Science.gov

Sample records for ruminal fermentation urinary

  1. Ruminal fermentation and degradation patterns, protozoa population and urinary purine derivatives excretion in goats and wethers fed diets based on olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, D R Yáñez; García, A I Martín; Moumen, A; Alcaide, E Molina

    2004-10-01

    Olives leaves, accrued during the processing of olive harvests for oil extraction, are poor in N, rich in crude fat and ADF (1.19, 8.03 and 28.2 g/100 g of DM, respectively), and relatively low in condensed tannins (11.1 mg/g of DM). Three experiments were conducted in a 2 x 3 (two animal species: goats vs. wethers; and three experimental diets: olive leaves without or with polyethylene glycol supply and olive leaves supplemented with barley and faba beans) factorial design to evaluate ruminal degradation and passage kinetics (Exp. 1), fermentation pattern and protozoa population (Exp. 2), and urinary purine derivatives excretion (Exp. 3). Polyethylene glycol was supplied to evaluate the effects of condensed tannins contained in olive leaves. Ruminal degradability of CP was low in both goats and wethers, although goats showed higher (P < 0.05) values than wethers. Supplementation of olive leaves with barley and faba beans increased (P < 0.001) ruminal degradability of DM and CP. Both goats and wethers fed olive leaves showed similarly low particulate fractional passage rates (0.021 and 0.023/h, respectively). Ingestion of olive leaves promoted low NH3-N and VFA concentrations, which reflect poor microbial activity. These concentrations, especially that of VFA, increased when barley and faba beans were added. Ingestion of olive leaves affected ruminal protozoa: Entodiniomorphida showed low concentrations and Holotricha completely disappeared. When animals received a diet based on olive leaves, barley, and faba beans, Holotricha appeared in the ruminal liquor and Entodiniomorphida increased (P < 0.001). In goats and wethers fed olive leaves alone, urinary allantoin excretion was very low (163 and 164 micromol/kg BW0.75 in goats and wethers, respectively), and moderate values (352 and 389 micromol/kg BW0.75 in goats and wethers, respectively) were observed when a diet of olive leaves, barley, and faba beans was fed. The polyethylene glycol supply did not have an

  2. Urinary excretion of purine derivatives, microbial protein synthesis, nitrogen use, and ruminal fermentation in sheep and goats fed diets of different quality.

    PubMed

    Carro, M D; Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Ranilla, M J; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare N balance, microbial N flow (MNF) estimated from purine derivatives (PD) urinary excretion, and its variation when estimated using purine bases:N ratios in liquid associated bacteria (LAB) from models reported in the literature (MNF - response models) or measured ratios in liquid and solid-associated bacterial (SAB) pellets (MNF-LAB+SAB), diet digestibility, and rumen fermentation variables in sheep and goats fed 3 different practical, quality diets to study interspecies differences concerning N use as accurately as possible. Four mature female Merino sheep and 4 mature female Granadina goats, each fitted with a ruminal cannula, were used in 3 × 3 Latin square design with an extra animal. Two experimental diets had a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 70:30 (DM basis) with alfalfa hay (ALC) or grass hay (GRC) as forage, and the third diet contained 70% concentrate and 30% alfalfa hay (CAL). All animals were fed the diets at a daily rate of 56 g/kg BW(0.75) to minimize feed selection. Digestibility of nutrients was similar (P = 0.16 to 0.88) in the 2 species, but some animal species × diet interactions (P = 0.01 to 0.04) were detected. There were small differences between the fermentation patterns of both animal species. Goats showed decreased VFA concentrations (P = 0.005) and butyrate proportions (P = 0.04), and greater acetate proportions (P = 0.02) compared with sheep, whereas N intake and percentage of N intake excreted in feces were similar in both species (P = 0.58 and 0.15, respectively), the percentage excreted via the urine was greater in goats compared with sheep (P < 0.001). As a consequence, sheep had greater (P < 0.001) N retention than goats (averaged across diets, 32.6% and 16.1% of N intake, respectively). There were no differences (P = 0.95) between animal species in total PD excretion, but goats showed a greater excretion of allantoin (P = 0.01) and decreased excretion of xanthine (P = 0.008) and

  3. Ruminal fermentation and degradation patterns, protozoa population, and urinary purine derivatives excretion in goats and wethers fed diets based on two-stage olive cake: effect of PEG supply.

    PubMed

    Yáñez Ruiz, D R; Moumen, A; Martín García, A I; Molina Alcaide, E

    2004-07-01

    Three experiments were conducted in Granadina goats and Segureña wethers fed at maintenance level to evaluate the effect of including a mixture of barley and a new by-product derived from olive oil extraction (two-stage dried olive cake) on ruminal degradation and passage kinetics (Exp. 1), fermentation pattern and protozoa population (Exp. 2), and urinary purine derivatives excretion (Exp. 3). Polyethylene glycol was supplied to the animals to evaluate the effects of tannins contained in the by-product. The experimental diets were as follows: alfalfa hay and alfalfa hay plus a concentrate, formulated with two-stage dried olive cake, barley, and a mineral-vitamin mixture either with or without the addition of polyethylene glycol to the drinking water. The inclusion of two-stage dried olive cake in the diet resulted in an increase of condensed tannins. Ruminal VFA concentration in goats and wethers increased (P < 0.05) and ammonia N (NH3-N) concentration decreased (P < 0.05). The inclusion of two-stage dried olive cake decreased (P < 0.001) urinary allantoin excretion only in wethers. Ruminal degradation profiles and fractional passage rates were similar in goats and wethers. The polyethylene glycol supply increased (P < 0.001) DM and N degradation rates in both animal species but did not modify the fractional passage rate. Ruminal fermentation patterns were also similar in goats and wethers and were affected by polyethylene glycol supply. In general, Entodiniomorphida and Holotricha protozoa counts were higher (P < 0.05) in the rumen of goats than of wethers. Protozoa count in wethers responded more to polyethylene glycol supply than in goats. The present work presents the first data obtained from a comparative study with sheep and goats concerning urinary excretion of purine derivatives. The excretion was similar in both animal species when fed alfalfa hay; however, polyethylene glycol affected only urinary allantoin excretion in wethers. Results suggest a

  4. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Role of fermentation acid absorption in the regulation of ruminal pH.

    PubMed

    Aschenbach, J R; Penner, G B; Stumpff, F; Gäbel, G

    2011-04-01

    Highly fermentable diets are rapidly converted to organic acids [i.e., short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid] within the rumen. The resulting release of protons can constitute a challenge to the ruminal ecosystem and animal health. Health disturbances, resulting from acidogenic diets, are classified as subacute and acute acidosis based on the degree of ruminal pH depression. Although increased acid production is a nutritionally desired effect of increased concentrate feeding, the accumulation of protons in the rumen is not. Consequently, mechanisms of proton removal and their quantitative importance are of major interest. Saliva buffers (i.e., bicarbonate, phosphate) have long been identified as important mechanisms for ruminal proton removal. An even larger proportion of protons appears to be removed from the rumen by SCFA absorption across the ruminal epithelium, making efficiency of SCFA absorption a key determinant for the individual susceptibility to subacute ruminal acidosis. Proceeding initially from a model of exclusively diffusional absorption of fermentation acids, several protein-dependent mechanisms have been discovered over the last 2 decades. Although the molecular identity of these proteins is mostly uncertain, apical acetate absorption is mediated, to a major degree, via acetate-bicarbonate exchange in addition to another nitrate-sensitive, bicarbonate-independent transport mechanism and lipophilic diffusion. Propionate and butyrate also show partially bicarbonate-dependent transport modes. Basolateral efflux of SCFA and their metabolites has to be mediated primarily by proteins and probably involves the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) and anion channels. Although the ruminal epithelium removes a large fraction of protons from the rumen, it also recycles protons to the rumen via apical sodium-proton exchanger, NHE. The latter is stimulated by ruminal SCFA absorption and salivary Na(+) secretion and protects epithelial integrity. Finally

  5. Ruminal fermentation of propylene glycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Tjandrakusuma, Siska; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2007-08-22

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h, all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in decreasing order, all increased with incubation time. Addition of any of the three substrates somewhat decreased acetate formation, while addition of either propylene glycol increased propionate formation but decreased that of butyrate. R- and S-propylene glycol did not differ significantly in either their rates of disappearance or the products formed when they were added to the fermentation medium. Fermentations of rumen fluid containing propylene glycol emitted the sulfur-containing gases 1-propanethiol, 1-(methylthio)propane, methylthiirane, 2,4-dimethylthiophene, 1-(methylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl disulfide, 1-(propylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl trisulfide, 3,5-diethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2-ethyl-1,3-dithiane, and 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trithiane. Metabolic pathways that yield each of these gases are proposed. The sulfur-containing gases produced during propylene glycol fermentation in the rumen may contribute to the toxic effects seen in cattle when high doses are administered for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Bacterial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of non-ruminants: influence of fermented feeds and fermentable carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Niba, A T; Beal, J D; Kudi, A C; Brooks, P H

    2009-10-01

    The search for alternatives to in-feed antibiotics in animal nutrition has highlighted the role dietary modulation can play in improving gut health. Current antibiotic replacement strategies have involved the use of microbes beneficial to health (probiotics) or fermentable carbohydrates (prebiotics) or both (synbiotics). The present review recognises the contribution of fermented feeds and fermentable carbohydrates in improving the gut environment in non-ruminants. It proposes the screening of probiotic bacteria for the production of fermented feeds and supplementation of these feeds with fermentable carbohydrates prior to feeding animals. It is suggested that the term 'fermbiotics' should be used to describe this intervention strategy.

  7. Ruminal degradation of quercetin and its influence on fermentation in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Berger, L M; Blank, R; Zorn, F; Wein, S; Metges, C C; Wolffram, S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ruminal degradation of the flavonol quercetin and to determine its potential antimicrobial effects on ruminal fermentation in cows. Ruminal degradation of quercetin (0 or 100μmol/L, respectively) as well as its influence on ruminal gas production (0, 50, or 100μmol of quercetin equivalents/L, respectively, either applied as aglycone or as its glucorhamnoside rutin) using concentrate, grass hay, and straw as substrates were investigated in vitro using the Hohenheim gas test. Additionally, the influence of quercetin on ruminal concentrations of volatile fatty acids and their molar ratio in rumen-fistulated, nonlactating cows (n=5) after intraruminal application of quercetin as aglycone or as rutin (0, 10, or 50mg of quercetin equivalents/kg of BW, respectively) was evaluated. Quercetin was rapidly and extensively degraded, whereby the disappearance of quercetin was accompanied by the simultaneous appearance of 2metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 4-methylcatechol. In vitro total gas and methane production were not reduced by the addition of quercetin aglycone or rutin, respectively, using concentrate, grass hay, and straw as substrates. As expected, however, effects of the substrates used were detected on total gas and methane production. Highest gas production was found with concentrate, whereas values obtained with grass hay and straw were lower. Relative methane production was highest with grass hay compared with concentrate and straw (27.1 vs. 25.0 and 25.5%). After intraruminal application of the quercetin aglycone or rutin, respectively, neither total concentration nor the molar ratio of volatile fatty acids in the rumen fluid were influenced. Results of the present study show that quercetin underlies rapid ruminal degradation, whereby 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 4-methylcatechol are the main metabolites, whereas the latter one most likely is formed by dehydroxylation from 3

  8. Effect of essential oils on ruminal fermentation and lactation performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tekippe, J A; Tacoma, R; Hristov, A N; Lee, C; Oh, J; Heyler, K S; Cassidy, T W; Varga, G A; Bravo, D

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments (Exp.) were conducted to study the effects of dietary addition of an essential oil product (EO) based on eugenol and cinnamaldehyde (0, control, or 525 mg/d of Xtract 6965; Pancosma SA, Geneva, Switzerland) on ruminal fermentation, total-tract digestibility, manure gas emissions, N losses, and dairy cow performance. In Exp. 1 and 3, the EO supplement was added to the vitamin-mineral premix. In Exp. 2, EO was top-dressed. Experiments 1 and 2 were crossover designs with 20 multiparous Holstein cows each (including 4 and 8 ruminally cannulated cows, respectively) and consisted of two 28-d periods. Intake of dry matter did not differ between treatments. Most ruminal fermentation parameters were unaffected by EO. Concentrations of ammonia (Exp. 1), isobutyrate (Exp. 1 and 2), and isovalerate (Exp. 1) were increased by EO compared with the control. Apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients was similar between treatments, except total-tract digestibility of neutral-detergent fiber, which was increased or tended to be increased by EO in Exp. 1 and 2. Manure emissions of ammonia and methane were unaffected by EO. Blood plasma and milk urea-N concentrations and urinary N losses were increased by EO compared with the control in Exp. 1, but not in Exp. 2. Average milk yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield, and milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations were unaffected by treatment. Urinary excretion of purine derivatives, a marker for microbial protein production in the rumen, was greater in cows receiving the EO diet in Exp. 1, but not in Exp. 2. In Exp. 3, 120 Holstein cows were grouped in pens of 20 cows/pen in a 12-wk experiment to study production effects of EO. Dry matter intake, milk yield (a trend for a slight decrease with EO), milk components, milk urea N, and feed efficiency were similar between treatments. Results from these studies indicate that supplementing dairy cows with 525 mg/d of Xtract 6965 had moderate effects on ruminal

  9. In vitro ruminal fermentation of treated alfalfa silage using ruminal inocula from high and low feed-efficient lactating cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to assess the effect of two additives on alfalfa silage and on in vitro ruminal fermentation when using ruminal inocula prepared from high feed-efficient (HE) and low feed-efficient (LE) lactating cows. Second and third cut alfalfa was harvested at 40% bloom stage, treated with con...

  10. Modelling digestive constraints in non-ruminant and ruminant foregut-fermenting mammals.

    PubMed

    Munn, Adam J; Streich, W Jürgen; Hummel, Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2008-09-01

    It has been suggested that large foregut-fermenting marsupial herbivores, the kangaroos and their relatives, may be less constrained by food intake limitations as compared with ruminants, due mainly to differences in their digestive morphology and management of ingesta particles through the gut. In particular, as the quality of forage declines with increasing contents of plant fibre (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin; measured as neutral-detergent fibre, NDF), the tubiform foregut of kangaroos may allow these animals to maintain food intakes more so than ruminants like sheep, which appear to be limited by fibrous bulk filling the foregut and truncating further ingestion. Using available data on dry matter intake (DMI, g kg(-0.75) d(-1)), ingesta mean retention time (MRT, h), and apparent digestibility, we modelled digestible dry matter intake (DDMI) and digestible energy intake (DEI) by ruminant sheep (Ovis aries) and by the largest marsupial herbivore, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus). Sheep achieved higher MRTs on similar DMIs, and hence sheep achieved higher DDMIs for any given level of DMI as compared with kangaroos. Interestingly, MRT declined in response to increasing DMI in a similar pattern for both species, and the association between DMI and plant NDF contents did not support the hypothesis that kangaroos are less affected by increasing fibre relative to sheep. However, when DEI was modelled according to DDMIs and dietary energy contents, we show that the kangaroos could meet their daily maintenance energy requirements (MER) at lower levels of DMI and on diets with higher fibre contents compared with sheep, due largely to the kangaroos' lower absolute maintenance and basal energy metabolisms compared with eutherians. These results suggest that differences in the metabolic set-point of different species can have profound effects on their nutritional niche, even when their digestive constraints are similar, as was the case for these ruminant and non-ruminant

  11. Effect of dietary crude protein level and degradability on ruminal fermentation and nitrogen utilization in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; Etter, R P; Ropp, J K; Grandeen, K L

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of two ruminally degradable protein (RDP) levels in diets containing similar ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) and metabolizable protein (MP) concentrations on ruminal fermentation, digestibility, and transfer of ruminal ammonia N into milk protein in dairy cows. Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows were allocated to two dietary treatments in a crossover design. The diets (adequate RDP [ARDP] and high RDP [HRDP]), had similar concentrations of RUP and MP, but differed in CP/RDP content. Ruminal ammonia was labeled with 15N and secretion of tracer in milk protein was determined for a period of 120 h. Ammonia concentration in the rumen tended to be greater (P = 0.06) with HRDP than with ARDP. Microbial N flow to the duodenum, ruminal digestibility of dietary nutrients, DMI, milk yield, fat content, and protein content and yield were not statistically different between diets. There was a tendency (P = 0.07) for increased urinary N excretion, and blood plasma and milk urea N concentrations were greater (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) with HRDP compared with ARDP. Milk N efficiency was decreased (P = 0.01) by the HRDP diet. The cumulative secretion of ammonia 15N into milk protein, as a proportion of 15N dosed intraruminally, was greater (P = 0.003) with ARDP than with HRDP. The proportions of bacterial protein originating from ammonia N and milk protein originating from bacterial or ammonia N averaged 43, 61, and 26% and were not affected by diet. This experiment indicated that excess RDP in the diet of lactating dairy cows could not be efficiently utilized for microbial protein synthesis and was largely lost through urinary N excretion. At a similar MP supply, increased CP or RDP concentration of the diet would result in decreased efficiency of conversion of dietary N into milk protein and less efficient use of ruminal ammonia N for milk protein syntheses.

  12. Redundancy, resilience, and host specificity of the ruminal microbiota: implications for engineering improved ruminal fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The ruminal microbial community is remarkably diverse, containing 100s of different bacterial and archaeal species, plus many species of fungi and protozoa. Molecular studies have identified a “core microbiome” dominated by phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but also containing many other taxa. The rumen provides an ideal laboratory for studies on microbial ecology and the demonstration of ecological principles. In particular, the microbial community demonstrates both redundancy (overlap of function among multiple species) and resilience (resistance to, and capacity to recover from, perturbation). These twin properties provide remarkable stability that maintains digestive function for the host across a range of feeding and management conditions, but they also provide a challenge to engineering the rumen for improved function (e.g., improved fiber utilization or decreased methane production). Direct ruminal dosing or feeding of probiotic strains often fails to establish the added strains, due to intensive competition and amensalism from the indigenous residents that are well-adapted to the historical conditions within each rumen. Known exceptions include introduced strains that can fill otherwise unoccupied niches, as in the case of specialist bacteria that degrade phytotoxins such as mimosine or fluoroacetate. An additional complicating factor in manipulating the ruminal fermentation is the individuality or host specificity of the microbiota, in which individual animals contain a particular community whose species composition is capable of reconstituting itself, even following a near-total exchange of ruminal contents from another herd mate maintained on the same diet. Elucidation of the interactions between the microbial community and the individual host that establish and maintain this specificity may provide insights into why individual hosts vary in production metrics (e.g., feed efficiency or milk fat synthesis), and how to improve herd performance. PMID

  13. Effects of ruminal doses of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oba, M; Mewis, J L; Zhining, Z

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate effects of a ruminal dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells. Six ruminally cannulated nonlactating nonpregnant Holstein cows (body weight=725±69.6kg) were assigned to treatments in a 3×3 Latin square design with 7-d periods; 1d for data and sample collection followed by a 6-d washout period. Cows were fed a diet containing whole-crop barley silage and dry ground corn, and dietary neutral detergent fiber and crude protein contents were 41.8 and 13.2% [dry matter (DM) basis], respectively. Treatment was a pulse-dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch (3.0, 3.0, and 2.85kg of DM, respectively; providing similar amounts of hexose across the treatments) through the ruminal cannulas. All treatments were given with alfalfa silage (1.75kg DM) to prevent acute rumen acidosis. Rumen pH was continuously monitored, and rumen fluid was sampled at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180min after the dose. In addition, ruminal papillae were sampled from the ventral sac at 180min after the dose. Ruminal dosing with sucrose and lactose, compared with corn starch, increased ruminal total volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportion of butyrate from 60 to 180min after the dose, and expression of genes for sodium hydrogen exchanger isoforms 1 and 2, and ATPase isoform 1 in ruminal epithelial cells. Ruminal dosing with sucrose, compared with lactose and corn starch, decreased rumen pH from 120 to 180min after the dose and molar proportion of acetate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min after the dose, and increased molar proportion of propionate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min, and expression of genes involved in butyrate metabolism (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase isoform 1) and anion exchange across ruminal apical cell membrane (putative anion transporter isoform 1). These results suggest that replacing dietary starch with sugars may affect ruminal

  14. Potential of tannin-rich plants for modulating ruminal microbes and ruminal fermentation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rira, M; Morgavi, D P; Archimède, H; Marie-Magdeleine, C; Popova, M; Bousseboua, H; Doreau, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutritional strategies for decreasing methane production by ruminants fed tropical diets, combining in vitro and in vivo methods. The in vitro approach was used to evaluate the dose effect of condensed tannins (CT) contained in leaves of Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, and Manihot esculenta (39, 75, and 92 g CT/kg DM, respectively) on methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics. Tannin-rich plants (TRP) were incubated for 24 h alone or mixed with a natural grassland hay based on Dichanthium spp. (control plant), so that proportions of TRP were 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0. Methane production, VFA concentration, and fermented OM decreased with increased proportions of TRP. Numerical differences on methane production and VFA concentration among TRP sources may be due to differences in their CT content, with greater effects for L. leucocephala and M. esculenta than for G. sepium. Independently of TRP, the response to increasing doses of CT was linear for methane production but quadratic for VFA concentration. As a result, at moderate tannin dose, methane decreased more than VFA. The in vivo trial was conducted to investigate the effect of TRP on different ruminal microbial populations. To this end, 8 rumen-cannulated sheep from 2 breeds (Texel and Blackbelly) were used in two 4 × 4 Latin square designs. Diets were fed ad libitum and were composed of the same feeds used for the in vitro trial: control plant alone or combined with pellets made from TRP leaves at 44% of the diet DM. Compared to TRP, concentration of Ruminococcus flavefaciens was greater for the control diet and concentration of Ruminococcus albus was least for the control diet. The methanogen population was greater for Texel than for Blackbelly. By contrast, TRP-containing diets did not affect protozoa or Fibrobacter succinogenes numbers. Hence, TRP showed potential for mitigating methane production by ruminants. These findings suggest

  15. Response to various amounts of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract on ruminal metabolism in cattle.

    PubMed

    Varel, V H; Kreikemeier, K K

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract stimulated or inhibited ruminal fermentation when fed at higher than recommended doses (3 g/d). Four dietary treatments of A. oryzae fermentation extract were fed daily to six cows fitted with ruminal cannulas. For each of four periods, bromegrass hay (6% CP) with and without extract was fed for 28 d. Dacron bags containing bromegrass cell walls were ruminally incubated to determine ruminal fiber degradation. The A. oryzae fermentation extract did not affect degradation of cell walls, cellulose, or hemicellulose. Total ruminal anaerobic or cellulolytic bacteria were not different among treatments; neither were the proportions of cellulolytic species, Butyrivibrio sp., Ruminococcus albus, or Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Ruminal ammonia was not different; however, total VFA were higher, and pH tended to be lower, when 27 g/d of A. oryzae fermentation extract was fed. The proportion of VFA was not different among treatments. The A. oryzae fermentation extract fed at nine times the recommended dosage did not produce any stimulatory effects, except for total VFA, and was not inhibitory or toxic to ruminal metabolism and forage fiber degradation.

  16. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations are unreliable estimators of treatment effects on ruminal fermentation in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile fatty acid concentrations ([VFA], mM) have long been used to assess impact of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation in vivo. However, discrepancies in statistical results between VFA and VFA pool size (VFAmol), possibly related to ruminal digesta liquid amount (LIQ, kg), suggest issues...

  17. Effect of Protein Supplementation on Ruminal Digestion of Herbage during Continuous Culture Fermentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Preliminary data suggests that level of crude protein (CP) supplementation may direct species selection in mixed species pastures by grazing ruminants through post-ingestive feedback of ruminal by-products. A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system was used to investigate the effect of increas...

  18. Influence of carbohydrate source on ruminal fermentation characteristics, performance, and microbial protein synthesis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gozho, G N; Mutsvangwa, T

    2008-07-01

    Eight multiparous Holstein cows (676 +/- 57 kg of body weight; 121 +/- 17 d-in-milk) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of 4 sources of carbohydrate on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation, and microbial N flow to the duodenum. Four cows in one of the Latin squares were fitted with permanent ruminal cannulae. Diets contained (DM basis) 50% forage in combinations of alfalfa hay and barley silage, and 50% concentrate. The concentrate portion of the diets contained barley, corn, wheat, or oats grain as the primary source of carbohydrate. Intake of DM ranged from 24.0 to 26.2 kg/d, and it tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet; consequently, milk yield tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet. Cows fed the barley- or wheat-based diets had a lower milk fat content compared with those fed the corn-based diet. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were largely unaffected by the source of dietary carbohydrate, with similar ruminal pH and volatile fatty acid and ammonia concentrations for the first 6 h after the morning feeding. Dietary treatment did not affect total tract apparent digestibility of DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber; however, total tract apparent digestibility of starch in cows fed the oats-based diet was higher compared with those fed the corn-and wheat-based diets. Nitrogen that was used for productive purposes (i.e., N secreted in milk + N apparently retained by the cow) tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with cows fed the barley-, corn-, or oats-based diets. Urinary purine derivative (PD) excretion was similar in cows fed the barley-, corn-, and wheat-based diets; however, purine derivative excretion was higher in cows fed the barley-based diet compared with those fed the oats-based diet. Consequently, estimated microbial N flow to the duodenum was

  19. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal.

  20. Effects of laidlomycin propionate and monensin on the in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domescik, E J; Martin, S A

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of laidlomycin propionate and monensin on the in vitro fermentation of ground corn, Trypticase, or alfalfa hay by mixed ruminal microorganisms. Ruminal fluid was collected from two steers fed 9.27 kg DM of a high-concentrate (62.2% ground corn and 17.4% cottonseed hulls) diet per day and composited. In the first study, no ionophore was included in the diet; the diet in the second study contained 11.1 g of laidlomycin propionate per ton of feed. The animals were allowed an adjustment period of 14 d for each dietary treatment before samples were collected. When ruminal fluid from unadapted animals was used, both monensin and laidlomycin propionate decreased (P<.05) CH4 concentration and the acetate:propionate ratio with ground corn and alfalfa hay. Monensin reduced (P<.05) in vitro dry matter disappearance of alfalfa and increased (P<.05) final pH in the ground corn and alfalfa hay fermentations. Both laidlomycin propionate and monensin decreased (P<.05) concentrations of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, CH4, and NH3 in Trypticase fermentations. When ruminal fluid from adapted animals was used, both ionophores still reduced the concentrations of most fermentation products. However, there was generally less inhibition compared with fermentations inoculated with unadapted mixed ruminal microorganisms. In the presence of 5 mM maltose, mixed ruminal bacteria produced high concentrations (10 to 11 mM) of lactate, and addition of both ionophores to these fermentations was effective in reducing (P<.05) lactate production. In conclusion, laidlomycin propionate alters the mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation in a manner similar to monensin, but, at the concentrations used in this study, monensin seemed to be a more potent inhibitor.

  1. Effects of dietary sulfur concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio on ruminal fermentation, sulfur metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid absorption in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Amat, S; McKinnon, J J; Penner, G B; Hendrick, S

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary S concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio (F:C) on ruminal fermentation, S metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption in beef heifers. Sixteen ruminally cannulated heifers (initial BW 628 ± 48 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement. The main factors included F:C (4% forage vs. 51% forage, DM basis) and the S concentration, which was modified using differing sources of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to achieve low- and high-S diets (LS = 0.30% vs. HS = 0.67% S on a DM basis). Elemental S was also added to increase the S content for the HS diets. Serum sulfate concentration from blood, sulfide (S(2-)), and SCFA concentrations from ruminal fluid, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentration from the ruminal gas cap, and urinary sulfate concentration were determined. Continuous rumen pH and SCFA (acetate, butyrate, and propionate) absorption were measured. There were no interactions between S concentration and F:C. The F:C did not affect DMI (P = 0.26) or ruminal S metabolite concentrations (P ≥ 0.19), but ruminal pH was lower (P < 0.01) and SCFA absorption was greater (P < 0.01) for low F:C diets. Heifers fed HS diets had less DMI (P < 0.01) but greater ruminal pH (P < 0.01), greater concentrations of ruminal H2S (P < 0.01) and serum sulfate (P < 0.01), and greater urinary sulfate concentration (P < 0.01) and output (P < 0.01) relative to heifers fed LS diets. Ruminal H2S was positively correlated with serum sulfate (r = 0.89; P < 0.01). Ruminal acetate concentration was not affected (P = 0.26) by dietary S concentration. Heifers fed the HS diet had lower (P = 0.01) ruminal propionate concentration and tended to have lower (P = 0.06) butyrate concentration than heifers fed the LS diet. Ruminal acetate was greater (P = 0.01) and butyrate was less (P < 0.01) with the high F:C diet than the low F:C diet. Both HS (P = 0.06) and low F

  2. Effects of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, H M; Martin, S A

    1999-09-01

    Previous research has shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture increases lactate utilization and cellulose digestion by pure cultures of ruminal bacteria. Based on these pure culture results, in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations were conducted to determine the effects of 0.35 and 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture on the fermentation of ground corn, maltose, alfalfa hay, bermudagrass hay, and lactate. In addition, experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin on the mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation. In the presence of ground corn, both concentrations of Sacc. cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products, except the 0.35 g/L treatment increased valerate concentration. Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products in maltose or lactate fermentations. When alfalfa hay was the substrate, 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased propionate concentration and both treatments decreased the acetate to propionate ratio. In the case of Coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.73 g/L Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased concentrations of acetate, propionate, CH4, butyrate, isovalerate, valerate, and decreased the acetate to propionate ratio, whereas both treatments increased total volatile fatty acid concentrations. Similar to alfalfa hay, in vitro dry matter disappearance of Coastal bermudagrass hay was numerically increased in the presence of Sacc. cerevisiae culture. Monensin altered the fermentation by decreasing concentrations of CH4 and lactate and increasing concentrations of propionate. There was no interaction between Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin. In conclusion, the incorporation of Sacc. cerevisiae culture into mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations of ground corn, maltose, or lactate had little effect on final pH and fermentation products. However, in the presence of alfalfa hay or Coastal bermudagrass hay Sacc

  3. Effects of Medicinal Herb Extracts on In vitro Ruminal Methanogenesis, Microbe Diversity and Fermentation System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Tae; Hwang, Hee Soon; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Shin Ja; Lee, Il Dong; Lee, Su Kyoung; Oh, Da Som; Lim, Jung Hwa; Yoon, Ho Baek; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Im, Seok Ki; Lee, Sung Sill

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the in vitro effects of medicinal herb extracts (MHEs) on ruminal fermentation characteristics and the inhibition of protozoa to reduce methane production in the rumen. A fistulated Hanwoo was used as a donor of rumen fluid. The MHEs (T1, Veratrum patulum; T2, Iris ensata var. spontanea; T3, Arisaema ringens; T4, Carduus crispus; T5, Pueraria thunbergiana) were added to the in vitro fermentation bottles containing the rumen fluid and medium. Total volatile fatty acid (tVFA), total gas production, gas profiles, and the ruminal microbe communities were measured. The tVFA concentration was increased or decreased as compared to the control, and there was a significant (p<0.05) difference after 24 h incubation. pH and ruminal disappearance of dry matter did not show significant difference. As the in vitro ruminal fermentation progressed, total gas production in added MHEs was increased, while the methane production was decreased compared to the control. In particular, Arisaema ringens extract led to decrease methane production by more than 43%. In addition, the result of real-time polymerase chain reaction indicted that the protozoa population in all added MHEs decreased more than that of the control. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that MHEs could have properties that decrease ruminal methanogenesis by inhibiting protozoa species and might be promising feed additives for ruminants. PMID:27004810

  4. Effects of timing of supplementation on ruminal digestion and fermentation pattern during continuous culture fermentation of grass herbage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several researchers have investigated cattle supplementation strategies, yet few studies focused on the benefits of supplementation time on herbage utilization. Using a dual flow continuous culture fermenter system designed to simulate ruminal digestion and nutrient outflow to the intestines, this s...

  5. Inhibition of ruminal cellulose fermentation by extracts of the perennial legume cicer milkvetch (Astragalus cicer).

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, P J; Hatfield, R D; Buxton, D R

    1993-01-01

    Cicer milkvetch (Astragalus cicer L.) is a perennial legume used as a pasture or rangeland plant for ruminants. A study was undertaken to determine whether reported variations in its ruminal digestibility may be related to the presence of an antinutritive material. In vitro fermentation of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) of cicer milkvetch by mixed rumen microflora was poorer than was the fermentation of NDF in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Fermentation of cicer milkvetch NDF was improved by preextraction of the ground herbage with water for 3 h at 39 degrees C. Such water extracts selectively inhibited in vitro fermentation of pure cellulose by mixed ruminal microflora and by pure cultures of the ruminal bacteria Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1 and Fibrobacter succinogenes S85. Inhibition of the cellulose fermentation by mixed ruminal microflora was dependent upon the concentration of cicer milkvetch extract and was overcome upon prolonged incubation. Pure cultures exposed to the extract did not recover from inhibition, even after long incubation times, unless the inhibitory agent was removed (viz., by dilution of inhibited cultures into fresh medium). The extract did not affect the fermentation of cellobiose by R. flavefaciens but did cause some inhibition of cellobiose fermentation by F. succinogenes. Moreover, the extracts did not inhibit hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, or p-nitrophenylcellobioside by supernatants of these pure cultures of cellulolytic bacteria or by a commercial cellulase preparation from the fungus Trichoderma reesei. The agent caused cellulose-adherent cells to detach from cellulose fibers, suggesting that the agent may act, at least in part, by disrupting the glycocalyx necessary for adherence to, and rapid digestion of, cellulose. Images PMID:8434909

  6. Effects of lasalocid or monensin supplementation on digestion, ruminal fermentation, blood metabolites, and milk production of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Martineau, R; Benchaar, C; Petit, H V; Lapierre, H; Ouellet, D R; Pellerin, D; Berthiaume, R

    2007-12-01

    Six ruminally fistulated midlactating multiparous Holstein cows were used in a double 3 x 3 Latin square design (35-d periods) to study the effects of lasalocid (LAS) and monensin (MON) supplemented at 24 mg/ kg of dry matter on digestion, ruminal fermentation, blood metabolites, and milk production. Cows were blocked according to milk production and fed a red clover silage-based total mixed ration (17.8% crude protein) without supplementation or supplemented with LAS or MON. Daily dry matter intake, milk production, and milk fat and protein concentrations were similar among treatments and averaged 23.5 kg, 36.6 kg, 3.36%, and 3.38%, respectively. Rumen lipogenic:glucogenic volatile fatty acids and NH(3)-N concentration were lower, and apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, and gross energy were higher with than without ionophore supplementation. Compared with LAS, MON increased concentrations of plasma urea-N and milk urea-N, and excretion of urinary urea-N and total N. Monensin also decreased N retention and tended to reduce plasma concentration of nonessential AA in comparison with LAS. Both ionophores reduced daily fecal excretion of N by 13 g compared with the control, but MON increased daily losses of urinary N by 36 g compared with LAS. Results from this study suggest that postabsorptive metabolism of N might be altered by the type of ionophore fed.

  7. Enteric methane production and ruminal fermentation from forage brassica diets fed in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brassicas provide forage for livestock during the late fall when traditional perennial cool-season forages are not productive. However, little research exists on ruminal fermentation and methane(CH4) production of brassicas fed as forage. A continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutr...

  8. Probiotics cultures in animal feed: Effects on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to infectious diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated the effects of probiotics included in dairy cattle and mice feed on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to Johne’s disease. To unveil the underlying mechanisms, dairy cattle were either fed Bovamine (1.04 x 10**9 cfu of Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 plus 2.04 x 10**...

  9. Redox mediators modify end product distribution in biomass fermentations by mixed ruminal microbes in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fermentation system of mixed ruminal bacteria is capable of generating large amounts of short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA) via the carboxylate platform in vitro. These VFAs are subject to elongation to larger, more energy-dense products through reverse beta-oxidation. This study examined the...

  10. Effect of summer annuals on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Summer annuals (SA) provide forage during the summer “forage slump”, yet research on ruminal fermentation and CH4 output of SA is lacking. A 4-unit, dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutrient digestibility, VFA production, bacterial protein synthesis, and CH4 output of...

  11. The effects of ruminally degraded protein on rumen fermentation and ammonia losses from manure in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Agle, M; Hristov, A N; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P; Vaddella, V K

    2010-04-01

    This experiment investigated the effect of dietary crude protein (CP) and ruminally degraded protein (RDP) levels on rumen fermentation, digestibility, ammonia emission from manure, and performance of lactating dairy cows. The experiment was a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design with 6 cows. Three diets varying in CP concentration were tested (CP, % of dry matter): 15.4 (high CP, control), 13.4 (medium CP), and 12.9% (low CP). These diets provided metabolizable protein balances of 323, -44, and 40 g/d and RDP balances of 162, -326, and -636 g/d (high, medium, and low, respectively). Both the medium and low CP diets decreased ruminal pH compared with high CP, most likely because of the higher nonfiber carbohydrate concentration in the former diets. Ruminal ammonia pool size (rumen ammonia N was labeled with (15)N) and the concentration of total free amino acids were greater for the high CP diet than for the RDP-deficient diets. Apparent total-tract nutrient digestibilities were not affected by treatment. Both the medium and low CP diets resulted in lower absolute and relative excretion of urinary N compared with the high CP diet, as a proportion of N intake. Excretion of fecal N and milk yield and composition were not affected by diet. Milk N efficiency (milk N / N intake) and the cumulative secretion of ammonia-(15)N in milk protein were greater for the RDP-deficient diets, and milk urea N concentration was greater for the high CP diet. Both medium and low CP diets decreased the irreversible loss of ruminal ammonia N compared with the high CP diet. The rate and cumulative ammonia emissions from manure were lower for the medium and low CP diets compared with the high CP diet. Overall, this study demonstrated that dairy diets with reduced CP and RDP concentrations will produce manure with lower ammonia-emitting potential without affecting cow performance, if metabolizable protein requirements are met.

  12. Effects of forage:concentrate ratio and forage type on apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial growth in goats.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Martín-García, A I; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2009-02-01

    The effects of forage type and forage:concentrate ratio (F:C) on apparent nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial growth were investigated in goats. A comparison between liquid (LAB) and solid (SAB)-associated bacteria to estimate microbial N flow (MNF) from urinary purine derivative excretion was also examined. Treatments were a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of forage type (grass hay vs. alfalfa hay) and high vs. low F:C (70:30 and 30:70, respectively). Four ruminally cannulated goats were fed, at maintenance intake, 4 experimental diets according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design. High-concentrate diets resulted in greater (P < 0.001) nutrient digestibility except for ADF. However, CP digestibility increased (P < 0.001) only for the high-concentrate diets including grass hay. Likewise, N retention, ruminal NH(3)-N concentration, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives increased (P < 0.05) with increasing concentrate in animals fed diets based on grass hay (0.23 vs. 0.13 g of retained N/g of digested N, 30.1 vs. 12.9 mg of NH(3)-N/100 mL, and 11.5 vs. 8.40 mmol/d, respectively), but not (P > 0.05) when diets included alfalfa hay. Total protozoa numbers and holotricha proportion were greater and less (P < 0.001), respectively, in high- than in low-concentrate diets. The F:C affected (P < 0.001) ruminal pH but not total VFA concentration (P = 0.12). Ammonia-N concentration was similar (P = 0.13) over time, whereas pH, VFA concentration, and protozoa numbers differed (P < 0.001) among diets. Estimated MNF was strongly influenced by using either the purine bases:N ratio obtained in our experimental conditions or values reported in the literature for small ruminants. There was a F:C effect (P = 0.006) on MNF estimated from LAB but not from SAB. The effect of F:C shifting from 70:30 to 30:70 in goat diets depends on the type of forage used. The MNF measured in goats fed different diets was influenced by the bacterial pellet (LAB or SAB). In addition

  13. In vitro ruminal fluid fermentation as influenced by corn-derived dried distillers' grains with solubles.

    PubMed

    Miśta, Sdorota; Pecka, Ewa; Zachwieja, Andrzej; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Bodarski, Rafał; Paczyńska, Katarzyna; Tumanowicz, Joanna; Kupczyński, Robert; Adamski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate changes to in vitro ruminal fluid fermentation due to the use of corn-derived dried distillers' grains with solubles (corn DDGS) as a partial or complete replacement for crushed cereal and oilseed meals in the fermentation substrate. The control substrate consisted of mixed cereal and oilseed meals (barley, wheat, soybean and rapeseed), while the experimental substrates were the same meals with increasing portions replaced with corn DDGS. Including corn DDGS decreased the total VFA concentration (P<0.05), ammonia level (P<0.001), methane emission (P<0.05) and total gas production (P<0.001) during microbial fermentation. Using DDGS-containing substrates did not change the proportions of acetate, propionate and butyrate, but did decrease the proportions of isobutyrate and isovalerate (P<0.001). The fermentation efficiency, VFA utilization index, cell yield coefficient and pH of the ruminal fluid also remained unchanged. The partial replacement of cereal and oilseed meals with corn DDGS had no deleterious effects on ruminal fluid fermentation.

  14. Supplementation of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) with condensed tannin-containing pellets of sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata): Effects on ruminant urinary urea excretion and digestibility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some feedstuffs that contain condensed tannins can reduce urinary urea excretion without compromising nutrition for ruminant livestock. This results in reducing environmental impact, improving productivity and enhancing sustainability of ruminant farming operations. In some situations there are adva...

  15. Moderation of ruminal fermentation by ciliated protozoa in cattle fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, T G; Towne, G; Beharka, A A

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of ciliated protozoa on ruminal fermentation in cattle fed high-grain diets. Six ruminally cannulated steers fed a corn-based grain diet (85% concentrate plus 15% alfalfa hay) at 12-h intervals were assigned randomly to two groups, ciliate free and faunated, in a crossover design. Defaunation was by ruminal emptying, omasal flushing, and treatment with sodium sulfosuccinate. Two to 3 weeks after defaunation, the ruminal contents of all steers were sampled before the morning feeding (0 h) and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after feeding to measure pH, analyze fermentation products, and monitor counts of ciliated protozoa and lactic acid-producing and -fermenting bacterial groups. Total numbers of ciliated protozoa in the faunated steers averaged 4.3 x 10(5)/g, and the protozoa consisted of nine genera. Ciliate-free steers had lower (P less than 0.01) ruminal pHs (pH 5.97) than faunated cattle (pH 6.45); however, the treatment-time interaction was not significant. Ruminal lactate and ammonia concentrations were similar in both groups. The total volatile fatty acid concentration was higher (P less than 0.05) in the ciliate-free steers than in the faunated steers and exhibited a treatment-time interaction (P less than 0.05). The acetate-to-propionate ratio was higher (P less than 0.05) in the faunated group than in the ciliate-free group and showed a treatment-time interaction (P less than 0.05). Total anaerobic bacterial counts were about fourfold higher in the ciliate-free group than in the faunated group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1514789

  16. Effects of Branched-chain Amino Acids on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation of Wheat Straw

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui Ling; Chen, Yong; Xu, Xiao Li; Yang, Yu Xia

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of three branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) on the in vitro ruminal fermentation of wheat straw using batch cultures of mixed ruminal microorganisms. BCAA were added to the buffered ruminal fluid at a concentration of 0, 2, 4, 7, or 10 mmol/L. After 72 h of anaerobic incubation, pH, volatile fatty acids (VFA), and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) in the ruminal fluid were determined. Dry matter (DM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradability were calculated after determining the DM and NDF in the original material and in the residue after incubation. The addition of valine, leucine, or isoleucine increased the total VFA yields (p≤0.001). However, the total VFA yields did not increase with the increase of BCAA supplement level. Total branched-chain VFA yields linearly increased as the supplemental amount of BCAA increased (p<0.001). The molar proportions of acetate and propionate decreased, whereas that of butyrate increased with the addition of valine and isoleucine (p<0.05). Moreover, the proportions of propionate and butyrate decreased (p<0.01) with the addition of leucine. Meanwhile, the molar proportions of isobutyrate were increased and linearly decreased (p<0.001) by valine and leucine, respectively. The addition of leucine or isoleucine resulted in a linear (p<0.001) increase in the molar proportions of isovalerate. The degradability of NDF achieved the maximum when valine or isoleucine was added at 2 mmol/L. The results suggest that low concentrations of BCAA (2 mmol/L) allow more efficient regulation of ruminal fermentation in vitro, as indicated by higher VFA yield and NDF degradability. Therefore, the optimum initial dose of BCAA for in vitro ruminal fermentation is 2 mmol/L. PMID:25049818

  17. In vitro ruminal fermentation of organic acids common in forage.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Van Soest, P J

    1984-01-01

    Mixed rumen bacteria from cows fed either timothy hay or a 60% concentrate were incubated with 7.5 mM citrate, trans-aconitate, malate, malonate, quinate, and shikimate. Citrate, trans-aconitate, and malate were fermented at faster rates than malonate, quinate, and shikimate. Acetate was the primary fermentation product for all six acids. Quinate and shikimate fermentations gave rist to butyrate, whereas malate and malonate produced significant amounts of propionic acid. High-pressure liquid chromatography of fermentation products from trans-aconitate incubations revealed a compound that was subsequently identified as tricarballylate. As much as 40% of the trans-aconitate acid was converted to tricarballylate, and tricarballylate was fermented slowly. The slow rate of tricarballylate metabolism by mixed rumen bacteria and its potential as a magnesium chelator suggest that tricarballylate formation could be an important factor in the hypomagnesemia that leads to grass tetany. PMID:6696413

  18. Inhibition of sulfate reduction to sulfide by 9,10-anthraquinone in in vitro ruminal fermentations.

    PubMed

    Kung, L; Hession, A O; Bracht, J P

    1998-08-01

    We studied the effects of sulfur and 9,10-anthraquinone on in vitro ruminal fermentation and production of hydrogen sulfide. A complete, pelleted diet containing 26.8% acid detergent fiber, 15.9% crude protein, and 0.25 to 0.29% sulfur was used as the basal substrate. Fermentations were conducted using the basal substrate and various sulfur additions (elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, calcium sulfate, and sodium sulfate) with or without varying amounts of 9,10-anthraquinone. An increase in the sulfur content of the substrate to > 1.0% with various sources of sulfur had minimal effects on concentrations of volatile fatty acids, but the production of hydrogen sulfide increased. High amounts of 9,10-anthraquinone (10 and 25 ppm of fluid) decreased the molar proportion of acetate and decreased the production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. However, 9,10-anthraquinone increased the molar proportions of propionate and butyrate. Approximately 70% of 9,10-anthraquinone was recovered after 24 h of in vitro ruminal fermentation. These findings suggest that 9,10-anthraquinone has the potential to reduce the production of methane and hydrogen sulfide in ruminal fermentations.

  19. Redundancy, resiliency, and host specificity of the ruminal microbiota: Implications for engineering improved ruminal fermentations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ruminal microbial community is remarkably diverse, containing hundreds of different bacterial and archaeal species, plus many species of fungi and protozoa. Molecular studies have identified a “core microbiome” dominated by members of the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but also containing m...

  20. Fermentation of model hemicelluloses by Prevotella strains and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens in pure culture and in ruminal enrichment cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hemicelluloses are major components of plant biomass, but their fermentation in the rumens of cattle and other ruminants is poorly understood. We compared four species of the ruminally dominant genus Prevotella and the well-known hemicellulose utilizer, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, with respect to deg...

  1. Effects of lauric acid on ruminal protozoal numbers and fermentation pattern and milk production in lactating dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate lauric acid (LA) as a practical agent to suppress ruminal protozoa (RP), and to assess the effects of RP suppression on fermentation patterns and milk production in dairy cows. In experiment 1, six Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulae were used in ...

  2. Effects of partial mixed rations and supplement amounts on milk production and composition, ruminal fermentation, bacterial communities, and ruminal acidosis.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Denman, S E; McSweeney, C; Wales, W J; Auldist, M J; Wright, M M; Marett, L C; Greenwood, J S; Hannah, M C; Celi, P; Bramley, E; Lean, I J

    2014-09-01

    and quadratically increased with supplement feeding amount. The Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacterial phyla identified. The Prevotellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lachnospiraceae were the dominant bacterial families, regardless of feeding group, and were influenced by feeding strategy, supplement feeding amount, or both. The Veillonellaceae family decreased in relative abundance in PMR-fed cows compared with controls, and the Streptococcaeae and Lactobacillaceae families were present in only minor relative abundances, regardless of feeding group. Despite large among- and within-group variation in bacterial community composition, distinct bacterial communities occurred among feeding strategies, supplement amounts, and sample times and were associated with ruminal fermentation measures. Control cows fed 16kg of DM of total supplement per day had the most distinct ruminal bacterial community composition. Bacterial community composition was most significantly associated with supplement feeding amount and ammonia, butyrate, valerate, and propionate concentrations. Feeding supplements in a PMR reduced the incidence of ruminal acidosis and altered ruminal bacterial communities, regardless of supplement feeding amount, but did not result in increased milk measures compared with isoenergetic control diets component-fed to late-lactation cows.

  3. Effects of protein concentration and degradability on performance, ruminal fermentation, and nitrogen metabolism in rapidly growing heifers fed high-concentrate diets from 100 to 230 kg body weight.

    PubMed

    Devant, M; Ferret, A; Gasa, J; Calsamiglia, S; Casals, R

    2000-06-01

    Twenty crossbred heifers (101 +/- 4.5 kg BW) were used to examine the effects of protein concentration and degradability on performance, ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives. Heifers were offered concentrate and barley straw for ad libitum consumption. Two protein concentrations (17 vs 14%, DM basis) and two protein sources differing in ruminal degradability (58 vs 42% of CP for soybean meal and treated soybean meal, respectively) were tested. The experiment was divided into four consecutive 28-d periods to evaluate the age (period) effect. Increasing protein concentration and degradability did not improve ADG or intake (P > .05). The increase in urinary N excretion (P < .001) in heifers fed 17% CP suggests that N was in excess of requirements. When the low-degradable protein source was supplemented and(or) CP concentration was low, ruminal NH3 N concentrations fell below 5 mg/100 mL. Urinary excretion of purine derivatives was not affected (P > .05) by protein concentration and degradability, suggesting that in high-concentrate diets NH3 N concentration was not limiting microbial growth. Total VFA concentration decreased (P < .001) and the acetate:propionate ratio increased (P < .01) with advancing period, suggesting an increase in ruminal absorption capacity and an increase in fiber fermentation. The decrease in ruminal NH3 N concentration in the last period suggests a greater use of NH3 N by microorganisms. This hypothesis is supported by the increase (P < .001) in urinary excretion of allantoin and estimated duodenal flows of purine bases and microbial protein with advancing period. Reducing CP concentration and increasing ruminal undegradable protein supply did not affect animal performance or estimated duodenal flow of microbial protein in rapidly growing heifers fed high-concentrate diets.

  4. Selection of barley grain affects ruminal fermentation, starch digestibility, and productivity of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Silveira, C; Oba, M; Yang, W Z; Beauchemin, K A

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 lots of barley grain cultivars differing in expected ruminal starch degradation on dry matter (DM) intake, ruminal fermentation, ruminal and total tract digestibility, and milk production of dairy cows when provided at 2 concentrations in the diet. Four primiparous ruminally cannulated (123 +/- 69 d in milk; mean +/- SD) and 4 multiparous ruminally and duodenally cannulated (46 +/- 14 d in milk) cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin Square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 16-d periods. Primiparous and multiparous cows were assigned to different squares. Treatments were 2 dietary starch concentrations (30 vs. 23% of dietary DM) and 2 lots of barley grain cultivars (Xena vs. Dillon) differing in expected ruminal starch degradation. Xena had higher starch concentration (58.7 vs. 50.0%) and greater in vitro 6-h starch digestibility (78.0 vs. 73.5%) compared with Dillon. All experimental diets were formulated to supply 18.3% crude protein and 20.0% forage neutral detergent fiber. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by treatment. Milk fat concentration (3.55 vs. 3.29%) was greater for cows fed Dillon compared with Xena, but was not affected by dietary starch concentration. Ruminal starch digestion was greater for cows fed high-starch diets compared with those fed low-starch diets (4.55 vs. 2.49 kg/d), and tended to be greater for cows fed Xena compared with those fed Dillon (3.85 vs. 3.19 kg/d). Ruminal acetate concentration was lower, and propionate concentration was greater, for cows fed Xena or high-starch diets compared with cows fed Dillon or low-starch diets, respectively. Furthermore, cows fed Xena or high-starch diets had longer duration that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (6.6 vs. 4.0 and 6.4 vs. 4.2 h/d) and greater total tract starch digestibility (94.3 vs. 93.0 and 94.3 vs. 93.0%) compared with cows fed Dillon or low-starch diets, respectively. These results

  5. Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic activities of anaerobic gut fungi isolated from wild and domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Kamra, Devki N; Sastry, Vadali R B

    2010-08-01

    Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic enzyme activities of anaerobic gut fungi from wild (17 isolates) and domestic ruminants (15 isolates) were examined. In a medium containing 0.5% wheat straw and 0.02% cellobiose as energy source, activities of carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), avicelase, xylanase, acetyl esterase and protease produced by the fungal isolates were investigated. Average activity of CMCase (17.4 vs. 8.25 mIU ml(-1)), acetyl esterase (134 vs. 57 mIU ml(-1)) and protease (4400 vs. 1683 mIU ml(-1)) were significantly higher in isolates from wild ruminants than those from domestic ruminants. Xylanase and avicelase activities were comparable. When compared irrespective of source, fungal isolates having monocentric growth pattern produced more fibrolytic enzymes than isolates having polycentric growth pattern. CMCase, xylanase, avicelase activities were highest in Neocallimastix isolates. Acetyl esterase activity was highest in Piromyces and Neocallimastix isolates. Protease activity was highest in Piromyces isolates followed closely by Neocallimastix isolates. Between isolates from wild and domestic ruminants few differences were observed in pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and end products of fermentation. Inter-strain differences in the end product formation were apparent. All of the isolates produced acetate, lactate and formate; only a few isolates produced succinate. For isolation of superior fibrolytic isolates of anaerobic fungi, greater emphasis should be given to the screening of enzyme activities of isolates of genera Neocallimastix and Piromyces.

  6. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robin C.; Ripley, Laura H.; Bowman, Jan G. P.; Callaway, Todd R.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; Beier, Ross C.; Harvey, Roger B.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35–87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation

  7. Establishment of ruminal enzyme activities and fermentation capacity in dairy calves from birth through weaning.

    PubMed

    Rey, M; Enjalbert, F; Monteils, V

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the establishment of ruminal fermentation and enzymatic activities in dairy calves from birth to weaning (d 83). Six Holstein calves, immediately separated from their mother at birth, were fed colostrum for 3 d after birth, and thereafter milk replacer, starter pelleted concentrate, and hay until d 83 of age. Ruminal samples were collected from each calf every day for the first 10 d, and additionally at d 12, 15, 19, 22, 26, 29, 33, 36, 40, 43, 47, 50, 55, 62, 69, and 83. Ruminal samples were collected 1h after milk feeding with a stomach tube. The pH and redox potential (E(h)) were immediately measured. Samples were kept for further determination of ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)-N) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, and xylanase, amylase, urease, and protease activities. Ruminal pH averaged 6.69, 5.82, and 6.34, from d 1 to 9, d 10 to 40, and d 43 to 83 of age, respectively. At first day of life, the ruminal E(h) value was positive (+224 mV). From d 2 to 9, d 10 to 40, and d 43 to 83 of age, ruminal E(h) averaged -164, -115, and -141 mV, respectively. From d 1 to 3, d 4 to 22, and d 26 to 83 of age, NH(3)-N concentration averaged 60.1, 179.8, and 58.2 mg/L, respectively. No VFA were detected in ruminal samples collected on d 1 of life of calves. From d 2 to 10 and d 12 to 83 of age, ruminal total VFA concentration averaged 19.5 and 84.4mM, respectively. Neither ruminal xylanase or amylase activities were observed at d 1 of age. From d 5 to 15 and d 19 to 83 of age, the xylanase activity averaged 182.2 and 62.4 μmol of sugar released per hour per gram of ruminal content dry matter (DM), respectively. From d 5 to 83 of age, the amylase activity reached 35.4 μmol of sugar released per hour per gram of ruminal content DM. The ruminal ureolytic activity was observed with an average value of 6.9 μg of NH(3)-N released per minute per gram of ruminal content DM over the 83-d experimental period. From d 1 to 4 and d

  8. Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    Research is being conducted with the objective of decreasing methane (CH4) production in the rumen, as methane emissions from ruminants are environmentally damaging and a loss of digestible energy to ruminants. Inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis generally results in accumulation of dihydrogen (H2), which is energetically inefficient and can inhibit fermentation. It would be nutritionally beneficial to incorporate accumulated H2 into propionate or butyrate production, or reductive acetogenesis. The objective of this analysis was to examine three possible physicochemical limitations to the incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate and butyrate production, and reductive acetogenesis, in methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal batch and continuous cultures: (i) Thermodynamics; (ii) Enzyme kinetics; (iii) Substrate kinetics. Batch (N = 109) and continuous (N = 43) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were used in this meta-analysis. Incorporation of accumulated H2 into propionate production and reductive acetogenesis seemed to be thermodynamically feasible but quite close to equilibrium, whereas this was less clear for butyrate. With regard to enzyme kinetics, it was speculated that hydrogenases of ruminal microorganisms may have evolved toward high-affinity and low maximal velocity to compete for traces of H2, rather than for high pressure accumulated H2. Responses so far obtained to the addition of propionate production intermediates do not allow distinguishing between thermodynamic and substrate kinetics control. PMID:26635743

  9. Effects of timing of corn silage supplementation on ruminal digestion, fermentation pattern and nutrient flow during continuous culture fermentation of a short and intensive orchardgrass herbage meal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system, this study evaluated the effect of timing of corn silage supplementation on ruminal digestion and nutrient flows of a short and intensive orchardgrass herbage meal. Fermenters were operated over four 10-d periods. Treatments included: 28 g DM of...

  10. Effect of supplement type on ruminal fermentation of an orchardgrass-based pasture diet during continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system was used to investigate the effect of supplemental crude protein (CP) level on digestion and ruminal fermentation of a vegetative orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) pasture-based diet. Treatments were: 10, 12, 14, and 16% supplemental CP fed at a rat...

  11. In Vitro Stimulation of Forage Fiber Degradation by Ruminal Microorganisms with Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Extract

    PubMed Central

    Varel, Vincent H.; Kreikemeier, Kelly K.; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Hatfield, Ronald D.

    1993-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract (Amaferm) was evaluated for its ability to influence degradation of brome grass and switchgrass fiber fractions by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro. Addition of Amaferm at a concentration of 0.067 mg/ml, which is approximately the concentration found in the rumen ecosystem (0.06 mg/ml), increased the degradation of brome grass neutral detergent fiber (NDF) by 28% after fermentation for 12 h (P < 0.01), but had no effect after fermentation for 24 or 48 h. The levels of degradation of both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions were increased after fermentation for 12 h (P < 0.01). Additions of 0.08 and 8% (vol/vol) Amaferm filtrate (12.5 g/100 ml) stimulated degradation of switchgrass NDF by 12 and 24% (P < 0.01), respectively, after fermentation for 12 h; when 80% filtrate was added, degradation was decreased by 38%. The concentrations of total anaerobes in culture tubes containing 80% filtrate were 5 times greater than the concentrations in the controls; however, the concentrations of cellulolytic organisms were 3.5 times lower than the concentrations in the controls (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the filtrate contained high concentrations of soluble substrate which did not allow the cellulolytic organisms to compete well with other populations. The remaining concentrations of esterified p-coumaric and ferulic acids were lower at 12 h in NDF residues obtained from fermentation mixtures supplemented with Amaferm. Because the total anaerobes were not inhibited in fermentation mixtures containing Amaferm, antibiotics are unlikely to be involved as a mode of action for increasing NDF degradation. The possibility that Amaferm contains enzymes (possibly esterases) that may play a role in stimulating the rate of fiber degradation by mixed ruminal microorganisms by removal of plant cell wall phenolic acid esters is discussed. PMID:16349057

  12. Ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in sheep fed hydroxyethylsoyamide.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T C

    1997-08-01

    Hydroxyethylsoyamide (HESA) was reported previously to protect soybean oil from ruminal biohydrogenation and increase plasma unsaturated fatty acids in sheep. Two digestibility trials with sheep and a rumen in vitro trials were conducted in this study to determine the effects of HESA on ruminal VFA and nutrient digestibility. Trial 1 was a 4 x 4 Latin square with 17-d periods in which four wethers were fed either a control diet (CON) with no added fat, 2.5% soybean oil (SBO), 5% butylsoyamide (BuSA), or 5% HESA. The HESA diet was ground with a mortar and pestle before feeding to disperse fat lumps that formed during diet mixing. Compared with the CON diet, the HESA diet reduced DMI, acetate/ propionate (A/P), and total tract fiber digestibility, but these were not affected by SBO or BuSA. Trial 2 was a 24-h rumen in vitro study showing that total VFA concentration and A/P in cultures were reduced by 10% linoleic acid but not by 10% ethanolamine or 10% HESA. In Trial 3, four wethers were fed the CON and HESA diets in a replicated 2 x 2 Latin square to determine digestibility responses to HESA when grinding was avoided. Fiber digestibilities and A/P were not affected by HESA in Trial 3. The HESA in this study had variable effects on fiber digestibility that may have been related to physical attributes of the diet, including particle size. Substitution of ethanolamine for butylamine during synthesis of the amide increased fatty acid digestibility but reduced dry matter intake.

  13. Diets of differentially processed wheat alter ruminal fermentation parameters and microbial populations in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S Z; Yang, Z B; Yang, W R; Li, Z; Zhang, C Y; Liu, X M; Wan, F C

    2015-11-01

    The influences of differently processed wheat products on rumen fermentation, microbial populations, and serum biochemistry profiles in beef cattle were studied. Four ruminally cannulated Limousin × Luxi beef cattle (400 ± 10 kg) were used in the experiment with a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The experimental diets contained (on a DM basis) 60% corn silage as a forage source and 40% concentrate with 4 differently processed wheat products (extruded, pulverized, crushed, and rolled wheat). Concentrations of ruminal NH-N and microbial protein (MCP) in cattle fed crushed and rolled wheat were greater ( < 0.05) than the corresponding values in cattle fed pulverized and extruded wheat. Ruminal concentrations of total VFA and acetate and the ratio of acetate to propionate decreased ( < 0.05) with increased geometric mean particle size (geometric mean diameter) of processed wheat, except for extruded wheat; cattle fed extruded wheat had the lowest concentrations of total VFA and acetate among all treatments. The relative abundance of , , ciliated protozoa, and was lower in cattle fed the pulverized wheat diet than in the other 3 diets ( < 0.05), whereas the relative abundance of was decreased in cattle fed extruded wheat compared with cattle fed crushed and rolled wheat ( < 0.05). No treatment effect was obtained for serum enzyme activity and protein concentration ( > 0.05). Our findings suggest that the method of wheat processing could have a significant effect on ruminal fermentation parameters and microbial populations in beef cattle and that crushed and rolled processing is better in terms of ruminal NH-N and MCP content, acetate-to-propionate ratio, and relative abundance of rumen microorganisms.

  14. Effects of Coconut Materials on In vitro Ruminal Methanogenesis and Fermentation Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E. T.; Park, C. G.; Lim, D. H.; Kwon, E. G.; Ki, K. S.; Kim, S. B.; Moon, Y. H.; Shin, N. H.; Lee, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of coconut materials on ruminal methanogenesis and fermentation characteristics, in particular their effectiveness for mitigating ruminal methanogenesis. Fistulated Holstein cows were used as the donor of rumen fluid. Coconut materials were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with rumen fluid-buffer mixture and timothy substrate for 24 h incubation. Total gas production, gas profiles, total volatile fatty acids (tVFAs) and the ruminal methanogens diversity were measured. Although gas profiles in added coconut oil and coconut powder were not significantly different, in vitro ruminal methane production was decreased with the level of reduction between 15% and 19% as compared to control, respectively. Coconut oil and coconut powder also inhibited gas production. The tVFAs concentration was increased by coconut materials, but was not affected significantly as compared to control. Acetate concentration was significantly lower (p<0.05), while propionate was significantly higher (p<0.05) by addition of the coconut materials than that of the control. The acetate:propionate ratio was significantly lowered with addition of coconut oil and coconut powder (p<0.05). The methanogens and ciliate-associated methanogens in all added coconut materials were shown to decrease as compared with control. This study showed that ciliate-associated methanogens diversity was reduced by more than 50% in both coconut oil and coconut powder treatments. In conclusion, these results indicate that coconut powder is a potential agent for decreasing in vitro ruminal methane production and as effective as coconut oil. PMID:25358365

  15. Free amino acid supplementation to steers: effects on ruminal fermentation and performance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C G; Titgemeyer, E C; Cochran, R C; Nagaraja, T G; Brandt, R T

    1997-04-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate amino acid utilization by cattle. In Exp. 1, five steers (580 kg) were fed 86% rolled corn diets with mixtures of amino acids containing up to 6 g/d DL-Met, 24 g/d L-Lys, 6 g/d L-Thr, and 3 g/d L-Trp. Treatments had little effect on ruminal fermentation, diet digestibility, N flow to the duodenum, or microbial efficiency. Ruminal concentrations of Met and Lys increased linearly (P < .05) with amino acid supplementation, whereas Thr responded quadratically, and Trp was not altered. In Exp. 2, four steers (414 kg) were used to measure effects of dietary monensin or laidlomycin propionate in high-grain diets supplemented with amino acids. Ionophores had no significant effect on ruminal fermentation or outflows of amino acids from the rumen. In Exp. 3, 100 steers (287 kg initial BW) were fed diets containing 1% of a nonprotein N source. Treatments were 1) no supplemental N (UREA), 2) UREA plus soybean meal (SBM), 3) UREA plus 2 g/d DL-Met, 8 g/d L-Lys, 2 g/d L-Thr, and 1 g/d L-Trp, or 4) UREA plus 4 g/d DL-Met, 16 g/d L-Lys, 4 g/d L-Thr, and 2 g/d L-Trp. During the growing period (diets based on whole-plant milo silage), gains were higher for SBM-supplemented steers than for UREA steers and intermediate for steers supplemented with amino acids. Few significant differences in performance were observed among treatments during the finishing phase (diets based on dry-rolled corn) or for the entire experiment, but cattle fed SBM or amino acids tended to be fatter and have better marbling scores and quality grades. Amino acids did not greatly alter ruminal fermentation or cattle performance.

  16. Bacterial fermentation of cheese whey for production of a ruminant feed supplement rich in curde protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C A; Henderson, H E; Erdman, M D

    1976-01-01

    A simple and efficient process for the production of a ruminant feed supplement, rich in crude protein (defined as total N X 6.25), by bacterial fermentation of cheese whey has been developed. The lactose in unpasteurized whey is fermented to lactate acid by Lactobacillus bulgaricus at a temperature of 43 degrees C and pH 5.5. The lactic acid produced is continually neutralized with ammonia to form ammonium lactate. The fermented product is concentrated by evaporation to a solids content of about 70% and adjusted to pH 6.8 with additional ammonia. The concentrated product contains about 55% crude protein. Approximately 6 to 8% of the crude protein is derived from bacterial cells. 17% from whey proteins, and 75 to 77% from ammonium lactate. The efficiency of conversion of lactose to lactic acid usually exceeds 95%. The fermentation time is greatly reduced upon the addition of 0.2% yeast extract or 0.1% corn steep liquor as a source of growth factors. Whey containing lactose at concentrations up to 7% can be fermented efficiently, but at higher concentrations lactose is fermented incompletely. The process has been scaled up to a pilot plant level, and 40 tons of concentrated product were produced fro animal feeding trials, without ever encountering putrefactive spoilage. PMID:12720

  17. Effects of essential oils on digestion, ruminal fermentation, rumen microbial populations, milk production, and milk composition in dairy cows fed alfalfa silage or corn silage.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Petit, H V; Berthiaume, R; Ouellet, D R; Chiquette, J; Chouinard, P Y

    2007-02-01

    Four Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design (28-d periods) with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to investigate the effects of addition of a specific mixture of essential oil compounds (MEO; 0 vs. 750 mg/d) and silage source [alfalfa silage (AS) vs. corn silage (CS)] on digestion, ruminal fermentation, rumen microbial populations, milk production, and milk composition. Total mixed rations containing either AS or CS as the sole forage source were balanced to be isocaloric and isonitrogenous. In general, no interactions between MEO addition and silage source were observed. Except for ruminal pH and milk lactose content, which were increased by MEO supplementation, no changes attributable to the administration of MEO were observed for feed intake, nutrient digestibility, end-products of ruminal fermentation, microbial counts, and milk performance. Dry matter intake and milk production were not affected by replacing AS with CS in the diet. However, cows fed CS-based diets produced milk with lower fat and higher protein and urea N concentrations than cows fed AS-based diets. Replacing AS with CS increased the concentration of NH(3)-N and reduced the acetate-to-propionate ratio in ruminal fluid. Total viable bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria, and protozoa were not influenced by MEO supplementation, but the total viable bacteria count was higher with CS- than with AS-based diets. The apparent digestibility of crude protein did not differ between the AS and CS treatments, but digestibilities of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber were lower when cows were fed CS-based diets than when they were fed AS-based diets. Duodenal bacterial N flow, estimated using urinary purine derivatives and the amount of N retained, increased in cows fed CS-based diets compared with those fed AS-based diets. Feeding cows AS increased the milk fat contents of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 (conjugated linoleic acid) and 18:3 (n-3 fatty

  18. Sucrose concentration alters fermentation kinetics, products, and carbon fates during in vitro fermentation with mixed ruminal microbes.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B; Weimer, P J

    2007-06-01

    incorporation of C from the medium, likely from AA and peptides. The results support the premises that direct effects of Suc concentration and perhaps protein:Suc alter yields of fermentation products. That substrate concentration altered fermentation products and kinetics, possibly due to interactions with the run conditions, advises the clear definition of substrates and fermentation conditions to determine how the results integrate into our knowledge of ruminant nutrition.

  19. Effect of nigericin, monensin, and tetronasin on biohydrogenation in continuous flow-through ruminal fermenters.

    PubMed

    Fellner, V; Sauer, F D; Kramer, J K

    1997-05-01

    Four ionophores differing in cation selectivity were compared for their effect on microbial fermentation and biohydrogenation by ruminal bacteria in continuous culture. Monensin and nigericin are monovalent antiporters with selective binding affinities for Na+ and K+, respectively. Tetronasin is a divalent antiporter that binds preferentially with Ca2+ or Mg2+. Valinomycin is a monovalent uniporter and does not exchange K+ for H+. Steady-state concentrations of 2 micrograms/ml of monensin, nigericin, tetronasin, or valinomycin were maintained by constant infusion into fermenters. Molar percentages of acetate were lower, and those of propionate were higher, in the presence of monensin, nigericin, and tetronasin; all three ionophores also decreased CH4 production. Concentrations of valinomycin as high as 8 micrograms/ml had no effect on volatile fatty acids or CH4 production. Monensin, nigericin, and tetronasin inhibited the rate of biohydrogenation of linoleic acid. Continuous infusion of C18:2n-6 at a steady-state concentration of 314 micrograms/ml into fermenters receiving monensin, nigericin, or tetronasin resulted in lower amounts of stearic acid and higher amounts of oleic acid. Ionophores increased total C18:2 conjugated acids mainly because of an increase in the cis-9, trans-11-C18:2 isomer. If reflected in milk fat, ionophore-induced changes in ruminal lipids could enhance the nutritional qualities of milk.

  20. Effect of 2-hydroxy-4-methylthio-butanoic acid on ruminal fermentation, bacterial distribution, digestibility, and performance of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Oh, J; Hristov, A N; Harvatine, K; Vazquez-Anon, M; Zanton, G I

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this experiment was to test the effect of a Met analog, 2-hydroxy-4-methylthio-butanoic acid (HMTBa), on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis, nutrient digestibility, urinary N losses, and performance of dairy cows. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein dairy cows were assigned to 4 levels of HMTBa [0 (control), 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15% (dry matter basis)] in a replicated 4×4 Latin square trial. Experimental periods were 28 d, including 21 d for adaptation. Ruminal ammonia and microbial N were labeled through a 6-d intraruminal infusion of (15)NH4Cl, and microbial protein synthesis in the rumen was estimated using the reticular sampling technique. Treatment had no effect on dry matter intake (28.4 to 29.8kg/d), milk yield (44.1 to 45.3kg/d), feed efficiency, and milk composition. Total-tract apparent digestibility of nutrients was generally not affected by treatment, except digestibility of crude protein and starch decreased quadratically with HMTBa supplementation. Fecal, but not urinary, and total excreta N losses were increased quadratically by HMTBa. Ruminal pH, ammonia concentration, protozoal counts, and the major volatile fatty acids were not affected by treatment. Microbial N outflow from the rumen was linearly increased by HMTBa. 2-Hydroxy-4-methylthio-butanoic acid linearly increased the proportion of Fecalibacterium and quadratically decreased the proportion of Eubacterium in ruminal contents. Of the individual bacterial species, HMTBa increased or tended to increase Prevotella loescheii and Prevotella oralis. 2-Hydroxy-4-methylthio-butanoic acid linearly increased the concentration (and yield) of 15:0 in milk fat. In the conditions of this crossover experiment, HMTBa had no effect on feed intake and performance of dairy cows, decreased dietary crude protein digestibility, and increased microbial N outflow from the rumen.

  1. Effects of feeding Fermenten on ruminal fermentation in lactating Holstein cows fed two dietary sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Penner, G B; Guan, L L; Oba, M

    2009-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding Fermenten (Church and Dwight Co., Princeton, NJ) with or without dietary sucrose on ruminal fermentation, apparent total-tract nutrient digestibility, and nutrient utilization. Eight ruminally cannulated Holstein cows (163 +/- 55 d in milk; mean +/- standard deviation) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Experimental diets were formulated with and without Fermenten (0 vs. 3.3% of dietary DM) at 2 dietary sugar concentrations (2.8 vs. 5.7%). Dietary treatment did not affect dry matter intake or apparent total-tract nutrient digestibility. Feeding Fermenten did not affect ruminal pH, but high-sugar diets tended to increase the daily minimum pH (5.61 vs. 5.42) and mean pH (6.17 vs. 6.30) compared with low-sugar diets. Ruminal ammonia concentration tended to be greater for cows fed Fermenten compared with control (18.1 vs. 15.9 mg/dL), but was not affected by dietary sugar concentration. Significant interactions between Fermenten and dietary sugar concentration were detected for some milk production responses. Fermenten treatment numerically increased milk fat yield (0.92 vs. 0.82 kg/d), 4% fat-corrected milk yield (24.3 vs. 21.9 kg/d), and milk energy output (18.2 vs. 16.4 Mcal/d) compared with control for cows fed low-sugar diets, but not for cows fed high-sugar diets. Increasing dietary sugar concentration did not enhance the effects of Fermenten, providing no support for the theory that synchronizing the availability of N and fermentable energy in the rumen improves nutrient utilization in lactating dairy cows.

  2. In vitro ruminal fermentation and in situ ruminal degradation of tamarind kernel powder extract residue in wethers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Oishi, Kazato; Sato, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Takashi; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kei; Kumagai, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    We examined the in vitro fermentation characteristics and in situ dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) degradability of tamarind kernel powder extract residue (TKPER), a by-product of polysaccharides thickener processing. Two types of TKPER (I and II), of which the CP and neutral detergent fiber organic matter basis contents (%) were 41.4 and 42.0 and 1.4 and 0.5, respectively, were compared with dry heat soybean (SB), soybean meal (SBM) and dry soybean curd residue (SBCR). The TKPERs had significantly lower in vitro gas production compared to the other products at each observation time (P < 0.05). The in vitro DM and CP digestibility (%) of TKPER I and II were 67.7 and 64.9, and 64.5 and 58.0, respectively, significantly lower than those of SB and SBM (P < 0.05). We used four wethers (55.6 ± 4.6 kg) with ruminal cannulas to investigate the in situ degradability of TKPER I, SB, SBM and SBCR. At the ruminal outflow rate of 0.05/h, the effective degradability (%) values of the DM and CP of TKPER I were 64.1 and 49.7, respectively, which were similar to those of SBM. In conclusion, TKPER had high CP and exhibited in situ degradability similar to that of SBM, suggesting that TKPER could be used as a protein source feed. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Effects of varying forage particle size and fermentable carbohydrates on feed sorting, ruminal fermentation, and milk and component yields of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Maulfair, D D; Heinrichs, A J

    2013-05-01

    Ration sorting is thought to affect ruminal fermentation in such a manner that milk yield milk and components are often decreased. However, the influence of ruminally degradable starch on ration sorting has not been studied. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the interactions between forage particle size (FPS) and ruminally fermentable carbohydrates (RFC) for dry matter intake (DMI), ration sorting, ruminal fermentation, chewing activity, and milk yield and components. In this study, 12 (8 ruminally cannulated) multiparous, lactating Holstein cows were fed a total mixed ration that varied in FPS and RFC. Two lengths of corn silage were used to alter FPS and 2 grind sizes of corn grain were used to alter RFC. It was determined that increasing RFC increased ruminating time and did not affect eating time, whereas increasing FPS increased eating time and did not affect ruminating time. Ruminal fermentation did not differ by altering either FPS or RFC. However, increasing FPS tended to increase mean and maximum ruminal pH and increasing RFC tended to decrease minimum ruminal pH. Particle size distribution became more diverse and neutral detergent fiber content of refusals increased over time, whereas starch content decreased, indicating that cows were sorting against physically effective neutral detergent fiber and for RFC. Selection indices determined that virtually no interactions occurred between FPS and RFC and that despite significant sorting throughout the day, by 24h after feeding cows had consumed a ration very similar to what was offered. This theory was reinforced by particle fraction intakes that very closely resembled the proportions of particle fractions in the offered total mixed ration. An interaction between FPS and RFC was observed for DMI, as DMI decreased with increasing FPS when the diet included low RFC and did not change when the diet included high RFC. Dry matter intake increased with RFC for long diets and did not change

  4. Effects of dietary supplementation of rumen-protected folic acid on rumen fermentation, degradability and excretion of urinary purine derivatives in growing steers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Liu, Qiang; Guo, Gang; Huo, WenJie; Ma, Le; Zhang, YanLi; Pei, CaiXia; Zhang, ShuanLin; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The present experiment was undertaken to determine the effects of dietary addition of rumen-protected folic acid (RPFA) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, enzyme activity and the relative quantity of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in growing beef steers. Eight rumen-cannulated Jinnan beef steers averaging 2.5 years of age and 419 ± 1.9 kg body weight were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The four treatments comprised supplementation levels of 0 (Control), 70, 140 and 210 mg RPFA/kg dietary dry matter (DM). On DM basis, the ration consisted of 50% corn silage, 47% concentrate and 3% soybean oil. The DM intake (averaged 8.5 kg/d) was restricted to 95% of ad libitum intake. The intake of DM, crude protein (CP) and net energy for growth was not affected by treatments. In contrast, increasing RPFA supplementation increased average daily gain and the concentration of total volatile fatty acid and reduced ruminal pH linearly. Furthermore, increasing RPFA supplementation enhanced the acetate to propionate ratio and reduced the ruminal ammonia N content linearly. The ruminal effective degradability of neutral detergent fibre from corn silage and CP from concentrate improved linearly and was highest for the highest supplementation levels. The activities of cellobiase, xylanase, pectinase and α-amylase linearly increased, but carboxymethyl-cellulase and protease were not affected by the addition of RPFA. The relative quantities of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes increased linearly. With increasing RPFA supplementation levels, the excretion of urinary purine derivatives was also increased linearly. The present results indicated that the supplementation of RPFA improved ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, activities of microbial enzymes and the relative quantity of the ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. According to the conditions of this

  5. Effect of processing high moisture ear corn on ruminal fermentation and milk yield.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, C; Broderick, G A

    1997-12-01

    Thirty-six multiparous dairy cows (8 fitted with ruminal cannulas) and 16 primiparous dairy cows were blocked by days in milk and parity and assigned to one of four diets containing 53% alfalfa silage [dry matter (DM) basis] plus 1) high moisture ear corn, 2) high moisture ear corn plus expeller soybean meal, 3) ground high moisture ear corn, or 4) ground high moisture ear corn plus expeller soybean meal. The high moisture ear corn was rolled before ensiling at 68% DM. Ground high moisture ear corn was prepared by further grinding through a 9.5-mm screen; grinding reduced the geometric mean particle size from 4.33 to 1.66 mm. Diets contained 1.69 Mcal of net energy for lactation/kg of DM. Relative to cows fed diet 1, milk yield was 4 kg/d greater for cows fed diet 2; numerically, milk yield was about 2 kg/d greater for cows fed diets 3 and 4 than for cows fed diet 1. Yield of milk components also was greater for cows fed diets 2 and 3 but not for cows fed diet 4. Intake of DM and yield of 4% FCM were greatest for cows fed diet 3 and lowest for cows fed diet 1. Digestibilities of DM, organic matter, starch, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber were increased, and ruminal NH3 concentration was depressed, by the grinding of high moisture corn; expeller soybean meal increased ruminal NH3. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not different among in vivo treatments, but the molar proportion of acetate decreased, and propionate increased, for cows fed diet 3. The grinding of high moisture corn significantly decreased pH, increased total volatile fatty acid concentration, and increased the rate of decline of NH3 concentration in ruminal in vitro incubations. Grinding improved the utilization of high moisture corn by lactating cows by stimulating ruminal fermentation.

  6. Methane Production of Different Forages in In vitro Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Meale, S. J.; Chaves, A. V.; Baah, J.; McAllister, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro rumen batch culture study was completed to compare effects of common grasses, leguminous shrubs and non-leguminous shrubs used for livestock grazing in Australia and Ghana on CH4 production and fermentation characteristics. Grass species included Andropodon gayanus, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Pennisetum purpureum. Leguminous shrub species included Cajanus cajan, Cratylia argentea, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Stylosanthes guianensis and non-leguminous shrub species included Annona senegalensis, Moringa oleifera, Securinega virosa and Vitellaria paradoxa. Leaves were harvested, dried at 55°C and ground through a 1 mm screen. Serum bottles containing 500 mg of forage, modified McDougall’s buffer and rumen fluid were incubated under anaerobic conditions at 39°C for 24 h. Samples of each forage type were removed after 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h of incubation for determination of cumulative gas production. Methane production, ammonia concentration and proportions of VFA were measured at 24 h. Concentration of aNDF (g/kg DM) ranged from 671 to 713 (grasses), 377 to 590 (leguminous shrubs) and 288 to 517 (non-leguminous shrubs). After 24 h of in vitro incubation, cumulative gas, CH4 production, ammonia concentration, proportion of propionate in VFA and IVDMD differed (p<0.05) within each forage type. B. ruziziensis and G. sepium produced the highest cumulative gas, IVDMD, total VFA, proportion of propionate in VFA and the lowest A:P ratios within their forage types. Consequently, these two species produced moderate CH4 emissions without compromising digestion. Grazing of these two species may be a strategy to reduce CH4 emissions however further assessment in in vivo trials and at different stages of maturity is recommended. PMID:25049482

  7. Fermentation of model hemicelluloses by Prevotella strains and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens in pure culture and in ruminal enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Elianna L; Weimer, Paul J

    2017-05-01

    Hemicelluloses are major components of plant biomass, but their fermentation in the rumens of cattle and other ruminants is poorly understood. We compared four species of the ruminally dominant genus Prevotella and the well-known hemicellulose utilizer, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, with respect to degradation of several isolated hemicelluloses (xylans, glucomannan, and xyloglucan). We also performed Illumina sequencing of the V3/V4 region of 16S rRNA genes to determine the relative proportions of Prevotella and Butyrivibrio in hemicellulose-fed enrichment cultures inoculated from ruminal contents of dairy cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) rich in hemicelluloses. Results confirmed the xylan fermentation and butyrate production abilities of B. fibrisolvens. Despite their reputation as generalist fermenters, the Prevotella strains poorly fermented these hemicelluloses but exhibited dramatic differences in fermentation end products. Prevotella was much less abundant in mixed bacterial enrichment cultures fed the same TMR than in the ruminal inoculum, yet Prevotella was again the most abundant genus in enrichment cultures fed xylans. By contrast, glucomannan fermentations were dominated by Streptococcus sp. Genera known for hemicellulose degradation (Butyrivibrio, Ruminococcus, and Fibrobacter) were not significantly enriched on these hemicelluloses. Substantial differences in fermentation end product distribution from the different hemicelluloses were observed, which would likely affect nutrient partitioning in the host animal. Differences in community composition between in vitro hemicellulose enrichments and inoculum samples emerged at every phylogenetic level, suggesting that in vitro conditions provide unique selective pressures on the bacterial community and also that ruminal bacteria exhibit specialization with respect to hemicellulose utilization.

  8. Digesta retention patterns of solute and different-sized particles in camelids compared with ruminants and other foregut fermenters.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Schwarm, Angela; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    The mean retention times (MRT) of solute or particles in the gastrointestinal tract and the forestomach (FS) are crucial determinants of digestive physiology in herbivores. Besides ruminants, camelids are the only herbivores that have evolved rumination as an obligatory physiological process consisting of repeated mastication of large food particles, which requires a particle sorting mechanism in the FS. Differences between camelids and ruminants have hardly been investigated so far. In this study we measured MRTs of solute and differently sized particles (2, 10, and 20 mm) and the ratio of large-to-small particle MRT, i.e. the selectivity factors (SF(10/2mm), SF(20/2mm), SF(20/10mm)), in three camelid species: alpacas (Vicugna pacos), llamas (Llama glama), and Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus). The camelid data were compared with literature data from ruminants and non-ruminant foregut fermenters (NRFF). Camelids and ruminants both had higher SF(10/2mm)FS than NRFF, suggesting convergence in the function of the FS sorting mechanism in contrast to NRFF, in which such a sorting mechanism is absent. The SF(20/10mm)FS did not differ between ruminants and camelids, indicating that there is a particle size threshold of about 1 cm in both suborders above which particle retention is not increased. Camelids did not differ from ruminants in MRT(2mm)FS, MRTsoluteFS, and the ratio MRT(2mm)FS/MRTsoluteFS, but they were more similar to 'cattle-' than to 'moose-type' ruminants. Camelids had higher SF(10/2mm)FS and higher SF(20/2mm)FS than ruminants, indicating a potentially slower particle sorting in camelids than in ruminants, with larger particles being retained longer in relation to small particles.

  9. Effects of increasing amounts of dietary wheat on performance and ruminal fermentation of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Doepel, L; Cox, A; Hayirli, A

    2009-08-01

    Twelve second-lactation Holstein cows were used in a replicated Latin square design to examine the effects of dietary wheat on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and whole-tract nutrient digestibility. Cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 diets containing 0, 10, and 20% steam-rolled wheat on a dry matter basis at the expense of steam-rolled barley. Cows were fed and milked twice daily. Six of the cows were ruminally cannulated, and rumen fluid samples were obtained from these cows 18 times during the last 2 d of each period. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake (20.9 kg/d) or yields of milk (36.1 kg/d) or milk components (1.25, 1.10, and 1.67 kg/d for fat, protein, and lactose, respectively). Fat percentage was not different among the treatments but protein content of the milk was reduced by the wheat treatments, and was lower when 10% wheat was included in the diet versus 20%. Cows fed wheat had lower ruminal pH (6.36 vs. 6.44) and greater NH(3)-N (11.49 vs. 8.10 mg/dL) and total volatile fatty acids (121 vs. 113 mM) concentrations than cows not fed wheat. The acetate:propionate ratio was lower for cows fed wheat than for those not fed wheat (3.21 vs. 3.36), but was not different between cows fed 10% versus 20% wheat. Wheat feeding did not alter whole-tract apparent digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, acid detergent fiber, and neutral detergent fiber. Results of this study show that up to 20% steam-rolled wheat can be included in the diet of dairy cows without compromising production or causing subacute ruminal acidosis if adequate fiber is provided and the diets are properly formulated and mixed.

  10. Corn silage management III: effects of hybrid, maturity, and processing on nitrogen metabolism and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Swift, M; Mahanna, W C; Shinners, K

    2002-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of maturity and mechanical processing of two hybrids of whole plant corn silage on DM and OM digestibility, nitrogen metabolism, ruminal fermentation, and milk production and composition in lactating Holstein cows. In the first experiment, Pioneer hybrid 3845 whole plant corn was harvested at hard dough, one-third milkline, and two-thirds milkline with a theoretical length-of-cut of 6.4 mm. At each stage of maturity, corn was harvested with (1-mm roll clearance) and without (15.9-mm roll clearance) mechanical processing using a John Deere 5830 harvester with an on-board kernel processor. In the second experiment, Pioneer hybrids 3845 and Quanta were harvested at one-third milkline, two-thirds milkline, and blackline stages of maturity with and without mechanical processing. The theoretical length-of-cut was 12.7 mm. Total tract DM and OM digestibilities were lower for cows fed diets containing processed corn silage in experiment 1, and tended to be lower for cows fed diets containing unprocessed corn silage in experiment 2. Ruminal acetate concentrations were greater and ruminal propionate concentrations were lower 2 and 6 h after feeding for cows fed diets containing corn silage harvested at physiological maturity in experiment 2. This was due to decreased digestion of starch at advanced maturities in experiment 2. Ruminal pH tended to decline rapidly after feeding for cows fed hybrid Quanta (2 h) compared to hybrid 3845 (5 h) corn silage based diets. Ruminal acetate concentrations decreased and ruminal propionate concentrations increased 2 and 6 h after feeding for cows fed diets containing hybrid Quanta corn silage compared to hybrid 3845 corn silage. This was related to a greater starch concentration in the corn silage, greater starch intake, and increased rate of starch digestion for cows fed hybrid Quanta corn silage-based diets. Microbial nitrogen flow was lower and feed nitrogen flow was greater for

  11. Evaluation of feeding glycerol on free-fatty acid production and fermentation kinetics of mixed ruminal microbes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krueger, N A; Anderson, R C; Tedeschi, L O; Callaway, T R; Edrington, T S; Nisbet, D J

    2010-11-01

    Ruminant-derived foods contain high proportions of saturated fats as a result of ruminal biohydrogenation that rapidly saturates and thus limits the availability of free unsaturated fatty acids for assimilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of glycerol on ruminal free-fatty acid (FFA) production rates and in vitro fermentation kinetics of alfalfa hay. In vitro incubations demonstrated 48% and 77% reductions in rates of FFA accumulation in incubations supplemented with 2% and 20% glycerol as compared to controls. In vitro incubations with alfalfa hay demonstrated that increasing levels of glycerol did not affect NDF digestibility of the hay. Additionally, increasing amounts of glycerol decreased the acetate to propionate ratio in the rumen. These results suggest that inhibiting bacterial fat degradation may promote ruminal passage of total lipid, thereby providing greater proportions of beneficial unsaturated fat for incorporation into beef products.

  12. Daily and alternate-day supplementation of urea or biuret to ruminants consuming low-quality forage: III. Effects on ruminal fermentation characteristics in steers.

    PubMed

    Currier, T A; Bohnert, D W; Falck, S J; Schauer, C S; Bartle, S J

    2004-05-01

    Five ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (491 +/- 21 kg BW) were used in an incomplete 5 x 4 Latin square with four 24-d periods to determine the influence of supplemental nonprotein N (NPN) source and supplementation frequency (SF) on the dynamics of ruminal fermentation in steers consuming low-quality grass straw (4% CP). Treatments (TRT) included an unsupplemented control (CON) and a urea or biuret supplement that were placed directly into the rumen at 0700 daily (D) or every other day (2D). The NPN treatments were formulated to provide 90% of the estimated degradable intake protein requirement; therefore, the urea and biuret treatments received the same amount of supplemental N over a 2-d period. Daily TRT were supplemented with CP at 0.04% of BW/d, whereas the 2D TRT were supplemented at 0.08% of BW every other day. Forage was provided at 120% of the previous 5-d average intake in two equal portions at 0715 and 1900. Ruminal fluid was collected 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h after supplementation on a day of and a day before supplementation for all TRT. Ruminal NH3-N increased (P < 0.04) with CP supplementation on the day all supplements were provided and on the day on which only daily supplements were provided compared with the CON. However, an NPN source x SF interaction (P = 0.03) on the day all supplements were provided indicated that NH3-N increased at a greater rate for urea as SF decreased compared with biuret. Ruminal NH3-N on the day only daily supplements were provided was greater (P = 0.02) for D compared with 2D. On the day all supplements were provided, D increased (P = 0.05) ruminal indigestible acid detergent fiber passage rate and ruminal fluid volume compared with 2D. These results suggest that urea or biuret can be used effectively as a supplemental N source by steers consuming low-quality forage without adversely affecting ruminal fermentation, even when provided every other day.

  13. Products derived from olive leaves and fruits can alter in vitro ruminal fermentation and methane production.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Pirouz; Durmic, Zoey; Vadhanabhuti, Joy; Vercoe, Philip E

    2017-03-01

    The industrial processing of olive generates a high quantity of by-products. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of products derived from olive trees, i.e. leaves, fruits or kernels as a sole substrate (part A), and crude extract from leaves combined with a substrate (part B) on rumen microbial fermentation in an in vitro batch fermentation system. In this study, total gas production, methane production, and concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and ammonia in ruminal fluid were measured. In part A, in vitro fermentation of leaves or fruits yielded a gas and total VFA production that were comparable with control substrate, while most of them produced significantly less methane (up to 55.6%) when compared to control substrate. In part B, amongst leaf extracts, only addition of chloroform extract reduced methane production, which was also associated with a decrease (P < 0.01) in gas production. This effect was associated with a significant reduction (P < 0.01) in acetate to propionate ratio and ammonia production, but not in reduction in VFA concentrations. Olive leaf and olive leaf chloroform extract reduced ammonia production and increased the molar proportion of propionate in the rumen and can assist in developing novel feed additives for methane mitigation from the rumen. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Influence of polymer-coated slow-release urea on total tract apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation and performance of Nellore steers

    PubMed Central

    Gardinal, R.; Calomeni, G. D.; Cônsolo, N. R. B.; Takiya, C. S.; Freitas, J. E.; Gandra, J. R.; Vendramini, T. H. A.; Souza, H. N.; Rennó, F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Two experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of coated slow-release urea on nutrient digestion, ruminal fermentation, nitrogen utilization, blood glucose and urea concentration (Exp 1), and average daily gain (ADG; Exp 2) of steers. Methods Exp 1: Eight ruminally fistulated steers [503±28.5 kg body weight (BW)] were distributed into a d 4×4 Latin square design and assigned to treatments: control (CON), feed grade urea (U2), polymer-coated slow-release urea A (SRA2), and polymer-coated slow-release urea B (SRB2). Dietary urea sources were set at 20 g/kg DM. Exp 2: 84 steers (350.5±26.5 kg initial BW) were distributed to treatments: CON, FGU at 10 or 20 g/kg diet DM (U1 and U2, respectively), coated SRA2 at 10 or 20 g/kg diet DM (SRA1 and SRA2, respectively), and coated SRB at 10 or 20 g/kg diet DM (SRB1 and SRB2, respectively). Results Exp 1: Urea treatments (U2+SRA2+SRB2) decreased (7.4%, p = 0.03) the DM intake and increased (11.4%, p<0.01) crude protein digestibility. Coated slow-release urea (SRA2+SRB2) showed similar nutrient digestibility compwared to feed grade urea (FGU). However, steers fed SRB2 had higher (p = 0.02) DM digestibility compared to those fed SRA2. Urea sources did not affect ruminal fermentation when compared to CON. Although, coated slow-release urea showed lower (p = 0.01) concentration of NH3-N (−10.4%) and acetate to propionate ratio than U2. Coated slow-release urea showed lower (p = 0.02) urinary N and blood urea concentration compared to FGU. Exp 2: Urea sources decreased (p = 0.01) the ADG in relation to CON. Animals fed urea sources at 10 g/kg DM showed higher (12.33%, p = 0.01) ADG compared to those fed urea at 20 g/kg DM. Conclusion Feeding urea decreased the nutrient intake without largely affected the nutrient digestibility. In addition, polymer-coated slow-release urea sources decreased ruminal ammonia concentration and increased ruminal propionate production. Urea at 20 g/kg DM, regardless of source

  15. Effect of different levels of concentrate on ruminal microorganisms and rumen fermentation in Nellore steers.

    PubMed

    Granja-Salcedo, Yury T; Ribeiro Júnior, Carlos S; de Jesus, Raphael B; Gomez-Insuasti, Arturo S; Rivera, Astrid R; Messana, Juliana D; Canesin, Roberta C; Berchielli, Telma T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different dietary levels of concentrate on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation and microbial population in steers. Eight Nellore steers fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a double 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment. The dietary treatments consist of four different proportions of concentrate to roughage: 30:70, 40:60, 60:40 and 80:20% in the dry matter, resulting in Diets 30, 40, 60 and 80, respectively. The roughage was corn silage, and the concentrate was composed of corn, soybean meal and urea. Apparent digestibility of organic matter and crude protein showed a linear association with concentrate proportion (p = 0.01), but the increased concentrate levels did not affect the digestibility of fibre. The lowest ruminal pH-values were observed in animals fed with Diet 80, remaining below pH 6.0 from 6 h after feeding, while in the other diets, the ruminal pH was below 6.0 not before 12 h after feeding. After feeding Diet 80, the ammonia concentration in the rumen was significantly the highest. Higher dietary concentrate levels resulted in a linear increase of propionic acid concentrations, a linear reduction of the ratio acetic acid to propionic acid (p < 0.01) and a linear increased synthesis of microbial nitrogen (p < 0.001). The predicted production of methane was lower in diets with greater amounts of concentrate (p = 0.032). The population of methanogens, R. flavefaciens and R. albus decreased with higher concentrate levels, while the population of S. ruminantium increased (p < 0.05). The results indicate that greater amounts of concentrate do not decrease ruminal pH-values as much as expected and inhibit some cellulolytic bacteria without impairing the dry matter intake and fibre digestibility in Nellore steers.

  16. Effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anja; Lebzien, Peter; Meyer, Ulrich; Borchert, Ulrike; Bulang, Michael; Flachowsky, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme product applied to a total mixed ration (TMR) prior to feeding on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, nutrient digestion, and milk yield and composition. Six multiparous lactating Holstein cows (598 +/- 29 kg initial live weight and 98 +/- 30 days in milk) fitted with rumen and duodenal cannulae were allocated to two treatments in a crossover design over three consecutive 28-d periods. The TMR containing 50% concentrates, 30% corn silage and 20% grass silage on dry matter (DM) basis, was mixed once daily and fed twice a day. Treatments were TMR alone (Control) or TMR with an enzyme product containing primarily cellulase and xylanase activities (9000 U endo-1,4-beta glucanase, 24000 U endo-1,3(4)-beta glucanase and 40000 U 1,4-beta xylanase per ml). The enzyme product was applied at a rate of 6.2 ml/kg TMR (DM basis). It was diluted at a rate of 1:5 with water and applied daily to the TMR. During the control period the cows received a TMR supplemented with 36 ml water/kg TMR on DM basis. Duodenal digesta flow was measured using Cr2O3 as flow marker and microbial protein in the duodenal digesta was estimated by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There were no significant differences in ruminal pH-values, NH3-N concentrations, total SCFA concentrations and molar proportions of SCFA. No treatment effects on microbial N flow to the duodenum and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis were observed. The apparent ruminal digestibilities of DM, organic matter, NDF and ADF, milk yield and composition were also not affected by the enzyme supplementation. In this study the application of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes fed to dairy cows did not show a significant effect on any parameter tested.

  17. Core fecal microbiota of domesticated herbivorous ruminant, hindgut fermenters, and monogastric animals.

    PubMed

    O' Donnell, Michelle M; Harris, Hugh M B; Ross, R Paul; O'Toole, Paul W

    2017-08-22

    In this pilot study, we determined the core fecal microbiota composition and overall microbiota diversity of domesticated herbivorous animals of three digestion types: hindgut fermenters, ruminants, and monogastrics. The 42 animals representing 10 animal species were housed on a single farm in Ireland and all the large herbivores consumed similar feed, harmonizing two of the environmental factors that influence the microbiota. Similar to other mammals, the fecal microbiota of all these animals was dominated by the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. The fecal microbiota spanning all digestion types comprised 42% of the genera identified. Host phylogeny and, to a lesser extent, digestion type determined the microbiota diversity in these domesticated herbivores. This pilot study forms a platform for future studies into the microbiota of nonbovine and nonequine domesticated herbivorous animals. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of nutritional and economic feed values of spent coffee grounds and Artemisia princeps residues as a ruminant feed using in vitro ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jakyeom; Jung, Jae Keun; Seo, Seongwon

    2015-01-01

    Much research on animal feed has focused on finding alternative feed ingredients that can replace conventional ones (e.g., grains and beans) to reduce feed costs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the economic, as well as nutritional value of spent coffee grounds (SCG) and Japanese mugwort (Artemisia princeps) residues (APR) as alternative feed ingredients for ruminants. We also investigated whether pre-fermentation using Lactobacillus spp. was a feasible way to increase the feed value of these by-products. Chemical analyses and an in vitro study were conducted for SCG, APR, and their pre-fermented forms. All the experimental diets for in vitro ruminal fermentation were formulated to contain a similar composition of crude protein, neutral detergent fiber and total digestible nutrients at 1x maintenance feed intake based on the dairy National Research Council (NRC). The control diet was composed of ryegrass, corn, soybean meal, whereas the treatments consisted of SCG, SCG fermented with Lactobacillus spp. (FSCG), APR, and its fermented form (FAPR). The treatment diets replaced 100 g/kg dry matter (DM) of the feed ingredients in the control. Costs were lower for the all treatments, except FAPR, than that of the control. After 24-h incubation, the NDF digestibility of the diets containing SCG and its fermented form were significantly lower than those of the other diets (P < 0.01); pre-fermentation tended to increase NDF digestibility (P = 0.07), especially for APR. Supplementation of SCG significantly decreased total gas production (ml/g DM) after 24-h fermentation in comparison with the control (P < 0.05); however, there were no significant differences between the control and the SCG or the APR diets in total gas production, as expressed per Korean Won (KRW). Diets supplemented with SCG or FSCG tended to have a higher total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, expressed as per KRW, compared with the control (P = 0.06). Conversely, the fermentation

  19. Evaluation of nutritional and economic feed values of spent coffee grounds and Artemisia princeps residues as a ruminant feed using in vitro ruminal fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jakyeom; Jung, Jae Keun

    2015-01-01

    Much research on animal feed has focused on finding alternative feed ingredients that can replace conventional ones (e.g., grains and beans) to reduce feed costs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the economic, as well as nutritional value of spent coffee grounds (SCG) and Japanese mugwort (Artemisia princeps) residues (APR) as alternative feed ingredients for ruminants. We also investigated whether pre-fermentation using Lactobacillus spp. was a feasible way to increase the feed value of these by-products. Chemical analyses and an in vitro study were conducted for SCG, APR, and their pre-fermented forms. All the experimental diets for in vitro ruminal fermentation were formulated to contain a similar composition of crude protein, neutral detergent fiber and total digestible nutrients at 1x maintenance feed intake based on the dairy National Research Council (NRC). The control diet was composed of ryegrass, corn, soybean meal, whereas the treatments consisted of SCG, SCG fermented with Lactobacillus spp. (FSCG), APR, and its fermented form (FAPR). The treatment diets replaced 100 g/kg dry matter (DM) of the feed ingredients in the control. Costs were lower for the all treatments, except FAPR, than that of the control. After 24-h incubation, the NDF digestibility of the diets containing SCG and its fermented form were significantly lower than those of the other diets (P < 0.01); pre-fermentation tended to increase NDF digestibility (P = 0.07), especially for APR. Supplementation of SCG significantly decreased total gas production (ml/g DM) after 24-h fermentation in comparison with the control (P < 0.05); however, there were no significant differences between the control and the SCG or the APR diets in total gas production, as expressed per Korean Won (KRW). Diets supplemented with SCG or FSCG tended to have a higher total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, expressed as per KRW, compared with the control (P = 0.06). Conversely, the fermentation

  20. Changes in ruminal fermentation, milk performance and milk fatty acid profile in dairy cows with subacute ruminal acidosis and its regulation with pelleted beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongqing; Wang, Libin; Zou, Yang; Xu, Xiaofeng; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2013-12-01

    The aims of the experiment were to investigate the variation in ruminal fermentation, milk performance and milk fatty acid profile triggered by induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA); and to evaluate the ability of beet pulp (BP) as a replacement for ground maize in order to alleviate SARA. Eight Holstein-Friesian cows were fed four diets (total mixed rations) during four successive periods (each of 17 d): (1) without wheat (W0); (2) with 10% finely ground wheat (FGW) (W10); (3) with 20% FGW (W20); (4) with 20% FGW and 10% pelleted BP (BP10). Inducing SARA by diet W20 decreased the daily mean ruminal pH (6.37 vs. 5.94) and the minimum ruminal pH (5.99 vs. 5.41) from baseline to challenge period. Ruminal concentrations of total volatile fatty acid, propionate, butyrate, valerate and isovalerate increased with the W20 compared with the W0 and W10 treatments. The substitution of BP for maize increased the minimum ruminal pH and molar percentage of acetate and decreased the molar percentage of butyrate. The diets had no effect on dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield, but the milk fat percentage and yield as well as the amount of fat-corrected milk was reduced in the W20 and BP10 treatments. The cows fed the W20 diet had greater milk concentrations of C11:0, C13:0, C15:0, C14:1, C16:1, C17:1, C18:2n6c, C20:3n6, total polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) and total odd-chain FA, and lower concentrations of C18:0 and total saturated FA compared with the cows fed the W0 diet. Therefore, it can be concluded that changes in ruminal fermentation, milk fat concentration and fatty acid profile are highly related to SARA induced by feeding high FGW diets, and that the substitution of BP for maize could reduce the risk of SARA in dairy cows.

  1. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system.

  2. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system. PMID:25699029

  3. Preparation of Glycerol-Enriched Yeast Culture and Its Effect on Blood Metabolites and Ruminal Fermentation in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gengping; Zhu, Yongxing; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate a glycerol-producing yeast strain from nature to prepare glycerol-enriched yeast culture (GY), and preliminarily evaluate the effects of GY on blood metabolites and ruminal fermentation in goats. During the trial, six isolates were isolated from unprocessed honey, and only two isolates with higher glycerol yield were identified by analysis of 26S ribosomal DNA sequences. One of the two isolates was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a direct-fed microbe permitted by the FDA. This isolate was used to prepare GY. The fermentation parameters were optimized through single-factor and orthogonal design methods to maximize the glycerol yield and biomass. The final GY contained 38.7±0.6 g/L glycerol and 12.6±0.5 g/L biomass. In vivo, eight castrated male goats with ruminal fistula were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square experiment with four consecutive periods of 15 d. Treatments were as follows: control, LGY, MGY, and HGY with 0, 100, 200, and 300 mL GY per goat per day, respectively. The GY was added in two equal portions at 08∶00 and 17∶00 through ruminal fistula. Samples of blood and ruminal fluid were collected on the last one and two days of each period, respectively. Results showed that the plasma concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol were not affected by the supplemented GY. Compared with the control, goats supplemented with MGY and HGY had significantly higher (P<0.05) concentrations of plasma glucose and total protein, ruminal volatile fatty acid and molar proportion of propionate, and significantly lower (P<0.05) ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen. These parameters changed linearly with increasing GY supplementation level (P<0.05). In conclusion, GY has great potential to be developed as a feed additive with dual effects of glycerol and yeast for ruminants. PMID:24709881

  4. Preparation of glycerol-enriched yeast culture and its effect on blood metabolites and ruminal fermentation in goats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Gengping; Zhu, Yongxing; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate a glycerol-producing yeast strain from nature to prepare glycerol-enriched yeast culture (GY), and preliminarily evaluate the effects of GY on blood metabolites and ruminal fermentation in goats. During the trial, six isolates were isolated from unprocessed honey, and only two isolates with higher glycerol yield were identified by analysis of 26S ribosomal DNA sequences. One of the two isolates was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a direct-fed microbe permitted by the FDA. This isolate was used to prepare GY. The fermentation parameters were optimized through single-factor and orthogonal design methods to maximize the glycerol yield and biomass. The final GY contained 38.7±0.6 g/L glycerol and 12.6±0.5 g/L biomass. In vivo, eight castrated male goats with ruminal fistula were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square experiment with four consecutive periods of 15 d. Treatments were as follows: control, LGY, MGY, and HGY with 0, 100, 200, and 300 mL GY per goat per day, respectively. The GY was added in two equal portions at 08∶00 and 17∶00 through ruminal fistula. Samples of blood and ruminal fluid were collected on the last one and two days of each period, respectively. Results showed that the plasma concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol were not affected by the supplemented GY. Compared with the control, goats supplemented with MGY and HGY had significantly higher (P<0.05) concentrations of plasma glucose and total protein, ruminal volatile fatty acid and molar proportion of propionate, and significantly lower (P<0.05) ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen. These parameters changed linearly with increasing GY supplementation level (P<0.05). In conclusion, GY has great potential to be developed as a feed additive with dual effects of glycerol and yeast for ruminants.

  5. Effects of alfalfa flavonoids on the production performance, immune system, and ruminal fermentation of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Jinshun; Liu, Mingmei; Su, Xiaoshuang; Zhan, Kang; Zhang, Chungang; Zhao, Guoqi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effects of alfalfa flavonoids on the production performance, immunity, and ruminal fermentation of dairy cows. Methods The experiments employed four primiparous Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas, and used a 4×4 Latin square design. Cattle were fed total mixed ration supplemented with 0 (control group, Con), 20, 60, or 100 mg of alfalfa flavonoids extract (AFE) per kg of dairy cow body weight (BW). Results The feed intake of the group receiving 60 mg/kg BW of AFE were significantly higher (p<0.05) than that of the group receiving 100 mg/kg BW. Milk yields and the fat, protein and lactose of milk were unaffected by AFE, while the total solids content of milk reduced (p = 0.05) linearly as AFE supplementation was increased. The somatic cell count of milk in group receiving 60 mg/kg BW of AFE was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the control group. Apparent total-tract digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and crude protein showed a tendency to increase (0.05ruminal fermentation parameters were not affected by AFE supplementation. Relative levels of the rumen microbe Ruminococcus flavefaciens tended to decrease (p = 0.09) quadratically, whereas those of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens showed a tendency to increase (p = 0.07) quadratically in response to AFE supplementation. Conclusion

  6. Effects of partially replacing dietary starch with dry glycerol in a lactating cow diet on ruminal fermentation during continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Rico, D E; Chung, Y-H; Martinez, C M; Cassidy, T W; Heyler, K S; Varga, G A

    2012-06-01

    The effects of dry glycerol as a partial replacement for dietary starch in a lactating cow diet on ruminal fermentation and bacterial protein synthesis were evaluated using 4 single-flow, continuous-culture fermentors (ranging from 1,015 to 1,040 mL in volume). The basal lactating cow diet was formulated to have partial contents of dietary starch provided from a corn starch supplement [at 12.37% diet dry matter (DM)], which was partially or completely replaced by a dry glycerol product. Both the corn starch supplement and dry glycerol product contained 65% of pure corn starch or glycerol, respectively. The final inclusion rate for pure glycerol was at 0, 3, 5, or 8% of DM in the basal diet. The experiment was conducted using a 4 × 4 Latin square design with four 9-d periods, with the first 6 d for adaptation and last 3 d for sampling. Fermentors were inoculated with 1L of ruminal fluid and 25 g of ruminal digesta from a ruminally cannulated cow receiving a lactation total mixed ration (16% crude protein, 32% neutral detergent fiber, and 25% starch; DM basis). Each fermentor was fed 75 g of DM of its respective experimental diet daily in 3 equal portions (at 0800, 1400, and 2000 h). Liquid dilution rate of the fermentors was maintained at 10%/h and solids retention time was set at 24 h. Fermentation fluid and the effluent from each fermentor were sampled once daily (at 1330 h) from d 7 to 9 of each period and pooled by period. Postprandial ruminal fermentation was studied by sampling the fermentors hourly for 5 h after the 0800 h feeding on d 9 of each period. The total fermentation contents were harvested at the end of the period for estimations of bacterial protein synthesis. Replacing corn starch with dry glycerol linearly increased the proportions of propionate and valerate at the expense of acetate in the fermentation fluid measured daily or for the first 5h after feeding. Replacing corn starch with dry glycerol also linearly increased the digestibility of

  7. Effect of replacing corn with brown rice in a total, mixed, ration silage on milk production, ruminal fermentation and nitrogen balance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Makoto; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Hosoda, Kenji; Nonaka, Kazuhisa

    2012-08-01

    Nine multiparous Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design to determine the effects of substituting corn grain with brown rice (BR) grain in total mixed ration (TMR) silage on milk yield, ruminal fermentation and nitrogen (N) balance. The TMR silages were made from the ensiling of TMR containing (dry matter basis) 50.1% forage in rice silage and corn silage combination, and 49.9% concentrate. The grain portion of the diets contained 31.2% steam-flaked corn, 31.2% steam-flaked BR or an equal mixture of corn and BR. Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield and milk fat, protein and lactose yields. The ruminal pH and total volatile fatty acid concentrations were not affected by dietary treatment. The urinary N excretion decreased linearly (P < 0.01) in response to increased levels of BR, with no dietary effect on N intake, N secretion in milk and fecal N excretion. Our results indicate that steam-flaked BR is a suitable replacement for steam-flaked corn in dairy cow diets, and that it can be included in rations to a level of at least 31.2% of dry matter without adverse effects on milk production, when cows were fed rice silage and corn silage-based diets.

  8. Ruminal fermentation and microbial ecology of buffaloes and cattle fed the same diet.

    PubMed

    Lwin, Khin-Ohnmar; Kondo, Makoto; Ban-Tokuda, Tomomi; Lapitan, Rosalina M; Del-Barrio, Arnel N; Fujihara, Tsutomu; Matsui, Hiroki

    2012-12-01

    Although buffaloes and cattle are ruminants, their digestive capabilities and rumen microbial compositions are considered to be different. The purpose of this study was to compare the rumen microbial ecology of crossbred water buffaloes and cattle that were fed the same diet. Cattle exhibited a higher fermentation rate than buffaloes. Methane production and methanogen density were lower in buffaloes. Phylogenetic analysis of Fibrobacter succinogenes-specific 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone library showed that the diversity of groups within a species was significantly different (P < 0.05) between buffalo and cattle and most of the clones were affiliated with group 2 of the species. Population densities of F.succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus and R. flavefaciens were higher until 6 h post-feeding in cattle; however, buffaloes exhibited different traits. The population of anaerobic fungi decreased at 3 h in cattle compared to buffaloes and was similar at 0 h and 6 h. The diversity profiles of bacteria and fungi were similar in the two species. The present study showed that the profiles of the fermentation process, microbial population and diversity were similar in crossbred water buffaloes and crossbred cattle.

  9. Optimized batch fermentation of cheese whey. Supplemented feedlot waste filtrate to produce a nitrogen-rich feed supplement for ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, M.D.; Reddy, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    An optimized batch fermentation process for the conversion of cattle feedlot waste filtrate, supplemented with cheese whey, into a nitrogenous feed supplement for ruminants is described. Feedlot waste filtrate supplemented with cheese whey (5 g of whey per 100 ml) was fermented by the indigenous microbial flora in the feedlot waste filtrate. Ammonium hydroxide was added to the fermentation not only to maintain a constant pH but also to produce ammonium salts of organic acids, which have been shown to be valuable as nitrogenous feed supplements for ruminants. The utilization of substrate carbohydrate at pH 7.0 and 43 degrees C was greater than 94% within 8 h, and the crude protein (total N X 6.25) content of the product was 70 to 78% (dry weight basis). About 66 to 69% of the crude protein was in the form of ammonia nitrogen. Lactate and acetate were the predominant acids during the first 6 to 8 hours of fermentation, but after 24 hours, appreciable levels of propionate and butyrate were also present. The rate of fermentation and the crude protein content of the product were optimal at pH 7.0 and decreased at a lower pH. For example, fermentation did not go to completion even after 24 hours at pH 4.5. Fermentation proceeded optimally at 43 degrees C, less so at 37 degrees C, and considerably more slowly at 23 and 50 degrees C. Concentrations of up to 15 g of cheese whey per 100 ml of feedlot waste filtrate were fermented efficiently. Fermentation of feedlot waste filtrate obtained from animals fed low silage-high grain, high silage-low grain, or dairy rations resulted in similar products in terms of total nitrogen and organic acid composition.

  10. Ruminal fermentation characteristics and fatty acid profile of ruminal fluid and milk of dairy cows fed flaxseed hulls supplemented with monensin.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Kazama, Daniele C; Côrtes, Cristiano; Kazama, Ricardo; Benchaar, Chaouki; Santos, Geraldo T D; Zeoula, Lucia M; Petit, Hélène V

    2011-02-01

    Flaxseed hull, a co-product obtained from flax processing, is a rich source of n-3 fatty acids (FA) but there is little information on its value for dairy production. Monensin supplementation is known to modify biohydrogenation of FA by rumen microbes. Therefore, the main objective of the experiment was to determine the effect of feeding a combination of monensin and flaxseed hulls on ruminal fermentation characteristics and FA profile of ruminal fluid and milk. Four ruminally fistulated multiparous Holstein cows averaging 665 ± 21 kg body weight and 190 ± 5 d in milk were assigned to a 4×4 Latin square design (28-d experimental periods) with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments were: 1) control, neither flaxseed hulls nor monensin; 2) diet containing (dry matter basis) 19·8% flaxseed hulls; 3) diet with monensin (16 mg/kg dry matter); 4) diet containing 19·8% (dry matter basis) flaxseed hulls and 16 mg monensin/kg. Flaxseed hull supplementation decreased the acetate to propionate ratio in ruminal fluid and monensin had no effect. Concentrations of trans-18:1 isomers (trans9,trans11,trans13/14+6/8) and cis9,12,15-18:3 in ruminal fluid and milk fat were higher and those of cis9,12-18:2 in milk fat tended (P=0·07) to be higher for cows supplemented with flaxseed hulls than for cows fed no flaxseed hulls. Monensin had little effect on milk fatty acid profile. A combination of flaxseed hulls and monensin did not result in better milk fatty acid profile than when feeding only flaxseed hulls.

  11. Effects of adding polyclonal antibody preparations on ruminal fermentation patterns and digestibility of cows fed different energy sources.

    PubMed

    Marino, C T; Otero, W G; Rodrigues, P H M; Dicostanzo, A; Millen, D D; Pacheco, R L D; Dilorenzo, N; Martins, C L; Arrigoni, M D B

    2011-10-01

    Nine ruminally cannulated cows fed different energy sources were used to evaluate an avian-derived polyclonal antibody preparation (PAP-MV) against the specific ruminal bacteria Streptococcus bovis, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Clostridium aminophilum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Clostridium sticklandii and monensin (MON) on ruminal fermentation patterns and in vivo digestibility. The experimental design was three 3 × 3 Latin squares distinguished by the main energy source in the diet [dry-ground corn grain (CG), high-moisture corn silage (HMCS), or citrus pulp (CiPu)]. Inside each Latin square, animals received one of the feed additives per period [none (CON), MON, or PAP-MV]. Dry matter intake and ruminal fermentation variables such as pH, total short-chain fatty acids (tSCFA), which included acetate, propionate, and butyrate, as well as lactic acid and NH(3)-N concentration were analyzed in this trial. Total tract DM apparent digestibility and its fractions were estimated using chromic oxide as an external marker. Each experimental period lasted 21 d. Ruminal fluid sampling was carried out on the last day of the period at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 h after the morning meal. Ruminal pH was higher (P = 0.006) 4 h postfeeding in MON and PAP-MV groups when compared with CON. Acetate:propionate ratio was greater in PAP-MV compared with MON across sampling times. Polyclonal antibodies did not alter (P > 0.05) tSCFA, molar proportion of acetate and butyrate, or lactic acid and NH(3)-N concentration. Ruminal pH was higher (P = 0.01), 4 h postfeeding in CiPu diets compared with CG and HMCS. There was no interaction between feed additive and energy source (P > 0.05) for any of the digestibility coefficients analyzed. Starch digestibility was less (P = 0.008) in PAP-MV when compared with CON and MON. In relation to energy sources, NDF digestibility was greater (P = 0.007) in CG and CiPu vs. the HMCS diet. The digestibility of ADF was greater (P = 0.002) in CiPu diets

  12. Effects of concentrate replacement by feed blocks on ruminal fermentation and microbial growth in goats and single-flow continuous-culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    Molina-Alcaide, E; Pascual, M R; Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Morales-García, E Y; Martín-García, A I

    2009-04-01

    The effect of replacing concentrate with 2 different feed blocks (FB) on ruminal fermentation and microbial growth was evaluated in goats and in single-flow continuous-culture fermenters. Diets consisted of alfalfa hay plus concentrate and alfalfa hay plus concentrate with 1 of the 2 studied FB. Three trials were carried out with 6 rumen-fistulated Granadina goats and 3 incubation runs in 6 single-flow continuous-culture fermenters. Experimental treatments were assigned randomly within each run, with 2 repetitions for each diet. At the end of each in vivo trial, the rumen contents were obtained for inoculating the fermenters. For each incubation run, the fermenters were inoculated with ruminal fluid from goats fed the same diet supplied to the corresponding fermenter flask. The average pH values, total and individual VFA, and NH(3)-N concentrations, and acetate:propionate ratios in the rumen of goats were not affected (P >or= 0.10) by diet, whereas the microbial N flow (MNF) and efficiency were affected (P fermenters, the diet affected pH (P<0.001), propionate concentrations (P=0.01), acetate:propionate ratio (P=0.03), carbohydrate digestibility (P >or= 0.05), and total (P=0.02), NH(3) (P=0.005), and non-NH(3) (P=0.02) N flows, whereas the efficiency of VFA production was not affected (P=0.75). The effect of diet on MNF and efficiency depended on the bacterial pellet used as a reference. An effect (P<0.05) of diet on the composition of solid- and liquid-associated bacteria was observed. The compositions of liquid-associated bacteria in the fermenter contents and effluent were similar (P=0.05). Differences (P<0.001) between in vivo and in vitro values for most fermentation variables and bacterial pellet compositions were found. Partial replacement of the concentrate with FB did not greatly compromise carbohydrate fermentation in unproductive goats. However, this was not the case for MNF and

  13. Methane production, digestion, ruminal fermentation, nitrogen balance, and milk production of cows fed corn silage- or barley silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Petit, H V; Massé, D I

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of replacing barley silage (BS) with corn silage (CS) in dairy cow diets on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion, milk production, and N balance. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (TMR; forage:concentrate ratio 60:40; dry matter basis) with the forage portion consisting of either barley silage (0% CS; 0% CS and 54.4% BS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (27% CS; 27.2% CS and 27.2% BS in the TMR), or corn silage (54% CS; 0% BS and 54.4% CS in the TMR). Increasing the CS proportion (i.e., at the expense of BS) also involved increasing the proportion of corn grain (at the expense of barley grain). Intake and digestibility of dry matter and milk production increased linearly as the proportion of CS increased in the diet. Increasing dietary CS proportion decreased linearly the acetate molar proportion and increased linearly that of propionate. Daily CH4 emissions tended to respond quadratically to increasing proportions of CS in the diet (487, 540, and 523 g/d for 0, 27, and 54% CS, respectively). Methane production adjusted for dry matter or gross energy intake declined as the amount of CS increased in the diet; this effect was more pronounced when cows were fed the 54% CS diet than the 27% CS diet. Increasing the CS proportion in the diet improved N utilization, as reflected by decreases in ruminal ammonia concentration and urinary N excretion and higher use of dietary N for milk protein secretion. Total replacement of BS with CS in dairy cow diets offers a strategy to decrease CH4 energy losses and control N losses without negatively affecting milk performance.

  14. Radiation pasteurised oil palm empty fruit bunch fermented with Pleurotus sajor-caju as feed supplement to ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang, Mat Rasol; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Mahmud, Mohd. Shukri; Wan Husain, Wan Badrin; Osman, Tajuddin; Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Kassim, Asmahwati; Wan Mahmud, Zal U'yun; Manaf, Ishak; Kume, Tamikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji

    1993-10-01

    In solid state fermentation, Pleurotus sajor-caju has been found to be able to degrade at least 30% oil palm empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) fibre leaving 70 % useful materials. Conditions under which fermentation carried out were investigated. It was found that, in the temperature range between 25- 28 °C, relative ph between 6-8, moisture between 60-70 % and medium composition of CaCO 3: rice bran 2 %: 5 % were the optimum conditions. The results showed in fermented products that, there were substantial reduction in cellulosic component such as Crude Fiber (CF, 18 %); Acid Detergent Fibre (ADF, 45 %), Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDF, 61 %) and Acid Detergent Lignin (ADL, 14 %). However, Crude Protein (CP, 10%) increased resulted from single cell protein enrichment of mycelial microbial mass. The mass reductions of substrate in fermentation process corresponds to the CO 2 released during fermentation. Hence, attributable to the decreased in content of CF, ADF, NDF, and ADL. The digestibility study has also been carried out to determine the useful level of this product to ruminant. Aflatoxin content was detected low in both the initial substrates and products. Based on nutritional value and low content of aflatoxin, the product is useful as a source of roughage to ruminant.

  15. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto on milk production, rumen fermentation and ruminal microbiome of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Wang, J Q; Deng, L F

    2013-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of Bacillus subtilis natto, which was initially isolated from fermented soybeans on milk production, rumen fermentation and ruminal microbiome in dairy cows. In Experiment 1, 36 early lactation Chinese Holstein dairy cows (56 ± 23 days in milk) were randomly assigned to three groups: Control, cows were fed total mixed ration (TMR); BSNLOW, TMR plus 0.5 × 1011 colony-forming units (cfu) of B. subtilis natto/cow per day; and BSNHIGH, TMR plus 1.0 × 1011 cfu of B. subtilis natto/cow per day. During the 70-day treatment period, daily milk production and daily milk composition were determined in individual cows. The results showed that supplementing dairy cows with 0.5 × 1011 and 1.0 × 1011 cfu of B. subtilis natto linearly increased (P < 0.01) milk production (25.2 and 26.4 kg/day v. 23.0 kg/day), 4% fat-corrected milk (27.3 and 28.1 kg/day v. 24.2 kg/day), energy-corrected milk (27.3 and 28.2 kg/day v. 24.2 kg/day), as well as milk fat (1.01 and 1.03 kg/day v. 0.88 kg/day), protein (0.77 and 0.82 kg/day v. 0.69 kg/day) and lactose yield (1.16 and 1.22 kg/day v. 1.06 kg/day) but decreased milk somatic cell counts (SCC) by 3.4% to 5.5% (P < 0.01) in BSNLOW and BSNHIGH treatments compared with Control. In Experiment 2, four rumen-cannulated dairy cows were fed the basal diet from 1 to 7 days (pre-trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 6 and 7; the same cows then were fed 1.0 × 1011 cfu/day B. subtilis natto from days 8 to 21 (trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 20 and 21. B. subtilis natto was discontinued from days 22 to 28 (post-trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 27 and 28. Compared with the pre- and post-periods, ruminal pH decreased by 2.7% to 3.0% during the trial period (P < 0.01), whereas ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total volatile fatty acids and molar proportion of propionate (P < 0.01) and valerate (P < 0.05) increased. Molar proportion of acetate

  16. Effects of Momordica charantia Saponins on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Microbial Population

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jinhe; Zeng, Bo; Tang, Shaoxun; Wang, Min; Han, Xuefeng; Zhou, Chuanshe; Yan, Qiongxian; He, Zhixiong; Liu, Jinfu; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Momordica charantia saponin (MCS) on ruminal fermentation of maize stover and abundance of selected microbial populations in vitro. Five levels of MCS supplements (0, 0.01, 0.06, 0.30, 0.60 mg/mL) were tested. The pH, NH3-N, and volatile fatty acid were measured at 6, 24, 48 h of in vitro mixed incubation fluids, whilst the selected microbial populations were determined at 6 and 24 h. The high dose of MCS increased the initial fractional rate of degradation at t-value = 0 (FRD0) and the fractional rate of gas production (k), but decreased the theoretical maximum of gas production (VF) and the half-life (t0.5) compared with the control. The NH3-N concentration reached the lowest concentration with 0.01 mg MCS/mL at 6 h. The MSC inclusion increased (p<0.001) the molar proportion of butyrate, isovalerate at 24 h and 48 h, and the molar proportion of acetate at 24 h, but then decreased (p<0.05) them at 48 h. The molar proportion of valerate was increased (p<0.05) at 24 h. The acetate to propionate ratio (A/P; linear, p<0.01) was increased at 24 h, but reached the least value at the level of 0.30 mg/mL MCS. The MCS inclusion decreased (p<0.05) the molar proportion of propionate at 24 h and then increased it at 48 h. The concentration of total volatile fatty acid was decreased (p<0.001) at 24 h, but reached the greatest concentration at the level of 0.01 mg/mL and the least concentration at the level of 0.60 mg/mL. The relative abundance of Ruminococcus albus was increased at 6 h and 24 h, and the relative abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes was the lowest (p<0.05) at 0.60 mg/mL at 6 h and 24 h. The relative abundance of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and fungus reached the greatest value (p<0.05) at low doses of MCS inclusion and the least value (p<0.05) at 0.60 mg/mL at 24 h. The present results demonstrates that a high level of MCS quickly inhibits in vitro fermentation of maize stover, while MCS at low doses has the

  17. Effect of dietary supplementation of rutin on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation and metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cui, K; Guo, X D; Tu, Y; Zhang, N F; Ma, T; Diao, Q Y

    2015-12-01

    The effect of long-term dietary supplementation with rutin on the lactation performance, ruminal fermentation and metabolism of dairy cows were investigated in this study. Twenty multiparous Chinese Holstein cows were randomly divided into four groups, and each was offered a basal diet supplemented with 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.5 mg rutin/kg of diet. The milk yield of the cows receiving 3.0 and 4.5 mg rutin/kg was higher than that of the control group, and the milk yield was increased by 10.06% and 3.37% (p < 0.05). On the basis of that finding, the cows supplemented with 0 or 3.0 mg rutin/kg of diet were used to investigate the effect of rutin supplementation on blood metabolites and hormone levels. Compared with the control group, the serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration of the 3.0 mg rutin/kg group is significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In another trial, four adult cows with permanent rumen fistula and duodenal cannulae were attributed in a self-control design to investigate the peak occurrence of rutin and quercetin in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract, ruminal fermentation and microbial population in dairy cows. The cows supplemented with 3.0 mg rutin/kg in the diet differed from the control period. Samples of rumen fluid, duodenal fluid and blood were collected at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 h after morning feeding. Compared to the control group, the pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration, number and protein content of rumen protozoa and blood urea nitrogen were lower, but the concentration of total volatile fatty acid (TVFA), microbial crude protein (MCP) and serum lysozyme content were higher for the cows fed the rutin diets. The addition of 3.0 mg rutin/kg to diets for a long term tended to increase the milk yield and improve the metabolism and digestibility of the dairy cows.

  18. Influence of ruminal or duodenal soybean oil infusion on intake, ruminal fermentation, site and extent of digestion, and microbial protein synthesis in beef heifers consuming grass hay.

    PubMed

    Krysl, L J; Judkins, M B; Bohman, V R

    1991-06-01

    Six heifers (two Hereford X Jersey, four Hereford X Longhorn; average BW 278 kg) cannulated at the rumen and duodenum and fed a grass hay (fescue/orchardgrass) diet were used in a replicated 3 X 3 Latin square. Treatments were either no infusion (C), 150 ml of duodenally infused soybean oil (DI), or 150 ml of ruminally infused soybean oil (RI)/heifer twice daily for a total daily infusion of 300 ml of soybean oil. Periods of the Latin square included 18 d for adaptation and 5 d for collection. Forage OM, ADF, NDF, and N intakes were not affected (P greater than .10) by soybean oil infusion. Ruminal (P = .11) and total tract (P less than .10) OM digestibilities were decreased by RI compared with C or DI, but ADF and NDF digestibilities were not affected by treatment. Duodenal N (P less than .05) and microbial N flows were increased (P less than .10) for C and RI compared with DI. Microbial efficiency (g of N/kg of OM truly fermented) was improved (P less than .10) by RI compared with DI but did not differ (P greater than .10) from C. Ruminal pH was lower (P less than .05) with RI than with either C or DI. Ruminal NH3 N, total VFA, and acetate were not affected (P greater than .10) by treatment. Propionate (mol/100 mol) was greater (P less than .05) with RI than with DI and C, but the proportion of butyrate did not differ among treatments. These data indicate minimal direct benefits for improving forage usage as a result of soybean oil infusion with a 100% grass diet; however, animals should realize benefits from additional dietary energy provided by infused lipid.

  19. Short communication: effect of oilseed supplementation of an herbage diet on ruminal fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Soder, K J; Brito, A F; Rubano, M D

    2013-04-01

    A 4-unit continuous culture fermentor system was used to evaluate the effects of oilseed supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, fermentation profile, and bacterial nitrogen (N) synthesis. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4×4 Latin square design with 7d for diet adaptation and 3d for data and sample collection. Dietary treatments were an herbage-only diet (HERB), or the following ground oilseeds supplemented to an herbage-based diet at 10% of total dry matter (DM) fed: flaxseed (FLAX), canola (CAN), or sunflower (SUN). Apparent DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were not affected by diet, averaging 62, 68, and 78%, respectively. True DM and organic matter digestibility were not affected by diet, averaging 78 and 82%, respectively. Fermentor pH and total volatile fatty acids were not affected by diet. Branched-chain volatile fatty acids tended to be lower for HERB compared with the 3 oilseed diets. Ammonia N concentrations were lowest for the HERB diet. Crude protein digestibility was not affected by diet. Flow of NH3-N was lowest for the HERB diet reflecting the lowest culture concentration of NH3-N. Bacterial N flows were lowest for HERB and SUN diets, intermediate for FLAX, and greatest for CAN. Flows of total N, non-NH3-N, and dietary N were not affected by diet. Likewise, efficiency of bacterial N synthesis was not affected by diet. Supplementation with FLAX, CAN, or SUN at 10% of total DM fed did not affect nutrient digestibility or ruminal fermentation compared with an all-herbage diet. The oilseeds tested herein may be considered as alternative energy supplements for grazing dairy cows, particularly during times of low availability of corn. However, in vivo studies are needed to further evaluate the effects of oilseeds supplementation of an herbage-based diet on milk production and composition (specifically human-beneficial fatty acids).

  20. Effect of Total Mixed Ration with Fermented Feed on Ruminal In vitro Fermentation, Growth Performance and Blood Characteristics of Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Alam, M J; Gu, M J; Park, K W; Jeon, C O; Ha, Jong K; Cho, K K; Lee, S S

    2012-02-01

    In this study, two experiments were conducted to evaluate the total mixed ration with fermented feed (TMRF) and total mixed ration (TMR) by rumen in vitro fermentation and their effects on the growth performance and blood characteristics of Hanwoo steers. In experiment 1, three Hanwoo steers (600±47 kg), each permanently fitted with a ruminal cannula were used. In this experiment, three diets designated as T1, TMRF (18.4% fermented feed, tall fescue, mammoth wild rye forage and whole crop barley); T2, TMRF (17.7% fermented feed, rice straw and whole crop barley); and T3, TMR (rice straw, whole crop barley and probiotics, but no fermented feed), which were subjected to rumen in vitro fermentation for 48 h. The results demonstrated that DM disappearance rate gradually increased with advancing fermentation time, but T1 and T2 were higher than the T3 (p<0.05) from 3 h to 12 h, but insignificant (p>0.05) at 24 and 48 h. None of the specific VFAs were affected except for acetic and non volatile lactic acids, which were produced more in T2 than in T1 and T3 at 24 h and 48 h of incubation. A/P was lower in T1 and T2 than inT3 at 24 h (p<0.05) and 48 h (p>0.05) of incubation. These results confirmed that TMRF-related treatment shows a superior performance to that of TMR during the ruminal fermentation period. In experiment 2, the three diets in experiment 1 plus 1 more control diet (concentrates, probiotics and 2% rice straw of body weight) were fed to the 48 Hanwoo steers (160±10 kg) for a period of 168 d. The results demonstrated that the daily and total live weight gain and feed efficiency were higher (p<0.05) in the TMRF and TMR groups than in the control group. SGOT, SGPT and BUN (p<0.05) were reduced in TMRF relative to the control and TMR groups by 168 d which confirmed that TMRF shows better blood profiles than the TMR and control groups. Overall, these results appear to show that TMRF has better in vitro ruminal characteristics than those of TMR; growth

  1. Effects of Flavonoid-rich Plant Extracts on In vitro Ruminal Methanogenesis, Microbial Populations and Fermentation Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun T.; Guan, Le Luo; Lee, Shin J.; Lee, Sang M.; Lee, Sang S.; Lee, Il D.; Lee, Su K.; Lee, Sung S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of flavonoid-rich plant extracts (PE) on ruminal fermentation characteristics and methane emission by studying their effectiveness for methanogenesis in the rumen. A fistulated Holstein cow was used as a donor of rumen fluid. The PE (Punica granatum, Betula schmidtii, Ginkgo biloba, Camellia japonica, and Cudrania tricuspidata) known to have high concentrations of flavonoid were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with rumen fluid. Total gas production and microbial growth with all PE was higher than that of the control at 24 h incubation, while the methane emission was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the control. The decrease in methane accumulation relative to the control was 47.6%, 39.6%, 46.7%, 47.9%, and 48.8% for Punica, Betula, Ginkgo, Camellia, and Cudrania treatments, respectively. Ciliate populations were reduced by more than 60% in flavonoid-rich PE treatments. The Fibrobacter succinogenes diversity in all added flavonoid-rich PE was shown to increase, while the Ruminoccocus albus and R. flavefaciens populations in all PE decreased as compared with the control. In particular, the F. succinogenes community with the addition of Birch extract increased to a greater extent than that of others. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that flavonoid-rich PE decreased ruminal methane emission without adversely affecting ruminal fermentation characteristics in vitro in 24 h incubation time, suggesting that the flavonoid-rich PE have potential possibility as bio-active regulator for ruminants. PMID:25656200

  2. Effects of replacing dietary starch with neutral detergent-soluble fibre on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, X H; Liu, C J; Liu, Y; Li, C Y; Yao, J H

    2013-12-01

    A rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC) apparatus with eight 800 ml fermenters was used to investigate the effects of replacing dietary starch with neutral detergent-soluble fibre (NDSF) by inclusion of sugar beet pulp in diets on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria. Experimental diets contained 12.7, 16.4, 20.1 or 23.8% NDSF substituted for starch on a dry matter basis. The experiment was conducted over two independent 15-day incubation periods with the last 8 days used for data collection. There was a tendency that 16.4% NDSF in the diet increased the apparent disappearance of organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF). Increasing dietary NDSF level increased carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activity in the solid fraction and apparent disappearance of acid detergent fibre (ADF) but reduced the 16S rDNA copy numbers of Ruminococcus albus in both liquid and solid fractions and R. flavefaciens in the solid fraction. The apparent disappearance of dietary nitrogen (N) was reduced by 29.6% with increased dietary NDSF. Substituting NDSF for starch appeared to increase the ratios of acetate/propionate and methane/volatile fatty acids (VFA) (mol/mol). Replacing dietary starch with NDSF reduced the daily production of ammonia-N and increased the growth of the solid-associated microbial pellets (SAM). Total microbial N flow and efficiency of microbial synthesis (EMS), expressed as g microbial N/kg OM fermented, tended to increase with increased dietary NDSF, but the numerical increase did not continue as dietary NDSF exceeded 20.1% of diet DM. Results suggested that substituting NDSF for starch up to 16.4% of diet DM increased digestion of nutrients (except for N) and microbial synthesis, and further increases (from 16.4% to 23.8%) in dietary NDSF did not repress microbial synthesis but did significantly reduce digestion of dietary N.

  3. Response of urinary purine derivatives excretion to different levels of ruminal glucose infusion in heifers.

    PubMed

    Dickhoefer, Uta; Ahnert, Sandra; Schoof, Hartwig; Moritz, Niels; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the response of urinary purine derivatives (PD) excretion to increasing levels of intraruminal glucose infusion to evaluate how well this indicator reflects induced changes in microbial crude protein flow. Four rumen-cannulated heifers (482 ± 25 kg body weight) were fed at maintenance energy level with a basal diet (on fresh matter basis) of 4 kg/d hay, 1.5 kg/d concentrate and 60 g/d minerals in two equal meals. The trial comprised a control period (Control I) without glucose infusion followed by four consecutive periods in which all animals received 125 g, 250 g, 500 g or 1000 g/d of glucose, respectively. For this, daily dosages of glucose and urea (90 g/d during all periods) were divided into three portions that were dissolved in water and directly administered into the rumen during morning and afternoon feedings and once during noon. After the highest glucose dosage, a second control period was carried out (Control II). Urinary PD excretion increased with glucose infusion of 125 g/d (71.4 mmol/d) and 1000 g/d (74.2 mmol/d) over the level at Control I (53.9 mmol/d (standard error of the mean (SEM) 3.4; p = 0.012). After withdrawing glucose infusion, PD excretion (79.0 mmol/d) did not return to Control I level (p = 0.001). In contrast, faecal nitrogen (N) excretions linearly increased with incremental glucose infusion (p < 0.001) from 33.9 g/d at Control I to 39.7 g/d (SEM 0.5) at 1000 g/d of glucose and were similar in Control I and II (p = 0.086). The contradicting responses in the excretions of faecal N and urinary PD to increasing glucose infusions highlight the limited accuracy of the PD excretion as a non-invasive indicator when incremental dosages of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates are supplied.

  4. Effect of Sunflower and Marine Oils on Ruminal Microbiota, In vitro Fermentation and Digesta Fatty Acid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Julio E.; Andrés, Sonia; Snelling, Timothy J.; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Yáñez-Ruíz, David R.; García-Estrada, Carlos; López, Secundino

    2017-01-01

    This study using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC) investigated the changes in the ruminal microbiota and anaerobic fermentation in response to the addition of different lipid supplements to a ruminant diet. A basal diet with no oil added was the control, and the treatment diets were supplemented with sunflower oil (2%) only, or sunflower oil (2%) in combination with fish oil (1%) or algae oil (1%). Four fermentation units were used per treatment. RUSITEC fermenters were inoculated with rumen digesta. Substrate degradation, fermentation end-products (volatile fatty acids, lactate, gas, methane, and ammonia), and microbial protein synthesis were determined. Fatty acid profiles and microbial community composition were evaluated in digesta samples. Numbers of representative bacterial species and microbial groups were determined using qPCR. Microbial composition and diversity were based on T-RFLP spectra. The addition of oils had no effect on substrate degradation or microbial protein synthesis. Differences among diets in neutral detergent fiber degradation were not significant (P = 0.132), but the contrast comparing oil–supplemented diets with the control was significant (P = 0.039). Methane production was reduced (P < 0.05) with all oil supplements. Propionate production was increased when diets containing oil were fermented. Compared with the control, the addition of algae oil decreased the percentage C18:3 c9c12c15 in rumen digesta, and that of C18:2 c9t11 was increased when the control diet was supplemented with any oil. Marine oils decreased the hydrogenation of C18 unsaturated fatty acids. Microbial diversity was not affected by oil supplementation. Cluster analysis showed that diets with additional fish or algae oils formed a group separated from the sunflower oil diet. Supplementation with marine oils decreased the numbers of Butyrivibrio producers of stearic acid, and affected the numbers of protozoa, methanogens, Selenomonas ruminantium and

  5. Evaluation of the nutritional value of locally produced forage in Korea using chemical analysis and in vitro ruminal fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Kwang Seok; Park, Su Bum; Lim, Dong Hyun; Seo, Seongwon

    2017-01-01

    Objective The use of locally produced forage (LPF) in cattle production has economic and environmental advantages over imported forage. The objective of this study was to characterize the nutritional value of LPF commonly used in Korea. Differences in ruminal fermentation characteristics were also examined for the LPF species commonly produced from two major production regions: Chungcheong and Jeolla. Methods Ten LPF (five from each of the two regions) and six of the most widely used imported forages originating from North America were obtained at least three times throughout a year. Each forage species was pooled and analyzed for nutrient content using detailed chemical analysis. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were also determined by in vitro anaerobic incubations using strained rumen fluid for 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. At each incubation time, total gas, pH, ammonia, volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were measured. By fitting an exponential model, gas production kinetics were obtained. Results Significant differences were found in the non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC) content among the forage species and the regions (p<0.01). No nutrient, other than NFC, showed significant differences among the regions. Crude protein, NFC, and acid detergent lignin significantly differed by forage species. The amount of acid detergent insoluble protein tended to differ among the forages. The forages produced in Chungcheong had a higher amount of NFC than that in Jeolla (p<0.05). There were differences in ruminal fermentation of LPF between the two regions and interactions between regions and forage species were also significant (p<0.05). The pH following a 48-h ruminal fermentation was lower in the forages from Chungcheong than from Jeolla (p<0.01), and total VFA concentration was higher in Chungcheong than in Jeolla (p = 0.05). This implies that fermentation was more active with the forages from Chungcheong than from Jeolla

  6. Effect of Sunflower and Marine Oils on Ruminal Microbiota, In vitro Fermentation and Digesta Fatty Acid Profile.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Julio E; Andrés, Sonia; Snelling, Timothy J; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Yáñez-Ruíz, David R; García-Estrada, Carlos; López, Secundino

    2017-01-01

    This study using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC) investigated the changes in the ruminal microbiota and anaerobic fermentation in response to the addition of different lipid supplements to a ruminant diet. A basal diet with no oil added was the control, and the treatment diets were supplemented with sunflower oil (2%) only, or sunflower oil (2%) in combination with fish oil (1%) or algae oil (1%). Four fermentation units were used per treatment. RUSITEC fermenters were inoculated with rumen digesta. Substrate degradation, fermentation end-products (volatile fatty acids, lactate, gas, methane, and ammonia), and microbial protein synthesis were determined. Fatty acid profiles and microbial community composition were evaluated in digesta samples. Numbers of representative bacterial species and microbial groups were determined using qPCR. Microbial composition and diversity were based on T-RFLP spectra. The addition of oils had no effect on substrate degradation or microbial protein synthesis. Differences among diets in neutral detergent fiber degradation were not significant (P = 0.132), but the contrast comparing oil-supplemented diets with the control was significant (P = 0.039). Methane production was reduced (P < 0.05) with all oil supplements. Propionate production was increased when diets containing oil were fermented. Compared with the control, the addition of algae oil decreased the percentage C18:3 c9c12c15 in rumen digesta, and that of C18:2 c9t11 was increased when the control diet was supplemented with any oil. Marine oils decreased the hydrogenation of C18 unsaturated fatty acids. Microbial diversity was not affected by oil supplementation. Cluster analysis showed that diets with additional fish or algae oils formed a group separated from the sunflower oil diet. Supplementation with marine oils decreased the numbers of Butyrivibrio producers of stearic acid, and affected the numbers of protozoa, methanogens, Selenomonas ruminantium and

  7. Effects of type of canola protein supplement on ruminal fermentation and nutrient flow to the duodenum in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Gozho, G N; McKinnon, J J; Christensen, D A; Racz, V; Mutsvangwa, T

    2009-10-01

    Ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, and flows to the duodenum in growing cattle fed differently produced canola protein supplements were studied in a 4 x 4 Latin square design using Speckle Park heifers (initial BW = 451 +/- 26 kg). Canola protein supplement treatments consisted of the following: 1) 8.78% regular canola meal (RCM); 2) 9.25% RCM plus 1.80% canola oil (RCMO); 3) 11.1% canola presscake from biodiesel oil extraction (CPC); and 4) 8.14% high ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) canola meal (RUCM) plus 1.32% canola oil (RUCMO). Experimental diets also contained 39.9, 40.2, 39.9, and 39.9% barley grain; 31.7, 31.4, 31.2, and 31.4% barley silage; and 17.5, 15.2, 15.6, and 16.5% oat hulls for the RCM, RCMO, CPC, and RUCMO diets, respectively. Feeding the CPC, RCMO, and RUCMO diets decreased (P < or = 0.05) ruminal NH(3)-N concentration compared with feeding the RCM diet. Compared with the RCM diet, adding canola oil in the RCMO diet or residual oil in the CPC diet resulted in greater ruminal concentrations of propionate (P < or = 0.09). Additionally, feeding the RCMO diet also resulted in greater ruminal concentrations of acetate (P = 0.07), valerate (P = 0.06), and total VFA (P = 0.07) compared with the RCM diet. Also, compared with the RCM diet, heifers on the RUCMO diet had decreased acetate (P = 0.02) concentrations. The changes in ruminal concentrations of acetate and propionate resulted in reduced acetate:propionate ratios in the RCMO (P = 0.08), CPC (P = 0.02), and RUCMO (P < 0.01) diets. Ruminal digestion and flows of nutrients to the duodenum were not affected by dietary treatment. However, adding canola oil to the RCMO and RUCMO dietary treatments decreased the digestibility of ADF (P < or = 0.08) and NDF (P < or = 0.08) in the total tract compared with the RCM diet. Total tract digestibility of OM was also decreased (P = 0.02) in heifers fed the RUCMO compared with the RCM diet. Notwithstanding the different processing methods employed in

  8. Parameters of rumen fermentation in a continuously fed sheep: evidence of a microbial rumination pool.

    PubMed

    Hungate, R E; Reichl, J; Prins, R

    1971-12-01

    The feed and feces of a continuously fed sheep were analyzed for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, with oxygen as the remainder. The daily feed-feces weight difference was used as the reactant in an equation representing the rumen fermentation. The measured products were the daily production of volatile fatty acids (VFA), CH(4), CO(2), and ammonia. The carbon unaccounted for was assumed to be in the microbial cell material produced in the rumen and absorbed before reaching the feces. The ratio of C to H, O, and N in bacteria was used to represent the elemental composition of the microbes formed in the rumen fermentation, completing the following equation:C(20.03)H(36.99)O(17.406)N(1.345) + 5.65 H(2)O --> C(12)H(24)O(10.1) + 0.83 CH(4) VFA + 2.76 CO(2) + 0.50 NH(3) + C(4.44)H(8.88)O(2.35)N(0.785) microbial cells absorbed With C arbitrarily balanced and O balanced by appropriate addition of water, any error is reflected in the H. The H recovery was 98.5%. The turnover rate constant for rumen liquid equilibrating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) was 2.27 per day. Direct counts and volume measurements of the individual types of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen were used to calculate the total microbial cell volume in the rumen, not equilibrating with it. The dry matter in the rumen (582 g) and the nitrogen content (12.05) of the microbes in the rumen were estimated, the latter constituting 85% of the measured N in the rumen. Calculations for rumen dry matter and nitrogen turning over at the PEG rate introduce big discrepancies with other parameters; a rumination pool must be postulated. Its size and composition are estimated. Arguments are presented to support the view that dry matter and some of the microbes, chiefly the protozoa, do not leave the rumen at the PEG rate. One experiment with the same sheep fed twice daily showed significantly less production of microbial cells than did the continuous (each 2 hr) feeding. Analysis of the microbial cell yield suggests that

  9. Parameters of Rumen Fermentation in a Continuously Fed Sheep: Evidence of a Microbial Rumination Pool

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, R. E.; Reichl, J.; Prins, R.

    1971-01-01

    The feed and feces of a continuously fed sheep were analyzed for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, with oxygen as the remainder. The daily feed-feces weight difference was used as the reactant in an equation representing the rumen fermentation. The measured products were the daily production of volatile fatty acids (VFA), CH4, CO2, and ammonia. The carbon unaccounted for was assumed to be in the microbial cell material produced in the rumen and absorbed before reaching the feces. The ratio of C to H, O, and N in bacteria was used to represent the elemental composition of the microbes formed in the rumen fermentation, completing the following equation:C20.03H36.99O17.406N1.345 + 5.65 H2O → C12H24O10.1 + 0.83 CH4 VFA + 2.76 CO2 + 0.50 NH3 + C4.44H8.88O2.35N0.785 microbial cells absorbed With C arbitrarily balanced and O balanced by appropriate addition of water, any error is reflected in the H. The H recovery was 98.5%. The turnover rate constant for rumen liquid equilibrating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) was 2.27 per day. Direct counts and volume measurements of the individual types of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen were used to calculate the total microbial cell volume in the rumen, not equilibrating with it. The dry matter in the rumen (582 g) and the nitrogen content (12.05) of the microbes in the rumen were estimated, the latter constituting 85% of the measured N in the rumen. Calculations for rumen dry matter and nitrogen turning over at the PEG rate introduce big discrepancies with other parameters; a rumination pool must be postulated. Its size and composition are estimated. Arguments are presented to support the view that dry matter and some of the microbes, chiefly the protozoa, do not leave the rumen at the PEG rate. One experiment with the same sheep fed twice daily showed significantly less production of microbial cells than did the continuous (each 2 hr) feeding. Analysis of the microbial cell yield suggests that, on the basis of 11 mg of cells

  10. Effect of different types of fibre supplemented with sunflower oil on ruminal fermentation and production of conjugated linoleic acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanling; Meng, Qingxiang

    2006-10-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the effect of different types of fibre supplemented with sunflower oil on ruminal fermentation and formation of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) by mixed ruminal microorganisms. Cell wall components extracted from wheat straw (representing lignified fibre), soybean hulls (representing easily digestible fibre), and purified cellulose were used as substrates. Sunflower oil was supplemented at the same level for all three types of fibre. After 24 h of incubation, ruminal fermentation parameters (including 24 h gas production, pH value, concentration of ammonia nitrogen and volatile fatty acids) and the concentration of long chain fatty acids in the culture fluid were determined. Results showed that the type of fibre influenced ruminal fermentation traits and the biohydrogenation of unsaturated C18 fatty acids in vitro. Composition of LCFA and profile of CLA were altered by the fibre type. Compared to the digestible fibre and purified cellulose, lignified fibre significantly increased the production of cis-9, trans-11 CLA and total CLA (sum of cis-9, trans-11 CLA, trans-10, cis-12 CLA, trans-9, trans-11 CLA, and cis-9, cis-11 CLA) by ruminal microorganisms. It was concluded that ruminal fermentation and production of CLA can be affected by the type of dietary fibre.

  11. Effect of barley and its amylopectin content on ruminal fermentation and nitrogen utilization in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Foley, A E; Hristov, A N; Melgar, A; Ropp, J K; Etter, R P; Zaman, S; Hunt, C W; Huber, K; Price, W J

    2006-11-01

    The effect of type of grain (corn vs. barley) and amylopectin content of barley grain (normal vs. waxy) on ruminal fermentation, digestibility, and utilization of ruminal ammonia nitrogen for milk protein synthesis was studied in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design trial with 6 lactating dairy cows. The experimental treatments were (proportion of dietary dry matter): CORN, 40% corn grain, NBAR, 30% normal Baronesse barley:10% corn grain, and WBAR, 30% high-amylopectin (waxy) Baronesse barley:10% corn grain. All grains were steam-rolled and fed as part of a total mixed ration. The NBAR and WBAR diets resulted in increased ruminal ammonia concentrations compared with CORN (8.2, 7.4, and 5.6 mM, respectively), but other ruminal fermentation parameters were not affected. Ruminal digestibility of dietary nutrients and microbial protein synthesis in the rumen were also not affected by diet. Corn grain had greater in situ effective ruminal dry matter degradability (62.8%) than the barley grains (58.2 and 50.7%, respectively), and degradability of the normal barley starch was greater than that of the waxy barley (69.3 and 58.9%, respectively). A greater percentage of relative starch crystallinity was observed for the waxy compared with the normal barley grain. Total tract apparent digestibility of dry matter and organic matter were decreased by WBAR compared with CORN and NBAR. Total tract starch digestibility was greater and milk urea nitrogen content was lower for CORN compared with the 2 barley diets. In this study, the extent of processing of the grain component of the diet was most likely the factor that determined the diet responses. Minimal processing of barley grain (processing indexes of 79.2 to 87.9%) reduced its total tract digestibility of starch compared with steam-rolled corn (processing index of 58.8%). As a result of the increased ammonia concentration and reduced degradability of barley dry matter in the rumen, the utilization of ruminal ammonia

  12. Influence of supplementary fibrolytic enzymes on the fermentation of corn and grass silages by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R J; Wallace, S J; McKain, N; Nsereko, V L; Hartnell, G F

    2001-07-01

    This study was done to determine the effectiveness of supplementary enzymes at increasing the fiber digestion by ruminal microorganisms and to assess whether enzyme activity limits the rate of fiber digestion in ruminal digesta. In vitro comparisons of enzyme activities in two feed enzyme preparations (A and B) with enzyme activities extracted from ruminal fluid indicated that the addition of fibrolytic enzymes at the application rates recommended by the manufacturers would not be expected to increase significantly glycanase and polysaccharidase activities in ruminal fluid. Preparations A and B both increased (P < 0.001) the rate of gas production from freeze-dried corn and grass silages in in vitro incubations with ruminal fluid, but only at concentrations much higher than recommended application rates. Autoclaved controls had little or no effect. Ultrafiltration of enzyme B indicated that most stimulation was due to components >100 kDa, which is consistent with the cause of the stimulation being enzyme activity. Fibrolytic enzymes from other sources were also able to stimulate gas production: increased rates of gas production were observed in seven out of eight combinations of "cellulase" and corn or grass silage (P < 0.05). The comparison of glycanase and polysaccharidase activities with gas-stimulatory activity in the different enzyme preparations indicated that the highest correlation was between increased gas production and enzyme activity against microgranular cellulose (P < 0.05). In a wider range of fibrolytic enzyme preparations, those with endo-(beta-1,4)- or exo-(beta-1,4)-xylanase activity equal to that of preparation A did not produce similar increased rates of fermentation of corn silage when glucanase activity was low (P > 0.05). In contrast, preparations with glucanase activity similar to enzyme A gave at least as great (P < 0.05) an improvement in gas production than enzyme A, irrespective of xylanase activity. It was concluded that enzyme

  13. Graded replacement of maize grain with molassed sugar beet pulp modulated ruminal microbial community and fermentation profile in vitro.

    PubMed

    Münnich, Matthias; Khol-Parisini, Annabella; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2017-07-19

    Molassed sugar beet pulp (Bp) is a viable alternative to grains in cattle nutrition for reducing human edible energy input. Yet little is known about the effects of high inclusion rates of Bp on rumen microbiota. This study used an in vitro approach and the quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique to establish the effects of a graded replacement of maize grain (MG) by Bp on the ruminal microbial community, fermentation profile and nutrient degradation. Six different amounts of Bp (0-400 g kg(-1) ), which replaced MG in the diet, were tested using the in vitro semi-continuous rumen simulation technique. The increased inclusion of Bp resulted in greater dietary content and degradation of neutral detergent fibre (P < 0.01). Further, Bp feeding enhanced (P < 0.01) the abundance of genus Prevotella and shifted (P < 0.01) the short-chain fatty acid patterns in favour of acetate and propionate and at the expense of butyrate. A total replacement of MG with Bp resulted in an increased daily methane production (P < 0.01). Results suggest positive effects of the replacement of MG by Bp especially in terms of stimulating ruminal acetate and propionate fermentation. However, high replacement rates of Bp resulted in lowered utilization of ammonia and higher ruminal methane production. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Short communication: Apparent ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows fed Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Castagnino, D S; Ying, Y; Allen, M S; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2017-10-01

    Apparent ruminal synthesis and duodenal flow of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were evaluated in an experiment using 15 ruminally and duodenally cannulated lactating Holstein cows fed a basal diet, according to a crossover design, supplemented or not with 56 g/d of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product. Duration of the treatment period was 28 d. The basal ration had 28% neutral detergent fber, 30% starch and 16.5% crude protein; forages were corn silage (67% of forage dry matter) and alfalfa silage (33% of forage dry matter). Concentrations of B vitamins were analyzed in feed and duodenal digesta. Apparent ruminal synthesis of each B vitamin was calculated as the duodenal flow minus the intake. Under the present experimental conditions, a dietary supplement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product had no effect apparent synthesis of B vitamins in the rumen or on the amounts of these vitamins reaching the duodenum and available for absorption by the dairy cow. Crown Copyright © 2017 Published by FASS and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. All rights reserved.

  15. Soybean milk residue ensiled with peanut hulls: fermentation acids, cell wall composition, and silage utilization by mixed ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-M J

    2005-08-01

    Preservation of soybean milk residue (SMR) by ensiling with peanut hulls (PEH) and subsequent utilization of silage by mixed ruminal microorganisms were investigated. Treatments were combinations of SMR with PEH at the following ratios: 100:0, 78:22, 71:29, and 60:40 (fresh weight basis). After eight weeks of ensiling, silage lactic acid, crude protein, ether extract, and non-fiber carbohydrates were highest when SMR was ensiled alone and reduced as amounts of SMR decreased. Similar trends were observed for silage in vitro dry matter digestibility, and gas and volatile fatty acid production by ruminal microorganisms. Conversely, silage pH, dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, cellulose, and lignin increased accordingly. The ensiling treatment appeared to alter silage cell wall composition. In particular, silage treated with PEH at the low level (78:22) resulted in reduced fiber contents and lignification. The silage (SMR:PEH=78:22) had enhanced efficiency of both silage fermentation and in vitro ruminal fermentation pattern.

  16. Contrast radiography of the lower urinary tract in the management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and swine.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J L; Dykes, N L; Love, K; Fubini, S L

    1998-01-01

    Contrast radiographic visualization of the small ruminant and porcine lower urinary tract is an infrequently used modality for the evaluation and management of obstructive urolithiasis. The administration of contrast medium through a tube cystostomy catheter used to divert urine flow until the resolution of the obstruction may provide an easy method to evaluate the status of the urethral obstruction. Contrast fluoroscopy is utilized to monitor and visualize therapeutic flushing of the urethra. A review of 26 patients seen at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital suggested that among the radiographic techniques used, positive contrast normograde cystourethrography through the tube cystostomy catheter allowed the best visualization of the lower urinary tract structures and enabled assessment of the resolution of the obstructive lesion.

  17. Effects of dilution rate and retention time of concentrate on efficiency of microbial growth, methane production, and ruminal fermentation in Rusitec fermenters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Ramos, S; Tejido, M L; Carro, M D

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 dilution rates (DL) and 2 concentrate retention times (RT) on microbial growth, methane production, and fermentation of a 30:70 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet in Rusitec fermenters maintained at similar pH. The DL were 3.78 (low DL, LDL) and 5.42%/h (high DL, HDL), and concentrate RT was either 24 h (T24) or 48 h (T48). Forage RT was 48 h in all fermenters. Apparent disappearance of diet DM and NDF was greater in HDL fermenters compared with LDL fermenters, but there was a significant DL x concentrate RT interaction, showing that the effect of DL was more pronounced in T48 compared with T24 fermenters. Methane production was not affected by DL, but was greater in T48 compared with T24 fermenters, which was consistent with the increased fiber degradation in T48 fermenters. Increasing DL augmented volatile fatty acid production and molar proportions of propionate, isovalerate, and valerate, and reduced those of caproate, but no effects were observed on acetate, butyrate, and isobutyrate proportions. Increasing concentrate RT resulted in greater volatile fatty acid production and proportions of acetate, butyrate, and caproate, but reduced those of propionate, valerate, and isovalerate. Ammonia-N production was not affected by concentrate RT, but was greater at HDL compared with LDL. Microbial growth was not affected by DL, but microbial growth efficiency was lower in HDL compared with LDL fermenters. Concentrate RT affected microbial growth and its efficiency, with both being greater in T48 compared with T24 fermenters. Carboxymetylcellulase and xylanase activities in ruminal fluid were greater in HDL compared with LDL fermenters, but were not affected by concentrate RT. There were DL x concentrate RT interactions for diet apparent disappearance, molar proportions of propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate, and acetate:propionate ratio, indicating that effects of DL on these variables were

  18. Effects of a mixture of steam-flaked corn and extruded soybeans on performance, ruminal development, ruminal fermentation, and intestinal absorptive capability in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Xie, X X; Meng, Q X; Liu, P; Wu, H; Li, S R; Ren, L P; Li, X Z

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of a mixture of steam-flaked corn and extruded soybeans on performance, ruminal development, ruminal fermentation variables, and intestinal absorptive capability in Holstein male calves (n = 39). Calves were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments (13 calves per treatment): 1) milk replacer (MR), 2) one-half of the amount of MR in treatment 1, plus a mixture of 62.1% steam-flaked corn and 30.5% extruded soybeans provided ad libitum (HMCS), or 3) a mixture of 62.1% steam-flaked corn and 30.5% extruded soybeans provided ad libitum (CS). All the calves were started at 2 ± 1 d of age and studied for 150 d. Each 30 d was defined as 1 period. Dry matter intake and growth were measured daily and monthly, respectively. All calves were harvested at 150 d of age, after which rumen fluid was collected. Rumen and intestine samples were gathered. Calves fed MR exhibited greater BW (P = 0.001) and ADG (P < 0.001), compared with calves fed HMCS and CS from period 2 to 3; however, from period 4 to 5, CS calves had greater (P < 0.04) ADG than MR calves. The treatments did not differ in final BW (P = 0.72) and ADG (P = 0.20) from period 2 to 5. Compared with HMCS and MR calves, CS calves had the greatest DMI (P < 0.001) and the least feed efficiency (P < 0.001) from period 2 to 5. For ruminal fermentation parameters, CS calves had decreased (P = 0.04) rumen pH than MR calves. The NH3 concentrations were greater (P = 0.03) in calves fed HMCS than calves fed MR and CS. Total VFA concentrations were greatest in CS calves (P = 0.02). Calves fed CS had the greatest molar concentrations of propionate, butyrate, and valerate (P < 0.002), and calves fed HMCS had the greatest molar concentrations of isobutyrate (P = 0.001) and isovalerate (P = 0.001). The CS calves exhibited greater empty rumen weight (P = 0.001), papillae length (P < 0.001), papillae width (P < 0.001), rumen wall thickness (P = 0.012), and papillae density (P = 0.003). The greatest villus heights

  19. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on ruminal starch digestion are dependent upon dry matter intake for lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Allen, M S; Ying, Y

    2012-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate ruminal digestion responses to Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP) supplementation and to determine if responses are influenced by voluntary feed intake. Fifteen ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows with a wide range in preliminary dry matter intake (pDMI; 20.1 to 31.0 kg/d) measured during a 14-d preliminary period were used in a crossover design experiment. Treatments were SCFP and control (a mix of dry ground corn and soybean meal), top-dressed at the rate of 56 g/d per head. The base diet contained 28% NDF, 30% starch, and 16.5% CP and included corn silage, alfalfa silage, high-moisture corn, protein supplement, and a mineral and vitamin supplement. Treatment periods were 28 d, with the final 8d used for sample and data collection. Voluntary dry matter intake was determined during the last 4d of the preliminary period. Ruminal digestion kinetics were determined using the pool-and-flux method. Main effects of SCFP treatment and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. An interaction was detected between SCFP treatment and pDMI for ruminal digestion rate of starch; SCFP increased the rate of starch digestion compared with the control for cows with pDMI below 26 kg/d and decreased it for cows with higher pDMI. This resulted in an interaction between treatment and pDMI for turnover rate of starch in the rumen and true and apparent ruminal starch digestibility because passage rate of starch from the rumen was not affected by treatment (mean=24.3%/h). Ruminal pH (mean=6.0), dry matter intake, milk yield and component percentages were not affected by treatment or its interaction with pDMI. Supplementation of SCFP reduced the rate of ruminal starch digestion for cows with higher feed intake, which could help stabilize the ruminal environment when large amounts of starch are consumed to support higher milk production. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  20. Effects of feeding frequency on intake, ruminal fermentation, and feeding behavior in heifers fed high-concentrate diets.

    PubMed

    Robles, V; González, L A; Ferret, A; Manteca, X; Calsamiglia, S

    2007-10-01

    Four ruminally fistulated Holstein heifers (BW = 385 +/- 6.2 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment to determine the effect of feeding frequency on intake, water consumption, ruminal fermentation, and feeding and animal behavior. The treatments consisted of different feeding frequencies: a) once daily (T1); b) twice daily (T2); c) 3 times daily (T3); and d) 4 times daily (T4). Heifers were offered ad libitum access to concentrate and barley straw. Feeding frequency did not affect DMI (P >0.10), but water consumption tended to increase linearly as feeding frequency increased (P = 0.08). Average ruminal pH was not affected (P >0.10) by feeding frequency, but at 12 h after feeding ruminal pH was greater for T2 than for the other treatments. Total VFA concentration and VFA proportions were not affected (P >0.10) by feeding frequency, except valerate proportion, which increased linearly (P = 0.05) as feeding frequency increased. The concentration of ammonia-N was affected (P <0.05) cubically as feeding frequency increased (greatest for T3 = 9.3 mg of N/100 mL; lowest for T2 = 7.2 mg of N/100 mL). Feeding frequency had no effect on daily percentages of behavioral activities (P >0.05), except for observational behavior, for which there was a linear decrease as feeding frequency increased (P = 0.02). Heifers spent the same time on chewing activities, independent of feeding frequency. However, meal criteria tended to be affected (P = 0.07) by feeding frequency, with T2 (39.4 min) showing the longest intermeal interval. Total daily meal time, meal frequency, and meal size were not affected by feeding frequency (P >0.10), whereas meal length and eating rate showed cubic tendencies (P = 0.10 and P = 0.06, respectively) as feeding frequency increased. These results suggest that in the present experimental conditions, with heifers fed high-concentrate diets and with noncompetitive feeding, a smaller range of ruminal pH values was observed when feed was offered twice

  1. Effects of dry matter intake restriction on diet digestion, energy partitioning, phosphorus retention, and ruminal fermentation by beef steers.

    PubMed

    Clark, J H; Olson, K C; Schmidt, T B; Linville, M L; Alkire, D O; Meyer, D L; Rentfrow, G K; Carr, C C; Berg, E P

    2007-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of DMI restriction on diet digestion, ruminal fermentation, ME intake, and P retention by beef steers. In Exp. 1, twelve Angus x steers (average initial BW = 450 +/- 18 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets that were formulated to promote a 1.6-kg ADG at intake levels corresponding approximately to 100% (ad libitum, AL), 90% (IR90), or 80% (IR80) of ad libitum DMI. In Exp. 2, twelve crossbred steers (average initial BW = 445 +/- 56 kg) fitted with ruminal cannulae were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 diets that were formulated to promote a 1.6-kg ADG at AL or IR80. All diets delivered similar total NE, MP, Ca, and P per day. During both experiments, fecal DM output by IR80 was less (P /= 0.20) among treatments during both experiments, whereas P retention was similar (P >/= 0.46) among treatments during Exp. 1. Total VFA and the molar proportion of acetate of AL were greater (P ruminally degradable protein, and MP intakes constant decreased fecal DM output and changed ruminal fermentation patterns in finishing steers. Improvements in performance associated with programmed-feeding regimens of the type studied here do not appear to be related to changes in diet digestion or ME intake.

  2. Decrease of ruminal methane production in Rusitec fermenters through the addition of plant material from rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus).

    PubMed

    García-González, R; González, J S; López, S

    2010-08-01

    Roots of rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and bark of alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) were tested as feed additives for decreasing ruminal methane production released from anaerobic fermentation of a forage-based diet in a rumen-simulating fermenter (Rusitec). Sixteen fermentation units (vessels) were set up for the experiment lasting 19 d. Treated vessels were supplied with 1g/d of rhubarb or alder buckthorn (4 vessels per plant species); another 4 vessels received 12 microM sodium monensin (positive control), and the remaining 4 vessels were controls (no additive). Upon termination of the experimental period, batch cultures were inoculated with the liquid contents of the vessels for examining in vitro fermentation kinetics of cellulose, starch, barley straw, and the same substrate used in the Rusitec cultures. Monensin induced changes in fermentation in agreement with those reported in the literature, and inocula from those cultures decreased the fermentation rate and total gas produced in the gas kinetics study. Rhubarb decreased methane production, associated with limited changes in the profile of volatile fatty acids throughout the duration of the study, whereas digestibility and total volatile fatty acids production were not affected. Rhubarb inocula did not affect gas production kinetics except for cellulose. Alder buckthorn decreased only methane concentration in fermentation gas, and this effect was not always significant. The use of rhubarb (milled rhizomes of Rheum spp.) in the diets of ruminants may effectively modulate ruminal fermentation by abating methane production, thus potentially involving productive and environmental benefits.

  3. Fermentation of peptides and amino acids by a monensin-sensitive ruminal Peptostreptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G J; Russell, J B

    1988-01-01

    A monensin-sensitive ruminal peptostreptococcus was able to grow rapidly (growth rate of 0.5/h) on an enzymatic hydrolysate of casein, but less than 23% of the amino acid nitrogen was ever utilized. When an acid hydrolysate was substituted for the enzymatic digest, more than 31% of the nitrogen was converted to ammonia and cell protein. Coculture experiments and synergisms with peptide-degrading strains of Bacteroides ruminicola and Streptococcus bovis indicated that the peptostreptococcus was unable to transport certain peptides or hydrolyze them extracellularly. Leucine, serine, phenylalanine, threonine, and glutamine were deaminated at rates of 349, 258, 102, 95, and 91 nmol/mg of protein per min, respectively. Deamination rates for some other amino acids were increased when the amino acids were provided as pairs of oxidized and reduced amino acids (Stickland reactions), but these rates were still less than 80 nmol/mg of protein per min. In continuous culture (dilution rate of 0.1/h), bacterial dry matter and ammonia production decreased dramatically at a pH of less than 6.0. When dilution rates were increased from 0.08 to 0.32/h (pH 7.0), ammonia production increased while production of bacterial dry matter and protein decreased. These rather peculiar kinetics resulted in a slightly negative estimate of maintenance energy and could not be explained by a change in fermentation products. Approximately 80% of the cell dry matter was protein. When corrections were made for cell composition, the yield of ATP was higher than the theoretical maximum value. It is possible that mechanisms other than substrate-level phosphorylation contributed to the energetics of growth. PMID:2975156

  4. Effects of a blend of garlic oil, nitrate and fumarate on in vitro ruminal fermentation and microbial population.

    PubMed

    Mbiriri, D T; Cho, S; Mamvura, C I; Choi, N J

    2017-08-01

    Although garlic oil and nitrate can effectively suppress ruminal methane (CH4 ) production in vitro, the application of these compounds is associated with suppressed total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration. On the other hand, the effectiveness of fumarate as a ruminal CH4 mitigating agent is variable but its application increases total VFA concentration. We therefore hypothesized that the different characteristics of the compounds can compensate for the shortcomings of the other. The objective of this study was to develop an optimal blend of garlic oil, nitrate and fumarate that can suppress in vitro ruminal CH4 without affecting total VFA concentration. Three ruminal in vitro fermentation experiments were carried out. The first one, a one factor at a time experiment was employed to investigate the effective concentration of each of the compounds on CH4 and VFA production by ruminal bacteria. We then applied the fractional factorial design and response surface methodology in the second experiment to determine optimal concentrations of the compounds in the blend. The optimal blending of garlic oil, fumarate and nitrate was determined to be 50 mg/l, 15 mm and 20 mm, respectively. This simulated optimal blend was verified in a 48 h in vitro batch fermentation experiment. The blend achieved the intended goal of suppressing CH4 whilst maintaining total VFA concentration. The blend and nitrate suppressed archaea populations (p < 0.001) but did not affect the total microbial population (p = 0.945). The observed results could be explained by additive effects of the agents making up the blend. Supplementing a high concentrate diet with the blend can significantly decrease ruminal CH4 and maintain total VFAin vitro. These findings however, need to be verified in vivo using the optimized ratio of combining the three methane inhibitors as a guide. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Proteolysis, fermentation efficiency, and in vitro ruminal digestion of peanut stover ensiled with raw or heated corn.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-M J

    2005-08-01

    Peanut stover (PS) is similar to full-bloom alfalfa hay in chemical composition. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of adding raw or heated corn meal to PS at ensiling on silage N components, fermentation acids, and digestion by ruminal microorganisms. The PS was collected after harvesting of peanuts and ensiled immediately without and with addition of raw or heated corn meal (100 g/kg of fresh weight). Corn was added to PS so that the initial mixture would contain adequate dry matter (DM) (approximately 30%) and additional nonfiber carbohydrate to enhance silage fermentation. After 8 wk of silo fermentation, corn-treated silages contained less structural carbohydrates but more non-fiber carbohydrates compared with the untreated control. A shift from hemicellulose to nonfiber carbohydrate use during silage fermentation was evident by corn treatment. Additional corn at ensiling resulted in silage N with less water-soluble N, protein N, nonprotein N, nonprotein nonammonia N (peptides plus amino acids), and ammonia N. Based on changes in soluble nonprotein N before and after ensiling, the amount of proteolysis was approximately 66% for control silage and was nearly 40% lower in response to corn treatment. Adding corn increased silage lactic acid, but both acetic and propionic acids decreased. These changes were reflected in the lower pH and higher fermentation efficiency with corn-treated silages. More DM was digested and greater amounts of volatile fatty acids, except for branched-chain acids, were produced in vitro by ruminal microorganisms with corn-treated silages. In addition, incubations with silage treated with heated corn contained higher concentrations of acetic and propionic acids compared with raw corn. In vitro ammonia accumulation per unit of DM digested was lower for corn treatments than the control, and for heated corn vs. raw corn-treated silage. These results indicate that supplementation of either raw or heated corn on PS at

  6. Effects on roughage inclusion and particle size on digestion and ruminal fermentation characteristics of beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Roughage is fed to cattle to promote ruminal health and decrease digestive upset, but inclusion in finishing diets is limited due to the cost per unit of energy. Rumination behavior may be a means to standardize roughage in beef cattle finishing diets, and increasing particle size of roughage could ...

  7. Heat Stress Alters Ruminal Fermentation and Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a study designed to assess the impact and interaction of nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) and ruminally degradable protein (RDP) on ruminal characteristics and animal behavior, animals experienced heat stress in the first period (HS), and no/greatly reduced heat stress (NHS) in the second period, all...

  8. Interactions of monensin with dietary fat and carbohydrate components on ruminal fermentation and production responses by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mathew, B; Eastridge, M L; Oelker, E R; Firkins, J L; Karnati, S K R

    2011-01-01

    Variation in milk fat percentage resulting from monensin supplementation to lactating dairy cows could be due to altered ruminal fermentation with interactions of monensin with ruminal biohydrogenation of fat and ruminal carbohydrate availability. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding monensin as Rumensin (R) in diets differing in starch availability (ground or steam-flaked corn), effective fiber (long or short alfalfa hay, LAH or SAH), and 4% fat (F) from distillers grains, roasted soybeans, and an animal-vegetable blend on ruminal fermentation characteristics and milk production in lactating dairy cows. Six ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows were used in a balanced 6×6 Latin square design with 21-d periods. The cows were fed 6 diets: (1) C=control diet with ground corn and LAH, (2) CR=C plus R, (3) CRFL=CR plus F, (4) CRFS=ground corn, R, F, and SAH, (5) SRFL=steam-flaked corn, R, F, and LAH, and (6) SRFS=steam-flaked corn, R, F, and SAH. Mean particle size of LAH was 5.00 mm and 1.36 mm for SAH. All diets were formulated to have 21% forage NDF and 40% NFC. The R tended to decrease DMI, decreased milk fat yield, and numerically lowered milk fat percentage (3.41 vs. 2.98%). Addition of F to R diets did not affect milk fat percentage. By feeding diets containing R and F, SAH tended to increase milk fat percentage for the ground-corn diet, but SAH tended to decrease milk fat percentage with steam-flaked corn (CRFL+SRFS vs. CRFS+SRFL). The steam-flaked corn increased total-tract NDF digestibility (CRFL + CRFS vs. SRFL+SRFS; 51.1 vs. 56%). Addition of F with R decreased total VFA concentration and increased rumen pH. Fat addition with R decreased rumen NH3N and MUN (12.8 vs. 13.9 mg/dL), and SFC decreased NH3N concentration compared with ground corn. Although R caused milk fat depression, addition of F did not further exacerbate milk fat depression. Fatty acid analysis did not implicate any particular biohydrogenation

  9. Effects of mineral salt supplement on enteric methane emissions, ruminal fermentation and methanogen community of lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yongxing; Shi, Rongguang; Cheng, Zhenhua; Dong, Hongmin

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of mineral salt supplement on enteric methane emissions, ruminal fermentation and methanogen community of dairy cows over a whole lactation period. Ten Holstein cows fed a total mixed ration (TMR) diet were randomly allocated into two groups, one supplied with mineral salts as the treatment group and the other as the control group. The methane measurement showed that the ingestion of mineral salts lowered enteric methane emissions significantly (P < 0.05), with an average of 10.5% reduction over the whole lactation period. Ruminal fermentation analysis showed the mineral salt intake could significantly decrease the acetate : propionate ratio (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR assay showed that rumen methanogen abundance significantly reduced in the treatment group (P < 0.05) but was not significantly influenced by mineral salt intake over the whole lactation period. Intergroup methanogen community composition was influenced slightly by mineral salt intake; however, significantly different intragroup profiles were apparent throughout the whole lactation period, according to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. In conclusion, these results suggested that the effective mitigation of enteric methane emissions by mineral salt intake could be attributed to decreased density of methanogenic archaea and that fluctuations in methane emission over the lactation period might be related to Methanobrevibacter diversity. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Development of feeding systems and strategies of supplementation to enhance rumen fermentation and ruminant production in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The availability of local feed resources in various seasons can contribute as essential sources of carbohydrate and protein which significantly impact rumen fermentation and the subsequent productivity of the ruminant. Recent developments, based on enriching protein in cassava chips, have yielded yeast fermented cassava chip protein (YEFECAP) providing up to 47.5% crude protein (CP), which can be used to replace soybean meal. The use of fodder trees has been developed through the process of pelleting; Leucaena leucocephala leaf pellets (LLP), mulberry leaf pellets (MUP) and mangosteen peel and/or garlic pellets, can be used as good sources of protein to supplement ruminant feeding. Apart from producing volatile fatty acids and microbial proteins, greenhouse gases such as methane are also produced in the rumen. Several methods have been used to reduce rumen methane. However, among many approaches, nutritional manipulation using feed formulation and feeding management, especially the use of plant extracts or plants containing secondary compounds (condensed tannins and saponins) and plant oils, has been reported. This approach could help todecrease rumen protozoa and methanogens and thus mitigate the production of methane. At present, more research concerning this burning issue - the role of livestock in global warming - warrants undertaking further research with regard to economic viability and practical feasibility. PMID:23981662

  11. Effect of diet supplementation with sunflower oil on milk production, fatty acid profile and ruminal fermentation in lactating dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Hervás, Gonzalo; Luna, Pilar; Mantecón, Angel R; Castañares, Natalia; de la Fuente, Miguel Angel; Juárez, Manuela; Frutos, Pilar

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research was to enhance the nutritional quality of ewe milk fat by increasing potentially healthy fatty acids (FA) through diet supplementation with unprotected oil rich in linoleic acid, and without detrimental effects on animal performance. Twenty-four ewes were assigned to two high concentrate diets, control or supplemented with 6% sunflower oil (SO), for 4 weeks. No differences between treatments were found in milk production and dry matter intake. Although the SO diet increased milk fat percentage and tended to reduce milk protein concentration, it did not affect milk fat, protein or total solid yield. Most of the modifications in milk FA composition were addressed toward a potentially healthier profile: a decrease in C12:0 to C16:0 and a remarkable increase in the contents of cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 (from 0.94 to 3.60 g/100 g total FA) and trans-11 C18:1 (from 2.23 to 8.61 g/100 g total FA). Furthermore, the levels reached were maintained throughout the period monitored. However, the SO diet increased other trans C18:1 isomer percentages, too. The lack of differences between treatments in the in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters, studied with batch cultures of rumen microorganisms, would indicate no negative effects on ruminal fermentation.

  12. Substitution of Wheat for Corn in Beef Cattle Diets: Digestibility, Digestive Enzyme Activities, Serum Metabolite Contents and Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y. F.; Zhao, H. B.; Liu, X. M.; You, W.; Cheng, H. J.; Wan, F. C.; Liu, G. F.; Tan, X. W.; Song, E. L.; Zhang, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing different amounts of wheat, as a partial or whole substitute for corn, on digestibility, digestive enzyme activities, serum metabolite contents and ruminal fermentation in beef cattle. Four Limousin×LuXi crossbred cattle with a body weight (400±10 kg), fitted with permanent ruminal, proximal duodenal and terminal ileal cannulas, were used in a 4×4 Latin square design with four treatments: Control (100% corn), 33% wheat (33% substitution for corn), 67% wheat (67% substitution for corn), and 100% wheat (100% substitution for corn) on a dry matter basis. The results showed that replacing corn with increasing amounts of wheat increased the apparent digestibility values of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p<0.05). While the apparent digestibility of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber were lower with increasing amounts of wheat. Digestive enzyme activities of lipase, protease and amylase in the duodenum were higher with increasing wheat amounts (p<0.05), and showed similar results to those for the enzymes in the ileum except for amylase. Increased substitution of wheat for corn increased the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (p<0.05). Ruminal pH was not different between those given only corn and those given 33% wheat. Increasing the substitution of wheat for corn increased the molar proportion of acetate and tended to increase the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Cattle fed 100% wheat tended to have the lowest ruminal NH3-N concentration compared with control (p<0.05), whereas no differences were observed among the cattle fed 33% and 67% wheat. These findings indicate that wheat can be effectively used to replace corn in moderate amounts to meet the energy and fiber requirements of beef cattle. PMID:26954111

  13. Effects of feeding forage soybean silage on milk production, nutrient digestion, and ruminal fermentation of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E; Mustafa, A F; Seguin, P

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feeding value of forage soybean silage (SS) for dairy cows relative to a fourth-cut alfalfa silage (AS). Forage soybean was harvested at full pod stage. Two isonitrogenous diets were formulated with a 48:52 forage:concentrate ratio. Soybean silage and AS constituted 72% of the forage in each diet, with corn silage constituting the remaining 28%. Twenty Holsteins cows in early lactation were used in a switchback design. Four lactating Holsteins cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used to determine the effects of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation parameters and in vivo total tract nutrient utilization. Relative to AS, SS contained 15, 28, and 25% more neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and crude protein, respectively. Dry matter intake (23.5 vs. 25.1 kg/d) and milk yield (35.5 vs. 37.2 kg/d) were lower for cows fed SS than for those fed AS. However, energy-corrected milk and milk efficiency were similar for both dietary treatments. Milk protein, lactose, and total solids concentrations were not influenced by dietary treatments (average 3.0, 4.7, and 12.6%, respectively). However, cows fed SS produced milk with greater milk fat (3.8 vs. 3.6%) and milk urea nitrogen concentrations (15.6 vs. 14.3 mg/dL) compared with cows fed AS. Ruminal pH was lower, whereas ruminal NH3-N concentration was greater in cows fed SS than in cows fed AS. Total tract digestibilities of dry matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber were not influenced by silage type. We concluded that forage SS, when compared with AS, had a negative impact on feed intake and milk yield, whereas energy-corrected milk, milk efficiency, and total tract nutrient digestion were similar.

  14. Effect of Yucca schidigera on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in heifers.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; McAllister, T A; Van Herk, F H; Cheng, K J; Newbold, C J; Cheeke, P R

    1999-09-01

    In a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square experiment, six heifers (443 +/- 6.1 kg) fed a 61% barley grain:39% alfalfa silage diet (DM basis) were given intraruminal doses of powdered Yucca schidigera (YS). Doses of 0 (control), 20, or 60 g/d were given at 0800 daily. Ruminal content was sampled 0, 2, 4, and 6 h after dosing. Acidity, concentrations of reducing sugars, free amino acids, and peptides in the rumen were not affected (P > .05) by YS. Relative to control, ruminal ammonia concentration was reduced (P < .05) 2 h after YS dosing. Ruminal propionate concentration was increased (P < .05) by YS. Protozoal numbers in the rumen were lower (P < .05) with YS than without. Yucca did not affect (P > .05) rate or extent of in situ DM degradability. Fibrolytic, amylolytic, and proteolytic activities in ruminal contents were similar among treatments (P > .05). Dry matter intake, apparent digestibilities of DM, NDF, and CP, nitrogen balance, and microbial protein synthesis in the rumen were not affected (P > .05) by treatment. The effect of YS on ruminal ammonia concentration likely resulted from a decreased concentration of protozoa and, presumably, from ammonia binding by YS. The effect on ruminal propionate was probably a result of a selective inhibitory effect of YS on rumen microbial species.

  15. Effects of flaxseed and chia seed on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, and long-chain fatty acid flow in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Silva, L G; Bunkers, J; Paula, E M; Shenkoru, T; Yeh, Y; Amorati, B; Holcombe, D; Faciola, A P

    2016-04-01

    Flaxseed (FS) and chia seed (CS) are oilseeds rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may change meat and milk composition when added to ruminants' diets and may have health benefits for humans. Literature on the effects of CS supplementation on ruminal metabolism is nonexistent. A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system consisting of 6 fermenters was used to assess the effect of FS and CS supplementation in an alfalfa hay-based diet on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and long-chain fatty acid flow. Diets were randomly assigned to fermenters in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design, with 3 consecutive periods of 10 d each, consisting of 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collection. Each fermenter was fed a total of 72 g of DM/d divided in 6 equal portions. Treatments were 1) alfalfa hay + calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acid (MEG; 69.3 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 2.7 g DM/d of calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acid), 2) alfalfa hay + FS (FLAX; 68.4 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 3.6 g DM/d of ground FS), and 3) alfalfa hay + CS (CHIA; 68.04 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 3.96 g DM/d of ground CS). Dietary treatments had similar amounts of total fat, and fat supplements were ground to 2-mm diameter. Effluents from the last 3 d of incubation were composited for analyses. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Ruminal apparent and true nutrient digestibility of all nutrients did not differ ( > 0.05) among treatments. Compared with MEG, FLAX and CHIA increased the flows of C18:3 -3, C20:4 -6, and total PUFA ( < 0.01). Both CHIA and FLAX treatments had greater ruminal concentrations of C18:0, indicating that both CS and FS fatty acids were extensively biohydrogenated in the rumen. The NH-N concentration, microbial N flow, and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis were not affected ( > 0.05) by treatments. Lastly, there were no differences ( > 0.05) among diets for total VFA concentration and molar proportions

  16. Supplementation of banana flower powder pellet and plant oil sources on in vitro ruminal fermentation, digestibility, and methane production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sungchhang; Wanapat, Metha; Viennasay, Bounnaxay

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of banana flower power pellet (BAFLOP-pellet) and plant oil source on in vitro gas production, fermentation efficiency, and methane (CH4) production. Rumen fluid was collected from two rumen-fistulated dairy steers fed on rice straw-based diet with concentrate supplement to maintain normal rumen ecology. All supplemented feed were added to respective treatments in the 30:70 roughage to concentrate-based substrate. The treatments were arranged according to a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement in a completely randomized design. First factor was different levels of BAFLOP-pellet supplementation (0, 30, and 60 g/kg of dietary substrate) and second factor was plant oil source supplementation [non-supplemented, 20 g/kg krabok seed oil (KSO), and 20 g/kg coconut oil (CO) of dietary substrate, respectively]. Under this investigation, BAFLOP-pellet supplementation increased gas production kinetics and in vitro digestibility (P < 0.05). Ruminal pH was dropped post incubation time in the non-supplemented group but was enhanced in BAFLOP-pellet-supplemented treatments. On the other hand, supplementation of KSO and CO depressed gas production and digestibility, but did not influence ruminal pH. In addition, protozoal population and CH4 production were decreased by BAFLOP-pellet and plant oil addition (P < 0.05). Based on this study, it could be concluded that supplementation of BAFLOP-pellet and plant oil source could enhance the in vitro fermentation efficiency while reduced protozoal population and CH4 production. It is suggested that BAFLOP-pellet (60 g/kg of dietary substrate) and KSO/CO (20 g/kg of dietary substrate) could be used to manipulate rumen fermentation characteristics fed on high-concentrate diet.

  17. Methane production, nutrient digestion, ruminal fermentation, N balance, and milk production of cows fed timothy silage- or alfalfa silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Massé, D I; Petit, H V; Benchaar, C

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of changing forage source in dairy cow diets from timothy silage (TS) to alfalfa silage (AS) on enteric CH₄ emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion, milk production, and N balance. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (TMR; forage:concentrate ratio of 60:40, dry matter basis), with the forage portion consisting of either TS (0% AS; 0% AS and 54.4% TS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (50% AS; 27.2% AS and 27.2% TS in the TMR), or AS (100% AS; 54.4% AS and 0% TS in the TMR). Compared with TS, AS contained less (36.9 vs. 52.1%) neutral detergent fiber but more (20.5 vs. 13.6%) crude protein (CP). In sacco 24-h ruminal degradability of organic matter (OM) was higher for AS than for TS (73.5 vs. 66.9%). Replacement of TS with AS in the diet entailed increasing proportions of corn grain and bypass protein supplement at the expense of soybean meal. As the dietary proportion of AS increased, CP and starch concentrations increased, whereas fiber content declined in the TMR. Dry matter intake increased linearly with increasing AS proportions in the diet. Apparent total-tract digestibility of OM and gross energy remained unaffected, whereas CP digestibility increased linearly and that of fiber decreased linearly with increasing inclusion of AS in the diet. The acetate-to-propionate ratio was not affected, whereas ruminal concentration of ammonia (NH₃) and molar proportion of branched-chain VFA increased as the proportion of AS in the diet increased. Daily CH₄ emissions tended to increase (476, 483, and 491 g/d for cows fed 0% AS, 50% AS, and 100% AS, respectively) linearly as cows were fed increasing proportions of AS. Methane production adjusted for dry matter intake (average=19.8 g/kg) or gross energy intake (average=5.83%) was not affected by increasing AS inclusion

  18. Fiber digestion, VFA production, and microbial population changes during in vitro ruminal fermentations of mixed rations by monensin-adapted and unadapted microbes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mixed ruminal microbes were incubated for 24 h in vitro with mixed forage and concentrate rations containing 20% or 30% non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC) to assess in vitro fiber digestibility, fermentation end products, and relative population sizes (RPS, expressed as a percentage of 16S rRNA gene cop...

  19. Effects of replacing soybean meal with canola meal or treated canola meal on ruminal digestion, fermentation pattern, omasal nutrient flow, and performance in lactating dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extrusion-treated canola meal (TCM) was produced in an attempt to increase the rumen undegradable protein (RUP) fraction of canola meal (CM). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing soybean meal (SBM) with CM or TCM on ruminal digestion, fermentation pattern, omasal nutr...

  20. Wet distillers grains plus solubles concentration in steam-flaked-corn-based diets: Effects on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, nutrient digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of wet distiller's grains plus solubles (WDG; < 15% sorghum grain) concentration in steam-flaked corn- (SFC) based diets on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, and diet digestibility of feeedlt ocattle. In Experi...

  1. Effects of the methane-inhibitors nitrate, nitroethane, lauric acid, Lauricidin**R and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, on ruminal fermentation in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of several methane-inhibitors on rumen fermentation were compared during three 24 h consecutive batch cultures of ruminal microbes in the presence of nonlimiting amounts of hydrogen. After the initial incubation series, methane production was reduced greater than 92% from that of nontre...

  2. Chemical composition, silage fermentation characteristics, and in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters of potato-wheat straw silage treated with molasses and lactic acid bacteria and corn silage.

    PubMed

    Babaeinasab, Y; Rouzbehan, Y; Fazaeli, H; Rezaei, J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of molasses and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the chemical composition, silage fermentation characteristics, and in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters of an ensiled potato-wheat straw mixture in a completely randomized design with 4 replicates. Wheat straw was harvested at full maturity and potato tuber when the leaves turned yellowish. The potato-wheat straw (57:43 ratio, DM basis) mixture was treated with molasses, LAB, or a combination. Lalsil Fresh LB (Lallemand, France; containing NCIMB 40788) or Lalsil MS01 (Lallemand, France; containing MA18/5U and MA126/4U) were each applied at a rate of 3 × 10 cfu/g of fresh material. Treatments were mixed potato-wheat straw silage (PWSS) without additive, PWSS inoculated with Lalsil Fresh LB, PWSS inoculated with Lalsil MS01, PWSS + 5% molasses, PWSS inoculated with Lalsil Fresh LB + 5% molasses, PWSS inoculated with Lalsil MS01 + 5% molasses, and corn silage (CS). The compaction densities of PWSS treatments and CS were approximately 850 and 980 kg wet matter/m, respectively. After anaerobic storage for 90 d, chemical composition, silage fermentation characteristics, in vitro gas production (GP), estimated OM disappearance (OMD), ammonia-N, VFA, microbial CP (MCP) production, and cellulolytic bacteria count were determined. Compared to CS, PWSS had greater ( < 0.001) values of DM, ADL, water-soluble carbohydrates, pH, and ammonia-N but lower ( < 0.05) values of CP, ash free-NDF (NDFom), ash, nitrate, and lactic, acetic, propionic, and butyric acids concentrations. When PWSS was treated with molasses, LAB, or both, the contents of CP and lactic and acetic acids increased, whereas NDFom, ammonia-N, and butyric acid decreased ( < 0.05). Based on in vitro ruminal experiments, PWSS had greater ( < 0.05) values of GP, OMD, and MCP but lower ( < 0.05) VFA and acetic acid compared to CS. With adding molasses alone or in combination with LAB inoculants to PWSS, the values of GP

  3. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by acarbose addition during two nutritional types of simulated severe subacute ruminal acidosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Liu, Junhua; Yin, Yuyang; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-10-01

    Little information is available on whether or not the effect of an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor on the prevention of ruminal acidosis is influenced by the type of diet during ruminant feeding. This study was conducted to explore the effect of acarbose addition on the prevention of severe subacute ruminal acidosis induced by either cracked wheat or beet pulp in vitro. Cracked wheat and beet pulp were fermented in vitro by rumen microorganisms obtained from three dairy cows. When cracked wheat was used as the substrate and fermented for 24 h, compared with the control, acarbose addition decreased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids, and lactate (P < 0.05), while linearly increased the ratio of acetate to propionate, pH value, and the ammonia-nitrogen level (P < 0.05). Applying Illumina MiSeq sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes as well as the ACE (abundance-based coverage estimator) value, Chao 1 value, and Shannon index increased significantly (P < 0.05), while there was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the relative abundance of Tenericutes as well as Proteobacteria after adding acarbose compared to the control. On the other hand, when beet pulp was used as the substrate, acarbose addition had no significant effects (P > 0.05) on the fermentation parameters and the Chao 1 value, the Shannon index, and the proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. In general, these findings indicate that acarbose had more effects on ruminal fermentation when wheat was used as the substrate, whereas it exhibited little effect on ruminal fermentation when beet pulp was used as the substrate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of supplementing condensed tannin extract on intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation, and milk production of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dschaak, C M; Williams, C M; Holt, M S; Eun, J-S; Young, A J; Min, B R

    2011-05-01

    A lactation experiment was conducted to determine the influence of quebracho condensed tannin extract (CTE) on ruminal fermentation and lactational performance of dairy cows. The cows were fed a high forage (HF) or a low forage (LF) diet with a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 59:41 or 41:59 on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows (62 ± 8.8 d in milk) were used. The design of the experiment was a double 4 × 4 Latin square with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments, and each period lasted 21 d (14 d of treatment adaptation and 7 d of data collection and sampling). Four dietary treatments were tested: HF without CTE, HF with CTE (HF+CTE), LF without CTE, and LF with CTE (LF+CTE). Commercial quebracho CTE was added to the HF+CTE and the LF+CTE at a rate of 3% of dietary DM. Intake of DM averaged 26.7 kg/d across treatments, and supplementing CTE decreased intakes of DM and nutrients regardless of forage level. Digestibilities of DM and nutrients were not affected by CTE supplementation. Milk yield averaged 35.3 kg/d across treatments, and yields of milk and milk component were not influenced by CTE supplementation. Negative effects of CTE supplementation on feed intake resulted in increased feed efficiency (milk yield/DM intake). Although concentration of milk urea N (MUN) decreased by supplementing CTE in the diets, efficiency of N use for milk N was not affected by CTE supplementation. Feeding the LF diet decreased ruminal pH (mean of 6.47 and 6.33 in HF and LF, respectively). However, supplementation of CTE in the diets did not influence ruminal pH. Supplementing CTE decreased total volatile fatty acid concentration regardless of level of forage. With CTE supplementation, molar proportions of acetate, propionate, and butyrate increased in the HF diet, but not in the LF diet, resulting in interactions between forage level and CTE supplementation. Concentration of ammonia-N tended to decrease with supplementation of

  5. Varying protein and starch in the diet of dairy cows. I. Effects on ruminal fermentation and intestinal supply of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Ipharraguerre, I R; Clark, J H; Freeman, D E

    2005-07-01

    The main objective of this experiment was to examine the effects of the percentage and source of crude protein (CP) and the amount of starch in the diet of dairy cows on ruminal fermentation, nutrient passage to the small intestine, and nutrient digestibility. For this purpose, 6 multiparous Holstein cows fistulated in the rumen and duodenum that averaged 73 d in milk were used in a 6 x 6 Latin square design with a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Two sources of CP [solvent-extracted soybean meal (SBM) and a mixture of SBM and a blend of animal-marine protein supplements plus ruminally protected Met (AMB)] and 3 levels of dietary protein (about 14, 16, and 18%) were combined into 6 treatments. On a dry matter (DM) basis, diets contained 25% corn silage, 20% alfalfa silage, 10% cottonseed, 26.7 to 37% corn grain, and 4 to 13.5% protein supplement. Intakes and digestibilities in the rumen and total tract of DM, organic matter, acid and neutral detergent fiber were unaffected by treatments. Increasing dietary CP from 14 to 18% decreased the intake and apparent ruminal and total tract digestion of starch, but increased the proportion of starch consumed by the cows that was apparently digested in the small intestine. At 14% CP, starch intake and total tract digestion were higher for the AMB diet than for the SBM diet, but the opposite occurred at 16% CP. Across CP sources, increasing CP in the diet from 14 to 18% increased the intakes of N and amino acids (AA), and ruminal outflows of nonammonia N, nonammonia nonmicrobial N, each individual AA except Met, total essential AA, and total AA. Across CP percentages, replacing a portion of SBM with AMB increased the intake of Met and Val and decreased the concentration of ammonia N in the rumen, but did not affect the intake of other essential AA or the intestinal supply of any essential AA and starch. The ruminal outflow of microbial N, the proportional contribution of Lys and Met to total AA delivered to the

  6. A protease additive increases fermentation of alfalfa diets by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Colombatto, D; Beauchemin, K A

    2009-03-01

    In vitro experiments were conducted to examine the characteristics and mode of action of a protease that increased the ruminal fiber digestibility of alfalfa hay. A commercial source of protease (Protex 6L, Genencor Int., Rochester, NY), already characterized for its main activities, was further analyzed to determine protease activity in response to pH, molecular size by SDS-PAGE, specificity to degrade model or feed substrates, response to autoclaving, and action of specific protease inhibitors in the absence or presence of ruminal fluid. In addition, batch culture in vitro incubations in buffered ruminal fluid were conducted to compare the enzyme product with purified protease sources, and dose-response studies (0 to 10 microL/g of forage DM) were carried out using alfalfa hay as a substrate. The enzyme product was shown to be an alkaline protease (optimum pH >8.5) of approximately 30 kDa. Specificity in the absence of ruminal fluid showed that the enzyme was active against gelatin and casein to the same extent, whereas it had limited (21% of the total) activity on BSA. In the presence of ruminal fluid and with the use of feed substrates, the protease increased (P < 0.05) 22-h IVDMD (%) of alfalfa hay, fresh corn silage, dry-rolled corn, and a total mixed ration composed of the 3 ingredients (39.5 vs. 44.7; 50.3 vs. 54.5; 63.8 vs. 68.4; and 55.4 vs. 56.4 for control vs. protease for each feed, respectively). Inhibitor studies in the absence of ruminal fluid indicated that the enzyme was inhibited most by a serine protease inhibitor but not by cysteine- or metalloprotease inhibitors (10 vs. 1.9 and 0.1%, respectively). In the presence of ruminal fluid, the serine protease inhibitor reversed (P < 0.05) the increase in alfalfa IVDMD achieved by the enzyme product, such that IVDMD was similar to that of the control treatment. Comparisons among different proteases revealed that only pure subtilisin achieved increases in IVDMD that were similar to those with protease

  7. Manipulation of ruminal fermentation and methane production by dietary saponins and tannins from mangosteen peel and soapberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Poungchompu, Onanong; Wanapat, Metha; Wachirapakorn, Chalong; Wanapat, Sadudee; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2009-01-01

    Four fistulated Holstein Friesian heifers were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. The main factors were two roughage-to-concentrate ratios (R:C, 70:30 and 30:70) and two supplementation levels of soapberry fruit-mangosteen peel (SM) pellets (0 and 4% tannins-saponins of total diets). Rice straw was used as a roughage source. The diet was fed ad libitum as a total mixed ration. SM pellets contained crude tannins and saponins at 12.1 and 15.7% of DM, respectively. It was found that at R:C 30:70 the DM intake and the digestibility of DM, CP and NDF were increased (p < 0.05), while SM pellet supplementation reduced the DM digestibility (p < 0.05). Ruminal pH was decreased at R:C 30:70. Total VFA and propionate was increased at high concentrate level and after SM pellet supplementation (p < 0.05); simultaneously, the acetate concentration and the acetate-to-propionate ratios were decreased (p < 0.05). Methane production was decreased at R:C 30:70 and additionally when SM pellets were supplemented (p < 0.05). This was in agreement with the percentage of methanogens in total ruminal DNA. Furthermore, the number of fungal zoospores were reduced at a higher concentrate proportion (R:C 30:70) and by SM-pellet supplementation (p < 0.05). Protozoal populations were diminished when SM pellets were supplemented (p < 0.05). In this study, it was shown that the roughage-to-concentrate ratio, as well as the supplementation of SM pellets containing condensed tannins and saponins, caused changes in ruminal microorganisms and their fermentation end-products.

  8. Effect of feeding tamarind kernel powder extract residue on digestibility, nitrogen availability and ruminal fermentation in wethers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Nakanishi, Takashi; Sato, Yoshiaki; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kei; Kumagai, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was to examine in vivo digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal fermentation of tamarind (Tamarind indica) kernel powder extract residue (TKPER) compared to soybean products and by-products in wethers. Methods Four wethers with initial body weight (BW) of 51.6±5.5 kg were assigned in a 4×4 Latin square design to investigate nutritional characteristics of TKPER, dry heat soybean (SB), dry soybean curd residue (SBCR) and soybean meal (SBM) feeding with ryegrass straw (R) at a ratio of 1:1 at 2% of BW in dry matter (DM) on a daily basis. Results The digestibility of DM, crude protein, and ether extract (EE) of TKPER-R diet were 57.0%, 87.0%, and 86.0%, respectively. Higher non-fiber carbohydrates digestibility was observed in TKPER-R diet (83.2%) than in SB-R diet (73.9%, p<0.05). Wethers fed the TKPER-R diet had lower retention of nitrogen (N) and ruminal ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) contents at 4 h after feeding than those fed the SBM-R diet (p<0.05), which had values similar to the SB-R or SBCR-R diet. The TKPER feeding had higher propionate (C3) and lower butyrate content, as well as lower acetate to propionate ratio (C2:C3) in rumen fluid than SBM feeding at 4 h after feeding (p<0.05). Conclusion TKPER did not bring any side effect to the wethers although it was lack of fiber, and could be used as a high protein and energy ingredient in concentrate with appropriate roughage to meet the fiber requirement for ruminants. PMID:27221250

  9. Meta-analysis of the effects of essential oils and their bioactive compounds on rumen fermentation characteristics and feed efficiency in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Khiaosa-ard, R; Zebeli, Q

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effects of essential oils and their bioactive compounds (EOBC) on rumen fermentation in vivo as well as animal performance and feed efficiency in different ruminant species, using a meta-analysis approach. Ruminant species were classified into 3 classes consisting of beef cattle, dairy cattle, and small ruminants. Two datasets (i.e., rumen fermentation and animal performance) were constructed, according to the available dependent variables within each animal class, from 28 publications (34 experiments) comprising a total of 97 dietary treatments. In addition, changes in rumen fermentation parameters relative to controls (i.e., no EOBC supplementation) of all animal classes were computed. Data were statistically analyzed within each animal class to evaluate the EOBC dose effect, taking into account variations of other variables across experiments (e.g., diet, feeding duration). The dose effect of EOBC on relative changes in fermentation parameters were analyzed across all animal classes. The primary results were that EOBC at doses <0.75 g/kg diet DM acted as a potential methane inhibitor in the rumen as a result of decreased acetate to propionate ratio. These responses were more pronounced in beef cattle (methane, P = 0.001; acetate to propionate ratio, P = 0.005) than in small ruminants (methane, P = 0.068; acetate to propionate ratio, P = 0.056) and in dairy cattle (P > 0.05), respectively. The analysis of relative changes in rumen fermentation variables suggests that EOBC affected protozoa numbers (P < 0.001) but only high doses (>0.20 g/kg DM) of EOBC had an inhibitory effect on this variable whereas lower doses promoted the number. For performance data, because numbers of observations in beef cattle and small ruminants were small, only those of dairy cattle (DMI, milk yield and milk composition, and feed efficiency) were analyzed. The results revealed no effect of EOBC dose on most parameters, except increased milk

  10. Effects of select nitrocompounds on in vitro ruminal fermentation during conditions of limiting or excess added reductant.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Krueger, Nathan A; Stanton, Thaddeus B; Callaway, Todd R; Edrington, Thomas S; Harvey, Roger B; Jung, Yong Soo; Nisbet, David J

    2008-12-01

    Ruminal methane (CH(4)) production results in the loss of up to 12% of gross energy intake and contributes nearly 20% of the United States' annual emission of this greenhouse gas. We report the effects of select nitrocompounds on ruminal fermentation after 22 h in vitro incubation (39 degrees C) with or without additions of hydrogen (H(2)), formate or both. In incubations containing no added reductant, CH(4) production was inhibited 41% by 2-nitro-1-propanol (2NPOH) and >97% by 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (3NPA), nitroethane (NE) and 2-nitroethanol (2NEOH) compared to non-treated controls and H(2) did not accumulate. With formate as the sole added reductant, nitro-treatment reduced CH(4) production by >99% and caused 42% to complete inhibition of formate catabolism compared to controls, and the accumulation of H(2) increased slightly. Nitro-treatment decreased CH(4) production 57-98% from that of controls when supplied H(2) or formate plus H(2). Formate catabolism was decreased 42-84% from that in controls by all nitro-treatments except 3NPA with both formate and H(2). Greater than 97% of the added H(2) was catabolized within controls; >84% was catabolized in nitro-treated incubations. Acetate, propionate and butyrate accumulations were unaffected by nitro-treatment irregardless of reductant; however, effects on ammonia and branched chain fatty acid accumulations varied. These results suggest that nitro-treatment inhibited formate dehydrogenase/formate hydrogen lyase and hydrogenase activity.

  11. Effects of Dietary Crude Glycerin Supplementation on Nutrient Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation, Blood Metabolites, and Nitrogen Balance of Goats

    PubMed Central

    Chanjula, P.; Pakdeechanuan, P.; Wattanasit, S.

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of increasing concentrations of crude glycerin (CGLY) in diets on nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen utilization of goats. Four male crossbred (Thai Native×Anglo Nubian) goats, with an average initial weight of 26±3.0 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 4×4 Latin square design with four 21 days consecutive periods. Treatments diets contained 0%, 5%, 10%, and 20% of dietary DM of CGLY. Based on this experiment, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) among treatment groups regarding DM intake and digestion coefficients of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, EE, NDF, and ADF). Likewise, mean serum glucose, BHBA, and PCV concentrations were not affected (p>0.05) by dietary treatments, whereas serum insulin concentration linearly increased (L, p = 0.002) with increasing the amount of CGLY supplementation. Ruminal pH, NH3-N, and BUN concentration were unchanged by dietary treatments, except for 20% of CGLY, NH3-N, and BUN were lower (p<0.05) than for the diets 10% of CGLY, while the difference between the diets 0%, 5%, and 20% of CGLY were not significant. The amount of N absorption and retention were similar among treatments. Based on this study, CGLY levels up to 20% in total mixed ration could be efficiently utilized for goats and this study elucidates a good approach to exploiting the use of biodiesel production for goat production. PMID:25049963

  12. Substitution of common concentrates with by-products modulated ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradation, and microbial community composition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ertl, P; Knaus, W; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Klevenhusen, F; Khiaosa-Ard, R; Zebeli, Q

    2015-07-01

    A rumen simulation technique was used to evaluate the effects of the complete substitution of a common concentrate mixture (CON) with a mixture consisting solely of by-products from the food industry (BP) at 2 different forage-to-concentrate ratios on ruminal fermentation profile, nutrient degradation, and abundance of rumen microbiota. The experiment was a 2×2 factorial arrangement with 2 concentrate types (CON and BP) and 2 concentrate levels (25 and 50% of diet dry matter). The experiment consisted of 2 experimental runs with 12 fermentation vessels each (n=6 per treatment). Each run lasted for 10d, with data collection on the last 5d. The BP diets had lower starch, but higher neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and fat contents compared with CON. Degradation of crude protein was decreased, but NDF and nonfiber carbohydrate degradation were higher for the BP diets. At the 50% concentrate level, organic matter degradation tended to be lower for BP and CH4 formation per unit of NDF degraded was also lower for BP. The BP mixture led to a higher concentration of propionate and a lower acetate-to-propionate ratio, whereas concentrations of butyrate and caproate decreased. Concentrate type did not affect microbial community composition, except that the abundance of bacteria of the genus Prevotella was higher for BP. Increasing the concentrate level resulted in higher degradation of organic matter and crude protein. At the higher concentrate level, total short-chain fatty acid formation increased and concentrations of isobutyrate and valerate decreased. In addition, at the 50% concentrate level, numbers of protozoa increased, whereas numbers of methanogens, anaerobic fungi, and fibrolytic bacteria decreased. No interaction was noted between the 2 dietary factors on most variables, except that at the higher concentrate level the effects of BP on CH4 and CO2 formation per unit of NDF degraded, crude protein degradation, and the abundance of Prevotella were more prominent. In

  13. Methane production by two non-ruminant foregut-fermenting herbivores: The collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    Vendl, Catharina; Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Furrer, Samuel; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lawrenz, Arne; Lange, Bastian; Munn, Adam; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) production varies between herbivore species, but reasons for this variation remain to be elucidated. Here, we report open-circuit chamber respiration measurements of CH4 production in four specimens each of two non-ruminant mammalian herbivores with a complex forestomach but largely differing in body size, the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu, mean body mass 17kg) and the pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis, 229kg) fed lucerne-based diets. In addition, food intake, digestibility and mean retention times were measured in the same experiments. CH4 production averaged 8 and 72L/d, 18 and 19L/kg dry matter intake, and 4.0 and 4.2% of gross energy intake for the two species, respectively. When compared with previously reported data on CH4 production in other non-ruminant and ruminant foregut-fermenting as well as hindgut-fermenting species, it is evident that neither the question whether a species is a foregut fermenter or not, or whether it ruminates or not, is of the relevance previously suggested to explain variation in CH4 production between species. Rather, differences in CH4 production between species on similar diets appear related to species-specific differences in food intake and digesta retention kinetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Protection of sunflower seed and sunflower meal protein with malic acid and heat: effects on in vitro ruminal fermentation and methane production.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Jorge Leonardo; Carro, Maria Dolores; Alvir, Maria Remedios; González, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Combined malic acid-heat treatments of protein supplements have been shown to reduce ruminal protein degradation, but there is no information on their possible influence on ruminal fermentation and methane emissions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the treatment of sunflower meal (SM) and sunflower seed (SS) with malic acid and subsequent drying at 150°C for 1 (MAL1) or 3 h (MAL3) on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane emission using ruminal fluid from sheep as inoculum. Compared with untreated samples, the MAL3 treatment reduced (P < 0.05) the dry matter effective degradability (DMED) by 78% and 46% for SS and SM, respectively, indicating heat damage. The MAL1 treatment reduced the DMED of SS by 22%, but did not affect (P > 0.05) total volatile fatty acid production for any feed. This treatment also increased (P < 0.05) the propionate proportion (by 17.7% and 15.6% for SS and SM, respectively) and decreased (P < 0.05) methane production (by 15.5% and 11.3%, respectively) and ammonia-N concentrations (by 26.5% and 14.5%, respectively). The MAL1 treatment was effective in reducing both ammonia-N concentrations and methane emissions without depressing SS and SM fermentation, but more research is needed to formulate environmentally cleaner diets for ruminants. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Effects of Forage:Concentrate Ratio on Growth Performance, Ruminal Fermentation and Blood Metabolites in Housing-feeding Yaks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G. J.; Song, S. D.; Wang, B. X.; Zhang, Z. F.; Peng, Z. L.; Guo, C. H.; Zhong, J. C.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of forage: concentrate ratio (F:C) on growth performance, ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites of housing-feeding yaks. Thirty-two Maiwa male yaks (initial body weight = 207.99±3.31 kg) were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments (8 yaks per treatment). Experimental diets were: A, B, C, D which contained 70:30, 60:40, 50:50 and 40:60 F:C ratios, respectively. Dry matter intake and average daily gain in yaks fed the C and D diets were greater (p<0.05) than yaks fed the A and B diets. No differences were found in ruminal NH3-N, total volatile fatty acids, acetate, butyrate, valerate, and isovalerate concentrations. The propionate concentration was increased (p<0.05) in the C and D groups compared with the A and B diets. In contrast, the acetate to propionate ratio was decreased and was lowest (p<0.05) in the C group relative to the A and B diets, but was similar with the D group. For blood metabolites, no differences were found in serum concentrations of urea-N, albumin, triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase (p>0.05) among treatments. Treatment C had a higher concentration of total protein and high density lipoprotein (p<0.05) than A and B groups. In addition, there was a trend that the globulin concentration of A group was lower than other treatments (p = 0.079). Results from this study suggest that increasing the level of concentrate from 30% to 50% exerted a positive effect on growth performance, rumen fermentation and blood metabolites in yaks. PMID:26580441

  16. Effects of oral nitroethane administration on enteric methane emissions and ruminal fermentation in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and its release to the atmosphere is considered to contribute to global warming. Ruminal enteric methane production represents a loss of 2% to 15% of the animal’s energy intake and contributes nearly 20% of the United States total methane emissions. Studies have ...

  17. Effects of long period feeding pistachio by-product silage on chewing activity, nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation parameters of Holstein male calves.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, P; Riasi, A; Alikhani, M

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pistachio by-product silage (PBPS) as a partial replacement for corn silage (CS) on chewing activity, nutrients digestibility and ruminal fermentation parameters in Holstein male calves over a 6-month assay. For this purpose, 24 Holstein male calves (4 to 5 months of age and 155.6±13.5 kg BW) were randomly assigned to one of the four dietary treatments (n=6). In these treatments, CS was substituted with different levels of PBPS (0%, 6%, 12% and 18% of dry matter (DM)). Nutrient digestibility was measured at the end of the experimental period (days 168 to 170). Ruminal fermentation parameters were determined on days 90 and 180 and chewing activity was determined on days 15 of the 3rd and 6th month of the experiment. Results showed that calves fed rations containing 6% PBPS spent more time ruminating (P<0.05) than the control group on the 3rd and 6th months. Feeding PBPS was found to have no effects on DM, organic matter (OM), ether extract or ash digestibility, but apparent digestibility of CP, NDFom and ADFom linearly decreased (P<0.01) with increasing substitutions. On days 90 and 180, ruminal concentrations of volatile fatty acids and NH3-N linearly decreased (P<0.01) with increasing levels of PBPS in the diets; however, ruminal pH and molar proportions of acetate, propionate and butyrate were similar across the treatments. It was concluded that partial substitution of CS with PBPS (6% or 12%) would have no adverse effects on nutrient digestibility, total chewing activity and ruminal fermentation parameters.

  18. Effects of different ratios and storage periods of liquid brewer's yeast mixed with cassava pulp on chemical composition, fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kamphayae, Sukanya; Kumagai, Hajime; Angthong, Wanna; Narmseelee, Ramphrai; Bureenok, Smerjai

    2016-06-11

    This study aims to evaluate the chemical composition, fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal fermentation of various ratios and storage periods of liquid brewer's yeast (LBY) mixed with cassava pulp (CVP). Four mixtures of fresh LBY and CVP were made (LBY0, LBY10, LBY20 and LBY30 for LBY:CVP at 0:100, 10:90, 20:80 and 30:70, respectively) on a fresh matter basis, in 500 g in plastic bags and stored at 30 to 32 °C. After storage, the bags were opened weekly from weeks 0 to 4. Fermentation quality and in vitro gas production (IVGP) were determined, as well as the dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber and acid detergent lignin contents. The contents of CP and EE increased, whereas all other components decreased, in proportion to LBY inclusion (p<0.01). The DM and OM contents gradually decreased in weeks 3 and 4 (p<0.05), while EE contents were lowest in week 0. The pH, ammonia nitrogen per total nitrogen (NH3-N/TN) and V-score in each mixture and storage period demonstrated superior fermentation quality (pH≤4.2, NH3-N/TN ≤12.5% and V-score >90%). The pH increased and NH3-N/TN decreased, with proportionate increases of LBY, whereas the pH decreased and NH3-N/TN increased, as the storage periods were extended (p<0.01). Although IVGP decreased in proportion to the amount of LBY inclusion (p<0.01), in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) was unaffected by the mixture ratios. The highest IVGP and IVOMD were observed in week 0 (p<0.01). We have found that the inclusion of LBY (as high as 30%) into CVP improves the chemical composition of the mixture, thereby increasing the CP content, while decreasing IVGP, without decreasing fermentation quality and IVOMD. In addition, a preservation period of up to four weeks can guarantee superior fermentation quality in all types of mixtures. Therefore, we recommend limiting the use of cassava pulp as a feed ingredient, given its low

  19. Rumen microbial abundance and fermentation profile during severe subacute ruminal acidosis and its modulation by plant derived alkaloids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mickdam, Elsayed; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Chizzola, Remigius; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-06-01

    Rumen microbiota have important metabolic functions for the host animal. This study aimed at characterizing changes in rumen microbial abundances and fermentation profiles using a severe subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in vitro model, and to evaluate a potential modulatory role of plant derived alkaloids (PDA), containing quaternary benzophenanthridine and protopine alkaloids, of which sanguinarine and chelerythrine were the major bioactive compounds. Induction of severe SARA strongly affected the rumen microbial composition and fermentation variables without suppressing the abundance of total bacteria. Protozoa and fungi were more sensitive to the low ruminal pH condition than bacteria. Induction of severe SARA clearly depressed degradation of fiber (P < 0.001), which came along with a decreased relative abundance of fibrolytic Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes (P < 0.001). Under severe SARA conditions, the genus Prevotella, Lactobacillus group, Megasphaera elsdenii, and Entodinium spp. (P < 0.001) were more abundant, whereas Ruminobacter amylophilus was less abundant. SARA largely suppressed methane formation (-70%, P < 0.001), although total methanogenic 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected. According to principal component analysis, Methanobrevibacter spp. correlated to methane concentration. Addition of PDA modulated ruminal fermentation under normal conditions such as enhanced (P < 0.05) concentration of total SCFA, propionate and valerate, and increased (P < 0.05) degradation of crude protein compared with the unsupplemented control diet. Our results indicate strong shifts in the microbial community during severe SARA compared to normal conditions. Supplementation of PDA positively modulates ruminal fermentation under normal ruminal pH conditions.

  20. Digestion, ruminal fermentation, ciliate protozoal populations, and milk production from dairy cows fed cinnamaldehyde, quebracho condensed tannin, or Yucca schidigera saponin extracts.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; McAllister, T A; Chouinard, P Y

    2008-12-01

    Four ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design (28-d periods) to determine the effects of cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 1 g/cow per day), condensed tannins from quebracho trees (QCT, containing 70% tannins, 150 g/cow per day), and saponins from Yucca schidigera extract (YSE, containing 10% saponins; 60 g/cow per day) on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoal populations, and milk production. Intake of dry matter was not affected by the addition of CIN or QCT, but cows fed YSE had lesser intake than cows fed the control diet (21.8 vs. 23.2 kg/d). Apparent total-tract digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber were unaffected by dietary treatments. Supplementation with CIN, QTE, or YSE did not affect in situ ruminal degradation of soybean meal, grass silage, or corn grain. Ruminal pH (6.67), total volatile fatty acid concentration (135 mM), and molar proportions (mol/100 mol of total volatile fatty acid) of acetate (65.0), propionate (19.6), and butyrate (11.2) were similar among treatments. Ruminal NH(3)-N concentration was not changed by the addition of CIN and YSE, but tended to decrease in cows fed QCT compared with cows fed the control diet (132 vs. 160 mg/L). Total numbers of ruminal protozoa were not changed by adding CIN, QCT, or YSE in the diet (5.85 log(10)/mL). However, the number of Isotricha was greater in ruminal fluid of cows fed CIN than in ruminal fluid of cows fed the control diet (4.46 vs. 4.23 log(10)/mL). Milk production (33.1 kg/d), milk fat (4.3%), and milk protein (3.5%) remained unchanged between dietary treatments. Results of this study show that under our experimental conditions, supplementing dairy cow diets with CIN, QCT, or YSE had limited effects on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and protozoal populations. The lack of effects observed in this study suggests that these antimicrobials require administration

  1. Chemical composition of alfalfa silage with waste date and its feeding effect on ruminal fermentation characteristics and microbial protein synthesis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, R; Tahmasbi, R; Dayani, O; Khezri, A

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding ensiled alfalfa with waste date on ruminal fermentation characteristics, microbial protein synthesis, protozoa population and blood parameters in sheep. Eight rams were used in a 2 × 2 change over design. Each experimental period consisted of 21 days including 16 days for adaptation and 5 days for sampling. For ensiling, fresh alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) with different levels of waste date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) were mixed together and ensiled in 100-l containers for 45 days. Chemical composition of silages such as dry matter (DM), crude protein, NH3 -N, organic matter, NDF, ADF and pH were determined. Then, it was used as 30% (DM basis) in diets. The experimental diets were as follows: (i) control (diet containing alfalfa silage without waste date), (ii) diet containing alfalfa silage with 5 g waste date/95 g DM, (iii) diet containing alfalfa silage with 10 g waste date/90 g DM, and (iv) diet containing alfalfa silage with 15 g waste date/85 g DM. The results of this experiment showed that adding waste date to alfalfa during ensiling, improved silage quality, DM and energy level. Total protozoa population and all of holotrich, cellulolytic and entodinia in rumen fluid were increased linearly by increasing the level of waste date. Nitrogen (N) intake, urinary N excretion and nitrogen retention were affected by dietary treatments. Also, allantoin, uric acid, total purine derivatives, microbial protein synthesis, cholesterol level and blood urea nitrogen were significantly different. In conclusion, direct ensilage of alfalfa can be attained by mixing 15 g waste date/85 g DM and positive associative effects such as increased metabolizable energy (ME) and silage quality occurred. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Effects of partial replacement of barley grain with beet pulp on performance, ruminal fermentation and plasma concentration of metabolites in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, A; Alikhani, M; Riasi, A; Ghorbani, G R; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of partial replacement of barley grain with beet pulp (BP) on dry matter intake (DMI), ruminal fermentation, plasma concentration of metabolites and milk yield of transition dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows [735 ± 26 kg of body weights and 3.5 ± 0.05 of body condition score (BCS)] were used in a randomized complete block design. Cows were assigned randomly on day 28 relative to expected parturition date to one of three treatments containing (i) 0% BP, (ii) 25% BP or (iii) 50% BP substituted for barley grain on a DM basis. During the pre-partum period, DMI and energy intake were greater (P < 0.01) in cows fed the BP diet compared with cows fed the barley grain diet. During the post-partum period, substituting BP for barley grain caused a response in DMI and energy intake, with the highest amount for the 25% BP diet and lowest for the 50% BP diet (P < 0.01). Milk yield was lowest (P < 0.01) for 50% BP diet than the other treatments. During the post-partum period, cows fed the 50% BP diets had greater rumen pH, molar proportion of butyrate and acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01) in the rumen compared with cows fed the 0% BP diets. In addition, cows fed the BP diets had greater (P < 0.01) plasma β-hydroxybutyrate and lower plasma glucose (P < 0.05) and blood urinary nitrogen (BUN) (P < 0.01) concentrations than cows fed the barley grain diets. Results showed that substituting BP for barley grain was effective in increasing DMI, but it did not have a significant effect on net energy balance during the post-partum period. However, replacing BP for barley grain at 50% had adverse effects on DMI, milk yield and metabolic status, as indicated by key blood metabolite concentrations.

  3. Effect of feeding corn, hull-less or hulled barley on fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fellner, V; Burns, J C; Marshall, D S

    2008-05-01

    Increased demands for corn grain warrant the evaluation of alternative grain types for ruminant production systems. This study was conducted to determine the effects of hulled and hull-less barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars compared with corn (Zea mays L.) as an alternative grain type on fermentation in cultures of mixed ruminal microorganisms. Three continuous fermentors were fed 14 g of dry feed per day (divided equally between 2 feedings) consisting of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) hay pellets (40% of dry matter) and 1) ground corn, 2) hulled barley, or 3) hull-less barley concentrate (60% of dry matter) in each fermentor. Following an adaptation period of 5 d, culture samples were taken at 2 h after the morning feeding on d 6, 7, and 8 of each period for analysis. A second run of the fermentors followed the same treatment sequence to provide replication. Culture pH was reduced with corn (5.55) and did not differ between barley cultivars (average pH 5.89). Total volatile fatty acid concentration and acetate to propionate ratio were not different across grain type or barley cultivar with the exception of greater total volatile fatty acid concentrations with hull-less barley. Corn produced less methane (14.6 mmol/d) and ammonia-N (7.3 mg/100 mL) compared with barley (33.1 mmol/d and 22 mg/100 mL, respectively); methane was greater with hull-less barley but ammonia-N concentration was similar between the 2 barley cultivars. Hull-less barley had greater digestibility compared with hulled barley, and corn had reduced digestibility compared with barley. Concentrations of C18:0 were greater and those of C18:1 and C18:2 lesser in cultures fed hulled and hull-less barley compared with corn. Our data indicate that grain type and barley cultivar have an impact on ruminal fermentation. The lesser starch concentration of barley minimized the drop in culture pH and improved digestibility.

  4. Ruminal fermentation, milk fatty acid profiles, and productive performance of Holstein dairy cows fed 2 different safflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Dschaak, C M; Noviandi, C T; Eun, J-S; Fellner, V; Young, A J; Zobell, D R; Israelsen, C E

    2011-10-01

    A lactation trial was conducted to determine the effects of supplementing whole safflower seeds (SS) on ruminal fermentation, lactational performance, and milk fatty acid (FA) profiles. Nine multiparous Holstein cows (days in milk = 110 ± 20) were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design. Each period lasted 21 d, with 14 d of adaptation and 7 d of data collection. Within square, cows were randomly assigned to a sequence of 3 dietary treatments as follows: cottonseed total mixed ration (TMR; CST), conventional SS (variety S-208) TMR (CSST), and NutraSaff SS (Safflower Technologies International, Sidney, MT) TMR (NSST). Diets contained approximately 63% forage (36% alfalfa hay, 4% grass hay, and 23% corn silage) and 37% concentrate supplemented with 2% cottonseed to the CST and 3% conventional or NutraSaff SS to the CSST or the NSST, respectively. Intake of dry matter (DM) averaged 21.8 kg/d and did not differ across diets, but feeding the NSST decreased intake of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) due to lower dietary concentration of NDF in the NSST. Digestibilities of DM and nutrients were similar among treatments. No differences in yields of milk or milk components were observed in response to supplementing SS. Dietary treatments did not affect ruminal pH, total or molar proportions of ruminal volatile FA, and ammonia-N. However, cows fed SS had a higher molar proportion of isobutyrate than those fed the CST diet. Ruminal C16:0 FA concentration increased with the CST, whereas C18:1 cis-9 and C18:2 n-6 tended to increase with SS supplementation, indicating that conventional and NutraSaff SS were partially protected from microbial biohydrogenation. Supplementing SS decreased milk C16:0 concentration, whereas it increased C18:1 cis-9 and C18:1 trans-9. Milk FA C18:1 trans-11 and cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid increased and tended to increase with feeding the NSST, respectively, but not the CSST diet. In conclusion, supplementing diets with whole SS at 3

  5. Effect of exchanging Onobrychis viciifolia and Lotus corniculatus for Medicago sativa on ruminal fermentation and nitrogen turnover in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grosse Brinkhaus, A; Bee, G; Silacci, P; Kreuzer, M; Dohme-Meier, F

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of feeding sainfoin (SF; Onobrychis viciifolia) and birdsfoot trefoil (BT; Lotus corniculatus), 2 temperate climate forage legumes that contain condensed tannins (CT), on ruminal fermentation and N turnover in dairy cows. Six ruminally cannulated multiparous dairy cows (milk yield=40kg/d; 36 d in milk) were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design. All animals were fed basal diets containing 20% pelleted SF (223g of CT/kg of dry matter), BT (30.3g of CT/kg of dry matter), or alfalfa (AL) and concentrate to meet their predicted nutrient requirements. Each experimental period consisted of a 21-d adaptation period in a tiestall, followed by a 7-d collection period in metabolic crates, where feces and urine were collected quantitatively. During the 7-d period, milk yield was recorded daily and milk samples were taken at each milking. Blood, ruminal fluid, and papillae were sampled on d 2 and 5. The relative abundance of selected bacterial strains in ruminal fluid and the gene expression of transporter genes in the papillae were determined with quantitative PCR. Total volatile fatty acids and the abundance of the cellulolytic bacteria Prevotella spp. and Ruminococcus flavefaciens decreased with SF compared with AL. The relative gene expression of the monocarboxylate transporter 1 was increased with BT compared with AL and SF. Total yields of milk, milk fat, and milk protein were similar among treatments. The proportion of 18:3n-3 in milk fat was greater and those of 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 were lower with SF than with BT. The contents of urea N in blood (2.71, 3.45, and 3.90mmol/L for SF, AL, and BT, respectively), milk (79.8, 100.1, and 110.9mg/kg for SF, AL, and BT, respectively), and urine were lower with SF than with AL and BT, and a trend toward a lower ruminal ammonia content occurred with SF compared with BT. Intake and excretion of N with milk were similar among treatments, but urine N was lower with SF

  6. Effects of oscillating dietary protein on ruminal fermentation and site and extent of nutrient digestion in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ludden, P A; Wechter, T L; Hess, B W

    2002-12-01

    Eight cannulated wethers (BW = 52.5 +/- 5.7 kg) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square designed experiment to evaluate the effects of oscillating dietary protein concentrations on ruminal fermentation, site and extent of digestion, and serum metabolite concentrations. Four treatments consisted of a 13, 15, or 17% CP diet fed daily or a regimen in which dietary CP was oscillated between 13 and 17% on a 48-h basis (ACP). All diets consisted of 65% bromegrass hay (10.5% CP, 61.9% NDF, 37.2% ADF) plus 35% corn-based supplement and were formulated to contain the same amount of degradable intake protein (9.6% of DM) plus additional undegradable intake protein (SoyPLUS, West Central Cooperative, Ralston, IA) to accomplish CP levels above 13%. Each of four experimental periods were 16 d in duration with 12 d for diet adaptation followed by 4 d for sample collection. All wethers were fed at 3.0% of initial BW (DM basis) throughout the experiment, resulting in an average organic matter intake of 1.39 kg/d across treatments. When compared to the 15% CP daily treatment, feeding ACP had no effect (P > or = 0.10) on ruminal or lower tract N, NDF, ADF, or OM digestion. True ruminal OM digestion responded quadratically (P = 0.07) to increasing dietary CP, reaching a maximum of 52.0% of OM intake with the 15% CP treatment. Sheep fed ACP tended to have lower (P = 0.08) ruminal NH3 N concentrations and an overall higher (P = 0.0001) molar proportion of acetate compared to those fed 15% CP daily. Total VFA concentrations were not affected (P > or = 0.45) by increasing dietary CP. Microbial efficiency did not differ (P > or = 0.55); thus, bacterial N flow at the duodenum responded quadratically (P = 0.04) to increasing dietary CP. Nonbacterial N (P = 0.001) and total N (P = 0.01) flows at the duodenum and total tract N digestibility (P < or = 0.04) increased linearly as dietary CP increased. Wethers fed ACP maintained a lower (P = 0.002) serum glucose and lower (P = 0.0006) serum

  7. Feeding behavior, ruminal fermentation, and performance of pregnant beef cows differing in phenotypic residual feed intake offered grass silage.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, C; Kenny, D A; Fahey, A G; McGee, M

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the relationship of residual feed intake (RFI) and performance with feeding behavior and ruminal fermentation variables in pregnant beef cows offered a grass silage diet. Individual grass silage DMI (dry matter digestibility = 666 g/kg) was recorded on 47 gestating (mean gestation d 166, SD = 26 d) Simmental and Simmental × Holstein-Friesian beef cows for a period of 80 d. Cow BW, BCS, skeletal measurements, ultrasonically scanned muscle and fat depth, visual muscular score, ruminal fermentation, blood metabolites, and feeding behavior were measured. Phenotypic RFI was calculated as actual DMI minus expected DMI. Expected DMI was computed for each animal by regressing DMI on conceptus-adjusted mean BW(0.75) and ADG over an 80-d period. Within breed, cows were ranked by RFI into low (efficient), medium, or high groups. Overall mean (SD) values for DMI (kg/d), RFI, initial conceptus-adjusted BW, and conceptus-adjusted ADG were 8.41 (1.09) kg/d, 0.01 (0.13) kg/d, 646 (70) kg, and -0.07 (0.32) kg, respectively. High-RFI cows ate 25% and 8% more than low- and medium-RFI cows, respectively. Live weight and ADG were not correlated (P > 0.05), and DMI was positively correlated (r = 0.80; P < 0.001) with RFI. The low- and high-RFI groups had similar (P > 0.05) BW, ADG, BCS, visual muscular scores, skeletal measurements, blood metabolites, calf birth weight, and calving difficulty scores. All ultrasonic fat and muscle depth measurements were similar (P > 0.05) for low- and high-RFI cows except for back fat thickness change, where low-RFI cows gained less fat (P < 0.05) than high-RFI cows. Low-RFI cows had greater pH and lower ammonia concentrations in ruminal fluid compared to their high-RFI contemporaries. Low-RFI cows had fewer (P < 0.001) daily feeding events, but these were of longer (P < 0.001) duration (min·feed event(-1)·d(-1)). Despite this, total daily duration of feeding was shorter (P < 0.001; min/d) for low- compared to high-RFI cows. High

  8. Dose and time response of ruminally infused algae on rumen fermentation characteristics, biohydrogenation and Butyrivibrio group bacteria in goats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglong; Fievez, Veerle; Mao, Shengyong; He, Wenbo; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Micro-algae could inhibit the complete rumen BH of dietary 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acid (UFAs). This study aimed to examine dose and time responses of algae supplementation on rumen fermentation, biohydrogenation and Butyrivibrio group bacteria in goats. Six goats were used in a repeated 3 × 3 Latin square design, and offered a fixed diet. Algae were infused through rumen cannule with 0 (Control), 6.1 (L-Alg), or 18.3 g (H-Alg) per day. Rumen contents were sampled on d 0, 3, 7, 14 and 20. H-Alg reduced total volatile fatty acid concentration and acetate molar proportion (P < 0.05), and increased propionate molar proportion (P < 0.05), whereas L-Alg had no effect on rumen fermentation. Changes in proportions of acetate and propionate in H-Alg were obvious from d 7 onwards and reached the largest differences with the control on d 14. Algae induced a dose-dependent decrease in 18:0 and increased trans-18:1 in the ruminal content (P < 0.05). H-Alg increased the concentrations of t9, t11-18:2 and t11, c15-18:2 (P < 0.05). L-Alg only seemed to induce a transient change in 18-carbon isomers, while H-Alg induced a rapid elevation, already obvious on d 3, concentrations of these fatty acid rose in some cases again on d 20. Algae had no effect on the abundances of Butyrivibrio spp. and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus (P > 0.10), while H-Alg reduced the total bacteria abundance (P < 0.05). However, this was induced by a significant difference between control and H-Alg on d 14 (-4.43 %). Afterwards, both treatments did not differ as increased variation in the H-Alg repetitions, with in some cases a return of the bacterial abundance to the basal level (d 0). Changes in rumen fermentation and 18-carbon UFAs metabolism in response to algae were related to the supplementation level, but there was no evidence of shift in ruminal biohydrogenation pathways towards t10-18:1. L-Alg mainly induced a transient effect on rumen biohydrogenation of 18-carbon

  9. Effect of camelina oil or live yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on ruminal methane production, rumen fermentation, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage diets.

    PubMed

    Bayat, A R; Kairenius, P; Stefański, T; Leskinen, H; Comtet-Marre, S; Forano, E; Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Shingfield, K J

    2015-05-01

    The potential of dietary supplements of 2 live yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or camelina oil to lower ruminal methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and the associated effects on animal performance, rumen fermentation, rumen microbial populations, nutrient metabolism, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition of cows fed grass silage-based diets were examined. Four Finnish Ayrshire cows (53±7 d in milk) fitted with rumen cannula were used in a 4×4 Latin square with four 42-d periods. Cows received a basal total mixed ration (control treatment) with a 50:50 forage-to-concentrate ratio [on a dry matter (DM) basis] containing grass silage, the same basal total mixed ration supplemented with 1 of 2 live yeasts, A or B, administered directly in the rumen at 10(10) cfu/d (treatments A and B), or supplements of 60g of camelina oil/kg of diet DM that replaced concentrate ingredients in the basal total mixed ration (treatment CO). Relative to the control, treatments A and B had no effects on DM intake, rumen fermentation, ruminal gas production, or apparent total-tract nutrient digestibility. In contrast, treatment CO lowered DM intake and ruminal CH4 and CO2 production, responses associated with numerical nonsignificant decreases in total-tract organic matter digestibility, but no alterations in rumen fermentation characteristics or changes in the total numbers of rumen bacteria, methanogens, protozoa, and fungi. Compared with the control, treatment CO decreased the yields of milk, milk fat, lactose, and protein. Relative to treatment B, treatment CO improved nitrogen utilization due to a lower crude protein intake. Treatment A had no influence on milk FA composition, whereas treatment B increased cis-9 10:1 and decreased 11-cyclohexyl 11:0 and 24:0 concentrations. Treatment CO decreased milk fat 8:0 to 16:0 and total saturated FA, and increased 18:0, 18:1, 18:2, conjugated linoleic acid, 18:3n-3, and trans FA concentrations. Decreases in ruminal CH4

  10. Nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation, microbial nitrogen flow, microbial abundances, and methane emissions in goats fed diets including tomato and cucumber waste fruits.

    PubMed

    Romero-Huelva, M; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2013-02-01

    The effects of replacing 50% of cereals-based concentrate with feed blocks (FB) including wastes of tomato fruits (diet ACT), wastes of cucumber fruits (diet ACC), or barley grain (diet ACB) on nutrient use, ruminal fermentation, microbial N flow to the duodenum, methane emissions, and abundances of total bacteria and methanogen were studied in goats. Four adult, dry, nonpregnant, rumen-fistulated Granadina goats (32.1 ± 5.52 kg BW) were used and 4 diets were studied in 4 trials by using a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design. Diets consisted of alfalfa hay plus concentrate in a 1:1 ratio (AC) or 1:0.5 plus FB including wastes of ACT, ACC, or ACB. In each trial, goats were randomly assigned to 1 of the diets. Intake of each FB including ACT, ACC, and ACB were 203 ± 73, 179 ± 39, and 144 ± 68 g·animal(-1)·d(-1), respectively. The ACT and ACC diets did not (P > 0.05) compromise digestible and metabolizable energy, but reduced N retention by up to 29% (P = 0.03). Cucumber-based FB decreased the purine bases (PB):N ratio (P = 0.02) in total bacterial pellets isolated from the rumen content. Tomato-based FB decreased purine derivatives urinary excretion (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P = 0.03) without affecting the efficiency of synthesis but decreased methane emission by 28% (P < 0.001) compared with the other diets. Tomato and cucumber-based FB resulted in greater (P < 0.001) rumen VFA concentration and molar proportions of propionate and butyrate (P ≤ 0.02) than AC and ACB diets. No effect (P = 0.07) of diet on total bacteria abundance was observed whereas the abundance of methanogens increased (P = 0.01) with wastes-based FB. Our study suggests that ACC-based FB could replace one-half of the amount of concentrate in goat diet without compromising rumen fermentation and nutrient and energy use and without increasing methane emissions. Blocks including ACT showed an antimethanogenic effect but reduced microbial N flow to the duodenum. Further research is

  11. Effects of ruminal infusion of garlic oil on fermentation dynamics, Fatty Acid profile and abundance of bacteria involved in biohydrogenation in rumen of goats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Mao, Shengyong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ruminal infusion of garlic oil (GO) on fermentation dynamics, fatty acid (FA) profile, and abundance of bacteria involved in biohydrogenation in the rumen. Six wethers fitted with ruminal fistula were assigned to two groups for cross-over design with a 14-d interval. Each 30-d experimental period consisted of a 27-d adaptation and a 3-d sample collection. Goats were fed a basal diet without (control) or with GO ruminal infusion (0.8 g/d). Ruminal contents collected before (0 h) and at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h after morning feeding were used for fermentation analysis, and 0 h samples were further used for FA determination and DNA extraction. Garlic oil had no influence on dry matter intakes of concentrate and hay. During ruminal fermentation, GO had no effects on total VFA concentration and individual VFA molar proportions, whereas GO increased the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen and microbial crude protein (p<0.05). Compared with control, GO group took a longer time for total VFA concentration and propionate molar proportion to reach their respective maxima after morning feeding. The ratio of acetate to propionate in control reduced sharply after morning feeding, whereas it remained relatively stable in GO group. Fatty acid analysis showed that GO reduced saturated FA proportion (p<0.05), while increasing the proportions of C18, t11-18:1 (TVA), c9,t11-conjugated linoleic acid (c9,t11-CLA), t10,c12-CLA, and polyunsaturated FA (p<0.05). The values of TVA/(c9,t11-CLA+TVA) and C18:0/(TVA+ C18:0) were reduced by GO (p<0.05). Real-time PCR showed that GO tended to reduce Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus abundance (p = 0.058), whereas GO had no effect on total abundance of the Butyrivibrio group bacteria. A low correlation was found between B. proteoclasticus abundance and C18:0/(TVA+C18:0) (p = 0.910). The changes of fermentation over time suggested a role of GO in delaying the fermentation process and maintaining a relatively

  12. Effect of field pea level on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, ruminal fermentation, and in situ disappearance in beef steers fed forage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Reed, J J; Lardy, G P; Bauer, M L; Gilbery, T C; Caton, J S

    2004-07-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated crossbred beef steers (397+/-55 kg initial BW) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square to evaluate the effects of increasing level of field pea supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, ruminal fermentation, and in situ disappearance in steers fed moderate-quality (8.0% CP, DM basis) grass hay. Basal diets, offered ad libitum twice daily, consisted of chopped (15.2-cm screen) grass hay. Supplements were 0, 0.81, 1.62, and 2.43 kg (DM basis) per steer daily of rolled field pea (23.4% CP, DM basis) offered in equal proportions twice daily. Steers were adapted to diets on d 1 to 9; on d 10 to 14, DMI were measured. Field pea and grass hay were incubated in situ, beginning on d 10, for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h. Ruminal fluid was collected and pH recorded at -2, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 h after feeding on d 13. Duodenal samples were taken for three consecutive days beginning on d 10 in a manner that allowed for a collection to take place every other hour over a 24-h period. Linear, quadratic, and cubic contrasts were used to evaluate the effects of increasing field pea level. Total DMI and OMI increased quadratically (P = 0.09), whereas forage DMI decreased quadratically (P = 0.09) with increasing field pea supplementation. There was a cubic effect (P < 0.001) for ruminal pH. Ruminal (P = 0.02) and apparent total-tract (P = 0.09) NDF disappearance decreased linearly with increasing field pea supplementation. Total ruminal VFA concentrations responded cubically (P = 0.008). Bacterial N flow (P = 0.002) and true ruminal N disappearance (P = 0.003) increased linearly, and apparent total-tract N disappearance increased quadratically (P = 0.09) with increasing field pea supplementation. No treatment effects were observed for ruminal DM fill (P = 0.82), true ruminal OM disappearance (P = 0.38), apparent intestinal OM digestion (P = 0.50), ruminal ADF disappearance (P = 0.17), apparent total-tract ADF

  13. Effects of feeding lauric acid or coconut oil on ruminal protozoa numbers, fermentation pattern, digestion, omasal nutrient flow, and milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Faciola, A P; Broderick, G A

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feeding of coconut oil (CO), in which lauric acid (La) comprises about 50% of the fatty acid composition, as a practical rumen protozoa (RP) suppressing agent, to assess whether the source of La affects ruminal fermentation and animal performance and to test whether suppressing RP improves N utilization, nutrient digestion, nutrient flow at the omasal canal, and milk production. Fifteen multiparous Holstein cows (3 fitted with ruminal cannulas) and 15 primiparous Holstein cows (3 fitted with ruminal cannulas) were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square experiment with 14d of adaptation and 14d of sample collection. Diets were fed as total mixed ration and contained (dry matter basis) 10% corn silage, 50% alfalfa silage, and 40% concentrate. The control diet contained 3% (dry matter basis) calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acids (Megalac, Church & Dwight Co. Inc., Princeton, NJ) as a ruminally inert fat source and had no added La or CO. Diets with La and CO were formulated to contain equal amounts of La (1.3%, dry matter basis). Dry matter intake was not affected by treatment. Both CO and La reduced RP numbers by about 40%. Lauric acid reduced yield of milk and milk components; however, CO did not affect yield of milk and yields of milk components. Both La and CO caused small reductions in total VFA concentration; CO increased molar proportion of ruminal propionate, reduced ruminal ammonia and branched-chain volatile fatty acids, suggesting reduced protein degradation, and reduced milk urea N and blood urea N concentrations, suggesting improved protein efficiency. Lauric acid reduced total-tract apparent digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber as well as ruminal apparent digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber as measured at the omasal canal; however, CO did not alter fiber digestion. Microbial protein flow at the omasal canal, as well as the flow of N fractions at

  14. Evaluation of isoquinoline alkaloid supplementation levels on ruminal fermentation, characteristics of digestion, and microbial protein synthesis in steers fed a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hernández, J A; Urías-Estrada, J D; López-Soto, M A; Barreras, A; Plascencia, A; Montaño, M; González-Vizcarra, V M; Estrada-Angulo, A; Castro-Pérez, B I; Barajas, R; Rogge, H I; Zinn, R A

    2016-01-01

    Four Holstein steers with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design to examine the effect of daily intake of 0, 2, 4 or 6 g/steer of standardized plant extract containing a mixture of quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloids and protopine alkaloids (QBA+PA) on the characteristics of ruminal fermentation and characteristics of digestion. The basal diet consisted of a steam-flaked corn-based finishing diet that contained 62% corn and 12% sudangrass hay and the rest of diet was composed of mainly dried distillers grains, molasses, fat, and minerals. The source of QBA+PA used was Sangrovit-RS (Phytobiotics Futterzusatzstoffe GmbH, Eltville, Germany) and supplementation levels of 2, 4, and 6 g Sangrovit-RS∙steer∙d, which represented a net daily ingestion of approximately 6, 12, and 18 mg of QBA+PA compounds, respectively. Inclusion of QBA+PA linearly increased ( = 0.04) flow to the duodenum of nonammonia N and linearly decreased ( < 0.01) duodenal flows of ammonia N. Ruminal microbial efficiency (duodenal microbial N; g/kg OM fermented in the rumen) and protein efficiency (duodenal nonammonia N; g/g N intake) were increased ( < 0.05) as the level of QBA+PA increased. There were no effects of QBA+PA supplementation on ruminal, postruminal, and total tract digestion of OM, starch, and NDF, but postruminal and total tract digestion of N increased ( < 0.01) as the level of QBA+PA increased. Digestible energy of the diet tended to increase (linear affect, = 0.09) with QBA+PA supplementation. Ruminal pH and total VFA molar concentrations were not different between treatments. Ruminal NH-N concentration linearly decreased ( = 0.02) with QBA+PA supplementation. Ruminal molar proportion of acetate increased ( = 0.04) as the supplementation level of QBA+PA increased. It is concluded that QBA+PA supplementation enhances efficiency of N utilization in feedlot steers fed a steam-flaked corn-based finishing diet. This effect was due, in part, to

  15. Effects of feeding three types of corn-milling coproducts on milk production and ruminal fermentation of lactating Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Kelzer, J M; Kononoff, P J; Gehman, A M; Tedeschi, L O; Karges, K; Gibson, M L

    2009-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of feeding 3 corn-milling coproducts on intake, milk production, ruminal fermentation, and digestibility of lactating Holstein cows. In experiment 1, three corn-milling coproducts were fed at 15% of the diet dry matter (DM) to 28 Holstein cows averaging (+/-SD) 625 +/- 81 kg of body weight and 116 +/- 33 d in milk to determine effects on DM intake and milk production. In experiment 2, the same rations were fed to 4 ruminally fistulated, multiparous Holstein cows averaging 677 +/- 41 kg of body weight and 144 +/- 5 d in milk to determine the effects on ruminal fermentation and digestibility. In both experiments, cows and treatments were assigned randomly in 4 x 4 Latin squares over four 21-d periods. Treatments were formulated by replacing portions of forage and concentrate feeds with 15% coproduct and included 1) 0% coproduct (control), 2) dried distillers grains plus solubles (DDGS), 3) dehydrated corn germ meal (germ), and 4) high-protein dried distillers grains (HPDDG). Feed intake was recorded daily, and milk samples were collected on d 19 to 21 of each period for analysis of major components. Rumen fluid was collected at 10 time points over 24 h post feeding on d 21 of experiment 2. In experiment 1, DM intake was greater for the germ (24.3 kg/d) and DDGS treatments (23.8 kg/d), but DDGS was not different from the control (22.9 kg/d) and HPDDG treatments (22.4 kg/d). Milk production paralleled DM intake and tended to be greater for the germ (32.1 kg/d) and DDGS treatments (30.9 kg/d), but the DDGS treatment was not different from the control (30.6 kg/d) and HPDDG treatments (30.3 kg/d). However, yields of milk fat, milk protein, and 3.5% FCM were similar and averaged (+/-SEM) 1.1 +/- 0.1, 0.9 +/- 0.03, and 31.7 +/- 1.3 kg/d. Milk urea nitrogen was greater for the HPDDG (15.9 mg/dL) and germ treatments (15.5 mg/dL) than for the control (15.0 mg/dL) and DDGS treatments (14.9 mg/dL). In experiment 2, DM

  16. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System.

    PubMed

    Del Bianco Benedeti, Pedro; Galoro da Silva, Lorrayny; Marostegan de Paula, Eduardo; Shenkoru, Teshome; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Amorati, Brad; Yeh, Yenling; Poulson, Simon Roger; Faciola, Antonio Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml) were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis), totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40), OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15), NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50) and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18). Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48), and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19). Concentrations of propionate (P < 0.01) and total volatile fatty acids (P < 0.01) increased linearly and concentrations of acetate (P < 0.01), butyrate (P = 0.01), iso-valerate (P < 0.01), and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids, as well as the acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01) decreased with glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P < 0.01) and on NH3-N flow (P < 0.01) were observed due to glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P

  17. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Del Bianco Benedeti, Pedro; Galoro da Silva, Lorrayny; Marostegan de Paula, Eduardo; Shenkoru, Teshome; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Amorati, Brad; Yeh, Yenling; Poulson, Simon Roger; Faciola, Antonio Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml) were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis), totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40), OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15), NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50) and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18). Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48), and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19). Concentrations of propionate (P < 0.01) and total volatile fatty acids (P < 0.01) increased linearly and concentrations of acetate (P < 0.01), butyrate (P = 0.01), iso-valerate (P < 0.01), and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids, as well as the acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01) decreased with glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P < 0.01) and on NH3-N flow (P < 0.01) were observed due to glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P

  18. Ruminal fermentation characteristics and microbial nitrogen assimilation in sheep fed differently composed grass silages.

    PubMed

    Seip, Katharina; Breves, Gerhard; Isselstein, Johannes; Daş, Gürbüz; Abel, Hansjörg

    2012-06-01

    The investigation aimed at examining if the composition of grassland silage affects the microbial nitrogen assimilation in the rumen of sheep. The silages were made of vegetative summer re-growths consisting of 48% grasses, 28% legumes and 24% other forbs (GCF) or of pure grass (G). Silage GCF contained more intermediately degradable non-structural and less slowly degradable carbohydrates, more crude protein (CP), a narrower ratio between slow and very slow degradable nitrogen (N), and exhibited higher in situ degradability of organic matter and CP than Silage G. Four adult wethers equipped with rumen fistulae were used in a two factorial trial. Feed was offered either as silage alone or as a mixture of silage and barley (60:40). Microbial N was estimated using continuous intraruminal 15N infusion and measurement of 15N-enrichment in microbes isolated from rumen liquor samples. With the exception of trends for ruminal butyrate concentrations, no interactions were detected between silage and barley feeding. Sheep receiving Silage GCF exhibited larger diurnal fluctuations of ammonia, and produced more microbial N (p < 0.05) than sheep on Silage G. Feeding the silages with barley decreased ruminal pH and elevated the concentrations of butyrate (p < 0.05). The 15N incorporation into microbial N was reduced by barley feeding (p < 0.05) along with a trend to accelerated rumen fluid turnover, resulting in similar microbial N yields as found in sheep receiving silage without barley. It is concluded that the larger and better balanced amounts of intermediately degradable carbohydrate- and N-containing fractions favoured the ruminal microbial protein synthesis in sheep consuming Silage GCF instead of Silage G.

  19. Effects of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil supplementation on feed intake, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen utilization of goats.

    PubMed

    Chanjula, Pin; Pongprayoon, Sahutaya; Kongpan, Sirichai; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    This experiment was evaluation of the effects of increasing concentrations of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil (CGWVO) in diets on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen balance of goats. Four crossbred male (Thai Native × Anglo Nubian) goats, with an average initial body weight (BW) of 31.5 ± 1.90 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments contained 0, 2, 4, and 6 % of dietary dry matter (DM) of CGWVO. Based on this experiment, there were significantly different (P > 0.05) among treatment groups regarding DM intake and digestion coefficients of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, EE, NDF, and ADF), which goats receiving 6 % of CGWVO had lower daily DMI and nutrient intake than those fed on 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO. Ruminal pH, NH3-N, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration were unchanged by dietary treatments, except that for 6 % of CGWVO supplementation, NH3-N, and BUN were lower (P < 0.05) than for the diets 0 % of CGWVO, while the differences between the diets 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO were not significant. The amounts of N absorption and retention were similar among treatments, except that for 6 % of CGWVO which N absorption was lower (P < 0.05) than among treatments while the difference between the diets 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO were not significant. Based on this study, CGWVO levels up to 4 % in total mixed ration could be efficiently utilized for goats. This study was a good approach in exploiting the use of biodiesel production from waste vegetable oil for goat production.

  20. Effect of essential oils, tylosin, and monensin on finishing steer performance, carcass characteristics, liver abscesses, ruminal fermentation, and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N F; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Greenquist, M A; Luebbe, M K; Williams, P; Engstrom, M A

    2009-07-01

    A feedlot (Exp. 1) experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of an essential oil mixture (EOM), experimental essential oil mixture (EXP), tylosin, and monensin (MON) on performance, carcass characteristics, and liver abscesses. A metabolism experiment (Exp. 2) was conducted to evaluate the effects of EOM, EXP, and MON on ruminal fermentation and digestibility in finishing steers. In Exp. 1, 468 yearling steers (398 +/- 34 kg initial BW) were used in 50 pens (10 pens/treatment) and received their respective dietary treatments for 115 d. Five dietary treatments were compared in Exp. 1: 1) control, no additives (CON); 2) EOM, 1.0 g/steer daily; 3) EXP, 1.0 g/steer daily; 4) EOM, 1.0 g/steer daily plus tylosin, 90 mg/steer daily (EOM+T); and 5) monensin, 300 mg/steer daily plus tylosin, 90 mg/steer daily (MON+T). Compared with CON, steers fed MON+T had decreased DMI (P < 0.01), and steers fed EOM+T and MON+T had improved G:F (P 0.58). There was a trend (P = 0.09) for a treatment effect on 12th-rib fat thickness, which resulted in a significant increase in calculated yield grade for the EOM+T treatment. No other carcass characteristics were affected by treatment (P >/= 0.10). Prevalence of total liver abscesses was reduced for steers fed tylosin compared with no tylosin (P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, 8 ruminally fistulated steers (399 +/- 49 kg initial BW) were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square designed experiment. Treatments were 1) CON, 2) EOM, 3) EXP, and 4) MON with feeding rates similar to Exp. 1. There were no differences in DMI, OM intake, and apparent total tract DM or OM digestibilities among treatments (P > 0.30). Feed intake patterns were similar among feed additive treatments (P > 0.13). Total VFA (P = 0.10) and acetate (P = 0.06) concentrations tended to be affected by treatment with EOM numerically greater than CON. Average ruminal pH ranged from 5

  1. Effect of 3-nitrooxypropanol on methane and hydrogen emissions, methane isotopic signature, and ruminal fermentation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J C; de Matos, L F; Harper, M T; Giallongo, F; Oh, J; Gruen, D; Ono, S; Kindermann, M; Duval, S; Hristov, A N

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this crossover experiment was to investigate the effect of a methane inhibitor, 3-nitrooxypropanol (3NOP), on enteric methane emission, methane isotopic composition, and rumen fermentation and microbial profile in lactating dairy cows. The experiment involved 6 ruminally cannulated late-lactation Holstein cows assigned to 2 treatments: control and 3NOP (60 mg/kg of feed dry matter). Compared with the control, 3NOP decreased methane emission by 31% and increased hydrogen emission from undetectable to 1.33 g/d. Methane emissions per kilogram of dry matter intake and milk yield were also decreased 34% by 3NOP. Milk production and composition were not affected by 3NOP, except milk fat concentration was increased compared with the control. Concentrations of total VFA and propionate in ruminal fluid were not affected by treatment, but acetate concentration tended to be lower and acetate-to-propionate ratio was lower for 3NOP compared with the control. The 3NOP decreased the molar proportion of acetate and increase those of propionate, butyrate, valerate, and isovalerate. Deuterium-to-hydrogen ratios of methane and the abundance of (13)CH3D were similar between treatments. Compared with the control, minor (4‰) depletion in the (13)C/(12)C ratio was observed for 3NOP. Genus composition of methanogenic archaea (Methanobrevibacter, Methanosphaera, and Methanomicrobium) was not affected by 3NOP, but the proportion of methanogens in the total cell counts tended to be decreased by 3NOP. Prevotella spp., the predominant bacterial genus in ruminal contents in this experiment, was also not affected by 3NOP. Compared with the control, Ruminococcus and Clostridium spp. were decreased and Butyrivibrio spp. was increased by 3NOP. This experiment demonstrated that a substantial inhibition of enteric methane emission by 3NOP in dairy cows was accompanied with increased hydrogen emission and decreased acetate-to-propionate ratio; however, neither an effect on rumen

  2. Comparison of methods for glycogen analysis of in vitro fermentation pellets produced with strained ruminal inoculum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial glycogen measurement is used to account for fates of carbohydrate substrates. It is commonly applied to washed cells or pure cultures which can be accurately subsampled, and it uses smaller sample sizes. However, the nonhomogenous fermentation pellets produced with strained rumen inoculum ...

  3. Effect of Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profiles on Intake, Nutrient Digestion and Ruminal Fermentation of Feedlot Nellore Steers.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Carvalho, Isabela P C; Messana, Juliana D; Canesin, Roberta C; Castagnino, Pablo S; Lage, Josiane F; Arcuri, Pedro B; Berchielli, Telma T

    2015-11-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of lipid sources with different fatty acid profiles on nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation. Ten rumen and duodenal fistulated Nellore steers (268 body weight±27 kg) were distributed in a duplicated 5×5 Latin square. Dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF; Lactoplus), and whole soybeans (WS). The roughage feed was corn silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The higher intake of DM and organic matter (OM) (p<0.001) was found in animals on the diet with PF and WF (around 4.38 and 4.20 kg/d, respectively). Treatments with PO and LO decreased by around 10% the total digestibility of DM and OM (p<0.05). The addition of LO decreased by around 22.3% the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (p = 0.047) compared with other diets. The higher microbial protein synthesis was found in animals on the diet with LO and WS (33 g N/kg OM apparently digested in the rumen; p = 0.040). The highest C18:0 and linolenic acid intakes occurred in animals fed LO (p<0.001), and the highest intake of oleic (p = 0.002) and C16 acids (p = 0.022) occurred with the diets with LO and PF. Diet with PF decreased biohydrogenation extent (p = 0.05) of C18:1 n9,c, C18:2 n6,c, and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA; around 20%, 7%, and 13%, respectively). The diet with PF and WF increased the concentration of NH3-N (p<0.001); however, the diet did not change volatile fatty acids (p>0.05), such as the molar percentage of acetate, propionate, butyrate and the acetate:propionate ratio. Treatments PO, LO and with WS decreased by around 50% the concentration of protozoa (p<0.001). Diets with some type of protection (PF and WS) decreased the effects of lipid on ruminal fermentation and presented similar outflow of benefit UFA as LO.

  4. Effect of dietary crude glycerol level on ruminal fermentation in continuous culture and growth performance of beef calves.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M H; Kerley, M S

    2012-03-01

    Continuous culture and in vivo experiments were conducted to measure changes in ruminal fermentation and animal performance when crude glycerol was added to diets. For the continuous culture experiment (n = 6), diets consisted of 4 levels of crude glycerol (0, 5, 10, and 20%) that replaced corn grain. Dry matter and OM digestibility decreased linearly (P < 0.05) when crude glycerol increased in the diet, and no effect (P = 0.20 and 0.65, respectively) was observed for CP and NDF digestibility. Total VFA concentration and ammonia did not change (P > 0.05) due to crude glycerol level. Microbial efficiency increased quadratically (P = 0.012) as crude glycerol increased, whereas microbial N flow did not differ (P = 0.36) among treatments. As crude glycerol increased in the diet, crude glycerol digestibility decreased (P < 0.05). Seventy-two crossbred steer calves (250 ± 2.0 kg) were assigned to 4 treatments: 0, 5, 10, and 20% crude glycerol that replaced corn grain. Animals were fed for a total of 150 d. No differences (P = 0.08) between treatments were measured for DMI. Average daily gain and GF responded quadratically (P < 0.05), with 10% crude glycerol resulting in the greatest values. In the second in vivo experiment, 100 crossbred steer calves (300 ± 2.0 kg) were assigned to 5 treatments: 0, 5, 10, 12.5, or 15% crude glycerol replaced corn grain. Calves were fed for a total of 135 d. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were measured in growth performance. For Exp. 3, one hundred heifer calves (270 ± 2.0 kg) were assigned to 4 treatments: 0, 5, 10, or 20% crude glycerol that replaced hay. No differences (P > 0.05) were measured in animal performance. We concluded that crude glycerol addition to a diet did not negatively affect ruminal fermentation, and addition of up to 20% in concentrate and hay-based diets should not affect performance or carcass characteristics.

  5. Effect of Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profiles on Intake, Nutrient Digestion and Ruminal Fermentation of Feedlot Nellore Steers

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Carvalho, Isabela P. C.; Messana, Juliana D.; Canesin, Roberta C.; Castagnino, Pablo S.; Lage, Josiane F.; Arcuri, Pedro B.; Berchielli, Telma T.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of lipid sources with different fatty acid profiles on nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation. Ten rumen and duodenal fistulated Nellore steers (268 body weight±27 kg) were distributed in a duplicated 5×5 Latin square. Dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF; Lactoplus), and whole soybeans (WS). The roughage feed was corn silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The higher intake of DM and organic matter (OM) (p<0.001) was found in animals on the diet with PF and WF (around 4.38 and 4.20 kg/d, respectively). Treatments with PO and LO decreased by around 10% the total digestibility of DM and OM (p<0.05). The addition of LO decreased by around 22.3% the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (p = 0.047) compared with other diets. The higher microbial protein synthesis was found in animals on the diet with LO and WS (33 g N/kg OM apparently digested in the rumen; p = 0.040). The highest C18:0 and linolenic acid intakes occurred in animals fed LO (p<0.001), and the highest intake of oleic (p = 0.002) and C16 acids (p = 0.022) occurred with the diets with LO and PF. Diet with PF decreased biohydrogenation extent (p = 0.05) of C18:1 n9,c, C18:2 n6,c, and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA; around 20%, 7%, and 13%, respectively). The diet with PF and WF increased the concentration of NH3-N (p<0.001); however, the diet did not change volatile fatty acids (p>0.05), such as the molar percentage of acetate, propionate, butyrate and the acetate:propionate ratio. Treatments PO, LO and with WS decreased by around 50% the concentration of protozoa (p<0.001). Diets with some type of protection (PF and WS) decreased the effects of lipid on ruminal fermentation and presented similar outflow of benefit UFA as LO. PMID:26580282

  6. Effects of chemical composition variation on the dynamics of ruminal fermentation and biological value of corn milling (co)products.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, L O; Kononoff, P J; Karges, K; Gibson, M L

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the dynamics of gas production of several corn (co)products, to develop equations to predict the rate of ruminal fiber digestion, to estimate total digestible nutrients (TDN) and net energy for lactation (NE(L)), and to assess the stochasticity of chemical composition and nutritive value variability. Four corn milling (co)products were evaluated in this study: high protein dried distillers grains (HP-DDG), corn bran (BRAN) and dehydrated germ (GERM), and a dried distillers grains plus soluble produced with a low-heat drying process (BPX). Alfalfa hay was used as an internal standard feed in the in vitro fermentation dynamics analysis. Standard chemical analyses, in vitro digestibility, and in vitro gas production techniques were used to obtain the necessary physicochemical characterization of feeds. The in vitro dry matter digestibility at 24 and 48 h of incubation decreased exponentially as acid detergent insoluble nitrogen increased. However, the degree of in vitro dry matter digestibility reduction was more accentuated at 24 than at 48 h of incubation. The difference among these feeds regarding the dynamics of the anaerobic fermentation within different substrates (intact feed, and fiber and defatted residues) was evaluated. Results suggested that the proportion of fiber digested in the rumen was affected by the degree of sample processing and fat removal. Fractional fermentation rate (kf) of neutral detergent residue (without sodium sulfite) and defatted fiber residue for BRAN, GERM, HP-DDG, and BPX was estimated to be 0.0635 and 0.0852 h(-1), 0.0803 and 0.0914 h(-1), 0.118 and 0.117 h(-1), and 0.0695 and 0.0844 h(-1), respectively. The most influential variables affecting kf(NDR) of HP-DDG and BPX also affected the predicted TDN, suggesting that fiber quality is essential to ensure higher TDN values for these feeds. Our study indicated that it is possible to routinely quantify the rate of fiber digestion and this

  7. Wet distillers grains plus solubles concentration in steam-flaked-corn-based diets: Effects on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, nutrient digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luebbe, M K; Patterson, J M; Jenkins, K H; Buttrey, E K; Davis, T C; Clark, B E; McCollum, F T; Cole, N A; MacDonald, J C

    2012-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of wet distillers grain plus solubles (WDG; <15% sorghum grain) concentration in steam-flaked corn (SFC) diets on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, and diet digestibility. In Exp. 1, six hundred crossbred steers (364 ± 35 kg of BW) were used in a randomized complete block design with 8 replications/treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a dry-rolled corn (DRC) control diet without WDG, a SFC control without WDG, and SFC with 4 WDG concentrations (15, 30, 45, 60% DM basis) replacing SFC, cottonseed meal, urea, and yellow grease. Final BW, ADG, G:F, HCW, and 12th-rib fat depth were greater (P ≤ 0.05) for SFC compared with DRC. Dry matter intake tended (P = 0.06) to be greater for DRC compared with SFC. Final BW, ADG, G:F, HCW, 12th-rib fat depth, and marbling score decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with increasing WDG concentration. In Exp. 2, six ruminally and duodenally cannulated crossbred steers (481 ± 18 kg of BW) were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design using the same diets as Exp. 1. Ruminal, postruminal, and total tract OM and NDF digestibility were not different (P > 0.14) for DRC compared with SFC. Ruminal and total tract starch digestibility were greater (P < 0.01) for SFC compared with DRC. Dry matter and OM intake were not different (P ≥ 0.43) among WDG treatments. Ruminal and total tract OM digestibility decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with increasing WDG concentration. Intake, ruminal digestibility, and total tract digestibility of NDF increased linearly (P < 0.01) with increasing WDG concentration. Starch intake decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with increasing WDG concentration. Ruminal starch digestibility increased (P = 0.01) with increasing concentration of WDG. Total tract starch digestibility decreased quadratically (P < 0.01) with increasing concentration of WDG. Feeding SFC improved steer performance compared with DRC. The concentration of WDG and corn

  8. Effect of maize silage to grass silage ratio and feed particle size on ruminal fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, B; Boguhn, J; Rodehutscord, M

    2011-02-01

    The effect of the forage source on ruminal fermentation in vitro was investigated for fine (F) and coarse (C) milled diets, using a modified Hohenheim gas production test and a semi-continuous rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). It was hypothesised that the replacement of maize silage by grass silage might lead to associative effects and that interactions related to particle size variation could occur. Five diets with a maize silage to grass silage ratio of 100 : 0, 79 : 21, 52 : 48, 24 : 76 and 0 : 100 differed in their content of CP and carbohydrate fractions, as well as digestible crude nutrients, derived from a digestibility trial with wether sheep. For in vitro investigations, the diets were ground to pass a sieve of either 1 mm (F) or 4 mm (C) perforation. Cumulative gas production was recorded during 93 h of incubation and its capacity decreased with increasing proportion of grass silage in the diet. Across all diets, gas production was delayed in C treatments compared with F treatments. Degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fractions was determined in a Rusitec system. Daily amounts of NH3-N and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were measured in the effluent. Degradation of organic matter (OM) and fibre fractions, as well as amounts of NH3-N, increased with stepwise replacement of maize silage by grass silage. Degradability of CP was unaffected by diet composition, as well as total SCFA production. In contrast to the results of the gas production test, degradation of OM and CP was higher in C than in F treatments, accompanied by higher amounts of NH3-N and SCFA. Interactions of silage ratio and particle size were rare. It was concluded that the stepwise replacement of maize silage by grass silage might lead to a linear response of most fermentation characteristics in vitro. This linear effect was also supported by total tract digestibility data. However, further investigations with silages of variable quality seem to be necessary.

  9. Prevalence and characteristics of lactose non-fermenting Escherichia coli in urinary isolates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yu, Jinkyung; Lee, Hyeyoung; Ryu, Hyejin; Park, Kanggyun; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-11-01

    Recently, serotype O75 was found to be prominent among the non-ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, and they were all lactose non-fermenters. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of lactose non-fermenters in urinary isolates of E. coli. A total of 167 E. coli isolates was collected. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were determined by VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France). The lactose non-fermenters underwent PCR-based O typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, phylogenetic grouping. For ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, the resistance mechanisms were investigated. Thirty-three (19.7%) isolates were lactose non-fermenters and the ciprofloxacin resistance rate was significantly higher than in lactose fermenters (66.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.0002). According to the serotype, O75 was the most common (42.4%, 14/33) and was followed by O16 (5/33), O2 (4/33), O25b (3/33), O15 (1/33), O6 (1/33), O1 (1/33). All the O75 isolates were ciprofloxacin-resistant and belonged to ST1193. By MLST, they were resolved into 11 STs. ST1193 was the most common (14/33) and was followed by ST131 (8/33). Interestingly, 8 isolates of ST131 were divided into three O types [O16 (4 isolates), O25b (3), and non-typeable (1)]. The ciprofloxacin resistance rate was high in isolates of O75-ST1193 and O25b-ST131 but low in O16-ST131 and O2-ST95. All the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates showed identical triple mutations in gyrA and parC but the serotype O25b isolates had an additional mutation in parC (E84V). Only one isolate harbored aac(6')-Ib-cr variant and no qnr gene was detected. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence and clonal composition of the lactose non-fermenters is needed.

  10. Evaluation of feeding glycerol on free-fatty acid production and fermentation kinetics of mixed ruminal microbes in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strategies to enrich ruminant-derived foods with unsaturated fatty acids are desired as these are considered beneficial for good human health. Ruminant-derived foods contain high proportions of saturated fats, a result of ruminal biohydrogenation, which rapidly saturates and thus limits the availab...

  11. Effects of zinc-treated soybean meal on ruminal fermentation and intestinal amino acid flows in steers fed corn silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Cecava, M J; Hancock, D L; Parker, J E

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of feeding zinc-treated soybean meal (Zn-SBM) on ruminal fermentation patterns and duodenal AA flows in steers fed diets based on corn silage and corn. Six steers (385 kg) fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were used in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design experiment with 14-d periods. Diets were supplemented with solvent-extracted soybean meal (SBM), Zn-SBM, or a 50:50 combination (CP basis) of SBM:Zn-SBM. Ruminal escape N content of SBM and Zn-SBM were 30.0 and 57.0%, respectively, based on 12-h Dacron bag incubation. Protein sources provided approximately 30% of total CP in diets containing 12.6% CP (DM basis). Dry matter intake was equalized throughout the study at 2.2% of average initial BW. Total N flow at the duodenum was similar (P = .47) among treatments, but a trend (P = .15) for increased nonmicrobial N flow occurred when SBM and Zn-SBM were fed in combination. Micobial N flow and true efficiency of microbial CP synthesis were not affected by treatment (P = .87 and .37, respectively). Ruminal fermentation characteristics generally were unaffected (P > .10) by protein source. A positive quadratic response (P < .06) was observed for total and essential AA flows to the small intestine because flows of total and essential AA from ruminally undegraded dietary protein tended (P = .12) to increase when SBM and Zn-SBM were fed in combination. Absorption of AA from the small intestine also showed a positive quadratic (P < .06) response for SBM:Zn-SBM. Microbial AA flow to the small intestine was similar (P = .87) among treatments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Influence of Yeast Fermented Cassava Chip Protein (YEFECAP) and Roughage to Concentrate Ratio on Ruminal Fermentation and Microorganisms Using In vitro Gas Production Technique.

    PubMed

    Polyorach, S; Wanapat, M; Cherdthong, A

    2014-01-01

    . succinogenes, R. flavefaciens, R. albus, methanogens and protozoal population were decreased (p<0.01) with decreasing R:C ratio. In conclusion, YEFECAP has a potential for use as a protein source for improving rumen fermentation efficiency in ruminants.

  13. Influence of Yeast Fermented Cassava Chip Protein (YEFECAP) and Roughage to Concentrate Ratio on Ruminal Fermentation and Microorganisms Using In vitro Gas Production Technique

    PubMed Central

    Polyorach, S.; Wanapat, M.; Cherdthong, A.

    2014-01-01

    . succinogenes, R. flavefaciens, R. albus, methanogens and protozoal population were decreased (p<0.01) with decreasing R:C ratio. In conclusion, YEFECAP has a potential for use as a protein source for improving rumen fermentation efficiency in ruminants. PMID:25049924

  14. Effects of disodium fumarate on ruminal fermentation and microbial communities in sheep fed on high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y W; McSweeney, C S; Wang, J K; Liu, J X

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of disodium fumarate (DF) on fermentation characteristics and microbial populations in the rumen of Hu sheep fed on high-forage diets. Two complementary feeding trials were conducted. In Trial 1, six Hu sheep fitted with ruminal cannulae were randomly allocated to a 2 × 2 cross-over design involving dietary treatments of either 0 or 20 g DF daily. Total DNA was extracted from the fluid- and solid-associated rumen microbes, respectively. Numbers of 16S rDNA gene copies associated with rumen methanogens and bacteria, and 18S rDNA gene copies associated with rumen protozoa and fungi were measured using real-time PCR, and expressed as proportion of total rumen bacteria 16S rDNA. Ruminal pH decreased in the DF group compared with the control (P < 0.05). Total volatile fatty acids increased (P < 0.001), but butyrate decreased (P < 0.01). Addition of DF inhibited the growth of methanogens, protozoa, fungi and Ruminococcus flavefaciens in fluid samples. Both Ruminococcus albus and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens populations increased (P < 0.001) in particle-associated samples. Trial 2 was conducted to investigate the adaptive response of rumen microbes to DF. Three cannulated sheep were fed on basal diet for 2 weeks and continuously for 4 weeks with supplementation of DF at a level of 20 g/day. Ruminal samples were collected every week to analyze fermentation parameters and microbial populations. No effects of DF were observed on pH, acetate and butyrate (P > 0.05). Populations of methanogens and R. flavefaciens decreased in the fluid samples (P < 0.001), whereas addition of DF stimulated the population of solid-associated Fibrobacter succinogenes. Population of R. albus increased in the 2nd to 4th week in fluid-associated samples and was threefold higher in the 4th week than control week in solid samples. Analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints revealed that there were significant changes in rumen

  15. Influence of fermentable carbohydrates or protein on large intestinal and urinary metabolomic profiles in piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R; Neumann, K; Kröger, S; Richter, J F; Wang, J; Martin, L; Bindelle, J; Htoo, J K; Vahjen, V; Van Kessel, A G; Zentek, J

    2012-12-01

    It was recently shown that variations in the ratio of dietary fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) and fermentable protein (fCP) differentially affect large intestinal microbial ecology and the mucosal response. Here we investigated the use of mass spectrometry to profile changes in metabolite composition in colon and urine associated with variation in dietary fCHO and fCP composition and mucosal physiology. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP and low fCHO, low fCP and high fCHO, high fCP and low fCHO, and high fCP and high fCHO. After 21 to 23 d, all pigs were euthanized and colon digesta and urine metabolite profiles were obtained by mass spectrometry. Analysis of mass spectra by partial least squares approach indicated a clustering of both colonic and urinary profiles for each pig by feeding group. Metabolite identification and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways revealed increased abundance of metabolites associated with arachidonic acid metabolism in colon of pigs fed a high concentration of fCP irrespective of dietary fCHO. Urinary metabolites did not show as clear patterns. Mass spectrometry can effectively differentiate metabolite profiles in colon contents and urine associated with changes in dietary composition. Whether metabolite profiling is an effective tool to identify specific metabolites (biomarkers) or metabolite profiles associated with gut function and integrity needs further elucidation.

  16. Ability of Acidaminococcus fermentans to oxidize trans-aconitate and decrease the accumulation of tricarballylate, a toxic end product of ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G M; Wells, J E; Russell, J B

    1994-01-01

    Mixed ruminal bacteria convert trans-aconitate to tricarballylate, a tricarboxylic acid which chelates blood divalent cations and decreases their availability (J. B. Russell and P. J. Van Soest, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 47:155-159, 1984). Decreases in blood magnesium in turn cause a potentially fatal disease known as grass tetany. trans-Aconitate was stoichiometrically reduced to tricarballylate by Selenomonas ruminantium, a common ruminal bacterium in grass-fed ruminants (J. B. Russell, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 49:120-126, 1985). When mixed ruminal bacteria were enriched with trans-aconitate, a trans-aconitate-oxidizing bacterium was also isolated (G. M. Cook, F. A. Rainey, G. Chen, E. Stackebrandt, and J. B. Russell, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:576-578, 1994). The trans-aconitate-oxidizing bacterium was identified as Acidaminococcus fermentans, and it converted trans-aconitate to acetate, a nontoxic end product of ruminal fermentation. When S. ruminantium and A. fermentans were cocultured with trans-aconitate and glucose, tricarballylate never accumulated and all the trans-aconitate was converted to acetate. Continuous-culture studies (dilution rate, 0.1 h-1) likewise indicated that A. fermentans could outcompete S. ruminantium for trans-aconitate. When mixed ruminal bacteria were incubated in vitro with 10 mM trans-aconitate for 24 h, 45% of the trans-aconitate was converted to tricarballylate. Tricarballylate production decreased 50% if even small amounts of A. fermentans were added to the incubation mixes (0.01 mg of protein per mg of mixed bacterial protein). When A. fermentans (2 g of bacterial protein) was added directly to the rumen, the subsequent conversion of trans-aconitate to tricarballylate decreased 50%, but this effect did not persist for more than 18 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8074529

  17. Effect of select nitrocompounds on ruminal fermentation; an initial look at their potential to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Callaway, Todd R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Jung, Yong Soo; Edrington, Thomas S; Nisbet, David J

    2003-10-01

    Methane production by ruminal microbes during the digestion of feedstuffs is an inefficient process resulting in losses of 2-12% of the gross energy consumed by ruminants. Presently, we report the effect of three inhibitors on ruminal methane production in vitro. Mixed populations of ruminal microbes collected from cannulated cows maintained on an alfalfa hay:corn diet (50:50) were incubated at 39 degrees C for 24 h under a 100% carbon dioxide gas phase in closed tubes with 72 mM added sodium formate. Cultures were supplemented with 12 mM 2-nitropropanol, nitroethane or nitroethanol (experiment 1) or with 2, 12 or 24 mM nitroethane or a combination of 12 mM nitroethane and 4 mM nitroethanol (experiment 2). Control cultures containing no added nitrocompound were incubated simultaneously with treated incubations. Methane concentrations were reduced (P<0.05) from those measured in control incubations (27.6 +/- 2.1 and 17.7 +/- 0.8 micromol/ml; mean +/- SD for experiments 1 and 2, respectively) by at least 57% and as much as 94% in the nitrocompound supplemented incubations. By comparison, the widely fed methane inhibitor, monensin, typically reduces ruminal methane production by about 33%. Concentrations of volatile fatty acids and ammonia that accumulated in the nitrocompound supplemented incubations were not markedly affected compared to those produced by control cultures despite the reductions in methane produced. Hydrogen accumulated only slightly in cultures supplemented with the nitrocompounds. These results demonstrate that 2-nitropropanol, nitroethane and nitroethanol inhibit ruminal methane production. Further research is warranted to determine the mechanisms responsible for this inhibition and to see if these inhibitors can be used in practical application to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methanogenesis.

  18. Effect of slow-release urea inclusion in diets containing modified corn distillers grains on total tract digestibility and ruminal fermentation in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-08-01

    Ruminal degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit may result when cattle are fed diets containing a greater inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). This deficit may arise from greater proportions of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and RUP in corn grain. Urea-derived N is 100% DIP; however, rates of degradation of carbohydrates and conventional urea (CU) may not match. Therefore, beneficial effects may result from the use of slow-release urea (SRU) sources over CU when added to DIP-deficient diets. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing DIP concentration through inclusion of 1 of 2 SRU sources or CU in DG-containing feedlot diets on ruminal fermentation and total tract digestibility. In addition, an in situ experiment was conducted to characterize N disappearance of urea sources from polyester bags. Four ruminally cannulated steers (initial BW = 588 ± 8 kg) were arranged in a 4 × 4 Latin square design and assigned randomly to 1 of 4 dietary treatments containing 0% (CON) or 0.6% urea in the form of CU (UREA) or SRU as Optigen II (polymer-encapsulated urea; OPTI) or NitroShure (lipid-encapsulated urea; NITRO), and 30% corn earlage, 20% modified corn DG with solubles, 7.8% corn silage, 4.3% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DM basis). Dietary DIP was estimated at 6.6% and 8.3% for CON and urea-containing dietary treatments, respectively. Steers were fed ad libitum once daily. Differences in purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index between treatments were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Intake of OM, digestibility of OM, NDF, CP, and starch, ruminal pH, total VFA ruminal concentration, and PDC index were not affected by treatment ( ≥ 0.21). Concentration of ammonia-N noticeably peaked at 4 h after feed delivery for cattle fed UREA (treatment × time, = 0.06) and measured at least 5.5 mg/dL for any treatment and at any hour after feed delivery

  19. Effects of feeding corn silage inoculated with microbial additives on the ruminal fermentation, microbial protein yield, and growth performance of lambs.

    PubMed

    Basso, F C; Adesogan, A T; Lara, E C; Rabelo, C H S; Berchielli, T T; Teixeira, I A M A; Siqueira, G R; Reis, R A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of feeding corn silage inoculated without or with either Lactobacillus buchneri (LB) alone or a combination of LB and Lactobacillus plantarum (LBLP) on the apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, and growth performance of lambs. Thirty Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred intact males lambs weighing 20.4±3.8 kg were blocked by weight into 10 groups. Lambs in each group were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 dietary treatments: untreated (Control), LB, and LBLP silage. Lambs were fed experimental diets for 61 d. The apparent digestibility was indirectly estimated from indigestible NDF measured on d 57 to 59. Spot urine samples were collected from all animals on d 59 to estimate microbial protein synthesis. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation on d 61 when they weighed 32.4±5.2 kg. Six additional ruminally cannulated Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred wethers weighing 40.5±1.8 kg were used to examine dietary effects on ruminal fermentation. Average daily gain was increased when lambs were fed LBLP silage (P<0.05) but not LB silage. The LBLP silage had the highest (P<0.05) lactic acid concentration and both inoculated silages had greater acetic acid concentrations than the Control silage (P<0.05). Inoculation of corn silage increased intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, total carbohydrate (CHO), and GE by the lambs but decreased digestibility of DM, OM, CP, total and nonstructural carbohydrates, and concentration of GE and ME. (P<0.05). Nevertheless, lambs fed inoculated silages had greater microbial N supply than those on the Control treatment (P<0.05). The acetate to propionate ratio was lower in ruminal fluid of wethers in LBLP treatment than LB and Control treatment (P<0.05) and ruminal pH tended to be greater in LB lambs than in LBLP and Control wethers (P<0.10). Finally, the inoculation with both bacteria combined enhanced the silage fermentation. The intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and GE

  20. Effect of lactic acid bacteria inoculant and beet pulp addition on fermentation characteristics and in vitro ruminal digestion of vegetable residue silage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Cai, Y; Takahashi, T; Yoshida, N; Tohno, M; Uegaki, R; Nonaka, K; Terada, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beet pulp (BP) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal dry matter (DM) digestion of vegetable residues, including white cabbage, Chinese cabbage, red cabbage, and lettuce. Silage was prepared using a small-scale fermentation system, and treatments were designed as control silage without additive or with BP (30% fresh matter basis), LAB inoculant Chikuso-1 (Lactobacillus plantarum, 5mg/kg, fresh matter basis), and BP+LAB. In vitro incubation was performed using rumen fluid mixed with McDougall's artificial saliva (at a ratio of 1:4, vol/vol) at 39°C for 6h to determine the ruminal fermentability of the vegetable residue silages. These vegetable residues contained high levels of crude protein (20.6-22.8% of DM) and moderate levels of neutral detergent fiber (22.7-33.6% of DM). In all silages, the pH sharply decreased and lactic acid increased, and the growth of bacilli, coliform bacteria, molds, and yeasts was inhibited by the low pH at the early stage of ensiling. The silage treated with BP or LAB had a lower pH and a higher lactic acid content than the control silage. After 6h of incubation, all silages had relatively high DM digestibility (38.6-44.9%); in particular, the LAB-inoculated silage had the highest DM digestibility and the lowest methane production. The vegetable residues had high nutritional content and high in vitro DM digestibility. Also, both the addition of a LAB inoculant and moisture adjustment with BP improved the fermentation quality of the vegetable residue silages. In addition, LAB increased DM digestibility and decreased ruminal methane production. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of pH and fermentative substrate on ruminal metabolism of fatty acids during short-term in vitro incubation.

    PubMed

    Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Palagiano, C; Enjalbert, F

    2014-08-01

    The ruminal biohydrogenation of c9,c12-18:2 can be affected by the fibre/starch ratio of the diet and the ruminal pH. The objectives of this study were to examine independently in vitro the effects of fermentation substrate (hay vs. corn starch) and buffer pH (6 vs. 7) on the biohydrogenation of c9,c12-18:2 carried out by grape seed oil, focusing on its t11 and t10 pathways, using 6-h ruminal incubations. The experimental design was a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Fermentation substrate and pH affected the C18 fatty acid balance in incubated media, but few interactions were observed. Compared with starch, hay as the fermentation substrate favoured the production of 18:0 (×2.3), all trans-18:1 isomers (×12.6) and CLA (×6.1), except c9,t11-CLA, and the disappearance of unsaturated C18 fatty acids, but decreased the production of odd and branched chain fatty acids. Compared with pH 6 buffer, pH 7 buffer resulted in higher c9,c12-18:2 disappearance and CLA production. For c9,t11-CLA, an interaction was noticed between the two factors, leading to the highest production in cultures incubated on hay with the 7 pH buffer. Compared with starch, hay as fermentation substrate favoured the activity of t11 producers, which are fibrolytic bacteria, and the production of t10 isomers, possibly due to the presence of potential t10 producers in hay. Low pH resulted in a decreased t11 isomers production and in a slightly increased t10 isomers production, probably due to a modulation of enzymatic or bacterial activity.

  2. Effects of three benzimidazole anthelmintics on the ruminal fermentation ability of sheep.

    PubMed

    Jara, W; Sumano, H; Ocampo, L

    1984-12-01

    The effects of albendazole, fenbendazole and oxfendazole on the fermentation ability of the rumen were assessed in 12 Dorset sheep, using as parameters volatile fatty acid concentration, percentage digestibility of cellulose in vitro and pH. Although the digestibility of cellulose was affected only at high concentrations, volatile fatty acid concentrations were markedly reduced after treatment. Correlation coefficient analysis revealed a significant correlation between digestibility of cellulose and volatile fatty acids, as well as between volatile fatty acids and pH. Despite an evident decrease in volatile fatty acids and digestibility of cellulose, it is suggested that this does not outweigh the advantages derived from the use of these benzimidazoles.

  3. Effect of unconventional oilseeds (safflower, poppy, hemp, camelina) on in vitro ruminal methane production and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopu; Kreuzer, Michael; Braun, Ueli; Schwarm, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Dietary supplementation with oilseeds can reduce methane emission in ruminants, but only a few common seeds have been tested so far. This study tested safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), poppy (Papaver somniferum), hemp (Cannabis sativa), and camelina (Camelina sativa) seeds in vitro using coconut (Cocos nucifera) oil and linseed (Linum usitatissimum) as positive controls. All the tested oilseeds suppressed methane yield (mL g(-1) dry matter, up to 21%) compared to the non-supplemented control when provided at 70 g oil kg(-1) dry matter, and they were as effective as coconut oil. Safflower and hemp were more effective than linseed (21% and 18% vs. 10%), whereas the effects of poppy and camelina were similar to linseed. When methane was related to digestible organic matter, only hemp and safflower seeds and coconut oil were effective compared to the non-supplemented control (up to 11%). The level of methanogenesis and the ratios of either the n-6:n-3 fatty acids or C18:2 :C18:3 in the seed lipids were not related. Unconventional oilseeds widen the spectrum of oilseeds that can be used in dietary methane mitigation. In vivo confirmation of their methane mitigating effect is still needed, and their effects on animal performance still must be determined. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Changes in total and individual proteins during drying, ensiling, and ruminal fermentation of forages.

    PubMed

    Messman, M A; Weiss, W P; Koch, M E

    1994-02-01

    Effects of wilting, drying, and ensiling on concentrations of proteins in alfalfa, crown vetch, perennial ryegrass, orchardgrass, and tall fescue were studied using SDS-PAGE. Seven to nine proteins were identified in the samples. Wilting forages for 24 h on a laboratory bench had little effect on the relative amounts of proteins. Drying forage (on a laboratory bench) for 5 d resulted in a 25 to 30% loss in electrophoretically identified proteins. A 45-kDa protein was more susceptible to hydrolysis during drying than were most other proteins. After ensiling, < 10% of the proteins in fresh alfalfa and fescue remained, but crown vetch silage contained 46% of its original proteins. A 54-kDa protein was extremely susceptible to hydrolysis during ensiling, but a 30-kDa protein was relatively resistant. Fresh forage and hay samples were incubated in vitro for 5 h to determine degradation of proteins. In general, the 54-kDa protein was most susceptible, and the 30-kDa protein was least susceptible, to ruminal hydrolysis. Certain proteins in hay were more degradable than those in fresh forage. Among fresh forages, alfalfa and fescue contained the lowest concentrations of undegradable proteins. Differences among forage species were considerably less for hay samples.

  5. Nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation, microbial abundances, and milk yield and composition in dairy goats fed diets including tomato and cucumber waste fruits.

    PubMed

    Romero-Huelva, M; Ramos-Morales, E; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2012-10-01

    The effects of replacing 35% of cereals-based concentrate with feed blocks (FB) containing waste fruits of tomato, cucumber, or barley grain in diets for lactating goats on nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation, microbial N flow to the duodenum, milk yield and quality, methane emissions, and abundances of total bacteria and methanogens were studied. Eight Murciano-Granadina goats (39.4 ± 5.39 kg of body weight, mean ± SD) in the middle of the third lactation were used and 4 diets were studied in a replicated 4×4 Latin square experimental design. Diets consisted of alfalfa hay (A) plus concentrate (C) in a 1:1 ratio (diet AC) or diets in which 35% of the concentrate was replaced with FB including wastes of tomato fruit, cucumber, or barley. In each period, 2 goats were randomly assigned to 1 of the dietary treatments. Intakes of FB including tomato, cucumber, and barley were 208 ± 65, 222 ± 52, and 209 ± 83 g of dry matter per animal and day, respectively. The replacement of 35% of concentrate with FB did not compromise nutrient apparent digestibility, total purine derivative urinary excretion, milk yield and composition, and total bacteria and methanogen abundances. Digestible energy and that in methane and urine were higher for AC than for FB-containing diets, whereas the metabolizable energy value was not affected by diet. The inclusion of tomato and cucumber fruits in FB decreased N in urine and CH(4) emissions compared with AC, which is environmentally relevant. However, tomato-based FB decreased microbial N flow in the rumen, whereas goats fed cucumber-based FB had the highest values for this measurement. Moreover, FB containing barley or tomato and cucumber led to lower rumen volatile fatty acid and NH(3)-N concentrations, respectively. Milk from goats fed diets including tomato and cucumber-based FB had higher linoleic, linolenic, and total polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations than that from goats fed AC. Overall, our study suggests that

  6. Effects of increasing amounts of corn dried distillers grains with solubles in dairy cow diets on methane production, ruminal fermentation, digestion, N balance, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Julien, C; Petit, H V; Massé, D I

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of including corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in the diet at the expense of corn and soybean meal on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, digestion (in sacco and apparent total-tract digestibility), N balance, and milk production of dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein cows were used in a triplicated 4×4 Latin square design (35-d periods) and fed (ad libitum intake) a total mixed ration containing (dry matter basis) 0, 10, 20, or 30% DDGS. Dry matter intake increased linearly, whereas apparent-total tract digestibility of dry matter and gross energy declined linearly as DDGS level in the diet increased. Increasing the proportion of DDGS in the diet decreased the acetate:propionate ratio, but this decrease was the result of reduced acetate concentration rather than increased propionate concentration. Milk yield increased linearly (up to +4kg/d) with increasing levels of DDGS in the diet and a tendency was observed for a quadratic increase in energy-corrected milk as the proportion of DDGS in the diet increased. Methane production decreased linearly with increasing levels of DDGS in the diet (495, 490, 477, and 475 g/d for 0, 10, 20, and 30% DDGS diets, respectively). When adjusted for gross energy intake, CH4 losses also decreased linearly as DDGS proportion increased in the diet by 5, 8, and 14% for 10, 20, and 30% DDGS diets, respectively. Similar decreases (up to 12% at 30% DDGS) were also observed when CH4 production was corrected for digestible energy intake. When expressed relative to energy-corrected milk, CH4 production declined linearly as the amount of DDGS increased in the diet. Total N excretion (urinary and fecal; g/d) increased as the amount of DDGS in the diet increased. Efficiency of N utilization (milk N secretion as a proportion of N intake) declined linearly with increasing inclusion of DDGS in the diet. However, productive N increased linearly with

  7. Effects of ruminal protein degradability and frequency of supplementation on site and extent of digestion and ruminal fermentation characteristics in lambs fed low-quality forage.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R L; Toone, C D; Ludden, P A

    2010-02-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated Suffolk wether lambs (34.5 +/- 2.0 kg initial BW) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square-designed experiment to examine the effects of ruminal protein degradability and supplementation frequency on site and extent of digestion in lambs consuming a low-quality forage diet. Wethers were fed a basal diet of mature crested wheatgrass hay (4.2% CP) for ad libitum consumption plus 1 of 4 supplements: 1) a high RDP supplement provided daily (RDP-D), 2) the high RDP supplement provided on alternate days (RDP-A), 3) a high RUP supplement provided on alternate days (RUP-A), or 4) a 50:50 mixture of the RDP and RUP supplements, provided on alternate days (MIX-A). Forage OM, N, NDF, or ADF intakes were not affected by treatment. True ruminal OM digestibility was greater (P < 0.001) for MIX-A lambs compared with other treatments. True ruminal N digestibility was less (P < 0.01) in RUP-A lambs compared with other treatments. Ruminal digestibilities of NDF and ADF were greater (P ruminal ammonia concentrations compared with RDP-D lambs, with RUP-A lambs exhibiting the least concentrations and least variation over time. Ruminal urease activity was not affected by treatment. Microbial N flow was not affected by treatment; however, there was an increase (P = 0.004) in microbial efficiency for RDP-D lambs. Alternate day protein supplementation with a mixture of RDP and RUP may improve digestibility in lambs consuming low-quality forage, which may be related to decreased fluctuation in ruminal ammonia concentrations as a result of greater endogenous N recycling.

  8. The effects of active dried and killed dried yeast on subacute ruminal acidosis, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Uwizeye, A; Mohammed, R; Yang, W Z; Walker, N D; Beauchemin, K A

    2014-02-01

    The study addressed the importance of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) viability for reducing the incidence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and improving total tract nutrient digestibility in beef heifers. Six ruminally cannulated beef heifers (680 ± 50 kg BW) were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design and were fed a diet consisting of 40% barley silage, 10% chopped grass hay, and 50% barley grain-based concentrate (DM basis). Treatments were 1) no yeast (Control), 2) active dried yeast (ADY; 4 g providing 10(10) cfu/g; AB Vista, Marlborough, UK), and 3) killed dried yeast (KDY; 4 g autoclaved ADY). The treatments were directly dosed via the ruminal cannula daily at the time of feeding. The periods consisted of 2 wk of adaptation (d 1 to 14) and 7 d of measurements (d 15 to 21). Ruminal pH was continuously measured (d 15 to 21) using an indwelling system. Ruminal contents were sampled on d 15 and 17 at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after feeding. Total tract nutrient digestibility was measured using an external marker (YbCl3) from d 15 to 19. No treatment difference was observed for DMI (P = 0.86). Yeast supplementation (ADY and KDY) tended to increase total tract digestibility of starch (P = 0.07) whereas no effects were observed on digestibility of other nutrients. Both ADY and KDY elevated minimum (P < 0.01) and mean ruminal pH (P = 0.02) whereas no effects were observed on maximum pH (P = 0.12). Irrespective of its viability, yeast supplementation was effective in reducing time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (P < 0.01) and 5.6 (P < 0.01). No treatment differences were observed for the ruminal VFA profile and lactate concentration. No treatment differences were observed on the relative population size of Streptococcus bovis, Fibrobacter succinogenes, and Megasphaera elsdenii (P > 0.10); however, the proportion of Ruminococcus flavefaciens in solid fraction of digesta was greater with KDY (P = 0.05). The study demonstrates the positive effects of yeast

  9. Effects of garlic and juniper berry essential oils on ruminal fermentation and on the site and extent of digestion in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Yang, W Z; Benchaar, C; Ametaj, B N; Chaves, A V; He, M L; McAllister, T A

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding essential oils from garlic (GAR) and juniper berry (JUN), or monensin (MO) on feed intake, ruminal fermentation, the site and extent of digestion, microbial protein synthesis, milk production, and immune status in dairy cows. Four midlactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods and 4 treatments: control (no additive), MO (330 mg/cow per d), GAR (5 g/cow per d), and JUN (2 g/cow per d). Cows were fed ad libitum a TMR consisting of 40% forage and 60% barley-based concentrate. Dry matter intake averaged 20.4 kg/d and was not affected by dietary additives. Total tract digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, fiber, and starch were not affected by experimental treatments. However, ruminal digestibilities of dry matter and organic matter were higher (+13%) for GAR and JUN than for the control diet, mainly because of increased crude protein digestion in the rumen. Feeding GAR and JUN increased ruminal digestion of dietary protein by 11% as compared with the control. In contrast, ruminal digestion of dietary protein was reduced by 11% with MO as compared with the control. Milk fat content was lower for MO (2.68%) than for the GAR (3.46%), JUN (3.40%), and control (3.14%) diets. No effects of GAR, JUN, or MO were observed on milk production, ruminal microbial protein synthesis, ruminal pH, and ruminal concentrations of volatile fatty acids and ammonia N. The total and differential numbers of white blood cells as well as serum amyloid A and haptoglobin were not affected by the treatments, suggesting that additives had no effect on the immune status of cows. Results of this study indicate that supplementing dairy cows with GAR (5 g/d) and JUN (2 g/d) essential oils improved feed digestibility in the rumen, but possibly at the expense of a reduction in the flow of bypass protein to the small intestine. Feeding monensin could

  10. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride are not confined to mammalian tissue: evidence for direct effects of ractopamine hydrochloride supplementation on fermentation by ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Walker, C E; Drouillard, J S

    2010-02-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on ruminal fermentation and proteolysis. In Exp. 1, in vitro gas and VFA production was measured in flasks incubated with 0, 0.226, 2.26, 22.6, and 226.0 mg of RAC/L of buffered ruminal fluid. Ractopamine hydrochloride had a quadratic effect on in vitro gas production (P < 0.05; 177, 181, 185, 190, and 170 mL for 0, 0.226, 2.26, 22.6, and 226.0 mg, respectively). Total VFA production was not significantly changed with RAC (P > 0.50). In Exp. 2, IVDMD was measured with tubes incubated with 0, 0.226, 2.26, or 22.6 mg of RAC/L of buffered ruminal fluid with 4 substrate combinations: corn, corn plus soybean meal, corn plus urea, and corn plus soybean meal plus urea. Dry matter disappearance was measured after 2, 4, 6, 8, or 12 h of fermentation. There was an interaction between RAC and substrate (P < 0.01), with more degradable forms of nitrogen eliciting greater IVDMD from RAC. Significant main effects also were detected for RAC, substrate, and hour (P < 0.001). In Exp. 3, AA and ammonia were measured in tubes treated with 0 or 2.26 mg of RAC/L of buffered ruminal fluid. Tubes were incubated for 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, or 240 min. There were decreases in ammonia and AA concentrations with RAC (P < 0.001). Experiment 4 used 16 ruminally fistulated Holstein steers in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors consisted of grain processing method (steam-flaked or dry-rolled corn), concentration of dried distillers grains (DG) with solubles (0 or 25% DG, DM basis), and concentration of RAC (0 or 200 mg/d). Ruminal ammonia concentrations were less when RAC was fed in combination with dry-rolled corn, but not when RAC was fed in conjunction with steam-flaked corn (grain processing x RAC, P < 0.01). Addition of RAC, steam-flaked corn, and DG all resulted in reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations (P < 0.01). Amino acid concentrations were

  11. Influence of CO sub 2 and low concentrations of O sub 2 on fermentative metabolism of the ruminal ciliate Polyplastron multivesiculatum

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.E.; Lloyd, D. ); McIntyre, P.S.; Saleh, M. ); Williams, A. )

    1991-05-01

    The effects of ruminal concentrations of CO{sub 2} and oxygen on the end products of endogenous metabolism and fermentation of D-glucose by the ruminal entodiniomorphid ciliate Polyplastron multivesiculatum were investigated. The principal metabolic products were butyric, acetic, and lactic acids, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identified glycerol as a previously unknown major product of D-(1-{sup 13}C) glucose fermentation by this protozoan. Metabolite formation rates were clearly influenced by the headspace gas composition. In the presence of 1 to 3 {mu}M O{sub 2}, acetate, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} formation was partially depressed. A gas headspace with a high CO{sub 2} content (66 kPa) was found to suppress hydrogenosomal pathways and to favor butyrate accumulation. Cytochromes were not detected ({lt}2 pmol/mg of protein) in P. multivesiculatum; protozoal suspensions, however, consumed O{sub 2} for up to 3 h at 1 kPa of O{sub 2}. Under gas phases of {gt}2.6 kPa of O{sub 2}, the organisms rapidly became vacuolate and the cilia became inactive. The results suggest that fermentative pathways in P. multivesiculatum are influenced by the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} concentrations that prevail in situ in the rumen.

  12. Effect of ensiling process of total mixed ration on fermentation profile, nutrient loss and in situ ruminal degradation characteristics of diet.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Makoto; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Nonaka, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    This experiment aimed to determine the changes in chemical composition, fermentation profile, in situ disappearance characteristics, and nutrient losses of ensiled total mixed ration (TMR) containing steam-flaked corn or brown rice (BR) during storage. TMRs for dairy cows, containing either steam-flaked corn or BR at 31.9% with 15.2% rye silage, 40.5% alfalfa silage, 5.0% beet pulp and 7.0% soybean meal, were prepared (dry matter (DM) basis). Each TMR was placed in a plastic drum silo, stored at 23°C in an air-conditioned room and sampled 0, 7, 14, 30, 90 and 210 days after preparation. In both grain sources, the fermentation products increased, while DM and starch storage losses increased and starch content greatly decreased during storage. The rapidly degradable fraction and effective ruminal degradability of DM, crude protein and starch increased during storage. These changes of dietary characteristics were large during 30 days of storage, but small after 90 days of storage. Replacing corn with BR led to increased fermentation products, starch loss and effective ruminal degradability of the ensiled TMR. These results indicate that the ensiling process of TMR changes the dietary characteristics and replacing corn with BR in TMR had a large impact on these dietary characteristics. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Effects of the methane-inhibitors nitrate, nitroethane, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae Chaetoceros on ruminal fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bozic, A K; Anderson, R C; Carstens, G E; Ricke, S C; Callaway, T R; Yokoyama, M T; Wang, J K; Nisbet, D J

    2009-09-01

    The effects of several methane-inhibitors on rumen fermentation were compared during three 24h consecutive batch cultures of ruminal microbes in the presence of nonlimiting amounts of hydrogen. After the initial incubation series, methane production was reduced greater than 92% from that of non-treated controls (25.8+/-8.1 micromol ml(-1) incubation fluid) in cultures treated with nitroethane, sodium laurate, Lauricidin or a finely-ground product of the marine algae, Chaetoceros (added at 1, 5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), respectively) but not in cultures treated with sodium nitrate (1 mg m1(-1)). Methane production during two successive incubations was reduced greater than 98% from controls (22.5+/-3.2 and 23.5+/-7.9 micromol ml(-1), respectively) by all treatments. Reductions in amounts of volatile fatty acids and ammonia produced and amounts of hexose fermented, when observed, were most severe in sodium laurate-treated cultures. These results demonstrate that all tested compounds inhibited ruminal methane production in our in vitro system but their effects on fermentation differed.

  14. Effects of dietary fiber and feeding frequency on ruminal fermentation, digesta water-holding capacity, and fractional turnover of contents.

    PubMed

    Froetschel, M A; Amos, H E

    1991-03-01

    To determine the effects of different sources of fiber and feeding frequency on digesta water-holding capacity (WHC; g H2O/g DM) and ruminal liquid contents, four ruminally fistulated Jersey steers were fed a 60:40 roughage-concentrate diet at 1.5 times NEm. Diets contained either sorghum silage (SS) or a 67:33 mixture of SS and soyhulls (SH) as roughage and were fed either once or 12 times daily, in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment with 15-d periods. Ruminal fluid was sampled at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after a dose of Co-EDTA on d 10 and analyzed for Co, VFA, ammonia, buffering capacity, and osmolality. Ruminal WHC, NDF, ADF, lignin, and starch were measured in samples obtained by ruminal evacuation at 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after feeding on d 11, 12, 14, and 15, respectively. Substitution of SH for SS decreased ruminal pH .32 units and dilution rate by 26.8% but increased total VFA by 10.9%, osmolality by 13.6%, and the fractional turnover rate (FTR) of ADF by 22.5% (P less than .05). Frequent feeding resulted in 4.7, 21.9, and 74.4% increases in total VFA and FTR of ruminal DM and starch (P less than .05), respectively. Interactions (P less than .05) were observed between dietary fiber source and feeding frequency for ruminal fluid molar percentage acetate to propionate ratio (A/P), liquid volume (evacuated), and WHC (kilograms). Substituting SH for SS decreased ruminal WHC (kilograms), liquid volume, and A/P only in steers fed once daily. Ruminal WHC (kilograms) was correlated positively with ruminal liquid volume but negatively with DM FTR. The dynamics of digesta WHC (kilograms) associated with dietary fiber source and feeding frequency suggest that it may influence the contribution of water and salivary secretions to ruminal liquid contents.

  15. Effects of ethyl-3-nitrooxy propionate and 3-nitrooxypropanol on ruminal fermentation, microbial abundance, and methane emissions in sheep.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, G; Abecia, L; Arco, A; Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Martín-García, A I; Molina-Alcaide, E; Kindermann, M; Duval, S; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of feeding ethyl-3-nitrooxy propionate (E3NP) and 3-nitrooxypropanol (3 NP), 2 recently developed compounds with potential antimethanogenic activity, in vitro and in vivo in nonlactating sheep on ruminal methane production, fermentation pattern, the abundance of major microbial groups, and feed degradability. Three experiments were conducted, 1 in vitro and 2 in vivo. The in vitro batch culture trial (experiment 1) tested 2 doses of E3NP and 3 NP (40 and 80 μL/L), which showed a substantial reduction of methane production (up to 95%) without affecting concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The 2 in vivo trials were conducted over 16 d (experiment 2) and 30 d (experiment 3) to study their effects in sheep. In experiment 2, 6 adult nonpregnant sheep, with permanent rumen cannula and fed alfalfa hay and oats (60:40), were treated with E3NP at 2 doses (50 and 500 mg/animal per day). After 7, 14, and 15 d of treatment, methane emissions were recorded in respiration chambers and rumen fluid samples were collected for VFA analysis and quantification of bacterial, protozoal, and archaeal numbers by real-time PCR. Methane production decreased by 29% compared with the control with the higher dose of E3NP on d 14 to 15. A decrease in the acetate:propionate ratio was observed without detrimental effects on dry matter intake. In experiment 3, 9 adult nonpregnant sheep, with permanent rumen cannula and fed with alfalfa hay and oats (60:40), were treated with E3NP or 3 NP at one dose (100mg/animal per day) over 30 d. On d 14 and d 29 to 30, methane emissions were recorded in respiration chambers. Rumen fluid samples were collected on d 29 and 30 for VFA analysis and quantification of bacterial, protozoal, and archaeal numbers by real-time PCR. In addition, on d 22 and 23, samples of oats and alfalfa hay were incubated in the rumen of sheep to determine dry matter ruminal degradation over 24 and 48 h, respectively; no

  16. The Effect of Plant Extracts on In-vitro Ruminal Fermentation, Methanogenesis and Methane-related Microbes in the Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E. T.; Min, K. -S.; Kim, C. -H.; Moon, Y. H.; Kim, S. C.; Lee, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The effect on methanogens attached to the surface of rumen ciliate protozoa by the addition of plant extracts (pine needles and ginkgo leaves) was studied with particular reference to their effectiveness for decreasing methane emission. The plant extracts (pine needles and ginkgo leaves) were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with rumen fluid. The microbial population including bacteria, ciliated-associated methanogen, four different groups of methanogens and Fibrobacter succinogenes were quantified by using the real-time PCR. Gas profiles including methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and runinal fermentation characteristics were observed in vitro. The methane emission from samples with an addition of individual juices from pine needles, ginkgo leaves and 70% ethanol extract from ginko leaves was significantly lower (p<0.05, 27.1, 28.1 and 28.1 vs 34.0 ml/g DM) than that of the control, respectively. Total VFAs in samples with an addition of any of the plant extracts were significantly lower than that of the control (p<0.05) as well. The order Methanococcales and the order Methanosarcinales were not detected by using PCR in any incubated mixtures. The ciliate-associated methanogens population decreased from 25% to 49% in the plant extacts as compared to control. We speculate that the supplementation of juice from pine needles and ginkgo leaves extract (70% ethanol extract) decreased the protozoa population resulting in a reduction of methane emission in the rumen and thus inhibiting methanogenesis. The order Methanobacteriales community was affected by addition of all plant extracts and decreased to less than the control, while the order Methanomicrobiales population showed an increase to more than that of the control. The F. succinogenes, the major fibrolytic microorganism, population in all added plant extracts was increased to greater than that of the control. In conclusion, pine needles and ginkgo leaves extracts appear to have properties that

  17. Effects of chestnut tannins and coconut oil on growth performance, methane emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Vaddella, V; Zhou, D

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chestnut tannins (CT) and coconut oil (CO) on growth performance, methane (CH₄) emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep. A total of 48 Rideau Arcott sheep (average body weight 31.5±1.97 kg, 16 wk old) were randomly assigned into 6 treatment groups in a 3 × 2 factorial design, with CT and CO as the main effects (8 sheep per group). The treatments were control diet (CTR), 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet (CT10 and CT30), 25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CO25), and 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet+25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CT10CO25 and CT30CO25). After the feeding trial (60 d), all sheep were moved to respiratory chambers to measure CH₄ emission. After CH₄ emission measurements, all sheep were slaughtered to obtain rumen fluid samples. Results showed that the addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO had no significant effects on growth performance of sheep but reduced CH₄ emission. Addition of CT reduced the NH₃-N concentration in rumen fluid in CT30. Addition of CO decreased the concentration of total volatile fatty acids in rumen fluid. No significant differences were observed in pH and molar proportion of volatile fatty acids among treatments. Addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO significantly decreased methanogen and protozoa populations. Moreover, CO decreased counts of Fibrobacter succinogenes. No significant differences were observed in populations of fungi, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, or Ruminococcus albus among treatments. In conclusion, supplementation of CT and CO seemed to be a feasible means of decreasing emissions of CH₄ from sheep by reduction of methanogen and protozoa populations with no negative effect on growth performance. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Shifts in Rumen Fermentation and Microbiota Are Associated with Dissolved Ruminal Hydrogen Concentrations in Lactating Dairy Cows Fed Different Types of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Xie, Tian Yu; Janssen, Peter H; Sun, Xue Zhao; Beauchemin, Karen A; Tan, Zhi Liang; Gao, Min

    2016-09-01

    Different carbohydrates ingested greatly influence rumen fermentation and microbiota and gaseous methane emissions. Dissolved hydrogen concentration is related to rumen fermentation and methane production. We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrates ingested greatly alter the rumen environment in dairy cows, and that dissolved hydrogen concentration is associated with these changes in rumen fermentation and microbiota. Twenty-eight lactating Chinese Holstein dairy cows [aged 4-5 y, body weight 480 ± 37 kg (mean ± SD)] were used in a randomized complete block design to investigate effects of 4 diets differing in forage content (45% compared with 35%) and source (rice straw compared with a mixture of rice straw and corn silage) on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial populations. Feed intake (10.7-12.6 kg/d) and fiber degradation (0.584-0.692) greatly differed (P ≤ 0.05) between cows fed the 4 diets, leading to large differences (P ≤ 0.05) in gaseous methane yield (27.2-37.3 g/kg organic matter digested), dissolved hydrogen (0.258-1.64 μmol/L), rumen fermentation products, and microbiota. Ruminal dissolved hydrogen was negatively correlated (r < -0.40; P < 0.05) with molar proportion of acetate, numbers of fungi, abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes, and methane yield, but positively correlated (r > 0.40; P < 0.05) with molar proportions of propionate and n-butyrate, numbers of methanogens, and abundance of Selenomonas ruminantium and Prevotella spp. Ruminal dissolved hydrogen was positively correlated (r = 0.93; P < 0.001) with Gibbs free energy changes of reactions producing greater acetate and hydrogen, but not correlated with those reactions producing more propionate without hydrogen. Changes in fermentation pathways from acetate toward propionate production and in microbiota from fibrolytic toward amylolytic species were closely associated with ruminal dissolved hydrogen in lactating dairy cows. An unresolved paradox was that greater dissolved

  19. Effects of garlic oil, nitrate, saponin and their combinations supplemented to different substrates on in vitro fermentation, ruminal methanogenesis, and abundance and diversity of microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K; Yu, Z

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of garlic oil (G), nitrate (N), saponin (S) and their combinations supplemented to different forage to concentrate substrates on methanogenesis, fermentation, diversity and abundances of bacteria and Archaea in vitro. The study was conducted in an 8 × 2 factorial design with eight treatments and two substrates using mixed ruminal batch cultures obtained. Quillaja S (0·6 g l(-1) ), N (5 mmol l(-1) ) and G (0·27 g l(-1) ) were used separately or in binary and tertiary combinations. The two substrates contained grass hay and a dairy concentrate mixture at a 70 : 30 (high-forage substrate) ratio or a 30 : 70 (high-concentrate substrate) ratio. Ruminal fermentation and cellulolytic bacterial populations were affected by interaction between substrate and anti-methanogenic compounds. The inhibitor combinations decreased the methane production additively regardless of substrate. For the high-concentrate substrate, S decreased methane production to a greater extent, so did G and N individually for the high-forage substrate. Feed degradability and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were not decreased by any of the treatments. Fibre degradability was actually improved by N+S for the high-forage substrate. VFA concentrations and profiles were affected differently by different anti-methanogenic inhibitors and their combinations. All treatments inhibited the growth of Archaea, but the effect on Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus and Ruminococcus flavefaciens varied. The results suggest that substrate influences the efficacy of these inhibitors when they are used separately, but in combinations, they can lower methanogenesis additively without much influence from the substrate. The presented research provided evidence that binary and tertiary combination of garlic oil, nitrate and saponin can lower the methane production additively without adversely impacting rumen fermentation and degradability, and forage to concentrate ratio

  20. Pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn: 3. Effects on ruminal fermentation, pH, and microbial protein efficiency in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Voelker, J A; Allen, M S

    2003-11-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on ruminal fermentation, pH, and microbial efficiency were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79 +/- 17 (mean +/- SD) DIM at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a DM basis. Diet concentrations of NDF and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% beet pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% beet pulp), 28.0, and 26.5% (12% beet pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% beet pulp), respectively. Substituting beet pulp for corn did not affect daily mean or minimum ruminal pH but tended to reduce pH range. Ruminal acetate:propionate responded in a positive exponential relationship to added beet pulp. Rate of valerate absorption from the rumen was not affected by treatment. Substituting beet pulp for corn up to 24% of diet DM did not affect efficiency of ruminal microbial protein production, expressed as microbial N flow to the duodenum as a percentage of OM truly digested in the rumen. Microbial efficiency was not correlated to mean pH or daily minimum pH. While microbial efficiency was not directly related to concentration of beet pulp fed, it was positively correlated with passage rate of particulate matter, as represented by starch and indigestible NDF, probably due to reduced turnover of microbial protein in the rumen.

  1. Effect of feeding legumes containing condensed tannins with orchardgrass on ruminal fermentation and methane production in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Developing feeding strategies that allow farmers to reduce methane (CH4) emissions from livestock is gaining interest worldwide. Legumes containing condensed tannins (CT) have been shown to decrease enteric CH4 in ruminants; however, research is lacking on how increased CT levels affect ruminal ferm...

  2. Digestibility, ruminal fermentation, ingesta kinetics and nitrogen utilisation in dairy cows fed diets based on silage of a brown midrib or a standard maize hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, Tobias; Hüther, Liane; Meyer, Ulrich; Lebzien, Peter; Breves, Gerhard; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to investigate an experimental brown midrib (Bm) maize hybrid in comparison with a control (Con) non-Bm maize hybrid on ruminal and total tract digestibility, ruminal fermentation, ruminal ingesta kinetics, nitrogen (N) utilisation and microbial efficiency. A total of six ruminally and duodenally cannulated German Holstein cows were used. Animals were fed diets of either 11.5 kg dry matter (DM) of a Con or a Bm maize silage plus 4.1 kg DM of concentrate. Ruminal and total tract digestibility of organic matter, neutral detergent fibre and acid detergent fibre did not differ between hybrids. Short-chain fatty acid concentrations and pH in the rumen were not affected, but ruminal mean retention time was lower for Diet Bm (Con: 45.4 ± 2.39 h; Bm: 40.6 ± 2.39 h; least squares means ± standard error). Cows fed Diet Bm had greater efficiency of N utilisation (Con: 30.1 ± 1.37%; Bm: 33.1 ± 1.37%) and increased flow of microbial crude protein at the duodenum (MCPF) (Con: 7.0 ± 0.37 g/MJ metabolisable energy (ME); Bm: 8.1 ± 0.37 g/MJ ME). Thus, MCPF and utilisable crude protein at the duodenum (uCP) were greater for Diet Bm (MCPF - Con: 1117 ± 52.1 g/d; Bm: 1306 ± 52.1 g/d; uCP - Con: 1594 ± 57.9 g/d; Bm: 1807 ± 57.9 g/d) and ruminal N balance was lower for Diet Bm (Con: 98.7 ± 8.92 g/d; Bm: 65.6 ± 8.92 g/d). The present results show that the Bm maize hybrid might be advantageous for dairy cow nutrition with regard to N utilisation and MCPF. However, further research is necessary to draw more precise conclusions on the potential of Bm maize hybrids in general.

  3. Rapid Fermentable Substance Modulates Interactions between Ruminal Commensals and Toll-Like Receptors in Promotion of Immune Tolerance of Goat Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong; Lu, Zhongyan; Chen, Zhan; Wu, Yufeng; Shen, Zanming

    2016-01-01

    Whether dietary non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC), a rapid fermentable substance, affects immune homeostasis of rumen through the modulation of interactions of ruminal microbiota and epithelial toll-like receptors (TLRs) remains unclear. A combination of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCRs was applied to study the synergetic responses of ruminal microbiota and epithelial TLRs to the dietary NFC switch from 15 to 31% in the goat model. The results showed that the 31% NFC diet caused the radical increases on the richness and diversity of rumen microbiota. The phylum Verrucomicrobia was most significantly expanded, whereas opportunistic pathogens, namely Rikenella, Anaeroplasma, and Olsenella, were significantly decreased. In rumen epithelium, the significantly increased expressions of TLR1, 6, 10 were associated with the significantly decreased expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1ß), IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Constrained correlation analysis indicated that the increased abundance of commensal bacteria in Verrucomicrobia subdivision 5 contributed to the upregulation of TLR10 expression. Finally, the significantly increased concentrations of rumen short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), coupled with the significantly upregulated expressions of epithelial genes related to SCFA absorption were observed in goats fed with 31% NFC diet. Thus, the NFC-induced expansion of rumen microbiota promoted epithelium tolerance by enhancement of the intensity of TLR10 signaling. The newly established equilibrium benefited to the transport of ruminal energy substances into the blood. PMID:27909428

  4. Effects of feeding polyphenol-rich winery wastes on digestibility, nitrogen utilization, ruminal fermentation, antioxidant status and oxidative stress in wethers.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kyohei; Kishi, Yosuke; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Four wethers were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the availability of two types of winery wastes, winery sediment and grape pomace, as ruminant feeds possessing antioxidant activities. Each wether was assigned to one of the following four treatments: (i) 75 g/kg winery sediment (WS) on a dry matter (DM) basis; (ii) 166 g/kg DM winery grape pomace (WP); (iii) control diet (CD; 17 g/kg DM soybean meal);and (iv) only tall fescue hay (TFH; no additive). Winery sediment and grape pomace had high levels of polyphenols and of radical scavenging activities. Feeding with winery sediment and grape pomace did not negatively affect the intake, but it depressed crude protein (CP) digestibility compared with CD (P = 0.052 and P < 0.01 for WS and WP, respectively). Polyphenols in winery wastes decreased ruminal ammonia production (P = 0.089 and P < 0.05), likely due to their inhibitive effect on microbial activities in the rumen. The addition of winery sediment and grape pomace decreased urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG; an index of oxidative damages) excretion per day (P < 0.05 and P = 0.059). The results indicated that winery sediment and grape pomace could alter nitrogen metabolism and/or act as new antioxidants for ruminants.

  5. Effects of addition of essential oils and monensin premix on digestion, ruminal fermentation, milk production, and milk composition in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Petit, H V; Berthiaume, R; Whyte, T D; Chouinard, P Y

    2006-11-01

    Four ruminally cannulated, lactating Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design (28-d periods) with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to study the effects of dietary addition of essential oils (0 vs. 2 g/d; EO) and monensin (0 vs. 350 mg/d; MO) on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, milk production, and milk composition. Intake of dry matter averaged 22.7 kg/d and was not significantly affected by dietary additives. Apparent digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and starch were similar among treatments. Apparent digestibility of acid detergent fiber was increased when diets were supplemented with EO (48.9 vs. 46.0%). Apparent digestibility of crude protein was higher for cows fed MO compared with those fed no MO (65.0 vs. 63.6%). Nitrogen retention was not changed by additive treatments and averaged 27.1 g/d across treatments. Ruminal pH was increased with the addition of EO (6.50 vs. 6.39). Ruminal ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration was lower with MO-supplemented diets compared with diets without MO (12.7 vs. 14.3 mg/100 mL). No effect of EO and MO was observed on total volatile fatty acid concentrations and molar proportions of individual volatile fatty acids. Protozoa counts were not affected by EO and MO addition. Production of milk and 4% fat-corrected milk was similar among treatments (33.6 and 33.4 kg/d, respectively). Milk fat content was lower for cows fed MO than for cows fed diets without MO (3.8 vs. 4.1%). The reduced milk fat concentration in cows fed MO was associated with a higher level of trans-10 18:1, a potent inhibitor of milk fat synthesis. Milk urea nitrogen concentration was increased by MO supplementation, but this effect was not apparent when MO was fed in combination with EO (interaction EO x MO). Results from this study suggest that feeding EO (2 g/d) and MO (350 mg/d) to lactating dairy cows had limited effects on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, milk

  6. Effects of increasing level of corn distillers dried grains with solubles on intake, digestion, and ruminal fermentation in steers fed seventy percent concentrate diets.

    PubMed

    Leupp, J L; Lardy, G P; Karges, K K; Gibson, M L; Caton, J S

    2009-09-01

    Five ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (500 +/- 5 kg of initial BW) were used in a 5 x 5 Latin square to evaluate effects of increasing level of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) in growing diets (70% concentrate) on OM intake, site of digestion, ruminal fermentation, and microbial efficiency. Diets consisted of 30% grass hay, 6% concentrated separator by-product, 4% supplement, and 60% dry-rolled corn, sunflower meal, urea, or DDGS (DM basis). Treatments consisted of increasing DDGS at 0, 15, 30, 45, or 60% of diet DM replacing a combination of dry-rolled corn, sunflower meal, and urea. Diets were balanced for growing steers gaining 1.22 kg/d and included 0.25% (DM basis) chromic oxide as a digesta flow marker. Diets were offered to the steers for ad libitum intake each day (10% above the intake of the previous day). Each period consisted of 14 d for adaptation and 7 d for collections. Intake of OM responded quadratically (P = 0.004) with greatest intakes at 15% DDGS and least at 60% DDGS. No differences (P >or= 0.14) were observed in CP intake or duodenal flow of OM, CP, and NDF. Apparent and true ruminal OM digestibilities decreased (linear; P fermented) was not affected (P = 0.22) by treatment. As DDGS increased, ruminal pH increased (linear; P = 0.004), whereas ammonia concentration remained unchanged (P = 0.42). Acetate proportions decreased (linear; P < 0.001) with increasing DDGS, whereas propionate and butyrate were not affected (P >or= 0.19). A cubic (P = 0.02) effect was observed for total ruminal fill (as is basis) with the greatest fill at 0% DDGS and the least fill at 45% inclusion. Replacing dry-rolled corn with up to 60% DDGS in 70% concentrate diets resulted in no adverse effects on

  7. In vitro ruminal fermentation characteristics and utilisable CP supply of sainfoin and birdsfoot trefoil silages and their mixtures with other legumes.

    PubMed

    Grosse Brinkhaus, A; Wyss, U; Arrigo, Y; Girard, M; Bee, G; Zeitz, J O; Kreuzer, M; Dohme-Meier, F

    2017-04-01

    The extensive protein degradation occurring during ensiling decreases the nutritive value of silages, but this might be counteracted by tannins. Therefore, silages from two legume species containing condensed tannins (CT) - sainfoin (SF) and birdsfoot trefoil (two cultivars: birdsfoot trefoil, cv. Bull (BTB) and birdsfoot trefoil, cv. Polom) - were compared for their in vitro ruminal fermentation characteristics. The effect of combining them with two CT-free legume silages (lucerne (LU) and red clover (RC)) was also determined. The supply of duodenally utilisable CP (uCP) in the forages was emphasised. The legumes were each harvested from three field sites. After 24 h of wilting on the field, the legumes were ensiled in laboratory silos for 86 days. Proximate constituents, silage fermentation characteristics, CT content and CP fractions were determined. Subsequently, silage samples and 1 : 1 mixtures of the CT-containing and CT-free silages were incubated for 24 h in batch cultures using ruminal fluid and buffer (1 : 2, v/v). Each treatment was replicated six times in six runs. The effects on pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acid concentrations, protozoal counts, and total gas and methane production were determined. uCP content was calculated by considering the CP in the silage and the ammonia in the incubation fluid from treatments and blanks. Statistical evaluation compared data from single plants alone and together with that from the mixtures. Among treatments, SF silage contained the least CP and the most CT. The non-protein nitrogen content was lower, favouring neutral detergent soluble and insoluble protein fractions, in the SF and RC silages. Absolute uCP content was lowest in SF and SF mixtures, although the ratio to total CP was the highest. In comparison with LU, the ammonia concentration of the incubation fluid was lower for SF, RC and BTB and for the mixture of SF with LU. The total gas and methane production was similar among the treatments, and the

  8. Effect of feeding mixed microbial culture fortified with trace minerals on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen and trace mineral balance in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Kwak, W S; Kim, Y I; Choi, D Y; Lee, Y H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of feeding trace mineralsfortified mixed microbial culture (TMC) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, blood electrolyte status, nitrogen balance, and trace mineral balance in sheep. Mixed microbes [0.6 % (v/w) of Enterobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Saccharomyces sp.] were cultured with 99 % feedstuffs and 0.4 % trace minerals including zinc and copper for ensiling. Six sheep (a mean body weight of 46.5 ± 1.2 kg) were fed two diets: a control diet (concentrate mix and rye straw) and an experimental diet (a control diet + 3.1 % TMC). TMC feeding did not induce negative effects on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, blood electrolytes, and nitrogen balance in sheep. Feeding with TMC increased the intake of trace minerals (p < 0.05) and did not affect absorption of trace minerals in the whole digestive tract. Feeding with TMC increased fecal excretion and absorbable intake, and retention of zinc and copper (p < 0.05) by 71 % and 77 %, respectively. Feeding with TMC resulted in higher zinc and copper bioavailability and retention without any adverse effects on sheep performance.

  9. Effects of Two Halophytic Plants (Kochia and Atriplex) on Digestibility, Fermentation and Protein Synthesis by Ruminal Microbes Maintained in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Riasi, A.; Mesgaran, M. Danesh; Stern, M. D.; Ruiz Moreno, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Eight continuous culture fermenters were used in a completely randomized design to evaluate various nutritional values of Kochia (Kochia scoparia) compared with Atriplex (Atriplex dimorphostegia). Dried and pelleted samples (leaves and stems) provided substrate for metabolism by ruminal microbes maintained in a continuous culture fermentation system. Results indicated that there were no differences (p>0.05) in dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) digestibility between the two halophytic plants. Atriplex had higher (p<0.05) organic matter (OM) digestibility compared with Kochia. Neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) digestibility of Atriplex (411 g/kg) was higher (p<0.05) than that of Kochia (348 g/kg), however acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibility was higher (p<0.05) in Kochia compared with Atriplex (406 vs. 234 g/kg). There were no differences (p>0.05) between the two halophytic plants in molar proportion of acetate and propionate, but the concentration of butyrate and valerate in Kochia were about two fold of Atriplex (p<0.05). When Kochia provided substrate to the microbes, protein synthesis was higher (p<0.05) compared with feeding Atriplex (5.96 vs. 4.85 g N/kg of OM truly digested). It was concluded that Kochia scoparia and Atriplex dimorphostegia had similar digestibility of DM and CP. It appears that these halophytic plants may not have enough digestible energy for high producing ruminants. PMID:25049608

  10. Chemical Composition, In vitro Gas Production, Ruminal Fermentation and Degradation Patterns of Diets by Grazing Steers in Native Range of North Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, M.; Herrera, E.; Carrete, F. O.; Ruiz, O.; Serrato, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to quantify annual and seasonal differences in the chemical composition, in vitro gas production, in situ degradability and ruminal fermentation of grazing steers’ diets. Diet samples were collected with four esophageal cannulated steers (350±3 kg BW); and four ruminally cannulated heifers (342±1.5 kg BW) were used to study the dry matter degradation and fermentation in rumen. Data were analyzed with repeated measurements split plot design. The crude protein, in vitro dry matter digestibility and metabolizable energy were higher during the first year of trial and in the summer (p<0.01). The values of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc and copper were higher in summer (p<0.05). The gas produced by the soluble and insoluble fractions, as well as the constant rate of gas production were greater in summer and fall (p<0.01). The ammonia nitrogen (NH3N) and total volatile fatty acids concentrations in rumen, the soluble and degradable fractions, the constant rate of degradation and the effective degradability of DM and NDF were affected by year (p<0.05) and season (p<0.01). Our study provides new and useful knowledge for the formulation of protein, energetic and mineral supplements that grazing cattle need to improve their productive and reproductive performance. PMID:25049495

  11. Effect of dietary physically effective fiber on ruminal fermentation and the fatty acid profile of milk in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Li, Zongjun; Li, Shengxiang; Ferguson, James D; Cao, Yangchun; Yao, Junhu; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to characterize the relationship among rumen fermentation variables, milk fatty acid profile, and dietary physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) content in a study that controlled for the potential confounding effects of dissimilar dry matter intake among treatments. Ten multiparous Xinong Saanen dairy goats were divided into 2 groups with 2 ruminally cannulated goats per group. Goats in each group were assigned to 1 of 2 dietary treatments (high and low peNDF) according to a 2×2 crossover design with 2 periods. The peNDF content of alfalfa hay (proportion of neutral detergent fiber retained on an 8.0-mm screen) was 42.1% for the high-peNDF and 14.5% for the low-peNDF group. To ensure similar dry matter intake, each morning the amount of alfalfa hay consumed on the prior day by the high-peNDF group was determined (amount offered minus morning refusals), and this was the amount of hay offered to the low-peNDF group that day. Each adaptation period consisted of 21d, followed by a 9-d sampling period. Dry matter intake and milk production and composition were similar between treatments. Milk energy efficiency increased with low dietary peNDF. Duration of pH below 5.60 was longer for goats fed the low-peNDF ration compared with the high-peNDF ration (4.08 vs. 0.41h/d); however, mean rumen pH (6.05 vs. 6.13) was not different between treatments. Reducing dietary peNDF increased rumen total volatile fatty acids (114.6 vs. 95.1mM) and decreased chewing time (404 vs. 673min/d), but did not affect the ratios of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The relative abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens increased with reduced dietary peNDF, but Ruminococcus albus proportions were not influenced by treatment. Reducing dietary peNDF decreased the proportion of iso C14:0, iso C15:0, and trans-11 C18:1 in milk fat, whereas the iso C17:0 and trans-10 C18:1 increased. This study demonstrated that low

  12. Fermentation Characteristics, Tannin Contents and In vitro Ruminal Degradation of Green Tea and Black Tea By-products Ensiled at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Makoto; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Kita, Kazumi; Jayanegara, Anuraga; Yokota, Hiro-omi

    2014-01-01

    Green and black tea by-products, obtained from ready-made tea industry, were ensiled at 10°C, 20°C, and 30°C. Green tea by-product silage (GTS) and black tea by-product silage (BTS) were opened at 5, 10, 45 days after ensiling. Fermentation characteristics and nutrient composition, including tannins, were monitored and the silages on day 45 were subjected to in vitro ruminal fermentation to assess anti-nutritive effects of tannins using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a tannin-binding agent. Results showed that the GTS and BTS silages were stable and fermented slightly when ensiled at 10°C. The GTS stored at 20°C and 30°C showed rapid pH decline and high acetic acid concentration. The BTS was fermented gradually with moderate change of pH and acid concentration. Acetic acid was the main acid product of fermentation in both GTS and BTS. The contents of total extractable phenolics and total extractable tannins in both silages were unaffected by storage temperatures, but condensed tannins in GTS were less when stored at high temperature. The GTS showed no PEG response on in vitro gas production, and revealed only a small increase by PEG on NH3-N concentration. Storage temperature of GTS did not affect the extent of PEG response to both gas production and NH3-N concentration. On the other hand, addition of PEG on BTS markedly increased both the gas production and NH3-N concentration at any ensiled temperature. It can be concluded that tannins in both GTS and BTS suppressed rumen fermentation, and tannins in GTS did more weakly than that in BTS. Ensiling temperature for both tea by-products did not affect the tannin’s activity in the rumen. PMID:25050034

  13. Effect of lauric acid and coconut oil on ruminal fermentation, digestion, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; Vander Pol, M; Agle, M; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P; Vaddella, V K; Johnson, K; Shingfield, K J; Karnati, S K R

    2009-11-01

    This experiment (replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design) was conducted to investigate the effects of lauric acid (LA) or coconut oil (CO) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition in lactating cows. Treatments consisted of intraruminal doses of 240 g of stearic acid/d (SA; control), 240 g of LA/d, or 530 g of CO/d administered once daily, before feeding. Between periods, cows were inoculated with ruminal contents from donor cows and allowed a 7-d recovery period. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield, or milk composition. Ruminal pH was slightly increased by CO compared with the other treatments, whereas LA and CO decreased ruminal ammonia concentration compared with SA. Both LA and CO decreased protozoal counts by 80% or more compared with SA. Methane production rate in the rumen was reduced by CO compared with LA and SA, with no differences between LA and SA. Treatments had no effect on total tract apparent dry matter, organic matter, N, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility coefficients or on cumulative (15 d) in vitro ammonia losses from manure. Compared with SA, LA and CO increased milk fat 12:0, cis-9 12:1, and trans-9 12:1 content and decreased 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, cis-9 10:1, 16:0, 18:0, cis 18:1, total 18:2, 18:3 n-3 and total polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Administration of LA and 14:0 (as CO) in the rumen were apparently transferred into milk fat with a mean efficiency of 18 and 15%, respectively. In conclusion, current data confirmed that LA and CO exhibit strong antiprotozoal activity when dosed intraruminally, an effect that is accompanied by decreases in ammonia concentration and, for CO, lowered methane production. Administration of LA and CO in the rumen also altered milk FA composition.

  14. Milk composition, milk fatty acid profile, digestion, and ruminal fermentation in dairy cows fed whole flaxseed and calcium salts of flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Côrtes, C; da Silva-Kazama, D C; Kazama, R; Gagnon, N; Benchaar, C; Santos, G T D; Zeoula, L M; Petit, H V

    2010-07-01

    Four ruminally lactating Holstein cows averaging 602+/-25 kg of body weight and 64+/-6 d in milk at the beginning of the experiment were randomly assigned to a 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of feeding whole flaxseed and calcium salts of flaxseed oil on dry matter intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, milk production and composition, and milk fatty acid profile. The treatments were a control with no flaxseed products (CON) or a diet (on a dry matter basis) of 4.2% whole flaxseed (FLA), 1.9% calcium salts of flaxseed oil (SAL), or 2.3% whole flaxseed and 0.8% calcium salts of flaxseed oil (MIX). The 4 isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were fed for ad libitum intake. Experimental periods consisted of 21 d of diet adaptation and 7 d of data collection and sampling. Dry matter intake, digestibility, milk production, and milk concentrations of protein, lactose, urea N, and total solids did not differ among treatments. Ruminal pH was reduced for cows fed the CON diet compared with those fed the SAL diet. Propionate proportion was higher in ruminal fluid of cows fed CON than in that of those fed SAL, and cows fed the SAL and CON diets had ruminal propionate concentrations similar to those of cows fed the FLA and MIX diets. Butyrate concentration was numerically higher for cows fed the SAL diet compared with those fed the FLA diet. Milk fat concentration was lower for cows fed SAL than for those fed CON, and there was no difference between cows fed CON and those fed FLA and MIX. Milk yields of protein, fat, lactose, and total solids were similar among treatments. Concentrations of cis-9 18:1 and of intermediates of ruminal biohydrogenation of fatty acids such as trans-9 18:1 were higher in milk fat of cows fed SAL and MIX than for those fed the CON diet. Concentration of rumenic acid (cis-9, trans-11 18:2) in milk fat was increased by 63% when feeding SAL compared with FLA. Concentration of alpha-linolenic acid was higher in milk fat of cows

  15. Effects of extruding wheat dried distillers grains with solubles with peas or canola meal on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, nutrient digestion, and milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Claassen, R M; Christensen, D A; Mutsvangwa, T

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to examine the effects of feeding coextruded and nonextruded supplements consisting of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles with peas (WDDGS-peas) or canola meal (WDDGS-CM) on ruminal fermentation, omasal flow, and production performance in Holstein cows. Eight cows (4 ruminally cannulated) were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square with 28-d periods and a 2×2 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments. Dietary treatments were coextruded or nonextruded mixtures of WDDGS-peas and WDDGS-CM that were included in total mixed rations at 15.1% [dry matter (DM) basis]. Diet had no effect on DM intake. Milk yield was greater in cows fed coextruded diets compared with those fed nonextruded diets. Milk fat content was greater in cows fed nonextruded diets compared with those fed coextruded diets, but milk fat yield was greater in cows fed coextruded diets compared with those fed nonextruded diets. Milk yield tended to be greater and milk protein yield was greater in cows fed WDDGS-peas compared with those fed WDDGS-CM. Cows fed nonextruded diets had a greater milk urea-N concentration compared with those fed coextruded diets. Cows fed coextruded diets had greater ruminal digestion of DM and tended to have greater ruminal digestion of organic matter compared with those fed nonextruded diets. Total-tract digestibilities of organic matter, crude protein, ether extract, and starch were greater, whereas that of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber tended to be greater in cows fed coextruded compared with those fed nonextruded diets. Total-tract digestibility of ether extract was lower whereas that of starch was greater and that of crude protein tended to be greater in cows fed WDDGS-peas compared with those fed WDDGS-CM. Total N excretion and milk N efficiency were unaffected by diet. Ruminal NH3-N concentration tended to be greater in cows fed WDDGS-CM compared with those fed WDDGS-peas. Ruminal propionate concentration was greater whereas

  16. Effects of corn condensed distillers solubles supplementation on ruminal fermentation, digestion, and in situ disappearance in steers consuming low-quality hay.

    PubMed

    Gilbery, T C; Lardy, G P; Soto-Navarro, S A; Bauer, M L; Caton, J S

    2006-06-01

    Two metabolism (4 x 4 Latin square design) experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of corn condensed distillers solubles (CCDS) supplementation on intake, ruminal fermentation, site of digestion, and the in situ disappearance rate of forage in beef steers fed low-quality switchgrass hay (Panicum virgatum L.). Experimental periods for both trials consisted of a 9-d diet adaptation and 5 d of collection. In Exp. 1, 4 ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (561 +/- 53 kg of initial BW) were fed low-quality switchgrass hay (5.1% CP, 40.3% ADF, 7.5% ash; DM basis) and supplemented with CCDS (15.4% CP, 4.2% fat; DM basis). Treatments included 1) no CCDS; 2) 5% CCDS; 3) 10% CCDS; and 4) 15% CCDS (DM basis), which was offered separately from the hay. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (266.7 +/- 9.5 kg of initial BW) were assigned to treatments similar to Exp. 1, except forage (Panicum virgatum L.; 3.3% CP, 42.5% ADF, 5.9% ash; DM basis) and CCDS (21.6% CP, 17.4% fat; DM basis) were fed as a mixed ration, using a forage mixer to blend the CCDS with the hay. In Exp. 1, ruminal, postruminal, and total tract OM digestibilities were not affected (P = 0.21 to 0.59) by treatment. Crude protein intake and total tract CP digestibility increased linearly with increasing CCDS (P = 0.001 and 0.009, respectively). Microbial CP synthesis tended (P = 0.11) to increase linearly with increasing CCDS, whereas microbial efficiency was not different (P = 0.38). Supplementation of CCDS to low-quality hay-based diets tended to increase total DM and OM intakes (P = 0.11 and 0.13, respectively) without affecting hay DMI (P = 0.70). In Exp. 2, ruminal OM digestion increased linearly (P = 0.003) with increasing CCDS, whereas postruminal and total tract OM digestibilities were not affected (P > or = 0.37) by treatment. Crude protein intake, total tract CP digestibility, and microbial CP synthesis increased (P < or = 0.06) with increasing level of CCDS

  17. Treatment of grain with organic acids at 2 different dietary phosphorus levels modulates ruminal microbial community structure and fermentation patterns in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harder, H; Khol-Parisini, A; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Klevenhusen, F; Zebeli, Q

    2015-11-01

    Recent data indicate positive effects of treating grain with citric (CAc) or lactic acid (LAc) on the hydrolysis of phytate phosphorus (P) and fermentation products of the grain. This study used a semicontinuous rumen simulation technique to evaluate the effects of processing of barley with 50.25 g/L (wt/vol) CAc or 76.25 g/L LAc on microbial composition, metabolic fermentation profile, and nutrient degradation at low or high dietary P supply. The low P diet [3.1g of P per kg of dry matter (DM) of dietary P sources only] was not supplemented with inorganic P, whereas the high P diet was supplemented with 0.5 g of inorganic P per kg of DM through mineral premix and 870 mg of inorganic P/d per incubation fermenter via artificial saliva. Target microbes were determined using quantitative PCR. Data showed depression of total bacteria but not of total protozoa or short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration with the low P diet. In addition, the low P diet lowered the relative abundance of Ruminococcus albus and decreased neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradation and acetate proportion, but increased the abundance of several predominantly noncellulolytic bacterial species and anaerobic fungi. Treatment of grain with LAc increased the abundance of total bacteria in the low P diet only, and this effect was associated with a greater concentration of SCFA in the ruminal fluid. Interestingly, in the low P diet, CAc treatment of barley increased the most prevalent bacterial group, the genus Prevotella, in ruminal fluid and increased NDF degradation to the same extent as did inorganic P supplementation in the high P diet. Treatment with either CAc or LAc lowered the abundance of Megasphaera elsdenii but only in the low P diet. On the other hand, CAc treatment increased the proportion of acetate in the low P diet, whereas LAc treatment decreased this variable at both dietary P levels. The propionate proportion was significantly increased by LAc at both P levels, whereas butyrate

  18. Effects of feeding lauric acid on ruminal protozoa numbers, fermentation, and digestion and on milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Faciola, A P; Broderick, G A

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the level of lauric acid (LA) addition to the diet necessary to effectively suppress ruminal protozoa (RP) to the extent observed when a single dose was given directly into the rumen, 2) to assess LA effects on production and ruminal metabolism, and 3) to determine the time needed for RP to reestablish themselves after LA is withdrawn from the diet of lactating dairy cows. In Exp. 1, 2 Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulae were used in a split-plot design pilot study. Both cows consumed the same level of LA, starting with 0 g/d and increasing to 129, 270, and 438 g/d mixed into the diet. Diets were fed as total mixed ration (TMR) and contained (DM basis) 30% corn silage, 30% alfalfa silage, and 40% concentrate. Lauric acid intake linearly decreased DMI (P = 0.03), RP numbers (P < 0.01), ruminal acetate molar proportion (P = 0.03), and ruminal ammonia concentration (P = 0.03). Lauric acid intake linearly increased ruminal valerate molar proportion (P = 0.02). A quadratic response of LA consumption was observed on total ruminal VFA concentration (P < 0.01) and propionate molar proportion (P < 0.01), with maximum responses at 270 g/d of LA intake. A quadratic response of LA consumption was also observed on total ruminal free amino acid (TAA) concentration (P < 0.01), with minimum concentration at 270 g/d of LA intake. After withdrawing the greatest LA dose from the diet, RP returned to their original numbers in 12 d. In Exp. 2, 48 multiparous Holstein cows (8 with ruminal cannulae) were blocked by days in milk into 12 blocks of 4 cows (2 blocks of cannulated cows) and randomly assigned within replicated 4 × 4 Latin squares to balanced dietary treatment sequences. Diets were fed as TMR and contained (DM basis) 36% corn silage, 29% alfalfa silage, and 35% concentrate, and LA intake levels were 0, 220, 404, and 543 g/d mixed in the TMR. In Exp. 2, LA linearly reduced RP (P < 0.01), ruminal ammonia (P < 0.01), and

  19. Effects of Sapindus saponaria fruits on ruminal fermentation and duodenal nitrogen flow of sheep fed a tropical grass diet with and without legume.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A; Carulla, J E; Lascano, C E; Díaz, T E; Kreuzer, M; Hess, H D

    2004-05-01

    observed. The NDF digestibility was decreased with S. saponaria in the grass-alone diet, but not in the legume-supplemented diet (interaction; P < 0.05). Interactions were absent in ruminal fermentation measures and duodenal N flow, indicating that effects were additive. Results suggest that, even when not decreasing ruminal protozoa count, supplementation of S. saponaria fruits is a beneficial way to improve ruminal VFA profile, microbial efficiency, and duodenal flow of microbial protein in sheep fed tropical grass-alone or grass-legume diets.

  20. Effects of increasing levels of corn dried distillers grains with solubles and monensin on intake, digestion, and ruminal fermentation in beef heifers fed high-barley grain diets.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Jin, Y; He, M L; Li, C; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether increasing corn-based dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in high-barley grain diets reduces the merit of using higher levels of monensin by assessing intake, digestibility, and ruminal pH and fermentation in feedlot heifers. Five ruminally and duodenally cannulated Angus heifers (average BW of 599±36 kg) were used in a 5×5 Latin square with a 2×2+1 factorial arrangement. Treatments were control (CON, 10% barley silage, 90% barley-based concentrate, and 28 mg monensin/kg DM) and diets substituting 20% (LDG) or 40% (HDG) DDGS for barley grain with 28 mg (ML) or 48 mg (MH) monensin/kg diet DM: 1) CONML, 2) LDGML, 3) HDGML, 4) LDGMH, and 5) HDGMH. Contrasts compared LDG vs. HDG, ML vs. MH, interactions between DDGS and monensin, and the effect of increasing DDGS in the diet. Increasing DDGS quadratically (P<0.01) increased DMI. There was no interaction for DMI between the dietary inclusion rate of DDGS and the dose of monensin; however, DMI was reduced (P<0.05) for heifers fed MH vs. ML. Ruminal digestibility of OM, NDF, and starch linearly decreased (P<0.01), but intestinal digestibility linearly increased (P<0.01) with increasing DDGS, resulting in no differences in total tract digestibility. Ruminal digestibility of OM was greater (P<0.04) in heifers fed MH than ML; however, the total tract digestibility of OM was not affected. Intake of N, flows of total N, nonammonia N, and dietary N were linearly (P<0.02) increased, and the efficiency of ruminal microbial synthesis linearly (P<0.04) improved with increasing DDGS. Increasing DDGS inclusion linearly decreased (P<0.04) the acetate to propionate ratio. Inclusion of MH decreased (P<0.04) acetate and increased (P<0.05) NH3-N compared to ML, but high monensin did not affect mean ruminal pH, the duration of pH<5.8, 5.5, 5.2, or the area below the curve at pH 5.8, 5.5, and 5.2, indicating that there was no evidence that it modulated ruminal pH. These

  1. Organic acid blend with pure botanical product treatment reduces Escherichia coli and Salmonella populations in pure culture and in in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Ester; Bari, Riccardo; Piva, Andrea; Edrington, Tom S; Pitta, Dipti W; Pinchak, William E; Nisbet, David J; Callaway, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria can live in the intestinal tract of food animals and can be transmitted to humans via food or indirectly through animal or fecal contact. Organic acid blend products have been used as nonantibiotic modifiers of the gastrointestinal fermentation of food animals to improve growth performance efficiency. However, the impact of these organic acid products on the microbial population, including foodborne pathogens, remains unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effects of a commercial organic acid and botanical blend product (OABP) on populations of the foodborne pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. Pure cultures (2×10(6) colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) of each pathogen were added to tubes that contained water-solubilized OABP added at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10% (vol/vol; n=3). Water-solubilized OABP reduced (p<0.05) the growth rate and final populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in pure culture at concentrations >2%. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were added (2×10(5) and 3×10(6) CFU/mL, respectively) to in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations that contained water-solubilized OABP at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10% (vol/vol; n=3) that were incubated for 24 h. OABP addition reduced (p<0.05) final populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in the ruminal fluid at concentrations ≥5%. The acetate-to-propionate ratios from the in vitro fermentations were reduced (p<0.05) by OABP treatment ≥5%. Treatments to reduce foodborne pathogens must be economically feasible to implement, and results indicate that organic acid products, such as OABP, can enhance animal growth efficiency and can be used to reduce populations of pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Substitution of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles for barley grain or barley silage in feedlot cattle diets: intake, digestibility, and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; McAllister, T A; Beauchemin, K A; He, M L; McKinnon, J J; Yang, W Z

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of substituting wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) for barley grain and barley silage on intake, digestibility, and ruminal fermentation in feedlot beef cattle. Eight ruminally cannulated Angus heifers (initial BW 455 ± 10.8 kg) were assigned to a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 4 treatments: control, low (25%), medium (30%), and high (35%) wheat DDGS (DM basis). The diets consisted of barley silage, barley concentrate, and wheat DDGS in ratios of 15:85:0 (CON), 10:65:25 (25DDGS), 5:65:30 (30DDGS), and 0:65:35 (35DDGS; DM basis), respectively. The diets were formulated such that wheat DDGS was substituted for both barley grain and barley silage to evaluate whether wheat DDGS can be fed as a source of both energy (grain) and fiber in feedlot finishing diets. Intakes (kg/d) of DM and OM were not different, whereas those of CP, NDF, ADF, and ether extract (EE) were greater (P < 0.01) and intake of starch was less (P < 0.01) for the 25DDGS compared with the CON diet. The digestibilities of CP, NDF, ADF, and EE in the total digestive tract were greater (P < 0.05) for 25DDGS vs. CON. Ruminal pH and total VFA concentrations were not different (P > 0.15) between 25DDGS and CON diets. Replacing barley silage with increasing amounts of wheat DDGS (i.e., from 25DDGS to 35DDGS) linearly reduced (P < 0.05) intakes of DM and other nutrients without altering (P=0.40) CP intake. In contrast, digestibilities of DM and other nutrients in the total digestive tract linearly increased (P < 0.05) with increasing wheat DDGS except for that of EE. Additionally, with increasing amounts of wheat DDGS, mean ruminal pH tended (P=0.10) to linearly decrease, and ruminal pH status decreased with longer (P=0.04) duration of pH <5.5 and <5.2, and greater (P=0.01) curve area under pH <5.8 and <5.5 without altering (P > 0.19) ruminal VFA and NH(3)-N concentrations. Results indicated that wheat DDGS can be effectively

  3. The effects of a garlic oil chemical compound, propyl-propane thiosulfonate, on ruminal fermentation and fatty acid outflow in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Foskolos, A; Siurana, A; Rodriquez-Prado, M; Ferret, A; Bravo, D; Calsamiglia, S

    2015-08-01

    The ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feeds in the European Union has stimulated research on potential alternatives. Recently, propyl-propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), a stable organosulfurate compound of garlic, was purified. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the potential effects of PTSO on rumen microbial fermentation and to define effective doses. Two experiments were conducted using dual-flow continuous culture fermenters in 2 replicated periods. Each experimental period consisted of 5 d for adaptation of the ruminal fluid and 3 d for sampling. Temperature (39°C), pH (6.4), and liquid (0.10 h(-1)) and solid (0.05 h(-1)) dilution rates were maintained constant. Samples were taken 2 h after feeding and from the 24-h effluent. Samples were analyzed for volatile fatty acids (VFA) and nitrogen fractions, and degradation of nutrients was calculated. In addition, 24-h effluents from experiment 2 were analyzed for their fatty acid (FA) profile. Treatments in experiment 1 included a negative control without additive, a positive control with monensin (12mg/L), and PTSO at 30 and 300mg/L. The addition of 30mg/L did not affect any of the measurements tested. The addition of 300mg/L reduced microbial fermentation, as suggested by the decreased total VFA concentration, true degradation of organic matter and acid detergent fiber, and a tendency to decrease neutral detergent fiber degradation. Experiment 2 was conducted to test increasing doses of PTSO (0, 50, 100, and 150mg/L) on rumen microbial fermentation. At 2 h postfeeding, total VFA and molar proportion of propionate responded quadratically, with higher values in the intermediate doses. Molar proportions of butyrate increased and branched-chain VFA decreased linearly as the dose of PTSO increased. In the 24-h effluents, total VFA, acetate, and branched-chain VFA concentrations decreased linearly and those of propionate responded cubically with the highest value at 100mg

  4. Effects of Supplementing Brown Seaweed By-products in the Diet of Holstein Cows during Transition on Ruminal Fermentation, Growth Performance and Endocrine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Z. S.; Kim, E. J.; Jin, Y. C.; Lee, J. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Lee, H. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of supplementing brown seaweed by-products (BSB) in the diet of ruminants on ruminal fermentation characteristics, growth performance, endocrine response, and milk production in Holstein cows. In Experiment 1, the effects of different levels (0%, 2%, and 4% of basal diet as Control, 2% BSB, 4% BSB, respectively) of BSB were evaluated at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h in vitro batch culture rumen fermentation. The pH tended to be higher for the higher level of BSB supplementation, with the pH at 12 h being significantly higher (p<0.05) than that of the control. The concentration of ammonia nitrogen was lower at 3, 9, 12, and 24 h incubation (p<0.05) compared with the control, and tended to be low at other incubation times. Volatile fatty acid concentration appeared to be minimally changed while lower values were observed with 4% BSB treatment at 24 h (p<0.05). In Experiment 2, effects of levels (0%, 2%, and 4%) of BSB on growth performance, endocrine responses and milk production were studied with Holstein dairy cows during transition. Dry matter intake, daily gain and feed efficiency were not affected by BSB supplementation. The concentration of plasma estrogen for the control, 2% BSB and 4% BSB after three months of pregnancy were 55.7, 94.1, and 72.3 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.08). Although the differences of progesterone levels between BSB treatments and the control were minimal, the concentration in 4% BSB treatment increased to 157.7% compared with the initial level of the study. Triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels were also higher after both three months and eight months of pregnancy than the initial level at the beginning of the study. In addition, BSB treatments during one month after delivery did not affect daily milk yield and composition. In conclusion, the present results indicate that supplementation of BSB did not compromise ruminal fermentation, and animal performance at lower levels and hence may have

  5. Effect of divergence in phenotypic residual feed intake on methane emissions, ruminal fermentation, and apparent whole-tract digestibility of beef heifers across three contrasting diets.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, R P; Hart, K J; Boland, T M; Kelly, A K; McGee, M; Kenny, D A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of divergent phenotypic ranking for residual feed intake (RFI) on ruminal CH emissions, diet digestibility, and indices of ruminal fermentation in heifers across 3 commercially relevant diets. Twenty-eight Limousin × Friesian heifers were used and were ranked on the basis of phenotypic RFI: 14 low-RFI and 14 high-RFI animals. Ruminal CH emissions were estimated over 5 d using the SF tracer gas technique on 3 successive occasions: 1) at the end of a 6-wk period (Period 1) on grass silage (GS), 2) at the end of an 8-wk period (Period 2) at pasture, and 3) at the end of a 5-wk period (Period 3) on a 30:70 corn silage:concentrate total mixed ration (TMR). Animals were allowed ad libitum access to feed and water at all times. Individual DMI was estimated during CH measurement and rumen samples were taken at the end of each CH measurement period. Diet type affected all feed intake and CH traits measured ( < 0.01) but was unavoidably confounded with animal age/size and experimental period. Correlation coefficients between RFI and DMI were significant ( < 0.05) only when animals were fed the TMR. Daily CH correlated with DMI ( = 0.42, < 0.05) only when animals grazed pasture. Daily DMI was lower in low-RFI animals ( = 0.047) but only when expressed as grams per kilogram metabolic BW. Absolute CH emissions did not differ between RFI groups ( > 0.05), but CH yield was greatest in low-RFI heifers ( = 0.03) as a proportion of both DMI and GE intake. Interactions between the main effects were observed ( < 0.05) for CP digestibility (CPD), DM digestibility (DMD), ruminal propionate, and the acetate:propionate ratio. Low-RFI animals had greater ( < 0.05) CPD and DMD than their high-RFI contemporaries when offered GS but not the other 2 diets. Low-RFI heifers also had greater OM digestibility ( = 0.027). Additionally, low-RFI heifers had a lower concentration of propionate ( < 0.05) compared with high-RFI heifers when fed GS, resulting in a

  6. Effect of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles and fibrolytic enzymes on ruminal fermentation, digestibility, growth performance, and feeding behavior of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; Walker, N D; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2015-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and fibrolytic enzymes (FE) on ruminal fermentation, in situ ruminal and in vivo total tract digestibility, growth performance, and feeding behavior of growing beef cattle. In Exp. 1, 6 ruminally cannulated Angus heifers (average BW of 794 ± 44.2 kg) were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design with 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments were a control diet consisting of 50% barley silage, 10% grass hay, and 40% barley grain-based concentrate (CON) and the CON with 15% DDGS substituted for barley grain (WDG) combined with either 0, 1, or 2 mL FE/kg diet DM, respectively. Inclusion of DDGS increased total tract digestibility of CP ( < 0.01), NDF ( = 0.04), and ADF ( = 0.03). Increasing FE linearly ( = 0.03) increased CP digestibility without affecting the digestibility of other nutrients. There were no effects of DDGS inclusion or FE on ruminal pH or VFA concentration except that propionate was greater ( = 0.04) with the WDG. In situ ruminal DM and NDF disappearance of barley silage was greater ( < 0.04) in heifers fed the WDG than in heifers fed the CON after 24 h of incubation. Increasing FE linearly ( = 0.03) increased in situ NDF disappearance of barley silage after 24 h of incubation. In Exp. 2, 120 weaned steers (initial BW of 289 ± 11.0 kg) were fed diets similar to those in Exp. 1. The steers fed the WDG had greater ( < 0.01) final BW, ADG, DMI, and G:F compared with steers fed the CON. Increasing FE did not alter ADG or G:F but tended ( < 0.07) to linearly decrease DMI. There were interactions ( < 0.02) between DDGS and FE on eating rate and the time spent at the feed bunk. Supplementing FE decreased ( < 0.01) time at the bunk and increased ( < 0.01) eating rate for steers fed the WDG but not for steers fed the CON. Eating rate ( < 0.01) and meal frequency ( = 0.02) were greater but eating duration was shorter ( < 0.01) for steers fed

  7. Effects of alfalfa extract, anise, capsicum, and a mixture of cinnamaldehyde and eugenol on ruminal fermentation and protein degradation in beef heifers fed a high-concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, P W; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Kamel, C

    2006-10-01

    Four Holstein heifers (360 +/- 22 and 450 +/- 28 kg of BW in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively) fitted with ruminal trocars were used in 4 x 4 Latin square designs to evaluate the effects on ruminal microbial fermentation of the following: Exp. 1, no additive, alfalfa extract (30 g/d, AEX), a mixture of cinnamaldehyde (0.18 g/d) and eugenol (0.09 g/d; CIE1), and AEX and CIE1 in combination; and Exp. 2, no additive, anise oil (2 g/d), capsicum oil (1 g/d), and a mixture of cinnamaldehyde (0.6 g/d) and eugenol (0.3 g/d). Heifers were fed a 90:10 concentrate:barley straw diet (16% CP; 25% NDF) for ad libitum intake. Each period consisted of 15 d for adaptation and 6 d for sampling. On d 16 to 18, DM and water intakes were measured. On d 19 to 21 ruminal contents were sampled at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after feeding to determine ruminal pH and the concentrations of VFA, L-lactate, large peptides, small peptides plus AA (SPep+AA), and ammonia N. On d 20 and 21, samples of ruminal fluid were collected at 0 and 3 h after feeding to determine protozoal counts. In Exp. 1, CIE1 and AEX decreased (P < 0.05) total DMI, concentrate DMI, and water intake. The increase (P < 0.05) in SPep+AA and the decrease (P < 0.05) in ammonia N when supplementing CIE1 suggest that deamination was inhibited. Treatment AEX increased (P < 0.05) the acetate to propionate ratio, which is less efficient for beef production. Treatment CIE1 increased (P < 0.05) counts of holotrichs. Effects of AEX and CIE1 were not additive for many of the measured metabolites. In Exp. 2, treatments had no effect on ruminal pH, total VFA concentration, and butyrate proportion. The capsicum oil treatment increased (P < 0.05) DMI, water intake, and SPep+AA N concentration and decreased (P < 0.05) acetate proportion, branched-chain VFA concentration, and large peptide N concentration. The cinnamaldehyde (0.6 g/d) and eugenol (0.3 g/d) treatment decreased (P < 0.05) water intake, acetate proportion, branched-chain VFA, L

  8. Increasing dietary sugar concentration may improve dry matter intake, ruminal fermentation, and productivity of dairy cows in the postpartum phase of the transition period.

    PubMed

    Penner, G B; Oba, M

    2009-07-01

    The current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of feeding diets varying in sugar concentration to postpartum transition cows on productivity, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility. We hypothesized that the high-sugar diet would increase dry matter intake and lactation performance. The secondary objective was to characterize changes in ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility over the first 4 wk of lactation. Fifty-two Holstein cows, including 28 primiparous and 24 multiparous cows, 10 of which were previously fitted with a ruminal cannula, were assigned to the experimental diets containing either high sugar (HS = 8.4%) or low sugar (LS = 4.7%) immediately after calving, based on their expected calving date. Data and samples were collected on d 5.2 +/- 0.3, 12.2 +/- 0.3, 19.2 +/- 0.3, and 26.1 +/- 0.3 relative to parturition for wk 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Cows fed HS had increased dry matter intake compared with those fed LS (18.3. vs. 17.2 kg/d). Further, cows fed HS sorted for particles retained on the pan of the Penn State Particle Size Separator to a greater extent than cows fed LS. Feeding HS tended to increase nadir (5.62 vs. 5.42), mean (6.21 vs. 6.06), and maximum pH (6.83 vs. 6.65). The duration (h/d) and area (pH x min/d) that ruminal pH was below pH 5.8 were not affected by treatment. Ruminal volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportions of individual volatile fatty acids were not affected by treatment. The digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and starch were not affected by treatment, averaging 63.3, 65.2, 43.2, and 93.5%, respectively. Feeding HS decreased plasma glucose concentration compared with feeding LS (51.3 vs. 54.0 mg/dL), but concentration of plasma insulin was not affected by treatment, averaging 4.17 microIU/mL. Cows fed HS had higher concentrations of plasma beta-hydroxybutrate (17.5 vs. 10.5 mg/dL) and nonesterified fatty acids (344 vs. 280 microEq/L). Milk yield

  9. Combination effects of nitrocompounds, pyromellitic diimide, and 2-bromoethanesulfonate on in vitro ruminal methane production and fermentation of a grain-rich feed.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Feng; Yang, Hong-Jian

    2012-01-11

    An L(16) (4(5)) orthogonal experimental design was used to evaluate combination effects of nitroethane (0-15 mM), 2-nitroethanol (0-15 mM), 2-nitro-1-propanol (0-15 mM), pyromellitic diimide (0-0.07 mM), and 2-bromoethanesulfonate (0-0.05 mM) on in vitro ruminal fermentation of a grain-rich feed. In vitro dry matter disappearance was adversely affected by these inhibitors, while cumulative gas production was not affected. Volatile fatty acid production was increased by nitroethane and 2-bromoethanesulfonate in a dose-dependent manner and was decreased by 2-nitroethanol and pyromellitic diimide. All inhibitor treatments increased the molar acetate proportion, while decreasing proportions of propionate and butyrate; hydrogen recovery was decreased by 36.9-45.2%; and methane production was reduced by 95.2-99.2%. The methanogenesis inhibition ranked: nitroethane > 2-nitroethanol > 2-nitro-1-propanol > 2-bromoethanesulfonate > pyromellitic diimide; combined concentrations of 5, 5, 5, 0.02, and 0.03 mM, respectively, gave the optimal inhibiting efficiency. These results may provide a reference to develop effective mitigation of methane emission from ruminants.

  10. Effects of species-diverse high-alpine forage on in vitro ruminal fermentation when used as donor cow's feed or directly incubated.

    PubMed

    Khiaosa-Ard, R; Soliva, C R; Kreuzer, M; Leiber, F

    2012-11-01

    Alpine forages are assumed to have specific effects on ruminal digestion when fed to cattle. These effects were investigated in an experiment from two perspectives, either by using such forages as a substrate for incubation or as feed for a rumen fluid donor cow. In total, six 24-h in vitro batch culture runs were performed. Rumen fluid was collected from a non-lactating donor cow after having grazed pastures at ∼2000 m above sea level for 2, 6 and 10 weeks. These 'alpine runs' were compared with three lowland samplings from before and 2 and 6 weeks after the alpine grazing where a silage-concentrate mix was fed. In each run, nine replicates of four forages each were incubated. These forages differed in type and origin (alpine hay, lowland ryegrass hay, grass-maize silage mix, pure hemicellulose) as well as in the content of nutrients. Concentrations of phenolic compounds in the incubated forages were (g/kg dry matter (DM)): 20 (tannin proportion: 0.47), 8 (0.27), 15 (0.52) and 0 (0), respectively. Crude protein was highest in the silage mix and lowest with hemicellulose, whereas the opposite was the case for fiber. The total phenol contents (g/kg DM) for the high altitude and the lowland diet of the donor cow were 27 (tannins: 0.50 of phenols) and 12 (0.27), respectively. Independent of the origin of the rumen fluid, the incubation with alpine hay decreased (P < 0.05) bacterial counts, fermentation gas amount, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production as well as ammonia and methane concentrations in fermentation gas (the latter two being not lower when compared with hemicellulose). Alpine grazing of the cow in turn increased (P < 0.001) bacterial counts and, to a lesser extent, acetate proportion compared with lowland feeding. Further, alpine grazing decreased protozoal count (P < 0.05) and VFA production (P < 0.001) to a small extent, whereas methane remained widely unchanged. There were interactions (P < 0.05) between forage type incubated and feeding period of the

  11. Evaluating in vitro dose-response effects of Lavandula officinalis essential oil on rumen fermentation characteristics, methane production and ruminal acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yadeghari, Shahin; Malecky, Mostafa; Dehghan Banadaky, Mehdi; Navidshad, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Four in vitro experiments (Exp.) were conducted to evaluate lavender essential oil (LEO) effects at 0 (control), 250 (low dose), 500 (medium dose), 750 and 1000 µL per L (high doses) of incubation medium on rumen gas production kinetics (Exp.1), ruminal digestibility and fermentation (Exp.2), methane production (Exp.3) and rumen acidosis (Exp.4). The asymptote of gas production (A) increased quadratically (p < 0.001), but the lag phase (L) increased (p = 0.003), and gas production rate (µ) decreased linearly (p = 0.031) with increasing dose of LEO. A linear and quadratic effect (p < 0.01) was observed for the gas produced after 24 hr of incubation (GP24). In vitro true dry matter degradability (IVTDMD) and in vitro true organic matter degradability (IVTOMD) both decreased linearly (p < 0.01), but microbial biomass (MB) and partitioning factor (PF) changed quadratically with increasing doses of LEO (p < 0.05). A cubic effect was observed for total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and ammonia (NH3) concentrations (p < 0.05). Acetate molar percentage decreased (p = 0.004), whereas those of butyrate and valerate increased linearly (p < 0.05) with LEO dosage. The molar percentage of propionate increased by 10.60 and 12.00% at low and medium doses of LEO, respectively. Methane production decreased by 11.00 and 44.00 to 60.00% at medium and high doses of LEO (p < 0.05), respectively. Lavender essential oil decreased also ruminal pH at all included doses (p < 0.05), intensifying rumen acidosis. These results revealed a dose-dependent selective effect (stimulatory at low and medium, and inhibitory at high doses) of LEO on rumen fermentation. PMID:26973763

  12. Evaluating in vitro dose-response effects of Lavandula officinalis essential oil on rumen fermentation characteristics, methane production and ruminal acidosis.

    PubMed

    Yadeghari, Shahin; Malecky, Mostafa; Dehghan Banadaky, Mehdi; Navidshad, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Four in vitro experiments (Exp.) were conducted to evaluate lavender essential oil (LEO) effects at 0 (control), 250 (low dose), 500 (medium dose), 750 and 1000 µL per L (high doses) of incubation medium on rumen gas production kinetics (Exp.1), ruminal digestibility and fermentation (Exp.2), methane production (Exp.3) and rumen acidosis (Exp.4). The asymptote of gas production (A) increased quadratically (p < 0.001), but the lag phase (L) increased (p = 0.003), and gas production rate (µ) decreased linearly (p = 0.031) with increasing dose of LEO. A linear and quadratic effect (p < 0.01) was observed for the gas produced after 24 hr of incubation (GP24). In vitro true dry matter degradability (IVTDMD) and in vitro true organic matter degradability (IVTOMD) both decreased linearly (p < 0.01), but microbial biomass (MB) and partitioning factor (PF) changed quadratically with increasing doses of LEO (p < 0.05). A cubic effect was observed for total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and ammonia (NH3) concentrations (p < 0.05). Acetate molar percentage decreased (p = 0.004), whereas those of butyrate and valerate increased linearly (p < 0.05) with LEO dosage. The molar percentage of propionate increased by 10.60 and 12.00% at low and medium doses of LEO, respectively. Methane production decreased by 11.00 and 44.00 to 60.00% at medium and high doses of LEO (p < 0.05), respectively. Lavender essential oil decreased also ruminal pH at all included doses (p < 0.05), intensifying rumen acidosis. These results revealed a dose-dependent selective effect (stimulatory at low and medium, and inhibitory at high doses) of LEO on rumen fermentation.

  13. Effect of Mediterranean saltbush (Atriplex halimus) ensilaging with two developed enzyme cocktails on feed intake, nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Alsersy, Haidy; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Borhami, Borhami E; Olivares, Jaime; Gado, Hany M; Mariezcurrena, Maria D; Yacuot, Mohamed H; Kholif, Ahmed E; El-Adawy, Mounir; Hernandez, Saul R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of feeding Atriplex halimus (AH) silage treated with two developed enzyme cocktails to sheep on feed intake, nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation. The AH silage was treated without or with 2 L of ZAD1(®) or ZAD2(®) /1000 kg with 5% molasses and ensiled for 30 days. Barley grain (300 g/head/day) was fed as an energy supplement once daily at 10.00 hours and AH silage with or without enzyme treatment was offered ad libitum to animals twice daily at 09.00 and 16.00 hours. Sheep were fed on four experimental forage diets comprised of AH silage and barley (D1), AH silage treated with ZAD1(®) and barley (D2), AH silage treated with ZAD2(®) and barley (D3) and AH silage treated with a combination of ZAD1(®) and ZAD2(®) (1:1) and barley (D4). Ensiling AH with enzymes reduced its contents of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber. The dry matter intake of AH of D2, D3 and D4 decreased (P < 0.001) as compared to D1. However, enzyme-treated diets had greater total digestible nutrients intake (P < 0.001) as compared to D1. The nutrients digestibility for D2, D3 and D4 were higher than those for D1 (P < 0.001), and were higher for D3 as compared to both D2 and D4. Sheep fed on D3 had highest (P < 0.001) ruminal total volatile fatty acids concentration, ammonia nitrogen concentration and microbial protein yield. It could be concluded that AH silage treated with ZAD1(®) or ZAD2(®) improved digestibility and rumen fermentation in sheep. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Effect of increasing flaxseed supplementation of a pasture-based diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flaxseed has been shown to decrease methane output when fed to ruminants in confinement. Organic dairy producers are interested in flaxseed as an alternative to other organic grains due to price, ability to grow on the farm, and availability. However, little is known regarding the effects of flaxsee...

  15. Effects of bacterial direct-fed microbials on ruminal fermentation, blood variables, and the microbial populations of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, G R; Morgavi, D P; Beauchemin, K A; Leedle, J A Z

    2002-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether bacterial direct-fed microbials (DFM) could be used to minimize the risk of acidosis in feedlot cattle receiving high concentrate diets. Six ruminally cannulated steers, previously adapted to a high concentrate diet, were used in a double 3 x 3 Latin square to study the effects of DFM on feed intake, ruminal pH, and ruminal and blood characteristics. Steers were provided ad libitum access to a diet containing steam-rolled barley, barley silage, and a protein-mineral supplement at 87, 9, and 4% (DM basis), respectively. Treatments were as follows: control, Propionibacterium P15 (P15), and Propionibacterium P15 and Enterococcus faecium EF212 (PE). The bacterial treatments (10(9) cfu/g) plus whey powder carrier, or whey powder alone for control, were top-dressed once daily at the time of feeding (10 g/[steer/d]). Periods consisted of 2 wk of adaptation and 1 wk of measurements. Ruminal pH was continuously measured for 6 d using indwelling electrodes. Dry matter intake and ruminal pH (mean, minimum, hours, and area pH < 5.8 or < 5.5) were not affected by treatment (P > 0.05). However, supplementation with P15 increased protozoal numbers (P < 0.05) with a concomitant increase in ruminal NH3 concentration (P < 0.01) and a decrease in the number of amylolytic bacteria (P < 0.05) compared with the control. Streptococcus bovis, enumerated using a selective medium, was numerically reduced with supplementation of PE. Although blood pH and blood glucose were not affected by DFM supplementation, steers fed PE had numerically lower concentrations of blood CO2 than control steers, which is consistent with a reduced risk of metabolic acidosis. Although the bacterial DFM used in this study did not induce changes in DMI or ruminal and blood pH, some rumen and blood variables indicated that the bacterial DFM used in this study may decrease the risk of acidosis in feedlot cattle.

  16. Diet inclusion of devil fish (Plecostomus spp.) silage and its impacts on ruminal fermentation and growth performance of growing lambs in hot regions of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Arroyo, Eduardo; Cipriano-Salazar, Moisés; Camacho-Díaz, Luis Miguel; Salem, Abdelfattah Zeidan Mohamed; Kholif, Ahmed Eid; Elghandour, Mona Mohamed Mohamed Yasseen; DiLorenzo, Nicolas; Cruz-Lagunas, Blas

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inclusion of devil fish (Plecostomus spp.-DF) silage in Criollo × Blackbelly lamb diets in hot region of Guerrero state of Mexico. Rumen fermentation including pH, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and ammonia-N (NH3-N) and productive variables including feed intake (FI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed conversion were determined. Twenty lambs with 18 ± 1.2 kg body weight in a completely randomized design were fed a total mixed ration (TMR) of concentrate (based on soybean meal, whole oat hay, ground corn cob, vitamins-minerals supplement) with DF silage at 0 % (DF0), 9 % (DF9), 18 % (DF18), and 27 % (DF27) of the TMR for 75 days. The ruminal pH showed no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments: ranging between 6.21 and 6.36. Propionic acid molar proportions showed an irregular pattern between experimental groups, which only differed (P < 0.05) between DF9 and DF27, without differences between the other treatments. A greater molar proportion of butyric acid was noted (P < 0.05) in DF27 when compared to the other treatments. The ruminal concentration of NH3-N showed some insignificant differences (P > 0.05) among treatments. The daily FI was increased (P < 0.01) in DF27 (1.131 g) when compared with DF0, while DF9 and DF18 showed intermediate consumption with no differences (P > 0.05) among them. The ADG showed only difference (cubic effect, P = 0.02) between DF9 and DF18. The highest feed conversion was observed (cubic effect, P < 0.01) with DF18, with a value of 4.7 kg of feed to gain 1 kg of body weight. It could be concluded that the inclusion of up to 18 % of DF silage in the TMR of growing lamb diets, in hot regions of Mexico, may improve productive performance and ruminal fermentation kinetics, without any negative effects.

  17. Influence of barley grain particle size and treatment with citric acid on digestibility, ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Bonchenari, M; Salem, A Z M; López, S

    2017-01-18

    Chemical and physical treatments of barley grain increase ruminally resistant starch and can improve the rumen fermentation pattern. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chemical (addition of citric acid, CA) and physical (grinding to two different particle sizes, PS) treatment of barley grain on performance, rumen fermentation, microbial protein yield in the rumen and selected blood metabolites in growing calves. In all, 28 male Holstein calves (172±5.1 kg initial BW) were used in a complete randomised design with a factorial arrangement of 2 barley grain particle sizes×2 levels of citric acid. The diets were as follows: (i) small PS (average 1200 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no CA addition); (ii) small PS barley grain soaked in a CA solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley); (iii) large PS (average 2400 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no citric acid addition) and (iv) large PS barley grain soaked in a citric acid solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley). Barley grain was then incorporated at 35% in a total mixed ration and fed to the calves for 11 weeks. Feeding small PS barley decreased feed intake (P=0.02) and average daily weight gain (P=0.01). The addition of CA to barley grain did not affect intake but increased weight gain (P0.05). However, the molar proportion of propionate was increased (P=0.03) when barley was more finely ground, and that of acetate was increased (P=0.04) when CA was added to barley grain. The ruminal concentration of ammonia nitrogen was increased (P<0.01) and microbial nitrogen synthesis in the rumen tended to decrease by adding CA to barley. Treating barley grain with citric acid increased fibre digestibility of total mixed rations, attenuated the decrease in ruminal pH, and improved weight gain and feed efficiency in male Holstein growing calves fed a high-cereal diet (550 g cereal grain/kg diet).

  18. Using a fibrolytic enzyme in barley-based diets containing wheat dried distillers grains with solubles: ruminal fermentation, digestibility, and growth performance of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; He, M L; Walker, N D; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2014-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of adding an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (FE) on ruminal pH and fermentation, digestibility, and growth performance of feedlot beef cattle fed a finishing diet containing wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). In Exp. 1, 4 ruminally cannulated Angus heifers (average BW of 807 ± 93.9 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Treatments were 1) control (CON; 10% barley silage and 90% barley grain-based concentrate), 2) CON diet substituting 30% wheat DDGS for barley grain (WDG), 3) WDG diet supplemented with low FE (WDGL), and 4) WDG diet supplemented with high FE (WDGH). Heifers fed WDG had less (P = 0.01) total tract DM digestibility than heifers fed CON. Increasing FE linearly (P < 0.05) increased starch digestibility without affecting digestibility of other nutrients. Addition of FE also reduced (P = 0.03) ruminal ammonia-N (NH3-N) concentration but did not affect VFA concentration. Moreover, application of FE to wheat DDGS linearly increased in situ ruminal DM (P < 0.01) and NDF (P = 0.02) disappearance after 48 h of incubation. In Exp. 2, 160 yearling steers (initial BW = 495 ± 37.9 kg) were fed the same diets as in Exp. 1. No differences in DMI, final BW, ADG, dietary NEg, or carcass characteristics were observed among diets. However, the steers fed WDG had less (P < 0.05) G:F and greater number of (P < 0.01) abscessed livers than steers fed CON. Increasing FE application in wheat DDGS diets did not affect DMI, final BW, or ADG but tended (P < 0.09) to linearly improve feed efficiency and decreased (P = 0.03) the incidence of abscessed livers. These results demonstrated adverse effects of including wheat DDGS in finishing diets on feed digestion, feed efficiency, and animal health. Application of FE in wheat DDGS-based diets potentially improved starch digestion, protein metabolism in the rumen, feed efficiency, and animal health.

  19. Replacing alfalfa silage with corn silage in dairy cow diets: Effects on enteric methane production, ruminal fermentation, digestion, N balance, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Julien, C; Massé, D I; Lettat, A; Chouinard, P Y; Petit, H V; Benchaar, C

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of replacing alfalfa silage (AS) with corn silage (CS) in dairy cow total mixed rations (TMR) on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, apparent total-tract digestibility, N balance, and milk production. Nine ruminally cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design (32-d period) and fed (ad libitum) a TMR [forage:concentrate ratio of 60:40; dry matter (DM) basis], with the forage portion consisting of either alfalfa silage (0% CS; 56.4% AS in the TMR), a 50:50 mixture of both silages (50% CS; 28.2% AS and 28.2% CS in the TMR), or corn silage (100% CS; 56.4% CS in the TMR). Increasing the CS proportion (i.e., at the expense of AS) in the diet was achieved by decreasing the corn grain proportion and increasing that of soybean meal. Intake of DM and milk yield increased quadratically, whereas DM digestibility increased linearly as the proportion of CS increased in the diet. Increasing the dietary CS proportion resulted in changes (i.e., lower ruminal pH and acetate:propionate ratio, reduced fiber digestibility, decreased protozoa numbers, and lower milk fat and higher milk protein contents) typical of those observed when cows are fed high-starch diets. A quadratic response in daily CH4 emissions was observed in response to increasing the proportion of CS in the diet (440, 483, and 434 g/d for 0% CS, 50% CS, and 100% CS, respectively). Methane production adjusted for intake of DM, and gross or digestible energy was unaffected in cows fed the 50% CS diet, but decreased in cows fed the 100% CS diet (i.e., quadratic effect). Increasing the CS proportion in the diet at the expense of AS improved N utilization, as reflected by the decreases in ruminal NH3 concentration and manure N excretion, suggesting low potential NH3 and N2O emissions. Results from this study, suggest that total replacement of AS with CS in dairy cow diets offers a means of decreasing CH4 output

  20. Effect of field pea-based creep feed on intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and performance by nursing calves grazing native range in western North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Gelvin, A A; Lardy, G P; Soto-Navarro, S A; Landblom, D G; Caton, J S

    2004-12-01

    Two experiments evaluated digestive and performance effects of field pea-based creep feed in nursing calf diets. In Exp.1, eight nursing steer calves (145 +/- 27 kg initial BW) with ruminal cannulas were used to evaluate effects of supplementation and advancing season on dietary composition, intake, digestion, and ruminal fermentation characteristics. Treatments were unsupplemented control (CON) and field pea-based creep (SUP; 19.1% CP, DM basis) fed at 0.45% BW (DM basis) daily. Calves grazed native range with their dams from early July through early November. Periods were 24 d long and occurred in July (JUL), August (AUG), September (SEP), and October (OCT). Experiment 2 used 80 crossbred nursing calves, 48 calves in yr 1 and 32 calves in yr 2 (yr 1 = 144 +/- 24 kg; yr 2 = 121 +/- 20 kg initial BW), to evaluate effects of field pea-based creep on calf performance. Treatments included unsupplemented control (CON); field pea-based creep feeds containing either 8% (LS); or 16% (HS) salt; and soybean meal/field pea-based creep containing (as-fed basis) 16% salt (HIPRO). Masticate samples from SUP calves in Exp.1 had greater CP (P = 0.05) than those from CON calves. Forage CP and ADIN decreased linearly with advancing season (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). In vitro OM digestibility of diet masticate decreased from JUL to OCT (P < 0.01; 58.5 to 41.3%). Forage intake did not differ (P = 0.33) between treatments but increased linearly with advancing season (1.67, 1.90, 3.12, 3.38 kg/d for JUL, AUG, SEP, and OCT, respectively; P < 0.01). Milk intake (percentage of BW) did not differ (P = 0.56) between CON and SUP calves but decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with advancing season. Supplemented calves had greater (P = 0.03) total intake (g/kg of BW; forage + milk + creep) compared with CON calves. Treatment did not affect (P < 0.30) rate of in situ disappearance of forage or creep. Forage DM, CP, and creep DM disappearance rate decreased linearly (P < or = 0.02) with

  1. Replacing corn silage with different forage millet silage cultivars: effects on milk yield, nutrient digestion, and ruminal fermentation of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Brunette, T; Baurhoo, B; Mustafa, A F

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary replacement of corn silage (CS) with 2 cultivars of forage millet silages [i.e., regular millet (RM) and sweet millet (SM)] on milk production, apparent total-tract digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics of dairy cows. Fifteen lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square experiment and fed (ad libitum) a high-forage total mixed ration (68:32 forage:concentrate ratio). Dietary treatments included CS (control), RM, and SM diets. Experimental silages constituted 37% of each diet DM. Three ruminally fistulated cows were used to determine the effect of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation and total-tract nutrient utilization. Relative to CS, RM and SM silages contained 36% more crude protein, 66% more neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and 88% more acid detergent fiber. Cows fed CS consumed more dry matter (DM; 24.4 vs. 22.7 kg/d) and starch (5.7 vs. 3.7 kg/d), but less NDF (7.9 vs. 8.7 kg/d) than cows fed RM or SM. However, DM, starch and NDF intakes were not different between forage millet silage types. Feeding RM relative to CS reduced milk yield (32.7 vs. 35.2 kg/d), energy-corrected milk (35.8 vs. 38.0 kg/d) and SCM (32.7 vs. 35.3 kg/d). However, cows fed SM had similar milk, energy-corrected milk, and solids-corrected milk yields than cows fed CS or RM. Milk efficiency was not affected by dietary treatments. Milk protein concentration was greatest for cows fed CS, intermediate for cows fed SM, and lowest for cows fed RM. Milk concentration of solids-not-fat was lesser, whereas milk urea nitrogen was greater for cows fed RM than for those fed CS. However, millet silage type had no effect on milk solids-not-fat and milk urea nitrogen levels. Concentrations of milk fat, lactose and total solids were not affected by silage type. Ruminal pH and ruminal NH3-N were greater for cows fed RM and SM than for cows fed CS. Total-tract digestibility of DM (average=67.9%), NDF (average=53

  2. Influence of nitrogen source on the fermentation of fibre from barley straw and sugarbeet pulp by ruminal micro-organisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ranilla, M J; Carro, M D; López, S; Newbold, C J; Wallace, R J

    2001-12-01

    Incubations were carried out with a batch culture system to study the effects of different N sources on the fermentation by ruminal micro-organisms from Merino sheep of two fibre substrates derived from feedstuffs that differed in their fermentation rate. The substrates were neutral-detergent fibre (NDF) from barley straw and sugarbeet pulp. N sources were ammonia (NH4Cl) and peptides (Trypticase). Three treatments were made by replacing ammonia-N with peptide-N at levels of 0 (AMMO), 33 (PEPLOW) and 66 % (PEPHIGH) of total N. There were no differences (P>0.05) between treatments in NDF degradation for both the barley straw and the sugarbeet pulp. Peptides increased (P<0.05) total volatile fatty acids daily production for both substrates, with greater values (P<0.001) for PEPHIGH than for PEPLOW for the sugarbeet pulp. The presence of peptides also increased (P<0.05) microbial N synthesis compared with AMMO, with PEPHIGH supporting more growth (P<0.001) than PEPLOW when the sugarbeet pulp NDF was fermented. The presence of peptides increased (P<0.01) the amount of solids-associated micro-organisms (SAM)-N for both the barley straw and the sugarbeet pulp fibres, values in the PEPHIGH treatment being higher (P<0.001) than those in PEPLOW. The proportion of SAM-N in the total microbial N was not affected (P>0.05) by the presence of peptides compared with the AMMO treatment, but values were greater for the PEPHIGH compared with the PEPLOW N source, reaching statistical significance (P<0.05) only for the sugarbeet pulp. For liquid-associated micro-organisms, the AMMO treatment resulted in the greatest (P<0.05) proportion of N derived from ammonia for both substrates, with a further decrease (P<0.01) for the PEPHIGH treatment compared with the PEPLOW for the sugarbeet pulp, indicating preferential uptake of peptides when they were available. Microbial growth efficiency (g microbial N/kg NDF degraded) was not affected (P>0.05) by N source. These results indicate that N

  3. Supplementation of increasing amounts of linseed oil to dairy cows fed total mixed rations: effects on digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoal populations, and milk fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Romero-Pérez, G A; Chouinard, P Y; Hassanat, F; Eugene, M; Petit, H V; Côrtes, C

    2012-08-01

    The effect of linseed oil (LO) supplementation on nutrient digestibility, forage (i.e., timothy hay) in sacco ruminal degradation, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoal populations, milk production, and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in dairy cows was investigated. Four ruminally cannulated, primiparous lactating cows were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design (28-d periods). They were fed a total mixed ration (50:50 forage:concentrate (F:C) ratio [dry matter (DM) basis] without supplementation (control, CTL), or supplemented (wt/wt; DM basis) with LO at 2, 3, or 4%. Supplementation with LO had no effect on DM intake (19 kg/d) and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients (organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, starch, and gross energy). Ruminal pH, ammonia, and total volatile FA concentrations were not changed by LO supplementation to diets. Extent of changes in volatile FA pattern and effective ruminal degradability of DM of timothy hay were minor. Neither the total numbers nor the genera distribution of protozoa was changed by the addition of increasing amounts of LO to the diet. Milk yield increased linearly (26.1, 27.3, 27.4, and 28.4 kg/d for CTL to LO4, respectively) as the amount of LO added to the diet increased. Milk fat content was not affected by LO supplementation, whereas milk protein content decreased linearly with increasing amounts of LO in the diet. Milk fat proportions of several intermediates of ruminal biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated FA (i.e., trans-10 18:1, trans-11 18:1, cis-9,trans-11 18:2, trans-11,cis-15 18:2, and cis-9,trans-11,cis-15 18:3) increased linearly with LO addition to the diet. The proportion of cis-9,cis-12 18:2 decreased linearly (2.06, 1.99, 1.91, and 1.83% for CTL to LO4, respectively) as the amount of LO in the diet increased. Milk fat content of cis-9,cis-12,cis-15 18:3 increased as the level of LO in the diet increased up to 3% but no further increase was observed when 4% of LO

  4. Effect of calcium oxide inclusion in beef feedlot diets containing 60% dried distillers grains with solubles on ruminal fermentation, diet digestibility, performance, and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, A J C; Felix, T L; Lemenager, R P; Schoonmaker, J P

    2014-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of increasing dietary CaO on ruminal fermentation, diet digestibility, performance, and carcass characteristics of feedlot steers fed 60% dried distillers grains with solubles ( DDGS: ). In Exp. 1, 120 steers were allotted by weight (355 ± 7.9 kg) to 1 of 4 treatments containing 60% DDGS, 20% corn silage, 13.5 to 14.4% ground corn, 4% supplement, and 0 to 2.5% limestone on DM basis to determine the effects of CaO on performance and carcass characteristics. Treatments consisted of 0, 0.8, 1.6, or 2.4% CaO inclusion in the diet (DM basis), with CaO replacing limestone. Steers were slaughtered at a target BW of approximately 641 kg. In Exp. 2, 4 steers (initial BW = 288 ± 3 kg) were randomly allotted to the same diets in a 4 × 4 Latin square design (14-d periods) to determine the effects of CaO on ruminal pH, VFA, and nutrient digestibility. Statistical analyses were conducted using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Inclusion of CaO at 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% increased ADG by 5.0, 3.9, and 0%, respectively, compared to 0% CaO (quadratic; P = 0.03). Intake was linearly decreased (P = 0.04) and G:F was linearly increased (P = 0.02) by CaO inclusion. Dressing percentage increased as CaO increased from 0 to 1.6% and then decreased for 2.4% CaO (quadratic; P < 0.01). In Exp. 2, steers fed 0% CaO had the greatest prefeeding ruminal pH, steers fed 0 and 0.8% CaO exhibited the most rapid postfeeding decline in ruminal pH, and steers fed 2.4% CaO exhibited a relatively stable ruminal pH throughout the 24-h period (treatment × time; P ≤ 0.01). Acetate, butyrate, and total VFA concentrations increased linearly (P ≤ 0.05) at 0, 3, 6, and 12 h postfeeding with increasing CaO. Propionate at 3 h postfeeding increased from 0 to 1.6% CaO and decreased from 1.6 to 2.4% CaO (quadratic; P = 0.10). Urine pH increased linearly (P ≤ 0.01) while urine output and urine ammonia decreased linearly (P ≤ 0.05) as CaO inclusion increased

  5. An evaluation of the clinical pathologic findings in experimentally induced urinary bladder rupture in pre-ruminant calves.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D G; MacWilliams, P S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the biochemical abnormalities that develop over time in preruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum. Uroperitoneum was produced by incising the bladder via a standing left flank laparotomy. Serum and peritoneal concentrations sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphate and creatinine were determined at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 40 h. Serum creatinine concentration was increased by 8 h post-bladder rupture. Peritoneal concentrations of potassium and phosphate were significantly elevated 2 h after bladder rupture and peritoneal creatinine was significantly elevated by 4 h. Serum to peritoneal fluid ratios for potassium, phosphate and creatinine exceeded 2:1 within 2 h of bladder rupture. Pre-ruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum did not become hyperkalemic during the 40 h experiment. PMID:9553714

  6. Elevated CO(2) and drought stress effects on the chemical composition of maize plants, their ruminal fermentation and microbial diversity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meibaum, Birgit; Riede, Susanne; Schröder, Bernd; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Breves, Gerhard

    2012-12-01

    Climate changes are supposed to influence productivity and chemical composition of plants. In the present experiments, it was hypothesised that the incubation of plants exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO₂]) and drought stress will result in different ruminal fermentation pattern and microbial diversity compared to unaffected plants. Maize plants were grown, well-watered under ambient (380 ppm CO₂, Variant A) and elevated [CO₂] (550 ppm CO₂, Variant B). Furthermore, each CO₂ treatment was also exposed to drought stress (380 ppm and 550 ppm CO₂,Variants C and D, respectively), which received only half as much water as the well-watered plants. Plant material from these treatments was incubated in a semi-continuous in vitro fermentation experiment using the rumen simulation technique. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was conducted for Bacteria and Archaea specific profiles. The analysis of crude nutrients showed higher contents of fibre fraction in drought stress Variants C and D. Crude protein content was increased by drought stress under ambient but not under elevated [CO₂]. Fermentation of drought stress variants resulted in significantly increased pH values, decreased digestibilities of organic matter and increased ammonia-N (NH₃-N) concentrations compared with well-watered variants. Additionally, the 550 ppm CO₂ Variants B and D showed significantly lower NH₃-N concentrations than Variants A and C. The Bacteria- and Archaea-specific SSCP profiles as well as the production rates of short-chain fatty acids and their molar percentages were not affected by treatments. During the first four days of equilibration period, a decrease of molar percentage of acetate and increased molar percentages of propionate were observed for all treatments. These alterations might have been induced by adaptation of the in vitro system to the new substrate. The rumen microflora appeared to be highly adaptive and

  7. Effects of dry-rolled or steam-flaked corn finishing diets with or without twenty-five percent dried distillers grains on ruminal fermentation and apparent total tract digestion.

    PubMed

    May, M L; Quinn, M J; Reinhardt, C D; Murray, L; Gibson, M L; Karges, K K; Drouillard, J S

    2009-11-01

    A metabolism study was conducted to evaluate ruminal fermentation and apparent total tract digestibilities of cattle finishing diets. Holstein steers (n = 16, 351 kg of BW) with ruminal cannulas were fed diets consisting of 0 or 25% dried corn distillers grains (DDG), using dry-rolled corn (DRC) or steam-flaked corn (SFC) as the principal energy source (2 x 2 factorial arrangement). The study was conducted in 2 periods, with 4 steers per treatment in each period. Periods consisted of a 12-d adaptation phase and a 3-d collection phase. Compared with DRC, feeding SFC decreased intakes of DM, OM, starch, NDF, and ether extract (P < 0.01), and steers fed SFC excreted less DM, OM, starch, NDF, and ether extract (P < 0.01). Compared with SFC, feeding DRC decreased ruminal concentrations of acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate, and decreased the acetate-to-propionate ratio (P < 0.01). Compared with SFC, DRC decreased ruminal propionate, valerate, and lactate concentrations (P < 0.01). When compared with cattle fed SFC, ruminal pH of cattle fed DRC was less at 0 h and greater at 6 h postfeeding (P < 0.01). Ruminal ammonia concentrations were greater for DRC vs. SFC at h 0, 6, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 postfeeding (P < 0.05). Feeding DDG decreased consumption of starch and ether extract, but increased NDF intake (P < 0.01). Fecal excretion of ether extract was increased by adding DDG compared with diets without DDG (P < 0.05), resulting in less apparent total tract digestibility of ether extract for cattle fed DDG (P < 0.01). Ruminal lactate concentrations were increased with addition of DDG compared with diets without DDG (P = 0.01). Ruminal ammonia concentrations were less for steers fed 25 vs. 0% DDG at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postfeeding (P < 0.05). We conclude, based on these results, that ruminal fermentation and apparent total tract digestibility of DDG are affected by grain processing.

  8. Effects of replacing soybean meal with canola meal differing in rumen-undegradable protein content on ruminal fermentation and gas production kinetics using 2 in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Paula, E M; Monteiro, H F; Silva, L G; Benedeti, P D B; Daniel, J L P; Shenkoru, T; Broderick, G A; Faciola, A P

    2017-07-01

    Previous research indicated that there were significant differences in rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) among canola meals (CM), which could influence the nutritional value of CM. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the effects of feeding CM with different RUP contents on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, and microbial growth using a dual-flow continuous culture system (experiment 1) and (2) evaluate ruminal gas production kinetics, in vitro organic matter (OM) digestibility, and methane (CH4) production of soybean meal (SBM) and CM with low or high RUP in the diet or as a sole ingredient using a gas production system (experiments 2 and 3). In experiment 1, diets were randomly assigned to 6 fermentors in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square. The only ingredient that differed among diets was the protein supplement. The treatments were (1) solvent-extracted SBM, (2) low-RUP solvent-extracted CM (38% RUP as a percentage of crude protein), and (3) high-RUP solvent-extracted CM (50% RUP). Diets were prepared as 3 concentrate mixtures that were combined with 25% orchardgrass hay and 15% wheat straw (dry matter basis). Experiments 2 and 3 had the same design with 24 bottles incubated 3 times for 48 h each. During the 48-h incubation, the cumulative pressure was recorded to determine gas production kinetics, in vitro OM digestibility, and CH4 production. In experiment 1, N flow (g/d), efficiency of N use, efficiency of bacterial N synthesis, total volatile fatty acids (mM), and molar proportion of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate were not affected by treatments. There were tendencies for a decrease in ruminal NH3-N and an increase in molar proportion of butyrate for the SBM diet compared with both CM diets. The molar proportion of valerate was greater in both CM diets, whereas the molar proportion of isovalerate and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids was lower for the CM diets compared with the SBM diet. In experiments 2 and 3, the SBM diet had

  9. Effects of sulfur and monensin concentrations on in vitro dry matter disappearance, hydrogen sulfide production, and volatile fatty acid concentrations in batch culture ruminal fermentations.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Dilorenzo, N; Leibovich, J; May, M L; Quinn, M J; Homm, J W; Galyean, M L

    2010-04-01

    Effects of monensin (MON) and S on in vitro fermentation and H(2)S production were evaluated in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 2 ruminally cannulated steers were adapted (>14 d) to a 75% concentrate diet [steam-flaked corn (SFC)-based], and ruminal fluid was collected approximately 4 h after feeding. Substrate composed (DM basis) of 85.2% SFC, 9% alfalfa hay, 5% cottonseed meal, and 0.8% urea was added with ruminal fluid and buffer to sealed 125-mL serum bottles to allow for gas collection. A Na(2)SO(4) solution was added to yield S equivalent to 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8% of substrate DM, and MON was included at 0, 2, 4, and 6 mg/L of culture volume. Bottle head-space gas was analyzed for H(2)S. No MON (P = 0.29) or MON x S interaction (P = 0.41) effects were detected for H(2)S production. Increasing S linearly increased (P < 0.01) H(2)S production (micromoles/g of fermented DM). The IVDMD (average 70.0%) was not affected by MON (P = 0.93), S (P = 0.18), or the MON x S interaction (P = 0.56). Total VFA concentrations were not affected by MON (P = 0.87), S (P = 0.14), or the MON x S interaction (P = 0.86), but increasing MON linearly decreased (P ruminally cannulated Jersey steers were adapted (>21 d) to a 75% concentrate diet (SFC base) that contained 15% (DM basis) wet corn distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) and MON at 22 mg/kg of DM. In vitro substrate DM was composed of 75.4% SFC, 15% WDGS, 9% alfalfa hay, and 0.6% urea, and S and MON concentrations were the same as in Exp. 1. No effects of MON (P = 0.93) or the MON x S interaction (P = 0.99) were noted for H(2)S production; however, increasing S linearly increased (P < 0.01) H(2)S production. No effects of MON (P = 0.16), S (P = 0.43), or the MON x S interaction (P = 0.10) were noted for IVDMD (average 70.9%). Total VFA concentrations were not

  10. Effects of replacing grass silage with forage pearl millet silage on milk yield, nutrient digestion, and ruminal fermentation of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Brunette, T; Baurhoo, B; Mustafa, A F

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary replacement of grass silage (GS) with forage millet silages that were harvested at 2 stages of maturity [i.e., vegetative stage and dough to ripe seed (mature) stage] on milk production, apparent total-tract digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics of dairy cows. Fifteen lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square experiment and fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (60:40 forage:concentrate ratio). Dietary treatments included control (GS), vegetative millet silage (EM), and mature millet silage (MM) diets. Experimental silages comprised 24% of dietary dry matter (DM). Soybean meal and slow-release urea were added in millet diets to balance for crude protein (CP). Three additional ruminally fistulated cows were used to determine the effect of treatments on ruminal fermentation and total-tract nutrient utilization. Cows fed the GS diet consumed more DM (22.9 vs. 21.7 ± 1.02 kg/d) and CP (3.3 vs. 3.1 ± 0.19 kg/d), and similar starch (4.9 ± 0.39 kg/d) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF; 8.0 ± 0.27 kg/d) compared with cows fed the MM diet. Replacing the EM diet with the MM diet did not affect DM, NDF, or CP intakes. Cows fed the MM diet produced less milk (26.1 vs. 29.1 ± 0.79 kg/d), energy-corrected milk (28.0 vs.30.5 ± 0.92 kg/d), and 4% fat-corrected milk (26.5 vs. 28.3 ± 0.92 kg/d) yields than cows fed the GS diet. However, cows fed diets with EM and GS produced similar yields of milk, energy-corrected milk, and 4% fat-corrected milk. Feed efficiency (milk yield:DM intake) was greater only for cows fed the GS diet than those fed the MM diet. Milk protein yield and concentration were greater among cows fed the GS diet compared with those fed the EM or MM diets. Milk fat and lactose concentrations were not influenced by diet. However, milk urea N was lower for cows fed the GS diet than for those fed the MM diet. Ruminal NH3-N was greater for cows fed the EM diet than for

  11. Methane production, ruminal fermentation characteristics, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen excretion, and milk production of dairy cows fed conventional or brown midrib corn silage.

    PubMed

    Hassanat, F; Gervais, R; Benchaar, C

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of replacing conventional corn silage (CCS) with brown midrib corn silage (BMCS) in dairy cow diets on enteric CH4 emission, nutrient intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation characteristics, milk production, and N excretion. Sixteen rumen-cannulated lactating cows used in a crossover design (35-d periods) were fed (ad libitum) a total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio = 65:35, dry matter basis) based (59% dry matter) on either CCS or BMCS. Dry matter intake and milk yield increased when cows were fed BMCS instead of CCS. Of the milk components, only milk fat content slightly decreased when cows were fed the BMCS-based diet compared with when fed the CCS-based diet (3.81 vs. 3.92%). Compared with CCS, feeding BMCS to cows increased yields of milk protein and milk fat. Ruminal pH, protozoa numbers, total VFA concentration, and molar proportions of acetate and propionate were similar between cows fed BMCS and those fed CCS. Daily enteric CH4 emission (g/d) was unaffected by dietary treatments, but CH4 production expressed as a proportion of gross energy intake or on milk yield basis was lower for cows fed the BMCS-based diet than for cows fed the CCS-based diet. A decline in manure N excretion and a shift in N excretion from urine to feces were observed when BMCS replaced CCS in the diet, suggesting reduced potential of manure N volatilization. Results from this study show that improving fiber quality of corn silage in dairy cow diets through using brown midrib trait cultivar can reduce enteric CH4 emissions as well as potential emissions of NH3 and N2O from manure. However, CH4 emissions during manure storage may increase due to excretion of degradable OM when BMCS diet is fed, which merits further investigation.

  12. Relationship of severity of subacute ruminal acidosis to rumen fermentation, chewing activities, sorting behavior, and milk production in lactating dairy cows fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Oba, M

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the current study were to evaluate the variation in severity of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) among lactating dairy cows fed a high-grain diet and to determine factors characterizing animals that are tolerant to high-grain diets. Sixteen ruminally cannulated late-lactating dairy cows (days in milk=282 ± 33.8; body weight=601 ± 75.9 kg) were fed a high-grain diet consisting of 35% forage and 65% concentrate mix. After 17 d of diet adaptation, chewing activities were monitored for a 24-h period and ruminal pH was measured every 30s for 72 h. Acidosis index, defined as the severity of SARA (area of pH <5.8) divided by dry matter intake (DMI), was determined for individual animals to assess the severity of SARA normalized for a feed intake level. Although all cows were fed the same diet, minimum pH values ranged from 5.16 to 6.04, and the acidosis index ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 pH · min/kg of DMI. Six cows with the lowest acidosis index (0.04 ± 0.61 pH · min/kg) and 4 with the highest acidosis index (7.67 ± 0.75 pH · min/kg) were classified as animals that were tolerant and susceptible to the high-grain diet, respectively. Total volatile fatty acid concentration and volatile fatty acid profile were not different between the groups. Susceptible animals sorted against long particles, whereas tolerant animals did not (sorting index=87.6 vs. 97.9, respectively). However, the tolerant cows had shorter total chewing time (35.8 vs. 45.1 min/kg of DMI). In addition, although DMI, milk yield, and milk component yields did not differ between the groups, milk urea nitrogen concentration was higher for tolerant cows compared with susceptible cows (12.8 vs. 8.6 mg/dL), which is possibly attributed to less organic matter fermentation in the rumen of tolerant cows. These results suggest that a substantial variation exists in the severity of SARA among lactating dairy cows fed the same high-grain diet, and that cows tolerant to the high-grain diet might be

  13. Effect of dietary supplementation with live-cell yeast at two dosages on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and total-tract nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Shaver, R D; Bertics, S J

    2012-07-01

    The experimental objective was to determine the effect of dietary supplementation with live-cell yeast (LCY; Procreatin-7, Lesaffre Feed Additives, Milwaukee, WI) at 2 dosages in high-starch (HS) diets [30% starch in dry matter (DM)] on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and total-tract nutrient digestibility in dairy cows compared with HS or low-starch (LS; 20% starch in DM) non-LCY diets. Sixty-four multiparous Holstein cows (114 ± 37 d in milk and 726 ± 74 kg of body weight at trial initiation) were randomly assigned to 32 electronic gate feeders (2 cows per feeder), which were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a completely randomized design. A 2-wk covariate adjustment period with cows fed a 50:50 mixture of the HS and LS diets was followed by a 12-wk treatment period with cows fed their assigned treatment diets. The HS diets were fed without (HS0) and with 2 (HS2) or 4 (HS4) g/cow per day of LCY. The LS diet did not contain LCY (LS0) and was formulated by partially replacing dry ground shelled corn with soy hulls. Cows fed LS0 consumed more DM than cows fed HS diets during wk 3, 10, 11, and 12. Yields of actual (44.5 kg/d, on average), fat-, energy-, and solids-corrected milk were unaffected by treatment. Milk fat content tended to be greater for LS0 than for HS0 and HS2 but not different from HS4. Milk urea nitrogen contents were greater for cows fed LS0 than for cows fed the HS diets. Feed conversion (kg of milk/kg of DM intake) was numerically greater for HS diets than for LS0. Ruminal pH was unaffected by treatment. Ruminal molar proportion of acetate was greater, whereas that of propionate was lower, for LS0 compared with HS diets. Dry matter and organic matter digestibilities were greater for HS2 and HS4 than for HS0. Digestibility of neutral detergent fiber was greater for HS4 than for HS0 and HS2. Dry matter, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities were greater for LS0 than for HS diets; starch digestibility was

  14. Effect of genotype on chemical composition, ruminal degradability and in vitro fermentation characteristics of maize residual plants.

    PubMed

    Zeller, F M E; Edmunds, B L; Schwarz, F J

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes to residual plant feeding value of early- and late-maturing maize varieties. The influence of the cell wall carbohydrate composition, in terms of neutral and acid detergent fibre (NDF and ADF) content, NDF and dry matter (DM) degradability, and in vitro organic matter digestibility and gas production on the feeding value of a range of maize genotypes, was measured. The different genotypes were allotted into two maturity groups (MG I--early to mid-early: S210-S240; MG II--mid-late to late: S 250-S280) and harvested at four different harvest dates (depending on the DM content of the kernels). The maize varieties of MG I had lower NDF and ADF contents and higher ruminal DM degradability, in vitro digestibility and gas production and thus a higher feeding value than MG II at the same stage of physiological maturity. A strong negative relationship between NDF content and the ruminal DM degradability (r = -0.81) was observed. The data indicate that the early-maturing varieties permit a larger flexibility in harvesting due to a longer period of starch inclusion into the kernel whilst simultaneously maintaining a good supply of rumen-available fibre. Conclusively, the higher feeding value of the early-maturing varieties, based on lower NDF and high DM digestibility, permits more flexibility in the harvesting period over the later-maturing varieties.

  15. Effect of dietary sugar concentration and sunflower seed supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, milk fatty acid profile, and blood metabolites of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, A; Valizadeh, R; Naserian, A A; Mesgaran, M Danesh; Carpenter, A J; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has shown that both sunflower seed (SF) and sucrose (SC) supplementation can result in variation in milk fat concentration and composition, possibly due to altered fermentation patterns and biohydrogenation of fatty acids in the rumen. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different sugar concentrations with or without SF supplementation on lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein dairy cows (body weight=620±15kg, 60±10 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Each 21-d period consisted of a 14-d diet adaptation period and 7-d collection period. Dairy cows were fed 1 of the following 4 diets: (1) no additional SC without SF supplementation (NSC-SF), (2) no additional SC with SF supplementation (NSC+SF), (3) SC without SF supplementation (SC-SF), and (4) SC with SF supplementation (SC+SF). The diets contained the same amount of forages (corn silage and alfalfa hay). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated by replacing corn grain with SC and SF and balanced using change in proportions of canola meal and sugar beet pulp. No interaction was detected between SC and SF supplementation with respect to dry matter intake, milk yield, and composition. A tendency was found for an interaction between inclusion of SC and SF on energy-corrected milk with the highest amount in the SC-SF diet. Ruminal pH and the molar proportion of acetate were affected by SC inclusion, with an increase related to the SC-SF diet. Diets containing SF decreased the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (4:0 to 10:0) and medium-chain fatty acids (12:0 to 16:0) in milk fat. The addition of SC tended to decrease the concentration of total trans-18:1. These data provide evidence that exchanging SC for corn at 4% of dietary dry matter

  16. Effect of the dose of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparations on preingestive fiber hydrolysis, ruminal fermentation, and in vitro digestibility of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Adesogan, A T

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of the dose rates of 5 Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE; 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) on in vitro digestibility, fermentation characteristics, and preingestive hydrolysis of bermudagrass haylage and to identify the optimal dose of each EFE for subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies. In experiment 1, EFE were diluted in citrate-phosphate buffer (pH 6) and applied in quadruplicate in each of 2 runs at 0× (control), 0.5×, 1×, 2×, and 3×; where 1× was the respective manufacturer-recommended dose (2.25, 2.25, 10, 15, and 15g of EFE/kg of dry matter). The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and for a further 24h at 39°C after the addition of ruminal fluid. In experiment 2, a similar approach to that in experiment 1 was used to evaluate simulated preingestive effects, except that sodium azide (0.02% wt/vol) was added to the EFE solution. The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and then 15mL of water was added before filtration to extract water-soluble compounds. For both experiments, data for each enzyme were analyzed separately as a completely randomized block design with a model that included effects of EFE dose, run, and their interaction. In experiment 1, increasing the EFE dose rate nonlinearly increased the DM digestibility of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D and the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D. Optimal doses of 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D, as indicated by the greatest increases in NDFD at the lowest dose tested, were 2×, 2×, 1×, 0.5×, and 0.5×, respectively. Increasing the dose rate of 2A, 11C, and 13D nonlinearly increased concentrations of total volatile fatty acids and propionate (mM), decreased their acetate-to-propionate ratios and linearly decreased those of samples treated with 1A and 15D. In experiment 2, increasing the dose rate of each EFE nonlinearly decreased concentrations of netural detergent fiber; also, increasing

  17. Effect of total mixed ration composition on fermentation and efficiency of ruminal microbial crude protein synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boguhn, J; Kluth, H; Rodehutscord, M

    2006-05-01

    The goal of this study was to identify dietary factors that affect fermentation and efficiency of microbial crude protein (CP(M)) synthesis in the rumen in vitro. We used 16 total mixed, dairy cow rations with known digestibilities that varied in ingredient composition and nutrient content. Each ration was incubated in a Rusitec (n = 3) for 15 d, and fermentation of different fractions was assessed. Observed extents of fermentation in 24 h were 35 to 47% for organic matter, 25 to 60% for crude protein, 3 to 28% for neutral detergent fiber, and 31 to 45% for gross energy. Organic matter fermentation depended on the content of crude protein and neutral detergent fiber in the ration. We studied net synthesis of CP(M) using an 15N dilution technique and found that 7 d of continuous 15N application are needed to achieve an 15N enrichment plateau in the N of isolated microbes in this type of study. The efficiency of CP(M) synthesis was 141 to 286 g/kg of fermented organic matter or 4.9 to 11.1 g/MJ of metabolizable energy, and these ranges agree with those found in the literature. Multiple regressions to predict the efficiency of CP(M) synthesis by diet data showed that crude protein was the only dietary chemical fraction that had a significant effect. Fat content and the inclusion rate of corn silage in the ration also tended to improve efficiency. We suggest that microbial need for preformed amino acids may explain the crude protein effect. A large part of the variation in efficiency of microbial activity still remains unexplained.

  18. Metabolic effects of D-psicose in rats: studies on faecal and urinary excretion and caecal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tatsuhiro; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Hashiguchi, Mineo; Izumori, Ken; Suzuki, Hiroo

    2003-01-01

    D-psicose (D -ribo-2-hexulose), a C-3 epimer of D-fructose, is one of the "rare sugars" present in small quantities in commercial carbohydrate complex or agricultural products. We investigated the absorption and excretion of D-psicose when orally administrated (5g/kg body weight) to Wistar rats, and the fermentation of D-psicose was measured as caecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) when fed to rats in controlled diets (0, 10, 20 and 30%). Urinary and faecal excretions of D-psicose over the 24 h, following a single oral administration, were 11-15% of dosage for the former and 8-13% of dosage for the latter. Serum D-psicose concentration and D-psicose in the contents of stomach and small intestines decreased progressively after administration. D-psicose in caecum contents was detected after 3h and 7h administration, but not after 1h. Rats fed on D-psicose diets showed short-chain fatty acid production with caecal hypertrophy. These results suggest that D-psicose is partly absorbable in the digestive tract and is excreted into urine and faeces. As with other poorly absorbed dietary carbohydrates, D-psicose is fermented in the caecum by intestinal microflora.

  19. Effect of creep feed supplementation and season on intake, microbial protein synthesis and efficiency, ruminal fermentation, digestion, and performance in nursing calves grazing native range in southeastern North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Reed, J J; Gelvin, A L; Lardy, G P; Bauer, M L; Caton, J S

    2006-02-01

    Nine ruminally and duodenally cannulated (172 +/- 23 kg of initial BW; Exp. 1) and 16 intact (153 +/- 28 kg of initial BW; Exp. 2) crossbred nursing steer calves were used to evaluate the effects of creep feed supplementation and advancing season on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, ruminal fermentation, and performance while grazing native rangeland. Treatments in both experiments were no supplement or supplement fed at 0.45% of BW (DM basis) daily. Supplement consisted of 55% wheat middlings, 38.67% soyhulls, 5% molasses, and 1.33% limestone. Three 15-d collection periods occurred in June, July, and August. In Exp. 1, ruminal evacuations were performed and masticate samples were collected for diet quality analysis on d 1. Duodenal and fecal samples were collected from cannulated calves on d 7 to 12 at 0, 4, 8, and 12 h after supplementation. Ruminal fluid was drawn on d 9 and used as the inoculate for in vitro digestibility. On d 11, ruminal fluid was collected, and the pH was recorded at -1, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h postsupplementation. In Exp. 1 and 2, milk intake was estimated using weigh-suckle-weigh on d 15. Steers in Exp. 2 were fitted with fecal bags on d 6 to 11 to estimate forage intake. In Exp. 1, supplementation had no effect (P = 0.22 to 0.99) on grazed diet or milk composition. Apparent total tract OM disappearance increased (P = 0.03), and apparent total tract N disappearance tended (P = 0.11) to increase in supplemented calves. Microbial efficiency was not affected (P = 0.50) by supplementation. There were no differences in ruminal pH (P = 0.40) or total VFA concentration (P = 0.21) between treatments, whereas ruminal NH3 concentration increased (P = 0.03) in supplemented compared with control calves. In Exp. 2, supplementation decreased (P = 0.02) forage OM intake (OMI; % of BW) and increased (P = 0.06) total OMI (% of BW). Supplementation had no effect on ADG (P = 0.94) or G:F (P = 0.35). Supplementation with a wheat middlings and soybean

  20. The effect of Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus plantarum on the fermentation, aerobic stability, and ruminal degradability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages.

    PubMed

    Filya, I

    2003-11-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus buchneri, alone or in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum, on the fermentation, aerobic stability, and ruminal degradability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages was studied under laboratory conditions. The inoculants were applied at 1 x 10(6) cfu/g. Silages with no additives served as control. After treatment, the chopped forages were ensiled in 1.5-L anaerobic jars. Three jars per treatment were sampled on d 2, 4, 8, 15, and 90. After 90 d of storage, the silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test lasting 5 d, in which CO2 production, as well as chemical and microbiological parameters, was measured to determine the extent of aerobic deterioration. At the end of the ensiling period (d 90), the L. buchneri- and L. buchneri + L. plantarum-inoculated silages had significantly higher levels of acetic acid than the control and L. plantarum-inoculated silages. Therefore, yeast activity was impaired in the L. buchneri- and L. buchneri + L. plantarum-inoculated silages. As a result, L. buchneri, alone or in combination with L. plantarum, improved aerobic stability of the low dry matter corn and sorghum silages. The combination of L. buchneri and L. plantarum reduced ammonia N concentrations and fermentation losses in the silages compared with L. buchneri alone. However, L. buchneri, L. plantarum, and a combination of L. buchneri + L. plantarum did not effect in situ rumen dry matter, organic matters, or neutral detergent fiber degradability of the silages. The L. buchneri was very effective in protecting the low dry matter corn and sorghum silages exposed to air under laboratory conditions. The use of L. buchneri, alone or in combination with L. plantarum, as a silage inoculant can improve the aerobic stability of low dry matter corn and sorghum silages by inhibition of yeast activity.

  1. Effects of corn silage hybrids and dietary nonforage fiber sources on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and productive performance of lactating Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Holt, M S; Williams, C M; Dschaak, C M; Eun, J-S; Young, A J

    2010-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of corn silage hybrids and nonforage fiber sources (NFFS) in high forage diets formulated with high dietary proportions of alfalfa hay (AH) and corn silage (CS) on ruminal fermentation and productive performance by early lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows (4 ruminally fistulated) averaging 36±6.2 d in milk were used in a duplicated 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Cows were fed 1 of 4 dietary treatments during each of the four 21-d replicates. Treatments were (1) conventional CS (CCS)-based diet without NFFS, (2) CCS-based diet with NFFS, (3) brown midrib CS (BMRCS)-based diet without NFFS, and (4) BMRCS-based diet with NFFS. Diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. Sources of NFFS consisted of ground soyhulls and pelleted beet pulp to replace a portion of AH and CS in the diets. In vitro 30-h neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradability was greater for BMRCS than for CCS (42.3 vs. 31.2%). Neither CS hybrids nor NFFS affected intake of dry matter (DM) and nutrients. Digestibility of N, NDF, and acid detergent fiber tended to be greater for cows consuming CCS-based diets. Milk yield was not influenced by CS hybrids and NFFS. However, a tendency for an interaction between CS hybrids and NFFS occurred, with increased milk yield due to feeding NFFS with the BMRCS-based diet. Yields of milk fat and 3.5% fat-corrected milk decreased when feeding the BMRCS-based diet, and a tendency existed for an interaction between CS hybrids and NFFS because milk fat concentration further decreased by feeding NFFS with BMRCS-based diet. Although feed efficiency (milk/DM intake) was not affected by CS hybrids and NFFS, an interaction was found between CS hybrids and NFFS because feed efficiency increased when NFFS was fed only with BMRCS-based diet. Total volatile fatty acid production and individual molar proportions were not affected by diets. Dietary

  2. Studies on supplementary desalted mother liquor on digestibility of nutrients, ruminal fermentation, and energy and nitrogen balance in Thai native cattle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takashi; Angthong, Wanna; Takeda, Motoharu; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2017-09-01

    Four Thai native steers were used to determine the adequate levels of supplementary desalted mother liquor (DML) for energy and nitrogen balances and ruminal fermentation. The crude protein and sodium chloride contents of DML were 25.5% and 60.3% on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. A 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment was conducted by adding different amounts of DML to three experimental diets (T1: 1.1%, T2: 2.2%, T3: 3.4% sodium chloride concentration with supplementary DML on a DM basis) and comparing their effects with those of a control diet (C) containing 1.0% commercial salt on a DM basis. The animals were given the experimental diets and rice straw daily at 1.2% and 0.8% of body weight, respectively, on a DM basis. No significant differences in the apparent digestibility of nutrients were observed among treatments. T3 achieved the lowest nitrogen retention (P < 0.05), followed by C, T2 and T1. The ratios of energy retention to gross energy were higher in T1 and T3 than T2, and that in C was lowest (P < 0.05). Supplementary NaCl concentration at 1% and 2% can be replaced with DML without an adverse effect on the digestibility of nutrients or on the nitrogen and energy retention. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Influence of ensiling, exogenous protease addition, and bacterial inoculation on fermentation profile, nitrogen fractions, and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility in rehydrated and high-moisture corn.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Fredin, S M; Shaver, R D

    2015-10-01

    Exogenous protease addition may be an option to increase proteolysis of zein proteins and thus starch digestibility in rehydrated and high-moisture corn (HMC) ensiled for short periods. In addition, microbial inoculation may accelerate fermentation and increase acid production and thus increase solubilization of zein proteins. Four experiments were performed to evaluate the effect on fermentation profile, N fractions, and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility (ivSD) of the following: (1) rehydration and ensiling of dry ground corn; (2) exogenous protease addition to rehydrated un-ensiled and ensiled corn; (3) exogenous protease addition or inoculation in rehydrated ensiled corn; and (4) exogenous protease addition or inoculation in HMC. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 were performed with 7 treatments: dry ground corn (DGC); DGC rehydrated to a targeted dry matter content of 70% (REH); REH treated with exogenous protease (REH+); REH ensiled for 30 d (ENS); ENS treated with exogenous protease (ENS+); ENS treated with a microbial inoculant containing Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Enterococcus faecium, and Pediococcus sp. (ENSI); and ENS treated with exogenous protease and microbial inoculant (ENSI+). Experiment 1 compared DGC, REH, and ENS with ivSD being greater for ENS (64.9%) than DGC and REH (51.7% on average). Experiment 2 compared REH and ENS without or with exogenous protease addition (REH+ and ENS+, respectively). Ensiling and exogenous protease addition increased ivSD, but exogenous protease addition was more effective in ENS than REH (6.4 vs. 2.6 percentage unit increase). Experiment 3 compared the effects of exogenous protease addition and inoculation in ENS corn (ENS, ENS+, ENSI, and ENSI+). The addition of protease, but not inoculant, increased ivSD. Inoculation reduced pH and acetate, propionate, and ethanol concentrations, and increased lactate and total acid concentrations. In experiment 4, 8 treatments were a combination of HMC noninoculated

  4. Feed intake, ruminal fermentation, and animal behavior of beef heifers fed forage free diets containing nonforage fiber sources.

    PubMed

    Iraira, S P; Ruíz de la Torre, J L; Rodríguez-Prado, M; Calsamiglia, S; Manteca, X; Ferret, A

    2013-08-01

    Eight Simmental heifers (initial BW 313.4 ± 13.2 kg) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental treatments in a 4 × 4 double Latin square design. The experiment was performed in four 28-d periods. Treatments tested were a control diet in which barley straw (BS) was used as a fiber source and 3 diets where the main difference was the nonforage fiber source used: soybean hulls (SH), beet pulp (BP) in pellets, and whole cottonseed (WCS). All ingredients, except the fiber sources, were ground through a 3-mm screen. Fiber ingredients were incorporated at 10, 17, 17, and 16% (on DM basis) in BS, SH, BP, and WCS, respectively. All diets were offered ad libitum as total mixed ration and designed to be isoenergetic (2.95 Mcal ME/kg DM), isonitrogenous (15% CP, DM basis), and with a NDF content of 20% (on DM basis) although there was a discrepancy between the theoretical and the actual chemical composition of the diets. Particle size separation was performed using the 3-screen Penn State Particle Separator. Animals were allotted in 8 individual roofed concrete pens equipped with a feedbunk and water trough. Intake was recorded over 7 d in the last week of each experimental period. Behavior was recorded for 24-h on d 2 and d 6 of each experimental week using a digital video recording device. A digital color camera was set up in front of each pen. Data recorded, except behavioral activities, were statistically analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. To test treatment effect for each behavioral activity, analysis was performed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS. Diets ranked from greater to lesser proportion of particles of less than 1.18 mm as follows: SH, BS, WCS, and BP. Dry matter intake of heifers fed WCS was greater than the remaining treatments (P = 0.049). The greatest average ruminal pH was registered in heifers fed BS (6.4) and BP (6.3) whereas the smallest was recorded in SH diet (5.9), with WCS (6.2) occupying an intermediate position (P = 0.006). Total

  5. Nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation characteristic in swamp buffaloes fed on chemically treated rice straw and urea.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Thi; Wanapat, Metha; Khejornsart, Pichad; Kongmun, Phongthorn

    2012-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine effects of urea-lime-treated rice straw and urea levels in concentrate on rumen fermentation, apparent nutrient digestibility, and cellulolytic bacteria population of 4-year-old, rumen-fistulated swamp buffaloes. All animals were randomly assigned according to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement in a 4 × 4 Latin square design to receive four dietary treatments: factor A, two sources of roughage (rice straw and 2%urea + 2%lime-treated rice straw); factor B, two levels of urea in concentrate mixture (0% and 4%). Roughages were given ad libitum together with 0.3% BW of concentrate. It was found that voluntary feed intake, the digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NDF, acetate, and propionate concentration were significantly increased (P < 0.05) by treated rice straw, while NH(3)-N, BUN, and propionic acid concentration were increased by both factors of treated rice straw and 4% urea in concentrate. The real-time PCR quantification of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus albus population, and anaerobic fungi were greater (P < 0.05), but the population of Ruminococcus flavefaciens, protozoa, and methanogenic bacteria were reduced (P > 0.05) as influenced by treated rice straw and urea level. In conclusion, the combined use of urea-lime-treated rice straw and fed with concentrate (4% urea) could improve rumen ecology, rumen fermentation efficiency, and nutrient digestibility in swamp buffaloes.

  6. Effects of altering alfalfa hay quality when feeding steam-flaked versus high-moisture corn grain on ruminal fermentation and lactational performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Eun, J-S; Kelley, A W; Neal, K; Young, A J; Hall, J O

    2014-12-01

    This experiment was performed to test a hypothesis that nutritive benefits of feeding high-moisture corn (HMC) would be different when fed with different qualities of alfalfa hay (AH) due to associative effects on ruminal fermentation and nutrient utilization efficiency. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows were used; 4 were surgically fitted with ruminal cannulas. Days in milk averaged 184 ± 10.7 at the start of the experiment. The experiment was performed in a duplicate 4 × 4 Latin square design. Within each square, cows were randomly assigned to a sequence of 4 diets during each of the four 21-d periods (14 d of treatment adaptation and 7 d of data collection and sampling). A 2 × 2 factorial arrangement was used; fair-quality AH [FAH; 39.6% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and 17.9% crude protein (CP)] or high-quality AH (HAH; 33.6% NDF and 21.9% CP) was combined with steam-flaked corn (SFC) or HMC to form 4 treatments: FAH with SFC, FAH with HMC, HAH with SFC, and HAH with HMC. The AH was fed at 32% dry matter (DM) content, whereas SFC or HMC was included at 17% DM content. Quality of AH did not affect DM intake, whereas feeding HMC decreased DM intake, regardless of quality of AH. Digestibility of DM was greater for cows fed HAH compared with those fed FAH (70.1 vs. 67.6%). Digestibility of NDF increased by feeding HMC (67.6 vs. 58.4%), but not by quality of AH. Under FAH, starch digestibility decreased by feeding HMC compared with SFC (85.7 vs. 95.0%), but it was similar under HAH, resulting in an interaction between quality of AH and type of corn grain (CG). Feeding different qualities of AH did not affect milk yield; however, feeding HMC decreased milk yield in FAH diet, causing an AH × CG interaction. Efficiency of milk yield/DM intake was improved due to feeding HMC, regardless of the quality of the AH. In addition, dietary N utilization for milk N tended to increase by feeding HMC, but it was not influenced by quality of AH. Yield of microbial

  7. Improvement of Nutritive Value and In vitro Ruminal Fermentation of Leucaena Silage by Molasses and Urea Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Phesatcha, K.; Wanapat, M.

    2016-01-01

    Leucaena silage was supplemented with different levels of molasses and urea to study its nutritive value and in vitro rumen fermentation efficiency. The ensiling study was randomly assigned according to a 3×3 factorial arrangement in which the first factor was molasses (M) supplement at 0%, 1%, and 2% of crop dry matter (DM) and the second was urea (U) supplement as 0%, 0.5%, and 1% of the crop DM, respectively. After 28 days of ensiling, the silage samples were collected and analyzed for chemical composition. All the nine Leucaena silages were kept for study of rumen fermentation efficiency using in vitro gas production techniques. The present result shows that supplementation of U or M did not affect DM, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber content in the silage. However, increasing level of U supplementation increased crude protein content while M level did not show any effect. Moreover, the combination of U and M supplement decreased the content of mimosine concentration especially with M2U1 (molasses 2% and urea 1%) silage. The result of the in vitro study shows that gas production kinetics, cumulation gas at 96 h and in vitro true digestibility increased with the increasing level of U and M supplementation especially in the combination treatments. Supplementation of M and U resulted in increasing propionic acid and total volatile fatty acid whereas, acetic acid, butyric acid concentrations and methane production were not changed. In addition, increasing U level supplementation increased NH3-N concentration. Result from real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant effect on total bacteria, whereas F. succinogenes and R. flavefaciens population while R. albus was not affected by the M and U supplementation. Based on this study, it could be concluded that M and urea U supplementation could improve the nutritive value of Leucaena silage and enhance in vitro rumen fermentation efficiency. This study also suggested that

  8. Improvement of Nutritive Value and In vitro Ruminal Fermentation of Leucaena Silage by Molasses and Urea Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Phesatcha, K; Wanapat, M

    2016-08-01

    Leucaena silage was supplemented with different levels of molasses and urea to study its nutritive value and in vitro rumen fermentation efficiency. The ensiling study was randomly assigned according to a 3×3 factorial arrangement in which the first factor was molasses (M) supplement at 0%, 1%, and 2% of crop dry matter (DM) and the second was urea (U) supplement as 0%, 0.5%, and 1% of the crop DM, respectively. After 28 days of ensiling, the silage samples were collected and analyzed for chemical composition. All the nine Leucaena silages were kept for study of rumen fermentation efficiency using in vitro gas production techniques. The present result shows that supplementation of U or M did not affect DM, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber content in the silage. However, increasing level of U supplementation increased crude protein content while M level did not show any effect. Moreover, the combination of U and M supplement decreased the content of mimosine concentration especially with M2U1 (molasses 2% and urea 1%) silage. The result of the in vitro study shows that gas production kinetics, cumulation gas at 96 h and in vitro true digestibility increased with the increasing level of U and M supplementation especially in the combination treatments. Supplementation of M and U resulted in increasing propionic acid and total volatile fatty acid whereas, acetic acid, butyric acid concentrations and methane production were not changed. In addition, increasing U level supplementation increased NH3-N concentration. Result from real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant effect on total bacteria, whereas F. succinogenes and R. flavefaciens population while R. albus was not affected by the M and U supplementation. Based on this study, it could be concluded that M and urea U supplementation could improve the nutritive value of Leucaena silage and enhance in vitro rumen fermentation efficiency. This study also suggested that

  9. Effect of Ground Corn Cob Replacement for Cassava Chip on Feed Intake, Rumen Fermentation and Urinary Derivatives in Swamp Buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Wanapat, M.; Pilajun, R.; Kang, S.; Setyaningsih, K.; Setyawan, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Four Thai - rumen fistulated male swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), about four years old with 400±20 kg liveweight, were randomly assigned according to a 4×4 Latin square design to receive dietary treatments. The treatments were: ground corn cob (GCC) replacement for cassava chip (CC) in concentrate at 0% (T1); GCC replacement at 33% (T2); GCC replacement at 67% (T3); and GCC replacement at 100% (T4), respectively. During the experiment, concentrate was offered at 0.5% BW while 5% urea-treated rice straw was given at ad libitum. The result revealed that there was no effect of GCC replacement on DMI among treatments. In addition, digestibilities of DM, OM and CP were not different while aNDF linearly increased with an increasing level of GCC replacement. However, GCC replacement did not affect rumen fermentation such as ruminal pH, NH3-N and VFA concentration; except C3 proportion which was the highest at 33% replacement while the lowest was at 100% replacement. All replacements of GCC resulted in similar protozoal and bacterial populations and microbial protein synthesis (MPS). Purine derivatives (PD) concentration in urine and PD to creatinine (PDC) index were varied with time of urination and among treatments at 0 to 8 and 8 to 16 h post feeding and higher values were shown among the GCC replacement groups. However at 16 to 24 h-post feeding, it was untraceable. In addition, creatinine concentration was similar among all treatments at every sampling time. Based on the above results, GCC can be used as an energy source for swamp buffalo fed with rice straw. Spot sampling of urine can be used for purine derivatives determination. PMID:25049671

  10. Effects of adding food by-products mainly including noodle waste to total mixed ration silage on fermentation quality, feed intake, digestibility, nitrogen utilization and ruminal fermentation in wethers.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kyohei; Yani, Srita; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2012-11-01

    Four wethers were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the applicability of two types of total mixed ration (TMR) silage with food by-products. Four food by-products (i.e., potato waste, soy sauce cake, soybean curd residue and noodle waste) were obtained and mixed with commercial concentrate (CC) as TMR silage. The two types of TMR silage, T1 and T2, each contained CC, in addition to all by-products for T1 (TRE1), and soy sauce cake and noodle waste for T2 (TRE2) on a dry matter (DM) basis. The silage was well-fermented with low pH values and high lactic acid concentration. As the experimental treatments, T1, T2 and CC (CTL) were fed with a basal diet. The result showed that the digestibility of DM and organic matter (OM) were higher for T1 than for CC (P < 0.05), while crude protein digestibility was not significantly different among T1, T2 and CC. The retained nitrogen was not affected by inclusion of food by-products. Ruminal pH in TRE1 and TRE2 immediately decreased compared to that in CTL. The study suggested that the two types of TMR silage, including food by-products, might be used as a substitute for commercial concentrate. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  11. Effects of coconut and fish oils on ruminal methanogenesis, fermentation, and abundance and diversity of microbial populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K; Yu, Z

    2013-03-01

    Coconut (CO) and fish (FO) oils were previously shown to inhibit rumen methanogenesis and biohydrogenation, which mitigates methane emission and helps improve beneficial fatty acids in meat and milk. This study aimed at investigating the comparative effects of CO and FO on the methanogenesis, fermentation, and microbial abundances and diversity in vitro rumen cultures containing different doses (0, 3.1, and 6.2 mL/L) of each oil and 400mg feed substrate using rumen fluid from lactating dairy cows as inocula. Increasing doses of CO and FO quadratically decreased concentrations of methane, but hydrogen concentrations were only increased quadratically by CO. Both oils linearly decreased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility of feeds but did not affect the concentration of total volatile fatty acids. However, CO reduced acetate percentage and acetate to propionate ratio and increased the percentages of propionate and butyrate to a greater extent than FO. Ammonia concentration was greater for CO than FO. As determined by quantitative real-time PCR, FO had greater inhibition to methanogens than CO, but the opposite was true for protozoal, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Fibrobacter succinogenes. Ruminococcus albus was not affected by either oil. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that bacterial and archaeal community composition were changed differently by oil type. Based on Pareto-Lorenz evenness curve analysis of the DGGE profiles, CO noticeably changed the functional organization of archaea compared with FO. In conclusion, although both CO and FO decreased methane concentrations to a similar extent, the mode of reduction and the effect on abundances and diversity of archaeal and bacterial populations differed between the oils. Thus, the use of combination of CO and FO at a low dose may additively lower methanogenesis in the rumen while having little adverse effect on rumen fermentation. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy

  12. Effect of including high-lipid by-product pellets in substitution for barley grain and canola meal in finishing diets for beef cattle on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility.

    PubMed

    Górka, P; Castillo-Lopez, E; Joy, F; Chibisa, G E; McKinnon, J J; Penner, G B

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of replacing barley grain and canola meal with high-lipid by-product pellets (HLBP; 14.6% CP, 29.8% NDF, 9.0% fat, and 5.52 MJ NE/kg in DM) on DMI, ruminal fermentation, nutrient flow at the omasal canal, and nutrient digestibility. Four ruminally cannulated and ovariectomized Hereford × Gelbvieh heifers (initial BW of 631.9 ± 23.3 kg; mean ± SD) were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Periods consisted of 28 d, including 10 d for diet transition, 11 d for dietary adaptation, and 7 d for measurements. Heifers were fed a typical finishing diet consisting of 89% of concentrate (barley grain and canola meal; CONT), 6% of barley silage, and 5% of mineral and vitamin supplement (on DM basis). Dietary treatments consisted of a CONT or diets where 30% (HLBP30), 60% (HLBP60), and 90% (HLBP90) of the barley grain and canola meal were replaced with HLBP. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatment ( > 0.10). Total short-chain fatty acid concentration and molar proportions of acetate, propionate, and butyrate ( > 0.10) among treatments and ruminal ammonia did not differ ( > 0.10) among treatments, and ruminal ammonia increased ( = 0.03) linearly with increasing HLBP inclusion rate in the diet. Mean and maximum pH increased, whereas the duration and area that pH was below 5.8, 5.5, and 5.2, thresholds used for mild, severe, and acute ruminal acidosis, respectively, decreased linearly ( ≤ 0.05) with increasing rates of inclusion of HLBP. Organic matter flow at the omasal canal increased linearly ( = 0.03) with increasing HLBP inclusion rate in the diet. However, OM digestibility coefficients and apparent ruminal NDF and ADF digestibility yielded negative values for some animals, especially those fed HLBP90, indicating that ruminal digestibility was underestimated. Total tract OM digestibility decreased linearly ( < 0.01) with increasing inclusion rates of HLBP. This study showed that HLBP inclusion in substitution for barley

  13. Effect of incremental flaxseed supplementation of an herbage diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Soder, K J; Brito, A F; Rubano, M D; Dell, C J

    2012-07-01

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of increasing flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, microbial N synthesis, and methane (CH(4)) output. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, with 7d for diet adaptation and 3d for data and sample collection. Treatments were 0, 5, 10, and 15% ground flaxseed supplementation of an orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) diet [70 g of total dry matter (DM) fed daily]. Samples were collected from the fermentors 4 times daily at feeding (0730, 1030, 1400, and 1900 h) on d 8 to 10 of each of four 10-d periods and analyzed for pH, ammonia-N, and volatile fatty acids. Gas samples for CH(4) analysis were collected immediately before and 1 and 2h after the 0730 h feeding on d 8, 9, and 10 and at the 1400 h feeding on d 7, 8, and 9 of each period. Effluents were analyzed for DM, organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber for determination of nutrient digestibilities, and for total purine concentration for estimation of microbial protein synthesis. Apparent DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities decreased linearly with increasing supplemental flaxseed, whereas true DM and organic matter digestibilities were not significantly affected by treatment, averaging 77.6 and 79.1%, respectively. Mean ruminal pH and concentration of total volatile fatty acids were not significantly affected by increasing the dietary concentration of flaxseed, averaging 6.68 and 55.9 mmol/L across treatments, respectively. However, molar proportions of acetate and propionate increased linearly, whereas those of butyrate and valerate decreased linearly with increasing flaxseed supplementation. Although CH(4) output decreased linearly as supplemental flaxseed increased from 0 to 15% of diet DM, ammonia-N concentration, apparent crude protein digestibility, and microbial N synthesis

  14. Exclusion of dietary sodium bicarbonate from a wheat-based diet: effects on milk production and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Doepel, L; Hayirli, A

    2011-01-01

    Milk production, rumen fermentation, and whole-tract apparent nutrient digestibility in response to feeding 20% steam-rolled wheat with or without sodium bicarbonate were evaluated in 12 Holstein cows averaging 165±16 DIM. Cows were fed 1 of 2 isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets containing either 0 or 0.75% sodium bicarbonate on a DM basis for 21 d in a crossover design. Rumen fluid samples were obtained 18 times during the last 2 d of each period, and fecal samples were collected on 12 occasions from d 18 to 21 of each period. Removal of sodium bicarbonate from the diet did not affect DMI (21.0 kg/d), yields of milk (30.8 kg/d), or milk components (1.16, 1.01, and 1.40 kg/d for fat, protein, and lactose, respectively). Whole-tract apparent digestibility of DM, CP, ADF, and NDF did not differ between the 2 treatments (75.3, 76.6, 67.2, and 63.6%, respectively). The mean rumen pH was 6.24 and was not affected by excluding sodium bicarbonate from the diet. Rumen NH3-N (12.31 mg/dL) and lactic acid (3.63 mM) concentrations were not different, whereas total volatile fatty acids concentration tended to increase when sodium bicarbonate was present in the diet (110 vs. 116 mM). However, average concentrations of the individual volatile fatty acids, as a proportion of total volatile fatty acids, were not affected by treatment. In conclusion, dairy cow diets can include up to 20% steam-rolled wheat without the need for added sodium bicarbonate as long as the diets are formulated to meet the fiber requirements of the cow.

  15. Evaluation of the response of ruminal fermentation and activities of nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes to particle length of corn silage in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zebeli, Q; Tafaj, M; Junck, B; Olschläger, V; Ametaj, B N; Drochner, W

    2008-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate effects of particle length (PL) of corn silage (CS) on distribution of dietary particle fractions, contents of physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF), cows' intake patterns and sorting activity, fermentation pro-file, and activities of nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes as well as degradation in the rumen and total tract in lactating dairy cows. Four ruminally cannulated Holstein cows, weighing 624 +/- 50 kg and 60 +/- 8 d in milk, were fed ad libitum 3 total mixed rations [about 16% crude protein, 34% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and 7 MJ of net energy of lactation/kg of dry matter (DM)] containing on DM basis 50% concentrate, 10% grass hay, and 40% CS with 3 different theoretical PL at harvesting (14, 8.1, and 5.5 mm for long, medium, and short, respectively). Results showed that the amount of DM retained on sieves with 19- and 8-mm screens of Penn State Particle Separator decreased linearly with decreasing PL of CS. The latter was reflected in a significant decrease in the content of dietary peNDF including both the DM (peNDF(>8)) and the NDF (peNDF(>8-NDF)) retained on 19- and 8-mm screens. In contrast, the fraction of particles retained between the 1.18- and 8-mm screens was increased, such that no differences among the diets were observed regarding the content of peNDF that includes DM of particles >1.18 mm (peNDF(>1.18)). The intake of particles retained between the 1.18- and 8-mm screens increased linearly, whereas the intake of peNDF(>1.18) increased quadratically with decreasing PL of CS. Sorting consumption was reduced by feeding the short CS, which was reflected in a reduced proportion of propionate and increased acetate-to-propionate ratio and butyrate pro-portion in the rumen. In contrast, no effects of PL of CS were observed on the concentration of total volatile fatty acids and pH in the rumen. In general, decreasing the PL of CS significantly increased the activities of

  16. Characteristics of Wet Distillers Grains on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Its Effects on Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Finishing Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Gyu Chul; Kwak, Hyung Jun; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Jang, Sun Sik; Lee, Sang Suk; Park, Keun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the nutrient composition, in vitro ruminal ammonia concentrations and pH of wet distillers grains (WDG, produced from tapioca 70% and rice 30%) and to evaluate dietary effects of fermented total mixed ration (TMR) using WDG on the performance, blood metabolites and carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers from mid fattening to slaughter. In Exp. I, average dry matter (DM), crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber, ash, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen free extract of seven WDG samples from an ethanol plant with different sampling dates were 19.9%, 24.8%, 3.8%, 21.8%, 8.87%, 60.3%, 34.5%, and 40.7% (DM basis), respectively. For in vitro ammonia concentrations and pH, each sample was assigned to 7 incubation times (0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h). Linear increase was observed between 12 and 48 h for ammonia concentrations, but final ammonia concentrations (72 h) were not significantly different among WDG samples and fermentation patterns of WDG samples showed similar tendency. In vitro pH varied among treatments from 0 to 24 h, but were not different statistically after 48 h. In Exp. II, 45 Hanwoo steers of 23 months (641±123 kg) from mid fattening period to slaughter (248 days) were randomly divided into three groups of 15 pens each (five repetitions/each treatment) and assigned to one of three dietary treatments; i) Control (TMR), ii) WDG 15 (TMR containing 15% of WDG, as fed basis) and iii) WDG 28 (TMR containing 28% of WDG, as fed basis). The body weight (BW), ADG, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of control and WDG 15 and 28 during 248 days were 760.8, 740.1, and 765.5 kg, and 0.50, 0.50, and 0.52 kg/d, and 18.6, 17.6, and 17.1, respectively. The dry matter intake (DMI) (kg/d) of control (9.11) was higher (p<0.05) than WDG treatments (WDG 15%, 8.57; 28%, 8.70). Nevertheless, DMI did not affect BW, ADG, and FCR of Hanwoo finishing steers. Blood metabolites were in normal ranges and were not

  17. Characteristics of Wet Distillers Grains on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Its Effects on Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Finishing Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Gyu Chul; Kwak, Hyung Jun; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Jang, Sun Sik; Lee, Sang Suk; Park, Keun Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the nutrient composition, in vitro ruminal ammonia concentrations and pH of wet distillers grains (WDG, produced from tapioca 70% and rice 30%) and to evaluate dietary effects of fermented total mixed ration (TMR) using WDG on the performance, blood metabolites and carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers from mid fattening to slaughter. In Exp. I, average dry matter (DM), crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber, ash, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and nitrogen free extract of seven WDG samples from an ethanol plant with different sampling dates were 19.9%, 24.8%, 3.8%, 21.8%, 8.87%, 60.3%, 34.5%, and 40.7% (DM basis), respectively. For in vitro ammonia concentrations and pH, each sample was assigned to 7 incubation times (0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h). Linear increase was observed between 12 and 48 h for ammonia concentrations, but final ammonia concentrations (72 h) were not significantly different among WDG samples and fermentation patterns of WDG samples showed similar tendency. In vitro pH varied among treatments from 0 to 24 h, but were not different statistically after 48 h. In Exp. II, 45 Hanwoo steers of 23 months (641±123 kg) from mid fattening period to slaughter (248 days) were randomly divided into three groups of 15 pens each (five repetitions/each treatment) and assigned to one of three dietary treatments; i) Control (TMR), ii) WDG 15 (TMR containing 15% of WDG, as fed basis) and iii) WDG 28 (TMR containing 28% of WDG, as fed basis). The body weight (BW), ADG, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of control and WDG 15 and 28 during 248 days were 760.8, 740.1, and 765.5 kg, and 0.50, 0.50, and 0.52 kg/d, and 18.6, 17.6, and 17.1, respectively. The dry matter intake (DMI) (kg/d) of control (9.11) was higher (p<0.05) than WDG treatments (WDG 15%, 8.57; 28%, 8.70). Nevertheless, DMI did not affect BW, ADG, and FCR of Hanwoo finishing steers. Blood metabolites were in normal ranges and were not

  18. Linseed oil and DGAT1 K232A polymorphism: Effects on methane emission, energy and nitrogen metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen microbial composition of Holstein-Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    van Gastelen, S; Visker, M H P W; Edwards, J E; Antunes-Fernandes, E C; Hettinga, K A; Alferink, S J J; Hendriks, W H; Bovenhuis, H; Smidt, H; Dijkstra, J

    2017-09-13

    Complex interactions between rumen microbiota, cow genetics, and diet composition may exist. Therefore, the effect of linseed oil, DGAT1 K232A polymorphism (DGAT1), and the interaction between linseed oil and DGAT1 on CH4 and H2 emission, energy and N metabolism, lactation performance, ruminal fermentation, and rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was investigated. Twenty-four lactating Holstein-Friesian cows (i.e., 12 with DGAT1 KK genotype and 12 with DGAT1 AA genotype) were fed 2 diets in a crossover design: a control diet and a linseed oil diet (LSO) with a difference of 22 g/kg of dry matter (DM) in fat content between the 2 diets. Both diets consisted of 40% corn silage, 30% grass silage, and 30% concentrates (DM basis). Apparent digestibility, lactation performance, N and energy balance, and CH4 emission were measured in climate respiration chambers, and rumen fluid samples were collected using the oral stomach tube technique. No linseed oil by DGAT1 interactions were observed for digestibility, milk production and composition, energy and N balance, CH4 and H2 emissions, and rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk fat, and with a higher milk fat and protein content, and proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat compared with the DGAT1 AA genotype, whereas the fat- and protein-corrected milk yield was unaffected by DGAT1. Also, DGAT1 did not affect nutrient digestibility, CH4 or H2 emission, ruminal fermentation or ruminal archaeal and bacterial concentrations. Rumen bacterial and archaeal composition was also unaffected in terms of the whole community, whereas at the genus level the relative abundances of some bacterial genera were found to be affected by DGAT1. The DGAT1 KK genotype was associated with a lower metabolizability (i.e., ratio of metabolizable to gross energy intake), and with a tendency for a lower milk N efficiency compared with the

  19. Effect of urea inclusion in diets containing corn dried distillers grains on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine index.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-01-01

    Increased availability of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and a great proportion of corn-derived CP in the diet may result in a degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit. Therefore, ruminal DIP deficit may result from high dietary inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing dietary DIP concentration through the inclusion of urea on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index. In Exp. 1, 42 steers (428 ± 5 kg initial BW) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets containing (DM basis) 0 (control [CON]), 0.4 (low urea [LU]), or 0.6% urea (high urea [HU]) to provide 6.4, 7.5, or 8.0% dietary DIP, respectively, and 12% high-moisture corn (HMC), 20% corn dried DG with solubles (DDGS), 10% ryegrass haylage, 2.9% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DRC). Steers were fed ad libitum once daily using a Calan gate system. Carcass-adjusted final BW and DMI were similar among treatments (P ≥ 0.58). Carcass-adjusted ADG was greater (P ≤ 0.04) for the HU diet compared with the LU and CON diets and was similar (P = 0.73) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass-adjusted G:F was greater (P = 0.03) for the HU diet compared with the LU diet, tended (P = 0.09) to be greater compared with the CON diet, and was similar (P = 0.61) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass characteristics were similar (P ≥ 0.34) among treatments. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally cannulated steers (347 ± 18 kg initial BW) were randomly assigned to a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design. Steers were fed the same CON or HU diet used in Exp. 1 ad libitum once daily. Differences in the PDC index were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Ruminal pH, OM intake, and starch and CP digestibility were not affected by treatment (P ≥ 0.13). Digestibility of OM and NDF and

  20. The duration of time that beef cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects the recovery from a bout of ruminal acidosis: dry matter intake and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, T; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the duration of time cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects their susceptibility to and recovery from ruminal acidosis. Sixteen Angus heifers (BW ± SEM, 261 ± 6.1 kg) were assigned to 1 of 4 blocks and fed a backgrounding diet consisting of 60% barley silage, 30% barley grain, and 10% supplement (DM basis). Within block, cattle were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments differing in the number of days they were fed the high-grain diet before an acidosis challenge: 34 d for long adapted (LA) and 8 d for short adapted (SA). All heifers were exposed to the same 20 d dietary transition to a high-grain diet containing 9% barley silage, 81% barley grain, and 10% supplement (DM basis). Ruminal acidosis was induced by restricting feed to 50% of DMI:BW for 24 h followed by an intraruminal infusion of ground barley at 10% DMI:BW. Heifers were then given their regular diet allocation 1 h after the intraruminal infusion. Data were collected during an 8-d baseline period (BASE), on the day of the acidosis challenge (CHAL), and during 2 consecutive 8-d recovery periods (REC1 and REC2). Acidosis induction increased daily duration (531 to 1,020 min/d; P < 0.001) and area (176 to 595 (min × pH)/d; P < 0.001) that ruminal pH was <5.5 relative to BASE. Relative to BASE, inducing acidosis also increased the daily mean (0.3 to 11.4 mM; P = 0.013) and maximum (1.3 to 29.3 mM; P = 0.008) ruminal fluid lactate concentrations. There was no effect of dietary treatment on ruminal pH, lactate, or short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations (P > 0.050). However, during BASE and CHAL, SA heifers experienced greater linear (P = 0.031), quadratic (P = 0.016), and cubic (P = 0.008) coefficients for the duration of time that pH was <5.5. In addition, a treatment × day interaction for the duration that pH was <5.5 during REC1 suggested that LA cattle tended to recover from the challenge more rapidly than SA cattle (P = 0.085). Regression analysis

  1. Ruminal digestion and fermentation of high-producing dairy cows with three different feeding systems combining pasture and total mixed rations.

    PubMed

    Bargo, F; Muller, L D; Varga, G A; Delahoy, J E; Cassidy, T W

    2002-11-01

    Six multiparous Holstein cows fitted with rumen cannulas were used to study the effect of three feeding systems combining pasture and total mixed rations (TMR) on ruminal digestion in a 21-wk repeated measures experiment. The three treatments were: 1) pasture plus concentrate (PC), 2) pasture plus partial TMR (pTMR), and 3) TMR (nonpasture). Ruminal NH3-N concentration was lower on both the pTMR and TMR treatments (10.2 +/- 0.5 mg/dL) than on the PC treatment (19.9 +/- 0.5 mg/dL). Ruminal pH was not affected by treatments and averaged 5.87. Neither total volatile fatty acid concentration (137.5 mmol/L) nor individual volatile fatty acid proportions (63.1,20.6, and 12.0 mol/ 100 mol for acetate, propionate, and butyrate, respectively) differed among treatments. The pTMR treatment reduced the total potentially degradable fraction of dry matter (85.5 vs. 82.3%) and the potentially digestible fraction of neutral detergent fiber (82.1 vs. 74.9%) of pasture compared to the PC treatment. Ruminal NH3-N losses were reduced when combining pasture and TMR; however this combination decreased the ruminal digestion of pasture, indicating the presence of associative effects in the rumen.

  2. The effect of buffering dairy cow diets with limestone, calcareous marine algae, or sodium bicarbonate on ruminal pH profiles, production responses, and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, C W; Taylor, S; Beya, M M; Calitz, T

    2015-08-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used to evaluate the effect of 2 dietary buffers on rumen pH, milk production, milk composition, and rumen fermentation parameters. A high concentrate total mixed ration [35.2% forage dry matter (DM)], formulated to be potentially acidotic, was used to construct 3 dietary treatments in which calcareous marine algae (calcified remains of the seaweed Lithothamnium calcareum) was compared with limestone (control) and sodium bicarbonate plus limestone. One basal diet was formulated and the treatment diets contained either 0.4% of dietary DM as Acid Buf, a calcified marine algae product (AB treatment), or 0.8% of dietary DM as sodium bicarbonate and 0.37% as limestone (BC treatment), or 0.35% of dietary DM as limestone [control (CON) treatment]. Cows were randomly allocated to treatments according to a double 3×3 Latin square design, with 3 treatments and 3 periods. The total experimental period was 66 d during which each cow received each treatment for a period of 15 d before the data collection period of 7 d. Rumen fluid was collected to determine volatile fatty acids, lactic acid, and ammonia concentrations. Rumen pH was monitored every 10min for 2 consecutive days using a portable data logging system fitted with in-dwelling electrodes. Milk samples were analyzed for solid and mineral contents. The effect of treatment on acidity was clearly visible, especially from the period from midday to midnight when rumen pH dropped below 5.5 for a longer period of time (13 h) in the CON treatment than in the BC (8.7 h) and AB (4 h) treatments. Daily milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk yields differed among treatments, with AB being the highest, followed by BC and CON. Both buffers increased milk fat content. Treatment had no effect on milk protein content, but protein yield was increased in the AB treatment. Total rumen volatile fatty acids and acetate concentrations were higher and propionate was lower in the AB

  3. Supplemental soybean oil or corn for beef heifers grazing summer pasture: effects on forage intake, ruminal fermentation, and site and extent of digestion.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, L; Hess, B W; Rule, D C

    2001-10-01

    Nine Angus x Gelbvieh heifers (average BW = 347 +/- 2.8 kg) with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in a split-plot designed experiment to determine the effects of soybean oil or corn supplementation on intake, OM, NDF, and N digestibility. Beginning June 8, 1998, heifers continually grazed a 6.5-ha predominantly bromegrass pasture and received one of three treatments: no supplementation (Control); daily supplementation of cracked corn (Corn) at 0.345% of BW; or daily supplementation (0.3% of BW) of a supplement containing cracked corn, corn gluten meal, and soybean oil (12.5% of supplemental DM; Oil). Soybean oil replaced corn on a TDN basis and corn gluten meal was included to provide equal quantities of supplemental TDN and N. Three 23-d periods consisted of 14 d of adaptation followed by 9 d of sample collections. Treatment and sampling period effects were evaluated using orthogonal contrasts. Other than crude fat being greater (P = 0.01) for supplemented heifers, chemical and nutrient composition of masticate samples collected via ruminal evacuation did not differ (P = 0.23 to 0.56) among treatments. Masticate NDF and ADF increased quadratically (P < or = 0.003) and N decreased linearly (P = 0.0001) as the grazing season progressed. Supplementation did not influence (P = 0.37 to 0.83) forage OM intake, total and lower tract OM digestibility, ruminal and total tract NDF digestibility, or total ruminal VFA; however, supplemented heifers had lower ruminal molar proportions of acetate (P = 0.01), higher ruminal molar proportions of butyrate (P = 0.007), and greater quantities of OM digested in the rumen (P = 0.10) and total tract (P = 0.02). As the grazing season progressed, total tract OM and N and ruminal NH3 concentrations and NDF digestibility decreased quadratically (P < or = 0.04). Microbial N flow (P = 0.09) and efficiency (P = 0.04) and postruminal N disappearance (P = 0.02) were greater for Control heifers and declined linearly (P < or = 0.02) as the

  4. Excretion patterns of solute and different-sized particle passage markers in foregut-fermenting proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) do not indicate an adaptation for rumination.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ikki; Sha, John C M; Ortmann, Sylvia; Schwarm, Angela; Grandl, Florian; Caton, Judith; Jens, Warner; Kreuzer, Michael; Marlena, Diana; Hagen, Katharina B; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-10-01

    Behavioral observations and small fecal particles compared to other primates indicate that free-ranging proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) have a strategy of facultative merycism(rumination). In functional ruminants (ruminant and camelids), rumination is facilitated by a particle sorting mechanism in the forestomach that selectively retains larger particles and subjects them to repeated mastication. Using a set of a solute and three particle markers of different sizes (b2, 5 and 8mm),we displayed digesta passage kinetics and measured mean retention times (MRTs) in four captive proboscis monkeys (6–18 kg) and compared the marker excretion patterns to those in domestic cattle. In addition, we evaluated various methods of calculating and displaying passage characteristics. The mean ± SD dry matter intake was 98 ± 22 g kg−0.75 d−1, 68 ± 7% of which was browse. Accounting for sampling intervals in MRT calculation yielded results that were not affected by the sampling frequency. Displaying marker excretion patterns using fecal marker concentrations (rather than amounts) facilitated comparisons with reactor theory outputs and indicated that both proboscis and cattle digestive tracts represent a series of very few tank reactors. However, the separation of the solute and particle marker and the different-sized particle markers, evident in cattle, did not occur in proboscis monkeys, in which all markers moved together, at MRTs of approximately 40 h. The results indicate that the digestive physiology of proboscis monkeys does not show typical characteristics of ruminants, which may explain why merycism is only a facultative strategy in this species.

  5. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    There is no information on the co-products from carinata bio-fuel and bio-oil processing (carinata meal) in molecular structural profiles mainly related to carbohydrate biopolymers in relation to ruminant nutrition. Molecular analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and chemometrics enable to detect structural features on a molecular basis. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine carbohydrate conformation spectral features in original carinata meal, co-products from bio-fuel/bio-oil processing; and (2) investigate differences in carbohydrate molecular composition and functional group spectral intensities after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h compared to canola meal as a reference. The molecular spectroscopic parameters of carbohydrate profiles detected were structural carbohydrates (STCHO, mainly associated with hemi-cellulosic and cellulosic compounds; region and baseline ca. 1483-1184 cm-1), cellulosic compounds (CELC, region and baseline ca. 1304-1184 cm-1), total carbohydrates (CHO, region and baseline ca. 1193-889 cm-1) as well as the spectral ratios calculated based on respective spectral intensity data. The results showed that the spectral profiles of carinata meal were significantly different from that of canola meal in CHO 2nd peak area (center at ca. 1091 cm-1, region: 1102-1083 cm-1) and functional group peak intensity ratios such as STCHO 1st peak (ca. 1415 cm-1) to 2nd peak (ca. 1374 cm-1) height ratio, CHO 1st peak (ca. 1149 cm-1) to 3rd peak (ca. 1032 cm-1) height ratio, CELC to total CHO area ratio and STCHO to CELC area ratio, indicating that carinata meal may not in full accord with canola meal in carbohydrate utilization and availability in ruminants. Carbohydrate conformation and spectral features were changed by significant interaction of meal type and incubation time and almost all the spectral parameters were significantly decreased (P < 0

  6. Effects of bulk density of steam-flaked corn in diets containing wet corn gluten feed on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, apparent total tract digestibility, and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, C H; Domby, E M; Anele, U Y; Schutz, J S; Gautam, K K; Galyean, M L

    2013-07-01

    The effects of varying bulk density of steam-flaked corn (SFC) in diets containing wet corn gluten feed (WCGF; Sweet Bran; Cargill Corn Milling, Blair, NE) have not been defined. In Exp. 1, yearling steers (n = 108; initial BW = 367 ± 1.18 kg) were housed in 27 pens (4 steers/pen) and received 1 of 3 different SFC bulk density treatments in a randomized complete block design. Bulk density treatments were 283, 335, or 386 g/L SFC in diets containing 25% WCGF (% of DM). Steers were fed once daily to provide ad libitum access to feed for an average of 163 d. For a 5-d period before d 70 of the experiment, DMI was measured, and fecal samples were collected from each pen for measurement of nutrient digestibility using dietary acid insoluble ash as a marker. Varying bulk densities of SFC did not affect (P ≥ 0.233) overall DMI, ADG, or G:F on a live- or carcass-adjusted basis. Dressing percent and LM area increased linearly (P ≤ 0.05) as bulk density increased, but other carcass traits were not affected by treatments. Intake of DM, OM, and CP during the 5-d digestion phase did not differ among bulk densities; however, starch intake increased linearly (P = 0.004) as bulk density of SFC increased. Digestibility of DM, OM, and CP tended (P ≤ 0.065) to decrease and starch digestibility decreased (P = 0.002) linearly as bulk density of SFC increased. In Exp. 2, a 3 × 3 Latin square design was used for collection of ruminal fluid from 3 ruminally cannulated Jersey steers adapted to the same diets used in Exp. 1. Bulk density did not affect NH3 concentrations, VFA molar proportions, ruminal fluid osmolality, and IVDMD of the diets. Total gas production increased linearly (P = 0.003) as bulk density of SFC increased from 283 to 335 g/L, but it decreased (P = 0.002) at 386 g/L. Present data suggest that bulk density can be increased up to 386 g/L in finishing diets containing 25% (DM basis) WCGF without affecting cattle performance and with limited effects on ruminal

  7. Influence of soybean meal and sorghum grain supplementation on intake, digesta kinetics, ruminal fermentation, site and extent of digestion and microbial protein synthesis in beef steers grazing blue grama rangeland.

    PubMed

    Krysl, L J; Branine, M E; Cheema, A U; Funk, M A; Galyean, M L

    1989-11-01

    acetate in ruminal fluid was less (P less than .10) for SBM and SFS than for C. Small amounts of supplemental SBM and SFS had little effect on forage intake, ruminal fermentation and site of digestion but both increased total tract OM digestion in steers grazing blue grama rangeland.

  8. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    There is no information on the co-products from carinata bio-fuel and bio-oil processing (carinata meal) in molecular structural profiles mainly related to carbohydrate biopolymers in relation to ruminant nutrition. Molecular analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and chemometrics enable to detect structural features on a molecular basis. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine carbohydrate conformation spectral features in original carinata meal, co-products from bio-fuel/bio-oil processing; and (2) investigate differences in carbohydrate molecular composition and functional group spectral intensities after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h compared to canola meal as a reference. The molecular spectroscopic parameters of carbohydrate profiles detected were structural carbohydrates (STCHO, mainly associated with hemi-cellulosic and cellulosic compounds; region and baseline ca. 1483-1184 cm(-1)), cellulosic compounds (CELC, region and baseline ca. 1304-1184 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO, region and baseline ca. 1193-889cm(-1)) as well as the spectral ratios calculated based on respective spectral intensity data. The results showed that the spectral profiles of carinata meal were significantly different from that of canola meal in CHO 2nd peak area (center at ca. 1091 cm(-1), region: 1102-1083 cm(-1)) and functional group peak intensity ratios such as STCHO 1st peak (ca. 1415 cm(-1)) to 2nd peak (ca. 1374 cm(-1)) height ratio, CHO 1st peak (ca. 1149 cm(-1)) to 3rd peak (ca. 1032 cm(-1)) height ratio, CELC to total CHO area ratio and STCHO to CELC area ratio, indicating that carinata meal may not in full accord with canola meal in carbohydrate utilization and availability in ruminants. Carbohydrate conformation and spectral features were changed by significant interaction of meal type and incubation time and almost all the spectral parameters were significantly

  9. Effects of three methane mitigation agents on parameters of kinetics of total and hydrogen gas production, ruminal fermentation and hydrogen balance using in vitro technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Yang, Shan; Deng, Jin Ping; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) can be mitigated through directly inhibiting methanogen activity and starving methanogens by hydrogen (H2 ) sink. Three types of mechanism (i.e. bromoethanesulphonate (BES), nitrate and emodin) and doses of CH4 mitigation agents were employed to investigate their pathways of CH4 inhibition. Results indicated that both BES and emodin inhibited CH4 production and altered H2 balance, which could be accompanied by decreased dry matter disappearance (DMD), fractional rate of gH2 formation, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, ability to produce and use reducing equivalences and molecular H2 , and increased final asymptotic gH2 production, time to the peak of gH2 , discrete lag time of gH2 production and fermentation efficiency. However, emodin decreased gas volume produced by rapidly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at early stage of incubation, while BES supplementation inhibited gas volume produced by both rapidly and slowly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at middle or late stage of incubation. The nitrate supplementation inhibited CH4 production without affecting VFA profile, because of its dual role as H2 sink and being toxic to methanogens. Nitrate supplementation had more complicated pattern of fermentation, VFA production and profile and H2 balance in comparison to BES and emodin supplementation.

  10. Using glycerin as a supplement for forage-fed ruminants.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The utility of crude glycerin as a feed additive for forage–fed ruminants depends largely on how well the animals are able to utilize the glycerol and other dietary components when crude glycerin is added to the diet. Several studies have demonstrated that ruminal fermentation of pure glycerol resul...

  11. Serosal-to-mucosal urea flux across the isolated ruminal epithelium is mediated via urea transporter-B and aquaporins when Holstein calves are abruptly changed to a moderately fermentable diet.

    PubMed

    Walpole, M E; Schurmann, B L; Górka, P; Penner, G B; Loewen, M E; Mutsvangwa, T

    2015-02-01

    Urea transport (UT-B) proteins are known to facilitate urea movement across the ruminal epithelium; however, other mechanisms may be involved as well because inhibiting UT-B does not completely abolish urea transport. Of the aquaporins (AQP), which are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that are predominantly involved in the movement of water, AQP-3, AQP-7, and AQP-10 are also permeable to urea, but it is not clear if they contribute to urea transport across the ruminal epithelium. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the functional roles of AQP and UT-B in the serosal-to-mucosal urea flux (Jsm-urea) across rumen epithelium; and (2) whether functional adaptation occurs in response to increased diet fermentability. Twenty-five Holstein steer calves (n=5) were assigned to a control diet (CON; 91.5% hay and 8.5% vitamin and mineral supplement) or a medium grain diet (MGD; 41.5% barley grain, 50% hay, and 8.5% vitamin and mineral) that was fed for 3, 7, 14, or 21 d. Calves were killed and ruminal epithelium was collected for mounting in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions and for analysis of mRNA abundance of UT-B and AQP-3, AQP-7, and AQP-10. To mimic physiologic conditions, the mucosal buffer (pH 6.2) contained no urea, whereas the serosal buffer (pH 7.4) contained 1 mM urea. The fluxes of (14)C-urea (Jsm-urea; 26 kBq/10 mL) and (3)H-mannitol (Jsm-mannitol; 37 kBq/10 mL) were measured, with Jsm-mannitol being used as an indicator of paracellular or hydrophilic movement. Serosal addition of phloretin (1 mM) was used to inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport, whereas NiCl2 (1 mM) was used to inhibit AQP-mediated urea transport. Across treatments, the addition of phloretin or NiCl2 reduced the Jsm-urea from 116.5 to 54.0 and 89.5 nmol/(cm(2) × h), respectively. When both inhibitors were added simultaneously, Jsm-urea was further reduced to 36.8 nmol/(cm(2) × h). Phloretin-sensitive and NiCl2-sensitive Jsm-urea were not affected by diet. The

  12. Supplemental protein for beef cattle grazing dormant intermediate wheatgrass pasture: effects on nutrient quality, forage intake, digesta kinetics, grazing behavior, ruminal fermentation, and digestion.

    PubMed

    Hess, B W; Park, K K; Krysl, L J; Judkins, M B; McCracken, B A; Hanks, D R

    1994-08-01

    Sixteen ruminally cannulated yearling beef cattle (British x British; average BW = 295 +/- 25 kg; three steers and one heifer per treatment) grazing dormant intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium Host) were allotted to four treatments: 1) no supplement (CON); 2) alfalfa hay (ALF; .52% of BW); 3) cottonseed meal (CSM; .22% of BW); and 4) corn gluten meal-wheat bran feed (CGMWBF; .36% of BW). Supplements were formulated (DM basis) so that intakes were isonitrogenous and were provided once daily (0700). Sampling periods were in February (FEB; .96% N in masticate), March (MAR; 1.06% N in masticate), and April (APR; 1.12% N in masticate) following an initial 21-d adaptation period. Daily grazing time was 1.1 to 1.5 h longer (P < .05) for CON cattle than for supplemented cattle. Forage OM intake (OMI) was not altered (P > .15) by supplemental protein; however, total OMI was greater (P < .04) for supplemented than for unsupplemented cattle. Harvesting efficiency (grams of OM intake-kilogram of BW-1.minute spent grazing-1) was greater (P < .05) for cattle fed CSM than for those fed CGF or CON; cattle fed ALF were intermediate in harvesting efficiency. Ruminal fluid kinetics, in situ rate and extent of NDF digestion, and total VFA concentration were not influenced (P > .10) by type of supplemental protein. Ruminal NH3 N concentration exhibited a treatment x sampling time interaction (P < .05). Type of protein supplement did not seem to affect most digestion measures; however, harvesting efficiency was influenced by supplement type.

  13. Ruminal fermentation kinetics in ewes offered a maize stover basal diet supplemented with cowpea hay, groundnut hay, cotton seed meal or maize meal.

    PubMed

    Chakeredza, S; ter Meulen, U; Ndlovu, L R

    2002-05-01

    The effect on ruminal digestive kinetics of supplementing maize stover (MS) with cowpea hay (CW), groundnut hay (GN), cotton seed meal (CSM) or maize meal (MM) was evaluated in a 5 x 5 Latin square using five Merino ewes with ruminal cannulae. CW and GN were offered at 30% w/w to MS, while CSM and MM were given at 15 g/kg0.75 per day. There were significant time (p < 0.001) and time x diet (p < 0.05) effects on pH but the effect of diet alone was not significant (p > 0.05). There was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the concentration of ammonia with time on the supplemented diets. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences in the concentrations of total volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Butyrate increased with supplementation (p < 0.05). Supplementation increased the concentrations of branched-chain and total VFAs with time (p < 0.05). The non-glucogenic ratio was not significantly (p > 0.05) lower on supplemented diets owing to the higher butyrate concentration. The degradation curve constants were not significantly different (p > 0.05), the average effective dry matter degradation being 27.80% +/- 0.618% at 0.05 h-1 flow rate. The chemical and physical characteristics of the cell wall of MS may have presented few sites for microbial colonization, so limiting degradation. These results showed that small quantities of forage supplements can improve the ruminal environment in animals subsisting on low-quality forages and form a basis for comparison with bought-in protein and energy sources.

  14. Effect of Citrus Byproducts on Survival of O157:H7 and Non-O157 Escherichia coli Serogroups within In Vitro Bovine Ruminal Microbial Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Duoss-Jennings, Heather A.; Schmidt, Ty B.; Callaway, Todd R.; Carroll, Jeffery A.; Martin, James M.; Shields-Menard, Sara A.; Broadway, Paul R.; Donaldson, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Citrus byproducts (CBPs) are utilized as a low cost nutritional supplement to the diets of cattle and have been suggested to inhibit the growth of both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. The objective of this study was to examine the effects in vitro that varying concentrations of CBP in the powdered or pelleted variety have on the survival of Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes O26:H11, O103:H8, O111:H8, O145:H28, and O157:H7 in bovine ruminal microorganism media. The O26:H11, O111:H8, O145:H28, and O157:H7 serotypes did not exhibit a change in populations in media supplemented with CBP with either variety. The O103:H8 serotype displayed a general trend for an approximate 1log10 reduction in 5% powdered CBP and 20% pelleted CBP over 6 h. There was a trend for reductions in populations of a variant form of O157:H7 mutated in the stx1 and stx2 genes in higher concentrations of CBP. These results suggest that variations exist in the survival of these serotypes of STEC within mixed ruminal microorganism fluid media when supplemented with CBP. Further research is needed to determine why CBPs affect STEC serotypes differently. PMID:23401690

  15. Organic acid blend with pure botanical product treatment reduces Escherichia coli and Salmonella populations in pure culture and in in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria can live in the intestinal tract of food animals and can be transmitted to humans via food or indirectly through animal or fecal contact. Organic acid blend products have been used as non-antibiotic modifiers of the gastrointestinal fermentation of food animals to impr...

  16. Microbial inoculant effects on silage and in vitro ruminal fermentation, and microbial biomass estimation for alfalfa, bmr corn, and corn silages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Third cut alfalfa, brown mid-rib (bmr) corn, and corn were chopped and inoculated with one of four different strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Uninoculated silage was the control treatment. For each crop, four mini-silos 1-L glass jars were ensiled per treatment. All silos were fermented for 60...

  17. Effects of concentrated separator by-product (desugared molasses) on intake, ruminal fermentation, digestion, and microbial efficiency in beef steers fed grass hay.

    PubMed

    Shellito, S M; Ward, M A; Lardy, G P; Bauer, M L; Caton, J S

    2006-06-01

    Concentrated separator by-product (CSB) is produced when beet molasses goes through an industrial desugaring process. To investigate the nutritional value of CSB as a supplement for grass hay diets (12.5% CP; DM basis), 4 ruminally and duodenally cannulated beef steers (332 +/- 2.3 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors were intake level: ad libitum (AL) vs. restricted (RE; 1.25% of BW, DM basis) and dietary CSB addition (0 vs. 10%; DM basis). Experimental periods were 21 d in length, with the last 7 d used for collections. By design, intakes of both DM and OM (g/kg of BW) were greater (P < 0.01; 18.8 vs. 13.1 +/- 0.69 and 16.8 vs. 11.7 +/- 0.62, respectively) for animals consuming AL compared with RE diets. Main effect means for intake were not affected by CSB (P = 0.59). However, within AL-fed steers, CSB tended (P = 0.12) to improve DMI (6,018 vs. 6,585 +/- 185 g for 0 and 10% CSB, respectively). Feeding CSB resulted in similar total tract DM and OM digestion compared with controls (P = 0.50 and 0.87, respectively). There were no effects of CSB on apparent total tract NDF (P = 0.27) or ADF (P = 0.35) digestion; however, apparent N absorption increased (P = 0.10) with CSB addition. Total tract NDF, ADF, or N digestion coefficients were not different between AL- and RE-fed steers. Nitrogen intake (P = 0.02), total duodenal N flow (P = 0.02), and feed N escaping to the small intestine (P = 0.02) were increased with CSB addition. Microbial efficiency was unaffected by treatment (P = 0.17). Supplementation with CSB increased the rate of DM disappearance (P = 0.001; 4.9 vs. 6.9 +/- 0.33 %/h). Restricted intake increased the rate of in situ DM disappearance (P = 0.03; 6.4 vs. 5.3 +/- 0.33 %/h) compared with AL-fed steers. Ruminal DM fill was greater (P = 0.01) in AL compared with RE. Total VFA concentrations were greater (P = 0.04) for CSB compared with controls; however, ammonia concentrations were reduced (P

  18. Fermentation of a bacterial cellulose/xylan composite by mixed ruminal microflora: implications for the role of polysaccharide matrix interactions in plant cell wall biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Hackney, J M; Jung, H J; Hatfield, R D

    2000-05-01

    Growth of the cellulose-synthesizing bacterium Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 53524 in media supplemented with 5% (w/v) glucose and 0.2% (w/v) of a water-soluble, nearly linear xylan from tobacco stalks resulted in the synthesis of a highly crystalline composite having a xylose/glucose ratio ranging from 0.06 to 0.24. The digestion of one composite (88% cellulose/12% xylan) by mixed ruminal microflora displayed kinetics of gas production similar to those of an unassociated mixture of the two components added in a xylan/cellulose ratio similar to that of the composite. The data suggest that intimate association of xylan and cellulose, as is typically found in secondary plant cell walls, does not inhibit the rate of digestion of the component polysaccharides.

  19. Effect of monensin inclusion on intake, digestion, and ruminal fermentation parameters by Bos taurus indicus and Bos taurus taurus steers consuming bermudagrass hay.

    PubMed

    Bell, N L; Anderson, R C; Callaway, T R; Franco, M O; Sawyer, J E; Wickersham, T A

    2017-06-01

    Effects of monensin inclusion and cattle subspecies on utilization of bermudagrass hay (13.7% CP, 77.3% NDF, and 38.8% ADF) were evaluated using ruminally cannulated steers (5 [BI] and 5 [BT]; 398 kg BW). Subspecies were concurrently subjected to a 2-period, 2-treatment crossover design. Treatments were 0 (CON) or 200 mg·steer·d monensin (MON) in 0.91 kg dried distillers' grains with solubles. Periods were 70 d in length: 20 d of adaptation, 22 d of sample collection, and 28 d for withdrawal of treatment. Steers were group housed during adaptation and moved to individual covered pens for sampling. Hay, ort, and fecal grab samples were collected d 21 through 25 for determination of intake and digestion. Ruminal fluid was collected with a suction strainer 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h after feeding on d 42 for pH, VFA, and ruminal NH-N (RAN) analysis. Additionally, at h 2, ruminal fluid and contents were collected for determination of rate of NH production and CH production rate. No subspecies × monensin interactions were observed ( ≥ 0.12). Monensin had no effect ( ≥ 0.16) on intake or digestibility parameters. No subspecies effect ( ≥ 0.11) was observed for forage OM intake, total OM intake, or OM digestion. Total digestible OM intake tended to be greater ( = 0.06) for BT steers than for BI steers (14.0 vs. 12.2 g/kg BW). There was an effect of hour after feeding ( ≤ 0.01) on pH, total VFA, acetate:propionate ratio, and molar percent acetate and propionate. Total VFA concentration was greater ( = 0.01) in CON steers than in MON steers (66.5 vs. 62.0 m). Monensin decreased molar percent acetate ( = 0.02) from 72.5 to 71.2% and increased molar percent propionate ( < 0.01) from 16.9 to 18.7%, resulting in a reduced ( < 0.01) acetate:propionate ratio (from 4.34 to 3.85). Although not significantly ( = 0.19), monensin numerically reduced the CH production rate by 15.8%. Greater ( = 0.07) CH production rate tended to be observed in BI steers than in BT steers (21.4 vs

  20. Investigations on the effect of forage source, grinding, and urea supplementation on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Bastian; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of maize silage and grass silage on microbial fermentation and protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system (Rusitec) when milling screen size (MSS) during grinding was varied. Oven-dried silages were milled through screens of 1, 4 or 9 mm pore size and incubated for 48 h in a Rusitec system. Furthermore, the effect of N supplementation to maize silage (MSS: 4 mm) was investigated and single dose vs. continuous infusion of urea-N were compared. Degradation of organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), fibre fractions and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as well as short-chain fatty acid production differed significantly between forage sources. Urea-N supplementation improved the degradation of NSC, but not that of fibre fractions in maize silage. The way of urea supply had only marginal effects on fermentation characteristics. An increase in MSS, and consequently in mean feed particle size, led to an improvement in the degradation of OM, CP and NSC, but efficiency of microbial net protein synthesis (EMPS; mg microbial N flow/g degraded OM) and the microbial amino acid profile were less affected. EMPS was higher in grass silage than in maize silage and was improved by urea-N supplementation in maize silage. This study indicates that fermentation of NSC as well as EMPS during incubation of maize silage was limited by availability of NH3-N. Furthermore, an increase in MSS above 1 mm seems to improve fermentation of silages in the Rusitec system.

  1. The effects of urea-treated potato pulp (PP) ensiled with beet pulp or wheat bran pellets to reduce moisture of PP and flake density of corn grain supplemented with the PP silage on digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masahito; Saito, Waka; Ooi, Motoki

    2010-06-01

    The effects of adding beet pulp or wheat bran to urea-treated potato pulp (PP) in order to reduce moisture of PP silage and flake density of corn grain on digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers were studied in a split-plot design experiment. The whole-plot treatments were PP silage mixed with 0% added pellets (CON), 9% (as-fed basis) beet pulp pellets (BP) or 9% (as-fed basis) wheat bran pellets (WB) as water-absorbing materials. The subplot treatments consisted of supplements formulated to contain either high-density corn (HDC) or low-density corn (LDC). BP steers consumed more (BP vs WB, P = 0.011) concentrate than did WB steers, whereas hay intake did not differ between the treatments. Dry matter (BP vs WB, P = 0.023) and organic matter (BP vs WB, P = 0.029) digestibility were higher for BP steers than for WB steers. Starch digestibility was higher (P = 0.006) for LDC than for HDC. There were no differences in the concentration of ruminal ammonia nitrogen among the treatments. Molar proportions of ruminal acetate were higher for BP steers than for WB steers (BP vs WB, P = 0.030). Conversely, molar proportions of propionate were lower for BP steers than for WB steers (BP vs WB, P = 0.044). Flake density of corn did not affect ruminal characteristics. In conclusion, from the viewpoint of feed intake and digestibility, BP is superior to WB as a moisture control material for urea-treated PP silage, and flake density of corn supplemented with urea-treated PP silage does not alter ruminal fermentation.

  2. Effects of feeding canola meal or wheat dried distillers grains with solubles as a major protein source in low- or high-crude protein diets on ruminal fermentation, omasal flow, and production in cows.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Kiran, D; Abeysekara, S

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feeding canola meal (CM) or wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (W-DDGS) as the major source of protein in diets varying in crude protein (CP) content on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein production, omasal nutrient flow, and production performance in lactating dairy cows. Eight lactating dairy cows were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with 29-d periods (21 d of dietary adaptation and 8 d of measurements) and a 2×2 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments. Four cows in 1 Latin square were ruminally cannulated to allow ruminal and omasal sampling. The treatment factors were (1) source of supplemental protein (CM vs. W-DDGS) and (2) dietary CP content (15 vs. 17%; DM basis). Diets contained 50% forage and 50% concentrate, and were fed twice daily at 0900 and 1600 h as total mixed rations for ad libitum intake. Dry matter intake and milk yield were unaffected by dietary treatments; however, milk yield in cows that were fed CM was numerically greater (+1.1 kg/d) when compared with cows fed W-DDGS. Feeding CM increased milk lactose content compared with feeding W-DDGS. Milk urea nitrogen and ruminal NH3-N concentrations were greater in cows fed the high-CP compared with those fed the low-CP diet. The rumen-degradable protein supply was greater in cows fed the high-CP when compared with those fed the low-CP diet when diets contained CM, whereas rumen-degradable protein supply was lower in cows fed the high-CP when compared with those fed the low-CP diet when diets contained W-DDGS. Total N flow at the omasal canal was not affected by diet; however, omasal flow of NH3-N was greater in cows fed CM when compared with those fed W-DDGS. The rumen-undegradable protein supply was greater in cows fed the low-CP when compared with those fed the high-CP diet when diets contained CM, whereas rumen-undegradable protein supply was lower in cows fed the low-CP when compared with those fed the

  3. Effect of high-dose nano-selenium and selenium-yeast on feed digestibility, rumen fermentation, and purine derivatives in sheep.

    PubMed

    Xun, Wenjuan; Shi, Liguang; Yue, Wenbin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Ren, Youshe; Liu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nano-selenium (NS) and yeast-selenium (YS) supplementation on feed digestibility, rumen fermentation, and urinary purine derivatives in sheep. Six male ruminally cannulated sheep, average 43.32 ± 4.8 kg of BW, were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square experiment. The treatments were control (without NS and YS), NS with 4 g nano-Se (provide 4 mg Se), and YS with 4 g Se-yeast (provide 4 mg Se) per kilogram of diet dry matter (DM), respectively. Experimental periods were 25 days with 15 days of adaptation and 10 days of sampling. Ruminal pH, ammonia N concentration, molar proportion of propionate, and ratio of acetate to propionate were decreased (P < 0.01), and total ruminal VFA concentration was increased with NS and YS supplementation (P < 0.01). In situ ruminal neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) degradation of Leymus chinensis (P < 0.01) and crude protein (CP) of soybean meal (P < 0.01) were significantly improved by Se supplementation. Digestibilities of DM, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract, aNDF, and ADF in the total tract and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were also affected by feeding Se supplementation diets (P < 0.01). Ruminal fermentation was improved by feeding NS, and feed conversion efficiency was also increased compared with YS (P < 0.01). We concluded that nano-Se can be used as a preferentially available selenium source in ruminant nutrition.

  4. Productivity, digestion, and health responses to hindgut acidosis in ruminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of large intestinal or hindgut fermentation in ruminant nutrition has received little research attention in recent decades. Though the contribution of the hindgut to total tract nutrient digestion is substantially less than the contribution from the rumen, hindgut fermentation impacts anima...

  5. Effect of monensin withdrawal on intake, digestion, and ruminal fermentation parameters by Bos taurus indicus and Bos taurus taurus steers consuming bermudagrass hay.

    PubMed

    Bell, N L; Callaway, T R; Anderson, R C; Franco, M O; Sawyer, J E; Wickersham, T A

    2017-06-01

    Effects of monensin withdrawal and cattle subspecies on the utilization of bermudagrass hay (14.3% CP, 72.3% NDF, and 36.9% ADF) were evaluated using ruminally cannulated steers (5 [BI] and 5 [BT]). Subspecies were concurrently subjected to a 2-period, 2-treatment crossover design. Treatments consisted of either 0 mg·steer·d-1 monensin with no previous monensin feeding (CON) or withdrawal from 200 mg·steer·d-1 monensin (MON) fed individually in 0.91 kg dried distillers' grains with solubles for 42 d. Withdrawal was evaluated for a 28-d period. Ruminal fluid was collected 2 h after feeding on d 0, 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21 after withdrawal for determination of pH, VFA, ruminal NH-N (RAN), rate of NH production, and CH production rate. Hay, ort, and fecal grab samples were collected d 23 through 28 after withdrawal for determination of intake and digestion. No subspecies × monensin, subspecies × day, or subspecies × monensin × day interactions were observed ( ≥ 0.11). An effect of day after monensin withdrawal was observed ( < 0.01) for total VFA concentration, with an increase following withdrawal followed by a decrease and then stabilization. Monensin × day after monensin withdrawal interactions ( ≤ 0.01) were observed for the acetate:propionate (A:P) ratio and molar percent of acetate and propionate. There was a decrease in molar percent of propionate between d 1 and 4 from 19.1 to 18.0; however, it remained greater ( ≤ 0.10) for MON than CON through d 7. Withdrawal increased molar percent of acetate from 68.3 to 69.8 between d 0 and 4 for MON steers. The A:P ratio was less ( ≤ 0.01) on d 0 for MON than for CON (3.4 vs. 4.0), but by d 4, it increased to 3.8 and was not different ( = 0.14) from CON. By d 14, no differences ( ≥ 0.88) remained for acetate, propionate, or the A:P ratio. After monensin withdrawal, monensin reduced ( < 0.01) RAN by 12.3% (2.09 vs. 1.83 m for CON and MON, respectively). Monensin withdrawal and cattle subspecies had no effect

  6. Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2014-07-28

    In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (P< 0.001) by LPS challenge, and the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids and amino N increased linearly (P< 0.001) according to the LPS dose. LPS infusion linearly decreased (P< 0.001) the organic matter degradability of alfalfa hay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity.

  7. The effect of the inclusion of recycled poultry bedding and the physical form of diet on the performance, ruminal fermentation, and plasma metabolites of fattening lambs.

    PubMed

    Mirmohammadi, D; Rouzbehan, Y; Fazaeli, H

    2015-08-01

    During a 125-d experimental period, 24 Afshari × Kurdish male lambs initially weighing 25.2 ± 1.2 kg were grouped by BW and randomly assigned to treatments under a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate the effects of feeding recycled poultry bedding (RPB; 0 and 200 g/kg DM) and the physical form of the diet (mash and block) on nutrient intake and digestibility, ruminal and plasma parameters, microbial N supply, N balance, feeding behavior, and growth performance of the lambs. Two diets with and without RPB in both mash and block form were prepared. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diet affected the concentration of VFA or the total tract apparent digestibility of nutrients. Dietary RPB inclusion increased DMI ( < 0.01), tended ( = 0.10) to reduce ADG, and decreased G:F ( = 0.05). The physical form of the diet had no effect on DMI but decreased ADG ( = 0.01) and G:F ( = 0.02) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diets had any effect on microbial N supply (g/d) and N retention. Rate of eating ( = 0.07), time spent eating ( = 0.87) and ruminating ( = 0.28), and total chewing activity ( = 0.65) were not affected by dietary RPB inclusion. Rate of eating decreased ( < 0.01) and time spent eating and total chewing activity increased ( = 0.01 and = 0.02, respectively) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Results of the current study showed that inclusion of RPB up to 200 g/kg DM in diets for fattening was possible without any effect on performance and animal health. Processing of feed into the mash form gave higher livestock productivity in comparison to the block form.

  8. Synergism of Cattle and Bison Inoculum on Ruminal Fermentation and Select Bacterial Communities in an Artificial Rumen (Rusitec) Fed a Barley Straw Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Oss, Daniela B; Ribeiro, Gabriel O; Marcondes, Marcos I; Yang, WenZhu; Beauchemin, Karen A; Forster, Robert J; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of increasing the proportion of bison relative to cattle inoculum on fermentation and microbial populations within an artificial rumen (Rusitec). The experiment was a completely randomized design with a factorial treatment structure (proportion cattle:bison inoculum; 0:100, 33:67, 67:33, and 100:0) replicated in two Rusitec apparatuses (n = 8 fermenters). The experiment was 15 d with 8 d of adaptation and 7 d of sampling. Fermenters were fed a diet of 70:30 barley straw:concentrate (DM basis). True digestibility of DM was determined after 48 h of incubation from d 13 to 15, and daily ammonia (NH3) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production were measured on d 9-12. Protozoa counts were determined at d 9, 11, 13, and 15 and particle-associated bacteria (PAB) from d 13 to 15. Select bacterial populations in the PAB were measured using RT-qPCR. Fermenter was considered the experimental unit and day of sampling as a repeated measure. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum resulted in a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) on straw, concentrate and total true DM disappearance and on straw and total neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) disappearance, with greater disappearances observed with mixed inoculum. There were no effect of source or proportion of inoculum on ADF disappearance (P > 0.05). Increasing bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) concentrate aNDF disappearance, total and concentrate N disappearance as well as total daily VFA and acetate production. A positive quadratic response (P < 0.05) was observed for daily NH3-N, propionate, butyrate, valerate, isovalerate and isobutyrate production, as well as the acetate:propionate ratio. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) total protozoa numbers. No effects were observed on pH, total gas and methane production, microbial N synthesis, or copies of 16S rRNA associated with total bacteria, Selenomonas ruminantium or Prevotella bryantii. Increasing bison

  9. Synergism of Cattle and Bison Inoculum on Ruminal Fermentation and Select Bacterial Communities in an Artificial Rumen (Rusitec) Fed a Barley Straw Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Oss, Daniela B.; Ribeiro, Gabriel O.; Marcondes, Marcos I.; Yang, WenZhu; Beauchemin, Karen A.; Forster, Robert J.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of increasing the proportion of bison relative to cattle inoculum on fermentation and microbial populations within an artificial rumen (Rusitec). The experiment was a completely randomized design with a factorial treatment structure (proportion cattle:bison inoculum; 0:100, 33:67, 67:33, and 100:0) replicated in two Rusitec apparatuses (n = 8 fermenters). The experiment was 15 d with 8 d of adaptation and 7 d of sampling. Fermenters were fed a diet of 70:30 barley straw:concentrate (DM basis). True digestibility of DM was determined after 48 h of incubation from d 13 to 15, and daily ammonia (NH3) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production were measured on d 9–12. Protozoa counts were determined at d 9, 11, 13, and 15 and particle-associated bacteria (PAB) from d 13 to 15. Select bacterial populations in the PAB were measured using RT-qPCR. Fermenter was considered the experimental unit and day of sampling as a repeated measure. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum resulted in a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) on straw, concentrate and total true DM disappearance and on straw and total neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) disappearance, with greater disappearances observed with mixed inoculum. There were no effect of source or proportion of inoculum on ADF disappearance (P > 0.05). Increasing bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) concentrate aNDF disappearance, total and concentrate N disappearance as well as total daily VFA and acetate production. A positive quadratic response (P < 0.05) was observed for daily NH3-N, propionate, butyrate, valerate, isovalerate and isobutyrate production, as well as the acetate:propionate ratio. Increasing the proportion of bison inoculum linearly increased (P < 0.05) total protozoa numbers. No effects were observed on pH, total gas and methane production, microbial N synthesis, or copies of 16S rRNA associated with total bacteria, Selenomonas ruminantium or Prevotella bryantii. Increasing bison

  10. Factors affecting lysine degradation by ruminal fusobacteria.

    PubMed

    Russell, James B

    2006-04-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum can readily be enriched from the rumen with lysine, and its deamination rate is very rapid. The addition of F. necrophorum JB2 to mixed ruminal bacteria significantly increased lysine degradation, but only if the ratio of ruminal fluid to basal medium was less than 25%. If more ruminal fluid (pH 6.1) was added, ammonia production decreased by as much as 80%. Clarified, autoclaved ruminal fluid was also inhibitory. When F. necrophorum JB2 was grown in a lysine-limited continuous culture (0.1 h(-1) dilution rate) and pH was decreased using HCl, optical density decreased linearly, and the culture washed out at pH 5.6. Batch cultures of F. necrophorum JB2 deaminated as much lysine at pH 6.1 as at pH 6.6, but only if fermentation acids were not present. Sodium acetate (100 mM) had little effect at pH 6.6, but the same concentration inhibited ammonia production by 80% at pH 6.1. The idea that fermentation acids could prevent the enrichment of fusobacteria in vivo was supported by the observation that dietary lysine supplementation did not enhance the lysine deamination rate of the mixed ruminal bacteria.

  11. Nutrient transport by ruminal bacteria: a review.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A

    1994-11-01

    Fermentation pathways have been elucidated for predominant ruminal bacteria, but information is limited concerning the specific transport mechanisms used by these microorganisms for C, energy, and N sources. In addition, it is possible that changes in ruminal environmental conditions could affect transport activity. Five carrier-mediated soluble nutrient transport mechanisms have been identified in bacteria: 1) facilitated diffusion, 2) shock sensitive systems, 3) proton symport, 4) Na+ symport, and the 5) phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Several regulatory mechanisms are also involved at the cell membrane to coordinate utilization of different sugars. Recent research has shown that predominant ruminal bacteria are capable of transporting soluble nutrients by several of the mechanisms outlined above. Megasphaera elsdenii, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Streptococcus bovis transport glucose by the PEP-PTS, and S. ruminantium and S. bovis also possess PEP-PTS activity for disaccharides. Glucose PTS activity in S. bovis was highest at a growth pH of 5.0, low glucose concentrations, and a dilution rate of .10 h-1. The cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes uses a Na+ symport mechanism for glucose transport that is sensitive to low extracellular pH and ionophores. Sodium also stimulated cellobiose transport by F. succinogenes, and there is evidence for a proton symport in the transport of both arabinose and xylose by S. ruminantium. A chemical gradient of Na+ seems to play an important role in AA transport in several ruminal bacteria. Studying nutrient transport mechanisms in ruminal bacteria will lead to a better understanding of the ruminal fermentation.

  12. Factors affecting methane production and mitigation in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masaki; Terada, Fuminori

    2010-02-01

    Methane (CH(4)) is the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) and that emitted from enteric fermentation in livestock is the single largest source of emissions in Japan. Many factors influence ruminant CH(4) production, including level of intake, type and quality of feeds and environmental temperature. The objectives of this review are to identify the factors affecting CH(4) production in ruminants, to examine technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants, and to identify areas requiring further research. The following equation for CH(4) prediction was formulated using only dry matter intake (DMI) and has been adopted in Japan to estimate emissions from ruminant livestock for the National GHG Inventory Report: Y = -17.766 + 42.793X - 0.849X(2), where Y is CH(4) production (L/day) and X is DMI (kg/day). Technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants include increasing productivity by improving nutritional management, the manipulation of ruminal fermentation by changing feed composition, the addition of CH(4) inhibitors, and defaunation. Considering the importance of ruminant livestock, it is essential to establish economically feasible ways of reducing ruminant CH(4) production while improving productivity; it is therefore critical to conduct a full system analysis to select the best combination of approaches or new technologies to be applied under long-term field conditions.

  13. Nutrient Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation Activities, Serum Parameters and Milk Production and Composition of Lactating Goats Fed Diets Containing Rice Straw Treated with Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Kholif, A. E.; Khattab, H. M.; El-Shewy, A. A.; Salem, A. Z. M.; Kholif, A. M.; El-Sayed, M. M.; Gado, H. M.; Mariezcurrena, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated replacement of Egyptian berseem clover (BC, Trifolium alexandrinum) with spent rice straw (SRS) of Pleurotus ostreatus basidiomycete in diets of lactating Baladi goats. Nine lactating homo-parity Baladi goats (average BW 23.8±0.4 kg) at 7 d postpartum were used in a triplicate 3×3 Latin square design with 30 d experimental periods. Goats were fed a basal diet containing 0 (Control), 0.25 (SRS25) and 0.45 (SRS45) (w/w, DM basis) of SRS. The Control diet was berseem clover and concentrate mixture (1:1 DM basis). The SRS45 had lowered total feed intake and forages intake compared to Control. The SRS25 and SRS45 rations had the highest digestibilities of DM (p = 0.0241) and hemicellulose (p = 0.0021) compared to Control which had higher (p<0.01) digestibilities of OM (p = 0.0002) and CP (p = 0.0005) than SRS25 and SRS45. Ruminal pH and microbial protein synthesis were higher (p<0.0001) for SRS25 and SRS45 than Control, which also had the highest (p<0.0001) concentration of TVFA, total proteins, non-protein N, and ammonia-N. All values of serum constituents were within normal ranges. The Control ration had higher serum globulin (p = 0.0148), creatinine (p = 0.0150), glucose (p = 0.0002) and cholesterol (p = 0.0016). Both Control and SRS25 groups had the highest (p<0.05) milk (p = 0.0330) and energy corrected milk (p = 0.0290) yields. Fat content was higher (p = 0.0373) with SRS45 and SRS25 groups compared with Control. Replacement of BC with SRS in goat rations increased milk levels of conjugated linoleic acid and unsaturated fatty acids compared with Control. It was concluded that replacing 50% of Egyptian berseem clover with SRS in goat rations improved their productive performance without marked effects on metabolic indicators health. PMID:25049962

  14. Characteristics of Wet and Dried Distillers Grains on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Effects of Dietary Wet Distillers Grains on Performance of Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ill Young; Ahn, Gyu Chul; Kwak, Hyung Jun; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Sang Suk; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Park, Keun Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the nutrient composition, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and organic matter disappearance (IVOMD) of three kinds of distillers grains (DG); i) wet distillers grains (WDG, KRW 25/kg), ii) dried distillers grains (DDG, KRW 280/kg), iii) dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS, KRW 270/kg) produced from tapioca 70% and rice 30%, and to evaluate dietary effects of WDG on the performance of Hanwoo steers. In Exp. 1, twelve-WDG, four-DDG and one-DDGS were collected from seven ethanol plants. Average crude protein, crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber of WDG, DDG, and DDGS were: 32.6%, 17.8%, 57.5%, and 30.2% for WDG, 36.7%, 13.9%, 51.4%, and 30.5% for DDG, and 31.0%, 11.9%, 40.3%, and 21.2% for DDGS (DM basis), respectively. The DDGS had a higher quantity of water-soluble fraction than WDG and DDG and showed the highest IVDMD (p<0.05) in comparison to others during the whole experimental time. The IVDMD at 0 to 12 h incubation were higher (p<0.05) in DDG than WDG, but did not show significant differences from 24 to 72 h. The same tendency was observed in IVOMD, showing that DG made from tapioca and rice (7:3) can be used as a feed ingredient for ruminants. Considering the price, WDG is a more useful feed ingredient than DDG and DDGS. In Exp. 2, 36 Hanwoo steers of 21 months (495.1±91 kg) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments for 85 days; i) Control (total mixed ration, TMR), ii) WDG 10% (TMR containing 10% of WDG, as fed basis), and iii) WDG 20% (TMR containing 20% of WDG, as fed basis). With respect to body weight and average daily gain, there were no differences between control and WDG treatments during the whole experimental period. Dry matter intake of control (9.34 kg), WDG 10% (9.21 kg) and 20% (8.86 kg) and feed conversion ratio of control (13.0), WDG 10% (13.2) and 20% (12.1) did not show differences between control and WDG treatments. Thus, the use of WDG up

  15. Characteristics of Wet and Dried Distillers Grains on In vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Effects of Dietary Wet Distillers Grains on Performance of Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ill Young; Ahn, Gyu Chul; Kwak, Hyung Jun; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Oh, Young Kyoon; Lee, Sang Suk; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Park, Keun Kyu

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the nutrient composition, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and organic matter disappearance (IVOMD) of three kinds of distillers grains (DG); i) wet distillers grains (WDG, KRW 25/kg), ii) dried distillers grains (DDG, KRW 280/kg), iii) dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS, KRW 270/kg) produced from tapioca 70% and rice 30%, and to evaluate dietary effects of WDG on the performance of Hanwoo steers. In Exp. 1, twelve-WDG, four-DDG and one-DDGS were collected from seven ethanol plants. Average crude protein, crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber of WDG, DDG, and DDGS were: 32.6%, 17.8%, 57.5%, and 30.2% for WDG, 36.7%, 13.9%, 51.4%, and 30.5% for DDG, and 31.0%, 11.9%, 40.3%, and 21.2% for DDGS (DM basis), respectively. The DDGS had a higher quantity of water-soluble fraction than WDG and DDG and showed the highest IVDMD (p<0.05) in comparison to others during the whole experimental time. The IVDMD at 0 to 12 h incubation were higher (p<0.05) in DDG than WDG, but did not show significant differences from 24 to 72 h. The same tendency was observed in IVOMD, showing that DG made from tapioca and rice (7:3) can be used as a feed ingredient for ruminants. Considering the price, WDG is a more useful feed ingredient than DDG and DDGS. In Exp. 2, 36 Hanwoo steers of 21 months (495.1±91 kg) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments for 85 days; i) Control (total mixed ration, TMR), ii) WDG 10% (TMR containing 10% of WDG, as fed basis), and iii) WDG 20% (TMR containing 20% of WDG, as fed basis). With respect to body weight and average daily gain, there were no differences between control and WDG treatments during the whole experimental period. Dry matter intake of control (9.34 kg), WDG 10% (9.21 kg) and 20% (8.86 kg) and feed conversion ratio of control (13.0), WDG 10% (13.2) and 20% (12.1) did not show differences between control and WDG treatments. Thus, the use of WDG up

  16. Effect of dietary supplementation with resveratrol on nutrient digestibility, methanogenesis and ruminal microbial flora in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Chen, D-D; Tu, Y; Zhang, N-F; Si, B-W; Deng, K-D; Diao, Q-Y

    2015-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on methanogenesis and microbial flora in Dorper × thin-tailed Han cross-bred ewes. In experiment 1, ten ewes (67.2 ± 2.24 kg BW) were assigned to two dietary treatments, a basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with resveratrol (0.25 g/head·day), to investigate the effect of resveratrol on nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance. In experiment 2, six ewes (64.0 ± 1.85 kg BW) with ruminal cannulae were assigned to the identical dietary treatments used in experiment 1 to investigate supplementary resveratrol on ruminal fermentation and microbial flora using qPCR. The results showed that supplementary resveratrol improved the digestibility of organic matter (OM; p < 0.001), nitrogen (N; p = 0.007), neutral detergent fibre (NDF; p < 0.001) and acid detergent fibre (ADF; p < 0.001). The excretion of faecal N was reduced (p = 0.007), whereas that of urinary N increased (p = 0.002), which led to an unchanged N retention (p = 0.157). Both CO2 and CH4 output scaled to digestible dry matter (DM) intake decreased from 602.5 to 518.7 (p = 0.039) and 68.2 to 56.6 (p < 0.001) respectively. Ruminal pH (p = 0.341), ammonia (p = 0.512) and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) (p = 0.249) were unaffected by resveratrol. The molar proportion of propionate increased from 13.1 to 17.5% (p < 0.001) while that of butyrate decreased from 11.0 to 9.55% (p < 0.001). The ratio of acetate to propionate (A/P) decreased from 5.44 to 3.96 (p < 0.001). Supplementary resveratrol increased ruminal population of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens (p < 0.001) while decreased protozoa and methanogens. In conclusion, dietary resveratrol inhibited methanogenesis without adversely affecting ruminal fermentation.

  17. Effect of dietary replacement of alfalfa with urea-treated almond hulls on intake, growth, digestibility, microbial nitrogen, nitrogen retention, ruminal fermentation, and blood parameters in fattening lambs.

    PubMed

    Rad, M Imani; Rouzbehan, Y; Rezaei, J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of dietary replacement of alfalfa with urea-treated almond hulls (UAH) on DM and nutrients intakes, growth performance, diet digestibility, microbial N supply (MNS), N retention, rumen fermentation parameters, and blood metabolites in fattening male Shall lambs (29.9 ± 1.9 kg initial BW). Three diets, with equal ME and CP concentrations and a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 40 to 60, were formulated in which alfalfa was replaced by different levels (0, 200, or 400 g/kg of diet DM) of UAH. Experimental diets were randomly assigned to the 3 groups ( = 8/group) in a completely randomized design for a 74-d period (14 d for adaptation and 60 d for data collection). Diets were offered as a total mixed ration to ensure 10% orts. Dry matter and nutrients intakes, animal growth, diet digestibility, MNS, N retention, rumen fermentation parameters, and plasma metabolites were determined. The dietary substitution of UAH for alfalfa had no effects on DMI (linear, = 0.96; quadratic, = 0.86), ADG (linear, = 0.35; quadratic, = 0.19), and G:F (linear, = 0.66; quadratic, = 0.13). In vivo digestibility coefficients of DM (linear, = 0.82; quadratic, = 0.42), OM (linear, = 0.73; quadratic, = 0.95), CP (linear, = 0.24; quadratic, = 0.66), and ash-free NDF (linear, = 0.69; quadratic, = 0.74) were not affected by the dietary treatment. Feeding lambs on diets containing UAH instead of alfalfa had no effects on MNS (linear, = 0.63; quadratic, = 0.68) and N retention (linear, = 0.44; quadratic, = 0.17). Rumen pH (linear, = 0.26; quadratic, = 0.071), ammonia N (linear, = 0.39; quadratic, = 0.13), and VFA (linear, = 0.091; quadratic, = 0.86) concentrations, acetic acid-to-propionic acid ratio (linear, = 0.93; quadratic, = 0.62), and protozoa population (linear, = 0.62; quadratic, = 0.22) were not influenced by the experimental diets. Substituting alfalfa with UAH had no effects on the plasma concentrations of glucose (linear, = 0

  18. Ruminal metabolism of plant toxins with emphasis on indolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J R; Breeze, R G

    1984-04-01

    Ruminal bacteria can perform biochemical transformations on plant constituents that may affect the health of ruminant animals. Reactions carried out by ruminal bacteria on oxalates and some pyrrolizidine alkaloids include decarboxylation, hydrolysis and reduction steps. Prior exposure of ruminal bacteria to these substances increases the rate of detoxification, indicating an adaptive response by the bacteria to these substrates. The formation of toxic substances by ruminal bacteria also occurs and may involve similar reactions. Hydrolysis of cyanogenic glycosides and miserotoxins , reduction of nitrate and S-methylcysteine sulfoxide to nitrite and dimethyl disulfide can result in toxicity in ruminants. Similarly, the deamination and decarboxylation reactions associated with the degradation of tryptophan and tryosine result in the formation of 3-methylindole and p-cresol, which are toxic. Formation of 3-methylindole results from fermentation of tryptophan to indoleacetic acid, with subsequent decarboxylation of indoleacetic acid to 3-methylindole by a Lactobacillus sp. The 3-methylindole causes acute pulmonary edema and emphysema in ruminants as a result of mixed function oxidase metabolism in tissues. The 3-methylindole is also the cause of naturally-occurring acute bovine pulmonary edema and emphysema after abrupt pasture change. Inhibition of ruminal 3-methylindole formation by monensin and other antibiotics lowers ruminal 3-methylindole concentrations and prevents acute lung injury in experimental animals.

  19. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, P; Boon, N; Goel, G; Yuangklang, C; Schonewille, J Th; Hendriks, W H; Fievez, V

    2013-12-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on rumen fermentation, protozoal counts and archaeal abundance, as well as their diversity and functional organization. KO contains similar amounts of C12:0 as CO (420 and 458 g/kg FA, respectively), but has a higher proportion of C14:0 (464 v. 205 g/kg FA, respectively). Treatments contained 35 g supplemental fat per kg DM: a control diet with tallow (T); a diet with supplemental CO; and a diet with supplemental KO. A 4th treatment consisted of a diet with similar amounts of MCFA (i.e. C10:0+C12:0+C14:0) from CO and KO. To ensure isolipidic diets, extra tallow was supplied in the latter treatment (KO+T). Eight fistulated bulls (two bulls per treatment), fed a total mixed ration predominantly based on cassava chips, rice straw, tomato pomace, rice bran and soybean meal (1.5% of BW), were used. Both KO and CO increased the rumen volatile fatty acids, in particular propionate and decreased acetate proportions. Protozoal numbers were reduced through the supplementation of an MCFA source (CO, KO and KO+T), with the strongest reduction by KO. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays based on archaeal primers showed a decrease in abundance of Archaea when supplementing with KO and KO+T compared with T and CO. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the rumen archaeal population did not result in a grouping of treatments. Richness indices were calculated from the number of DGGE bands, whereas community organization was assessed from the Pareto-Lorenz evenness curves on the basis of DGGE band intensities. KO supplementation (KO and KO+T treatments) increased richness and evenness within the archaeal community. Further research including methane

  20. Effects of whole-plant corn silage hybrid type on intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation, and lactation performance by dairy cows through a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Shaver, R D

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effect of whole-plant corn silage (WPCS) hybrids in dairy cattle diets may allow for better decisions on hybrid selection by dairy producers, as well as indicate potential strategies for the seed corn industry with regard to WPCS hybrids. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis using literature data on the effects of WPCS hybrid type on intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and lactation performance by dairy cows. The meta-analysis was performed using a data set of 162 treatment means from 48 peer-reviewed articles published between 1995 and 2014. Hybrids were divided into 3 categories before analysis. Comparative analysis of WPCS hybrid types differing in stalk characteristics were in 4 categories: conventional, dual-purpose, isogenic, or low-normal fiber digestibility (CONS), brown midrib (BMR), hybrids with greater NDF but lower lignin (%NDF) contents or high in vitro NDF digestibility (HFD), and leafy (LFY). Hybrid types differing in kernel characteristics were in 4 categories: conventional or yellow dent (CONG), NutriDense (ND), high oil (HO), and waxy. Genetically modified (GM) hybrids were compared with their genetically similar non-biotech counterpart (ISO). Except for lower lignin content for BMR and lower starch content for HFD than CONS and LFY, silage nutrient composition was similar among hybrids of different stalk types. A 1.1 kg/d greater intake of DM and 1.5 and 0.05 kg/d greater milk and protein yields, respectively, were observed for BMR compared with CONS and LFY. Likewise, DMI and milk yield were greater for HFD than CONS, but the magnitude of the difference was smaller. Total-tract NDF digestibility was greater, but starch digestibility was reduced, for BMR and HFD compared with CONS or LFY. Silage nutrient composition was similar for hybrids of varied kernel characteristics, except for lower CP and EE content for CONG than ND and HO. Feeding HO WPCS to dairy cows decreased milk fat content

  1. Impact of variation in structure of condensed tannins from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) on in vitro ruminal methane production and fermentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hatew, B; Stringano, E; Mueller-Harvey, I; Hendriks, W H; Carbonero, C Hayot; Smith, L M J; Pellikaan, W F

    2016-04-01

    Our study investigated the effects of condensed tannins (CT) on rumen in vitro methane (CH4 ) production and fermentation characteristics by incubating lucerne in buffered rumen fluid in combination with different CT extracts at 0 (control), 40, 80 and 120 g CT/kg of substrate DM. Condensed tannins were extracted from four sainfoin accessions: Rees 'A', CPI63763, Cotswold Common and CPI63767. Gas production (GP) was measured using a fully automated GP apparatus with CH4 measured at distinct time points. Condensed tannins differed substantially in terms of polymer size and varied from 13 (Rees 'A') to 73 (CPI63767) mean degree of polymerization, but had relatively similar characteristics in terms of CT content, procyanidin: prodelphinidin (PC: PD) and cis:trans ratios. Compared to control, addition of CT from CPI63767 and CPI63763 at 80 and 120 g CT/kg of substrate DM reduced CH4 by 43% and 65%, and by 23% and 57%, respectively, after 24-h incubation. Similarly, CT from Rees 'A' and Cotswold Common reduced CH4 by 26% and 46%, and by 28% and 46% respectively. Addition of increasing level of CT linearly reduced the maximum rates of GP and CH4 production, and the estimated in vitro organic matter digestibility. There was a negative linear and quadratic (p < 0.01) relation between CT concentration and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) production. Inclusion of 80 and 120 g CT/kg of substrate DM reduced (p < 0.001) branched-chain VFA production and acetate: propionate ratio and was lowest for CPI63767. A decrease in proteolytic activity as indirectly shown by a change in VFA composition favouring a shift towards propionate and reduction in branched-chain VFA production varied with type of CT and was highest for CPI63767. In conclusion, these results suggest that tannin polymer size is an important factor affecting in vitro CH4 production which may be linked to the CT interaction with dietary substrate or microbial cells.

  2. Divergent utilization patterns of grass fructan, inulin, and other nonfiber carbohydrates by ruminal microbes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fructans are an important nonfiber carbohydrate in cool-season grasses. Their fermentation by ruminal microbes is not well described, though such information is needed to understand their nutritional value to ruminants. Our objective was to compare kinetics and product formation of orchardgrass fruc...

  3. Opportunities to enhance performance and efficiency through nutrient synchrony in concentrate-fed ruminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronization of the ruminal degradation of carbohydrates and crude protein (CP) is projected to increase ruminal microbial protein synthesis and improve nitrogen (N) use efficiency. Attempts to synchronize the fermentation of dietary carbohydrates and CP have been met with mixed results, suggest...

  4. Effects of low rumen-degradable protein or abomasal fructan infusion on diet digestibility and urinary nitrogen excretion in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gressley, T F; Armentano, L E

    2007-03-01

    Post-ileal carbohydrate fermentation in dairy cows converts blood urea nitrogen (BUN) into fecal microbial protein. This should reduce urinary N, increase fecal N, and reduce manure NH3 volatilization. However, if intestinal BUN recycling competes with ruminal BUN recycling, hindgut fermentation may reduce NH3 for rumen microbial protein synthesis. Eight lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 14-d periods. Treatments were arranged as a 2 x 2 factorial. Diets contained either adequate rumen-degradable protein (RDP; high RDP) or were 28% below predicted RDP requirements (low RDP). Cows received abomasal infusions of either 10 L/d of saline or 10 L/d of saline containing 1 kg/d of inulin. We hypothesized that reducing ruminal NH3, either by restricting RDP intake or by diverting BUN to feces with inulin, would reduce rumen microbial protein synthesis, as would be evidenced by significant main effects of treatments on rumen NH3, milk production, and urinary purine derivative excretion. Furthermore, we thought it likely that effects of inulin might be greater when rumen NH3 was already low, as would be indicated by significant interactions between inulin infusion and dietary RDP level on rumen NH3, milk production, and urinary purine derivative excretion. Rumen NH3 was reduced by the low-RDP diet, but urinary purine derivative excretion and milk production were unaffected. However, the low-RDP diet reduced apparent total tract digestibility of OM and starch and reduced in situ rumen NDF digestibility. Abomasal inulin reduced the BUN concentration but did not affect milk yield or rumen NH3, suggesting that RDP requirements are not affected by hindgut fermentation. Inulin shifted 23 g/d of N from urine to feces. However, based on fecal purine excretion, we estimated that only 8 g/d of the increased fecal N was due to increased fecal microbial output. Inulin reduced true digestibility of dietary protein or increased nonmicrobial as

  5. Effect of dietary concentrate on rumen fermentation, digestibility, and nitrogen losses in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Agle, M; Hristov, A N; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P M; Vaddella, V K

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effect of level of dietary concentrate on rumen fermentation, digestibility, and N losses in lactating dairy cows. The experiment was a replicated 3x3 Latin square design with 6 cows and 16-d adaptation periods. Ruminal contents were exchanged between cows at the beginning of each adaptation period. Data for 2 of the diets tested in this experiment are presented here. The diets contained (dry matter basis): 52% (LowC; control) and 72% (HighC) concentrate feeds. Crude protein contents of the diets were 16.5 and 16.4%, respectively. The HighC diet decreased ruminal pH and ammonia concentration and increased propionate concentration compared with LowC. Acetate:propionate ratio was greater for LowC than for HighC. Rumen methane production and microbial protein synthesis were unaffected by diet. Dry matter intake was similar among diets, but milk yield was increased by HighC compared with LowC (36.0 and 33.2 kg/d, respectively). Milk fat percentage and yield and total-tract apparent NDF digestibility were decreased by HighC compared with LowC. More ruminal ammonia N was transferred into milk protein with HighC than with LowC. Urinary N excretion, plasma urea N, and milk urea N concentration were not affected by diet. The ammonia emitting potential of manure was similar between LowC and HighC diets. Increased concentrate proportion in the diet of dairy cows resulted in reduced ruminal ammonia concentration and enhanced ammonia utilization for milk protein synthesis. These effects, however, did not result in reduced urinary N losses and only marginally improved milk N efficiency. Increasing dietary concentrate was not a successful strategy to mitigate enteric methane production and ammonia emissions from manure.

  6. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  7. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M.; Bruce, David C.; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Feng; Detter, Chris; Detter, John C.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff S.; Hauser, Loren J.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Land, Miriam L.; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol. PMID:21914885

  8. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7.

    PubMed

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David C; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Feng; Detter, Chris; Detter, John C; Goodwin, Lynne A; Han, Cliff S; Hauser, Loren J; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  9. Ruminant nitrogen usage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research on protein absorption by ruminants and takes a look at the calculation of optimum nutrient requirements, including bacterial digestion, in the calculations. It also describes the parameters of nitrogen conversion in the ruminant and examines the different kinds of protein found in animal feedstuffs.

  10. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may begin around the time of menopause. Urgency urinary incontinence happens when people have a sudden need ... urinary incontinence is a mix of stress and urgency urinary incontinence. You may leak urine with a laugh ...

  11. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Acidosis: new insights into the persistent problem.

    PubMed

    Oba, M; Wertz-Lutz, A E

    2011-04-01

    The Ruminant Nutrition Symposium titled "Acidosis: New insights into the persistent problem" was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, American Society of Animal Science, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Western Section-ASAS, and the Canadian Society of Animal Science in Denver, Colorado, July 11 to 15, 2010. The objective of the symposium was to provide the ruminant nutrition community with new insights and perspectives from recent research findings on acidosis. Under modern production systems, ruminants are fed high-grain diets to maximize their energy intake and productivity. However, feeding highly fermentable diets often causes excess fermentation and results in accumulation of fermentation acids in the rumen, leading to a decrease in feed intake, poor feed efficiency, liver abscesses, and lameness in feedlot cattle or lactating dairy cows. Although our understanding of nutritional factors (i.e., effects of type and processing method of grains and importance of physically effective fiber) affecting rumen pH have increased substantially over the past few decades, rumen acidosis has continued to be a common problem in the ruminant livestock industry. The symposium program was organized to review recent research findings in acidosis with more emphasis on physiological aspects, and provide novel insights into the persistent problem.

  12. Establishment and Development of Ruminal Hydrogenotrophs in Methanogen-Free Lambs▿

    PubMed Central

    Fonty, Gérard; Joblin, Keith; Chavarot, Michel; Roux, Remy; Naylor, Graham; Michallon, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether reductive acetogenesis can provide an alternative to methanogenesis in the rumen. Gnotobiotic lambs were inoculated with a functional rumen microbiota lacking methanogens and reared to maturity on a fibrous diet. Lambs with a methanogen-free rumen grew well, and the feed intake and ruminal volatile fatty acid concentrations for lambs lacking ruminal methanogens were lower but not markedly dissimilar from those for conventional lambs reared on the same diet. A high population density (107 to 108 cells g−1) of ruminal acetogens slowly developed in methanogen-free lambs. Sulfate- and fumarate-reducing bacteria were present, but their population densities were highly variable. In methanogen-free lambs, the hydrogen capture from fermentation was low (28 to 46%) in comparison with that in lambs containing ruminal methanogens (>90%). Reductive acetogenesis was not a significant part of ruminal fermentation in conventional lambs but contributed 21 to 25% to the fermentation in methanogen-free meroxenic animals. Ruminal H2 utilization was lower in lambs lacking ruminal methanogens, but when a methanogen-free lamb was inoculated with a methanogen, the ruminal H2 utilization was similar to that in conventional lambs. H2 utilization in lambs containing a normal ruminal microflora was age dependent and increased with the animal age. The animal age effect was less marked in lambs lacking ruminal methanogens. Addition of fumarate to rumen contents from methanogen-free lambs increased H2 utilization. These findings provide the first evidence from animal studies that reductive acetogens can sustain a functional rumen and replace methanogens as a sink for H2 in the rumen. PMID:17675444

  13. Production and nitrogen utilization in lactating dairy cows fed ground field peas with or without ruminally protected lysine and methionine.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A B D; Whitehouse, N L; Aragona, K M; Schwab, C S; Reis, S F; Brito, A F

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has shown that cows fed ≥24% of the diet dry matter (DM) as field peas decreased milk yield as well as concentration and yield of milk protein, possibly due to reduced DM intake and limited supply of Lys and Met. Twelve multiparous and 4 primiparous lactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The diets contained (DM basis) 34.8% corn silage, 15.2% grass-legume silage, 5.9% roasted soybean, 2.4% mineral-vitamin premix, 2.0% alfalfa pellets, and either (1) 36% ground corn, 2.4% soybean meal, and 1.3% urea (UR), (2) 29.7% ground corn, 9.8% soybean meal, 0.13% ruminally protected (RP) Lys, and 0.07% RP-Met (CSBAA), (3) 25% ground field peas, 12.3% ground corn, and 2.4% soybean meal (FP), or (4) FP supplemented with 0.15% RP-Lys and 0.05% RP-Met (FPAA). Our objective was to test the effects of FP versus UR, FPAA versus CSBAA, and FPAA versus FP on milk yield and composition, N utilization, nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation profile, and plasma concentration of AA. Milk yield did not differ across diets. Compared with cows fed UR, those fed FP had greater DM intake, concentration and yield of milk true protein, apparent total-tract digestibility of fiber, urinary excretion of purine derivatives, and concentrations of total volatile fatty acids in the rumen and Lys in plasma, and less milk urea N and ruminal NH3-N. The concentration of milk urea N, as well as the concentration and yield of milk fat increased in cows fed FPAA versus CSBAA. Moreover, cows fed FPAA had greater ruminal concentration of total volatile fatty acids, increased proportions of acetate and isobutyrate, and decreased proportions of propionate and valerate than those fed CSBAA. The plasma concentrations of His, Leu, and Phe decreased, whereas plasma Met increased and plasma Lys tended to increase in cows fed FPAA versus CSBAA. Concentration of milk true protein, but not yield, was increased in cows fed FPAA

  14. Application of meta-omics techniques to understand greenhouse gas emissions originating from ruminal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert J; Snelling, Timothy J; McCartney, Christine A; Tapio, Ilma; Strozzi, Francesco

    2017-01-16

    Methane emissions from ruminal fermentation contribute significantly to total anthropological greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. New meta-omics technologies are beginning to revolutionise our understanding of the rumen microbial community structure, metabolic potential and metabolic activity. Here we explore these developments in relation to GHG emissions. Microbial rumen community analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA sequence analysis are not yet predictive of methane emissions from individual animals or treatments. Few metagenomics studies have been directly related to GHG emissions. In these studies, the main genes that differed in abundance between high and low methane emitters included archaeal genes involved in methanogenesis, with others that were not apparently related to methane metabolism. Unlike the taxonomic analysis up to now, the gene sets from metagenomes may have predictive value. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis predicts metabolic function better than only a taxonomic description, because different taxa share genes with the same function. Metatranscriptomics, the study of mRNA transcript abundance, should help to understand the dynamic of microbial activity rather than the gene abundance; to date, only one study has related the expression levels of methanogenic genes to methane emissions, where gene abundance failed to do so. Metaproteomics describes the proteins present in the ecosystem, and is therefore arguably a better indication of microbial metabolism. Both two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and shotgun peptide sequencing methods have been used for ruminal analysis. In our unpublished studies, both methods showed an abundance of archaeal methanogenic enzymes, but neither was able to discriminate high and low emitters. Metabolomics can take several forms that appear to have predictive value for methane emissions; ruminal metabolites, milk fatty acid profiles, faecal long-chain alcohols and urinary metabolites have all

  15. Influence of direct-fed fibrolytic enzymes on diet digestibility and ruminal activity in sheep fed a grass hay-based diet.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, L A; Tejido, M L; Ranilla, M J; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2008-07-01

    Six rumen-fistulated Merino sheep were used in a crossover design experiment to evaluate the effects of an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparation (12 g/d; ENZ), delivered directly into the rumen, on diet digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial protein synthesis. The enzyme contained endoglucanase and xylanase activities. Sheep were fed a mixed grass hay:concentrate (70:30; DM basis) diet at a daily rate of 46.1 g/kg of BW(0.75). Samples of grass hay were incubated in situ in the rumen of each sheep to measure DM and NDF degradation. The supplementation with ENZ did not affect diet digestibility (P = 0.30 to 0.66), urinary excretion of purine derivatives (P = 0.34), ruminal pH (P = 0.46), or concentrations of NH(3)-N (P = 0.69) and total VFA (P = 0.97). In contrast, molar proportion of propionate were greater (P = 0.001) and acetate:propionate ratio was lower (P < 0.001) in ENZ-supplemented sheep. In addition, ENZ supplementation tended to increase (P = 0.06) numbers of cellulolytic bacteria at 4 h after feeding. Both the ruminally insoluble potentially degradable fraction of grass hay DM and its fractional rate of degradation were increased (P = 0.002 and 0.05, respectively) by ENZ treatment. Supplementation with ENZ also increased (P = 0.01 to 0.02) effective and potential degradability of grass hay DM and NDF. Ruminal fluid endoglucanase and xylanase activities were greater (P < 0.001 and 0.03, respectively) in ENZ-supplemented sheep than in control animals. It was found that ENZ supplementation did not affect either exoglucanase (P = 0.12) or amylase (P = 0.83) activity. The results indicate that supplementing ENZ directly into the rumen increased the fibrolytic activity and stimulated the growth of cellulolytic bacteria without a prefeeding feed-enzyme interaction.

  16. Fermentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Lutzen, N.W.

    1982-02-23

    Fermentation process consists essentially of fermenting a 10-45% w/w aqueous slurry of granular starch for the production of ethanol with an ethanol-producing microorganism in the presence of alpha-amylase and glucoamylase, the conduct of said fermentation being characterized by low levels of dextrin and fermentable sugars in solution in the fermentation broth throughout the fermentation, and thereafter recovering enzymes from the fermentation broth for use anew in fermentation of granular starch.

  17. Influence of altering ruminal degradation of soybean meal protein on in situ ruminal fiber disappearance of forages and fibrous byproducts.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H S; Cameron, M R; Fahey, G C; Merchen, N R; Clark, J H

    1995-08-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of altering ruminal CP degradation of soybean meal (SBM) by roasting (Exp. 1) on ruminal characteristics and extents of in situ disappearance of DM, OM, and fiber components (Exp. 2). A control diet (8.2% CP) containing oat hulls, corn silage, starch grits, ammoniated corn cobs, and molasses was supplemented to 17.1% CP with unroasted SBM (SBM-0) or SBM roasted at 165 degrees C for 75, 150, or 210 min (SBM-75, SBM-150, and SBM-210, respectively). In Exp. 1, SBM was incubated for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 h in the rumen of two steers that were fed the SBM-0 diet. Extents of ruminal CP degradation and rates of N disappearance decreased (P < .05) linearly with increasing roasting time of SBM. In Exp. 2, five ruminally cannulated steers were used in a 5 x 5 Latin square design and were fed the five diets listed above during five 11-d periods. On d 11, five substrates (alfalfa hay, orchardgrass hay, corn silage, soy hulls, and wheat straw) were incubated in the rumen for 24 h. Extents of in situ disappearance of DM, OM, and fiber (NDF, ADF, cellulose, hemicellulose, and total dietary fiber) were analyzed as a split-plot design. No substrate x diet interaction (P > .05) was observed for any of the measurements evaluated. Extents of in situ disappearance (24 h) of DM, OM, and fiber were highest (P < .05) when the control diet was fed and were lowest (P < .05) when the SBM-0 diet was fed. Decreasing the availability of SBM protein in the diet by roasting increased (P < or = .10) extents of in situ disappearance of DM, OM, and fiber linearly. These extents were similar for steers fed the control diet or the diet containing SBM-210. Ruminal concentrations of NH3 N, branched-chain VFA, and valerate were highest (P < .05) and ruminal pH lowest (P < .05) when the SBM-0 diet was fed. Results indicated a rapid ruminal fermentation of both protein and readily available carbohydrates of SBM (resulting in pH below 6.0) during the first 4

  18. Fermentation characteristics and microbial growth promoted by diets including two-phase olive cake in continuous fermenters.

    PubMed

    Moumen, A; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Martín-García, I; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2008-02-01

    bacterial protein synthesis are not so clear since values estimated from DAPA and PB did not show similar trends. Neither inoculum origin nor PEG had important effects on fermentation characteristics. The DAPA could be an adequate marker in continuous fermenters, with comparative purposes, as protozoa are not present and, estimated protein synthesis values are similar to those obtained in vivo with similar diets using urinary excretion of PD (Yáñez Ruiz et al., 2004b). Further research is needed to state the optimal proportion of 2POC in practical diets for ruminants at both maintenance and production stages.

  19. Technical Note: Predicting ruminal methane inhibition by condensed tannins using nonlinear exponential decay regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Naumann, H D; Tedeschi, L O; Fonseca, M A

    2015-11-01

    Methane (CH) is a potent greenhouse gas that is normally produced by microbial fermentation in the rumen and released to the environment mainly during eructation. Prediction of ruminal CH production is important for ruminant nutrition, especially for the determination of ME intake to assess the amount of total GE available for metabolism by an animal. Equations have been developed to predict ruminal CH production based on dietary constituents, but none have considered condensed tannins (CT), which are known to impact CH production by ruminants. The objective was to develop an equation to predict ruminal CH, accounting for CT effects. Methane production data were acquired from 48-h in vitro fermentation of a diverse group of warm-season perennial forage legumes containing different concentrations of CT over the course of 3 yr ( = 113). The following nonlinear exponential decay regression equation was developed: CH₄ = 113.6 × exp (-0.1751 x CT) - 2.18), [corrected] in which CH is expressed in grams per kilogram of fermentable organic matter and CT is in percentage of the DM. This equation predicted that CH production could be reduced by approximately 50% when CT is 3.9% DM. This equation is likely more accurate when screening CT-containing forages for their potential ability to mitigate in vitro CH production by ruminants when the CT concentration is greater than 3% DM. Therefore, despite the degree of variability in ruminal CH production, this equation could be used as a tool for screening CT-containing forages for their potential to inhibit ruminal CH. Future research should focus on the development of predictive equations when other potential reducers of ruminal CH are used in conjunction with CT.

  20. [Local anaesthesia in ruminants].

    PubMed

    Nuss, Karl; Schwarz, Andrea; Ringer, Simone

    2017-06-20

    The use of local anaesthesia in ruminants allows many surgical procedures to be conducted free of pain, efficiently and inexpensively in the field. Local anaesthesia combined with sedation and immobilisation of the animal can replace general anaesthesia for many procedures (e. g. castration, claw amputation). The level of difficulty differs among various local anaesthetic techniques: local infiltration of tissue or anaesthesia of the cornual nerve are easily performed, whereas local anaesthesia of the eye, regional anaesthesia in limbs or anaesthesia for umbilical surgery are more difficult to carry out. This article presents an illustrated overview of the most common local anaesthetic procedures in cattle as well as in small ruminants and serves as a practical guide for veterinarians in the field. In principle, these techniques can likewise be applied in other ruminants or artiodactyls.

  1. The Post-mortem Examination in Ruminants and its Possible Benefit to Ruminant Clinical Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wäsle, K; Pospischil, A; Hässig, M; Gerspach, C; Hilbe, M

    To highlight the important role of post-mortem examination of ruminants and to identify possible benefits for modern ruminant medicine, a comparison of clinical and pathological diagnoses was conducted and influencing factors were identified. For this purpose, results from 2,000 ruminants that had undergone necropsy examination at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, were analysed retrospectively. Both clinical and pathological diagnoses were available for 81.40% of cattle, 80.22% of sheep and 66.66% of goats; no diagnoses were available for 3.86% of cattle, 3.30% of sheep and 7.41% of goats. In the remaining cases, either the pathological diagnosis or the clinical diagnosis was unavailable. The greatest influences on the presence of diagnoses were the way in which the animal died, the type of necropsy examination and the age of the animal. The majority of diagnoses were attributed to digestive and respiratory disorders in cattle and digestive, neurological and urinary disorders in small ruminants. The main clinical diagnoses was confirmed pathologically in 86.20% of cattle, 85.51% of sheep and 82.00% of goats, while 7.03% of diagnoses in cattle, 12.26% in sheep and 11.00% in goats could not be confirmed by post-mortem or histopathological examinations. Relevant additional information or specification of diagnoses was given in 70.87% of cattle, 45.21% of sheep and 56.66% of goats. The concurrence of diagnoses and diagnosis specification was most influenced by the way in which the animal died, the type of necropsy examination that was conducted, the performance of histopathology following the necropsy examination and whether the animal was submitted in connection with a livestock health problem. This study highlighted the abiding importance of the post-mortem examination in modern ruminant medicine, despite technical advances in clinical technologies, both as a diagnostic tool and for quality control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ruminal Acidosis in Feedlot: From Aetiology to Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Joaquín; Benedito, José Luis; Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Acute ruminal acidosis is a metabolic status defined by decreased blood pH and bicarbonate, caused by overproduction of ruminal D-lactate. It will appear when animals ingest excessive amount of nonstructural carbohydrates with low neutral detergent fiber. Animals will show ruminal hypotony/atony with hydrorumen and a typical parakeratosis-rumenitis liver abscess complex, associated with a plethora of systemic manifestations such as diarrhea and dehydration, liver abscesses, infections of the lung, the heart, and/or the kidney, and laminitis, as well as neurologic symptoms due to both cerebrocortical necrosis and the direct effect of D-lactate on neurons. In feedlots, warning signs include decrease in chewing activity, weight, and dry matter intake and increase in laminitis and diarrhea prevalence. The prognosis is quite variable. Treatment will be based on the control of systemic acidosis and dehydration. Prevention is the most important tool and will require normalization of ruminal pH and microbiota. Appropriate feeding strategies are essential and involve changing the dietary composition to increase neutral detergent fiber content and greater particle size and length. Appropriate grain processing can control the fermentation rate while additives such as prebiotics or probiotics can help to stabilize the ruminal environment. Immunization against producers of D-lactate is being explored. PMID:25489604

  3. Prospects of complete feed system in ruminant feeding: A review

    PubMed Central

    Beigh, Yasir Afzal; Ganai, Abdul Majeed; Ahmad, Haidar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Effective utilization of available feed resources is the key for economical livestock rearing. Complete feed system is one of the latest developments to exploit the potential of animal feed resources in the best possible way. The complete feed is a quantitative mixture of all dietary ingredients, blended thoroughly to prevent separation and selection, fed as a sole source of nutrients except water and is formulated in a desired proportion to meet the specific nutrient requirements. The concentrate and roughage levels may vary according to the nutrient requirement of ruminants for different production purposes. The complete feed with the use of fibrous crop residue is a noble way to increase the voluntary feed intake and thus animal’s production performance. In this system of feeding, the ruminant animals have continuous free choice availability of uniform feed mixture, resulting in more uniform load on the rumen and less fluctuation in release of ammonia which supports more efficient utilization of ruminal non-protein nitrogen. Feeding complete diet stabilizes ruminal fermentation, thereby improves nutrient utilization. This feeding system allows expanded use of agro-industrial by­products, crop residues and nonconventional feeds in ruminant ration for maximizing production and minimizing feeding cost, thus being increasingly appreciated. However, to extend the concept extensively to the field and make this technology successful and viable for farmers, more efforts are needed to be taken. PMID:28507415

  4. Dietary fiber content influences soluble carbohydrate levels in ruminal fluids.

    PubMed

    Pinder, R S; Patterson, J A; O'Bryan, C A; Crandall, P G; Ricke, S C

    2012-01-01

    The soluble carbohydrate concentration of ruminal fluid, as affected by dietary forage content (DFC) and/or ruminally undegradable intake protein content (UIPC), was determined. Four ruminally cannulated steers, in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, were offered diets containing high (75 % of DM) or low (25 % of DM) DFC and high (6 % of DM) or low (5 % of DM) UIPC, in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Zinc-treated SBM was the primary UIP source. Soluble hexose concentration (145.1 μM) in ruminal fluid (RF) of steers fed low DFC diets exhibited a higher trend (P = 0.08) than that (124.5 μM) of steers fed high DFC diets. UIPC did not modulate (P = 0.54) ruminal soluble hexose concentrations. Regardless of diet, soluble hexose concentration declined immediately after feeding and did not rise until 3 h after feeding (P < 0.0001). Cellobiose (≈90 %) and glucose (≈10 %) were the major soluble hexoses present in RF. Maltose was not detected. Soluble glucose concentration (13.0 μM) was not modified by either UIPC (P = 0.40) nor DFC (P = 0.61). However, a DFC by post-prandial time interaction was detected (P = 0.02). Pentose concentrations were greater (P = 0.02) in RF of steers fed high DFC (100.2 μM) than steers fed low DFC (177.0 μM). UIPC did not influence (P = 0.35) soluble pentose concentration. The identity of soluble pentoses in ruminal fluid could not be determined. However, unsubstituted xylose and arabinose were excluded. These data indicate that: (i) soluble carbohydrate concentrations remain in ruminal fluid during digestion and fermentation; (ii) slight diurnal changes began after feeding; (iii) DFC influences the soluble carbohydrate concentration in RF; and (iv) UIPC of these diets does not affect the soluble carbohydrate concentration of RF.

  5. Effect of nitrogen source in high-concentrate, low-protein beef cattle diets on microbial fermentation studied in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Devant, M; Ferret, A; Calsamiglia, S; Casals, R; Gasa, J

    2001-07-01

    In Exp. 1, four Holstein heifers (112+/-5.5 kg BW) fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square to evaluate the effects of N source on ruminal fermentation and urinary excretion of purine derivatives. A 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used; the factors were the type of protein source (soybean meal, SBM, vs a 50:50 mixture of fish meal and corn gluten meal, FMCGM) and the partial substitution of protein source by urea (with vs without). Heifers were allowed to consume concentrate and barley straw on an ad libitum basis. Barley straw:concentrate ratio (12:88) and average ruminal pH (6.25) were not affected (P > 0.05) by treatment. Ruminal NH3 N concentration and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were not affected (P > 0.05) by supplemental N source. In situ CP degradability of supplemented SBM was very low (50%). In Exp. 2, eight dual-flow continuous-culture fermenters were used to study diet effects on microbial fermentation and nutrient flow, using forage:concentrate ratio, solid and liquid passage rates, and pH fluctuation to simulate in vivo conditions. The treatment containing SBM without urea reached the greatest total VFA concentration (P < 0.01), molar percentage of acetate (P < 0.05), and NH3 N concentration (P < 0.05), followed by treatments with partial substitution of protein source by urea, and finally by the treatment containing FMCGM. True OM digestion tended to increase (P = 0.13) in treatments containing SBM. These results suggest that amino N from SBM and NH3 N concentration stimulated nutrient digestion. Microbial protein synthesis was lowest in treatments with FMCGM and without urea, indicating that rapidly available N limited microbial growth. The low CP degradability of SBM observed may have contributed to the limitation in N supply for microbial growth. Efficiency of microbial protein synthesis increased in treatments containing urea (P < 0.05). Protein source affected total (P < 0.05) and essential AA (P

  6. Harvesting, rumination, digestion, and passage of fruit and leaf diets by a small ruminant, the blue duiker.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, P S; Shipley, L A

    2000-06-01

    Because small ruminants (<15 kg) have a high ratio of metabolic rate to fermentation capacity, they are expected to select and require low-fiber, nutrient-dense concentrate diets. However, recent studies suggest that small ruminants may not be as limited in their digestive capacity as previously thought. In this study, we examined harvesting, rumination, digestion, and passage of three diets (domestic figs Ficus carica, fresh alfalfa Medicago sativa, and Pacific willow leaves Salix lasiandra) ranging from 10 to 50% neutral detergent fiber content (NDF) in captive blue duikers (Cephalophus monticola, 4 kg). Harvesting and rumination rates were obtained by observing and videotaping animals on each diet, and digestibility and intake were determined by conducting total collection digestion trials. We estimated mean retention time of liquid and particulate digesta by administering Co-EDTA and forages labelled with YbNO3 in a pulse dose and monitoring fecal output over 4 days. Duikers harvested and ruminated the fig diet faster than the alfalfa and willow diets. Likewise, they achieved higher dry matter, energy, NDF, and protein digestibility when eating figs, yet achieved a higher daily digestible energy intake on the fresh willow and alfalfa than on the figs by eating proportionately more of these forages. Duikers maintained a positive nitrogen balance on all diets, including figs, which contained only 6.3% crude protein. Mean retention time of cell wall in the duikers' digestive tract declined with increasing NDF and cellulose content of the diet. Digestibility coefficients and mean retention times of these small ruminants were virtually equivalent to those measured for ruminants two orders of magnitude larger, suggesting that they are well adapted for a mixed diet.

  7. Acetone and isopropanol in ruminal fluid and feces of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Shiogama, Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Acetone and its metabolite isopropanol are produced by gut microbes as well as by the host's metabolism. To evaluate the production of acetone and isopropanol in alimentary tracts, a total of 80 pair-samples of feces and ruminal fluid were taken in lactating dairy cows that had been fed silage-containing diets. Acetone and isopropanol were analyzed, together with ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Isopropanol was detected in 57 fecal and all the ruminal samples; however, the ruminal isopropanol and ethanol concentrations were distinctly lower than those in the feces. Acetone was detected in 13 fecal and 53 ruminal samples; however, there was no significant difference in acetone concentrations between the feces and the ruminal fluid. The group with higher fecal isopropanol concentration showed higher fecal proportions of acetate accompanied by low proportion of minor VFA, which consisted of isobutyrate and iso- and n-valerate. In the group with higher ruminal isopropanol concentration, ethanol concentration was higher; the ruminal VFA profiles showed only a negligible difference. Fecal and ruminal ethanol concentrations were not affected by feed ethanol. Thus, the colon showed an accelerated alcoholic fermentation compared with the rumen of dairy cows; however, acetone was present at higher frequency in the rumen than in the feces.

  8. Effects of Candida norvegensis live cells on in vitro oat straw rumen fermentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. Th...

  9. Effects of plants containing secondary compounds and plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology.

    PubMed

    Wanapat, Metha; Kongmun, Pongthon; Poungchompu, Onanong; Cherdthong, Anusorn; Khejornsart, Pichad; Pilajun, Ruangyote; Kaenpakdee, Sujittra

    2012-03-01

    A number of experiments have been conducted to investigate effects of tropical plants containing condensed tannins and/or saponins present in tropical plants and some plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology in ruminants. Based on both in vitro and in vivo trials, the results revealed important effects on rumen microorganisms and fermentation including methane production. Incorporation and/or supplementation of these plants containing secondary metabolites have potential for improving rumen ecology and subsequently productivity in ruminants.

  10. Grain processing effects on starch utilization by ruminants.

    PubMed

    Theurer, C B

    1986-11-01

    Starch utilization may be markedly enhanced by proper grain processing; however, extent of improvement is primarily dependent upon the ruminant species, grain source and method of processing. Grain processing has less impact on starch digestion by sheep than cattle. The magnitude of improvement is inverse to the starch digestion values for nonprocessed (or minimally processed) grains. Utilization of sorghum grain starch is improved most by extensive processing, and then corn, with little improvement in barley starch digestion. Studies comparing processing effects on barley or wheat starch utilization by cattle were not found. Steam-flaking consistently improves digestibility of starch by cattle fed corn- or sorghum grain-based diets over whole, ground or dry-rolled processes. Other extensive processing methods appear to enhance starch digestibility of corn and sorghum grain to a similar extent as steam-flaking, but comparative data are too limited to quantitate adequately effects of these methods. This improvement in starch utilization appears to be the primary reason for enhanced feed conversion of cattle fed diets high in these processed grains. The major site of cereal grain starch digestion is usually the rumen. Processing increases microbial degradation of starch in the rumen and decreases amounts of starch digested post-ruminally. Rates of in vitro amylolytic attack of starch in cereal grains by both ruminal microbial and pancreatic enzyme sources are improved by processing methods employing proper combinations of moisture, heat and pressure. In vitro and in situ studies suggest that much of the increase in ruminal starch fermentation with steam-flaking is due to changes in starch granular structure, which produces additive effects beyond those of decreasing particle size. Thus, efficiency of ruminal starch fermentation by cattle appears to be improved by proper processing of corn and sorghum grain. Processing and grain source studies both suggest that

  11. Effect of dietary cation-anion difference on ruminal metabolism, total apparent digestibility, blood and renal acid-base regulation in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Martins, C M M R; Arcari, M A; Welter, K C; Gonçalves, J L; Santos, M V

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) on ruminal fermentation, total apparent digestibility, blood and renal metabolism of lactating dairy cows. Sixteen Holstein cows were distributed in four contemporary 4×4 Latin Square designs, which consisted of four periods of 21 days and four treatments according to DCAD: +290; +192; +98 and -71 milliequivalent (mEq)/kg dry matter (DM). Ruminal pH and concentrations of acetic and butyric acid increased linearly according to the increase of DCAD. Similarly, NDF total apparent digestibility linearly increased by 6.38% when DCAD increased from -71 to 290 mEq/kg DM [Y=65.90 (SE=2.37)+0.0167 (SE=0.0068)×DCAD (mEq/kg DM)]. Blood pH was also increased according to DCAD, which resulted in reduction of serum concentrations of Na, K and ionic calcium (iCa). To maintain the blood acid-base homeostasis, renal metabolism played an important role in controlling serum concentrations of Na and K, since the Na and K urinary excretion increased linearly by 89.69% and 46.06%, respectively, from -71 to 290 mEq/kg DM. Changes in acid-base balance of biological fluids may directly affect the mineral composition of milk, as milk concentrations of Na, K, iCa and chlorides were reduced according to blood pH increased. Thus, it can be concluded that the increase of DCAD raises the pH of ruminal fluid, NDF total apparent digestibility, and blood pH, and decreases the milk concentration of cationic minerals, as well as the efficiency of Na utilization to milk production.

  12. Peste des petits ruminants.

    PubMed

    Parida, S; Muniraju, M; Mahapatra, M; Muthuchelvan, D; Buczkowski, H; Banyard, A C

    2015-12-14

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants.

  13. Peste des petits ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Parida, S.; Muniraju, M.; Mahapatra, M.; Muthuchelvan, D.; Buczkowski, H.; Banyard, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus causes a highly infectious disease of small ruminants that is endemic across Africa, the Middle East and large regions of Asia. The virus is considered to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture across the developing world and has recently been targeted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) for eradication with the aim of global elimination of the disease by 2030. Fundamentally, the vaccines required to successfully achieve this goal are currently available, but the availability of novel vaccine preparations to also fulfill the requisite for differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) may reduce the time taken and the financial costs of serological surveillance in the later stages of any eradication campaign. Here, we overview what is currently known about the virus, with reference to its origin, updated global circulation, molecular evolution, diagnostic tools and vaccines currently available to combat the disease. Further, we comment on recent developments in our knowledge of various recombinant vaccines and on the potential for the development of novel multivalent vaccines for small ruminants. PMID:26443889

  14. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... The knowledge gained from these studies is advancing scientific understanding of why urinary tract disorders develop, leading to improved methods of diagnosing, treating, and preventing them. Clinical trials ...

  15. [Saponins in nutrition of swine, poultry and ruminants].

    PubMed

    Westendarp, H

    2005-02-01

    Saponins are glycosides found in many plants, which have soap character due to their surfactant properties. They work haemolytic and may cause symptoms of intoxication in high concentration. Among therapeutically relevant effects expectorative, anti-inflammatory and immune-stimulating effects have the highest ranking. Beyond that, saponins demonstrate antimicrobial properties particularly against fungi and additionally against bacteria and protozoa. In animal nutrition additions of saponins can suppress intestinal and ruminal ammonia production. The ammonia-reducing effect is primarily attributed to an inhibition of proteolytic microorganisms. Due to reduced NH3-concentrations metabolism is relieved, which offers benefits to animal welfare and animal performance. Accordingly improved feed convertion ratio can be registered in weanling and growing-finishing pigs with the employment of saponin-containing feed additives. With regard to ruminal fermentation in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that beside proteolytic protozoa also cellolytic and amylolytic bacterial species are restrained. To what extent antimicrobial activity supress digestion or whether the selective effects on microorganisms can be used purposefully to manipulate ruminal fermentation, must be clarified in further investigations.

  16. Buffer nitrogen solubility, in vitro ruminal partitioning of nitrogen and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves of four fodder tree species.

    PubMed

    Cudjoe, N; Mlambo, V

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the chemical composition, buffer N solubility, in vitro ruminal N degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves from Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, Morus alba and Trichanthera gigantea trees. These tree leaves are a potential protein source for ruminants, but their site-influenced nutritive value is largely unknown. Leucaena leucocephala leaves had the highest N content (42.1 g/kg DM), while T. gigantea leaves had the least (26.1 g/kg DM). Leucaena leucocephala had the highest buffer solubility index (20%), while 10% of the total N in leaves of the other three species was soluble. The rapidly fermentable N fraction 'a' was highest in M. alba leaves (734.9 g/kg DM) and least in T. gigantea leaves (139.5 g/kg DM). The rate of fermentation (c) was highest for M. alba (7%/hours) leaves. No significant correlations were recorded between buffer solubility index of N and in vitro ruminal N degradability parameters: a, b, and c. The highest response to tannin inactivation using polyethylene glycol, in terms of percentage increase in 36-hours cumulative gas production, was recorded in M. alba (39%) and T. gigantea (38%) leaves. It was concluded that buffer solubility of N is not a good indicator of ruminal N degradation in the leaves of these tree species. Leaves of M. alba could be more valuable as a source of rapidly fermentable N when animals are offered low-protein, high-fibre diets compared with other tree species evaluated in the current study. However, when feeding M. alba leaves, the role of tannins must be considered because these secondary plant compounds showed significant in vitro ruminal biological activity.

  17. Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) bitter acids: modulation of rumen fermentation and potential as an alternative growth promoter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics can improve ruminant growth and efficiency by altering rumen fermentation via selective inhibition of microorganisms. However, antibiotic use is increasingly restricted due to concerns about the spread of antibiotic-resistance. Plant-based antimicrobials are alternatives to antibiotics ...

  18. Brief Report: Adolescents' Co-Rumination with Mothers, Co-Rumination with Friends, and Internalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with…

  19. Measuring State-Specific Rumination: Development of the Rumination about an Interpersonal Offense Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Nathaniel G.; Vogel, David L.; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Goldman, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    The tendency to ruminate has been consistently linked to psychological disturbances, such as increased stress, anger, and fear in response to provocations. However, existing measures of rumination focus on the disposition to ruminate rather than on rumination about a specific situation. This limits the ability to explore rumination about a…

  20. Brief Report: Adolescents' Co-Rumination with Mothers, Co-Rumination with Friends, and Internalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with…

  1. Fermented Vegetables

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The wide variety of fermented foods of the world can be classified by the materials obtained from the fermentation, such as alcohol (beer, wine), organic acid such as lactic acid and acetic acid (vegetables, dairy), carbon dioxide (bread), and amino acids or peptides from protein (fish fermentations...

  2. Whole corn and wet distiller's grains substitution in steam-flaked corn diet alters rumen fermentation and bacterial dynamics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study evaluated effects of whole shelled corn (WSC) in steam-flaked corn (SFC) finishing diets containing differing amounts of wet distiller's grains with solubles (WDGS) on ruminal fermentation and shifts in ruminal bacterial populations. A total of 642 heifers (initial body weight (BW) = 412 +/-...

  3. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to restrict your activities and limit your social interactions Increase the risk of falls in older adults ... increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence include: Gender. Women are more likely to have stress incontinence. ...

  4. The autonomic phenotype of rumination.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Shapiro, David; Davydov, Dmitry M; Goldstein, Iris B; Mills, Paul J

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that ruminative thoughts may be mediators of the prolonged physiological effects of stress. We hypothesized that autonomic dysregulation plays a role in the relation between rumination and health. Rumination was induced by an anger-recall task in 45 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) change scores were evaluated to obtain the autonomic phenotype of rumination. Personality traits and endothelial activation were examined for their relation to autonomic responses during rumination. Degree of endothelial activation was assessed by circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Vagal withdrawal during rumination was greater for women than men. Larger decreases in the high frequency component of HRV were associated with higher levels of anger-in, depression, and sICAM-1 levels. BRS reactivity was negatively related to trait anxiety. BEI reactivity was positively related to anger-in, hostility, anxiety, and depression. Lower BEI and BRS recovery were associated with lower social desirability and higher anger-out, anxiety, and depression. Findings suggest that the autonomic dysregulation that characterizes rumination plays a role in the relationships between personality and cardiovascular health.

  5. An assessment of GHG emissions from small ruminants in comparison with GHG emissions from large ruminants and monogastric livestock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, G.; Tsiplakou, E.

    2012-03-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are expected to cause global warming which results in extreme weather changes that could affect crop yields and productivity, food supplies and food prices. It is also expected that climate change will have an impact on animal metabolism and health, reproduction and productivity. On the other hand, the expected increased demand of animal origin products in the coming years will increase the reared animal numbers and consequently GHG emissions. This paper outlines the main GHGs emitted from livestock which are CO2, CH4 and N2O, coming from respiration, enteric fermentation and manure management respectively, with CH4 and N2O having the highest global warming potential. Ruminant livestock has the highest contribution to these GHG emissions with small ruminants share being 12.25% of the total GHG emissions from livestock's enteric and manure CH4, and manure N2O in CO2 equivalent, producing 9.45 kg CO2 equivalent per kg body weight with the respective values for cattle, pigs and poultry being 5.45, 3.97 and 3.25. Since the production systems significantly affect the GHG emissions, the grazing, livestock crop complex, and intensive ones account for 30.5%, 67.29% and 5.51% for total CH4 emission (from enteric fermentation and manure management) and 24.32%, 68.11% and 7.57% for N2O respectively. Taking into account the positive and negative impacts of small ruminant livestock production systems to the environmental aspects in general, it is recommended that a number of potentially effective measures should be taken and the appropriate mitigation technologies should be applied in order to reduce effectively and essentially the GHG emissions to the atmosphere, with no adverse effects on intensification and increased productivity of small ruminants production systems.

  6. Effect of Aspergillus oryzae extract alone or in combination with antimicrobial compounds on ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beharka, A A; Nagaraja, T G

    1998-06-01

    The effect of an Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract on the growth rates of pure cultures of ruminal bacteria was determined. Bacteria were grown in an anaerobic ruminal fluid and carbohydrate medium. A sterile filtrate made with 10% A. oryzae was added to the medium at 2 or 5% (vol/vol) to provide a final A. oryzae concentration of 2 or 5 mg/ml, respectively. The filtrate had no effect on the growth rates of 10 of the 19 ruminal bacteria tested; however, the filtrate increased the growth rates of the bacteria that digest fiber, Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes, and the bacteria that utilize lactate, Megasphaera elsdenii, Selenomonas lactilytica, and Selenomonas ruminantium. No differences in growth rate were detected between the two concentrations of A. oryzae filtrate. We also investigated the interactions between A. oryzae and antimicrobial compounds on the growth rates of six species of ruminal bacteria that had shown positive responses or no response to the filtrate. The addition of A. oryzae filtrate to medium containing chlortetracycline or neomycin tended to diminish the negative effects of those compounds on the growth rates of some ruminal bacteria, although the bacteria had no positive growth response to the filtrate alone. In contrast, the combination of A. oryzae filtrate and tylosin decreased the growth rate of Sel. ruminantium D. These results indicated that A. oryzae stimulates growth of some bacteria that digest fiber and ferment lactate in the rumen and interacts positively or negatively with certain antimicrobial feed additives.

  7. Decision making in ruminant orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, J F; Adams, S B

    1996-03-01

    Decision making in ruminant orthopedics is determined by many factors, the most of important of which is age, size, and value of the patient, the nature of the injury, the prognosis for effective treatment and satisfactory healing, the intentions of the client, and the experiences of the veterinarian. Ruminant orthopedics currently is expanding to include the treatment of llamas and small ruminants as companion animals in addition to the treatment of valuable livestock. The future promises increasing sophistication in treatments and an ever higher quality of patient care.

  8. Fermentative digestion of food in the colobus monkey, Colobus, polykomos.

    PubMed

    Kay, R N; Hoppe, P; Maloiy, G M

    1976-04-15

    Fermentation of leafy food occurs in the enlarged saccus gastricus of the colobus monkey with the formation of volatile fatty acid, as in the rumen of ruminant animals. About half of the digestible organic matter and cellulose of the diet is digested in this way.

  9. Fusobacterium necrophorum: a ruminal bacterium that invades liver to cause abscesses in cattle.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, S; Narayanan, S K; Stewart, G C; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G

    2009-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, and an aerotolerant anaerobe, is a normal inhabitant of the rumen of cattle. The organism is in ruminal contents and adherent to the ruminal wall. Its role in ruminal fermentation is to metabolize lactic acid and degrade feed and epithelial proteins. The ruminal concentration is higher in grain-fed than forage-fed cattle. From the rumen, the organism gains entry into the portal circulation and is trapped in the liver to cause abscesses. The organism is an opportunistic pathogen and a primary causative agent of liver abscesses, an economically important disease of grain-fed cattle. Liver abscesses are often secondary to ruminal acidosis and rumenitis in grain-fed cattle. Two subspecies of F. necrophorum, subsp. necrophorum (biotype A) and subsp. funduliforme (biotype B), are recognized that can be differentiated based on morphological, biochemical, biological and molecular characteristics. The subsp. necrophorum is more virulent and is isolated more frequently from infections than the subsp. funduliforme. Several toxins or secreted products have been implicated as virulence factors. The major factors contributing to ruminal colonization and invasion into the liver are hemagglutinin, endotoxin and leukotoxin, of which leukotoxin is the protective antigen. In some conditions, the organism synergistically interacts with Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a facultative anaerobic organism and a secondary etiologic agent, to cause liver abscesses.

  10. Modulation of sheep ruminal urea transport by ammonia and pH.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongyan; Stumpff, Friederike; Deiner, Carolin; Rosendahl, Julia; Braun, Hannah; Abdoun, Khalid; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Martens, Holger

    2014-09-01

    Ruminal fermentation products such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and CO2 acutely stimulate urea transport across the ruminal epithelium in vivo, whereas ammonia has inhibitory effects. Uptake and signaling pathways remain obscure. The ruminal expression of SLC14a1 (UT-B) was studied using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional short-term effects of ammonia on cytosolic pH (pHi) and ruminal urea transport across native epithelia were investigated using pH-sensitive microelectrodes and via flux measurements in Ussing chambers. Two variants (UT-B1 and UT-B2) could be fully sequenced from ovine ruminal cDNA. Functionally, transport was passive and modulated by luminal pH in the presence of SCFA and CO2, rising in response to luminal acidification to a peak value at pH 5.8 and dropping with further acidification, resulting in a bell-shaped curve. Presence of ammonia reduced the amplitude, but not the shape of the relationship between urea flux and pH, so that urea flux remained maximal at pH 5.8. Effects of ammonia were concentration dependent, with saturation at 5 mmol/l. Clamping the transepithelial potential altered the inhibitory potential of ammonia on urea flux. Ammonia depolarized the apical membrane and acidified pHi, suggesting that, at physiological pH (< 7), uptake of NH4 (+) into the cytosol may be a key signaling event regulating ruminal urea transport. We conclude that transport of urea across the ruminal epithelium involves proteins subject to rapid modulation by manipulations that alter pHi and the cytosolic concentration of NH4 (+). Implications for epithelial and ruminal homeostasis are discussed.

  11. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... indicates the bladder does not empty completely. A health care provider performs this test during an office visit. The patient often receives ... more urodynamic tests to diagnose urinary retention. The health care provider will perform these tests during an office visit. For tests that use ...

  12. Cucumber fermentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Humans have consumed fermented cucumber products since before the dawn of civilization. Although cucumber fermentation remains largely a traditional process, it has proven to be a consistently safe process by which raw cucumbers are transformed into high quality pickles that have a long shelf-life ...

  13. Ruminants, climate change and climate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, William J.; Smith, Pete; Haberl, Helmut; Montzka, Stephen A.; McAlpine, Clive; Boucher, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant meat production are significant. Reductions in global ruminant numbers could make a substantial contribution to climate change mitigation goals and yield important social and environmental co-benefits.

  14. Effect of nitroethane, dimethyl-2-nitroglutarate and 2-nitro-methyl-propionate on ruminal methane production and hydrogen balance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Huwe, Janice K; Smith, David J; Stanton, Thaddeus B; Krueger, Nathan A; Callaway, Todd R; Edrington, Thomas S; Harvey, Roger B; Nisbet, David J

    2010-07-01

    Ruminal methanogenesis is considered a digestive inefficiency that results in the loss of 2-12% of the host's gross energy intake and contributes nearly 20% to the United States annual CH(4) emissions. Presently, the effects of the known CH(4) inhibitor, nitroethane, and two synthetic nitrocompounds, dimethyl-2-nitroglutarate and 2-nitro-methyl-propionate, on ruminal CH(4) production and fermentation were evaluated in vitro. After 24 h incubation at 39 degrees C under 100% CO(2), ruminal fluid cultures treated with 2.97 or 11.88 mumol ml(-1) of the respective nitrocompounds produced > 92% less CH(4) (P < 0.05) than non-treated controls. Quantification of fermentation end-products produced and H(2) balance estimates indicate that fermentation efficiencies were not compromised by the nitro-treatments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. End product yields from the extraruminal fermentation of various polysaccharide, protein and nucleic acid components of biofuels feedstocks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    “Extraruminal” fermentations, employing mixed ruminal bacterial consortia incubated in vitro, are capable of fermenting a complex array of biomass materials to mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA), methane, and carbon dioxide. Most of the potential energy in the biomass feedstock is retained in th...

  16. Peste des petits ruminants in Arabian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Kinne, J; Kreutzer, R; Kreutzer, M; Wernery, U; Wohlsein, P

    2010-08-01

    Recurrence of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) was diagnosed in the United Arabian Emirates in several wild ruminants confirmed by morphological, immunohistochemical, serological and molecular findings. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus strain belongs to lineage IV, which is different to some previously isolated PPR strains from the Arabian Peninsula. This study shows that wild ruminants may play an important epidemiological role as virus source for domestic small ruminants.

  17. Comparison of fermentation of diets of variable composition and microbial populations in the rumen of sheep and Rusitec fermenters. I. Digestibility, fermentation parameters, and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Tejido, M L; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2010-08-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep and 8 Rusitec fermenters were used to determine the effects of forage to concentrate (F:C) ratio and type of forage in the diet on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis. The purpose of the study was to assess how closely fermenters can mimic the dietary differences found in vivo. The 4 experimental diets contained F:C ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 with either alfalfa hay or grass hay as the forage. Microbial growth was determined in both systems using (15)N as a microbial marker. Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those observed in sheep by changing F:C ratio on pH; neutral detergent fiber digestibility; total volatile fatty acid concentrations; molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate; and amylase activity. In contrast, Rusitec fermenters did not reproduce the dietary differences found in sheep for NH(3)-N and lactate concentrations, dry matter (DM) digestibility, proportions of isobutyrate and valerate, carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities, and microbial growth and its efficiency. Regarding the effect of the type of forage in the diet, Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those found in sheep for most determined parameters, with the exception of pH, DM digestibility, butyrate proportion, and carboxymethylcellulase activity. Minimum pH and maximal volatile fatty acid concentrations were reached at 2h and at 6 to 8h postfeeding in sheep and fermenters, respectively, indicating that feed fermentation was slower in fermenters compared with that in sheep. There were differences between systems in the magnitude of most determined parameters. In general, fermenters showed lower lactate concentrations, neutral detergent fiber digestibility, acetate:propionate ratios, and enzymatic activities. On the contrary, fermenters showed greater NH(3)-N concentrations, DM digestibility, and proportions of propionate

  18. Relationship between pH and temperature in the ruminal fluid of cows, based on a radio-transmission pH-measurement system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Atsushi; Sato, Shigeru; Kato, Takuma; Ikuta, Kentaro; Yamagishi, Norio; Okada, Keiji; Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Ito, Kazunori

    2012-08-01

    To assess the relationship between pH and temperature in the ruminal bottom fluid, circadian changes were monitored using cows fed a control diet (C diet) or a rumen acidosis-inducing diet (RAI diet) by using a wireless radio-transmission pH- measurement system. These two parameters were measured simultaneously at 10-min intervals on day 14 after commencement of feeding. Compared to the mean ruminal pH for 60 min immediately after the morning feeding (0 hr), significantly lower pH was noted 3-13 hr later (P<0.05) and 4-19 hr later (P<0.01) in cows fed the C and RAI diets, respectively, although the reduction in the latter was much higher than that in the former. In contrast, significantly higher ruminal temperature was found at 8 and 12-14 hr later (P<0.05) and 6, 8, and 10-19 hr later (P<0.01) in cows fed the C and RAI diets, respectively. A significant negative correlation was observed between the lowest ruminal pH and its corresponding ruminal temperature in cows fed the C and RAI diets (r=-0.722 and -0.650, P<0.01, respectively), suggesting active fermentation and volatile fatty acid production in the rumen. However, ruminal pH profiles may not be predictable by measuring only ruminal temperature because decreases in ruminal pH were preceded by increases in ruminal temperature, and circadian changes in pH and temperature were associated with ruminal fermentation.

  19. Phytase activity of anaerobic ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yanke, L J; Bae, H D; Selinger, L B; Cheng, K J

    1998-06-01

    Phytase catalyses the release of phosphate from phytate (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate), the predominant form of phosphorus in cereal grains, oilseeds and legumes. The presence of phytase activity was investigated in 334 strains of 22 species of obligately anaerobic ruminal bacteria. Measurable activities were demonstrated in strains of Selenomonas ruminantium, Megasphaera elsdenii, Prevotella ruminicola, Mitsuokella multiacidus and Treponema spp. Strains isolated from fermentations with cereal grains proved to have high activity, and activity was particularly prevalent in S. ruminantium, with over 96% of the tested strains being positive. The measured phytase activity was found exclusively associated with the bacterial cells and was produced in the presence of approximately 14 mM phosphate. The most highly active strains were all S. ruminantium, with the exception of the one Mitsuokella multiacidus strain examined. Phytase activity varied greatly among positive strains but activities as high as 703 nmol phosphate released (ml culture)-1 were measured for a S. ruminantium strain and 387 nmol phosphate released (ml culture)-1 for the Mitsuokella multiacidus strain.

  20. Mycoplasma infections in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, D C

    2001-07-01

    Mycoplasmas have complex mechanisms of antigenic variation that allow them to evade the immune system. These organisms cause a variety of clinical syndromes that can have a significant economic effect on small ruminant production. The syndromes range from acute septicemia and death to chronic infection resulting in decreased production. Recent research findings have shed light on the means by which these organisms evade the host immune response and cause or contribute to the development of disease in the host. This article provides a review of the pathogenesis, clinical signs, and treatment options for common disease syndromes involving Mycoplasma spp. in small ruminants.

  1. [Urinary bilharziasis].

    PubMed

    Gigase, P L

    1992-01-01

    A short account is given of present views on urinary schistosomiasis or bilharziasis. The incidence of infections is increasing in endemic areas of Africa and the near east, as a consequence of irrigation programs and hydroelectric power development. Urinary schistosomiasis is a disease of children and young adults. The serious consequences, obstructive uropathy due to more or less irreversible ureteral lesions, and cancer of the bladder, less directly related to the infection, appear but later in life. Diagnosis is still based on parasitology and serology but ultrasonography has proven to be an important means to evaluate the extent of lesions of the urinary tract, especially in developing countries. Praziquantel was a major development in the medical treatment and cures easily the infection. Some irreversible consequences have however to be treated surgically. Schistosomiasis is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in medically backward endemic countries. The control of the disease aims at reducing morbidity and mortality, consequences of the infection, rather than to avoid infection itself. It is based on mass treatment of school age children, together with focal molluscacides at places where people have contacts with water. Vaccination will be available in the near future and will be a welcome addition to other control measures, but will not be able to interrupt transmission on its own. Only economic development will solve in the long term this social African problem.

  2. Lessons from the cow: what the ruminant animal can teach us about consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Paul J; Russell, James B; Muck, Richard E

    2009-11-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of cellulosic biomass is a promising source of ethanol. This process uses anaerobic bacteria, their own cellulolytic enzymes and fermentation pathways that convert the products of cellulose hydrolysis to ethanol in a single reactor. However, the engineering and economics of the process remain questionable. The ruminal fermentation is a very highly developed natural cellulose-degrading system. We propose that breakthroughs developed by cattle and other ruminant animals in cellulosic biomass conversion can guide future improvements in engineered CBP systems. These breakthroughs include, among others, an elegant and effective physical pretreatment; operation at high solids loading under non-aseptic conditions; minimal nutrient requirements beyond the plant biomass itself; efficient fermentation of nearly all plant components; efficient recovery of primary fermentation end-products; and production of useful co-products. Ruminal fermentation does not produce significant amounts of ethanol, but it produces volatile fatty acids and methane at a rapid rate. Because these alternative products have a high energy content, efforts should be made to recover these products and convert them to other organic compounds, particularly transportation fuels.

  3. Functional analysis and intervention for chronic rumination.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kathryn E; Luiselli, James K; Tomassone, Shanon

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a functional analysis and treatment evaluation of chronic rumination in a 19-year-old man with intellectual disabilities. Outcomes of the functional analysis suggested that rumination was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results of the intervention evaluation suggested that (a) noncontingent access to food after meals reduced rumination more effectively than did noncontingent access to inedible stimuli, (b) a particular type of food was associated with lower levels of rumination than other types of food, and (c) both presession and continuous access to food reduced levels of rumination more effectively than did fixed-time access to food.

  4. Rumination and Performance in Dynamic, Team Sport

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michael M.; Memmert, Daniel; Frees, Anastasia; Radzevick, Joseph; Pretz, Jean; Noël, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    People high in rumination are good at tasks that require persistence whereas people low in rumination is good at tasks that require flexibility. Here we examine real world implications of these differences in dynamic, team sport. In two studies, we found that professional male football (soccer) players from Germany and female field hockey players on the US national team were lower in rumination than were non-athletes. Further, low levels of rumination were associated with a longer career at a higher level in football players. Results indicate that athletes in dynamic, team sport might benefit from the flexibility associated with being low in rumination. PMID:26779110

  5. Effect of maturity and hybrid on ruminal and intestinal digestion of corn silage in dry cows.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, J; Baumont, R; Le Morvan, A; Nozière, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of stage of maturity at harvest on extent of starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and protein digestion, and rumen fermentation in dry cows fed whole-plant corn silage from different hybrids. Four nonlactating Holstein cows cannulated at the rumen and proximal duodenum were fed 4 corn silages differing in hybrid (flint vs. flint-dent) and maturity stage (early vs. late) in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. From early to late maturity, starch content increased (from 234.5 to 348.5 g/kg), whereas total-tract (99.7 to 94.5%) and ruminal starch digestibility (91.3 to 86.5%) decreased significantly. The decrease in ruminal starch digestibility with increasing maturity was similar between hybrids. No effects were found of maturity, hybrid, or maturity × hybrid interaction on total-tract NDF digestibility, ruminal NDF digestibility, true digestibility of N and organic matter in the rumen, or microbial synthesis. Harvesting at later maturity led to increased ruminal ammonia, total volatile fatty acid concentrations, and acetate/propionate ratio but not pH. This study concludes that delaying date of harvest modifies the proportions of digestible starch and NDF supplied to cattle. Adjusting date of corn harvest to modulate amount of rumen-digested starch could be used as a strategy to control nutrient delivery to ruminants.

  6. Pathophysiological evaluation of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) by continuous ruminal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Evaluation of the radio-transmission pH-measurement system for monitoring the ruminal pH and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle is described. This is done in order to reveal the possible application of this system for detection and pathophysiological research of SARA by continuous ruminal pH measurement. The possibility of using this system for assessment of the ruminal pH in SARA cattle, and the presence of negative correlation between the ruminal pH and ruminal temperature in heathy and SARA cattle were determined. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ruminal microbial community was simpler in SARA cattle, and the bacterial numbers in SARA cattle were lower than those in healthy hay-fed cattle. Concentrate feeding might have reduced the diversity of the ruminal microbial community. Changes in the ruminal microbial community of SARA cattle might be related to the changes in ruminal pH followed by the decrease in the number of some bacteria. Continuous monitoring of the ruminal pH using the radio-transmission pH-measurement system would be applied for detection and prevention of SARA in the field and pathophysiological research of SARA, including ruminal zymology and bacteriology, which have been determined previously by sampling of the ruminal fluid and measuring of ruminal pH.

  7. Pathophysiological evaluation of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) by continuous ruminal pH monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of the radio‐transmission pH‐measurement system for monitoring the ruminal pH and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle is described. This is done in order to reveal the possible application of this system for detection and pathophysiological research of SARA by continuous ruminal pH measurement. The possibility of using this system for assessment of the ruminal pH in SARA cattle, and the presence of negative correlation between the ruminal pH and ruminal temperature in heathy and SARA cattle were determined. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ruminal microbial community was simpler in SARA cattle, and the bacterial numbers in SARA cattle were lower than those in healthy hay‐fed cattle. Concentrate feeding might have reduced the diversity of the ruminal microbial community. Changes in the ruminal microbial community of SARA cattle might be related to the changes in ruminal pH followed by the decrease in the number of some bacteria. Continuous monitoring of the ruminal pH using the radio‐transmission pH‐measurement system would be applied for detection and prevention of SARA in the field and pathophysiological research of SARA, including ruminal zymology and bacteriology, which have been determined previously by sampling of the ruminal fluid and measuring of ruminal pH. PMID:26279060

  8. Effects of dried distiller's grains and lasalocid inclusion on feedlot lamb growth, carcass traits, nutrient digestibility, ruminal fluid volatile fatty acid concentrations, and ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentration.

    PubMed

    Crane, A R; Redden, R R; Swanson, K C; Howard, B M; Frick, T J; Maddock-Carlin, K R; Schauer, C S

    2017-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that increasing the inclusion level of dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS) to feedlot lambs would increase growth and the inclusion of lasalocid (LAS; Bovatec, Alpharma, LLC, Bridgewater, NJ) would increase ADG and G:F, while not affecting digestibility, ruminal VFA concentration, and ruminal pH. Furthermore, we hypothesized that rations containing LAS and higher levels of DDGS would cause increased ruminal hydrogen sulfide gas (HS) concentrations. Two hundred forty crossbred (Suffolk × Rambouillet) lambs (31.9 ± 5.87 kg BW; approximately 90 d of age) were allocated to 6 treatments in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Lambs were placed into 24 feedlot pens (4 pens/treatment; 10 lambs/pen) for a 111 d finishing study. Main effects included concentration of DDGS (0, 15, or 30% DM basis) and inclusion of LAS (0 or 22.05 g/metric ton LAS) resulting in treatments of: 1) 0% DDGS without LAS (0DDGS-NL), 2) 0% DDGS with LAS (0DDGS-L), 3) 15% DDGS without LAS (15DDGS-NL), 4) 15% DDGS with LAS (15DDGS-L), 5) 30% DDGS without LAS (30DDGS-NL), and 6) 30% DDGS with LAS (30DDGS-L). Two-day weights were taken at the beginning and end of the experiment. Two-hundred-eighteen lambs (64.8 ± 7.99 kg BW) were slaughtered on d 112 at a commercial abattoir and carcass data collected. The inclusion of LAS increased ( ≤ 0.02) final BW, ADG, G:F, and HCW. As DDGS in the ration increased to 30%, DMI decreased linearly ( = 0.03) while G:F increased linearly ( = 0.03). A second study was conducted utilizing the same treatments to evaluate N and S balance, ruminal VFA and H2S concentration, and ruminal pH in 24 crossbred wethers (Suffolk × Rambouillet; 41.2 ± 12.23 kg BW). Daily urinary sulfur excretion and ruminal H2S concentration were linearly increased ( < 0.001) as DDGS increased in the ration. Total ruminal VFA concentration linearly decreased ( = 0.002) as DDGS increased in the ration. The inclusion of

  9. Effects of a bacterial probiotic on ruminal pH and volatile fatty acids during subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Hiroko; QADIS, Abdul Qadir; KIM, Yo-Han; IKUTA, Kentaro; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; SATO, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Effects of a bacterial probiotic (BP) on ruminal fermentation and plasma metabolites were evaluated in four Holstein cattle (body weight, 645 ± 62 kg; mean ± SD) with induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). SARA was induced by feeding a SARA-inducing diet, and thereafter, 20, 50 or 100 g per head of a commercial BP was administered for 7 consecutive days during the morning feeding. Cattle without BP served as the control. The 24-hr mean ruminal pH in the control was lower, whereas those in the BP groups administered 20 or 50 g were significantly higher compared to the control from days 2 to 7. Circadian patterns of the 1-hr mean ruminal pH were identical (6.4–6.8) among all cattle receiving BP. Although the mean minimum pH in the control on day –7 and day 0 was <5.8, the pH in the treatment groups on day 7 was >5.8 and significantly higher than that of the control group ( >5.2). Ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were not affected by BP treatment; however, the BP groups had lower lactic acid levels compared with the control group at 20:00 on day 7. Additionally, non-esterified fatty acid levels decreased from 8:00 to 20:00 in all BP groups on day 7. These results suggest that administration of 20 to 50 g of a multi-strain BP for 7 days might improve the low pH and high lactic acid level of the ruminal fluid in SARA cattle. PMID:27430197

  10. Effect of cellulose fine structure on kinetics of its digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, P J; Lopez-Guisa, J M; French, A D

    1990-01-01

    The digestion kinetics of a variety of pure celluloses were examined by using an in vitro assay employing mixed ruminal microflora and a modified detergent extraction procedure to recover residual cellulose. Digestion of all of the celluloses was described by a discontinuous first-order rate equation to yield digestion rate constants and discrete lag times. These kinetic parameters were compared with the relative crystallinity indices and estimated accessible surface areas of the celluloses. For type I celluloses having similar crystallinities and simple nonaggregating particle morphologies, the fermentation rate constants displayed a strong positive correlation (r2 = 0.978) with gross specific surface area; lag time exhibited a weaker, negative correlation (r2 = 0.930) with gross specific surface area. Crystallinity was shown to have a relatively minor effect on the digestion rate and lag time. Swelling of microcrystalline cellulose with 72 to 77% phosphoric acid yielded substrates which were fermented slightly more rapidly than the original material. However, treatment with higher concentrations of phosphoric acid resulted in a more slowly fermented substrate, despite a decrease in crystallinity and an increase in pore volume. This reduced fermentation rate was apparently due to the partial conversion of the cellulose from the type I to the type II allomorph, since mercerized (type II) cellulose was also fermented more slowly, and only after a much longer lag period. The results are consistent with earlier evidence for the cell-associated nature of cellulolytic enzymes of ruminal bacteria and suggest that ruminal microflora do not rapidly adapt to utilization of celluloses with altered unit cell structures. PMID:2403252

  11. [Dysfunction of the esophageal groove ("ruminal drinking") as a complication of neonatal diarrhea in the calf].

    PubMed

    Dirr, L; Dirksen, G

    1989-01-01

    It is well documented that the induction of the oesophageal groove reflex in the milk fed calf depends on certain prerequisites: The fluid drunk by the calf must come into contact with the receptors located in the pharynx, it must be consumed voluntarily by the animal without undue disturbances, it should have no offensive smell or taste and the general status of the calf should not be disturbed. When those conditions are not met the oesophageal groove closes incompletely or not at all and the milk flows into the reticulo-rumen. If the milk or any other nutrient solution remains there for a sufficient period of time, the nutrients it contains are subjected to bacterial breakdown. In a study including 249 calves (age less than 14 days) suffering from enteritis catarrhalis acuta it could be demonstrated that no closure of the oesophageal groove occurred in 11.2% of the patients; 11 calves of that group died. The same was probably true for a further 11.8% of the diarrheic calves; 12 of them died. In 37 ruminal drinkers, suffering from neonatal diarrhea (n = 30) or another primary disease (n = 7) the acid status of the rumen fluid could be examined several times. According to the analyses the following types of fermentation could be distinguished: --predominant butyric acid fermentation; --predominant lactic acid fermentation; --"biphasic type": predominant lactic acid fermentation changes to predominant butyric acid fermentation or vice versa. In the milk fed calf suffering from neonatal diarrhea, dysfunction of the oesophageal groove reflex (ruminal drinking) with its consequences (rumen acidosis, dyskeratosis of the ruminal mucosa) can result in a fatal outcome.

  12. Biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract.

    PubMed

    González-Pedraza Avilés, A; Ortíz-Zaragoza, M C; Inzunza-Montiel, A E; Ponce-Rosas, E R

    1996-01-01

    A modified scheme is proposed for biotyping Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract of symptomatic and asymptomatic women based on detection of hippurate hydrolysis, beta-galactosidase (ONPG) and lipase, and fermentation of arabinose, galactose and xylose. Thirty biotypes were found among 73 strains. The distribution of biotypes was similar in both populations but the biotypes 1H, 5G and 7G were found more frequently in women without symptoms of urinary tract infection.

  13. Characterizing the Ruminative Process in Young Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hilt, Lori M.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rumination involves repeatedly and passively dwelling on negative feelings and brooding about their causes and consequences. Prior work has found that rumination predicts many forms of psychopathology including anxiety, binge eating, binge drinking, self-injury, and especially depression (Nolen-Hoeksema, Wisco, & Lyubomirsky, 2008). In the present study, we attempt to characterize the ruminative process in real time in young adolescents, specifically by examining factors that predict rumination following an interpersonal stressor. Method A community sample of 105 youth ages 9-14 (70% girls; 66% Caucasian) completed questionnaires regarding depressive symptoms and trait rumination along with an assessment of selective attention using an emotional faces dot-probe task. Participants then underwent an interpersonal stressor and audio rumination induction in the laboratory during which time thoughts were sampled regularly and coded. Results Results indicate that negative self-referential thought is a common response to the stressor and is predicted by trait rumination scores. While most participants were able to disengage from this type of thinking, 10.5% persisted through (i.e., ruminated) until the end of the study. These individuals were characterized by higher depressive symptoms and an attentional bias away from happy (relative to neutral) faces. Conclusions Differences in attentional processes may characterize rumination in youth. Implications for the measurement of rumination as well as treatment are discussed. PMID:23477416

  14. An Attentional Scope Model of