification effect with the correlation analysis. The result shows that the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.7 include molasses, abrasion number, hardness, tannin, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter; the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.5 include pH, iodine, butane and tetrachloride. In succession, the partial correlation analysis shows that activated carbon property items mostly influencing on IBAC purification effect include molasses, hardness, abrasion number, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter. The causation of these property items bringing influence on IBAC purification is that the activated carbon holes distribution (representative activated carbon property item is molasses) provides inhabitable location and adjust food for the dominance bacteria; the mechanical resist-crash property of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: abrasion number and hardness) have influence on the stability of biofilm; and the particle diameter size and distribution of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter) can directly affect the force of water in IBAC filter bed, which brings influence on the dominance bacteria immobilizing on activated carbon.

  17. Changes in rubisco, cysteine-rich proteins and antioxidant system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) due to sulphur deficiency, cadmium stress and their combination.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Rita; Ahmad, Javed; Bashir, Humayra; Iqbal, Muhammad; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Sulphur (S) deficiency, cadmium (Cd) toxicity and their combinations are of wide occurrence throughout agricultural lands. We assessed the impact of short-term (2 days) and long-term (4 days) applications of cadmium (40 μg/g soil) on spinach plants grown on sulphur-sufficient (300 μM SO4(2-)) and sulphur-deficient (30 μM SO4(2-)) soils. Compared with the control (+S and -Cd), oxidative stress was increased by S deficiency (-S and -Cd), cadmium (+S and +Cd) and their combination stress (-S and +Cd) in the order of (S deficiency) < (Cd stress) < (S deficiency and +Cd stress). SDS-PAGE profile of leaf proteins showed a high vulnerability of rubisco large subunit (RbcL) to S deficiency. Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) was particularly sensitive to Cd as well as dual stress (+Cd and -S) but increased with Cd in the presence of S. Cysteine content in low molecular weight proteins/peptide was also affected, showing a significant increase under cadmium treatment. Components of ascorbate-glutathione antioxidant system altered their levels, showing the maximum decline in ascorbate (ASA), dehydroascorbate (DHA), total ascorbate (ASA + DHA, hereafter TA), glutathione (GSH) and total glutathione (GSH + GSSG, hereafter TG) under S deficiency. However, total ascorbate and total glutathione increased, besides a marginal increase in their reduced and oxidized forms, when Cd was applied in the presence of sufficient S. Sulphur supply also helped in increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) under Cd stress. However, their activity suffered by S deficiency and by Cd stress during S deficiency. Each stress declined the contents of soluble protein and photosynthetic pigments; the highest decline in contents of protein and pigments occurred under S deficiency and dual stress respectively. The fresh and dry weights, although affected adversely by every stress, declined most under dual stress. It

  18. Isolation and characterization of the organ-specific and light-inducible promoter of the gene encoding rubisco activase in potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Qu, D; Song, Y; Li, W M; Pei, X W; Wang, Z X; Jia, S R; Zhang, Y Q

    2011-04-12

    Constitutive promoters have been widely used in crop biotechnology applications. Tissue-specific or inducible promoters, however, have advantages in some cases. We isolated the 731-bp 5' flanking sequence of a potato (Solanum tuberosum) gene, encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activase (RCA), which was isolated by genome walking. By using GUS as a reporter and with Northern blot analysis, the 702-bp fragment (referred to as StRCAp), ranging from nt -731 to -30 relative to the initiation code of the RCA gene, was analyzed in transgenic tobacco plants. The activity of StRCAp in leaves was 0.4-fold less than that of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and was expressed throughout the green part of the light-grown transgenic T(1) seedlings, including cytoledons, leaves and young stems, but not roots. Further deletion analysis revealed that a shorter fragment (nt -249 to -30, StRCAp2) retained light-inducible features in cytoledons and leaves, but showed no detectable activity in young stems and roots. Although the activity of StRCAp2 in leaves was reduced significantly compared with that of StRCAp, the overall data indicated that cis-elements sufficient to regulate organ-specific and light-inducible transcription are within the 220-bp fragment. There is potential for application of StRCAp in plant genetic engineering.

  19. Decline of Activity and Quantity of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and Net Photosynthesis in Ozone-Treated Potato Foliage 1

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Michael S.; Pell, Eva J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of ozone (O3) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and quantity and net photosynthesis in greenhouse-grown Solanum tuberosum L. cv `Norland' foliage was studied in relation to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to 0.06 to 0.08 microliters per liter O3 from 1000 to 1600 hours for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5, plants were exposed to a 6-hour simulated inversion in which O3 peaked at 0.12 microliters per liter. Net photosynthesis declined in response to O3 but recovered to near control levels 3 days after the exposure ended. Rubisco activity and quantity in control potato foliage increased and then decreased during the 12-day interval of the study. In some experiments foliage studied was physiologically mature and Rubisco activity had peaked when O3 exposure commenced. In those cases, O3 accelerated the decline in Rubisco activity. When less mature foliage was treated with O3, the leaves never achieved the maximal level of Rubisco activity observed in control foliage and also exhibited more rapid decline in initial and total activity. Percent activation of Rubisco (initial/total activity) was not affected significantly by treatment. Quantity of Rubisco decreased in concert with activity. The decrease in activities is most likely due to a decrease in available protein rather than a decrease in the percentage of Rubisco activated in vivo. The reduction in the quantity of Rubisco, an important foliar storage protein, could contribute to premature senescence associated with toxicity of this air pollutant. PMID:16667037

  20. Automated flow-based anion-exchange method for high-throughput isolation and real-time monitoring of RuBisCO in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ruth; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Galmés, Jeroni

    2011-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized, completely enclosed multisyringe-flow system is proposed for high-throughput purification of RuBisCO from Triticum aestivum extracts. The automated method capitalizes on the uptake of the target protein at 4°C onto Q-Sepharose Fast Flow strong anion-exchanger packed in a cylindrical microcolumn (105 × 4 mm) followed by a stepwise ionic-strength gradient elution (0-0.8 mol/L NaCl) to eliminate concomitant extract components and retrieve highly purified RuBisCO. The manifold is furnished downstream with a flow-through diode-array UV/vis spectrophotometer for real-time monitoring of the column effluent at the protein-specific wavelength of 280 nm to detect the elution of RuBisCO. Quantitation of RuBisCO and total soluble proteins in the eluate fractions were undertaken using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and the spectrophotometric Bradford assay, respectively. A comprehensive investigation of the effect of distinct concentration gradients on the isolation of RuBisCO and experimental conditions (namely, type of resin, column dimensions and mobile-phase flow rate) upon column capacity and analyte breakthrough was effected. The assembled set-up was aimed to critically ascertain the efficiency of preliminary batchwise pre-treatments of crude plant extracts (viz., polyethylenglycol (PEG) precipitation, ammonium sulphate precipitation and sucrose gradient centrifugation) in terms of RuBisCO purification and absolute recovery prior to automated anion-exchange column separation. Under the optimum physical and chemical conditions, the flow-through column system is able to admit crude plant extracts and gives rise to RuBisCO purification yields better than 75%, which might be increased up to 96 ± 9% with a prior PEG fractionation followed by sucrose gradient step.

  1. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy.

  2. Influence of mechanical activation of steel powder on its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Darenskaia, E. A.; Myachin, Y. V.; Vasilyeva, I. E.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    It has been studied properties of stainless steel based powders after mechanical activation using planetary ball milling technique. It have been shown that after one minute mechanical activation porosity of sintered steel is less than 5%, which is less than the porosity of the sintered steel powder without mechanical activation. The sample without activation has austenite state, which changes after activation toaustenite and ferrite mixtures. X-ray analysis confirmed that the mechanical activation leads to a change in the phase state of the samples: the samples without activation of the FCC structure (γ-Fe), after activation - FCC (γ-Fe) and BCC (α-Fe). The hardness increases at increasing activation time from 800 MPa for the sample without mechanical activation to 1250 MPa for the sample with the activation time of 10 minutes.

  3. Dipeptide Phe-Cys derived from in silico thermolysin-hydrolysed RuBisCO large subunit suppresses oxidative stress in cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Cho, Young-Sook; Gong, Min; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2015-03-15

    A dipeptide (Phe-Cys) was predicted to be bioactive following bioinformatics analysis of the large subunit of plant and microalgae ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO), which was hydrolysed in silico with thermolysin. The peptide was synthesised and found to possess in vitro reducing potential and inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, comparable to the activity of glutathione. In cultured Chang human hepatocytes, 2.5-10 μM Phe-Cys was found to induce the suppression of reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in oxidative stressed cells. Intracellular glutathione levels were found to increase in the peptide-treated cells under normal condition, which can potentially contribute in protecting the cells from oxidative damage. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that the levels of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase-1, increased in the hepatic cells when treated with Phe-Cys in the presence of the oxidant. The results show that this peptide has great potential to be used against oxidative stress-induced health conditions.

  4. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine; Karra, Reddy

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  5. A novel method for determination of the (15) N isotopic composition of Rubisco in wheat plants exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Avice, Jean Christophe; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Although ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is mostly known as a key enzyme involved in CO2 assimilation during the Calvin cycle, comparatively little is known about its role as a pool of nitrogen storage in leaves. For this purpose, we developed a protocol to purify Rubisco that enables later analysis of its (15) N isotope composition (δ(15) N) at the natural abundance and (15) N-labeled plants. In order to test the utility of this protocol, durum wheat (Triticum durum var. Sula) exposed to an elevated CO2 concentration (700 vs 400 µmol mol(-1) ) was labeled with K(15) NO3 (enriched at 2 atom %) during the ear development period. The developed protocol proves to be selective, simple, cost effective and reproducible. The study reveals that (15) N labeling was different in total organic matter, total soluble protein and the Rubisco fraction. The obtained data suggest that photosynthetic acclimation in wheat is caused by Rubisco depletion. This depletion may be linked to preferential nitrogen remobilization from Rubisco toward grain filling.

  6. Functional characterization of sequence motifs in the transit peptide of Arabidopsis small subunit of rubisco.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Sookjin; Lee, Gil-Je; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Cheong, Gang-Won; Hwang, Inhwan

    2006-02-01

    The transit peptides of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are necessary and sufficient for targeting and import of proteins into chloroplasts. However, the sequence information encoded by transit peptides is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated sequence motifs in the transit peptide of the small subunit of the Rubisco complex by examining the ability of various mutant transit peptides to target green fluorescent protein reporter proteins to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf protoplasts. We divided the transit peptide into eight blocks (T1 through T8), each consisting of eight or 10 amino acids, and generated mutants that had alanine (Ala) substitutions or deletions, of one or two T blocks in the transit peptide. In addition, we generated mutants that had the original sequence partially restored in single- or double-T-block Ala (A) substitution mutants. Analysis of chloroplast import of these mutants revealed several interesting observations. Single-T-block mutations did not noticeably affect targeting efficiency, except in T1 and T4 mutations. However, double-T mutants, T2A/T4A, T3A/T6A, T3A/T7A, T4A/T6A, and T4A/T7A, caused a 50% to 100% loss in targeting ability. T3A/T6A and T4A/T6A mutants produced only precursor proteins, whereas T2A/T4A and T4A/T7A mutants produced only a 37-kD protein. Detailed analyses revealed that sequence motifs ML in T1, LKSSA in T3, FP and RK in T4, CMQVW in T6, and KKFET in T7 play important roles in chloroplast targeting. In T1, the hydrophobicity of ML is important for targeting. LKSSA in T3 is functionally equivalent to CMQVW in T6 and KKFET in T7. Furthermore, subcellular fractionation revealed that Ala substitution in T1, T3, and T6 produced soluble precursors, whereas Ala substitution in T4 and T7 produced intermediates that were tightly associated with membranes. These results demonstrate that the transit peptide contains multiple motifs and that some of them act in concert or

  7. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries.

  8. Mechanical properties that influence antimicrobial peptide activity in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Marín-Medina, Nathaly; Ramírez, Diego Alejandro; Trier, Steve; Leidy, Chad

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small amphiphilic proteins found in animals and plants as essential components of the innate immune system and whose function is to control bacterial infectious activity. In order to accomplish their function, antimicrobial peptides use different mechanisms of action which have been deeply studied in view of their potential exploitation to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. One of the main mechanisms of action of these peptides is the disruption of the bacterial membrane through pore formation, which, in some cases, takes place via a monomer to oligomer cooperative transition. Previous studies have shown that lipid composition, and the presence of exogenous components, such as cholesterol in model membranes or carotenoids in bacteria, can affect the potency of distinct antimicrobial peptides. At the same time, considering the membrane as a two-dimensional material, it has been shown that membrane composition defines its mechanical properties which might be relevant in many membrane-related processes. Nevertheless, the correlation between the mechanical properties of the membrane and antimicrobial peptide potency has not been considered according to the importance it deserves. The relevance of these mechanical properties in membrane deformation due to peptide insertion is reviewed here for different types of pores in order to elucidate if indeed membrane composition affects antimicrobial peptide activity by modulation of the mechanical properties of the membrane. This would also provide a better understanding of the mechanisms used by bacteria to overcome antimicrobial peptide activity.

  9. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  10. Optical properties of actively controlled reflection and transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    2001-05-01

    Reflection and transmission gratings have found a wide variety of applications as optical filters and beam steering elements. In this work we have studied the optical properties of reflection and transmission gratings whose diffraction properties could be actively controlled. Two different material systems were utilized for the study. Reflection gratings in optical fibers were used and reflection and transmission gratings were fabricated holographically in a polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) material. The optical properties of refractive index-shifted gratings were studied using the fiber Bragg gratings. It was found that narrow, high transmission spikes developed inside a high reflectivity stopgap when the refractive index of a section of the grating is shifted. The refractive index-shift was achieved using the thermo- optic effect. Experimental as well as theoretical results are presented and discussed. The optical properties of electrically switchable reflection and transmission gratings fabricated in polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials were also studied. The PDLC material is electro-optic and therefore by applying an external electric field to the gratings the diffraction properties are modified. Gratings were fabricated holographically. From the study of the transmission properties of the reflection gratings we found that the reflection of the structures can be switched off by applying an external electric field and that the reflectivity is polarization insensitive for normal incidence. We also studied the diffraction properties of PDLC transmission gratings. In our analysis of the diffraction properties of these electrically- switchable liquid crystal gratings we found that it was necessary to use a generalized two-wave coupled mode theory that includes the effects of the optical anisotropy of the liquid crystal. We found that the morphology of the PDLC gratings depends on the specific PDLC mixture used to fabricate the grating.

  11. Inhibition of RuBisCO cloned from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus and expressed in Escherichia coli with compounds predicted by Molecular Operation Environment (MOE).

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Toshio; Shiota, Kazunori; Al-Taweel, Khaled; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Kensaku; Yui, Toshifumi; Wadano, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) of a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus vulcanus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme had higher thermostability than RuBisCOs isolated from mesophilic cyanobacteria. Prediction of the tertiary structure was performed using the software Molecular Operating Environment (MOE). The predicted structure did not give any clue about the basis of thermostability. Then, the molecular docking of substrates and inhibitors in the catalytic site were carried out to test analogs for consistency of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, a RuBisCO substrate. The analogs were searched in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and 99 compounds were selected for the docking. The mol files from LIGAND Database in KEGG were changed to a three dimensional (3D) structure for use in docking simulation. The docking simulation was performed on ASEDock of MOE, and the SiteFinder command suggested about 20 candidates for the docking site of the compounds. Based on the homology of these candidate sites with the xylulose 1,5-bisphosphate (XBP)-binding site of RuBisCO isolated from Synechococcus PCC 6301, one site was selected for the docking simulation. The 40 compounds with the highest docking energies included synthetic organic substances that had never been demonstrated to be inhibitors of RuBisCO. The total docking energies were -102 kcal/mol, -104 kcal/mol, -94.0 kcal/mol, and -57.7 kcal/mol for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. Kinetic analysis of RuBisCO revealed a K(m) value of 315 microM for RuBP, and K(i) values of 1.70, 0.93, and 2.04 mM for etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. From these values, the binding energies were estimated to be -4.85, -3.84, -4.20, and -3.73 kcal/mol for RuBP, etidronate, risedronate, and citrate respectively. The differences between the values estimated from experimental data and by

  12. Evidence for the maintenance of motoneurone properties by msucel activity.

    PubMed Central

    Czéh, G; Gallego, R; Kudo, N; Kuno, M

    1978-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological properties of soleus motoneurones in adult cats were examined with intracellular electrodes following alterations of activity of the soleus muscle induced by transection of the thoracic spinal cord or by conduction block of the muscle nerve with tetrodotoxin (TTX) cuffs. Attempts were also made to maintain muscle activity by daily stimulation of the maintain muscle activity by daily stimulation of the peripheral nerve. 2. Within 8 days after transection of the thoracic cord, soleus motoneurones showed a significant decrease in the duration of afterhyperpolarization following action potentials. This change in motoneurone properties induced by cord transection was prevented by daily stimulation of the sciatic nerve. 3. Soleus motoneurones showed a significant decrease in the duration of after-hyperpolarization within 8 days after conduction block of the soleus nerve with TTX. This change in montoneurone properties was prevented by daily stimulation of the nerve peripheral to the TTX cuff but not central to the cuff. 4. The soleus muscle showed a significant decrease in weight relative to body weight within 8 days after transection of the thoracic cord. This decrease in muscle weight following cord transection was prevented by daily stimulation of the sciatic nerve. 5. No fibrillation was detected in the soleus muscle 8 days after conduction block of the soleus nerve with TTX. The maximum twitch tension of the soleus muscle evoked by nerve stimulation showed no significant difference between the two sides treated and untreated with TTX. Fast axoplasmic transport measured with cholinesterase as a marker was not affected by TTX. Thus, there was no sign of functional although morphological abnormalities were found in some nerve fibres. 6. It is concluded that motoneurone properties in an adult depend partly upon some factors associated with activity of the innervated muscles and that such trophic signals are retrogradely carried by the motor axons

  13. Comparative Study of Surface-Active Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Disaccharide Monoesters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air–water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  14. A Survey of Nanoflare Properties in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, N. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate coronal heating using a systematic technique to analyze the properties of nanoflares in active regions (AR). Our technique computes cooling times, or time-lags, on a pixel-by-pixel basis using data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Our technique has the advantage that it allows us to analyze all of the coronal AR emission, including the so-called diffuse emission. We recently presented results using this time-lag analysis on NOAA AR 11082 (Viall & Klimchuk 2012) and found that the majority of the pixels contained cooling plasma along their line of sight, consistent with impulsive coronal nanoflare heating. Additionally, our results showed that the nanoflare energy is stronger in the AR core and weaker in the active region periphery. Are these results representative of the nanoflare properties exhibited in the majority of ARs, or is AR 11082 unique? Here we present the time-lag results for a survey of ARs and show that these nanoflare patterns are born out in other active regions, for a range of ages, magnetic complexity, and total unsigned magnetic flux. Other aspects of the nanoflare properties, however, turn out to be dependent on certain AR characteristics.

  15. Molecular characterization and in situ localization of endosymbiotic 16S ribosomal RNA and RuBisCO genes in the pogonophoran tissue.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sato, Makoto; Sasayama, Yuichi; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    Gutless pogonophorans are generally thought to live in symbiosis with methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). We identified a 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) and a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxlase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, E.C.4.1.1.39) gene that encode the form I large subunit ( cbbL) from symbiont-bearing tissue of the pogonophoran Oligobrachia mashikoi. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence suggested that the pogonophoran endosymbiont belonged to the gamma-subdivision of Proteobacteria. The endosymbiont was most closely related to an uncultured bacterium from a hydrocarbon seep, forming a unique clade adjacent to the known methanotrophic 16S rDNA cluster. The RuBisCO gene from the pogonophoran tissue was closely related to those of the chemoautotrophic genera Thiobacillus and Hydrogenovibrio. Presence of the RuBisCO gene suggested a methanotrophic symbiosis because some methanotrophic bacteria are known to be capable of autotrophy via the Calvin cycle. In contrast, particulate and soluble methane monooxygenase genes ( pmoA and mmoX) and the methanol dehydrogenase gene ( mxaF), which are indicators for methanotrophs or methylotrophs, were not detected by repeated trial of polymerase chain reaction. For 16S rRNA and RuBisCO genes, endosymbiotic localizations were confirmed by in situ hybridization. These results support the possibilities that the pogonophoran host has a novel endosymbiont which belongs to the gamma-subdivision of Proteobacteria, and that the endosymbiont has the gene of the autotrophic enzyme RuBisCO.

  16. Composition of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryal RuBisCO genotypes in three Western Pacific arc hydrothermal vent systems.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam Easa; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    We studied the diversity of all forms of the RuBisCO large subunit-encoding gene cbbL in three RuBisCO uncharacterized hydrothermal vent communities. This diversity included the archaeal cbbL and the forms IC and ID, which have not previously been studied in the deep-sea environment, in addition to the forms IA, IB and II. Vent plume sites were Fryer and Pika in the Mariana arc and the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin, Japan. The cbbL forms were PCR amplified from plume bulk microbial DNA and then cloned and sequenced. Archaeal cbbL was detected in the Mariana samples only. Both forms IA and II were amplified from all samples, while the form IC was amplified only from the Pika and Suiyo samples. Only the Suiyo sample showed amplification of the form ID. The form IB was not recorded in any sample. Based on rarefaction analysis, nucleotide diversity and average pairwise difference, the archaeal cbbL was the most diverse form in Mariana samples, while the bacterial form IA was the most diverse form in the Suiyo sample. Also, the Pika sample harbored the highest diversity of cbbL phylogenetic lineages. Based on pairwise reciprocal library comparisons, the Fryer and Pika archaeal cbbL libraries showed the most significant difference, while Pika and Suiyo showed the highest similarity for forms IA and II libraries. This suggested that the Fryer supported the most divergent sequences. All archaeal cbbL sequences formed unique phylogenetic lineages within the branches of anaerobic thermophilic archaea of the genera Pyrococcus, Archaeoglobus, and Methanococcus. The other cbbL forms formed novel phylogenetic clusters distinct from any recorded previously in other deep-sea habitats. This is the first evidence for the diversity of archaeal cbbL in environmental samples.

  17. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value.

  18. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter M.; Fehler, Michael C.; Johnson, Paul A.; Phillips, W. Scott

    1994-01-01

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  19. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation, termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MR elastography to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination. PMID:23079508

  20. Psychometric properties of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Razan; Holm, Margo B

    2013-03-01

    The Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable assessment tool that was created to assess Participation. It has been translated to several languages and adapted to different international cultures. The most recent version of this tool is the Arabic Heritage Activity Card Sort (A-ACS). The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the new Arabic version in Jordanian adults. Forty three Jordanian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 62 healthy adults were recruited to test the psychometric properties of the tool. The A-ACS correlated moderately with the participation index of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) (concurrent validity), was able to discriminate between patients and healthy participants on the current and retained levels of participation (F = 5.09, p < 0.03; F = 6.01, p < 0.02, respectively) (discriminative validity), and correlated moderately with the total scores of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) and the total score on the Arabic version of the self-report Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills (r = 0.581, p < 0.00) (convergent validity). The tool also showed good test-retest reliability (r = 0.80, p < 0.00) and excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90). The Arabic Heritage of the Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable tool for Arabic-speaking occupational therapists to use when assessing participation in Jordanian patients with MS or healthy adults. Limitations of this study include using only one diagnostic group from Jordan and examining only the Recovery and Community Versions of the tool. Future studies are needed to examine further psychometric properties for patients with different diagnoses and from different countries in the Arabic region for all three versions of the A-ACS.

  1. Molluscicidal properties and selective toxicity of surface-active agents

    PubMed Central

    Visser, S. A.

    1965-01-01

    Of over 100 commercially produced surface-active agents tested against the bilharziasis vector snail Biomphalaria sudanica, 13 were found to possess considerable and highly selective molluscicidal properties at concentrations of less than 1 ppm for exposures of 48 hours. Against crustacea, fish, water plants, mosquito larvae, mice, and the eggs of B. sudanica, the toxicities of the 13 surfactants were slight. The chemicals did not appear to be absorbed by organic matter to any appreciable extent. It is thought that the toxicity to B. sudanica is of both a chemical and a physical nature. PMID:5294185

  2. The molecular properties of nitrobenzanthrone isomers and their mutagenic activities.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Bojana D; Stanković, Branislav; Ðorđević, Dragana S

    2014-06-01

    The mutagenic activity of five mono-substituted nitrobenzanthrones (NBA) has been determined in the Ames assay (Takamura-Enya et al., 2006). In the present study, a theoretical investigation of the electronic properties of all mono-substituted NBA isomers and their relation to mutagenic activity are presented. Equilibrium geometries, vertical ionization potentials (VIP), vertical electron affinities (VEA), relative energies, dipole moments and electronic dipole polarizabilities, and the IR and Raman spectra of NBA isomers calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods are presented. The position of the nitro group affects the spectral features of the IR and Raman spectra of the NBA isomers. The results show that a good linear relationship exists between the summation of Raman activities (∑ARaman) over all the 3N-6 vibrational modes and the mutagenic activity of the NBA isomers in Salmonella typhimurium strains. The spectroscopic results suggest that the unknown mutagenic activities of 4-NBA, 5-NBA, 6-NBA, 8-NBA and 10-NBA are predicted to follow the order 4-NBA>10-NBA>5-NBA>8-NBA>6-NBA.

  3. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  4. Swarming Bristle-Bots: Exploring Properties of Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Martin B.; Beasock, Damian

    Active Matter describes an ubiquitous class of non-equilibrium systems that encompasses a diverse range of phenomena in the living and non-living realm. Examples are microscopic bio-filaments and their associated motor proteins, flocks of birds and fish, vibrated rods and disks, or nanoscale colloids actuated by catalytic activity on their surface. What unifies these systems is that they are all composed of self-driven units. In consequence, these systems are not driven into non-equilibrium by energy input at their boundary, but by local energy injection. As fascinating as these systems are, there are currently barely any laboratory systems that allow for controlled experiments in dry active matter. That is, systems not immersed in a fluid that can be observed without specialized equipment. Here we present a two-dimensional `active matter' system consisting of hundreds of macroscopic (~0.05 m long), modified, commercially available bristle-bots. We show that this swarm of toys classifies as active matter as it exhibits properties such as dynamic phase separation. Because of their straight forward implementation, their size and controllability, such swarms can not only answer scientific questions, but they have great potential as educational tools in teaching labs and classrooms.

  5. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation. PMID:23569975

  6. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  7. Rocket effluent: Its ice nucleation activity and related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parungo, F. P.; Allee, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of inadvertent weather modification from rocket effluent, aerosol samples were collected from an instrumented aircraft subsequent to the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. The aerosol's morphology, concentration, and size distribution were examined with an electron microscope. The elemental compositions of individual particles were analyzed with an X-ray energy spectrometer. Ice nucleus concentration was measured with a thermal diffusion chamber. The particles' physical and chemical properties were related to their ice nucleation activity. A laboratory experiment on rocket propellant exhaust was conducted under controlled conditions. Both laboratory and field experimental results indicated that rocket propellant exhaust can produce active ice nuclei and modify local weather in suitable meteorological conditions.

  8. Porosity and sorption properties of activated carbons prepared from anthracite by steam-air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, N.V.; Kartel, N.T.; Tsyba, N.N.; Strelko, V.V.; Nikolaichuk, A.D.; Mironyuk, T.I.

    2006-04-15

    Fundamental aspects of the steam-air activation of anthracite from Donets coal fields were studied. The effect of the flow rate of moistened air on the development of a porous structure and the sorption properties of the adsorbents obtained were examined.

  9. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  10. Physical Properties of Cooling Plasma in Quiescent Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Curdt, W.; Hara, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 <= log T <= 5.45 range. EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 <= log T <= 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242°and 253fdg EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

  11. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  12. The coupling of glycolysis and the Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to achieve low carbon dioxide emission fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Han; Ou-Yang, Fan-Yu; Yang, Cheng-Han; Li, Si-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Rubisco-based engineered Escherichia coli, containing two heterologous enzymes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PrkA), has been shown to be capable of the in situ recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) during glycolysis. Two alternative approaches have been proposed to further enhance the carbon flow from glycolysis to a Rubisco-based pathway through the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (NOPPP). The first is achieved by elevating the expression of transketolase I (TktA) and the second by blocking the native oxidation-decarboxylation reaction of E. coli by deleting the zwf gene from the chromosome (designated as JB/pTA and MZB, respectively). Decreases in the CO2 yield and the CO2 evolution per unit mole of ethanol production by at least 81% and 40% are observed. It is demonstrated in this study that the production of one mole of ethanol using E. coli strain MZB, the upper limit of CO2 emission is 0.052mol.

  13. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  14. Anionic Gemini Surfactants:. Synthesis and Surface Active Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Dipti; Tyagi, V. K.

    New compounds bearing two phosphate groups and two long chain (dodecyl) were prepared by two-step reaction: (i) phosphorylation of dodecanol with pyrophosphoric acid, (ii) reaction of dodecyl phosphate with N(CH3)4OH and 1,6-dibromo hexane. The effect of reaction variables like time and molar ratio of reactants on yield has also been reported. The 1:2:0.5 molar ratio of reactants (dodecyl phosphate, N(CH3)4OH, and Br(CH2)6 Br, respectively) and 3 h duration resulted to give maximum yield of anionic gemini surfactants. The structure of synthesized surfactant was investigated by modern analytical techniques, viz. FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR. Amphipathic disodium phosphates were obtained by neutralization of free acids with sodium hydroxide and their surface active properties in aqueous solution were measured. These disodium phosphates possessed 77.3% anionic content and showed good water solubility. Foaming properties and wetting ability were also evaluated.

  15. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator.

  16. The rubisco small subunit is involved in tobamovirus movement and Tm-2²-mediated extreme resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Haili; Jia, Qi; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2013-01-01

    The multifunctional movement protein (MP) of Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV) is involved in viral cell-to-cell movement, symptom development, and resistance gene recognition. However, it remains to be elucidated how ToMV MP plays such diverse roles in plants. Here, we show that ToMV MP interacts with the Rubisco small subunit (RbCS) of Nicotiana benthamiana in vitro and in vivo. In susceptible N. benthamiana plants, silencing of NbRbCS enabled ToMV to induce necrosis in inoculated leaves, thus enhancing virus local infectivity. However, the development of systemic viral symptoms was delayed. In transgenic N. benthamiana plants harboring Tobacco mosaic virus resistance-2² (Tm-2²), which mediates extreme resistance to ToMV, silencing of NbRbCS compromised Tm-2²-dependent resistance. ToMV was able to establish efficient local infection but was not able to move systemically. These findings suggest that NbRbCS plays a vital role in tobamovirus movement and plant antiviral defenses.

  17. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies of Rubisco large and small subunits and their application in the functional analysis of the genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Da; Lu, Tian-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Fu; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Xing-Zhi

    2004-09-01

    Spinach Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) large (rbcL) and small (rbcS) subunits were separated by SDS-PAGE, and protein amount and purity were determined by Bradford assay. Polyclonal antibodies against rbcL and rbcS subunit were generated in female BALB/c mice and had no cross-reaction with each other. A total of 81 microg antigens were used and 0.3 ml anti-sera with titer of 1:5000 were yielded. The antibodies were also applicable to study rbcL and rbcS in tobacco plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Potato virus X vector pGR107 induced silencing of rbcS gene by Agrobacterium in Nicotiana benthamiana was performed. The expression level of rbcL and rbcS was lower in rbcS silenced plants than that in control plants as detected by the corresponding antibodies. This implied that the expression of rbcL was regulated by rbcS.

  18. Interactive effects of nitrogen and light on growth rates and RUBISCO content of small and large centric diatoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Among marine phytoplankton groups, diatoms span the widest range of cell size, with resulting effects upon their nitrogen uptake, photosynthesis and growth responses to light. We grew two strains of marine centric diatoms differing by ~4 orders of magnitude in cell biovolume in high (enriched artificial seawater with ~500 µmol L(-1) µmol L(-1) NO3(-)) and lower-nitrogen (enriched artificial seawater with <10 µmol L(-1) NO3(-)) media, across a range of growth light levels. Nitrogen and total protein per cell decreased with increasing growth light in both species when grown under the lower-nitrogen media. Cells growing under lower-nitrogen media increased their cellular allocation to RUBISCO and their rate of electron transport away from PSII, for the smaller diatom under low growth light and for the larger diatom across the range of growth lights. The smaller coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is able to exploit high nitrogen in growth media by up-regulating growth rate, but the same high-nitrogen growth media inhibits growth of the larger diatom species.

  19. Small Antisense RNA RblR Positively Regulates RuBisCo in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinlu; Li, Tianpei; Xu, Wen; Zhan, Jiao; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) function as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in organisms from all domains of life. Cyanobacteria are thought to have developed a complex RNA-based regulatory mechanism. In the current study, by genome-wide analysis of differentially expressed small RNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under high light conditions, we discovered an asRNA (RblR) that is 113nt in length and completely complementary to its target gene rbcL, which encodes the large chain of RuBisCO, the enzyme that catalyzes carbon fixation. Further analysis of the RblR(+)/(−) mutants revealed that RblR acts as a positive regulator of rbcL under various stress conditions; Suppressing RblR adversely affects carbon assimilation and thus the yield, and those phenotypes of both the wild type and the overexpressor could be downgraded to the suppressor level by carbonate depletion, indicated a regulatory role of RblR in CO2 assimilation. In addition, a real-time expression platform in Escherichia coli was setup and which confirmed that RblR promoted the translation of the rbcL mRNA into the RbcL protein. The present study is the first report of a regulatory RNA that targets RbcL in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and provides strong evidence that RblR regulates photosynthesis by positively modulating rbcL expression in Synechocystis. PMID:28261186

  20. Synthesis, surface-active properties, and antimicrobial activities of new double-chain gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murguía, Marcelo C; Vaillard, Victoria A; Sánchez, Victoria G; Conza, José Di; Grau, Ricardo J

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of neutral and cationic dimeric surfactants were prepared involving ketalization reaction, Williamson etherification, and regioselective oxirane ring opening with primary and tertiary alkyl amines. The critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (gamma(CMC)), surface excess concentration (Gamma), and area per molecule at the interface (A) were determined and values indicate that the cationic series is characterized by good surface-active and self-aggregation properties. For the first time, we reported the antimicrobial activities against representative bacteria and fungi for dimeric compounds. The antimicrobial activity was found to be dependent on the target microorganism (Gram-positive bacteria > fungi > Gram-negative bacteria), as well as both the neutral or ionic nature (cationic > neutral) and alkyl chain length (di-C(12) > di-C(18) > di-C(8)) of the compounds. The cationic di-C(12) derivative was found to have equipotent activity to that of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) used as standard.

  1. Properties of the Hemolytic Activities of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Short, Everett C.; Kurtz, Harold J.

    1971-01-01

    Some properties of the cell-free and cell-associated hemolysins of Escherichia coli were studied. Several strains of E. coli that were isolated from intestines of pigs with edema disease produce large quantities of cell-free hemolysin when grown in the presence of an extract of meat. The component of meat that stimulates production of cell-free hemolysin is not extracted by lipid solvents and is not dialyzable. The cell-free hemolysin is an acidic substance that occurs in two forms. It is inactivated by trypsin but not by lecithinase, lysozyme, ribonuclease, or deoxyribonuclease, shows optimum activity between pH 7 and 8, and requires calcium ion for activity. It does not appear to be an enzyme. The kinetics of the lytic reaction are most consistent with the hypothesis that one molecule of cell-free hemolysin is sufficient to lyse one erythrocyte and that it is inactivated in the lytic reaction. The cell-free hemolysin does not sufficiently damage the cell during the prelytic period to cause lysis after the hemolysin-calcium-erythrocyte complex has been disrupted. The cell-associated hemolysin was not separated from the cell by autolysis, freezing, sonic treatment, or treatment with trypsin or lysozyme. It appears to be closely associated with the metabolic status of the cell. Organisms that are highly hemolytic under usual conditions of assay immediately lose most of their hemolytic capability in the presence of sodium cyanide, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, and rifampin. PMID:16558036

  2. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  3. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically selected and X-ray-detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In nine systems, the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3″ diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of two. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGNs selected from the SDSS galaxy catalog with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0.″6 (0.8 kpc) to 17.″4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2.″7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGNs in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess the kinematics of AGN photoionized gas in galaxy mergers. We find that spectroscopic offset AGN selection may be up to {89}-16+7% incomplete due to small projected velocity offsets. We also find that the magnitude of the velocity offsets are generally larger than expected if our spatial selection introduces a bias toward face-on orbits, suggesting the presence of complex kinematics in the emission line gas of AGNs in galaxy mergers.

  4. Antifungal activity of two Lactobacillus strains with potential probiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Gerbaldo, Gisela A; Barberis, Carla; Pascual, Liliana; Dalcero, Ana; Barberis, Lucila

    2012-07-01

    Aflatoxin (highly toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by fungi) contamination is a serious problem worldwide. Modern agriculture and animal production systems need to use high-quality and mycotoxin-free feedstuffs. The use of microorganisms to preserve food has gained importance in recent years due to the demand for reduced use of chemical preservatives by consumers. Lactic acid bacteria are known to produce various antimicrobial compounds that are considered to be important in the biopreservation of food and feed. Lactobacillus rhamnosus L60 and Lactobacillus fermentum L23 are producers of secondary metabolites, such as organic acids, bacteriocins and, in the case of L60, hydrogen peroxide. The antifungal activity of lactobacilli strains was determined by coculture with Aspergillus section Flavi strains by two qualitative and one quantitative methods. Both L23 and L60 completely inhibited the fungal growth of all aflatoxicogenic strains assayed. Aflatoxin B (1) production was reduced 95.7-99.8% with L60 and 27.5-100% with L23. Statistical analysis of the data revealed the influence of L60 and L23 on growth parameters and aflatoxin B (1) production. These results are important given that these aflatoxicogenic fungi are natural contaminants of feed used for animal production, and could be effectively controlled by Lactobacillus L60 and L23 strains with probiotic properties.

  5. Silicate application increases the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic activities in Kentucky bluegrass under drought stress and post-drought recovery.

    PubMed

    Saud, Shah; Yajun, Chen; Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Na, Li; Xin, Li; Alhussien, Safa Abd Alaleem Fadal Elseed

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress is the most pervasive threat to plant growth, which disrupts the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic activities, while silicate (Si) application may have the potential to alleviate the damaging effects of drought on plant growth. In present study, the role of Si in regulating the photosynthesis and its associated metabolic events in Kentucky bluegrass (cv. Arcadia) were investigated under drought stress. Drought stress and four levels (0, 200, 400, 800 mg L(-1)) of Si (Na2SiO3.9H2O) were imposed on 1-year-old plants removed from field and cultured under glasshouse conditions. After 20 days of drought stress, the plants were re-watered to reach soil field capacity for the examination of recovery on the second and the seventh day. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design replicated four times. Drought stress severely decreased the photosynthesis, water use efficiency, stomatal conductance, cholorophyll contents, Rubisco activity, and Rubisco activation state in Kentucky bluegrass. Nevertheless, application of Si had a positive influence on all these attributes, particularly under stress conditions. As compared to control, Si application at 400 mg L(-1) recorded 78, 64, and 48 % increase in photosynthesis, Rubisco initial activity, and Rubisco total activity, respectively, at 20 days of drought. Higher photosynthesis and higher Rubisco activity in Si-applied treatments suggest that Si may have possible (direct or indirect) role in maintenance of more active Rubisco enzyme and Rubisco activase and more stable proteins for carbon assimilation under stress conditions, which needs to be elucidated in further studies.

  6. Dynamic properties of biologically active synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Hricovíni, Milos; Gairi, Margarida; Guerrini, Marco; de Paz, José Luis; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2005-10-01

    A complete study of the dynamics of two synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides, D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (1) and -->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHAc-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (2), has been performed using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters, T1, T2, and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect (NOEs). Compound 1 is constituted from sequences corresponding to the major polysaccharide heparin region, while compound 2 contains a sequence never found in natural heparin. They differ from each other only in sulphation patterns, and are capable of stimulating fibroblast growth factors (FGFs)-1 induced mitogenesis. Both oligosaccharides exhibit a remarkable anisotropic overall motion in solution as revealed by their anisotropic ratios (tau /tau||), 4.0 and 3.0 respectively. This is a characteristic behaviour of natural glycosaminoglycans (GAG) which has also been observed for the antithrombin (AT) binding pentasaccharide D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcA-beta-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-(3,6-SO4)-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-1-->Me (3) (Hricovíni, M., Guerrini, M., Torri, G., Piani, S., and Ungarelli, F. (1995) Conformational analysis of heparin epoxide in aqueous solution. An NMR relaxation study. Carbohydr. Res., 277, 11-23). The motional properties observed for 1 and 2 provide additional support to the suitability of these compounds as heparin models in agreement with previous structural (de Paz, J.L., Angulo, J., Lassaletta, J.M., Nieto, P.M., Redondo-Horcajo, M., Lozano, R.M., Jiménez-Gallego, G., and Martín-Lomas, M. (2001) The activation of fibroblast growth factors by heparin: synthesis, structure and biological activity of heparin-like oligosaccharides. Chembiochem, 2, 673-685; Ojeda, R

  7. Synthesis of a cyanopeptide-analogue with trypsin activating properties.

    PubMed

    Radau, G; Rauh, D

    2000-04-17

    An efficient synthesis of a peptidic analogue of cyanobacterial metabolites with proposed serine protease inhibitory activity has been developed. Surprisingly, one trypsin activating compound was obtained.

  8. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Reflecting widespread unhappiness with the growing tax burdens in this country, the most active area of litigation reported in the property chapter this year involves various attempts by taxpayers to prevent the construction or remodeling of public school facilities. While some taxpayers fought to keep schools from being built, others in New York…

  9. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents.

  10. Heterologous expression and initial characterization of recombinant RbcX protein from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 and the role of RbcX in RuBisCO assembly.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Gubernator, Beata; Kolesinski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    In the cyanobacterial RuBisCO operon from Thermosynechococcus elongatus the rbcX gene is juxtaposed and cotranscribed with the rbcL and rbcS genes which encode large and small RuBisCO subunits, respectively. It has been suggested that the rbcX position is not random and that the RbcX protein could be a chaperone for RuBisCO. In this study, the RbcX protein from T. elongatus was overexpressed, purified and preliminary functional studies were conducted. The recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli extracts was predominantly present in a soluble fraction in a dimeric form. Coexpression experiments have demonstrated that RbcX can mediate RbcL dimer (L(2)) formation, and that it is essential for the L(8) core complex assembly. This is the first characterization of the RbcX protein from a thermophilic organism.

  11. Physical and chemical properties and adsorption type of activated carbon prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2007-08-25

    Activated carbon was prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation at six different NaOH/char ratios. The physical properties including the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the micropore ratio, the pore diameter, the burn-off, and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation as well as the chemical properties, namely elemental analysis and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), were measured. The results revealed a two-stage activation process: stage 1 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 0-1, surface pyrolysis being the main reaction; stage 2 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 2-4, etching and swelling being the main reactions. The physical properties of stage 2 activated carbons were similar, and specific area was from 1478 to 1887m(2)g(-1). The results of reaction mechanism of NaOH activation revealed that it was apparently because of the loss ratio of elements C, H, and O in the activated carbon, and the variations in the surface functional groups and the physical properties. The adsorption of the above activated carbons on phenol and three kinds of dyes (MB, BB1, and AB74) were used for an isotherm equilibrium adsorption study. The data fitted the Langmuir isotherm equation. Various kinds of adsorbents showed different adsorption types; separation factor (R(L)) was used to determine the level of favorability of the adsorption type. In this work, activated carbons prepared by NaOH activation were evaluated in terms of their physical properties, chemical properties, and adsorption type; and activated carbon PKN2 was found to have most application potential.

  12. Passive and active mechanical properties of biotemplated ceramics revisited.

    PubMed

    Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Plank, Johann; Zollfrank, Cordt; Paris, Oskar

    2016-10-13

    Living nature and human technology apply different principles to create hard, strong and tough materials. In this review, we compare and discuss prominent aspects of these alternative strategies, and demonstrate for selected examples that nanoscale-precision biotemplating is able to produce uncommon mechanical properties as well as actuating behavior, resembling to some extent the properties of the original natural templates. We present and discuss mechanical testing data showing for the first time that nanometer-precision biotemplating can lead to porous ceramic materials with deformation characteristics commonly associated with either biological or highly advanced technical materials. We also review recent findings on the relation between hierarchical structuring and humidity-induced directional motion. Finally, we discuss to which extent the observed behavior is in agreement with previous results and theories on the mechanical properties of multiscale hierarchical materials, as well as studies of highly disperse technical materials, together with an outlook for further lines of investigation.

  13. Determination of the relative expression levels of rubisco small subunit genes in Arabidopsis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M; Putterill, J J; Ross, G S; Laing, W A

    2001-04-15

    Multigene families are common in higher organisms. However, due to the close similarities between members, it is often difficult to assess the individual contribution of each gene to the overall expression of the family. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are four genes encoding the small subunits (SSU) of ribulose-1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (rubisco) whose nucleotide sequences are up to 98.4% identical. In order to overcome the technical limitations associated with gene-specific probes (or primers) commonly used in existing methods, we developed a new gene expression assay based on the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) technique with a single pair of primers. With this RACE gene expression assay, we were able to determine the relative transcript levels between four Arabidopsis SSU genes. We found that the relative SSU gene expression differed significantly between plants grown at different temperatures. Our observation raises the possibility that an adaptation of rubisco to the environment may be achieved through the specific synthesis of the SSU proteins, which is determined by the relative expression levels between the SSU genes.

  14. Statistical properties of trading activity in Chinese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqian; Cheng, Xueqi; Shen, Huawei; Wang, Zhaoyang

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of traders' trading behavior using cumulative distribution function(CDF). We analyze exchange data of 52 stocks for one-year period which contains non-manipulated stocks and manipulated stocks published by China Securities Regulatory Commission(CSRC). By analyzing the total number of transactions and the trading volume of each trader over a year, we find the cumulative distributions have power-law tails and the distributions between non-manipulated stocks and manipulated stocks are different. These findings can help us to detect the manipulated stocks.

  15. Autophosphorylation properties of inactive and active JNK2.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Genaro; Ficarro, Scott B; Gutierrez, Gustavo J; Bhoumik, Anindita; Peters, Eric C; Ronai, Ze'ev; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-07-15

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are ubiquitous proteins that phosphorylate their substrates, such as transcription factors, in response to physical stress, cytokines or UV radiation. This leads to changes in gene expression, ensuing either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Active phospho JNK1 is the main in vivo kinase component of the JNK cascade, whereas JNK2 is presumed not to participate as a kinase during JNK signalling. However, there is evidence that JNK isoforms interact functionally in vivo. Also, a recent chemical genetics investigation has confirmed that JNK transient activation leads to cellular proliferation, whereas a sustained one is pro-apoptotic. Here we investigate the phosphorylation pattern of JNK2, with protein biochemistry tools and tandem mass spectrometry. We choose to focus on JNK2 because of its reported constitutive activity in glioma cells. Our results indicate that purified JNK2 from transfected nonstressed 293T cells is a mixture of the mono-sites pThr183 and pTyr185 of its activation loop and of pThr386 along its unique C-terminal region. Upon UV stimulation, its phosphorylation stoichiometry is upregulated on the activation loop, generating a mixture of mono-pTyr185 and the expected dual-pThr183/pTyr185 species, with the pThr386 specie present but unaltered respect to the basal conditions.

  16. Adsorption properties and photocatalytic activity of TiO2/activated carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Song, Shuangping; Shi, Zhongliang

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalysts of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and TiO2/activated carbon fiber (TiO2/ACF) composite were prepared by sol-gel method, followed by calcining the pure TiO2 sols and the TiO2/ACF sols at 500°C for 2 h in a N2 atmosphere, respectively. These photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption property of TiO2/ACF composite using methylene blue as adsorbate. The adsorption data obtained from different batch experiments were analyzed using pseudo-second-order kinetic model, the experimental data can be adequately described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The photodecomposition behavior of TiO2/ACF was investigated in aqueous solution using methylene blue as target pollutant. It was found that methylene blue could be removed rapidly from water by TiO2/ACF, the photocatalytic decomposition was obviously improved when the photocatalyst was used. Kinetics analysis revealed that the photocatalytic decomposition reaction can be described well by a first-order rate equation.

  17. Activation of lexical and syntactic target language properties in translation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Paredes, N; Macizo, P; Bajo, M T

    2008-07-01

    Is reading for translation equal to reading in monolingual contexts? Horizontal/parallel theories of translation propose that normal reading and reading for translation differ because the translator engages in partial reformulation while reading for translating the source text. In contrast, vertical/serial theories assume that the translators first extract the meaning of the message, and only then they proceed to reformulate it. In two experiments, we manipulated lexical and syntactic properties of the target language (TL) while translators read for repetition or for translation. On-line sentence comprehension was affected by the lexical frequency of words in the TL (Experiment 1) and the syntactic congruency between the source language (SL) and TL sentences (Experiment 2). However, the influence of lexical and syntactic TL properties was restricted to the reading for translation task. According to our results, the horizontal view of translation includes code-to-code links between the SL and TL involving at least the lexical and syntactic level of processing.

  18. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  19. Phytoplankton carbon fixation gene (RuBisCO) transcripts and air-sea CO2 flux in the Mississippi River plume

    SciTech Connect

    John, David E.; Wang, Zhaohui A.; Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Corredor, Jorge E.; López, José M.; Cabrera, Alvaro; Bronk, Deborah A.; Tabita, F. Robert; Paul, John H.

    2007-08-30

    River plumes deliver large quantities of nutrients to oligotrophic oceans, often resulting in significant CO2 drawdown. To determine the relationship between expression of the major gene in carbon fixation (large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) and CO2 dynamics, we evaluated rbcL mRNA abundance using novel quantitative PCR assays, phytoplankton cell analyses, photophysiological parameters, and pCO2 in and around the Mississippi River plume (MRP) in the Gulf of Mexico. Lower salinity (30–32) stations were dominated by rbcL mRNA concentrations from heterokonts, such as diatoms and pelagophytes, which were at least an order of magnitude greater than haptophytes, alpha-Synechococcus or high-light Prochlorococcus. However, rbcL transcript abundances were similar among these groups at oligotrophic stations (salinity 34–36). Diatom cell counts and heterokont rbcL RNA showed a strong negative correlation to seawater pCO2. While Prochlorococcus cells did not exhibit a large difference between low and high pCO2 water, Prochlorococcus rbcL RNA concentrations had a strong positive correlation to pCO2, suggesting a very low level of RuBisCO RNA transcription among Prochlorococcus in the plume waters, possibly due to their relatively poor carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These results provide molecular evidence that diatom/pelagophyte productivity is largely responsible for the large CO2 drawdown occurring in the MRP, based on the co-occurrence of elevated RuBisCO gene transcript concentrations from this group and reduced seawater pCO2 levels. This may partly be due to efficient CCMs that enable heterokont eukaryotes such as diatoms to continue fixing CO2 in the face of strong CO2 drawdown. Finally, our work represents the first attempt to relate in situ microbial gene expression to contemporaneous CO2 flux

  20. Scintillation Properties of Eu2+-Activated Barium Fluoroiodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2009-11-18

    The scintillation properties of powders and single-crystals of BaFI doped with Eu2+ are presented. Single crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. Under optical and X-ray excitation, the samples exhibit a narrow E2+ 5d-4f transition emission centered at 405 nm. The scintillation light output is estimated to be 55,000+-5,000 photons/MeV at 662 keV with 85percent of the light decaying within 600 ns. An energyresolution of 8.5percent full width at half maximum (FWHM) has been achieved using this scintillator for 662 keV excitation (137Cs source) at room temperature.

  1. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  2. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    PubMed

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor.

  3. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and Na+/Ca2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in this process. PMID:27852805

  4. Control of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase activity in Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. The purification and properties of an endogenous activator of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, A; Sandy, J D; Tait, G H

    1973-11-01

    1. A low-molecular-weight activator of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase was detected in extracts of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. The compound activates the enzyme extracted from oxygenated semi-anaerobically grown organisms by a factor of 6-8. 2. The activator was extensively purified, but owing to the exceedingly small amounts that could be extracted in the active form its structure was not determined. 3. The activator contains an acetylatable amino group; it is more stable at acid than at alkaline pH values; it is stable to treatment with I(2)-KI or potassium ferricyanide, but irreversibly inactivated by Na(2)S(2)O(4) or NaBH(4). 4. The chromatographic, electrophoretic, chemical and stability properties of the activator are similar to those of pteridines; purified activator preparations contain pteridines, as shown by their fluorescence spectrum. This does not, however, constitute an identification of the activator. 5. The activator enhances the activity of crude and partially purified enzyme and does not appear to require other endogenous factors or a supply of air to produce activation. Activation of the purified enzyme, however, requires the presence of either pyridoxal phosphate or sodium succinate. In the absence of both these factors the activator produces a time- and temperature-dependent decay of activity.

  5. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  6. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme.

  7. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme. PMID:8550452

  8. Nanoscale Properties and Stability Simulations of Alkali Activated Cement Phases from First Principle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Ongun; White, Claire

    Using first principle density functional calculations, we present the nanoscale properties of interactions, local bonds, charge distributions, mechanical properties and strength of alkali activated cement phases which are the most promising alternative to the ordinary Portland cement with a much lower cost to the environment. We present results on the stability and long term durability of various alkali activated cement structures, effects of external alkali agents on their properties and ways of utilizing them for further applications. We compare the calculated properties of alkali activated cement with those of ordinary Portland cement and contribute to the formation of long term durability data of these phases. Comparison with X-ray and neutron scattering experiment results are also provided via pair distribution functions extracted from simulation results.

  9. Properties of solar activity and ionosphere for solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Nepomnyashchaya, E. V.; Obridko, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    Based on the known forecast of solar cycle 25 amplitude ( Rz max ≈ 50), the first assessments of the shape and amplitude of this cycle in the index of solar activity F10.7 (the magnitude of solar radio flux at the 10.7 cm wavelength) are given. It has been found that ( F10.7)max ≈ 115, which means that it is the lowest solar cycle ever encountered in the history of regular ionospheric measurements. For this reason, many ionospheric parameters for cycle 25, including the F2-layer peak height and critical frequency ( hmF2 and foF2), will be extremely low. For example, at middle latitudes, typical foF2 values will not exceed 8-10 MHz, which makes ionospheric heating ineffective in the area of upper hybrid resonance at frequencies higher than 10 MHz. The density of the atmosphere will also be extremely low, which significantly extends the lifetime of low-orbit satellites. The probability of F-spread will be increased, especially during night hours.

  10. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  11. Statistical Properties of Longitudinal Time-Activity Data for Use in Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal ...

  12. Influence of post-treatment strategies on the properties of activated chars from broiler manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a myriad of carbonaceous precursors that can be used advantageously to produce activated carbons or chars, due to their low cost, availability and intrinsic properties. Because of the nature of the raw material, production of granular activated chars from broiler manure results in a signif...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the activated carbons used for elemental mercury (Hgo) adsorption, in order to understand the role of oxygen surface functional groups on the mechanism of Hgo adsorption by activated carbons....

  14. Mechanochemical activation of clays as a means for changing their physicochemical and manufacturing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulebakin, V.G.; Shakora, A.S.

    1995-05-01

    The possibility of increasing the reactivity of clays and loams by their preliminary mechanochemical activation without introducing any addition into the mixture is investigated. It is established that mechanochemical activation substantially changes the physicochemical and manufacturing properties of clays and loams and can find practical application.

  15. Chemical properties and toxicity of soils contaminated by mining activity.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Baran; Tomasz, Czech; Jerzy, Wieczorek

    2014-09-01

    This research is aimed at assessing the total content and soluble forms of metals (zinc, lead and cadmium) and toxicity of soils subjected to strong human pressure associated with mining of zinc and lead ores. The research area lay in the neighbourhood of the Bolesław Mine and Metallurgical Plant in Bukowno (Poland). The study obtained total cadmium concentration between 0.29 and 51.91 mg, zinc between 7.90 and 3,614 mg, and that of lead between 28.4 and 6844 mg kg(-1) of soil d.m. The solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 was 1-49% for zinc, 5-45% for cadmium, and <1-10% for lead. In 1 mol HCl dm(-3), the solubility of the studied metals was much higher and obtained values depending on the collection site, from 45 to 92% for zinc, from 74 to 99%, and from 79 to 99% for lead. The lower solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 than 1 mol HCl dm(-3) is connected with that, the ammonium nitrate has low extraction power, and it is used in determining the bioavailable (active) form of heavy metals. Toxicity assessment of the soil samples was performed using two tests, Phytotoxkit and Microtox(®). Germination index values were between 22 and 75% for Sinapis alba, between 28 and 100% for Lepidium sativum, and between 10 and 28% for Sorghum saccharatum. Depending on the studied soil sample, Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition was 20-96%. The sensitivity of the test organisms formed the following series: S. saccharatum > S. alba = V. fischeri > L. sativum. Significant positive correlations (p ≤ 0.05) of the total and soluble contents of the metals with luminescence inhibition in V. fischeri and root growth inhibition in S. saccharatum were found. The general trend observed was an increase in metal toxicity measured by the biotest with increasing available metal contents in soils. All the soil samples were classified into toxicity class III, which means that they are toxic and present severe danger. Biotest are a good complement to

  16. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications.

  17. Quantitative assessment on soil enzyme activities of heavy metal contaminated soils with various soil properties.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yu; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Soil enzyme activities are greatly influenced by soil properties and could be significant indicators of heavy metal toxicity in soil for bioavailability assessment. Two groups of experiments were conducted to determine the joint effects of heavy metals and soil properties on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that arylsulfatase was the most sensitive soil enzyme and could be used as an indicator to study the enzymatic toxicity of heavy metals under various soil properties. Soil organic matter (SOM) was the dominant factor affecting the activity of arylsulfatase in soil. A quantitative model was derived to predict the changes of arylsulfatase activity with SOM content. When the soil organic matter content was less than the critical point A (1.05% in our study), the arylsulfatase activity dropped rapidly. When the soil organic matter content was greater than the critical point A, the arylsulfatase activity gradually rose to higher levels showing that instead of harm the soil microbial activities were enhanced. The SOM content needs to be over the critical point B (2.42% in our study) to protect its microbial community from harm due to the severe Pb pollution (500mgkg(-1) in our study). The quantitative model revealed the pattern of variation of enzymatic toxicity due to heavy metals under various SOM contents. The applicability of the model under wider soil properties need to be tested. The model however may provide a methodological basis for ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soil.

  18. Influence of post-treatment strategies on the properties of activated chars from broiler manure.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabel M; Boykin, Debbie L; Thomas Klasson, K; Uchimiya, Minori

    2014-01-01

    There are a myriad of carbonaceous precursors that can be used advantageously to produce activated carbons or chars, due to their low cost, availability and intrinsic properties. Because of the nature of the raw material, production of granular activated chars from broiler manure results in a significant ash fraction. This study was conducted to determine the influence of several pre- and post-treatment strategies in various physicochemical and adsorptive properties of the resulting activated chars. Pelletized samples of broiler litter and cake were pyrolyzed at 700 °C for 1h followed by a 45 min steam activation at 800 °C at different water flow rates from 1 to 5 mL min(-1). For each activation strategy, samples were either water-rinsed or acid-washed and rinsed or used as is (no acid wash/rinse). Activated char's physicochemical and adsorptive properties towards copper ions were selectively affected by both pre- and post-treatments. Percent ash reduction after either rinsing or acid washing ranged from 1.1 to 15.1% but washed activated chars were still alkaline with pH ranging from 8.4 to 9.1. Acid washing or water rinsing had no significant effect in the ability of the activated char to adsorb copper ions, however it significantly affected surface area, pH, ash content and carbon content. Instead, manure type (litter versus cake) and the activation water flow rate were determining factors in copper ion adsorption which ranged from 38 mg g(-1) to 104 mg g(-1) of activated char. Moreover, strong positive correlations were found between copper uptake and concentration of certain elements in the activated char such as phosphorous, sulfur, calcium and sodium. Rinsing could suffice as a post treatment strategy for ash reduction since no significant differences in the carbon properties were observed between rinsed and acid wash treatments.

  19. Materials Property Profiles for Actively Cooled Panels: An Illustration for Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, N.; Valdevit, L.; Evans, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    A scheme for identifying and visualizing the material properties that limit the performance of candidate materials for actively cooled aerospace propulsion components is presented and illustrated for combustor panels for Mach 7 hypersonic vehicles. The method provides a framework for exploring the nonlinear interactions between design and materials optimization. By probing the active constraints along the border of feasible design space, the limiting properties have been elucidated for a representative group of candidate materials. Property vectors that enhance design options have also been determined. For one of the promising candidate alloys (the Ni-based superalloy, INCONEL X-750), the possibilities of reclaiming design space and lowering optimal combustor panel weight by tailoring its strength properties are assessed.

  20. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  1. [Activity of antioxidant system of Aspergillus versicolor with radioadaptive properties under conditions of exposure to radiation].

    PubMed

    Tuhaĭ, T I

    2011-01-01

    Melanin pigments were revealed for the first time in Aspergillus versicolor strains. Ionizing irradiation practically did not influence melanin synthesis in A. versicolor strains with radioadaptive properties and stimulated its synthesis in the control strain, which did not show such properties. High level of superoxide dismutase activity (from 100 up to 720 U/mg of protein) was revealed in the investigated strains. The irradiation in exponential phase of growth did not practically influence or raised activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the strains with radioadaptive properties and oppressed its activity in the control strain. The irradiation in a stationary phase was accompanied by a decrease of SOD activity in the strains with radioadaptive properties, and essential (2 times) increase of SOD activity in the control strain and strain A. versicolor 101, which did not show radiotropism. The extracellular catalase activity (1.52-37.04 mmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) protein) exceeded by more than an order the intracellular one (8-230 mol x min(-1) x mg(-1) protein) in the investigated strains.

  2. Physicochemical effect of activation temperature on the sorption properties of pine shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wasim, Agha Arslan; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin

    2017-03-01

    Activated carbons produced from a variety of raw materials are normally selective towards a narrow range of pollutants present in wastewater. This study focuses on shifting the selectivity of activated carbon from inorganic to organic pollutants using activation temperature as a variable. The material produced from carbonization of pine shells substrate was activated at 250°C and 850°C. Both adsorbents were compared with commercial activated carbon for the sorption of lead, cadmium, methylene blue, methyl blue, xylenol orange, and crystal violet. It was observed that carbon activated at 250°C was selective for lead and cadmium whereas the one activated at 850°C was selective for the organic dyes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study revealed that AC850 had less surface functional groups as compared to AC250. Point of zero charge and point of zero salt effect showed that AC250 had acidic groups at its surface. Scanning electron microscopy depicted that increase in activation temperature resulted in an increase in pore size of activated carbon. Both AC250 and AC850 followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Temkin isotherm model was a best fit for empirical data obtained at equilibrium. The model also showed that sorption process for both AC250 and AC850 was physisorption.

  3. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines.

  4. Qualitative attributes and measurement properties of physical activity questionnaires: a checklist.

    PubMed

    Terwee, Caroline B; Mokkink, Lidwine B; van Poppel, Mireille N M; Chinapaw, Mai J M; van Mechelen, Willem; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2010-07-01

    The large number of available physical activity (PA) questionnaires makes it difficult to select the most appropriate questionnaire for a certain purpose. This choice is further hampered by incomplete reporting and unsatisfactory evaluation of the content and measurement properties of the questionnaires. We provide a checklist for appraising the qualitative attributes and measurement properties of PA questionnaires, as a tool for selecting the most appropriate PA questionnaire for a certain target population and purpose. The checklist is called the Quality Assessment of Physical Activity Questionnaire (QAPAQ). This review is one of a group of four reviews in this issue of Sports Medicine on the content and measurement properties of physical activity questionnaires. Part 1 of the checklist can be used to appraise the qualitative attributes of PA questionnaires, i.e. the construct to be measured by the questionnaire, the purpose and target population for which it was developed, the format, interpretability and ease of use. Part 2 of the checklist can be used to appraise the measurement properties of a PA questionnaire, i.e. reliability (parameters of measurement error and reliability coefficients), validity (face and content validity, criterion validity and construct validity) and responsiveness. The QAPAQ can be used to select the most appropriate PA questionnaire for a certain purpose, but it can also be used to design or report a study on measurement properties of PA questionnaires. Using such a checklist will contribute to improving the assessment, reporting and appraisal of the content and measurement properties of PA questionnaires.

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activity took place on the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report... the property, what specific information must an agency include in the title report? If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, the reporting agency must include information on the type...

  6. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J; Dong, He

    2015-12-07

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.

  7. RPMA (Real Property Maintenance Activities) Consolidation Activities in the National Capital Region. Volume 1. Main Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    planning the activities of future IPCs. Pre-IPC Activities Participating installations should have been directed through command channels to take the...the task with minimal impact on the existing A workload, and (2) ensure that the request for inforniation is formal and sent through channels . Planners...34... . .•.....¢,.. -...... ,- % * .*. ...... ....... .°. •.-.-.-. •..... 39. The District init inttei the cofl ract Ior <I’MA t i i on;, e i, ( I i HQDA through command channels . 40

  8. Properties of Ce-activated alkali-lutetium double phosphate scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wiśniewski, D.; Wojtowicz, A. J.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation properties of Ce-activated alkali-lutetium double phosphate single crystals that vary with the alkali ion type and activation level are summarized and compared. The materials investigated here have been identified as fast and efficient scintillators for the detection of x-ray and radiation, and in case of Li3Lu(PO4)2:Ce, for thermal neutron detection as well.

  9. Electron-density descriptors as predictors in quantitative structure--activity/property relationships and drug design.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Arabi, Alya A

    2011-06-01

    The use of electron density-based molecular descriptors in drug research, particularly in quantitative structure--activity relationships/quantitative structure--property relationships studies, is reviewed. The exposition starts by a discussion of molecular similarity and transferability in terms of the underlying electron density, which leads to a qualitative introduction to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The starting point of QTAIM is the topological analysis of the molecular electron-density distributions to extract atomic and bond properties that characterize every atom and bond in the molecule. These atomic and bond properties have considerable potential as bases for the construction of robust quantitative structure--activity/property relationships models as shown by selected examples in this review. QTAIM is applicable to the electron density calculated from quantum-chemical calculations and/or that obtained from ultra-high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments followed by nonspherical refinement. Atomic and bond properties are introduced followed by examples of application of each of these two families of descriptors. The review ends with a study whereby the molecular electrostatic potential, uniquely determined by the density, is used in conjunction with atomic properties to elucidate the reasons for the biological similarity of bioisosteres.

  10. Activation of Macrophages by Lipopolysaccharide for Assessing the Immunomodulatory Property of Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengwei; Chen, Zetao; Han, Pingping; Hu, Qingang; Xiao, Yin

    2017-03-24

    The design paradigm of biomaterials has been changed to ones with favorable immunomodulatory effects, indicating the importance of accurately evaluating the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. Among all the immune cells macrophages receive most attention, due to their plasticity and multiple roles in the materials and host interactions, and thereby become model immune cells for the evaluation of immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials in many studies. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a polysaccharide in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, elicit strong immune responses, which was often applied to activate macrophages, resulting in a proinflammatory M1 phenotype, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6. However, there is no consensus on how to apply macrophages and LPS to detect the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. The lack of scientific consideration of this issue has led to some inaccurate and insufficient conclusions on the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials, and inconsistences between different research groups. In this study, we carried out a systemic study to investigate the stimulatory effects of LPS with different times, doses, and conditions on the activation of macrophages. An experimental pathway was proposed accordingly for the activation of macrophages using LPS for assessing the immunomodulatory property of biomaterials.

  11. Influence of Copper Nanoparticles on the Physical-Chemical Properties of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity. PMID:24663333

  12. Influence of copper nanoparticles on the physical-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity.

  13. Activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by muramyl dipeptide requires specific intracellular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.; Fidler, I.J.

    1986-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism by which muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates antitumor cytotoxic properties in normal and interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..)-primed human peripheral blood monocytes. The structurally and functionally active MDP analog, nor-muramyl dipeptide (nor-MDP), and (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP were used as reference glycopeptides. Direct activation of normal, noncytotoxic monocytes by nor-MDP was enhanced its encapsulation within multilamellar vesicles (MLV). Studies with (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP revealed that the activation of monocytes by nor-MDP was not attributable to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor, nor did it result merely from the internalization by monocytes of glycopeptide. Subthreshold concentrations of nor-MDP could activate tumor cytotoxic properties in IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes. The intracellular interaction of (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP with IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes was specific in that intracellular levels of radiolabeled material could be displaced and recovered as intact molecules by unlabeled nor-MDP, but not by a biologically inactive MDP stereoisomer. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by MDP occurs subsequent to intracellular interaction with specific MDP receptors.

  14. Relation between molecular electrostatic potential, several electronic properties and antibacterial activity of some synthetic furane derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasterios, Melina; Avendaño, Milagros; Amaro, María Isabel; Infante, Wilson; Charris, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    The present work reports the preliminary evaluation of the antibacterial activity, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) determination and relevant electronic properties for their behavior as one electron acceptor, of a serial of compounds, active and inactive analogues, derived form furan, that were previously synthesized within our investigation group, with the purpose of establishing the existence of a valid correlation between their antibacterial activity and those electrostatic and electronic properties. According to the balance between the positive and negative areas in combination with the size of the MEP's area it was determined that these derivatives exhibit activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria or only against Gram-positive ones. We found no valid correlation between the single point energy, the energy associated to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO); LUMO's density, nucleophilic susceptibility, Log P and the dipole moment, with the experimental activity determined for them. This could be because this is an homologous serial where the properties derived from the electronic distribution just change between those molecules that have a nitro group (active) in contrast with those wherein this group is absent (inactive).

  15. Engineering support activities for the Apollo 17 Surface Electrical Properties Experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the engineering support activities which were required to ensure fulfillment of objectives specified for the Apollo 17 SEP (Surface Electrical Properties) Experiment. Attention is given to procedural steps involving verification of hardware acceptability to the astronauts, computer simulation of the experiment hardware, field trials, receiver antenna pattern measurements, and the qualification test program.

  16. Influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on phenolic composition, antioxidant activities, and viscoelastic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, water holding capacities, and viscoelastic properties was studied. Barley flour was jet-cooked without or with pH adjustment at 7, 9, or 11. Generally, the free phenolic content and antioxi...

  17. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Several court cases involving acquisition, use, and disposal of property by institutions of higher education are briefly summarized in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as municipal annexation of university property; repurchase of properties temporarily allocated to faculty members; implications of zoning laws and zoning board…

  18. Assessment in vitro of the active hemostatic properties of wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Jesty, Jolyon; Wieland, Martin; Niemiec, Jack

    2009-05-01

    The development of actively hemostatic wound dressings for use in severe trauma remains a major public-health and military goal. But, although some manufacturers claim that existing dressings activate platelets and/or blood coagulation, mechanistic evidence is often lacking. We describe a method for assessing the active hemostatic properties of dressings in vitro, entailing measurement of the flow of recalcified platelet-rich plasma (PRP) through a dressing sample. If the dressing is hemostatically active, flow is reduced. This flow is then compared with the flow-through of PRP in which both platelet and coagulation function are blocked with EDTA. The ratio of the two generates a hemostatic index that ranges from 1.0 (no active hemostasis) to 0 (highly potent). The method is applicable to porous or semiporous dressings, whether fabric, sponge, fleece, or granules. For an active dressing, the test is easily modified to differentiate between the contributions of platelet and coagulation to overall hemostasis. The method is illustrated for fabrics, over-the-counter gauze and sponge dressings, collagen-based sheets, and an absorbent granule dressing. One active collagen dressing is used to illustrate discrimination between platelet and coagulation function. The ability to assess hemostatic properties may significantly enhance the development of advanced active dressings.

  19. Physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides sequentially extracted from peony seed dreg.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sun, Yu-Han; Qu, Jie; Li, Ling; Prasad, Chandan; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2016-10-01

    The sequential extraction of peony seed dreg polysaccharides (PSDP) with hot buffer (HBSS), chelating agent (CHSS), dilute alkaline (DASS) and concentrated alkaline (CASS) yielded four different polysaccharide fractions. Based on their absorptions at 3600-3200cm(-1) and 1200-800cm(-1), these fractions were confirmed to be polysaccharides. The properties of four PSDPs displayed some slight differences. The CASS showed the highest peak temperature and endothermic enthalpy. The emulsifying activity and emulsifying stability of four PSDPs exhibited a dose-dependent pattern; HBSS showed the highest emulsifying activity, and CHSS displayed the longest emulsifying stability. The four PSDPs also exhibited wide variations in their antioxidant activities. For example, i) CASS showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power and ABTS radical scavenging activity; ii) HBSS exhibited the highest hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and iii) CHSS displayed the higher ferrous ions chelating ability than others.

  20. Activities of carboxylating enzymes in the CAM species Opuntia ficus-indica grown under current and elevated CO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Israel, A A; Nobel, P S

    1994-06-01

    Responses of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were determined along with net CO2 uptake rates for the Crassulacean acid metabolism species Opuntia ficus-indica growing in open-top chambers. During the spring 13 months after planting, total daily net CO2 uptake of basal and first-order daughter cladodes was 28% higher at 720 than at 360 μl CO2 l(-1). The enhancement, caused mainly by higher CO2 assimilation during the early part of the night, was also observed during late summer (5 months after planting) and the following winter. The activities of Rubisco and PEPCase measured in vitro were both lower at the elevated CO2 concentration, particularly under the more favorable growth conditions in the spring and late summer. Enzyme activity in second-order daughter cladodes increased with cladode age, becoming maximal at 6 to 10 days. The effect ofelevated CO2 on Rubisco and PEPCase activity declined with decreasing irradiance, especially for Rubisco. Throughout the 13-month observation period, O. ficus-indica thus showed increased CO2 uptake when the atmospheric CO2 concentration was doubled despite lower activities of both carboxylating enzymes.

  1. Interactions of C4 subtype metabolic activities and transport in maize are revealed through the characterization of DCT2 mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C4 photosynthesis is an elaborate set of metabolic pathways that utilize specialized anatomical and biochemical adaptations to concentrate CO2 around RuBisCO. The activities of the C4 pathways are coordinated between two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), and rely hea...

  2. Activity patterns in the Sahara Desert: an interpretation based on cross-sectional geometric properties.

    PubMed

    Nikita, Efthymia; Siew, Yun Ysi; Stock, Jay; Mattingly, David; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2011-11-01

    The Garamantian civilization flourished in modern Fezzan, Libya, between 900 BC and 500 AD, during which the aridification of the Sahara was well established. Study of the archaeological remains suggests a population successful at coping with a harsh environment of high and fluctuating temperatures and reduced water and food resources. This study explores the activity patterns of the Garamantes by means of cross-sectional geometric properties. Long bone diaphyseal shape and rigidity are compared between the Garamantes and populations from Egypt and Sudan, namely from the sites of Kerma, el-Badari, and Jebel Moya, to determine whether the Garamantian daily activities were more strenuous than those of other North African populations. Moreover, sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry are assessed at an intra- and inter-population level. The inter-population comparisons showed the Garamantes not to be more robust than the comparative populations, suggesting that the daily Garamantian activities necessary for survival in the Sahara Desert did not generally impose greater loads than those of other North African populations. Sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry in almost all geometric properties of the long limbs were comparatively low among the Garamantes. Only the lower limbs were significantly stronger among males than females, possibly due to higher levels of mobility associated with herding. The lack of systematic bilateral asymmetry in cross-sectional geometric properties may relate to the involvement of the population in bilaterally intensive activities or the lack of regular repetition of unilateral activities.

  3. Development of an active food packaging system with antioxidant properties based on green tea extract.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Gullo, Giuseppe; Bosetti, Osvaldo; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    A formula including green tea extract (GTE) was developed as an active food packaging material. This formula was moulded to obtain an independent component/device with antioxidant properties that could be easily coupled to industrial degassing valves for food packaging in special cases. GTE components (i.e., gallic acid, catechins and caffeine) were identified and quantified by HPLC-UV and UPLC-MS and migration/diffusion studies were carried out. Antioxidant properties of the formula alone and formula-valve were measured with static and dynamic methods. The results showed that the antioxidant capacity (scavenging of free radicals) of the new GTE formula was 40% higher than the non-active system (blank). This antioxidant activity increased in parallel with the GTE concentration. The functional properties of the industrial target valve (e.g., flexibility) were studied for different mixtures of GTE, and good results were found with 17% (w/w) of GTE. This new active formula can be an important addition for active packaging applications in the food packaging industry, with oxidative species-scavenging capacity, thus improving the safety and quality for the consumer and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  4. Anisotropic Elastography for Local Passive Properties and Active Contractility of Myocardium from Dynamic Heart Imaging Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Sun, L. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters. PMID:23165032

  5. Improving mechanical properties of polyethylene orthopaedic implants by high frequency cold plasma surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Vlad, Iulia E.; Dadarlat, Dorin N.; Anghel, Sorin D.

    2013-11-01

    Although a tremendous progress has been made in developing new methods and materials for manufacturing orthopaedic implants, the new technology still faces various problems. Polyethylene implants are relatively easy to manufacture and at lower cost compared to metallic or ceramic implants, but they present a fundamental problem: during usage and in time, due to their manufacturing technology, the material suffers from pitting and delamination which leads to crack propagation and finally to sudden fracture. Our studies and tests performed on polyethylene showed that, using cold plasma surface activation during the manufacturing process of the orthopaedic implants made from polyethylene can significantly increase their mechanical properties. The breaking tests revealed an increase of the tensile strength in the laminated polyethylene samples by a factor of 4 after plasma activation. "Aging" tests have been also performed to investigate how the cold plasma treated samples maintain their properties in time, after the surface activation process.

  6. Molecular and structural properties of polymer composites filled with activated charcoal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Liong, Syarifuddin; Bakri, Fahrul

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the molecular properties, structural properties, and chemical composition of composites by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, respectively. FTIR spectra shows absorption band of hydroxyl group (-OH), methyl group (-CH3) and aromatic group (C-C). The absorption band for aromatic group (C-C) shows the formation of carbonaceous in composites. XRF shows chemical composition of composites, which the main chemicals are SO3, Cl, and ZnO. The loss on ignition value (LOI) of activated charcoal indicates high carbonaceous matter. The crystallite size for diffraction pattern from hydrogel polymer is about 17 nm and for activated charcoal are about 19 nm. The crystallite size of the polymer is lower than that of activated charcoal, which make possible of the particle from filler in contact with each other to form continuous conducting polymer through polymer matrix.

  7. Anisotropic elastography for local passive properties and active contractility of myocardium from dynamic heart imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Ge; Sun, L Z

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters.

  8. Bioprotective properties of Dragon's blood resin: In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food preservation is basically done to preserve the natural characteristics and appearance of the food and to increase the shelf life of food. Food preservatives in use are natural, chemical and artificial. Keeping in mind the adverse effects of synthetic food preservatives, there is a need to identify natural food preservatives. The aims of this study were to evaluate in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Dragon's blood resin obtained from Dracaena cinnabari Balf f., with a view to develop safer food preservatives. Methods In this study, three solvents of varying polarity were used to extract and separate the medium and high polarity compounds from the non-polar compounds of the Dragon's blood resin. The extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against the food borne pathogens. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were assessed using DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging, FRAP, metal chelating and reducing power assays. Total phenolics, flavonoids and flavonols of extracts were also estimated using the standard methods. Results Phytochemical analysis of extracts revealed high phenolic content in CH2Cl2 extract of resin. Free radical scavenging of CH2Cl2 extract was found to be highest which is in good correlation with its total phenolic content. All test microorganisms were also inhibited by CH2Cl2 extract. Conclusions Our result provide evidence that CH2Cl2 extract is a potential source of natural antioxidant compounds and exhibited good inhibitory activity against various food borne pathogens. Thus, CH2Cl2 extract of Dragon's blood resin could be considered as possible source of food preservative. PMID:21329518

  9. Polyclonal antibodies for specific detection of tobacco host cell proteins can be efficiently generated following RuBisCO depletion and the removal of endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Zulfaquar Ahmad; Hellwig, Stephan; Drossard, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer; Buyel, Johannes Felix

    2016-03-01

    The production of biopharmaceutical proteins in plants requires efficient downstream processing steps that remove impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and adventitious endotoxins produced by bacteria during transient expression. We therefore strived to develop effective routines for endotoxin removal from plant extracts and the subsequent use of the extracts to generate antibodies detecting a broad set of HCPs. At first, we depleted the superabundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) for which PEG precipitation achieved the best results, preventing a dominant immune reaction against this protein. We found that a mixture of sera from rabbits immunized with pre-depleted or post-depleted extracts detected more HCPs than the individual sera used alone. We also developed a powerful endotoxin removal procedure using Polymyxin B for extracts from wild type plants or a combination of fiber-flow filtration and EndoTrap Blue for tobacco plants infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The antibodies we generated will be useful for quality and performance assessment in future process development and the methods we present can easily be transferred to other expression systems rendering them useful in the field of plant molecular farming.

  10. Chemical analysis of Greek pollen - Antioxidant, antimicrobial and proteasome activation properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is a bee-product known for its medical properties from ancient times. In our days is increasingly used as health food supplement and especially as a tonic primarily with appeal to the elderly to ameliorate the effects of ageing. In order to evaluate the chemical composition and the biological activity of Greek pollen which has never been studied before, one sample with identified botanical origin from sixteen different common plant taxa of Greece has been evaluated. Results Three different extracts of the studied sample of Greek pollen, have been tested, in whether could induce proteasome activities in human fibroblasts. The water extract was found to induce a highly proteasome activity, showing interesting antioxidant properties. Due to this activity the aqueous extract was further subjected to chemical analysis and seven flavonoids have been isolated and identified by modern spectral means. From the methanolic extract, sugars, lipid acids, phenolic acids and their esters have been also identified, which mainly participate to the biosynthetic pathway of pollen phenolics. The total phenolics were estimated with the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and the total antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH method while the extracts and the isolated compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity by the dilution technique. Conclusions The Greek pollen is rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids which indicate the observed free radical scavenging activity, the effects of pollen on human fibroblasts and the interesting antimicrobial profile. PMID:21699688

  11. Mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated fly ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, M; Bascarević, Z; Bradić, V

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the properties of geopolymer obtained by alkali-activation of fly ash (FA), i.e. the influence of characteristics of the representative group of FA (class F) from Serbia, as well as that of the nature and concentration of various activators on mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymers. Aqueous solutions of Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, NaOH+Na(2)CO(3), KOH and sodium silicate (water glass) of various concentrations were used as alkali activators. It was established that the nature and concentration of the activator was the most dominant parameter in the alkali-activation process. In respect of physical characteristics of FA, the key parameter was fineness. The geopolymer based on FA with the highest content of fine particles (<43 microm), showed the highest compressive strength in all cases. Regardless of FA characteristics, nature and concentration of the activator, the alkali-activation products were mainly amorphous. The formation of crystalline phases (zeolites) occurred in some cases, depending on the reaction conditions. The highest compressive strength was obtained using sodium silicate. Together with the increase of sodium silicate SiO(2)/Na(2)O mass ratio, the atomic Si/Al ratio in the reaction products was also increased. Under the experimental conditions of this investigation, high strength was directly related to the high Si/Al ratio.

  12. Dynamic changes in interneuron morpho-physiological properties mark the maturation of hippocampal network activity

    PubMed Central

    Allene, C.; Picardo, M. A.; Becq, H.; Miyoshi, G.; Fishell, G.; Cossart, R.

    2012-01-01

    During early postnatal development, neuronal networks successively produce various forms of spontaneous patterned activity that provide key signals for circuit maturation. Initially, in both rodent hippocampus and neocortex, coordinated activity emerges in the form of Synchronous Plateau Assemblies (SPAs) that are initiated by sparse groups of gap-junction coupled oscillating neurons. Subsequently, SPAs are replaced by synapse-driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs). Whether these sequential changes in mechanistically distinct network activities correlate with modifications in single-cell properties is unknown. To understand this, we have studied the morpho-physiological fate of single SPA-cells as a function of development. We focused on CA3 GABAergic interneurons, which are centrally involved in generating GDPs in the hippocampus. As the network matures, GABAergic neurons are engaged more in GDPs and less in SPAs. Using inducible genetic fate mapping, we show that the individual involvement of GABAergic neurons in SPAs is correlated to their temporal origin. In addition, we demonstrate that the SPA to GDP transition is paralleled by a remarkable maturation in the morpho-physiological properties of GABAergic neurons. Compared to those involved in GDPs, interneurons participating in SPAs possess immature intrinsic properties, receive synaptic inputs spanning a wide amplitude range, and display large somata as well as membrane protrusions. Thus, a developmental switch in the morpho-physiological properties of GABAergic interneurons as they progress from SPA to GDPs marks the emergence of synapse-driven network oscillations. PMID:22573691

  13. Proteolytic properties of single-chain factor XII: a mechanism for triggering contact activation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan; Matafonov, Anton; Sun, Mao-Fu; Cheng, Qiufang; Dickeson, S Kent; Verhamme, Ingrid M; Emsley, Jonas; Gailani, David

    2017-03-16

    When blood is exposed to variety of artificial surfaces and biologic substances, the plasma proteins factor XII (FXII) and prekallikrein undergo reciprocal proteolytic conversion to the proteases αFXIIa and α-kallikrein by a process called contact activation. These enzymes contribute to host-defense responses including coagulation, inflammation, and fibrinolysis. The initiating event in contact activation is debated. To test the hypothesis that single-chain FXII expresses activity that could initiate contact activation, we prepared human FXII variants lacking the Arg353 cleavage site required for conversion to αFXIIa (FXII-R353A), or lacking the 3 known cleavage sites at Arg334, Arg343, and Arg353 (FXII-T, for "triple" mutant), and compared their properties to wild-type αFXIIa. In the absence of a surface, FXII-R353A and FXII-T activate prekallikrein and cleave the tripeptide S-2302, demonstrating proteolytic activity. The activity is several orders of magnitude weaker than that of αFXIIa. Polyphosphate, an inducer of contact activation, enhances PK activation by FXII-T, and facilitates FXII-T activation of FXII and FXI. In plasma, FXII-T and FXII-R353A, but not FXII lacking the active site serine residue (FXII-S544A), shortened the clotting time of FXII-deficient plasma and enhanced thrombin generation in a surface-dependent manner. The effect was not as strong as for wild-type FXII. Our results support a model for induction of contact activation in which activity intrinsic to single-chain FXII initiates αFXIIa and α-kallikrein formation on a surface. αFXIIa, with support from α-kallikrein, subsequently accelerates contact activation and is responsible for the full procoagulant activity of FXII.

  14. Low-temperature irradiation effects on tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    2000-12-01

    Tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steel, F82H irradiated up to 0.8 dpa at low temperature below 300°C were investigated. The helium effect on these properties was also investigated using the boron isotope doping method. Neutron irradiation increased yield stress accompanied with ductility loss, and it also shifted the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) from -50°C to 0°C. Boron-doped F82H showed larger degradation in DBTT and ductility than boron-free F82H, while they had the same yield stress before and after irradiation.

  15. Electrochemical and fluorescence properties of SnO2 thin films and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J.; Mohanraj, K.; Sivakumar, G.; Umamaheswari, S.

    2015-05-01

    Nanocrystalline SnO2 thin films were deposited by a simple and inexpensive sol-gel spin coating technique and the films were annealed at two different temperatures (350 °C and 450 °C). Structural, vibrational, optical and electrochemical properties of the films were analyzed using XRD, FTIR, UV-Visible, fluorescence and cyclic voltammetry techniques respectively and their results are discussed in detail. The antimicrobial properties of SnO2 thin films were investigated by agar agar method and the results confirm the antibacterial activity of SnO2 against Escherichia coli and Bacillus.

  16. Electrochemical and fluorescence properties of SnO2 thin films and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Henry, J; Mohanraj, K; Sivakumar, G; Umamaheswari, S

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline SnO2 thin films were deposited by a simple and inexpensive sol-gel spin coating technique and the films were annealed at two different temperatures (350°C and 450°C). Structural, vibrational, optical and electrochemical properties of the films were analyzed using XRD, FTIR, UV-Visible, fluorescence and cyclic voltammetry techniques respectively and their results are discussed in detail. The antimicrobial properties of SnO2 thin films were investigated by agar agar method and the results confirm the antibacterial activity of SnO2 against Escherichiacoli and Bacillus.

  17. Influence of flocculation and settling properties of activated sludge in relation to secondary settler performance.

    PubMed

    Wilén, B M; Onuki, M; Hermansson, M; Lumley, D; Mino, T

    2006-01-01

    Floc characteristics were studied at a full scale activated sludge treatment plant with a unique process solution incorporating pre-denitrification with post-nitrification in nitrifying trickling filters. Since greater nitrogen removal is achieved when more secondary settled wastewater is recirculated to the trickling filters, the secondary settlers are always operated close to their maximal capacity. The flocculation and settling properties are therefore crucial and have an effect on the overall plant performance. Since the plant is operated at a short sludge age, these properties change quickly, resulting in variable maximal secondary settler capacity. The dynamics in floc structure and microbial community composition were studied and correlated to the secondary settler performance. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used to investigate the microbial community structure and their spatial distribution. The floc structure could to some extent be related to the flocculation and settling properties of the sludge. Even small differences had an influence suggesting that colloidal properties also play a significant role in determining the floc properties. No correlation between microbial community composition and settling properties could be established with the group-specific probes investigated.

  18. Piezoelectric properties of the new generation active matrix hybrid (micro-nano) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parali, Levent; Şabikoğlu, İsrafil; Kurbanov, Mirza A.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric composite structure is obtained by addition of nano-sized BaTiO3, SiO2 to the micro-sized PZT and polymers composition. Although the PZT material itself has excellent piezoelectric properties, PZT-based composite variety is limited. Piezoelectric properties of PZT materials can be varied with an acceptor or a donor added to the material. In addition, varieties of PZT-based sensors can be increased with doping polymers which have physical-mechanical, electrophysical, thermophysical and photoelectrical properties. The active matrix hybrid structure occurs when bringing together the unique piezoelectric properties of micro-sized PZT with electron trapping properties of nano-sized insulators (BaTiO3 or SiO2), and their piezoelectric, mechanic and electromechanic properties significantly change. In this study, the relationship between the piezoelectric constant and the coupling factor values of microstructure (PZT-PVDF) and the hybrid structure (PZT-PVDF-BaTiO3) composite are compared. The d33 value and the coupling factor of the hybrid structure have shown an average of 54 and 62% increase according to microstructure composite, respectively. In addition, the d33 value and the coupling factor of the hybrid structure (PZT-HDPE-SiO2) have exhibited about 68 and 52% increase according to microstructure composite (PZT-HDPE), respectively.

  19. Granular activated carbons from broiler manure: physical, chemical and adsorptive properties.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabel M; Marshall, Wayne E

    2005-04-01

    Broiler manure produced at large concentrated facilities poses risks to the quality of water and public health. This study utilizes broiler litter and cake as source materials for granular activated carbon production and optimizes conditions for their production. Pelletized manure samples were pyrolyzed at 700 degrees C for 1 h followed by activation in an inert atmosphere under steam at different water flow rates, for a period ranging from 15 to 75 min. Carbon physical and adsorptive properties were dependent on activation time and quantity of steam used as activant, yields varied from 18% to 28%, surface area varied from 253 to 548 m2/g and copper ion adsorption varied from 0.13 to 1.92 mmol Cu2+/g carbon. Best overall performing carbons were steam activated for 45 min at 3 ml/min. Comparative studies with commercial carbons revealed the broiler cake-based carbon as having the highest copper ion efficiency.

  20. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J.; Dong, He

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would

  1. Influence of the activator in an acrylic bone cement on an array of cement properties.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gladius; Xu, Jie; Deb, Sanjukta; Lasa, Blanca Vázquez; Román, Julio San

    2007-06-01

    In all but one of the acrylic bone cement brands used in cemented arthroplasties, N,N-dimethyl-4-toluidine (DMPT) serves as the activator of the polymerization reaction. However, many concerns have been raised about this activator, all related to its toxicity. Thus, various workers have assessed a number of alternative activators, with two examples being N,N-dimethylamino-4-benzyl laurate (DMAL) and N,N-dimethylamino-4-benzyl oleate (DMAO). The results of limited characterization of cements that contain DMAL or DMAO have been reported in the literature. The present work is a comprehensive comparison of cements that contain one of these three activators, in which the values of a large array of their properties were determined. These properties range from the setting time and maximum exotherm temperature of the curing cement to the variation of the loss elastic modulus of the cured cement with frequency of the applied indenting force in dynamic nanoindentation tests. The present results, taken in conjunction with those presented in previous reports by the present authors and co-workers on other properties of these cements, indicate that both DMAL and DMPT are suitable alternatives to DMPT.

  2. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  3. Insights on how the activity of an endoglucanase is affected by physical properties of insoluble celluloses.

    PubMed

    Bragatto, Juliano; Segato, Fernando; Cota, Junio; Mello, Danilo B; Oliveira, Marcelo M; Buckeridge, Marcos S; Squina, Fabio M; Driemeier, Carlos

    2012-05-31

    Cellulose physical properties like crystallinity, porosity, and particle size are known to influence cellulase activity, but knowledge is still insufficient for activity prediction from such measurable substrate characteristics. With the aim of illuminating enzyme-substrate relationships, this work evaluates a purified hyperthermophilic endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (from Pyrococcus furiosus) acting on 13 celluloses characterized for crystallinity and crystal width (by X-ray diffraction), wet porosity (by thermoporometry), and particle size (by light scattering). Activities are analyzed by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation, which is justified by low enzyme-substrate affinity. Michaelis-Menten coefficients K(m) and k(cat) are reinterpreted in the context of heterogeneous cellulose hydrolysis. For a set of as-received and milled microcrystalline celluloses, activity is successfully described as a function of accessible substrate concentration, with accessibility proportional to K(m)(-1). Accessibility contribution from external particle areas, pore areas, and crystalline packing are discriminated to have comparable magnitudes, implying that activity prediction demands all these substrate properties to be considered. Results additionally suggest that looser crystalline packing increases the lengths of released cello-oligomers as well as the maximum endoglucanase specific activity (k(cat)).

  4. Biochemical and functional studies of the activation of tumoricidal properties in macrophages by muramyl peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The systemic injection of muramyl dipeptides (MDP) encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles (liposomes, MLV) leads to the activation of tumoricidal properties in mononuclear phagocytes and the eradication of established lymph node and pulmonary metastases. These studies were undertaken to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which MDP activates macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and to understand its potential for the therapy of disseminated cancer. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenously administered free (unencapsulated) and MLV-encapsulated (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP and its (/sup 3/H)-labeled lipophilic derivative, muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (MTP-PE) in mice demonstrated unique patterns of circulatory clearance, organ distribution, metabolism, and excretion. The in vitro activation of tumoricial properties in normal and gamma-interferon primed, noncytotoxic human blood monocytes by nor-MDP could be enhanced by its lipophilic derivatization (MTP-PE) or encapsulation within MLV. Studies using (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP and (/sup 3/H)MTP-PE revealed that the activation of monocytes by muramyl peptides could not be described as resulting from an interaction with MDP cell surface receptors nor from a nonspecific consequence of glycopeptide internalization but rather from a specific intracellular event. Efficient delivery of MDP to macrophages in vivo can be obtained via encapsulation in liposomes, MDP activated macrophages destroy tumor cells without apparent selectivity, and the systemic activation of macrophages by MDP has great potential for enhancing host defense against cancer.

  5. Antioxidant Activity, Antitumor Effect, and Antiaging Property of Proanthocyanidins Extracted from Kunlun Chrysanthemum Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Siqun; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity, antitumor effect, and antiaging property of proanthocyanidins from Kunlun Chrysanthemum flowers (PKCF) grown in Xinjiang. In vitro antioxidant experiments results showed that the total antioxidant activity and the scavenging capacity of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) radicals increased in a concentration-dependent manner and were stronger than those of vitamin C. To investigate the antioxidant activity of PKCF in vivo, we used serum, liver, and kidney from mouse for the measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC). Results indicated that PKCF had antioxidative effect in vivo which significantly improved the activity of SOD and T-AOC and decreased MDA content. To investigate the antitumor activity of PKCF, we used H22 cells, HeLa cells, and Eca-109 cells with Vero cells as control. Inhibition ratio and IC50 values were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay; PKCF showed great inhibitory activity on H22 cells and HeLa cells. We also used fruit flies as a model for analyzing the anti-aging property of PKCF. Results showed that PKCF has antiaging effect on Drosophila. Results of the present study demonstrated that PKCF could be a promising agent that may find applications in health care, medicine, and cosmetics. PMID:25628774

  6. Biological and surface-active properties of double-chain cationic amino acid-based surfactants.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wiesław; Łukasiak, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    Cationic amino acid-based surfactants were synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis and terminal acylation of their α and ε positions with saturated fatty acids. Five new lipopeptides, N-α-acyl-N-ε-acyl lysine analogues, were obtained. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal (fungicidal) concentration were determined on reference strains of bacteria and fungi to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the lipopeptides. Toxicity to eukaryotic cells was examined via determination of the haemolytic activities. The surface-active properties of these compounds were evaluated by measuring the surface tension and formation of micelles as a function of concentration in aqueous solution. The cationic surfactants demonstrated diverse antibacterial activities dependent on the length of the fatty acid chain. Gram-negative bacteria and fungi showed a higher resistance than Gram-positive bacterial strains. It was found that the haemolytic activities were also chain length-dependent values. The surface-active properties showed a linear correlation between the alkyl chain length and the critical micelle concentration.

  7. In vitro antimicrobial activity on clinical microbial strains and antioxidant properties of Artemisia parviflora

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisia parviflora leaf extracts were evaluated for potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Antimicrobial susceptibility assay was performed against ten standard reference bacterial strains. Antioxidant activity was analyzed using the ferric thiocyanate and 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content were compared. Phytochemical analyses were performed to identify the major bioactive constitution of the plant extract. Results Hexane, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of A. parviflora leaves exhibited good activity against the microorganisms tested. The n-hexane extract of A. parviflora showed high inhibition of the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri. Methanol extract showed strong radical scavenging and antioxidant activity, other extracts showed moderate antioxidant activity. The major derivatives present in the extracts are of terpenes, steroids, phenols, flavonoids, tannins and volatile oil. Conclusions The results obtained with n-hexane extract were particularly significant as it strongly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa, E. coli and S. flexneri. The major constituent of the n-hexane extract was identified as terpenes. Strong antioxidant activity could be observed with all the individual extracts. The antimicrobial and antioxidant property of the extracts were attributed to the secondary metabolites, terpenes and phenolic compounds present in A. parviflora and could be of considerable interest in the development of new drugs. PMID:23171441

  8. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Steven M.; Piele, Philip K.

    This chapter reviews 1982 cases related to school property. Cases involving citizen efforts to overturn school board decisions to close schools dominate the property chapter, and courts continue to uphold school board authority to close schools, transfer students, and sell or lease the buildings. Ten cases involving detachment and attachment of…

  9. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.; Zeller, Trisha A.

    A number of cases related to property issues involving institutions of higher education are examined in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as funding for property and equipment acquisition; opposition to building construction or demolition; zoning issues; building construction and equipment contracts; and lease agreements. Current…

  10. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    This chapter deals with 1981 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving the detachment and attachment of land continue to dominate the property chapter with 11 cases reported, the same number summarized in last year's chapter. One case involving school board referenda raised the interesting question of whether or not a state could…

  11. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Chapter 7 of a book on school law, this chapter deals with 1979 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving taxpayer attempts to prevent the construction of school buildings dominate this year's property chapter, as they did last year's. Yet, paradoxically, there is also a significant increase in cases in which taxpayers tried to…

  12. Improvement of High Temperature Mechanical Property by Precipitation Hardening of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sakasegawa, H.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Tamura, M.; Khono, Y.; Kimura, A.

    2003-07-15

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels (RAFs) are leading candidates for blanket and first wall structures of the D-T fusion reactors. Recently, in order to achieve better efficiency of energy conversion by using RAFs in advanced blanket systems, improvement of high temperature mechanical property of RAFs is desired. In this work, experimental alloys, FETA-series (Fe-Ta-C or N) steels, were prepared to observe precipitation hardening mechanism by MX-type particles at elevated temperatures in detail. According to the results, innovative improvement of creep property can be achieved by applying of precipitation hardening by very fine TaX (X=C, N) particles. With increasing tantalum content, finer dispersion of MX-type particles, dislocation structures and sub-grain structures were observed by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). These fine structures contributed to the improvement of creep property.

  13. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  14. Entrapped elemental selenium nanoparticles affect physicochemical properties of selenium fed activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Seder-Colomina, Marina; Jordan, Norbert; Dessi, Paolo; Cosmidis, Julie; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Weiss, Stephan; Farges, François; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-09-15

    Selenite containing wastewaters can be treated in activated sludge systems, where the total selenium is removed from the wastewater by the formation of elemental selenium nanoparticles, which are trapped in the biomass. No studies have been carried out so far on the characterization of selenium fed activated sludge flocs, which is important for the development of this novel selenium removal process. This study showed that more than 94% of the trapped selenium in activated sludge flocs is in the form of elemental selenium, both as amorphous/monoclinic selenium nanospheres and trigonal selenium nanorods. The entrapment of the elemental selenium nanoparticles in the selenium fed activated sludge flocs leads to faster settling rates, higher hydrophilicity and poorer dewaterability compared to the control activated sludge (i.e., not fed with selenite). The selenium fed activated sludge showed a less negative surface charge density as compared to the control activated sludge. The presence of trapped elemental selenium nanoparticles further affected the spatial distribution of Al and Mg in the activated sludge flocs. This study demonstrated that the formation and subsequent trapping of elemental selenium nanoparticles in the activated sludge flocs affects their physicochemical properties.

  15. The photosynthetic properties of rice leaves treated with low temperature and high irradiance.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Naoki; Makino, Amane; Yokota, Satoshi; Mae, Tadahiko

    2005-08-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves were examined after treatment with low temperature (15 degrees C) and high irradiance (1,500 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1)). Decreases in quantum efficiencies in PSII (PhiPSII) and PSI (PhiPSI) and in the rate of CO2 assimilation were observed with a decrease in the maximal quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) by simultaneous measurements of Chl fluorescence, P700+ absorbance and gas exchange. The decreases in PhiPSII were most highly correlated with those in CO2 assimilation. Although the initial (the activity immediately measured upon extraction) and total (the activity following pre-incubation with CO2 and Mg2+) activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) decreased slightly, the maximal activity (the activity following treatment with SO4(2-)) of Rubisco remained almost constant. These results indicate that the decrease in CO2 assimilation rate with the decreasing F(v)/F(m) was not caused by a decrease in Rubisco activity but rather by a decrease in RuBP regeneration capacity which resulted from the decrease in the rate of the linear electron transport. On the other hand, the decrease in PhiPSI was very small and the ratio of PhiPSI to PhiPSII increased. The de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments also increased. Thus, the cyclic electron transport around PSI occurred in photoinhibited leaves.

  16. Active Antifogging Property of Monolayer SiO2 Film with Bioinspired Multiscale Hierarchical Pagoda Structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiwu; Mu, Zhengzhi; Li, Bo; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2016-09-27

    Antifogging surfaces with hydrophilic or even superhydrophilic wetting behavior have received significant attention due to their ability to reduce light scattering by film-like condensation. However, a major challenge remains in achieving high-speed antifogging performance and revealing the hydrophilic-based antifogging mechanism of glass or other transparent materials under aggressive fogging conditions. Herein, with inspiration from the fog-free property of the typical Morpho menelaus terrestris butterfly (Butler, 1866) wing scales, a monolayer SiO2 film with multiscale hierarchical pagoda structures (MHPSs) based on glass substrate was designed and fabricated using an optimized biotemplate-assisted wet chemical method without any post-treatments. The biomimetic monolayer film (BMF) composed of nanoscale SiO2 3D networks displayed excellent antifogging properties, which is superior to that of the glass substrate itself. The MHPS-based BMF even kept high transmittance (∼95%) under aggressive fog conditions, and it almost instantaneously recovered to a fog-free state (<5 s). Moreover, the underlying active antifogging strategy gathering initial fog capture and final antifog together was revealed. The fogdrops spontaneously adhered on the BMF surface and rapidly spread along the MHPSs in an anisotropic way, which made the fogdrops evaporate instantaneously to attain an initial fog-free state, leading to an efficient active antifogging performance. These properties mainly benefit from the synergistic effect of both hydrophilic chemical compositions (nanoscale SiO2) and physical structures (biomimetic MHPSs) of the BMF. High-speed active antifogging performance of the glass materials enabled the retention of a high transmittance property even in humid conditions, heralding reliable optical performance in outdoor practical applications, especially in aggressive foggy environments. More importantly, the investigations in this work offer a promising way to handily

  17. UV-shielding property, photocatalytic activity and photocytotoxicity of ceria colloid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zholobak, N M; Ivanov, V K; Shcherbakov, A B; Shaporev, A S; Polezhaeva, O S; Baranchikov, A Ye; Spivak, N Ya; Tretyakov, Yu D

    2011-01-10

    UV-shielding property, photocatalytic activity and cytotoxicity (including photocytotoxicity) of citrate-stabilized ceria colloid solutions were studied. It was established that UV-shielding property (namely, the sun protection factor, the critical absorption wavelength and the UVA/UVB-ratio) of ceria nanoparticles are as good as those of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. It was further demonstrated that ceria nanoparticles possesses substantially lower photocatalytic activity, which additionally decreases upon decrease in ceria particle size. It was found that colloid ceria solutions are non-toxic to mouse fibroblasts (L929) and fibroblast-like cells of African Green monkey (VERO). Moreover, ceria nanoparticles are capable to protect these cells from UV-irradiation-induced damage. It was proposed that nanocrystalline ceria could be used not only as UV-blocking material, but also as prophylactic and even therapeutic compound for sunburns treatment.

  18. Micromechanical analysis of constitutive properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kenny; Dai, Qingli

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be very important in the application of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. The PSF is fabricated by coating the piezoceramic onto the silicon carbide core fiber with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process to overcome the fragile nature of the monolithic piezoelectric materials. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The PSF laminate transducer has electrical inputs/outputs that are delivered through a separate etched interdigital electrode layer. This study analyzed the electromechanical properties with the generalized dilute scheme for active PSF composite laminate by considering multiinclusions. The well-known Mori-Tanaka approach was used to evaluate the concentration tensor in the multi-inclusion micromechanics model. To accurately predict the transverse properties, the extended role of mixtures were applied by considering the inclusions' geometry and shape. The micromechanical finite element modeling was also conducted with representative volume element (RVE) to compare with the micromechanics analysis on the electromechanical properties. The micromechanics analysis and finite element micromechanical modeling were conducted with varied fiber geometry dimensions and volume fractions. These comparison studies indicate the combined micromechanics models with the generalized dilute scheme can effectively predict the electro-elastic properties of multi-inclusion PSF composites.

  19. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O; Nielsen, R H; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2015-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners who were either physically active (HAY) or inactive (LAY) in young age. Twelve men in HAY group and eight men in LAY group participated. Structural, functional, and biochemical properties of Achilles tendon were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound video recordings, mechanical tests, and tendon biopsies, respectively. There was no difference between the groups with respect to tendon cross-sectional area or tendon free length. There was no difference between the groups with respect to maximal force or mechanical properties. The collagen content, enzymatic and nonenzymatic cross-link density did not differ between the groups, nor did collagen fibril density, diameter, and area. There was a correlation between age and pentosidine/collagen within the groups [(HAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.47) and (LAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.52)]. The data suggest that high or low activity during youth did not appreciably influence the mechanical, structural, or biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in adult long distance runners.

  20. Cellular Interaction and Toxicity Depends on Physiochemical Properties and Surface Modification of Redox Active Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dowding, Janet M.; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X. T.; Sayle, Dean C.; von Kalm, Laurence; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 NPs (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exists regarding the toxicity of CNP. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CeO2 NPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physiochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer H2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2) or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physiochemical properties of these CeO2 NPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 were readily taken into endothelial cells and their aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability (MTT) at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in the ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CeO2 NPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs, and may suggest ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications. PMID:23668322

  1. Methanolic extracts of Withania somnifera leaves, fruits and roots possess antioxidant properties and antibacterial activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Withania somnifera, also known as ashwagandha, is an important herb in ayurvedic and indigenous medical systems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of an 80% aqueous methanolic extract of W. somnifera roots (WSREt), fruits (WSFEt) and leaves (WSLEt). Methods Several assays were performed to determine the antioxidant properties of this herb including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), ferrous chelation and inhibition of β-carotene bleaching. Results The values for DPPH, FRAP, ferrous chelation and inhibition of β carotene bleaching for the three types of extracts ranged from 101.73-801.93 μg/ml, 2.26-3.29 mM Fe/kg, 0.22-0.65 mg/ml and 69.87-79.67%, respectively, indicating that W. somnifera, particularly the leaves, possesses significant antioxidant properties. The mean ascorbic acid content was 20.60-62.60 mg/100 g, and the mean anthocyanin content was 2.86-12.50 mg/100 g. Antibacterial activities were measured using the agar well diffusion method and five pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Citrobacter freundii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The leaf extracts displayed the highest activity against S. typhi (32.00 ± 0.75 mm zone of inhibition), whereas the lowest activity was against K. pneumoniae (19.00 ± 1.48 mm zone of inhibition). The lowest minimum inhibitory concentration value was 6.25 mg/ml, which was against S. typhi, followed by 12.5 mg/ml against E. coli. Conclusion In addition to its antioxidant properties, W. somnifera exhibited significant antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly S. typhi. PMID:23039061

  2. Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dowding, Janet M; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C; von Kalm, Laurence; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2013-06-25

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exist regarding the toxicity of CNPs. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CNPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physicochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer; H2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2), or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physicochemical properties of these CNPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 was readily taken into endothelial cells and the aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CNPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest that the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs and may suggest that ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications.

  3. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements.

  4. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    PubMed

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  5. The effect of the neural activity on topological properties of growing neural networks.

    PubMed

    Gafarov, F M; Gafarova, V R

    2016-09-01

    The connectivity structure in cortical networks defines how information is transmitted and processed, and it is a source of the complex spatiotemporal patterns of network's development, and the process of creation and deletion of connections is continuous in the whole life of the organism. In this paper, we study how neural activity influences the growth process in neural networks. By using a two-dimensional activity-dependent growth model we demonstrated the neural network growth process from disconnected neurons to fully connected networks. For making quantitative investigation of the network's activity influence on its topological properties we compared it with the random growth network not depending on network's activity. By using the random graphs theory methods for the analysis of the network's connections structure it is shown that the growth in neural networks results in the formation of a well-known "small-world" network.

  6. Physical Properties, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films Containing Carvacrol and Pomegranate Peel Extract.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Lv, Hua; Yang, Bingjie; Chen, Xiaoe; Sun, Haiyan

    2015-06-15

    Chitosan-based active films were developed by incorporation of carvacrol (10 g/L), pomegranate peel extract (PPE, 10 g/L) and carvacrol + PPE (10 g/L of each) and their physical, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties were investigated. Incorporation of carvacrol and carvacrol + PPE into the films significantly decreased the water vapor permeability, tensile strength and percentage of elongation at break. Incorporation of carvacrol, PPE and carvacrol + PPE into the films decreased the transparency, but significantly increased the total phenol content and antioxidant activity. All the films, with the exception of PPE-incorporated film, exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus of the film incorporated with carvacrol + PPE was moderately higher than that incorporated with carvacrol or PPE alone, suggesting a synergistic action between carvacrol and PPE.

  7. HELIOSEISMOLOGY OF PRE-EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS. II. AVERAGE EMERGENCE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C.; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.; Javornik, B.

    2013-01-10

    We report on average subsurface properties of pre-emerging active regions as compared to areas where no active region emergence was detected. Helioseismic holography is applied to samples of the two populations (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, which were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Leka et al. We find that there are statistically significant signatures (i.e., difference in the means of more than a few standard errors) in the average subsurface flows and the apparent wave speed that precede the formation of an active region. The measurements here rule out spatially extended flows of more than about 15 m s{sup -1} in the top 20 Mm below the photosphere over the course of the day preceding the start of visible emergence. These measurements place strong constraints on models of active region formation.

  8. Catalytic activity of metallic nanoisland coatings. The influence of size effects on the recombination properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilina, O. A.; Berzhansky, V. N.; Tomilin, S. V.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    The results of investigations of the quantum-size effects influence on selective properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts are presents. As etalon exothermic reaction was used the reaction of atomic hydrogen recombination. The nanostructured Pd and Pt films on Teflon substrate were used as a samples of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. It was shown that for nanoparticles with various sizes the catalytic activity has the periodic dependence. It has been found that for certain sizes of nanoparticles their catalytic activity is less than that of Teflon substrate.

  9. Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients: Prediction of Physical-Chemical Properties from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzano, Loredana

    2013-03-01

    Polymorphism in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) plays a crucial role both for medical and intellectual property concerns but despite ongoing efforts, experimental and computational investigations of the existence and the physical-chemical properties of the same compound in different forms is still an open question.While comparison between computed and experimental values for properties derived from differences between states is often promising (such as bulk modulus), results are disappointing for absolute values (such as density). Quantum mechanical computational methods describe the systems at 0K, experimentally properties are often evaluated at room temperature. Therefore it is not surprising that results determined from first principles dramatically differ from those obtained experimentally. By applying a quantum mechanical periodic approach that takes into account long range London dispersion forces fitted for solid materials, and by imposing different cell volumes corresponding to different thermodynamic conditions, we show how results from calculations at 0K (structures, vibrational spectra, elastic constants) may be compared to experimental values at higher temperatures, helping to foster a stronger linkage between computational and experimental work on systems such as APIs. Where experimental results are not available, our work represents an innovative approach in addressing the properties of APIs. Our results can also serve as foundation for the developing of new force fields to be adopted within a multi-scale computational approach.

  10. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate.

  11. Analysis of structure and properties of active carbons and their copolymeric precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Gawdzik, B.; Puziy, A. M.; Poddubnaya, O. I.

    2010-06-01

    The relations between chemical structures of BM-DVB copolymers obtained with various monomer molar ratios and their carbonization products were studied. Three porous copolymers 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1 of BM to DVB were the starting materials for preparation of active carbons. Two activation agents were employed: air and phosphoric acid. The carbonization process was performed in the same way in these two cases. To characterize the obtained materials FTIR spectroscopy, thermal and elemental analyses were applied. Porous structure parameters were obtained by means of nitrogen sorption. The results proved that differences in the molar ratio of monomers used in the syntheses of polymeric precursor play a key role for structure and properties of copolymers but have rather small influence on properties of the obtained carbons. Preliminary treatment is more effective during the activation process. The carbons obtained by activation with phosphoric acid are microporous and have well developed porous structures. The air activated carbons are mesoporous with specific surface areas similar to those of polymeric precursors.

  12. Co-Crystals: A Novel Approach to Modify Physicochemical Properties of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, A. V.; Shete, A. S.; Dabke, A. P.; Kulkarni, P. V.; Sakhare, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Crystal form can be crucial to the performance of a dosage form. This is especially true for compounds that have intrinsic barriers to drug delivery, such as low aqueous solubility, slow dissolution in gastrointestinal media, low permeability and first-pass metabolism. The nature of the physical form and formulation tends to exhibit the greatest effect on bioavailability parameters of water insoluble compounds that need to be given orally in high doses. An alternative approach available for the enhancement of drug solubility, dissolution and bioavailability is through the application of crystal engineering of co-crystals. The physicochemical properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredients and the bulk material properties can be modified, whilst maintaining the intrinsic activity of the drug molecule. This article covers the advantages of co-crystals over salts, solvates (hydrates), solid dispersions and polymorphs, mechanism of formation of co-crystals, methods of preparation of co-crystals and application of co-crystals to modify physicochemical characteristics of active pharmaceutical ingredients along with the case studies. The intellectual property implications of creating co-crystals are also highly relevant. PMID:20502540

  13. Active control of the optical properties of nanoscale coatings using 'smart' nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortie, Michael B.; Barnett, Michael; Ford, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    Coatings that can self-modulate their optical properties as a function of an external stimulus are of significant technological interest. In this regard, the possibilities for thermo- or electrochromic materials such as VO II and WO 3 are already comparatively well-known. Here, however, we explore a new kind of 'smart' coating, based on the active control of a plasmon resonance in nanoparticles. One possible system is based on the modulation of the plasmon resonance of a precious metal nanorod or nanosphere by an active dielectric shell. The active dielectric undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition on increase of temperature which modulates the plasmon resonance of the underlying precious metal nanoparticle, thereby changing the wavelength at which its optical extinction is maximum. In the case of nanorods, the absorption maximum of the longitudinal plasmon is particularly sensitive to the aspect ratio of the nanoparticle and the dielectric properties of the environment, and may be readily tuned across the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. In addition, nanoparticles of certain thermochromic dielectrics, such as VO II, are expected to have a plasmon resonance of their own which can be switched on or off by control of the temperature. We consider some of the possibilities, using both the discrete dipole approximation and the exact analytical solution due to Mie to calculate the optical properties.

  14. Enzymatic properties of immobilized Alcaligenes faecalis cells with cell-associated beta-glucosidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatly, M.A.; Phillips, C.R.

    1984-06-01

    Enzymatic properties of Alcaligenes faecalis cells immobilized in polyacrylamide were characterized and compared with those reported for the extracted enzyme, and with those measured for free cells. Many of the properties reflected those of the extracted enzyme rather than those measured in the free whole cells prior to immobilization, suggesting cell disruption during immobilization. These properties included the pH activity profile, a slightly broader pH stability profile, and the activation energy. Electron micrographs showed evidence of cell debris among the polymer matrix. The immobilized cells were not viable, and did not consume glucose. Thermal stability was less after immobilization with a half-line of 16 h at 45 degrees C, and 3.5 h at 50 degrees C. The immobilized preparation was more stable when stored lyophilized rather than in buffer, losing 23 and 52% activity, respectively, after six months. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited by both acetate and citrate buffers. If the immobilized enzyme is to be used in conjunction with cellulases from Trichoderma reesei for cellulase saccharification, the optimal conditions would be pH 5.5 and 45 degrees C in a buffer containing no carboxylic acid groups.

  15. Phytochemical compositions, and antioxidant properties, and antiproliferative activities of wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Lv, Junli; Yu, Lu; Lu, Yingjian; Niu, Yuge; Liu, Linwei; Costa, Jose; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2012-11-15

    Ten soft wheat varieties grown in Maryland were compared for their phytochemical compositions, antioxidant properties and antiproliferative activities. Free radical scavenging capacities were examined against DPPH(·), oxygen, hydroxyl and ABTS(·+) radicals. Significant radical scavenging capacities were detected in all wheat flour extracts. Total phenolic content ranged from 1.66 to 2.01 mg of GAE/g wheat flour. The wheat flours contained 172.91-297.55 μg/g insoluble bound ferulic acid, contributing 89.74-94.29% of total ferulic acid on a per weight basis. The concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin were 0.27-0.46 and 0.08-0.13 μg/g, respectively. In addition, the wheat flours had 0.30-0.59 and 0.07-0.29 μg/g α- and δ-tocopherols, respectively. Four wheat flour extracts were further examined for their antiproliferative activities. The Jamestown wheat flour showed significant antiproliferative activity against both HT-29 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells at the initial treatment concentration of 50 mg flour equivalents/ml, while USG3555 flour showed inhibitive effect only in HT-29 cancer cells, suggesting the different and possible selective antiproliferative property of the wheat flours. These results may be used to direct the breeding effects to produce soft winter wheat varieties with improved health properties.

  16. Use of Gallic Acid to Enhance the Antioxidant and Mechanical Properties of Active Fish Gelatin Film.

    PubMed

    Limpisophon, Kanokrat; Schleining, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the potential roles of gallic acid in fish gelatin film for improving mechanical properties, UV barrier, and providing antioxidant activities. Glycerol, a common used plasticizer, also impacts on mechanical properties of the film. A factorial design was used to investigate the effects of gallic acid and glycerol concentrations on antioxidant activities and mechanical properties of fish gelatin film. Increasing the amount of gallic acid increased the antioxidant capacities of the film measured by radical scavenging assay and the ferric reducing ability of plasma assay. The released antioxidant power of gallic acid from the film was not reduced by glycerol. The presence of gallic acid not only increased the antioxidant capacity of the film, but also increased the tensile strength, elongation at break, and reduced UV absorption due to interaction between gallic acid and protein by hydrogen bonding. Glycerol did not affect the antioxidant capacities of the film, but increased the elasticity of the films. Overall, this study revealed that gallic acid entrapped in the fish gelatin film provided antioxidant activities and improved film characteristics, namely UV barrier, strength, and elasticity of the film.

  17. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  18. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Huckle, Linda L; Lu, Shunwen; Knauber, Donna C

    2014-03-15

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in lateral buds isolated from field-grown tubers. All five putative StCKX genes encoded proteins with in vitro CKX activity. All five enzymes were maximally active at neutral to slightly alkaline pH with 2,6-dichloro-indophenol as the electron acceptor. In silico analyses indicated that four proteins were likely secreted. Substrate dependence of two of the most active enzymes varied; one exhibiting greater activity with isopentenyl-type cytokinins while the other was maximally active with cis-zeatin as a substrate. [(3)H]-isopentenyl-adenosine was readily metabolized by excised tuber buds to adenine/adenosine demonstrating that CKX was active in planta. There was no change in apparent in planta CKX activity during either natural or chemically forced dormancy progression. Similarly although expression of individual StCKX genes varied modestly during tuber dormancy, there was no clear correlation between StCKX gene expression and tuber dormancy status. Thus although CKX gene expression and enzyme activity are present in potato tuber buds throughout dormancy, they do not appear to play a significant role in the regulation of cytokinin content during tuber dormancy progression.

  19. Chromospheric activity properties and search for subdwarfs and extreme subdwarfs based on LAMOST stellar spectral survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liyun; Pi, Qingfeng; Han, Xianming L.; Shi, Jianrong; Wang, Daimei; Luo, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-04-01

    Big data obtained from a stellar spectroscopic survey carried out using the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also known as Guo Shou Jing telescope) provide important information for studying chromospheric activity, variability of chromospheric activity, and chromospheric statistical properties, and for searching subdwarfs and extreme subdwarfs. Using as chromospheric activity indicator the Hα line, we detected 6391 active M stars among the 99741 stars in the M-star catalogue of the LAMOST survey. We also obtained the relationship between the fraction of active stars and the spectral types, which is consistent to previous results. We also studied the effects of activity on broadband photometric colors, and we did not see significant differences between active and inactive M stars. Using as spectroscopic molecular indicators the CaH123 and TiO5 lines, we found 1288 subdwarfs (including 120 active subdwarfs). We also found 15 extreme subdwarf (2 active extreme subdwarf) candidates. Our subdwarf candidates are slightly redder by about 0.05 mag in g-r compared with dwarfs using the g-r and r-i, and g-r and i-z color diagrams. Using our active M-star catalogue, we found that 898 stars exhibited Hα emission in at least two exposures (170 of them in at least three exposures). Among these 170 stars, 163 of them show variability in Hα emission on long timescales (more than 2.5 h). Furthermore, 34 stars show variability over short timescales (less than 2.5 h), and 29 actives show variability over both short and long time scales.

  20. Influences of influent carbon source on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fenxia; Peng, Ge; Li, Ying

    2011-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the bioflocculation, settling and dewatering characteristics in the activated sludge process in order to establish more efficient operational strategies. The influences of carbon source on the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and flocculation, settling and dewatering properties of the activated sludge were investigated. Laboratory-scale completely mixed activated sludge processes were used to grow the activated sludge with different carbon sources of starch, glucose and sodium acetate. The sludge fed with acetate had highest loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and that fed with starch lowest. The amount of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), protein content in LB-EPS, polysaccharide content and protein contents in TB-EPS, were independent of the influent carbon source. The polysaccharide content in LB-EPS of the activated sludge fed with sodium acetate was lower slightly than those of starch and glucose. The sludge also had a nearly consistent flocs size and the sludge volume index (SVI) value. ESS content of the sludge fed with sodium acetate was higher initially, although it was similar to those fed with glucose and starch finally. However, the specific resistance to filtration and normalized capillary suction time fluctuated first, but finally were stable at around 5.0×10(8)mkg(-1) and 3.5 s Lg(-1) SS, respectively. Only the protein content in LB-EPS weakly correlated with the flocs size and SVI of the activated sludge. But there was no correlation between any other EPS contents or components and the physicochemical properties of the activated sludge.

  1. Tandem Repeats, High Copy Number and Remarkable Diel Expression Rhythm of Form II RuBisCO in Prorocentrum donghaiense (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinguo; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Gene structure and expression regulation of form II RuBisCO (rbcII) in dinoflagellates are still poorly understood. Here we isolated this gene (Pdrbc) and investigated its diel expression pattern in a harmful algal bloom forming dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense. We obtained cDNA sequences with triple tandem repeats of the coding unit (CU); the 5′ region has the sequence of a typical dinoflagellate plastid gene, encoding an N-terminus with two transmembrane regions separated by a plastid transit peptide. The CUs (1,455 bp except 1464 bp in last CU) are connected through a 63 bp spacer. Phylogenetic analysis showed that rbcII CUs within species formed monophyletic clusters, indicative of intraspecific gene duplication or purifying evolution. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) we estimated 117±40 CUs of Pdrbc in the P. donghaiense genome. Although it is commonly believed that most dinoflagellate genes lack transcriptional regulation, our RT-qPCR analysis on synchronized cultures revealed remarkable diel rhythm of Pdrbc expression, showing significant correlations of transcript abundance with the timing of the dark-to-light transition and cell cycle G2M-phase. When the cultures were shifted to continuous light, Pdrbc expression remained significantly correlated with the G2M-phase. Under continuous darkness the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, and the rhythm of Pdrbc transcription disappeared. Our results suggest that dinoflagellate rbcII 1) undergoes duplication or sequence purification within species, 2) is organized in tandem arrays in most species probably to facilitate efficient translation and import of the encoded enzyme, and 3) is regulated transcriptionally in a cell cycle-dependent fashion at least in some dinoflagellates. PMID:23976999

  2. Properties of active nucleosomes as revealed by HMG 14 and 17 chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, S T

    1982-01-01

    Nucleosomes from actively transcribed genes (active nucleosomes) contain nonhistone proteins HMG 14 and 17 and are preferentially sensitive to digestion by DNAse I. Active nucleosomes isolated by chromatography on an HMG 14 and 17 glass bead affinity column were analyzed with respect to overall structure, accessory nonhistone components and modifications to the DNA and histones. The experiments lead to the following conclusions: the DNA in the active nucleosome is undermethylated compared to bulk DNA; topoisomerase I is a non-stoichiometric component of the active nucleosome fraction; the level of histone acetylation is enriched in active nucleosomes, but the extent of enrichment cannot account for HMG binding; and the two histone H3 molecules in the active nucleosome can dimerize more readily and are, therefore, probably closer together than those in the bulk of the nucleosomes. Additionally it is shown that HMG 14 and 17 prefer to bind to single- vs. double-stranded nucleic acids. The role of HMG 14 and 17 in producing a highly DNAse I sensitive structure and correspondingly helping to facilitate transcription is discussed in terms of these properties. Images PMID:6210882

  3. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  4. SteamTablesGrid: An ActiveX control for thermodynamic properties of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2011-04-01

    An ActiveX control, steam tables grid ( StmTblGrd) to speed up the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of pure water is developed. First, it creates a grid (matrix) for a specified range of temperature (e.g. 400-600 K with 40 segments) and pressure (e.g. 100,000-20,000,000 Pa with 40 segments). Using the ActiveX component SteamTables, the values of selected properties of water for each element (nodal point) of the 41×41 matrix are calculated. The created grid can be saved in a file for its reuse. A linear interpolation within an individual phase, vapor or liquid is implemented to calculate the properties at a given value of temperature and pressure. A demonstration program to illustrate the functionality of StmTblGrd is written in Visual Basic 6.0. Similarly, a methodology is presented to explain the use of StmTblGrd in MS-Excel 2007. In an Excel worksheet, the enthalpy of 1000 random datasets for temperature and pressure is calculated using StmTblGrd and SteamTables. The uncertainty in the enthalpy calculated with StmTblGrd is within ±0.03%. The calculations were performed on a personal computer that has a "Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.2 GHz, RAM 1.0 GB" processor and Windows XP. The total execution time for the calculation with StmTblGrd was 0.3 s, while it was 60.0 s for SteamTables. Thus, the ActiveX control approach is reliable, accurate and efficient for the numerical simulation of complex systems that demand the thermodynamic properties of water at several values of temperature and pressure like steam flow in a geothermal pipeline network.

  5. An optimized molecular inclusion complex of diferuloylmethane: enhanced physical properties and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qunyou; Li, Yi; Wu, Jianyong; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate the enhanced physical properties and biological activity of a molecular inclusion complex (MICDH) comprising diferuloylmethane (DFM) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Methods The preparation conditions of MICDH were optimized using an orthogonal experimental design. The solubility, in vitro release and model fitting, microscopic morphology, molecular structure simulation, anti-lung cancer activity, and action mechanism of MICDH were evaluated. Results The solubility of DFM was improved 4400-fold upon complexation with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The release rate of DFM was significantly higher from MICDH than from free DFM. MICDH exhibited higher antitumor activity against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than free DFM. More cells were arrested in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle or were induced to undergo apoptosis when treated with MICDH than when treated with free DFM. Furthermore, increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium ion levels and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in cells treated with MICDH. Conclusion MICDH markedly improved the physical properties and antitumor activity of DFM. MICDH may prove to be a preferred alternative to free DFM as a formulation for DFM delivery in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23091376

  6. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activities and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Property from Mycelium Culture Extracts.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Moon; Kwon, Kyung Min; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Since mushrooms have many bioactive components, they have been used as components in folk medicine. Because mycelium has an advantage when it comes to large-scale production, this study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant properties and anti-tyrosinase activity from 55 mycelia in culture media. Relatively high 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging capacity was detected from the ethanol extract of culture media including mycelium (EECiM) of Morchella esculenta var. esculenta (MEVE), Auricularia polytricha (APO), Tremella aurantia (TAU), Volvariella bombycina (VBO), and Oudemansiella sp. (Osp), which also showed strong reducing power and inhibitory activity in relation to the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value. On the other hand, relatively high tyrosinase inhibitory activity was detected in Inonotus mikadoi (IMI), Coriolus versicolor (CVE), Volvariella volvacea (VVO), Panellus serotinus (PSE), Auricularia auricula (AAU), and Fomitopsis sp. (Fsp). Interestingly, the APO EECiM exhibited the highest DPPH radical scavenging rate (77.5 ± 4.3%) and reducing power (1.18 ± 0.041), while the highest inhibitory power of the TBA value and antityrosinase activity were detected in that of TAU (64.5 ± 4.1%) and IMI (46.0 ± 7.5%), respectively. Overall, our study suggested potential candidates for EECiMs that exhibited powerful antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory properties and might be used as natural antioxidant tyrosinase inhibitor.

  7. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activities and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Property from Mycelium Culture Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Moon; Kwon, Kyung Min; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Since mushrooms have many bioactive components, they have been used as components in folk medicine. Because mycelium has an advantage when it comes to large-scale production, this study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant properties and anti-tyrosinase activity from 55 mycelia in culture media. Relatively high 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging capacity was detected from the ethanol extract of culture media including mycelium (EECiM) of Morchella esculenta var. esculenta (MEVE), Auricularia polytricha (APO), Tremella aurantia (TAU), Volvariella bombycina (VBO), and Oudemansiella sp. (Osp), which also showed strong reducing power and inhibitory activity in relation to the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value. On the other hand, relatively high tyrosinase inhibitory activity was detected in Inonotus mikadoi (IMI), Coriolus versicolor (CVE), Volvariella volvacea (VVO), Panellus serotinus (PSE), Auricularia auricula (AAU), and Fomitopsis sp. (Fsp). Interestingly, the APO EECiM exhibited the highest DPPH radical scavenging rate (77.5 ± 4.3%) and reducing power (1.18 ± 0.041), while the highest inhibitory power of the TBA value and antityrosinase activity were detected in that of TAU (64.5 ± 4.1%) and IMI (46.0 ± 7.5%), respectively. Overall, our study suggested potential candidates for EECiMs that exhibited powerful antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory properties and might be used as natural antioxidant tyrosinase inhibitor. PMID:26345142

  8. Effects of activation on the elastic properties of intact soleus muscles with a deletion in titin.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Jenna A; Powers, Krysta L; Pace, Cinnamon M; Uyeno, Theodore; Nishikawa, Kiisa C

    2017-03-01

    Titin has long been known to contribute to muscle passive tension. Recently, it was also demonstrated that titin-based stiffness increases upon Ca(2+) activation of wild-type mouse psoas myofibrils stretched beyond overlap of the thick and thin filaments. In addition, this increase in titin-based stiffness was impaired in single psoas myofibrils from mdm mice, characterized by a deletion in the N2A region of the Ttn gene. Here, we investigated the effects of activation on elastic properties of intact soleus muscles from wild-type and mdm mice to determine whether titin contributes to active muscle stiffness. Using load-clamp experiments, we compared the stress-strain relationships of elastic elements in active and passive muscles during unloading, and quantified the change in stiffness upon activation. Results from wild-type muscles show that upon activation, the elastic modulus increases, elastic elements develop force at 15% shorter lengths, and there was a 2.9-fold increase in the slope of the stress-strain relationship. These results are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to results from single wild-type psoas myofibrils. In contrast, mdm soleus showed no effect of activation on the slope or intercept of the stress-strain relationship, which is consistent with impaired titin activation observed in single mdm psoas myofibrils. Therefore, it is likely that titin plays a role in the increase of active muscle stiffness during rapid unloading. These results are consistent with the idea that, in addition to the thin filaments, titin is activated upon Ca(2+) influx in skeletal muscle.

  9. [Effects of nitrogen addition on soil physico-chemical properties and enzyme activities in desertified steppe].

    PubMed

    Su, Jie-Qiong; Li, Xin-Rong; Bao, Jing-Ting

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the impacts of nitrogen (N) enrichment on soil physico-chemical property and soil enzyme activities in desert ecosystems, a field experiment by adding N at 0, 1.75, 3.5, 7, or 14 g N x m(-2) a(-1) was conducted in a temperate desert steppe in the southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert. The results showed that N addition led to accumulations of total N, NO(3-)-N, NH(4+)-N, and available N in the upper soil (0-10 cm) and subsoil (10-20 cm), however, reductions in soil pH were observed, causing soil acidification to some extent. N addition pronouncedly inhibited soil enzyme activities, which were different among N addition levels, soil depths, and years, respectively. Soil enzyme activities were significantly correlated with the soil N level, soil pH, and soil moisture content, respectively.

  10. Study on the preparation of straw activated carbon and its phenol adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Using sunflower straw as raw materials to manufacture straw activated carbon-modified by phosphoric acidand adsorption isotherm of phenol on straw activated carbon was studied in a batch reactor. The physical properties of the prepared straw activated carbons were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The effect of various parameters, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature, were studied on optimum conditions. The results have shown that the absorbent was efficient, the removal ratio of phenol up to 99.36% with an adsorbent dosage of 16 g·L-1, a pH of 6.0-8.0, at 25 °C. The experimental adsorption data fitted reasonably well to the Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity was 109.89 mg/g. The process of adsorption is a exothermic process.

  11. Gene activation properties of a mouse DNA sequence isolated by expression selection.

    PubMed Central

    von Hoyningen-Huene, V; Norbury, C; Griffiths, M; Fried, M

    1986-01-01

    The MES-1 element was previously isolated from restricted total mouse cellular DNA by "expression selection"--the ability to reactivate expression of a test gene devoid of its 5' enhancer sequences. Mes-1 has been tested in long-term transformation and short-term CAT expression assays. In both assays MES-1 is active independent of orientation and at a distance when placed 5' to the test gene. The element is active with heterologous promoters and functions efficiently in both rat and mouse cells. MES-1 activates expression by increasing transcription from the test gene's own start (cap) site. Thus the expression selection technique can be used for the isolation of DNA sequences with enhancer-like properties from total cellular DNA. Images PMID:3016657

  12. Effects of γ-irradiation on phenolics content, antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of whole grainrice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yafang; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Wang, Yuefei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    Three rice genotypes with different color were gamma irradiated at a dose of 2, 4, 6, 8and 10 kGy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the phenolics content and the antioxidant activity, as well as physicochemical properties of whole grain rice. The bound phenolics content in all the genotypes were significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation. Gamma irradiation at high dose significantly increased the free, bound and total antioxidant activities of three rice genotypes except for the free antioxidant activities of red rice. Though the color parameters were slightly changed, these changes could not be visibly identified. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) viscosities and gel hardness decreased continuously with the increase of the irradiation doses. It is suggested that gamma irradiation enhanced the antioxidant potential and eating quality of whole grainrice.

  13. Thermal properties of ration components as affected by moisture content and water activity during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Chinachoti, P; Wang, D; Hallberg, L M; Sun, X S

    2008-11-01

    Beef roast with vegetables is an example of a meal, ready-to-eat (MRE) ration entrée. It is a mixture of meat, potato, mushroom, and carrot with a gravy sauce. The thermal properties of each component were characterized in terms of freezing point, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy during freezing using differential scanning calorimetry. Freezing and thawing curves and the effect of freezing and thawing cycles on thermal properties were also evaluated. The freezing points of beef, potato, mushroom, and sauce were all in the range of -5.1 to -5.6 degrees C, but moisture content, water activity, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy varied among these components. Freezing temperature greatly affected the unfrozen water fraction. The unfreezable water content (unfrozen water fraction at -50 degrees C) of ration components was in the range of 8.2% to 9.7%. The freezing and thawing curves of vegetables with sauce differed from those of beef but took similar time to freeze or thaw. Freezing and thawing cycles did not greatly affect the thermal properties of each component. Freezing point and latent heat were reduced by decreasing moisture content and water activity of each component. Water activity was proportionally linear to freezing point at a(w) > 0.88, and moisture content was proportionally linear to freezable water content in all ration components. Water was not available for freezing when moisture content was reduced to 28.8% or less. This study indicates that moisture content and water activity are critical factors affecting thermal behavior of ration components during freezing.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Arabic Version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Instrument.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Translation of instruments needs to ensure equivalence between the source and the target language to establish the psychometric properties of the translated version. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) instrument. The 12-item English version of the SDSCA was translated into Arabic using back translation on a sample of 140 Lebanese participants with Type 2 diabetes. Construct validity was measured using exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation. Multitrait scaling analysis was used to test for item convergent and discriminant validity based on item-scale correlations. Conceptual and content validity were examined by an expert panel in diabetes. Internal consistency reliability R was assessed using interitem correlations. The average interitem correlation for the four subscales ranged between--.05 for Diet and .66 for Glucose Testing. Factor analysis identified four factors which accounted for 60% of the variance. The preliminary results of Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities-Arabic Version (SDSCA-Ar) are comparable to the psychometric properties the original SDSCA. SDSCA-Ar is a valid measure of diabetes self-care in Lebanese patients with diabetes.

  15. Structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Davide; Márquez, María J.; Márquez, María B.; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities in gas and aqueous solution phases were studied by using DFT calculations. The self consistent reaction field (SCRF) method was combined with the polarized continuum (PCM) model in order to study the solvent effects and to predict their reactivities and behaviours in both media. Thus, the 3-mercapto-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (I), 3-methylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (II), 3-Ethylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (III), S-[3-(4-cyano-5-phenyl)isothiazolyl] ethyl thiocarbonate (IV), 5-Phenyl-3-(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) disulphanyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (V) and 1,2-Bis(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) sulphanyl Ethane (VI) derivatives were studied by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. All the properties were compared and analyzed in function of the different R groups linked to the thiazole ring. This study clearly shows that the high polarity of (I) probably explains its elevated antiviral activity due to their facility to traverse biological membranes more rapidly than the other ones while in the (IV) and (V) derivatives the previous hydrolysis of both bonds increasing their antiviral properties inside the cell probably are related to their low S-R bond order values. In addition, the complete vibrational assignments and force constants are presented.

  16. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2.

    PubMed

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B; Talaga, Anna K; Zhao, Haiqing; Reisert, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5' end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5' end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca(2+) sensitivity and that the exon 4-encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties.

  17. Charge density and optical properties of multicomponent crystals containing active pharmaceutical ingredients or their analogues.

    PubMed

    Gryl, Marlena

    2015-08-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), through their favourable donor/acceptor spatial distribution and synthon formation flexibility, are attractive building blocks in modern materials crystallography. The optical properties of a crystal strongly depend on two factors, i.e. the spatial distribution of molecules in the crystal structure and the electronic properties of molecular building blocks (dipole moments, polarizabilities, hyperpolarizabilities). Although the latter are easy to predict through ab initio calculations, the former are not. Only a combination of experimental and theoretical charge density studies together with prediction and measurement of optical properties enable full analysis of the obtained functional material in terms of its usefulness in practical applications. This article presents design strategies of optical materials based on selected pharmaceutical molecules. Factors that contribute to molecular recognition in the four selected polar/chiral crystal phases (derived through charge density and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis) have been determined. Theoretically predicted optical properties of the molecular/ionic building blocks as well as bulk effects have been confirmed experimentally. This research is a first step in the design of novel optical materials based on push-pull molecules and APIs.

  18. Plutonium behavior after pulmonary administration according to solubility properties, and consequences on alveolar macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Van der Meeren, Anne; Gremy, Olivier; Renault, Daniel; Miroux, Amandine; Bruel, Sylvie; Griffiths, Nina; Tourdes, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical form in which plutonium enters the body influences the lung distribution and the transfer rate from lungs to blood. In the present study, we evaluated the early lung damage and macrophage activation after pulmonary contamination of plutonium of various preparation modes which produce different solubility and distribution patterns. Whatever the solubility properties of the contaminant, macrophages represent a major retention compartment in lungs, with 42 to 67% of the activity from broncho-alveolar lavages being associated with macrophages 14 days post-contamination. Lung changes were observed 2 and 6 weeks post-contamination, showing inflammatory lesions and accumulation of activated macrophages (CD68 positive) in plutonium-contaminated rats, although no increased proliferation of pneumocytes II (TTF-1 positive cells) was found. In addition, acid phosphatase activity in macrophages from contaminated rats was enhanced 2 weeks post-contamination as compared to sham groups, as well as inflammatory mediator levels (TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1) in macrophage culture supernatants. Correlating with the decrease in activity remaining in macrophages after plutonium contamination, inflammatory mediator production returned to basal levels 6 weeks post-exposure. The production of chemokines by macrophages was evaluated after contamination with Pu of increasing solubility. No correlation was found between the solubility properties of Pu and the activation level of macrophages. In summary, our data indicate that, despite the higher solubility of plutonium citrate or nitrate as compared to preformed colloids or oxides, macrophages remain the main lung target after plutonium contamination and may participate in the early pulmonary damage.

  19. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, −20 °C, −80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at −80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and −20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, −20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3−. Moreover, PAW stored at −80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2− contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation. PMID:27346695

  20. Thalamic Kv7 channels: pharmacological properties and activity control during noxious signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Manuela; Szkudlarek, Hanna J; Coulon, Philippe; Meuth, Patrick; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Nguyen, Xuan Vinh; Göbel, Kerstin; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The existence of functional Kv7 channels in thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons and the effects of the K+-current termed M-current (IM) on thalamic signal processing have long been debated. Immunocytochemical evidence suggests their presence in this brain region. Therefore, we aimed to verify their existence, pharmacological properties and function in regulating activity in neurons of the ventrobasal thalamus (VB). Experimental Approach Characterization of Kv7 channels was performed by combining in vitro, in vivo and in silico techniques with a pharmacological approach. Retigabine (30 μM) and XE991 (20 μM), a specific Kv7 channel enhancer and blocker, respectively, were applied in acute brain slices during electrophysiological recordings. The effects of intrathalamic injection of retigabine (3 mM, 300 nL) and/or XE991 (2 mM, 300 nL) were investigated in freely moving animals during hot-plate tests by recording behaviour and neuronal activity. Key Results Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits were found to be abundantly expressed in TC neurons of mouse VB. A slow K+-current with properties of IM was activated by retigabine and inhibited by XE991. Kv7 channel activation evoked membrane hyperpolarization, a reduction in tonic action potential firing, and increased burst firing in vitro and in computational models. Single-unit recordings and pharmacological intervention demonstrated a specific burst-firing increase upon IM activation in vivo. A Kv7 channel-mediated increase in pain threshold was associated with fewer VB units responding to noxious stimuli, and increased burst firing in responsive neurons. Conclusions and Implications Kv7 channel enhancement alters somatosensory activity and may reflect an anti-nociceptive mechanism during acute pain processing. PMID:25684311

  1. Salvia leriifolia Benth (Lamiaceae) extract demonstrates in vitro antioxidant properties and cholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica R; Tundis, Rosa; Conforti, Filomena; Menichini, Federica; Bonesi, Marco; Nadjafi, Farsad; Frega, Natale Giuseppe; Menichini, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    The object of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antioxidant properties and cholinesterase inhibitory activity of Salvia leriifolia Benth extracts and fractions. The functional role of herbs and spices and their constituents is a hot topic in food-related plant research. Salvia species have been used since ancient times in folk medicine for cognitive brain function and have been subjected to extensive research. Thus, we hypothesize that S leriifolia, because of its functional properties, would be a good candidate to use as a nutraceutical product for improving memory in the elderly or patients affected by Alzheimer disease (ad). To test this hypothesis, we examined the cholinesterase inhibitory activity using the modified colorimetric Ellman's method against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The n-hexane exhibited the highest activity, with inhibitory concentration 50% (IC(50)) values of 0.59 and 0.21 mg/mL, for AChE and BChE, respectively. This extract was fractionated, and 9 of these fractions (A-I) were obtained and tested. Fraction G, characterized by the presence of sesquiterpenes as major components, was the most active against AChE (IC(50) = 0.05 mg/mL). Because oxidative stress is a critical event in the pathogenesis of AD, we decided to screen the antioxidant activity (AA) using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl test, β-carotene bleaching test, and bovine brain peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid) assay. The ethyl acetate extract showed the highest activity, with IC(50) values of 2 and 33 μg/mL on β-carotene bleaching test and thiobarbituric acid test, respectively. These results suggest potential health benefits of S leriifolia extracts. However, this finding requires additional investigation in vivo.

  2. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C, ‑80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at ‑80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and ‑20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3‑. Moreover, PAW stored at ‑80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2‑ contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation.

  3. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-06-27

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, -20 °C, -80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at -80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and -20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, -20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3(-). Moreover, PAW stored at -80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2(-) contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation.

  4. Magnetite impregnation effects on the sorbent properties of activated carbons and biochars.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhantao; Sani, Badruddeen; Mrozik, Wojciech; Obst, Martin; Beckingham, Barbara; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Werner, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the sorbent properties of magnetic activated carbons and biochars produced by wet impregnation with iron oxides. The sorbents had magnetic susceptibilities consistent with theoretical predictions for carbon-magnetite composites. The high BET surface areas of the activated carbons were preserved in the synthesis, and enhanced for one low surface area biochar by dissolving carbonates. Magnetization decreased the point of zero charge. Organic compound sorption correlated strongly with BET surface areas for the pristine and magnetized materials, while metal cation sorption did not show such a correlation. Strong sorption of the hydrophobic organic contaminant phenanthrene to the activated carbon or biochar surfaces was maintained following magnetite impregnation, while phenol sorption was diminished, probably due to enhanced carbon oxidation. Copper, zinc and lead sorption to the activated carbons and biochars was unchanged or slightly enhanced by the magnetization, and iron oxides also contributed to the composite metal sorption capacity. While a magnetic biochar with 219 ± 3.7 m(2)/g surface area nearly reached the very strong organic pollutant binding capacity of the two magnetic activated carbons, a magnetic biochar with 68 ± 2.8 m(2)/g surface area was the best metal sorbent. Magnetic biochars thus hold promise as more sustainable alternatives to coal-derived magnetic activated carbons.

  5. SpeB of Streptococcus pyogenes Differentially Modulates Antibacterial and Receptor Activating Properties of Human Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Egesten, Arne; Olin, Anders I.; Linge, Helena M.; Yadav, Manisha; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karlsson, Anna; Collin, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Background CXC chemokines are induced by inflammatory stimuli in epithelial cells and some, like MIG/CXCL9, IP–10/CXCL10 and I–TAC/CXCL11, are antibacterial for Streptococcus pyogenes. Methodology/Principal Findings SpeB from S. pyogenes degrades a wide range of chemokines (i.e. IP10/CXCL10, I-TAC/CXCL11, PF4/CXCL4, GROα/CXCL1, GROβ/CXCL2, GROγ/CXCL3, ENA78/CXCL5, GCP-2/CXCL6, NAP-2/CXCL7, SDF-1/CXCL12, BCA-1/CXCL13, BRAK/CXCL14, SRPSOX/CXCL16, MIP-3α/CCL20, Lymphotactin/XCL1, and Fractalkine/CX3CL1), has no activity on IL-8/CXCL8 and RANTES/CCL5, partly degrades SRPSOX/CXCL16 and MIP-3α/CCL20, and releases a 6 kDa CXCL9 fragment. CXCL10 and CXCL11 loose receptor activating and antibacterial activities, while the CXCL9 fragment does not activate the receptor CXCR3 but retains its antibacterial activity. Conclusions/Significance SpeB destroys most of the signaling and antibacterial properties of chemokines expressed by an inflamed epithelium. The exception is CXCL9 that preserves its antibacterial activity after hydrolysis, emphasizing its role as a major antimicrobial on inflamed epithelium. PMID:19274094

  6. Effect of phosphogypsum amendment on soil physico-chemical properties, microbial load and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Soumya; Mishra, C S K; Guru, B C; Rath, Monalisa

    2011-09-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is produced as a solid waste from phosphatic fertilizer plants. The waste slurry is disposed off in settling ponds or in heaps. This solid waste is now increasingly being used as a calcium supplement in agriculture. This study reports the effectof PG amendmenton soil physico chemical properties, bacterial and fungal count and activities of soil enzymes such as invertase, cellulase and amylase over an incubation period of 28 days. The highest mean percent carbon loss (55.98%) was recorded in 15% PG amended soil followed by (55.28%) in 10% PG amended soil and the minimum (1.68%) in control soil. The highest number of bacterial colonies (47.4 CFU g(-1) soil), fungal count (17.8 CFU g(-1) soil), highest amylase activity (38.4 microg g(-1) soil hr(-1)) and cellulase activity (38.37 microg g(-1) soil hr(-1)) were recorded in 10% amended soil. Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) has been recorded in the activities of amylase and cellulase over the period of incubation irrespective of amendments. Considering the bacterial and fungal growth and the activities of the three soil enzymes in the control and amended sets, it appears that 10% PG amendment is optimal for microbial growth and soil enzyme activities.

  7. Adsorption properties of CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon containing introduced ionic fluoride and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, Seiki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1996-10-15

    Plasma technology has been available for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) decomposition or etching of silicone. The adsorption properties of CFC (CFC113) and CFC replacements (HCFC141b, HCFC225cb, and 5FP) on several kinds of plasma-treated activated carbons (P-ACs) prepared under different treatment gases were investigated using the adsorption isotherms, the limiting pore volume and the affinity coefficient and energy of adsorption calculated by the Dubinin-Radushkevich plot, and the quality and kinds of introduced fluoride and chloride. The dissolved fluoride and chloride atoms were introduced to the surface of activated carbon by CFC113, HCFC141b, and HCFC225cb, while the dissolved fluoride atoms were those from 5FP and tetrafluoromethane. The adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements, except for 5FP, on P-ACs was larger than that on U-AC. The specific adsorption site on plasma-treated activated carbon of the CFC and CFC replacements was the fluoride atoms which were introduced by plasma treatment. It is concluded that the plasma-treated activated carbon was suitable for the recovery of CFC and CFC replacements, because the adsorbed amount of CFC and CFC replacements was larger than that on untreated activated carbon, and the adsorbed CFC and CFC replacements on activated carbon were decomposed by the plasma treatment.

  8. COMPARISON OF CHAOTIC AND FRACTAL PROPERTIES OF POLAR FACULAE WITH SUNSPOT ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, L. H.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Dun, G. T.; Li, B.

    2016-01-15

    The solar magnetic activity is governed by a complex dynamo mechanism and exhibits a nonlinear dissipation behavior in nature. The chaotic and fractal properties of solar time series are of great importance to understanding the solar dynamo actions, especially with regard to the nonlinear dynamo theories. In the present work, several nonlinear analysis approaches are proposed to investigate the nonlinear dynamical behavior of the polar faculae and sunspot activity for the time interval from 1951 August to 1998 December. The following prominent results are found: (1) both the high- and the low-latitude solar activity are governed by a three-dimensional chaotic attractor, and the chaotic behavior of polar faculae is the most complex, followed by that of the sunspot areas, and then the sunspot numbers; (2) both the high- and low-latitude solar activity exhibit a high degree of persistent behavior, and their fractal nature is due to such long-range correlation; (3) the solar magnetic activity cycle is predictable in nature, but the high-accuracy prediction should only be done for short- to mid-term due to its intrinsically dynamical complexity. With the help of the Babcock–Leighton dynamo model, we suggest that the nonlinear coupling of the polar magnetic fields with strong active-region fields exhibits a complex manner, causing the statistical similarities and differences between the polar faculae and the sunspot-related indicators.

  9. Comparison of Chaotic and Fractal Properties of Polar Faculae with Sunspot Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L. H.; Li, B.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Dun, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    The solar magnetic activity is governed by a complex dynamo mechanism and exhibits a nonlinear dissipation behavior in nature. The chaotic and fractal properties of solar time series are of great importance to understanding the solar dynamo actions, especially with regard to the nonlinear dynamo theories. In the present work, several nonlinear analysis approaches are proposed to investigate the nonlinear dynamical behavior of the polar faculae and sunspot activity for the time interval from 1951 August to 1998 December. The following prominent results are found: (1) both the high- and the low-latitude solar activity are governed by a three-dimensional chaotic attractor, and the chaotic behavior of polar faculae is the most complex, followed by that of the sunspot areas, and then the sunspot numbers; (2) both the high- and low-latitude solar activity exhibit a high degree of persistent behavior, and their fractal nature is due to such long-range correlation; (3) the solar magnetic activity cycle is predictable in nature, but the high-accuracy prediction should only be done for short- to mid-term due to its intrinsically dynamical complexity. With the help of the Babcock-Leighton dynamo model, we suggest that the nonlinear coupling of the polar magnetic fields with strong active-region fields exhibits a complex manner, causing the statistical similarities and differences between the polar faculae and the sunspot-related indicators.

  10. Properties of the long-term optical activity of the prototype polar AM Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, Vojtěch

    2016-12-01

    AM Her displays strong long-term activity with the high and low states. This investigation uses AAVSO optical data for a time series analysis of the long-term variations. Rapid changes of brightness (e.g. the orbital modulation) were smoothed out to emphasize the activity on super-orbital time-scale. I show that the character of this activity changed considerably on time-scales of years, which is reflected in a large evolution of the complicated histogram of the optical brightness. The high states are not the well-defined, narrow levels of brightness. I also show that AM Her displays transitions between the high and low states with the intermittently existing cycles. The longest uninterrupted series of transitions from the high to low state consists of seven episodes (about 6 yr). The existence of this series can be controlled by the lifetime of the active regions on the donor, which modulates the mass transfer rate. I show that the episodes of the high and low states accumulate in clusters, which produces an additional cycle after smoothing by the moving averages. The cycles of activity of the donor can explain this modulation. A single isolated short episode of the low state does not imply a break of this cycle. I also argue that the specific properties of star-spots and their migration caused by the differential rotation of the donor would be needed to explain the complex activity of AM Her.

  11. Enhancement of the photocatalytic activity and electrochemical property of graphene-SrWO4 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Nie, Yu; Yang, Hongxun; Sun, Shengnan; Chen, Yingying; Yang, Tongyi; Lin, Shengling

    2016-05-01

    SrWO4 is a promising candidate as not only photocatalyst for the removal of organic pollutants from water, but also electrode material for energy storage devices. However, the drawbacks of its poor adsorptive performance, low electrical conductivity, and high recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pair impede its practical applications. In this work, we have developed a new graphene/SrWO4 nanocomposite synthesized via a facile chemical precipitation method. Characterizations show that SrWO4 nanoparticles with 80 nm or so deposited on the surface of graphene nanosheets. Graphene nanosheets in the graphene-SrWO4 hybrid could increase adsorptive property, improve the electrical conductivity of hybrid, and reduce the recombination of electron-hole pairs. As a kind of photocatalyst or electrode material for supercapacitor, the binary graphene-SrWO4 hybrid presents enhanced photocatalytic activity and electrochemical property compared to pure SrWO4.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of newly developed low activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria, M.; Gavillet, D.; Spätig, P.; Rezai-Aria, F.; Rossmann, S.

    1996-10-01

    The reference ferritic-martensitic steel of the European Fusion Technology Program, the 10CrMoNbV MANET cast, has been modified by replacing the elements that result in long term residual radioactivity when irradiated under a fusion neutron spectra by others which have shorter activation periods. A base composition of a 9CrWVTa steel has been so defined. Two different compositions of the base alloy have been cast from high purity components, which the Mn and N contents have been varied. The extracted carbide types and their size distribution have been studied under the electron microscope. The mechanical properties of both compositions have been determined. Both steel compositions have a ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) well below room temperature while their tensile properties are comparable to those of the parent (MANET) steel.

  13. Antibacterial properties and major bioactive components of cinnamon stick (Cinnamomum burmannii): activity against foodborne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Brooks, John D; Corke, Harold

    2007-07-11

    Cinnamomum burmannii Blume (cinnamon stick) from Indonesia is a little-investigated spice. In this study, the antibacterial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of cinnamon stick extract were evaluated against five common foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella anatum). Cinnamon stick extract exhibited significant antibacterial properties. Major compounds in cinnamon stick were tentatively identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC-MS) as a predominant volatile oil component ((E)-cinnamaldehyde) and several polyphenols (mainly proanthocyanidins and (epi)catechins). Both (E)-cinnamaldehyde and proanthocyanidins significantly contributed to the antibacterial properties. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to observe morphological changes of bacteria treated with the crude extract of cinnamon stick and its major components. This study suggests that cinnamon stick and its bioactive components have potential for application as natural food preservatives.

  14. Evolution of galaxy properties across the peak of cosmic activity in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriendt, Julien

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will review how numerical hydrodynamics simulations predict galaxies evolve in the redshift range 1properties (mass, size, morphology, star formation history).The discussion will be underpinned by recent efforts to measure the degree of alignment between galaxy spins and the large scale cosmic web filaments in which they are embedded. Relative contributions to property evolution will be split between major and minor, gas rich and gas poor mergers as well as smooth accretion, and quantitatively assessed. Finally, switching from nurture to nature, I will also discuss the role played by various feedback processes, whether of stellar origin or driven by active nuclei, in driving such changes or freezing them in.

  15. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  16. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes and analyze all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate…

  17. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    A review of cases involving higher education property matters shows that many are concerned with building construction, equipment installation, or repair contracts. A number of other cases involve routine conflicts between colleges or universities and other governmental entities over matters such as requests for special exceptions to zoning…

  18. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate related cases and to illuminate any unifying legal principles…

  19. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    The author notes that controversies over construction bids and contracts continue to represent the largest number of property cases reported in this year's chapter. Most of these cases are routine disputes between colleges or universities and contractors over such issues as the return of bid bonds, recovery of additional costs for construction…

  20. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    While the number of cases dealing with school property issues was significantly lower than in previous years, a significant number of cases involving the detachment and attachment of land to school districts arose. Eight of the eleven cases dealing with land detachment come from Illinois. The cases concerned requests from parents that their…

  1. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    While the types of cases reported in this year's chapter are essentially the same as those reported in last year's, the number of certain types of cases have changed--in some instances significantly. For example, the number of cases raising constitutional issues in the areas of school construction, location, and property use have declined. On the…

  2. Mechanical property changes of low activation ferritic/martensitic steels after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Hamilton, M. L.; Narui, M.

    Mechanical property changes of Fe- XCr-2W-0.2V,Ta ( X: 2.25-12) low activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Japanese Low Activation Ferritic/martensitic (JLF) steels and F82H after neutron irradiation were investigated with emphasis on Charpy impact property, tensile property and irradiation creep properties. Dose dependence of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in JLF-1 (9Cr steel) irradiated at 646-700 K increased with irradiation up to 20 dpa and then decreased with further irradiation showing highest DBTT of 260 K at 20 dpa. F82H showed similar dose dependence in DBTT to JLF-1 with higher transition temperature than that of JLF-1 at the same displacement damage. Yield strength in JLF steels and F82H showed similar dose dependence to that of DBTT. Yield strength increased with irradiation up to 15-20 dpa and then decreased to saturate above about 40 dpa. Irradiation hardening in 7-9%Cr steels (JLF-1, JLF-3, F82H) were observed to be smaller than those in steels with 2.25%Cr (JLF-4) or 12%Cr (JLF-5). Dependences of creep strain on applied hoop stress and neutron fluence were measured to be 1.5 and 1, respectively. Temperature dependence of creep coefficient showed a maximum at about 700 K which was caused by irradiation induced void formation or irradiation enhanced creep deformation. Creep coefficient of F82H was larger than those of JLF steels above 750 K. This was considered to be caused by the differences in N and Ta concentration between F82H and JLF steels.

  3. Effect of activated sludge properties and membrane operation conditions on fouling characteristics in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Zhang, Kai; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Oerther, Daniel B; Sorial, George A

    2006-06-01

    Biofouling control is considered to be a major challenge in operating membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for the treatment of wastewater. This study examined the impact of biological, chemical, and physical properties of activated sludge on membrane filtration performance in laboratory-scale MBRs. Sludges with different microbial communities were produced using pseudo-continuous stirred-tank reactors and pseudo-plug flow reactors treating a synthetic paper mill wastewater. Various filtration resistances were used to investigate membrane fouling characteristics, and molecular biology tools targeting 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences were used to identify predominant bacterial populations in the sludges or attached to the fouled membranes. Filtration experiments using axenic cultures of Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Gordonia amarae were also performed to better understand the initiation and development of biofouling. The results showed that the tendency of membranes to biofoul depended upon membrane operating conditions as well as the properties of the activated sludge in the MBR systems. Specific bacterial populations, which were not dominant in the activated sludges, were selectively accumulated on the membrane surface leading to the development of irreversible biofouling.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic properties, antibacterial activity and theoretical studies of a novel difunctional acylhydrazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan-Xian; Zhong, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Yu-jian; Pan, Fu-You

    2011-09-01

    A novel difunctional acylhydrazone has been synthesized by the reaction of 5-methylisoxazole-4-carboyl hydrazine with benzaldehyde and characterized by X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy. The obtained results demonstrate the crystal belongs to triclinic, space group P1¯. Moreover, the spectroscopic properties were evaluated through density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD DFT) calculations. The results reveal that UV-Vis absorption peaks at 194, 217.5 and 290.5 nm are mainly attributed to (p, π) → π ∗, partly (p, π) → π ∗ and partly π → π ∗, and predominantly π → π ∗, respectively, with intraligand charge-transfer transition (ILCT) character. The fluorescence emission peak at 485.96 nm should be assigned to ILCT. In addition, the results of antibacterial activities indicate the title compound has certain modest antibacterial activity as well as the broad-spectrum bacteriostasis, which can be supported by the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). Therefore, the title compound exhibits both antibacterial activity and photoluminescent property, which has potential applications in many fields such as material science and photodynamic therapy.

  5. Investigating the lytic activity and structural properties of Staphylococcus aureus phenol soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Laabei, Maisem; Jamieson, W David; Yang, Yi; van den Elsen, Jean; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous bacterial pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, expresses a large arsenal of virulence factors essential for pathogenesis. The phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of cytolytic peptide toxins which have multiple roles in staphylococcal virulence. To gain an insight into which specific factors are important in PSM-mediated cell membrane disruption, the lytic activity of individual PSM peptides against phospholipid vesicles and T cells was investigated. Vesicles were most susceptible to lysis by the PSMα subclass of peptides (α1-3 in particular), when containing between 10 and 30mol% cholesterol, which for these vesicles is the mixed solid ordered (so)-liquid ordered (lo) phase. Our results show that the PSMβ class of peptides has little effect on vesicles at concentrations comparable to that of the PSMα class and exhibited no cytotoxicity. Furthermore, within the PSMα class, differences emerged with PSMα4 showing decreased vesicle and cytotoxic activity in comparison to its counterparts, in contrast to previous studies. In order to understand this, peptides were studied using helical wheel projections and circular dichroism measurements. The degree of amphipathicity, alpha-helicity and properties such as charge and hydrophobicity were calculated, allowing a structure-function relationship to be inferred. The degree of alpha-helicity of the peptides was the single most important property of the seven peptides studied in predicting their lytic activity. These results help to redefine this class of peptide toxins and also highlight certain membrane parameters required for efficient lysis.

  6. Properties of active gelatin films incorporated with rutin-loaded nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Dammak, Ilyes; de Carvalho, Rosemary Aparecida; Trindade, Carmen Sílvia Fávaro; Lourenço, Rodrigo Vinicius; do Amaral Sobral, Paulo José

    2017-05-01

    Physico-chemical, mechanical, barrier, release profiles and antioxidant properties of composite gelatin based-films incorporated with rutin-loaded oil-in-water nanoemulsion, at various concentrations (5, 10, 15, or 20% (based on the weight of the gelatin powder)) were studied. All the gelatin/rutin-loaded nanoemulsion films displayed higher tensile strength and higher elongation at break than the gelatin control film. The composite films did not show significant differences in thickness, color, brightness and transparency. The structural properties evaluated by FTIR showed that the rutin-loaded nanoemulsion achieved complete miscibility within the gelatin matrix. All the gelatin/nanoemulsion films exhibited compact and homogenous microstructure. In addition, these films showed high antioxidant activities monitored by DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power activities. The Korsmeyer-Peppas model described well the rutin release profile. Rutin release was mainly governed by Fickian diffusion with simultaneous interfering swelling and disintegration phenomena. These results indicate that nanoemulsions-in-gelatin systems can function as potential active packaging systems to enhance shelf life of food products and then to provide a high-quality products (fresh/safe).

  7. Exploration of DAPI analogues: Synthesis, antitrypanosomal activity, DNA binding and fluorescence properties.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Kumar, Arvind; Say, Martial; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Paul, Ananya; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2017-03-10

    The DAPI structure has been modified by replacing the phenyl group with substituted phenyl or heteroaryl rings. Twelve amidines were synthesized and their DNA binding, fluorescence properties, in vitro and in vivo activities were evaluated. These compounds are shown to bind in the DNA minor groove with high affinity, and exhibit superior in vitro antitrypanosomal activity to that of DAPI. Six new diamidines (5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f and 5j) exhibit superior in vivo activity to that of DAPI and four of these compounds provide 100% animal cure at a low dose of 4 × 5 mg/kg i.p. in T. b. rhodesiense infected mice. Generally, the fluorescence properties of the new analogues are inferior to that of DAPI with the exception of compound 5i which shows a moderate increase in efficacy while compound 5k is comparable to DAPI.

  8. Antibiofilm Properties of Interfacially Active Lipase Immobilized Porous Polycaprolactam Prepared by LB Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prabhawathi, Veluchamy; Boobalan, Thulasinathan; Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    Porous biomaterial is the preferred implant due to the interconnectivity of the pores. Chances of infection due to biofilm are also high in these biomaterials because of the presence of pores. Although biofilm in implants contributes to 80% of human infections [1], there are no commercially available natural therapeutics against it. In the current study, glutaraldehyde cross linked lipase was transferred onto a activated porous polycaprolactam surface using Langmuir-Blodgett deposition technique, and its thermostability, slimicidal, antibacterial, biocompatibility and surface properties were studied. There was a 20% increase in the activity of the covalently crosslinked lipase when compared to its free form. This immobilized surface was thermostable and retained activity and stability until 100°C. There was a 2 and 7 times reduction in carbohydrate and 9 and 5 times reduction in biofilm protein of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli respectively on lipase immobilized polycaprolactam (LIP) when compared to uncoated polycaprolactam (UP). The number of live bacterial colonies on LIP was four times less than on UP. Lipase acted on the cell wall of the bacteria leading to its death, which was confirmed from AFM, fluorescence microscopic images and amount of lactate dehydrogenase released. LIP allowed proliferation of more than 90% of 3T3 cells indicating that it was biocompatible. The fact that LIP exhibits antimicrobial property at the air-water interface to hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic bacteria along with lack of cytotoxicity makes it an ideal biomaterial for biofilm prevention in implants. PMID:24798482

  9. Impact of oxygen cut off and starvation conditions on biological activity and physico-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Villain, Maud; Clouzot, Ludiwine; Guibaud, Gilles; Marrot, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical and biological parameters were monitored both throughout different oxygen cut off and starvation (OCS) times (6 h-72 h) and after the restoration of normal operational conditions. Sludge apparent viscosity and soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics were measured to determine the activated sludge (AS) properties. Oxygen transfer, biological activity with specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) measurements during endogenous/exogenous conditions (without any external substrate/with external substrate consumption) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were measured to assess the AS performances. During the different stress times, AS deflocculated as a decrease of apparent viscosity was observed and microorganisms biodegraded the released EPS to survive. After aeration return, and under endogenous conditions, size exclusion chromatographic fingerprints of soluble EPS were modified and macromolecules probably of type humic-like substances appeared in significant quantities. These new macromolecules presumably acted as biosurfactants. Consequently, the liquid surface tension, as well as the oxygen transfer rate (OTR), decreased. Under exogenous conditions, high biological activity (SOUR = 11.8 +/- 2.1 mg(O2 x g(MLVSS)(-1) x h(-1)) compensated the decrease of oxygen transfer. Finally, AS biomass maintained a constant COD degradation rate (15.7 +/- 1.9 mg(O2) x g(MLVSS)(-1) x h(-1)) before and after the disturbances for all times tested. This work demonstrates that AS microorganisms can counteract concomitant oxygen and nutrients shortage when the duration of such a condition does not exceed 72 h. Dissociation of endogenous/exogenous conditions appears to offer an ideal laboratory model to study EPS and biomass activity effects on oxygen transfer.

  10. Mechanical properties of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis in relation to intensity of sport activity.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Karamanidis, Kiros; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; De Monte, Gianpiero; Stafilidis, Savvas

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the mechanical properties (i.e. force strain relationship) of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis relate to the performed sport activity in an intensity-dependent manner. This was done by comparing sprinters with endurance runners and subjects not active in sports. Sixty-six young male subjects (26+/-5 yr; 183+/-6 cm; 77.6+/-6.7 kg) participated in the study. Ten of these subjects were adults not active in sports, 28 were endurance runners and 28 sprinters. All subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary plantar flexion contractions (MVC) on a dynamometer. The distal aponeuroses of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) was visualised by ultrasound during the MVC. The results showed that only the sprinters had higher normalised stiffness (relationship between tendon force and tendon strain) of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis and maximal calculated tendon forces than the endurance runners and the subjects not active in sports. Furthermore, including the data of all 66 examined participants tendon stiffness correlated significantly (r=0.817, P<0.001) with the maximal tendon force achieved during the MVC. It has been concluded that the mechanical properties of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis do not show a graded response to the intensity of the performed sport activity but rather remain at control level in a wide range of applied strains and that strain amplitude and/or frequency should exceed a given threshold in order to trigger additional adaptation effects. The results further indicate that subjects with higher muscle strength possibly increase the margin of tolerated mechanical loading of the tendon due to the greater stiffness of their triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis.

  11. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Localization and Activation Effects on Ganglion Response Properties

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Jordan M.; Amthor, Franklin R.; Keyser, Kent T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The activation and blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) affects retinal ganglion cell light responses and firing rates. This study was undertaken to identify the full complement of mAChRs expressed in the rabbit retina and to assess mAChR distribution and the functional effects of mAChR activation and blockade on retinal response properties. Methods. RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the complement and distribution of mAChRs in the rabbit retina. Extracellular electrophysiology was used to determine the effects of the activation or blockade of mAChRs on ganglion cell response properties. Results. RT-PCR of whole neural retina resulted in the amplification of mRNA transcripts for the m1 to m5 mAChR subtypes. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that all five mAChR subtypes were expressed by subpopulations of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells in the rabbit retina, including subsets of cells in cholinergic and glycinergic circuits. Nonspecific muscarinic activation and blockade resulted in the class-specific modulation of maintained ganglion cell firing rates and light responses. Conclusions. The expression of mAChR subtypes on subsets of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells provides a substrate for both enhancement and suppression of retinal responses via activation by cholinergic agents. Thus, the muscarinic cholinergic system in the retina may contribute to the modulation of complex stimuli. Understanding the distribution and function of mAChRs in the retina has the potential to provide important insights into the visual changes that are caused by decreased ACh in the retinas of Alzheimer's patients and the potential visual effects of anticholinergic treatments for ocular diseases. PMID:20042645

  12. Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of locomotor activity-related neurons in cfos-EGFP mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yue; Carlin, Kevin P; Li, Zongming; McMahon, Douglas G; Brownstone, Robert M; Jordan, Larry M

    2009-12-01

    Although locomotion is known to be generated by networks of spinal neurons, knowledge of the properties of these neurons is limited. Using neonatal transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the c-fos promoter, we visualized EGFP-positive neurons in spinal cord slices from animals that were subjected to a locomotor task or drug cocktail [N-methyl-D-aspartate, serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and acetylcholine (ACh)]. The activity-dependent expression of EGFP was also induced in dorsal root ganglion neurons with electrical stimulation of the neurons. Following 60-90 min of swimming, whole cell patch-clamp recordings were made from EGFP+ neurons in laminae VII, VIII, and X from slices of segments T(12) to L(4). The EGFP+ neurons (n = 55) could be classified into three types based on their responses to depolarizing step currents: single spike, phasic firing, and tonic firing. Membrane properties observed in these neurons include hyperpolarization-activated inward currents (29/55), postinhibitory rebound (11/55), and persistent-inward currents (31/55). Bath application of 10-40 microM 5-HT and/or ACh increased neuronal excitability or output with hyperpolarization of voltage threshold and changes in membrane potential. 5-HT also increased input resistance, reduced the afterhyperpolarization (AHP), and induced membrane oscillations, whereas ACh reduced the input resistance and increased the AHP. In this study, we demonstrate a new way of identifying neurons active in locomotion. Our results suggest that the EGFP+ neurons are a heterogeneous population of interneurons. The actions of 5-HT and ACh on these neurons provide insights into the neuronal properties modulated by these transmitters for generation of locomotion.

  13. Molecular characterization and endosymbiotic localization of the gene encoding D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RuBisCO) form II in the deep-sea vestimentiferan trophosome.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2002-06-01

    To better understand the contribution of micro-organisms to the primary production in the deep-sea gutless tubeworm Lamellibrachia sp., the 16S-rDNA-based phylogenetic data would be complemented by knowledge of the genes that encode the enzymes relevant to chemoautotrophic carbon fixation, such as D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RuBisCO; EC 4.1.1.39). To phylogenetically characterize the autotrophic endosymbiosis within the trophosome of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia sp., bulk trophosomal DNA was extracted and analysed based on the 16S-rRNA- and RuBisCO-encoding genes. The 16S-rRNA- and RuBisCO-encoding genes were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. For the 16S rDNA, a total of 50 clones were randomly selected and analysed directly by sequencing. Only one operational taxonomic unit resulted from the 16S rDNA sequence analysis. This may indicate the occurrence of one endosymbiotic bacterial species within the trophosome of the Lamellibrachia sp. used in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA showed that the Lamellibrachia sp. endosymbiont was closely related to the genus Rhodobacter, a member of the alpha-Protebacteria. For the RuBisCO genes, only the form II gene (cbbM) was amplified by PCR. A total of 50 cbbM clones were sequenced, and these were grouped into two operational RuBisCO units (ORUs) based on their deduced amino acid sequences. The cbbM ORUs showed high amino acid identities with those recorded from the ambient sediment bacteria. To confirm the results of sequence analysis, the localization of the symbiont-specific 16S rRNA and cbbM sequences in the Lamellibrachia sp. trophosome was visualized by in situ hybridization (ISH), using specific probes. Two types of cells, coccoid and filamentous, were observed at the peripheries of the trophosome lobules. Both the symbiont-specific 16S rDNA and cbbM probes hybridized at the same sites coincident with the location of the coccoid cells, whereas the filamentous cells showed no

  14. Phosphatase activity in relation to key litter and soil properties in mature subtropical forests in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; Wen, Dazhi; Liu, Xian

    2015-05-15

    Phosphatase-mediated phosphorus (P) mineralization is one of the critical processes in biogeochemical cycling of P and determines soil P availability in forest ecosystems; however, the regulation of soil phosphatase activity remains elusive. This study investigated the potential extracellular activities of acid phosphomonoesterase (AcPME) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) and how they were related to key edaphic properties in the L horizon (undecomposed litter) and F/H horizon (fermented and humified litter) and the underlying mineral soil at the 0-15cm depth in eight mature subtropical forests in China. AcPME activity decreased significantly in the order of F/H horizon>L horizon>mineral soil horizon, while the order for PDE activity was L horizon=F/H horizon>mineral soil horizon. AcPME (X axis) and PDE (Y axis) activities were positively correlated in all horizons with significantly higher slope in the L and F/H horizons than in the mineral soil horizon. Both AcPME and PDE activities were positively related to microbial biomass C, moisture content and water-holding capacity in the L horizon, and were positively related to soil C:P, N:P and C:N ratios and fine root (diameter≤2mm) biomass in the mineral soil horizon. Both enzyme activities were also interactively affected by forest and horizon, partly due to the interactive effect of forest and horizon on microbial biomass. Our results suggest that modulator(s) of the potential extracellular activity of phosphatases vary with horizon, depending on the relative C, P and water availability of the horizon.

  15. Influence of Space-Flight Factors on the Properties of Microorganisms, Producers of Biologically Active Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, T. K.; Kanaeva, E. N.; Ukraintsev, A. D.; Smolyanaya, G. L.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Shcherbakov, G. Ya.

    2001-07-01

    The following substances were isolated under the influence of space-flight factors in cosmic experiments aboard the Mirorbital station: an MIB-90 monoisolant, which is distinguished by its morphological and biochemical properties and enhanced productivity, was isolated from the Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. Kurstaki var. Z-52culture, which is a producer of the plant protection agent Lepidocide; and MIA-74 and MIP-89 monoisolants, which are highly active toward heavy petroleum fractions (C23 C33), were isolated from the Arthrobacter OC-1culture, which is a producer of biodegradants for petroleum.

  16. Non-Ideal Detonation Properties of Ammonium Nitrate and Activated Carbon Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Atsumi; Echigoya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hidefumi; Ogawa, Terushige; Katoh, Katsumi; Kubota, Shiro; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji

    To obtain a better understanding of detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) and activated carbon (AC) mixtures, steel tube tests with several diameters were carried out for various compositions of powdered AN and AC mixtures and the influence of the charge diameter on the detonation velocity was investigated. The results showed that the detonation velocity increased with the increase of the charge diameter. The experimentally observed values were far below the theoretically predicted values made by the thermodynamic CHEETAH code and they showed so-called non-ideal detonation. The extrapolated detonation velocity of stoichiometric composition to the infinite diameter showed a good agreement with the theoretical value.

  17. Nanocomposites of polymers with layered inorganic nanofillers: Antimicrobial activity, thermo-mechanical properties, morphology, and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songtipya, Ponusa

    In the first part of the thesis, polyethylene/layered silicate nanocomposites that exhibit an antimicrobial activity were synthesized and studied. Their antimicrobial activity was designed to originate from non-leaching, novel cationic modifiers---amine-based surfactants---used as the organic-modification of the fillers. Specifically, PE/organically-modified montmorillonite ( mmt) nanocomposites were prepared via melt-processing, and simultaneous dispersion and antimicrobial activity was designed by proper choice of the fillers' organic modification. The antimicrobial activity was measured against three micotoxinogen fungal strains (Penicillium roqueforti and claviforme, and Fusarium graminearum ). Various mmt-based organofillers, which only differ in the type or amount of their organic modification, were used to exemplify how these surfactants can be designed to render antifungal activity to the fillers themselves and the respective nanocomposites. A comparative discussion of the growth of fungi on unfilled PE and nanocomposite PE films is used to demonstrate how the antimicrobial efficacy is dictated by the surfactant chemistry and, further, how the nanocomposites' inhibitory activity compares to that of the organo-fillers and the surfactants. An attempt to improve the thermomechanical reinforcement of PE/mmt nanocomposites while maintaining their antimicrobial activity, was also carried out by combining two different organically modified montmorillonites. However, a uniform microscopic dispersion could not be achieved through this approach. In the second part of this thesis, a number of fundamental studies relating to structure-property relations in nanocomposites were carried out, towards unveiling strategies that can concurrently optimize selected properties of polymers by the addition of nanofillers. Specifically, the dispersion-crystallinity-reinforcement relations in HDPE/mmt nanocomposites was investigated. The influence of a functional HDPE compatibilizer

  18. Golden Needle Mushroom: A Culinary Medicine with Evidenced-Based Biological Activities and Health Promoting Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Calyn; Hoo, Pearl Ching-Xin; Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Pusparajah, Priyia; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes (enoki, velvet shank, golden needle mushroom or winter mushroom), one of the main edible mushrooms on the market, has long been recognized for its nutritional value and delicious taste. In recent decades, research has expanded beyond detailing its nutritional composition and delved into the biological activities and potential health benefits of its constituents. Many bioactive constituents from a range of families have been isolated from different parts of the mushroom, including carbohydrates, protein, lipids, glycoproteins, phenols, and sesquiterpenes. These compounds have been demonstrated to exhibit various biological activities, such as antitumour and anticancer activities, anti-atherosclerotic and thrombosis inhibition activity, antihypertensive and cholesterol lowering effects, anti-aging and antioxidant properties, ability to aid with restoring memory and overcoming learning deficits, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-bacterial, ribosome inactivation and melanosis inhibition. This review aims to consolidate the information concerning the phytochemistry and biological activities of various compounds isolated from F. velutipes to demonstrate that this mushroom is not only a great source of nutrients but also possesses tremendous potential in pharmaceutical drug development. PMID:28003804

  19. Effect of membranes with various hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties on lipase immobilized activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Jie; Kuo, Chia-Hung; Chen, Chih-I; Yu, Chung-Cheng; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, three membranes: regenerated cellulose (RC), glass fiber (GF) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), were grafted with 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and activated with glutaraldehyde (GA) for lipase covalent immobilization. The efficiencies of lipases immobilized on these membranes with different hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties were compared. The lipase immobilized on hydrophobic PVDF-DA-GA membrane exhibited more than an 11-fold increase in activity compared to its immobilization on a hydrophilic RC-DA-GA membrane. The relationship between surface hydrophobicity and immobilized efficiencies was investigated using hydrophobic/hydrophilic GF membranes which were prepared by grafting a different ratio of n-butylamine/1,4-diaminobutane (BA/DA). The immobilized lipase activity on the GF membrane increased with the increased BA/DA ratio. This means that lipase activity was exhibited more on the hydrophobic surface. Moreover, the modified PVDF-DA membrane was grafted with GA, epichlorohydrin (EPI) and cyanuric chloride (CC), respectively. The lipase immobilized on the PVDF-DA-EPI membrane displayed the highest specific activity compared to other membranes. This immobilized lipase exhibited more significant stability on pH, thermal, reuse, and storage than did the free enzyme. The results exhibited that the EPI modified PVDF is a promising support for lipase immobilization.

  20. Physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities of polysaccharide from floral mushroom cultivated in Huangshan Mountain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Hui; Xu, Jin-Long; Zhang, Jing-Cheng; Liu, Yong; Sun, Han-Ju; Zha, Xueqiang

    2015-10-20

    In this paper, a polysaccharide fraction (FMPS) was purified from the floral mushroom cultivated in Huangshan Mountain for the first time. Physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities of FMPS were investigated. FMPS had an average molecular weight of 7.2×10(5)Da and was composed of glucose. On the basis of FT-IR, NMR and methylation analysis, the repeating unit of FMPS was established as (1→3)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl backbone with 1-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl branches substituted at O-6 position of (1→3)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues. The advanced structure studies indicated that FMPS was a triple-helical polysaccharide. The main hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of FMPS was 23.4nm and it could form a stable system with water in 1.2×10(-2)g/mL solutions. In addition, FMPS exhibited high DPPH radical scavenging activities (79.46% at 5mg/mL) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities (74.18% at 5mg/mL), as well as Fe(2+)chelating activities and ABTS radical scavenging activities to some extent.

  1. Golden Needle Mushroom: A Culinary Medicine with Evidenced-Based Biological Activities and Health Promoting Properties.

    PubMed

    Tang, Calyn; Hoo, Pearl Ching-Xin; Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Pusparajah, Priyia; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes (enoki, velvet shank, golden needle mushroom or winter mushroom), one of the main edible mushrooms on the market, has long been recognized for its nutritional value and delicious taste. In recent decades, research has expanded beyond detailing its nutritional composition and delved into the biological activities and potential health benefits of its constituents. Many bioactive constituents from a range of families have been isolated from different parts of the mushroom, including carbohydrates, protein, lipids, glycoproteins, phenols, and sesquiterpenes. These compounds have been demonstrated to exhibit various biological activities, such as antitumour and anticancer activities, anti-atherosclerotic and thrombosis inhibition activity, antihypertensive and cholesterol lowering effects, anti-aging and antioxidant properties, ability to aid with restoring memory and overcoming learning deficits, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-bacterial, ribosome inactivation and melanosis inhibition. This review aims to consolidate the information concerning the phytochemistry and biological activities of various compounds isolated from F. velutipes to demonstrate that this mushroom is not only a great source of nutrients but also possesses tremendous potential in pharmaceutical drug development.

  2. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  3. Spectral, electrical conductivity and biological activity properties of some new azopyrimidine derivatives and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Khalil, Ekram A; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Gohar, Yousry M; Sweyllam, Amr

    2007-07-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of 5-(o-substituted phenylazo)-6-amino-2-thiouracils and 6-(o-substituted phenylazo)-5-aminouracils containing different substituents are studied at different pH's. The dissociation constants are evaluated and discussed. Phenomenon of tautomerism is more supported by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The electrical conductivity of some ligands and their Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes in the temperature range 293-150K favoured their semiconducting properties where the metal ion forms a bridge to facilitate the flow of the current. The biological activity of some ligands and their complexes are tested against a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that some of the compounds have a well considerable activity against some of the organisms.

  4. Predicting the DPP-IV inhibitory activity pIC₅₀ based on their physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tianhong; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Minjie; Wu, Milin; Su, Qiang; Lu, Wencong; Zhang, Yuhui

    2013-01-01

    The second development program developed in this work was introduced to obtain physicochemical properties of DPP-IV inhibitors. Based on the computation of molecular descriptors, a two-stage feature selection method called mRMR-BFS (minimum redundancy maximum relevance-backward feature selection) was adopted. Then, the support vector regression (SVR) was used in the establishment of the model to map DPP-IV inhibitors to their corresponding inhibitory activity possible. The squared correlation coefficient for the training set of LOOCV and the test set are 0.815 and 0.884, respectively. An online server for predicting inhibitory activity pIC50 of the DPP-IV inhibitors as described in this paper has been given in the introduction.

  5. Relationship between electronic properties and drug activity of seven quinoxaline compounds: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Assle taghipour, Khatoon; van der Spoel, David; Manzetti, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP level of theory were carried out on seven quinoxaline compounds, which have been synthesized as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents. Three conformers were optimized for each compound and the lowest energy structure was found and used in further calculations. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters as well as electron density around oxygen and nitrogen atoms were calculated for each compound. The relationship between the calculated electronic parameters and biological activity of the studied compounds were investigated. Six similar quinoxaline derivatives with possible more drug activity were suggested based on the calculated electronic descriptors. A mechanism was proposed and discussed based on the calculated electronic parameters and bond dissociation energies.

  6. Evaluation of toxicological properties and photodynamic activity of Photolon ointment: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shliakhtsin, Siarhei V.; Trukhachova, Tatsiana V.; Istomin, Yuriy P.; Dunetz, Ludmila N.; Kuvshinov, Andrey V.; Naumovich, Semen A.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate toxicological properties and photodynamic activity of a new ready form of the photosensitizer Photolon (Fotolon) - an ointment for topical use. The data obtained show the use of topicaly applied photosensitizer provides sufficient penetration and accumulation of the active compound in tumor tissue as well as in affected periodontal tissues for the effective PDT. There are several advantages of PDT with topical application of the photosensitizer such as absence of systemic toxic and photosensitive reactions, relatively low cost of the treatment and etc. We have shown that PDT of affected periodontal tissues with local application of Photolon/Fotolon ointment provides an ability of local destruction of microbial cell, located as on the gum surface as in the spatium intercellulare what is extremely important for successful treatment of acute and chronic periodontitis.

  7. Modulation of Activity Profiles for Largazole-Based HDAC Inhibitors through Alteration of Prodrug Properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Largazole is a potent and class I-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor purified from marine cyanobacteria and was demonstrated to possess antitumor activity. Largazole employs a unique prodrug strategy, via a thioester moiety, to liberate the bioactive species largazole thiol. Here we report alternate prodrug strategies to modulate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles of new largazole-based compounds. The in vitro effects of largazole analogues on cancer cell proliferation and enzymatic activities of purified HDACs were comparable to the natural product. However, in vitro and in vivo histone hyperacetylation in HCT116 cells and implanted tumors, respectively, showed differences, particularly in the onset of action and oral bioavailability. These results indicate that, by employing a different approach to disguise the “warhead” moiety, the functional consequence of these prodrugs can be significantly modulated. Our data corroborate the role of the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of compounds to elicit the desired and timely functional response. PMID:25147612

  8. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  9. The influence comparing of activated biochar and conventional biochar on the soil biological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořáčková, Helena; Mykajlo, Irina; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment we have used biochar. This material is the product of the pyrolysis that has shown a positive effect on numerous physical and chemical soil properties. However, its influence on the biological component of the soil is very variable. A number of toxic substances that inhibit the soil productivity may be produced during pyrolysis process. The experiment dealt with the hypothesis concerning biochar toxicity reduction by simulating natural processes in the soil. Biochar has been exposed to aeration in the aquatic environment, enriched with nutrients and a source of native soil microflora. It has been created 6 variants in total, each with four replications. The soils samples have been placed in a phytotron for 90 days. Variants consisted of the soil with fertilizers adding (compost, biochar, activated biochar) and have been prepared as well as variants containing compost and biochar and activated biochar optionally. The highest aboveground biomass production has been estimated in variants containing compost, while the lowest production - in the variants containing conventional biochar. During production comparing of the variants with the conventional biochar, activated biochar and control samples it has been evident that activated biochar promotes plant growth, and in contradiction conventional biochar inhibits it. We will approach to the same conclusions when comparing variants with a combination of conventional biochar + compost and activated biochar + compost. Mineral nitrogen leaching has been another investigated parameter. The highest leaching has occurred in the control variant, while the lowest - in the variant with activated biochar (the leaching of nitrate nitrogen has been negligeable). Our results suggest that activated biochar has the potential; however, it is necessary to carry out similar experiments in the field conditions.

  10. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission.

  11. Physical properties and antibacterial activity of chitosan/acemannan mixed systems.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Lozano, Amada Yerén; Domard, Alain; Velázquez, Carlos A; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-01-22

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of mixed chitosan-acemannan (CS-AC) mixed gels and the antibacterial activity of dilute mixed solutions of both polysaccharides. Physical hydrogels of chitosan comprising varying amounts of non-gelling acemannan were prepared by controlled neutralization of chitosan using ammonia. As the overall acemannan concentration in the mixed hydrogel increased while fixing that of CS, the mechanical strength decreased. These results indicate that AC perturbs the formation of elastic junctions and overall connectivity as it occurs in the isolated CS network. Heterotypic associations between CS and AC leading to the formation of more compact microdomains may be at play in reducing the density of the gel network consolidated by CS, possibly due to shorter gel junctions. Micro-DSC studies at pH 12.0 seem consistent with the suggestion that molecular heterotypic associations between CS and AC may be at play in determining the overall physical properties of the mixed gel systems. In dilute solution, CS showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus but not against Escherichia coli; AC did not exert antimicrobial activity against any of the two bacterial species. In blended solutions of both polysaccharides, as the amount of AC increased, the antimicrobial activity of the system against S. aureus ceased. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate acemannan in chitosan-acemannan gels and that although the mechanical strength decreases due to the presence of AC, the gel network persists even at high amount of AC. This study anticipates that the CS-AC mixed gels may offer promise for the future development of biomaterials such as scaffolds to be used in wound therapy.

  12. Fab-based bispecific antibody formats with robust biophysical properties and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Sereno, Arlene J; Huang, Flora; Lewis, Steven M; Lieu, Ricky L; Weldon, Caroline; Torres, Carina; Fine, Cody; Batt, Micheal A; Fitchett, Jonathan R; Glasebrook, Andrew L; Kuhlman, Brian; Demarest, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    A myriad of innovative bispecific antibody (BsAb) platforms have been reported. Most require significant protein engineering to be viable from a development and manufacturing perspective. Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) and diabodies that consist only of antibody variable domains have been used as building blocks for making BsAbs for decades. The drawback with Fv-only moieties is that they lack the native-like interactions with CH1/CL domains that make antibody Fab regions stable and soluble. Here, we utilize a redesigned Fab interface to explore 2 novel Fab-based BsAbs platforms. The redesigned Fab interface designs limit heavy and light chain mixing when 2 Fabs are co-expressed simultaneously, thus allowing the use of 2 different Fabs within a BsAb construct without the requirement of one or more scFvs. We describe the stability and activity of a HER2×HER2 IgG-Fab BsAb, and compare its biophysical and activity properties with those of an IgG-scFv that utilizes the variable domains of the same parental antibodies. We also generated an EGFR × CD3 tandem Fab protein with a similar format to a tandem scFv (otherwise known as a bispecific T cell engager or BiTE). We show that the Fab-based BsAbs have superior biophysical properties compared to the scFv-based BsAbs. Additionally, the Fab-based BsAbs do not simply recapitulate the activity of their scFv counterparts, but are shown to possess unique biological activity.

  13. Tailored spectroscopic and optical properties in rare earth-activated glass-ceramics planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Davor; Van Tran, Thi Thanh; Dieudonné, Belto; Cristina, Armellini; Berneschi, Simone; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Varas, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Feron, Patrice; Duverger Arfuso, Claire; Cibiel, Gilles; Turrell, Sylvia; Tran Ngoc, Khiem; Boulard, Brigitte; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Glass-ceramic waveguides overcome some of the efficiency problems experienced with conventional waveguides. These two-phase materials are composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The respective volume fractions of the crystalline and amorphous phases determine the properties of the glass ceramic. They also represent a valid alternative to widely used glass hosts such as silica as an effective optical medium for light propagation and luminescence enhancement. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters for solar energy exploitation.

  14. From tunable core-shell nanoparticles to plasmonic drawbridges: Active control of nanoparticle optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Chad P.; Zhang, Hui; Swearer, Dayne F.; Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Hoener, Benjamin S.; Huang, Da; Hoggard, Anneli; Chang, Wei-Shun; Mulvaney, Paul; Ringe, Emilie; Halas, Naomi J.; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are highly sensitive to interparticle distance, giving rise to dramatic but frequently irreversible color changes. By electrochemical modification of individual nanoparticles and nanoparticle pairs, we induced equally dramatic, yet reversible, changes in their optical properties. We achieved plasmon tuning by oxidation-reduction chemistry of Ag-AgCl shells on the surfaces of both individual and strongly coupled Au nanoparticle pairs, resulting in extreme but reversible changes in scattering line shape. We demonstrated reversible formation of the charge transfer plasmon mode by switching between capacitive and conductive electronic coupling mechanisms. Dynamic single-particle spectroelectrochemistry also gave an insight into the reaction kinetics and evolution of the charge transfer plasmon mode in an electrochemically tunable structure. Our study represents a highly useful approach to the precise tuning of the morphology of narrow interparticle gaps and will be of value for controlling and activating a range of properties such as extreme plasmon modulation, nanoscopic plasmon switching, and subnanometer tunable gap applications. PMID:26665175

  15. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR EMERGING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM FUNDAMENTAL ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES - PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  16. Structural similarity based kriging for quantitative structure activity and property relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana L; Falcao, Andre O

    2014-07-28

    Structurally similar molecules tend to have similar properties, i.e. closer molecules in the molecular space are more likely to yield similar property values while distant molecules are more likely to yield different values. Based on this principle, we propose the use of a new method that takes into account the high dimensionality of the molecular space, predicting chemical, physical, or biological properties based on the most similar compounds with measured properties. This methodology uses ordinary kriging coupled with three different molecular similarity approaches (based on molecular descriptors, fingerprints, and atom matching) which creates an interpolation map over the molecular space that is capable of predicting properties/activities for diverse chemical data sets. The proposed method was tested in two data sets of diverse chemical compounds collected from the literature and preprocessed. One of the data sets contained dihydrofolate reductase inhibition activity data, and the second molecules for which aqueous solubility was known. The overall predictive results using kriging for both data sets comply with the results obtained in the literature using typical QSPR/QSAR approaches. However, the procedure did not involve any type of descriptor selection or even minimal information about each problem, suggesting that this approach is directly applicable to a large spectrum of problems in QSAR/QSPR. Furthermore, the predictive results improve significantly with the similarity threshold between the training and testing compounds, allowing the definition of a confidence threshold of similarity and error estimation for each case inferred. The use of kriging for interpolation over the molecular metric space is independent of the training data set size, and no reparametrizations are necessary when more compounds are added or removed from the set, and increasing the size of the database will consequentially improve the quality of the estimations. Finally it is shown

  17. Impact of network activity on the integrative properties of neocortical pyramidal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Destexhe, A; Paré, D

    1999-04-01

    During wakefulness, neocortical neurons are subjected to an intense synaptic bombardment. To assess the consequences of this background activity for the integrative properties of pyramidal neurons, we constrained biophysical models with in vivo intracellular data obtained in anesthetized cats during periods of intense network activity similar to that observed in the waking state. In pyramidal cells of the parietal cortex (area 5-7), synaptic activity was responsible for an approximately fivefold decrease in input resistance (Rin), a more depolarized membrane potential (Vm), and a marked increase in the amplitude of Vm fluctuations, as determined by comparing the same cells before and after microperfusion of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The model was constrained by measurements of Rin, by the average value and standard deviation of the Vm measured from epochs of intense synaptic activity recorded with KAc or KCl-filled pipettes as well as the values measured in the same cells after TTX. To reproduce all experimental results, the simulated synaptic activity had to be of relatively high frequency (1-5 Hz) at excitatory and inhibitory synapses. In addition, synaptic inputs had to be significantly correlated (correlation coefficient approximately 0.1) to reproduce the amplitude of Vm fluctuations recorded experimentally. The presence of voltage-dependent K+ currents, estimated from current-voltage relations after TTX, affected these parameters by <10%. The model predicts that the conductance due to synaptic activity is 7-30 times larger than the somatic leak conductance to be consistent with the approximately fivefold change in Rin. The impact of this massive increase in conductance on dendritic attenuation was investigated for passive neurons and neurons with voltage-dependent Na+/K+ currents in soma and dendrites. In passive neurons, correlated synaptic bombardment had a major influence on dendritic attenuation. The electrotonic attenuation of simulated synaptic inputs was

  18. Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist, exerts anticonvulsive properties.

    PubMed

    Porta, Natacha; Vallée, Louis; Lecointe, Cécile; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Staels, Bart; Bordet, Régis; Auvin, Stéphane

    2009-04-01

    The underlying mechanisms of the ketogenic diet (KD) remain unknown. Involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) has been suggested. The aim of this study was to assess the anticonvulsant properties of fenofibrate, a PPARalpha agonist. Wistar rats were fed at libitum during 14 days by regular diet, KD, regular diet containing 0.2% fenofibrate (F), or KD containing 0.2% fenofibrate (KD + F). Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) threshold and latencies to the onset of status epilepticus induced by lithium-pilocarpine were used to assess diet treatments with anticonvulsive effects. Myoclonic and generalized seizure PTZ thresholds were increased in F- and KD-treated animals in comparison to control. No difference was observed between KD + F group and the others groups (control, F, KD). Latencies to the onset of status epilepticus were increased in F and KD groups compared to control. Fenofibrate exerts anticonvulsive properties comparable to KD in adult rats using PTZ and lithium-pilocarpine models. The underlying mechanisms such as PPARalpha activation and others should be investigated. These findings may provide insights into future directions to simplify KD protocols.

  19. Elution kinetics, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical properties of 11 different antibiotic loaded acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-López, Ruben; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Antelo-Lorenzo, Ramón; Guardia-Olmedo, Juan; Moliz, Juan; Hernández-Quero, José; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements (ALABC) spacers are routinely used in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The objectives of our study were to evaluate different ALABC for elution kinetics, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. A 10 or 20% mixture (w/w) beads of medium viscosity bone cement (DePuy, Inc) and vancomycin (VAN), gentamycin (GM), daptomycin (DAP), moxifloxacin (MOX), rifampicin (RIF), cefotaxime (CTX), cefepime (FEP), amoxicillin clavulanate (AmC), ampicillin (AMP), meropenem (MER), and ertapenem (ERT) were formed and placed into wells filled with phosphate-buffered saline. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 or Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. AmC, AMP, and FEP concentration rapidly decreased after day 2, being almost undetectable at day 4. Sustained and high elution rates were observed with VAN, GM, MOX, and RIF for the 30-day duration of the experiment. DAP, MER, ERT, and CTX elution rates constantly decreased from day 4. All antibiotics tested retained antimicrobial activity proving thermal stability. Mechanical properties of ALABC were maintained except when RIF was used.

  20. Effect of extrusion processing on immune activation properties of hazelnut protein in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tina; Para, Radhakrishna; Gonipeta, Babu; Reitmeyer, Mike; He, Yingli; Srkalovic, Ines; Ng, Perry K W; Gangur, Venu

    2016-09-01

    Although food processing can alter food allergenicity, the impact of extrusion processing on in vivo hazelnut allergenicity is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extrusion processing will alter the immune activation properties of hazelnut protein (HNP) in mice. Soluble extrusion-processed HNP (EHNP) was prepared and evaluated for immune response using an established transdermal sensitization mouse model. Mice were sensitized with identical amounts of EHNP versus raw HNP. After confirming systemic IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses, oral hypersensitivity reaction was quantified by hypothermia shock response (HSR). Mechanism was studied by measuring mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation. Compared to raw HNP, the EHNP elicited slower but similar IgE antibody (Ab) response, lower IgG1 but higher IgG2a Ab response. The EHNP exhibited significantly lower oral HSR as well as MMC degranulation capacity. These results demonstrate that the extrusion technology can be used to produce soluble HNP with altered immune activation properties.

  1. Correlation of Coronal Plasma Properties and Solar Magnetic Field in a Decaying Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Young, Peter R.; Muglach, Karin; Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We present the analysis of a decaying active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode during 2009 December 7-11. We investigated the temporal evolution of its structure exhibited by plasma at temperatures from 300,000 to 2.8 million degrees, and derived the electron density, differential emission measure, effective electron temperature, and elemental abundance ratios of Si/S and Fe/S (as a measure of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect). We compared these coronal properties to the temporal evolution of the photospheric magnetic field strength obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. We find that, while these coronal properties all decreased with time during this decay phase, the largest change was at plasma above 1.5 million degrees. The photospheric magnetic field strength also decreased with time but mainly for field strengths lower than about 70 Gauss. The effective electron temperature and the FIP bias seem to reach a “basal” state (at 1.5 × 106 K and 1.5, respectively) into the quiet Sun when the mean photospheric magnetic field (excluding all areas <10 G) weakened to below 35 G, while the electron density continued to decrease with the weakening field. These physical properties are all positively correlated with each other and the correlation is the strongest in the high-temperature plasma. Such correlation properties should be considered in the quest for our understanding of how the corona is heated. The variations in the elemental abundance should especially be considered together with the electron temperature and density.

  2. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2

    PubMed Central

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B.; Talaga, Anna K.

    2013-01-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5′ end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5′ end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca2+ sensitivity and that the exon 4–encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties. PMID:23669718

  3. Functional properties and antifungal activity of films based on gliadins containing cinnamaldehyde and natamycin.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Mari Pau; Fajardo, Paula; Gartner, Hunter; Gomez-Estaca, Joaquin; Gavara, Rafael; Almenar, Eva; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2014-03-03

    Gliadin films cross-linked with cinnamaldehyde (1.5, 3, and 5%) and incorporated with natamycin (0.5%) were prepared by casting, and their antifungal activity, water resistance, and barrier properties were characterized. Incorporation of natamycin gave rise to films with greater water uptake, weight loss and diameter gain, and higher water vapor and oxygen permeabilities. These results may be associated to a looser packing of the protein chains as a consequence of the presence of natamycin. The different cross-linking degree of the matrices influenced the natamycin migration to the agar test media, increasing from 13.3 to 23.7 (μg/g of film) as the percentage of cinnamaldehyde was reduced from 5% to 1.5%. Antifungal activity of films was assayed against common food spoilage fungi (Penicillium species, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum acutatum). The greatest effectiveness was obtained for films containing natamycin and treated with 5% of cinnamaldehyde. The level of cinnamaldehyde reached in the head-space of the test assay showed a diminishing trend as a function of time, which was in agreement with fungal growth and cinnamaldehyde metabolization. Developed active films were used in the packaging of cheese slices showing promising results for their application in active packaging against food spoilage.

  4. Selective Gating of Neuronal Activity by Intrinsic Properties in Distinct Motor Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many neural circuits show fast reconfiguration following altered sensory or modulatory inputs to generate stereotyped outputs. In the motor circuit of Xenopus tadpoles, I study how certain voltage-dependent ionic currents affect firing thresholds and contribute to circuit reconfiguration to generate two distinct motor patterns, swimming and struggling. Firing thresholds of excitatory interneurons [i.e., descending interneurons (dINs)] in the swimming central pattern generator are raised by depolarization due to the inactivation of Na+ currents. In contrast, the thresholds of other types of neurons active in swimming or struggling are raised by hyperpolarization from the activation of fast transient K+ currents. The firing thresholds are then compared with the excitatory synaptic drives, which are revealed by blocking action potentials intracellularly using QX314 during swimming and struggling. During swimming, transient K+ currents lower neuronal excitability and gate out neurons with weak excitation, whereas their inactivation by strong excitation in other neurons increases excitability and enables fast synaptic potentials to drive reliable firing. During struggling, continuous sensory inputs lead to high levels of network excitation. This allows the inactivation of Na+ currents and suppression of dIN activity while inactivating transient K+ currents, recruiting neurons that are not active in swimming. Therefore, differential expression of these currents between neuron types can explain why synaptic strength does not predict firing reliability/intensity during swimming and struggling. These data show that intrinsic properties can override fast synaptic potentials, mediate circuit reconfiguration, and contribute to motor–pattern switching. PMID:26156983

  5. Antiadherent and Antibiofilm Activity of Humulus lupulus L. Derived Products: New Pharmacological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Micota, Bartlomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Jedrejek, Dariusz; Wieckowska-Szakiel, Marzena

    2013-01-01

    New antimicrobial properties of products derived from Humulus lupulus L. such as antiadherent and antibiofilm activities were evaluated. The growth of gram-positive but not gram-negative bacteria was inhibited to different extents by these compounds. An extract of hop cones containing 51% xanthohumol was slightly less active against S. aureus strains (MIC range 31.2–125.0 μg/mL) than pure xanthohumol (MIC range 15.6–62.5 μg/mL). The spent hop extract, free of xanthohumol, exhibited lower but still relevant activity (MIC range 1-2 mg/mL). There were positive coactions of hop cone, spent hop extracts, and xanthohumol with oxacillin against MSSA and with linezolid against MSSA and MRSA. Plant compounds in the culture medium at sub-MIC concentrations decreased the adhesion of Staphylococci to abiotic surfaces, which in turn caused inhibition of biofilm formation. The rate of mature biofilm eradication by these products was significant. The spent hop extract at MIC reduced biofilm viability by 42.8%, the hop cone extract by 74.8%, and pure xanthohumol by 86.5%. When the hop cone extract or xanthohumol concentration was increased, almost complete biofilm eradication was achieved (97–99%). This study reveals the potent antibiofilm activity of hop-derived compounds for the first time. PMID:24175280

  6. Statistical properties of longitudinal time-activity data for use in human exposure modeling.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Kristin; McCurdy, Thomas; Glen, Graham; Nysewander, Melissa; Errickson, April; Forbes, Susan; Graham, Stephen; McCurdy, Lisa; Smith, Luther; Tulve, Nicolle; Vallero, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal of improving the parameterization of human activity algorithms in EPA's exposure modeling efforts. Despite the longitudinal, multi-season nature of the study, participant non-compliance with the protocol over time did not play a major role in data collection. The diversity (D)--a ranked intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)-- and lag-one autocorrelation (A) statistics of study participants are presented for time spent in outdoor, motor vehicle, residential, and other-indoor locations. Day-type (workday versus non-workday, and weekday versus weekend), season, temperature, and gender differences in the time spent in selected locations and activities are described, and D & A statistics are presented. The overall D and ICC values ranged from approximately 0.08-0.26, while the mean population rank A values ranged from approximately 0.19-0.36. These statistics indicate that intra-individual variability exceeds explained inter-individual variability, and low day-to-day correlations among locations. Most exposure models do not address these behavioral characteristics, and thus underestimate population exposure distributions and subsequent health risks associated with environmental exposures.

  7. Changes in antioxidant activities and physicochemical properties of Kapi, a fermented shrimp paste, during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Faithong, Nandhsha; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-10-01

    Changes in chemical composition, physical properties and antioxidant activities of Kapi were monitored during fermentation for 12 months. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl), ABTS (2, 2 - azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) radical scavenging activity as well as ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) gradually increased as the fermentation time increased, particularly during the first 8 months (P < 0.05). Thereafter, the decreases in DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities were observed (P < 0.05), whereas FRAP remained constant (P > 0.05). The continuous increases in ammonia nitrogen, formaldehyde nitrogen and amino nitrogen contents were noticeable within the first 8 months (P < 0.05), indicating the formation of peptides and free amino acids via the hydrolysis of protein by both microbial and indigenous proteases. Browning intensity most likely caused by the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were concomitantly observed throughout fermentation, as evidenced by the decreases in lightness (L*-value), but the increases in redness (a*-value) and yellowness (b*-value). Low level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in Kapi was found during 12 months. Antioxidant activities of Kapi were more likely governed by the low molecular weight peptides, amino acids as well as Maillard reaction products generated during fermentation.

  8. Enhanced catalytic activity and inhibited biofouling of cathode in microbial fuel cells through controlling hydrophilic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Liu, Jia; Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Yujie

    2016-11-01

    The hydrophilicity of activated carbon cathode directly determines the distribution of three-phase interfaces where oxygen reduction occurs. In this study, activated carbon cathodes are fabricated by using hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and amphiphilic LA132 at various weight ratio to investigate the effect of hydrophilic property on cathode performance. Contact angle tests confirm the positive impact of LA132 content on hydrophilicity. Cathode with 67 wt% LA132 content shows the highest electrochemical activity as exchange current density increases by 71% and charge transfer resistance declines by 44.6% compared to that of PTFE cathode, probably due to the extended reaction interfaces by optimal hydrophilicity of cathode so that oxygen reduction is facilitated. As a result, the highest power density of 1171 ± 71 mW m-2 is obtained which is 14% higher than PTFE cathode. In addition to the hydrophilicity, this cathode had more negative charged surface of catalyst layer, therefore the protein content of cathodic biofilm decreased by 47.5%, indicating the effective bacterial inhibition when 67 wt% LA132 is used. This study shows that the catalytic activity of cathode is improved by controlling proper hydrophilicity of cathode, and that biofilm can be reduced by increasing hydrophilicity and lowering the surface potential.

  9. Antiadherent and antibiofilm activity of Humulus lupulus L. derived products: new pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Rozalski, Marcin; Micota, Bartlomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Stochmal, Anna; Jedrejek, Dariusz; Wieckowska-Szakiel, Marzena; Rozalska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    New antimicrobial properties of products derived from Humulus lupulus L. such as antiadherent and antibiofilm activities were evaluated. The growth of gram-positive but not gram-negative bacteria was inhibited to different extents by these compounds. An extract of hop cones containing 51% xanthohumol was slightly less active against S. aureus strains (MIC range 31.2-125.0  μg/mL) than pure xanthohumol (MIC range 15.6-62.5  μg/mL). The spent hop extract, free of xanthohumol, exhibited lower but still relevant activity (MIC range 1-2 mg/mL). There were positive coactions of hop cone, spent hop extracts, and xanthohumol with oxacillin against MSSA and with linezolid against MSSA and MRSA. Plant compounds in the culture medium at sub-MIC concentrations decreased the adhesion of Staphylococci to abiotic surfaces, which in turn caused inhibition of biofilm formation. The rate of mature biofilm eradication by these products was significant. The spent hop extract at MIC reduced biofilm viability by 42.8%, the hop cone extract by 74.8%, and pure xanthohumol by 86.5%. When the hop cone extract or xanthohumol concentration was increased, almost complete biofilm eradication was achieved (97-99%). This study reveals the potent antibiofilm activity of hop-derived compounds for the first time.

  10. Evaluation of nonlinear properties of epileptic activity using largest Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana M.; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Sysoev, Ilya V.

    2016-04-01

    Absence seizures are known to be highly non-linear large amplitude oscillations with a well pronounced main time scale. Whilst the appearance of the main frequency is usually considered as a transition from noisy complex dynamics of baseline EEG to more regular absence activity, the dynamical properties of this type of epileptiformic activity in genetic absence models was not studied precisely. Here, the estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent from intracranial EEGs of 10 WAG/Rij rats (genetic model of absence epilepsy) was performed. Fragments of 10 seizures and 10 episodes of on-going EEG each of 4 s length were used for each animal, 3 cortical and 2 thalamic channels were analysed. The method adapted for short noisy data was implemented. The positive values of the largest Lyapunov exponent were found as for baseline as for spike wave discharges (SWDs), with values for SWDs being significantly less than for on-going activity. Current findings may indicate that SWD is a chaotic process with a well pronounced main timescale rather than a periodic regime. Also, the absence activity was shown to be less chaotic than the baseline one.

  11. Physicochemical properties and in vitro antioxidant activities of polysaccharide from Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. pulp.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kexue; Zhang, Yanjun; Nie, Shaoping; Xu, Fei; He, Shuzhen; Gong, Deming; Wu, Gang; Tan, Lehe

    2017-01-02

    A water-soluble polysaccharide from Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (jackfruit) pulp (JFP-Ps) was purified and its physicochemical properties were investigated. The in vitro antioxidant activities of JFP-Ps was evaluated by measuring DPPH and OH radicals scavenging activities, as well as reducing power. The results showed that JFP-Ps contained 79.12% of total sugar, 5.83% of protein, 15.65% of uronic acid, and 15 kinds of amino acids with high levels of Asp, Glu, Val, Leu and Lys. JFP-Ps was mainly composed of Rha, Ara, Gal, Glc, Xyl and GalA, with an average molecular weight of 1668kDa. FT-IR results showed the bands at the range of 1200-850cm(-1) suggested the presence of carbohydrates in JFP-Ps. The results of antioxidant activities showed that JFP-Ps exhibited strong DPPH and OH radical scavenging activities, with a relatively lower reducing power, suggesting that JFP-Ps can be exploited as effective natural antioxidant applications in medical and food industries.

  12. Propolis induced antibacterial activity and other technical properties of cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, S; Higazy, A; Hebeish, A

    2013-08-01

    Propolis is a gum gathered by honey bees from various plants; the honey bees use propolis to seal holes in their honey combs, smooth out the internal wall and protect the entrance against intruders. It is composed of 50% resin (flavonoids and related phenolic acid), 30% wax, 10% essential oils, 5% pollen and 5% various organic components. As a natural mixture, propolis is widely used in medicine, cosmetics and food. So far no attempts have been yet made to make use of propolis in the realm of textile finishing. Current work presents the first systemic study targeted to build up a scientific basis for production of cotton textiles having antibacterial activity and other useful properties by making use of propolis as eco-friendly finish within the scope of green strategy. Propolis extract solution (70/30 ethanol/water) of 10% concentration was prepared as the stock. Different amounts of the latter were used along with a crosslinking agent and catalyst for treatment of cotton fabrics as per pad-dry-cure technique. Antibacterial activity of the so treated fabrics was obtained through monitoring the efficiency of the interaction of propolis with cotton cellulose. This interaction was expressed as inhibition zone diameter after the treated fabrics were exposed to (G+ve) and (G-ve) bacteria. Other properties include crease recovery, tensile strength and elongation at break. Factors affecting these properties such as type, nature and concentration of the crosslinking agent, concentration of propolis, and conditions of curing were investigated. In addition characterization of the propolis containing modified cotton fabrics including demonstration of the antibacterial activity, SEM, FTIR, durability to washing, UV protection and water repellency were performed. Based on results obtained, it is concluded that application of propolis along with glyoxal and Al2(SO4)3catalyst using pad-dry (3min/80°C), cure (5/140°C) bring about cotton textile with superior antibacterial

  13. Development of spontaneous activity and response properties of primary lagenar neurons in the chick.

    PubMed

    Galicia, Salvador; Cortes, Celso; Galindo, Fabian; Flores, Amira

    2010-04-01

    Here, we report for the first time developmental changes in spontaneous activity and in response properties of single nerve fibers from the macular chick lagena. Such aspects are important in order to get insight into the functional role of the lagena which remains undetermined. For this purpose, we used intracellular and extracellular single-unit recording techniques in an isolated inner ear preparation from the chicken at ages E15 and P1. At E15, afferent fibers displayed a low irregular spontaneous discharge rate (41 +/- 14 spikes/s, CV = 1.17 +/- 0.1), which was replaced by regular high frequency spontaneous activity at P1 (CV = 0.48 +/- 0.8, 89 +/- 27 spikes/s). During the developmental period including E15, the percentage of silent neurons was 60% while that of P1 was 40%. The synaptic activity was higher at E15 than at P1. The action potential waveform generated at E15 had small amplitude and derivative depolarization, and consequently, a large duration in correlation with respect to action potential waveform at P1 (respectively: 53 +/- 2 vs. 65 +/- 3 mV, 60 +/- 11 vs. 109 +/- 20 mV/ms, 3.6 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.12 ms). In addition, we recognized two response dynamics to the injection of current steps: phasic, or rapidly adapting neurons and tonic, or slowly adapting neurons. Our results indicate similar developmental processes for the lagena as described for the vestibular system in other species, in agreement with the known morphological characteristics of this otholitic end organ. The presence of more than one subtype of afferent neuron also correlates with previous reports on vestibular afferents with analogous electrophysiological properties, strongly suggesting the vestibular nature of the lagena.

  14. Effect of the physicochemical properties of binary ionic liquids on lipase activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Yao, Peipei; Yu, Xinxin; Huang, Xirong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate is used as a model reaction to determine the activity and stability of Candida rugosa lipase in binary ionic liquids (ILs). The binary ILs consist of hydrophobic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim]PF6) and a small amount of hydrophilic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ([Bmim]NO3) or 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([Bmim]CF3SO3) or 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim]BF4). The activity and the stability of lipase are first correlated with the physicochemical properties of the binary ILs. In the three binary IL systems, both the hydrophilicity and the polarity of the systems increase with the increase of the content of hydrophilic ILs (HILs). At a fixed concentration of HIL, they vary in a descending order of [Bmim]PF6/[Bmim]NO3>[Bmim]PF6/[Bmim]CF3SO3>[Bmim]PF6/[Bmim]BF4. This order is in contrast with the order of the lipase conformation stability, i.e., the higher the polarity of ILs, the more unstable the lipase conformation. However, both the activity and the stability of lipase depend on the type and the content of the HIL in binary ILs, showing a complex dependency. Analysis shows that the catalytic performance of lipase in the binary ILs is affected not only by the direct influence of the ILs on lipase conformation, but also through their indirect influence on the physicochemical properties of water. The present study helps to explore binary IL mixtures suitable for lipase-based biocatalysis.

  15. Olvanil: a non-pungent TRPV1 activator has anti-emetic properties in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kit-Man; Ngan, Man-Piu; Wai, Man-Keung; Yeung, Chi-Kong; Andrews, Paul L R; Percie du Sert, Nathalie; Rudd, John A

    2010-02-01

    Anti-emetic drugs such as the tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonists are useful to control emesis induced by diverse challenges. Evidence suggests pungent capsaicin-like TRPV1 activators also have broad inhibitory anti-emetic activity. However, pungent compounds are associated with undesirable effects including adverse actions on the cardiovascular system and on temperature homeostasis. In the present investigations using the ferret, we examine if the non-pungent vanilloid, olvanil, has useful anti-emetic properties without adversely affecting behaviour, blood pressure or temperature control. Olvanil (0.05-5 mg/kg, s.c.) was compared to the pungent vanilloid, resiniferatoxin (RTX; 0.1 mg/kg, s.c.), and to the anandamide reuptake inhibitor, AM404 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), for a potential to inhibit emesis induced by apomorphine (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), copper sulphate (50 mg/kg, intragastric), and cisplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Changes in blood pressure and temperature were also recorded using radiotelemetry implants. In peripheral administration studies, RTX caused transient hypertension, hypothermia and reduced food and water intake, but also significantly inhibited emesis induced by apomorphine, copper sulphate, or cisplatin. Olvanil did not have a similar adverse profile, and antagonised apomorphine- and cisplatin-induced emesis but not that induced by copper sulphate. AM404 reduced only emesis induced by cisplatin without affecting other parameters measured. Following intracerebral administration only olvanil antagonised cisplatin-induced emesis, but this was associated with transient hypothermia. In conclusion, olvanil demonstrated clear anti-emetic activity in the absence of overt cardiovascular, homeostatic, or behavioural effects associated with the pungent vanilloid, RTX. Our studies indicate that non-pungent vanilloids may have a useful spectrum of anti-emetic properties via central and/or peripheral mechanisms after peripheral administration.

  16. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-10-06

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems.

  17. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems. PMID:26378047

  18. Medicinal properties of mangiferin, structural features, derivative synthesis, pharmacokinetics and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biologically active and potentially therapeutically useful pharmacophores from natural products has been a long-term focus in the pharmaceutical industry. The recent emergence of a worldwide obesity and Type II diabetes epidemic has increased focus upon small molecules that can modulate energy metabolism, insulin sensitivity and fat biology. Interesting preliminary work done on mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L., portends potential for this pharmacophore as a novel parent compound for treating metabolic disorders. MGF is comprised of a C-glucosylated xanthone. Owing to the xanthone chemical structure, MGF has a redox active aromatic system and has antioxidant properties. MGF exerts varied and impressive metabolic effects in animals, improving metabolic disorders. For example we have discovered that MGF is a novel activator of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, leading to enhancement of carbohydrate utilization in oxidative metabolism, and leading to increased insulin sensitivity in animal models of obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, recent unbiased proteomics studies revealed that MGF upregulates proteins pivotal for mitochondrial bioenergetics and downregulates proteins controlling de novo lipogenesis in liver, helping to explain protective effects of MGF in prevention of liver steatosis. Several chemical studies have achieved synthesis of MGF, suggesting possible synthetic strategies to alter its chemical structure for development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information. Ultimately, chemical derivatization studies could lead to the eventual development of novel therapeutics based upon the parent pharmacophore structure. Here we provide comprehensive review on chemical features of MGF, synthesis of its derivatives, its pharmacokinetics and biological activities.

  19. The microstructural stability and mechanical properties of two low activation martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, M.; Marmy, P.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J.; Briguet, C.; Rezai-Aria, F.; Gavillet, D.

    1996-12-31

    A desirable feature of future magnetically confined fusion reactors is the prospect of producing low level radioactive waste. In order to minimize the volume of radioactive material, in particular from the first wall and blanket structures, reduced long term activation alloys are being developed. Here, a low activation composition of a martensitic 9% Cr steel has been studied, based on the DIN (Deutsches Inst. fuer Normung) 1.4914 composition (MANET) but replacing Ni, Mo and Nb by the low activation elements W, V and Ta. Two casts were produced from high purity components, in which the effects of controlled additions of Mn (0.58 and 0.055 wt. %) and N (7 and 290 wt. ppm) were studied, so that the final compositions resulted in one cast with high Mn and low N (steel A) and the other with the opposite conditions (steel B). The two steels were evaluated in terms of structural stability and mechanical properties under tensile, fatigue and fracture toughness tests. It has been found that both alloys have a DBTT below room temperature, which in the case of the steel A is 70 K below that of MANET. Although the tensile strength is somewhat below that of the parent steel, both steels have longer fatigue life.

  20. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite.

    PubMed

    David, Jan; Smejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Sárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified hydroponic method was applied to determine the effects of their potassium salts on Zea mays seedlings roots with respect to the plant weight, root length, root division, and starch and protein content. The relations between the determined parameters were evaluated through Principal Component Analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The results indicated that the most important factor determining the biological activity of South-Moravian lignite potassium humates is related to the nature of self-assemblies, while the chemical composition had no direct connection with the root growth of Zea mays seedlings. It was demonstrated a controlled processing that provided humic substances with different chemical and physicochemical properties and variable biological activity.

  1. Anti-allergic properties of the bromeliaceae Nidularium procerum: inhibition of eosinophil activation and influx.

    PubMed

    Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Amendoeira, Fábio C; Gomes, Gleice S; Zanon, Cristiane; Chedier, Luciana M; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C; Frutuoso, Válber S; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Weller, Peter F; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Patrícia T

    2005-12-01

    New therapeutic approaches for the treatment of allergic diseases can be aided by the development of agents capable of regulating eosinophilic leukocytes. Here, we evaluated the anti-allergic properties of a crude extract of the Brazilian bromeliaceae Nidularium procerum, focusing on its effects on allergic eosinophilia. By studying allergic pleurisy in actively sensitized C57Bl/6 mice, we observed that pretreatment with N. procerum (2 mg/kg; i.p.) reduced pleural eosinophil influx triggered by allergen challenge. N. procerum was also able to reduce lipid body numbers found within infiltrating eosinophils, indicating that N. procerum in vivo is able to affect both migration and activation of eosinophils. Consistently, pretreatment with N. procerum blocked pleural eosinophil influx triggered by PAF or eotaxin, key mediators of the development of allergic pleural eosinophilia. The effect of N. procerum was not restricted to eosinophils, since N. procerum also inhibited pleural neutrophil and mononuclear cell influx. Of note, N. procerum failed to alter the acute allergic reaction, characterized by mast cell degranulation, oedema, and cysteinyl leukotriene release. N. procerum also had direct effects on murine eosinophils, since it inhibited both PAF- and eotaxin-induced eosinophil chemotaxis on an in vitro chemotactic assay. Therefore, N. procerum may be a promising anti-allergic therapy, inasmuch as it presents potent anti-eosinophil activity.

  2. Antifungal properties of ethanolic extract and its active compounds from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana (Florin) heartwood.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tsair-Bor; Chang, Hui-Ting; Hsieh, Chun-Chun; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2008-07-01

    The ethanolic extract of Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana heartwood was screened for antifungal compounds by agar dilution assay and liquid chromatography. Two compounds, beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin, responsible for the antifungal property of C. macrolepis var. formosana heartwood were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and identified by 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The antifungal activities of these two compounds were further evaluated against total 15 fungi, including wood decay fungi, tree pathogenic fungi and molds. The hexane soluble fraction showed the strongest antifungal activities among all fractions. beta-Thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin exhibited not only very strong antifungal activity, but also broad antifungal spectrum. The MIC values of beta-thujaplicin and gamma-thujaplicin were in the range of 5.0-50.0 microg/ml. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to study the structural change of fungal hyphae induced by beta-thujaplicin. Strong cell wall shrinkage indicated the fungicidal effect could be attributed to the combined actions of metal chelating and cytoplasm leakage. It also suggests that the role of metal chelating is indispensable in the design of environmental-friendly fungicides.

  3. Photocatalytic properties and selective antimicrobial activity of TiO2(Eu)/CuO nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Robert; Dworniczek, Ewa; Caplovicova, Maria; Monfort, Olivier; Lianos, Panagiotis; Caplovic, Lubomir; Plesch, Gustav

    2016-05-01

    TiO2(Eu)/CuO nanocomposites were prepared by precipitation method. The anatase nanocrystallites with a size of 26 nm exhibited well crystallized and characteristical dipyramidal morphology and {1 0 1} and {0 0 1} faceting. Transmission electron microscopy photographs with atomic resolution showed that the Eu(III) dopants were bounded on surface of titania. In the composites, the CuO nanocrystals exhibiting a monoclinic tenorite structure with a size in the range from 2 to 5 nm were grafted to the surface of titania. The influence of copper(II) oxide led to distinct selectivity in the photocatalytic and antimicrobial properties of the investigated TiO2(Eu)/CuO nanocomposites. While the presence of CuO nanocrystals strongly increased the photocatalytic production of hydrogen by ethanol reforming, it decreased the activity in photoinduced total mineralization of phenol comparing with non-modified TiO2(Eu). In investigated TiO2(Eu)/CuO powders, the photoinduced antimicrobial activity against membranes of Enterococcus species was influenced by the selective binding of CuO to the surface of the microorganism leading to distinct selectivity in their action. The activity against Enterococcus faecalis was higher than against Enterococcus faecium.

  4. Effects of serpentinite fertilizer on the chemical properties and enzyme activity of young spruce soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Januszek, Kazimierz; Małek, Stanisław; Wanic, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental plots used in the study were located in the middle forest zone (elevation: 900-950 m a.s.l.) on two nappes of the flysch Carpathians in southern Poland. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of serpentinite in combination with nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers on selected chemical properties of the soil and activity of dehydrogenase and urease in the studied soils. All fertilizer treatments significantly enriched the tested soils in magnesium. The use of serpentinite as a fertilizer reduced the molar ratio of exchangeable calcium to magnesium, which facilitated the uptake of magnesium by tree roots due to competition between calcium and magnesium. After one year of fertilization on the Wisła experimental plot, the pH of the Ofh horizon increased, while the pH of the mineral horizons significantly decreased. Enrichment of serpentinite with nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers stimulated the dehydrogenase activity in the studied organic horizon. The lack of a negative effect of the serpentinite fertilizer on enzyme activity in the spruce stand soil showed that the concentrations of the heavy metals added to the soil were not high enough to be toxic and indicated the feasibility of using this fertilizer in forestry.

  5. Islet neogenesis associated protein (ingap): structural and dynamical properties of its active pentadecapeptide.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrés N; Mogilner, Inés G; Grigera, J Raúl; Borelli, M Inés; Del Zotto, Hector; Gagliardino, Juan José

    2009-02-01

    We have studied the structural and dynamical properties of the biologically active pentadecapeptide of the islet neogenesis associated protein (INGAP-PP) and of two other pentadecapeptides with the same amino acid composition but randomly scrambled primary sequences, using molecular dynamic simulations. Our data demonstrates that whilst the peptides with scrambled sequences show no definite prevalent structure in solution, INGAP-PP maintains a notably stable tertiary fold, namely, a conformer with a central beta-sheet and closed C-terminal. Such structure resembles the one corresponding to the amino acid sequence of human pancreatitis associated protein-1 (PAP-1), which presents 85% sequence homology with INGAP. These results could reasonably explain why the two scrambled sequences tested showed no biological activity, while INGAP-PP significantly increases beta-cells function and mass both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The capability of INGAP-PP to temporarily adopt other closely related conformations offers also a plausible explanation for the 50 fold experimental difference in potency between the active pentadecapeptide and the whole protein. They also suggest that the C-terminal region of INGAP-PP may plausibly be the locus for its interaction with the cell receptor. Consequently, the knowledge gathered through our data can help to obtain more potent INGAP-PP analogs, suitable for the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  6. Flow and magnetic field properties in the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 12396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Böhm, F.; Balthasar, H.; Fischer, C. E.; Kuckein, C.; Bello González, N.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Diercke, A.; Feller, A.; González Manrique, S. J.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Pator Yabar, A.; Rezaei, R.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Improved measurements of the photospheric and chromospheric three-dimensional magnetic and flow fields are crucial for a precise determination of the origin and evolution of active regions. We present an illustrative sample of multi-instrument data acquired during a two-week coordinated observing campaign in August 2015 involving, among others, the GREGOR solar telescope (imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy) and the space missions Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The observations focused on the trailing part of active region NOAA 12396 with complex polarity inversion lines and strong intrusions of opposite polarity flux. The GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) provided Stokes IQUV spectral profiles in the photospheric Si I λ1082.7 nm line, the chromospheric He I λ1083.0 nm triplet, and the photospheric Ca I λ1083.9 nm line. Carefully calibrated GRIS scans of the active region provided maps of Doppler velocity and magnetic field at different atmospheric heights. We compare quick-look maps with those obtained with the ``Stokes Inversions based on Response functions'' (SIR) code, which furnishes deeper insight into the magnetic properties of the region. We find supporting evidence that newly emerging flux and intruding opposite polarity flux are hampering the formation of penumbrae, i.e., a penumbra fully surrounding a sunspot is only expected after cessation of flux emergence in proximity to the sunspots.

  7. The Effect of Physical Activity on the Properties of Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontaga, I.; Paeglitis, A.

    2000-09-01

    The effect of sports training or lack of physical activity on the properties of bone tissue is investigated. People with normal physical activity, sportsmen, and hypodynamic persons are tested. Ultrasound as a safe and noninvasive method is used. In normal activity and after short-time sports training or bed rest, the maximum ultrasound velocity is observed in the middle part of the tibia diaphysis because this region has the highest bending moment. Long-time sports training (more than seven years) in basketball and freestyle skiing alters the distribution of ultrasound velocity along the tibia: the maximum velocity is found in the distal diaphysis of the tibia due to the existence of high mechanical stresses in this region caused by the intense external impact loads and the calf muscle contraction. The maximum velocity for rowers is in the middle diaphysis or in the region between the proximal and middle diaphysis, since high impact loads are not characteristic of their foot joints. Long-time hypodynamia weakens the distal diaphysis of the tibia due to the lack of naturally occuring high stresses in this part of the bone.

  8. Unusual ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of anoxic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Watson, G M; Yu, J P; Tabita, F R

    1999-03-01

    The predominant pool of organic matter on earth is derived from the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas, catalyzed primarily by the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). By virtue of its capacity to use molecular oxygen as an alternative and competing gaseous substrate, the catalytic efficiency of RubisCO and the enzyme's ability to assimilate CO2 may be severely limited, with consequent environmental and agricultural effects. Recent genomic sequencing projects, however, have identified putative RubisCO genes from anoxic Archaea. In the present study, these potential RubisCO sequences, from Methanococcus jannaschii and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, were analyzed in order to ascertain whether such sequences might encode functional proteins. We also report the isolation and properties of recombinant RubisCO using sequences obtained from the obligately anaerobic hyperthermophilic methanogen M. jannaschii. This is the first description of an archaeal RubisCO sequence; this study also represents the initial characterization of a RubisCO molecule that has evolved in the absence of molecular oxygen. The enzyme was shown to be a homodimer whose deduced sequence, along with other recently obtained archaeal RubisCO sequences, differs substantially from those of known RubisCO molecules. The recombinant M. jannaschii enzyme has a somewhat low, but reasonable kcat, however, unlike previously isolated RubisCO molecules, this enzyme is very oxygen sensitive yet it is stable to hyperthermal temperatures and catalyzes the formation of the expected carboxylation product. Despite inhibition by oxygen, this unusual RubisCO still catalyzes a weak yet demonstrable oxygenase activity, with perhaps the lowest capacity for CO2/O2 discrimination ever encountered for any RubisCO.

  9. Relaxin Affects Smooth Muscle Biophysical Properties and Mechanical Activity of the Female Mouse Colon.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Garella, Rachele; Idrizaj, Eglantina; Nistri, Silvia; Francini, Fabio; Baccari, Maria Caterina

    2015-12-01

    The hormone relaxin (RLX) has been reported to influence gastrointestinal motility in mice. However, at present, nothing is known about the effects of RLX on the biophysical properties of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Other than extending previous knowledge of RLX on colonic motility, the purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the hormone to induce changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) and on sarcolemmal ion channels of colonic SMCs of mice that are related to its mechanical activity. To this aim, we used a combined mechanical and electrophysiological approach. In the mechanical experiments, we observed that RLX caused a decay of the basal tone coupled to an increase of the spontaneous contractions, completely abolished by the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). The electrophysiological results indicate for the first time that RLX directly affects the SMC biophysical properties inducing hyperpolarization of RMP and cycles of slow hyperpolarization/depolarization oscillations. The effects of RLX on RMP were abolished by ODQ as well as by a specific inhibitor of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, KT5823. RLX reduced Ca(2+) entry through the voltage-dependent L-type channels and modulated either voltage- or ATP-dependent K(+) channels. These effects were abolished by ODQ, suggesting the involvement of the nitric oxide/guanylate cyclase pathway in the effects of RLX on RMP and ion channel modulation. These actions of RLX on membrane properties may contribute to the regulation of the proximal colon motility by the nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

  10. Nano-TiO2@Ag/PVC film with enhanced antibacterial activities and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fajia; Liu, Hu; Li, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Huanyu; Zhu, Danping; Zheng, Yingying; Li, Chaorong

    2012-03-01

    The antibacterial and photocatalytic PVC film was prepared by doping heteronanostructure of TiO2 nanowire@Ag nanoparticles. TiO2 nanowire with 50-60 nm in diameter and 0.1 mm in length was prepared by a hydrothermal method, and Ag nanopartical about 5-10 nm in diameter was grafted on the surface of TiO2 nanowire evenly in the solution. The antimicrobial ability and the photocatalytic properties of the nano-TiO2@Ag/PVC film were systematically investigated by changing the influence factors such as the content of nano-TiO2@Ag, pH value and the cultivation condition. It confirmed that the nano-TiO2@Ag nanostructure could increase the antibacterial efficiency of the PVC film. Further, nano-TiO2@Ag/PVC film also showed enhanced photocatalytic activity to decompose Rhodmine B (RhB).

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  12. Mechanical properties of low activating martensitic 8?10% CrWVTa steels of type OPTIFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.; Ehrlich, K.

    1996-10-01

    A series of low activating steels (OPTIFER-Ia, Ib, II, III and IV) has been developed as materials for the first wall and blanket structures of a future fusion device. The steels have been characterized by metallurgical examinations and by tests of the mechanical properties using tensile, impact bending and creep rupture tests. In comparison with conventional martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels (e.g., MANET and P91 steels) a strong improvement of upper shelf impact energy and a remarkable shift to lower DBTT = -118°C was obtained, whereas other mechanical data are similar. Fracture toughness can be optimized by proper selection of austenitization temperature, quenching and tempering treatment with a preference of a lower austenitizing temperature.

  13. Low-temperature mechanical and magnetic properties of the reduced activation martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui-Li; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Rui; Wang, Xian-Ping; Fang, Qian-Feng; Liu, Chang-Song; Suo, Jin-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical and magnetic properties as well as their relationship in the reduced activation martensitic (RAM) steel were investigated in the temperature range from -90°C to 20°C. Charpy impact tests show that the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the RAM steel is about -60°C. Low-temperature tensile tests show that the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and total elongation values increase as temperature decreases, indicating that the strength and plasticity below the DBTT are higher than those above the DBTT. The coercive field ( H C) in the scale of logarithm decreases linearly with the increasing temperature and the absolute value of the slope of ln H C versus temperature above the DBTT is obviously larger than that below the DBTT, also confirmed in the T91 steel. The results indicate that the non-destructive magnetic measurement is a promising candidate method for the DBTT detection of ferromagnetic steels.

  14. Low cycle fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Nagasaka, T.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.; Namba, C.

    2000-12-01

    To investigate fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (9Cr-2W steel, JLF-1), low cycle fatigue tests were performed in air at room temperature under axial strain control for a complete push-pull condition. The strain rate was 0.4% s-1. Cyclic strain-hardening was observed within the initial 20 cycles, and then cyclic strain-softening occurred gradually until the final failure, though the plastic strain range did not change significantly. Tensile peak stresses in hysteresis curves measured at around half the number of cycles to failure depended on the total strain range. The drop in the peak stress by the cyclic strain-softening increased with decreasing total strain range. The regression curve of the total strain range against the fatigue life was formulated using the Manson-Coffin equation and the fatigue life of JLF-1 steel was compared with that of 8Cr-2W steel.

  15. Quantitative structure property relationships for the adsorption of pharmaceuticals onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, E R V; Drewes, J E

    2010-01-01

    Isotherms were determined for the adsorption of five pharmaceutical residues, primidone, carbamazepine, ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac, to Calgon Filtrasorb 300 powdered activated carbon (PAC). The sorption behavior was examined in ultra-pure and wastewater effluent organic matter (EfOM) matrices, where more sorption was observed in the ultra-pure water for PAC doses greater than 10 mg/L suggesting the presence of EfOM hinders the sorption of the pharmaceuticals to the PAC. Adsorption behaviors were described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Quantitative structure property relationships (QSPRs) in the form of polyparameter linear solvation energy relationships were developed for simulating the Freundlich adsorption capacity in both ultra-pure and EfOM matrices. The significant 3D-based descriptors for the QSPRs were the molar volume, polarizability and hydrogen-bond donor parameters.

  16. Sensitivity of temporal excitation properties to the neuronal element activated by extracellular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Grill, Warren M

    2004-01-15

    Measurements of the chronaxies and refractory periods with extracellular stimuli have been used to conclude that large diameter axons are responsible for the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS). We hypothesized that because action potential initiation by extracellular stimulation occurs in the axons of central nervous system (CNS) neurons, the chronaxies and refractory periods determined using extracellular stimulation would be similar for cells and axons. Computer simulation was used to determine the sensitivity of chronaxie and refractory period to the neural element stimulated. The results demonstrate that chronaxies and refractory periods were dependent on the polarity of the extracellular stimulus and the electrode-to-neuron distance, and indicate that there is little systematic difference in either chronaxies or refractory periods between local cells or axons of passage with extracellular stimulation. This finding points out the difficulty in drawing conclusions regarding which neuronal elements are activated based on extracellular measurements of temporal excitation properties.

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures and its photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Shanwen; Fang, Xiaoxin; Huang, Honghong; Li, Lun; Wang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Huihu

    2016-12-01

    An ultrathin layer of amorphous carbon coated C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose as precursor in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS) were used for the characterization of as-prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of C@ZnO samples were investigated using PL spectroscopy. The microstructure analysis results show that the glucose content has a great influence on the size, morphology, crystallinity and surface chemical states of C@ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, the as-prepared C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures exhibit the enhanced photocatalytic activity and good photostability for methyl orange dye degradation due to its high adsorption ability and its improved optical characteristics.

  18. Thermal and Kinetic Properties of Motions in a Prominence Activation and Nearby Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese; Landi, E.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the thermal properties of a prominence activation and motions in a nearby loop. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us to analyze the thermal and kinetic energy of the moving sources as functions of time. The loop and prominence are most apparent in lines formed at temperatures below 250,000 K. We find that in most cases the temperature distribution of plasma in a moving feature changes relatively little over time periods of about 20 minutes.

  19. Effect of silicon on the microstructure and mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shenghu; Rong, Lijian

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Si in the range of 0.05-0.77 wt.% on the microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels has been investigated. An increase in Si content affected the prior austenite grain size resulting in an increase in the tensile strength at room temperature. The tensile strength of steels tested above 773 K did not change significantly with the addition of Si, which was due to the diminished carbide hardening effect and boundary strengthening effect. Detailed fractographic analysis revealed that tear fractures occurred in the samples tensile tested at room temperature, while cup and cone fractures were found in samples tensile tested at temperatures above 773 K, which were induced by the easing of dislocation pile-ups. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) decreased when the Si content increased to 0.22 wt.%. However, the DBTT increased when the Si content reached 0.77 wt.% and this was due to the precipitation of Laves phase. The RAFM steel with approximately 0.22 wt.% Si content was found to possess an optimized combination of microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness.

  20. Hancornia speciosa latex for biomedical applications: physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciane Madureira; Floriano, Juliana Ferreira; Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Magno, Lais Nogueira; da Mota, Lígia Souza Lima Silveira; Peixoto, Nei; Mrué, Fátima; Melo-Reis, Paulo; Lino Junior, Ruy de Souza; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Pablo José

    2014-09-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa is used in folk medicine for treatment of several diseases, such as acne, warts, diabetes, gastritis and inflammation. In this work, we describe the biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic properties of H. speciosa latex and its potential application in medicine. The physical-chemical characterization was carried out following different methodologies (CHN elemental analyses; thermogravimetric analyses and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). The biocompatibility was evaluated through cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests in fibroblast mouse cells and the angiogenic properties were evaluated using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay model. The physical-chemical results showed that the structure of Hancornia speciosa latex biomembrane is very similar to that of Hevea brasiliensis (commercially available product). Moreover, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that H. speciosa latex is biocompatible with life systems and can be a good biomaterial for medical applications. The CAM test showed the efficient ability of H. speciosa latex in neovascularization of tissues. The histological analysis was in accordance with the results obtained in the CAM assay. Our data indicate that the latex obtained from H. speciosa and eluted in water showed significant angiogenic activity without any cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on life systems. The same did not occur with H. speciosa latex stabilized with ammonia. Addition of ammonia does not have significant effects on the structure of biomembranes, but showed a smaller cell survival and a significant genotoxicity effect. This study contributes to the understanding of the potentialities of H. speciosa latex as a source of new phytomedicines.

  1. Temperature and time dependence of the electro-mechanical properties of flexible active fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Atitallah, H.; Ounaies, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2016-04-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) are comprised of piezoelectric fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix. AFCs use interdigitated electrodes, which produce electric field lines parallel to the fiber direction, thus taking advantage of the larger d 33 piezoelectric coefficient. The polymer volume content of the AFCs is generally more than 50%; since polymers tend to have behaviors affected by their viscoelastic characteristics especially at elevated temperatures, it is necessary to understand the thermo-electro-mechanical behavior of AFCs at different loading rates. In this study, mechanical, electrical and electromechanical properties of AFCs were measured at different isothermal temperatures, namely 25 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C and at different loading rates. The measurements of all the properties of AFCs were done along the fiber direction. It was found that at higher temperatures, the modulus and tensile strength decreased for all strain rates and the strain at failure increased. The remnant polarization increased with decrease in frequency and increase in temperature; however, the coercive field decreased with temperature and was not affected by the frequency. Due to the viscoelastic behavior of the epoxy, the piezoelectric coefficient d 33 increased at higher temperature and lower frequency. It was also noted that this coefficient is dependent on the magnitude of the electric field.

  2. Properties of collagen gels cross-linked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid deriviate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Liu, Wentao; Tian, Zhenhua; Li, Conghu; Li, Guoying

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the properties of collagen gel, N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid derivative (NHS-AA) was introduced into the formation of collagen fibrils. NHS-AA with different [NHS-AA]/[NH2] ratios (0.1-1.5, calculated by [ester group] of NHS-AA and [NH2] of lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen) was added after, simultaneously with or before the formation of collagen fibrils (abbreviated CAF, CSF and CBF, respectively) to obtain different collagen gels. With the same dose of NHS-AA, the cross-linking degree for CAF was lower than those for CSF and CBF. The formation of collagen fibrils was restrained by NHS-AA for CSF and CBF while that for CAF was unaffected. When the dose of NHS-AA increased from 0.1 to 1.5, the water contents of CSF and CBF increased while that of CAF had no obvious change. With lower dose of NHS-AA (0.1), CAF possessed higher value of G' (87.3Pa) and the best thermal stability (47.6°C). As the ratio of [NHS-AA]/[NH2] increased to 1.5, CSF had the maximum value of G' (288.8Pa) and CAF had the best thermal stability (52.9°C). These results showed collagen gels with different properties could be prepared by adding NHS-AA with different adding sequence and dose.

  3. Antiangiogenic and antimetastatic properties of Neovastat (AE-941), an orally active extract derived from cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Eric; Falardeau, Pierre; Mousa, Shaker A; Dimitriadou, Violetta; Pepin, Marie-Claude; Wang, Taiqi; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A

    2002-01-01

    A novel naturally occurring antiangiogenic agent isolated from cartilage, referred to as Neovastat (AE-941), was examined for its efficacy against tumor neovascularization and progression. Exposure to Neovastat results in ex ovo antiangiogenic properties in the chorioallantoid membrane of chicken embryo (71% decrease in the angiogenic index as compared to the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treated control embryos, P < 0.0001). Oral administration of Neovastat inhibits bFGF-induced angiogenesis in the Matrigel mouse model (87.5% decrease in hemoglobin as compared to the bFGF-treated control implants, P < 0.0001). Neovastat also induces a dose response decrease of lung metastases in the Lewis lung carcinoma model (oral administration; 69.1% of inhibition obta