Science.gov

Sample records for running bone density

  1. Long-distance running, bone density, and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, N.E.; Bloch, D.A.; Jones, H.H.; Marshall, W.H. Jr.; Wood, P.D.; Fries, J.F.

    1986-03-07

    Forty-one long-distance runners aged 50 to 72 years were compared with 41 matched community controls to examine associations of repetitive, long-term physical impact (running) with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Roentgenograms of hands, lateral lumbar spine, and knees were assessed without knowledge of running status. A computed tomographic scan of the first lumbar vertebra was performed to quantitate bone mineral content. Runners, both male and female, have approximately 40% more bone mineral than matched controls. Female runners, but not male runners, appear to have somewhat more sclerosis and spur formation in spine and weight-bearing knee x-ray films, but not in hand x-ray films. There were no differences between groups in joint space narrowing, crepitation, joint stability, or symptomatic osteoarthritis. Running is associated with increased bone mineral but not, in this cross-sectional study, with clinical osteoarthritis.

  2. The Interaction of Voluntary Running Exercise and Food Restriction Induces Low Bone Strength and Low Bone Mineral Density in Young Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Yuki; Agata, Umon; Kakutani, Yuya; Higano, Michito; Hattori, Satoshi; Ogata, Hitomi; Ezawa, Ikuko; Omi, Naomi

    2015-07-01

    There is a concern that the combination of exercise with food intake reduction has a risk of reducing bone strength and bone mass in young female athletes. We examined the influence of the interaction of voluntary running exercise and food restriction on bone in young female rats. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: the sedentary and ad libitum feeding group (SED), voluntary running exercise and ad libitum feeding group (EX), sedentary and 30 % food restriction group (SED-FR), and voluntary running exercise and 30 % food restriction group (EX-FR). The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Statistical analysis was carried out by two-way analysis of variance with exercise and restriction as the between-subjects factors. As a result, there were significant interactions of running and restriction on energy availability, breaking force, breaking energy, and bone mineral density (BMD). Breaking force and energy in the EX group were significantly higher than in the SED group; breaking force and energy were significantly lower in the EX-FR group than in the EX group, and breaking force in the EX-FR group was significantly lower than that in the SED-FR group. BMD in the EX-FR group was significantly lower than in the EX and SED-FR groups. These results suggest that food restriction induced low bone strength in young female rats engaging in voluntary running exercise. Also, through the interaction of exercise and food restriction, voluntary running exercise combined food restriction, unlike ad libitum feeding conditions, induced low bone strength, and low BMD in young female rats.

  3. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone density scan measures the density of bone in a person. The lower the density of a bone the ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and ...

  4. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... In some communities, a CT scan with special software can also be used to diagnose or monitor ... patient's bone mineral density. DEXA machines feature special software that compute and display the bone density measurements ...

  5. Genome-wide Survey of Runs of Homozygosity Identifies Recessive Loci for Bone Mineral Density in Caucasian and Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Xu, Chao; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Runs of homozygosity (ROHs), in which both parental alleles are identical, have been proposed to have recessive effects on multiple human complex diseases. Osteoporosis is a common complex disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD), which is highly heritable. And recessive loci that contribute to BMD variations have been identified. In this study, we performed a genome-wide ROHs association study using our SNP array data from three GWAS samples including 4,900 subjects from Caucasian and Chinese populations. Significant results were further subjected to replication in 3,747 additional subjects. ROHs associated with BMD were also tested for associations with osteoporotic fractures in a GWAS fracture sample. Combining results from all the samples, we identified 697 autosomal regions with ROHs. Among these, we detected genome-wide significant associations between BMD and 6 ROHs, including ROH1q31.3, 1p31.1, 3q26.1, 11q12.1, 21q22.1 and 15q22.3 (combined P=6.29 × 10−5 − 3.17 × 10 −8). Especially, ROH1p31.1 was found to be associated with increased risk of osteoporotic hip fractures (odds ratio [OR] 3.71, P=0.032). To investigate the functional relevance of the identified ROHs, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in lymphoblast cell lines. Three ROHs, including ROH1p31.1, 11q12.1, and 15q22.3, were found to be significantly associated with mRNA expression levels of their nearby genes (PeQTL < 0.05). In summary, our findings reveal that ROHs could play as recessive-acting determinants contributing to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Further molecular and functional studies are needed to explore and clarify the potential mechanism. PMID:25983029

  6. Does a Treadmill Running Exercise Contribute to Preventing Deterioration of Bone Mineral Density and Bone Quality of the Femur in KK-Ay Mice, a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model?

    PubMed

    Takagi, Satoshi; Yamashita, Takenori; Miura, Toshihiro

    2017-08-04

    Although it has been recently shown that type 2 diabetics have an increased risk of hip fracture, the effects of exercise therapy to prevent this have not been clarified. We examined whether a treadmill running exercise contributes to the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone microarchitecture of the femur and what kind of exercise intensity and duration are optimum in type 2 diabetes mellitus using KK-Ay diabetic mice. The mice were divided into two running groups, one fast speed and short duration (FS), the other slow speed and long duration (SL), and a group of controls with no running (CO). The running exercise was started when the mice were 8 weeks of age, and continued once a day 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Ten weeks after the start of the running exercise, the BMD of the proximal region and mid-diaphysis in the SL were significantly higher in comparison with that in the CO, whereas there was no difference in bone microarchitecture among the three groups. Blood glucose, insulin levels, and visceral fat contents in the SL were significantly lower than those in the CO and FS. Bone resorption protein and C-reactive protein levels in the SL were significantly lower than those in the CO. These results suggest that slow, long duration loading is better for both bone and glycemic control than fast, short duration loading in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and display the bone density measurements on a computer monitor. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... passed over the area, generating images on a computer monitor. You must hold very still and may be ...

  8. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    ... density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... most common and accurate way uses a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. DEXA uses low- ...

  9. Bone versus breast density.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The common link with oestrogen levels suggests that bone mineral density and mammographic density might also be linked. One study found weak support for this, but another study failed to provide confirmation. Overall, the relationship is very weak, if it exists at all. Other factors such as weight-bearing exercise, which have opposing impacts on these variables, may have a more dominant effect.

  10. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Home › Patients › Diagnosis Information › Bone Density Exam/ ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Contact Us Privacy Policy Legal Disclaimer Medical ...

  11. Instrumentation for bone density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meharg, L. S.

    1968-01-01

    Measurement system evaluates the integrated bone density over a specific cross section of bone. A digital computer converts stored bone scan data to equivalent aluminum calibration wedge thickness, and bone density is then integrated along the scan by using the trapezoidal approximation integration formula.

  12. Osteocyte density in woven bone.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, C J; Majeska, R J; Schaffler, M B

    2004-11-01

    Woven bone forms rapidly during tissue growth, following injury and in response to certain anabolic stimuli. Functional differences between woven and lamellar bone may be due, in part, to differences in osteocyte density (cells per unit tissue). Woven bone has been estimated to contain four to eight times more osteocytes than lamellar bone, although primary data to support this assertion are limited. Given recent findings implicating osteocytes as regulators of bone remodeling, bone formation and bone volume, such large differences in osteocyte density between woven and lamellar bone may have important consequences. In this study, we compared the density of osteocyte lacunae (lacunae/mm(2) tissue) in rat lamellar bone with that in woven bone formed under several different circumstances. We found that the lacunar density of lamellar cortical bone in the rat (834+/-83 cells/mm2, mean+/-SD) did not differ significantly from that of periosteal woven bone formed via intramembranous osteogenesis, either in response to mechanical loading (921+/-204 cells/mm2) or in the periosteal buttressing region of the fracture callus (1138+/-168 cells/mm2). In contrast, lacunar density of endochondrally derived woven bone in the center (gap) region of fracture callus was nearly 100% greater (1875+/-270 cells/mm2) than in lamellar cortical bone while lacunar density of primary spongiosa of the growth plate was 40% greater (1674+/-228 cells/mm2) than that in lamellar cancellous bone (1189+/-164). These findings demonstrate that lacunar density in woven bone varies depending on skeletal site and developmental history and appears to be elevated in endochondrally derived woven bone adjacent to marrow space. Given the considerable evidence supporting osteocytes as local initiators of bone remodeling, we suggest that woven bone with increased lacunar density may undergo remodeling at an accelerated rate.

  13. Dietary restrictions, bone density, and bone quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-hai; Ables, Gene P

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), protein restriction (PR), and specific amino acid restriction (e.g., methionine restriction (MR)) are different dietary interventions that have been confirmed with regard to their comprehensive benefits to metabolism and health. Based on bone densitometric measurements, weight loss induced by dietary restriction is known to be accompanied by reduced areal bone mineral density, bone mass, and/or bone size, and it is considered harmful to bone health. However, because of technological advancements in bone densitometric instruments (e.g., high-resolution X-ray tomography), dietary restrictions have been found to cause a reduction in bone mass/size rather than volumetric bone mineral density. Furthermore, when considering bone quality, bone health consists of diverse indices that cannot be fully represented by densitometric measurements alone. Indeed, there is evidence that moderate dietary restrictions do not impair intrinsic bone material properties, despite the reduction in whole-bone strength because of a smaller bone size. In the present review, we integrate research evidence from traditional densitometric measurements, metabolic status assays (e.g., energy metabolism, oxidative stresses, and inflammatory responses), and biomaterial analyses to provide revised conclusions regarding the effects of CR, PR, and MR on the skeleton.

  14. High bone density and bone health.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Karin Sedó; Pinheiro, Marcelo de Medeiros; Szejnfeld, Vera Lúcia; Martini, Lígia Araújo

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the main aspects related to high bone density (HBD) as well as to discuss the physiologic mechanisms involved in bone health. There are still no well-defined criteria for identification of individuals with HBD and there are few studies on the topic. Most studies demonstrate that overweight, male gender, black ethnic background, physical activity, calcium and fluoride intake and use of medications such as statins and thiazide diuretics play a relevant and positive role on bone mineral density. Moreover, it is known that individuals with certain diseases such as obesity, diabetes, estrogen receptor-positive breast or endometrial cancer have greater bone density than healthy individuals, as well as athletes having higher bone density than non-athletes does not necessarily mean that they have healthy bones. A better understanding of risk and protective factors may help in the management of patients with bone frailty and have applicability in the treatment and in the prevention of osteoporosis, especially intervening on non-modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone density screening for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    2002-06-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) testing is an effective approach for the early detection of osteopenia and osteoporosis. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Gynecologic Practice recommends BMD testing for all postmenopausal women aged 65 years or older and for all postmenopausal women who present with fractures. The Committee also concludes that BMD testing may be recommended to post-menopausal women younger than 65 years who have one or more risk factors for osteoporosis. Bone mineral density testing also may be useful for pre-menopausal and postmenopausal women who present with certain diseases or medical conditions and those who take certain drugs associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis.

  16. Genetic regulation of bone mass: from bone density to bone strength.

    PubMed

    Langman, Craig B

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized in adults by diminished bone density. Bone is an organ that evolves and grows throughout life, and establishing optimal bone density in childhood and adolescence serves to buffer bone loss later in life. Bone density, a measurable entity, is the clinical substitute for bone strength, or the ability to defend against fracture. Chronic diseases may adversely affect optimal peak bone density. Bone density is under genetic control, as revealed by three lines of investigations. These include (1) the finding of quantitative trait loci for bone density, (2) the finding that specific mutations in genes that are important in the development of osteoblast or osteoclast lineages alter bone density, and (3) the linkeage of known polymorphisms for genes involved in mineral homeostasis to bone density and/or fracture. Future therapeutics for improving peak bone density or delaying bone loss later in life may take advantage of the genetic nature of bone density development.

  17. [Hyperprolactinaemia and bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Kostrzak, Anna; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2015-08-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the most common endocrinological disorder at women at the reproductive age. Prolactin is produced by the anterior lobe of the pituitary.The main role of prolactin is associated with mamotrophic action and lactogenesis. Hyperprolactinaemia causes several symptoms such as menstrual disorders, infertility, decrease of sexual function, galactorrhea in women and gynecomasty, impotence and decrease of semen quality in men. Recent studies have presented prolactin as a homone involved in many metabolic processes. Long-term consequences of high prolactin serum concentration are related to higher risk of cardiovascular system disease, disturbances in lipid profile and immunological system. Hyperprolactiaemia causes decrease of bone mass density (BMD). High serum prolactin levels lead to increase of the risk of osteopenia or/and osteoporosis. Decrease of BMD results from hypoestrogenism induced by hyperprolactinaemia and also by the direct negative influence of prolactin on bone. Hyperprolactinaemia related to prolactinoma significantly (more than functional hyperprolactiaemia) increases the risk of osteopenia, osteoporosis and bone fractures. Important group of patients threatened by osteoporosis and bone fracture is constituted by women which use antipsychotic drugs (which induce hyperprolactinaemia). Hyperprolactinaemia diagnosed in patients should be treated as soon as possible. Hyperprolactinaemic patients should be diagnosed in the direction of osteopenia and osteoporosis. When diagnosis is confirmed proper treatment is indicated.

  18. Exercise and Bone Density: Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    20040116 025 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Exercise , bone, meta-analysis, osteoporosis, bone density, physical 37 activity , physical fitness, men...drugs were taken that could enhance BMD, cigarette 18 Caplan GA, Ward JA. The benefits of exercise in smoking, diet, previous physical activity ...weight-bearing exercise in older women in re- calcium nutrition and physical activity on bone lation to bone density and falls. BMI. 1997;314:569. mass in

  19. Reduced vertebral bone density in hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietschmann, F.; Breslau, N. A.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and single-photon absorptiometry were used to determine bone density at the lumbar spine and radial shaft in 62 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria, 27 patients with fasting hypercalciuria, and 31 nonhypercalciuric stone formers. Lumbar bone density was significantly lower in patients with absorptive (-10%) as well as in those with fasting hypercalciuria (-12%), with 74 and 92% of patients displaying values below the normal mean, whereas only 48% of the nonhypercalciuric stone formers had bone density values below the normal mean. In contrast, radial bone density was similar in all three groups of renal stone formers investigated. The comparison of urinary chemistry in patients with absorptive hypercalciuria and low normal bone density compared to those with high normal bone density showed a significantly increased 24 h urinary calcium excretion on random diet and a trend toward a higher 24 h urinary uric acid excretion and a higher body mass index in patients with low normal bone density. Moreover, among the patients with absorptive hypercalciuria we found a statistically significant correlation between the spinal bone density and the 24 h sodium and sulfate excretion and the urinary pH. These results gave evidence for an additional role of environmental factors (sodium and animal proteins) in the pathogenesis of bone loss in absorptive hypercalciuria. In conclusion, our data suggest an osteopenia of trabecular-rich bone tissues in patients with fasting and absorptive hypercalciurias.

  20. Reduced vertebral bone density in hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietschmann, F.; Breslau, N. A.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and single-photon absorptiometry were used to determine bone density at the lumbar spine and radial shaft in 62 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria, 27 patients with fasting hypercalciuria, and 31 nonhypercalciuric stone formers. Lumbar bone density was significantly lower in patients with absorptive (-10%) as well as in those with fasting hypercalciuria (-12%), with 74 and 92% of patients displaying values below the normal mean, whereas only 48% of the nonhypercalciuric stone formers had bone density values below the normal mean. In contrast, radial bone density was similar in all three groups of renal stone formers investigated. The comparison of urinary chemistry in patients with absorptive hypercalciuria and low normal bone density compared to those with high normal bone density showed a significantly increased 24 h urinary calcium excretion on random diet and a trend toward a higher 24 h urinary uric acid excretion and a higher body mass index in patients with low normal bone density. Moreover, among the patients with absorptive hypercalciuria we found a statistically significant correlation between the spinal bone density and the 24 h sodium and sulfate excretion and the urinary pH. These results gave evidence for an additional role of environmental factors (sodium and animal proteins) in the pathogenesis of bone loss in absorptive hypercalciuria. In conclusion, our data suggest an osteopenia of trabecular-rich bone tissues in patients with fasting and absorptive hypercalciurias.

  1. Spatial mapping of humeral head bone density.

    PubMed

    Alidousti, Hamidreza; Giles, Joshua W; Emery, Roger J H; Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Short-stem humeral replacements achieve fixation by anchoring to the metaphyseal trabecular bone. Fixing the implant in high-density bone can provide strong fixation and reduce the risk of loosening. However, there is a lack of data mapping the bone density distribution in the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was to investigate the bone density in proximal humerus. Eight computed tomography scans of healthy cadaveric humeri were used to map bone density distribution in the humeral head. The proximal humeral head was divided into 12 slices parallel to the humeral anatomic neck. Each slice was then divided into 4 concentric circles. The slices below the anatomic neck, where short-stem implants have their fixation features, were further divided into radial sectors. The average bone density for each of these regions was calculated, and regions of interest were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance set at P < .05. Average apparent bone density was found to decrease from proximal to distal regions, with the majority of higher bone density proximal to the anatomic neck of the humerus (P < .05). Below the anatomic neck, bone density increases from central to peripheral regions, where cortical bone eventually occupies the space (P < .05). In distal slices below the anatomic neck, a higher bone density distribution in the medial calcar region was also observed. This study indicates that it is advantageous with respect to implant fixation to preserve some bone above the anatomic neck and epiphyseal plate and to use the denser bone at the periphery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Bone mineral density in renal osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki

    2002-11-01

    Renal osteodystrophy can be classified into several disorders, which is now major problem in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Most of studies reported that the bone mineral density of HD patients decreased, but there exist the differences depending on many factors such as sex, bone site, years of HD, the type of disorders. The clinical usefulness of bone densitometry has been evaluated in many studies.

  3. Bone density and its importance in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Tina; Jain, Abhay Kumar; Jaiswal, Raj Kumar; Mehrotra, Praveen; Mehrotra, Rachita

    2013-01-01

    Background Researchers have generally focused on tissue reactions occurring within the periodontal ligament and bone to find possible explanation for various clinical phenomena, with less attention being paid to the inherent bone density. Recently, regional differences in jaw anatomy and bone structure including bone density have become important issue to explain some of the variation in clinical practice with respect to tooth movement, implant success rate, anchorage loss etc. Materials and methods The intent of this review is to discuss various methods and classification proposed to determine bone density in particular area and its importance in field of orthodontia. Various clinical studies and research done in relation to bone density were searched using PubMed. Results and conclusion This review endeavours to compile the research of bone density in maxilla and mandible. Many clinical studies have demonstrated relation between bone density and various clinical phenomena in dentistry. Knowledge of bone density in particular area of oral cavity may help the clinician to plan proper site for implant placement and various anchorage augmentation techniques in order to increase success rate of the treatment. PMID:25737892

  4. Weight loss and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Plaisance, Eric P; Fisher, Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Despite evidence that energy deficit produces multiple physiological and metabolic benefits, clinicians are often reluctant to prescribe weight loss in older individuals or those with low bone mineral density (BMD), fearing BMD will be decreased. Confusion exists concerning the effects that weight loss has on bone health. Bone density is more closely associated with lean mass than total body mass and fat mass. Although rapid or large weight loss is often associated with loss of bone density, slower or smaller weight loss is much less apt to adversely affect BMD, especially when it is accompanied with high intensity resistance and/or impact loading training. Maintenance of calcium and vitamin D intake seems to positively affect BMD during weight loss. Although dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is normally used to evaluate bone density, it may overestimate BMD loss following massive weight loss. Volumetric quantitative computed tomography may be more accurate for tracking bone density changes following large weight loss. Moderate weight loss does not necessarily compromise bone health, especially when exercise training is involved. Training strategies that include heavy resistance training and high impact loading that occur with jump training may be especially productive in maintaining, or even increasing bone density with weight loss.

  5. Bone density in eumenorrheic female college athletes.

    PubMed

    Risser, W L; Lee, E J; LeBlanc, A; Poindexter, H B; Risser, J M; Schneider, V

    1990-10-01

    Information is limited on the effect of exercise on bone density in young eumenorrheic athletes. We studied 12 Caucasian intercollegiate volleyball players (V), nine basketball players (B), ten swimmers (S), and 13 non-athletes (N) with bone density measurements by photon absorptiometry of their calcaneus and lumbar spine (L2-L4). The effect of athletic status on bone density was analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance, with height and weight as covariates. The bone densities reported below are mean +/- SE, adjusted for the covariates; units = g.cm-2, P less than 0.005. The swimmers had a significantly lower mean density in the lumbar spine than all other groups; the non-athletes' mean density was also lower than that of volleyball players (V = 1.31 +/- 0.03, B = 1.26 +/- 0.04, N = 1.18 +/- 0.03, S = 1.05 +/- 0.03). The volleyball and basketball players' mean calcaneal densities were greater than those of the swimmers and non-athletes (V = 0.530 +/- 0.017, B = 0.564 +/- 0.023, N = 0.438 +/- 0.018, S = 0.375 +/- 0.019). The higher bone densities for athletes in vertical weight-bearing activities are consistent with some but not all published data. The swimmers' low bone density in the lumbar spine, less than published values for amenorrheic runners, was unexpected.

  6. Physical Activity and Bone Density in Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowley, Susan M.; Whalen, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of bone density regulation as a function of the daily tissue "effective" stress has been derived. Using the model, the influence of daily activity in the form of a daily loading history has been related to bone density of the calcaneus. The theory incorporates a stress exponent m to account for differences in the importance of magnitude and number of load cycles experienced during daily activity. We have derived a parameter from the model, the "Bone Density Index" (BDI). We have developed a method of collecting daily habitual loading histories using an insole force sensor interfaced to a portable digital data logger carried in a fanny pack. Our goal for this study was to determine a stress exponent, m, relating GRFz history to Calcaneal Bone Mineral Density (CBMD).

  7. Physical Activity and Bone Density in Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowley, Susan M.; Whalen, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of bone density regulation as a function of the daily tissue "effective" stress has been derived. Using the model, the influence of daily activity in the form of a daily loading history has been related to bone density of the calcaneus. The theory incorporates a stress exponent m to account for differences in the importance of magnitude and number of load cycles experienced during daily activity. We have derived a parameter from the model, the "Bone Density Index" (BDI). We have developed a method of collecting daily habitual loading histories using an insole force sensor interfaced to a portable digital data logger carried in a fanny pack. Our goal for this study was to determine a stress exponent, m, relating GRFz history to Calcaneal Bone Mineral Density (CBMD).

  8. Soy protein is beneficial but high-fat diet and voluntary running are detrimental to bone structure in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Graef, George L; Nielsen, Forrest H; Johnson, LuAnn K; Cao, Jay

    2015-06-01

    Physical activity and soy protein isolate (SPI) augmentation have been reported to be beneficial for bone health. We hypothesized that combining voluntary running and SPI intake would alleviate detrimental changes in bone induced by a high-fat diet. A 2 × 2 × 2 experiment was designed with diets containing 16% or 45% of energy as corn oil and 20% SPI or casein fed to sedentary or running male C57BL/6 mice for 14 weeks. Distal femurs were assessed for microstructural changes. The high-fat diet significantly decreased trabecular number (Tb.N) and bone mineral density (BMD) and increased trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Soy protein instead of casein, regardless of fat content, in the diet significantly increased bone volume fraction, Tb.N, connectivity density, and BMD and decreased Tb.Sp. Voluntary running, regardless of fat content, significantly decreased bone volume fraction, Tb.N, connectivity density, and BMD and increased Tb.Sp. The high-fat diet significantly decreased osteocalcin and increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b) concentrations in plasma. Plasma concentrations of osteocalcin were increased by both SPI and running. Running alleviated the increase in TRAP 5b induced by the high-fat diet. These findings demonstrate that a high-fat diet is deleterious, and SPI is beneficial to trabecular bone properties. The deleterious effect of voluntary running on trabecular structural characteristics indicates that there may be a maximal threshold of running beyond which beneficial effects cease and detrimental effects occur. Increases in plasma osteocalcin and decreases in plasma TRAP 5b in running mice suggest that a compensatory response occurs to counteract the detrimental effects of excessive running.

  9. Exercise and Bone Density: Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    SUBJECT TERMS exercise , bone, meta-analysis, osteoporosis, bone density, physical activity , physical fitness, men, women 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...this investigation was the result of the exercise protocols employed. However, while higher impact activities such as jumping and high impact aerobic...have any effect on femoral neck BMD in postmenopausal women, such activities should almost always be recommended. For example, while exercise may

  10. Bone density in patients with chondromalacia patella.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Iraj; Khazaeli, Shabnam; Hatami, Parta; Malekpour, Mahdi

    2010-06-01

    Chondromalacia of the patella is the most common cause of anterior knee pain in young women. The etiology of the disease is not well-understood but the initial lesion is a disorganization of collagenous structures. Since the disease is proposed to be due to generalized constitutional disturbance, we postulated that bony structures could also be involved. To investigate this hypothesis we measured the bone density of 286 patients with the diagnosis of chondromalacia of the patella during a 4-year period using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method. We found a significant number of patients having low bone densities. This problem was more pronounced in men and in younger age groups. We suggest base-line bone density evaluation in all patients, treatment of osteopenia or osteoporosis in select patients and regular follow-ups using DXA.

  11. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Matthew; Loker, William; Warden, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots) of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic regression. The

  12. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Matthew; Loker, William; Warden, Craig

    2016-09-01

    The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots) of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children's hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic regression. The locations of intubations were

  13. Vegetarian lifestyle and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Marsh, A G; Sanchez, T V; Michelsen, O; Chaffee, F L; Fagal, S M

    1988-09-01

    The amount and type of dietary protein affect bone mineral loss after the menopause. This observation was substantiated in 10 y of studies by direct photon absorptiometry, four results of which follow. 1) Studies of 1600 women in southwestern Michigan revealed that those who had followed the lactoovovegetarian diet for at least 20 y had only 18% less bone mineral by age 80 whereas closely paired omnivores had 35% less bone mineral. 2) A study of self-selected weighed food intake showed no statistical difference in nutrient intakes but a difference in Ca:P ratio and acid-base formation of diet, each significant to p less than 0.001. 3) When sulfur intake of a fixed diet was increased, the titratable acidity of the urine increased proportionately. 4) Bone mineral densities of 304 older women from the continental United States closely paralleled those from earlier Michigan studies.

  14. Bone mineral density is reduced by telmisartan in male spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Birocale, Antonio Marcos; Medeiros, Ana Raquel Santos; Ruffoni, Leandro Dias Gonçalves; Takayama, Liliam; de Oliveira, José Martins; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza

    2016-12-01

    Telmisartan, an angiotensin AT1 receptor blocker, and treadmill running were compared for their effects on bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical properties of male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). It was hypothesized that running (18m/min/60min/d) and telmisartan (5mg/kg/d) would have a positive effect on bone parameters. Three-month-old male SHRs were divided into three groups: sedentary (S), telmisartan (T), and exercise (E). At the end of an 8-week protocol, femur and lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for bone mineral density and by the three-point bending test for biomechanical properties. Blood pressure in all groups was measured by a tail-cuff manometer. Telmisartan and treadmill running reduced blood pressure when compared to the sedentary group; however, telmisartan did not improve bone characteristics. Instead, it reduced BMD of femur total and lumbar vertebrae and worsened bone biomechanic properties. Treadmill running maintained bone characteristics and hence was effective in maintaining bone health. Results showed that telmisartan negatively affected bones suggesting that caution should be taken in possible therapeutic applications for protecting bone health in hypertensive conditions. More studies are necessary to clarify the mechanisms through which telmisartan favors bone loss in this model. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone mineral density: testing for osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary osteoporosis is related to bone loss from ageing. Secondary osteoporosis results from specific conditions that may be reversible. A thoracolumbar X-ray is useful in identifying vertebral fractures, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is the preferred method of calculating bone mineral density. The density of the total hip is the best predictor for a hip fracture, while the lumbar spine is the best site for monitoring the effect of treatment. The T-score is a comparison of the patient’s bone density with healthy, young individuals of the same sex. A negative T-score of –2.5 or less at the femoral neck defines osteoporosis. The Z-score is a comparison with the bone density of people of the same age and sex as the patient. A negative Z-score of –2.5 or less should raise suspicion of a secondary cause of osteoporosis. Clinical risk calculators can be used to predict the 10-year probability of a hip or major osteoporotic fracture. A probability of more than 5% for the hip or more than 20% for any fracture is abnormal and treatment may be warranted. PMID:27340320

  16. Exercise Training and Bone Mineral Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, Timothy G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of exercise on total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women is reviewed. Studies on non-estrogen-replete postmenopausal women show 1-2% changes in regional BMD with 1 year of weight-bearing exercises. Studies of exercise training in the estrogen-replete postmenopausal population suggest large BMD changes.…

  17. Endochondral bone growth, bone calcium accretion, and bone mineral density: how are they related?

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-07-01

    Endochondral bone growth in young growing mammals or adult mammals with persistent growth plates progresses from proliferation, maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes to mineralization of cartilaginous matrix to form an osseous tissue. This complex process is tightly regulated by a number of factors with different impacts, such as genetics, endocrine/paracrine factors [e.g., PTHrP, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), IGF-1, FGFs, and prolactin], and nutritional status (e.g., dietary calcium and vitamin D). Despite a strong link between growth plate function and elongation of the long bone, little is known whether endochondral bone growth indeed determines bone calcium accretion, bone mineral density (BMD), and/or peak bone mass. Since the process ends with cartilaginous matrix calcification, an increase in endochondral bone growth typically leads to more calcium accretion in the primary spongiosa and thus higher BMD. However, in lactating rats with enhanced trabecular bone resorption, bone elongation is inversely correlated with BMD. Although BMD can be increased by factors that enhance endochondral bone growth, the endochondral bone growth itself is unlikely to be an important determinant of peak bone mass since it is strongly determined by genetics. Therefore, endochondral bone growth and bone elongation are associated with calcium accretion only in a particular subregion of the long bone, but do not necessarily predict BMD and peak bone mass.

  18. Exercise and Bone Density: Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    cycling (C), swimming (S), aerobic dance (AD), stairclimbing (SC), Other (O) 250 Compliance % of exercise sessions that subjects attended 251...Exercise and bone mineral density in men: a meta-analysis GEORGE A. KELLEY,1 KRISTI S. KELLEY,1 AND ZUNG VU TRAN2 1Department of Kinesiology and Physical...exer- cise (n521, 44.966.5 yr) or con- trol (n519, 43.364.5 yr) group 1 yr of aerobic exercise of choice (walking, jogging, swimming , sta- tionary

  19. Tensile properties of rat femoral bone as functions of bone volume fraction, apparent density and volumetric bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; Araiza Arroyo, Francisco J; Rosso, Claudio; Aran, Shima; Snyder, Brian D

    2011-09-02

    Mechanical testing has been regarded as the gold standard to investigate the effects of pathologies on the structure-function properties of the skeleton. Tensile properties of cancellous and cortical bone have been reported previously; however, no relationships describing these properties for rat bone as a function of volumetric bone mineral density (ρ(MIN)), apparent density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) have been reported in the literature. We have shown that at macro level, compression and torsion properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone can be well described as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) using non-destructive micro-computed tomographic imaging and mechanical testing to failure. Therefore, the aim of this study is to derive a relationship expressing the tensile properties of rat cortical bone as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) over a range of normal and pathologic bones. We used bones from normal, ovariectomized and osteomalacic animals. All specimens underwent micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess bone morphometric and densitometric indices and uniaxial tension to failure. We obtained univariate relationships describing 74-77% of the tensile properties of rat cortical bone as a function of BV/TV, apparent density or ρ(MIN) over a range of density and common skeletal pathologies. The relationships reported in this study can be used in the structural rigidity to provide a non-invasive method to assess the tensile behavior of bones affected by pathology and/or treatment options.

  20. Nanostructured magnesium increases bone cell density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Lucy; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium has attracted some attention in orthopedics due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. Since magnesium is an essential natural mineral for bone growth, it can be expected that as a biomaterial, it would support bone formation. However, upon degradation in the body, magnesium releases OH- which results in an alkaline pH that can be detrimental to cell density (for example, osteoblasts or bone forming cells). For this reason, modification of magnesium may be necessary to compensate for such detrimental effects to cells. This study created biologically inspired nanoscale surface features on magnesium by soaking magnesium in various concentrations of NaOH (from 1 to 10 N) and for various periods of time (from 10 to 30 min). The results provided the first evidence of increased roughness, surface energy, and consequently greater osteoblast adhesion, after 4 h as well as density up to 7 days on magnesium treated with any concentration of NaOH for any length of time compared to untreated controls. For these reasons, this study suggests that soaking magnesium in NaOH could be an inexpensive, simple and effective manner to promote osteoblast functions for numerous orthopedic applications and, thus, should be further studied.

  1. Space: The Final Frontier of Bone Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean D.

    2011-01-01

    It is a medical requirement at NASA to evaluate the skeletal integrity of "long-duration" astronauts by measuring bone mineral density [BMD] with DXA technology. A long-duration mission is a spaceflight that is greater than 30 days but is typically the continuous 120-180 day missions aboard the International Space Station [ISS]. Not only does NASA use the BMD index to monitor fracture risk in this astronaut population, but these measures are also used to describe the effects of spaceflight, to certify skeletal health readiness for flight, to monitor the recovery of lost bone mass after return to earth, and to evaluate the efficacy of countermeasures to bone loss. However, despite the fact that DXA-based BMD is a widely-applied surrogate for bone strength that is grounded in an abundance of population-based fracture data, its applicability to the long-duration astronaut is limited. The cohort of long-duration astronauts is not the typical group for evaluating osteoporosis or determining age-related fracture risk. The cohort is young (< 55 years), predominantly male and exposed to novel risk factors for bone loss besides the weightlessness of space. NASA is concerned about early onset osteoporosis in the astronaut exposed to long-duration spaceflight, especially since any detectable symptoms are likely to manifest after return to earth and perhaps years after space travel. This risk raises the question: is NASA doing enough now to mitigate a fracture event that may manifest later? This presentation will discuss the limitations and constraints to understanding skeletal changes due to prolonged spaceflight and the recommendations, by clinical experts in osteoporosis and BMD, to transition research technologies for clinical decision-making by NASA.

  2. Bone mineral density in healthy Tunisian women.

    PubMed

    Sahli, Hela; Testouri, Nedia; Chihaoui, Manel Ben; Salah, Afef Hadj; Cheour, Elhem; Meddeb, Nihel; Zouari, Bechir; Sellami, Slaheddine

    2009-07-20

    Interpretation of densitometric results requires a comparison with reference bone mineral density (BMD) values of normal age and sex-matched persons. Thus the aim of this study was to determine these values for healthy Tunisian women, to estimate the prevalence of osteoporosis and to compare our findings with other populations. A cross-sectional study of 1378 Tunisian women aged between 20 and 96 years was carried out using DXA (GE-Lunar Prodigy). Subjects with suspected conditions affecting bone metabolism were excluded. Measurements were taken at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. These values were expressed at T-scores, with reference to the mean BMD values of the group aged 20-40 years. The peak bone mass, estimated in this age group was 1.174+0.127 g/cm(2) at the lumbar spine and 1.016+/-0.118 g/cm(2) at the femoral site. It was attained respectively within the age of 25 years and 36 years. For both sites, the expected decline in BMD was shown when the successive age groups [40-49 years] and [50-59 years] were compared. Bone loss was rapid during the first 5 years after menopause. Thereafter BMD declined slowly but continually. The prevalence of osteoporosis in the women over 50 years of age, taking account of peak bone mass observed in our cohort, was 23.3% at the spine and 17.3% at the femoral neck with a combined prevalence of 23.4%. These rates attained respectively 30.4%, 11.8% and 32.9% when we considered the Italian values, which demonstrate the variability of osteodensitometric depending to the reference population adopted.

  3. Matter density perturbation and power spectrum in running vacuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the matter density perturbation δm and power spectrum P(k) in the running vacuum model, with the cosmological constant being a function of the Hubble parameter, given by Λ = Λ0 + 6σHH0 + 3νH2, in which the linear and quadratic terms of H would originate from the QCD vacuum condensation and cosmological renormalization group, respectively. Taking the dark energy perturbation into consideration, we derive the evolution equation for δm and find a specific scale dcr = 2π/kcr, which divides the evolution of the universe into the sub-interaction and super-interaction regimes, corresponding to k ≪ kcr and k ≫ kcr, respectively. For the former, the evolution of δm has the same behaviour as that in the Λ cold dark model, while for the latter, the growth of δm is frozen (greatly enhanced) when ν + σ > (<)0 due to the couplings between radiation, matter and dark energy. It is clear that the observational data rule out the cases with ν < 0 and ν + σ < 0, while the allowed window for the model parameters is extremely narrow with ν , |σ | ≲ O(10^{-7}).

  4. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  5. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  6. [Metabolic status and bone mineral density in patients with pseudarthrosis of long bones in hyperhomocysteinemia].

    PubMed

    Bezsmertnyĭ, Iu O

    2013-06-01

    In article described research of the metabolic status and bone mineral density in 153 patients with with pseudarthrosis of long bones, in individuals with consolidated fractures and healthy people. The violations of reparative osteogenesis at hyperhomocysteinemia are accompanied by disturbances of the functional state of bone tissue, inhibition of biosynthetic and increased destruction processes, reduced bone mineral density in the formation of osteopenia and osteoporosis. The degree and direction of change of bone depends on the type of violation of reparative osteogenesis.

  7. Bone mineral density in weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, M K; Johnell, O; Obrant, K J

    1993-03-01

    The effect of intense physical training on the bone mineral content (BMC) and soft tissue composition, and the development of these values after cessation of the active career, was studied in 40 nationally or internationally ranked male weight lifters. Nineteen were active and 21 had retired from competition sports. Fifty-two age- and sex-matched nonweight lifters served as controls. The bone mineral density (BMD) in total body, spine, hip, and proximal tibial metaphysis was measured with a Lunar Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) apparatus and the BMD of the distal forearm was measured with single photon absorptiometry (SPA). Seventeen of the lifters had been measured earlier with SPA in the forearm and 23 in the tibial condyle during their active career in 1975. The BMD was significantly higher in the weight lifters compared with the controls (10% in the total body P < 0.001, 12% in the trochanteric region P < 0.001, and 13% in the lumbar spine P < 0.001). All measured regions except the head showed significant higher bone mass in the weight lifters compared with the controls. In older lifters, the difference from the controls seemed to increase in total body and lumbar vertebrae (BMD), but remained unchanged in the hip. Significant correlation was found between the SPA measurements in 1975 and the corresponding measurements 15 years later in both the forearm (r = 0.51, P < 0.05 at the 1-cm level and r = 0.87, P < 0.001 at the 6-cm level) and in the tibial condyle (r = 0.61, P < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Low bone mineral density and decreased bone turnover in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Söderpalm, Ann-Charlott; Magnusson, Per; Ahlander, Anne-Christine; Karlsson, Jón; Kroksmark, Anna-Karin; Tulinius, Már; Swolin-Eide, Diana

    2007-12-01

    This cross-sectional study examined bone mineral density, bone turnover, body composition and calciotropic hormones in 24 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (2.3-19.7 years), most of whom were being treated with prednisolone, and 24 age-matched healthy boys. Our study demonstrated lower bone mineral density in the DMD group for total body, spine, hip, heel and forearm measurements. These differences between DMD patients and controls increased with increasing age. Biochemical markers of both bone formation and resorption revealed reduced bone turnover in DMD patients. The fracture rate was not higher in DMD patients. The DMD group had low vitamin D levels but high leptin levels in comparison with the control group. Muscle strength correlated with bone mineral density assessed at the hip and heel in the DMD group. Interventions that increase bone formation should be considered, as DMD patients have reduced bone turnover in addition to their low bone mineral density.

  9. Foot bone marrow edema after a 10-wk transition to minimalist running shoes.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Sarah T; Johnson, A Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike H; Hunter, Iain; Robinson, Eric; Rich, Brent S E; Brown, Stephen Douglas

    2013-07-01

    Minimalist running shoes are becoming a more popular choice for runners in the past few years. However, there is little conclusive evidence about the advantages or disadvantages of running in these shoes. Although performance benefits may exist, injury may also occur from the added stress of running without the benefit of cushioning under the foot. Bone marrow edema can be a manifestation of added stress on the foot. This study measured bone marrow edema in runners' feet before and after a 10-wk period of transitioning from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Thirty-six experienced recreational runners underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after a 10-wk period. Seventeen subjects were in the control group (ran in their traditional shoes only for 10 wk), whereas the other 19 were in the experimental group (gradually transitioned to Vibram FiveFinger running shoes for 10 wk). The severity of the bone marrow edema was scored on a range of 0-4 (0 = no bone marrow edema, 4 = edema in more than 50% of the length of the bone). A score of 4 represented a stress fracture. Pretraining MRI scores were not statistically different between the groups. The posttraining MRI scores showed that more subjects in the Vibram group (10 of 19) showed increases in bone marrow edema in at least one bone after 10 wk of running than that in the control group (P = 0.009). Runners interested in transitioning to minimalist running shoes, such as Vibram FiveFingers, should transition very slowly and gradually to avoid potential stress injury in the foot.

  10. Anthropometric models of bone mineral content and areal bone mineral density based on the bone mineral density in childhood study

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, V.; Kalkwarf, H. J.; Lappe, J. M.; Oberfield, S.; Shepherd, J. A.; Winer, K. K.; Zemel, B. S.; Hangartner, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary New models describing anthropometrically adjusted normal values of bone mineral density and content in children have been created for the various measurement sites. The inclusion of multiple explanatory variables in the models provides the opportunity to calculate Z-scores that are adjusted with respect to the relevant anthropometric parameters. Introduction Previous descriptions of children’s bone mineral measurements by age have focused on segmenting diverse populations by race and sex without adjusting for anthropometric variables or have included the effects of a single anthropometric variable. Methods We applied multivariate semi-metric smoothing to the various pediatric bone-measurement sites using data from the Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study to evaluate which of sex, race, age, height, weight, percent body fat, and sexual maturity explain variations in the population’s bone mineral values. By balancing high adjusted R2 values with clinical needs, two models are examined. Results At the spine, whole body, whole body sub head, total hip, hip neck, and forearm sites, models were created using sex, race, age, height, and weight as well as an additional set of models containing these anthropometric variables and percent body fat. For bone mineral density, weight is more important than percent body fat, which is more important than height. For bone mineral content, the order varied by site with body fat being the weakest component. Including more anthropometrics in the model reduces the overlap of the critical groups, identified as those individuals with a Z-score below −2, from the standard sex, race, and age model. Conclusions If body fat is not available, the simpler model including height and weight should be used. The inclusion of multiple explanatory variables in the models provides the opportunity to calculate Z-scores that are adjusted with respect to the relevant anthropometric parameters. PMID:25311106

  11. Bisphophonates in CKD Patients with Low Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Yen, Jen-Fen; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) have a high risk of bone fracture because of low bone mineral density and poor bone quality. Osteoporosis also features low bone mass, disarranged microarchitecture, and skeletal fragility, and differentiating between osteoporosis and CKD-MBD in low bone mineral density is a challenge and usually achieved by bone biopsy. Bisphosphonates can be safe and beneficial for patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 30 mL/min or higher, but prescribing bisphosphonates in advanced CKD requires caution because of the increased possibility of low bone turnover disorders such as osteomalacia, mixed uremic osteodystrophy, and adynamic bone, even aggravating hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, bone biopsy in advanced CKD is an important consideration before prescribing bisphosphonates. Treatment also may induce hypocalcemia in CKD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, but vitamin D supplementation may ameliorate this effect. Bisphosphonate treatment can improve both bone mineral density and vascular calcification, but the latter becomes more unlikely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD with vascular calcification but no decreased bone mineral density. Using bisphosphonates requires considerable caution in advanced CKD, and the lack of adequate clinical investigation necessitates more studies regarding its effects on these patients. PMID:24501586

  12. Method for improved prediction of bone fracture risk using bone mineral density in structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cann, Christopher E. (Inventor); Faulkner, Kenneth G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive in-vivo method of analyzing a bone for fracture risk includes obtaining data from the bone such as by computed tomography or projection imaging which data represents a measure of bone material characteristics such as bone mineral density. The distribution of the bone material characteristics is used to generate a finite element method (FEM) mesh from which load capability of the bone can be determined. In determining load capability, the bone is mathematically compressed, and stress, strain force, force/area versus bone material characteristics are determined.

  13. Bone Density: MedinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Bones? (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Osteopetrosis Overview (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ... and Calcium (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Also in Spanish Women Breast Cancer and Bone ...

  14. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score <-2 for BMI <20, 20-25, 25-30, and >30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  15. Bone mineral density in professional female dancers.

    PubMed

    Keay, N; Fogelman, I; Blake, G

    1997-06-01

    To measure the long term effects of dance training and the contribution of the timing and duration of any menstrual disruption on bone mineral density (BMD). Measurement of BMD in 57 premenopausal, previously professionally dance trained women and the relationship to menstrual and training history. Bone density measurements at lumbar spine and femoral neck by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The average Z score for BMD at the lumbar spine in the amenorrhoeic dancers was significantly below that for the normal population. The average Z score for BMD at the femoral neck in the eumenorrhoeic dancers was significantly above that for the normal population. There was a significant difference between the average Z score for BMD at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck between the amenorrhoeic and eumenorrhoeic dancers. Significant negative relationships were found between BMD at the lumbar spine and (1) age at menarche, (2) duration of amenorrhoea, (3) BMD at the femoral neck, and (4) the variable of ideal minus lowest weight, which was independent of amenorrhoea. No significant relationships were found between duration of oral contraceptive pill usage and BMD at either the lumbar spine or the femoral neck in eumenorrhoeic or amenorrhoeic dancers. In order to quantify the effect of a combination of these significant factors, a model of BMD was constructed using multiple regression incorporating the variables duration of amenorrhoea, age at menarche, and ideal minus lowest body weight. In this model R2 was 33.6%, in other words 33.6% of the total variation in the Z score for BMD at the lumbar spine could be accounted for by these factors. Professional female dancers with a history of delayed menarche and amenorrhoea have been identified as another group of premenopausal women potentially at risk of developing osteoporosis because of a decrease in BMD at the lumbar spine. The femoral neck in dancers with a history of amenorrhoea was partially protected from loss of BMD by

  16. Bone mineral density in professional female dancers.

    PubMed Central

    Keay, N; Fogelman, I; Blake, G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the long term effects of dance training and the contribution of the timing and duration of any menstrual disruption on bone mineral density (BMD). DESIGN: Measurement of BMD in 57 premenopausal, previously professionally dance trained women and the relationship to menstrual and training history. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bone density measurements at lumbar spine and femoral neck by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: The average Z score for BMD at the lumbar spine in the amenorrhoeic dancers was significantly below that for the normal population. The average Z score for BMD at the femoral neck in the eumenorrhoeic dancers was significantly above that for the normal population. There was a significant difference between the average Z score for BMD at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck between the amenorrhoeic and eumenorrhoeic dancers. Significant negative relationships were found between BMD at the lumbar spine and (1) age at menarche, (2) duration of amenorrhoea, (3) BMD at the femoral neck, and (4) the variable of ideal minus lowest weight, which was independent of amenorrhoea. No significant relationships were found between duration of oral contraceptive pill usage and BMD at either the lumbar spine or the femoral neck in eumenorrhoeic or amenorrhoeic dancers. In order to quantify the effect of a combination of these significant factors, a model of BMD was constructed using multiple regression incorporating the variables duration of amenorrhoea, age at menarche, and ideal minus lowest body weight. In this model R2 was 33.6%, in other words 33.6% of the total variation in the Z score for BMD at the lumbar spine could be accounted for by these factors. CONCLUSION: Professional female dancers with a history of delayed menarche and amenorrhoea have been identified as another group of premenopausal women potentially at risk of developing osteoporosis because of a decrease in BMD at the lumbar spine. The femoral neck in dancers with a

  17. Bone density and the lightweight skeletons of birds.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2010-07-22

    The skeletons of birds are universally described as lightweight as a result of selection for minimizing the energy required for flight. From a functional perspective, the weight (mass) of an animal relative to its lift-generating surfaces is a key determinant of the metabolic cost of flight. The evolution of birds has been characterized by many weight-saving adaptations that are reflected in bone shape, many of which strengthen and stiffen the skeleton. Although largely unstudied in birds, the material properties of bone tissue can also contribute to bone strength and stiffness. In this study, I calculated the density of the cranium, humerus and femur in passerine birds, rodents and bats by measuring bone mass and volume using helium displacement. I found that, on average, these bones are densest in birds, followed closely by bats. As bone density increases, so do bone stiffness and strength. Both of these optimization criteria are used in the design of strong and stiff, but lightweight, manmade airframes. By analogy, increased bone density in birds and bats may reflect adaptations for maximizing bone strength and stiffness while minimizing bone mass and volume. These data suggest that both bone shape and the material properties of bone tissue have played important roles in the evolution of flight. They also reconcile the conundrum of how bird skeletons can appear to be thin and delicate, yet contribute just as much to total body mass as do the skeletons of terrestrial mammals.

  18. Bone mineral density, adiposity, and cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Hamid R.; Bates, Kristyn A.; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola S.; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R.; Rodrigues, Mark A.; Bird, Sabine M.; Brown, Belinda M.; Beilby, John; Howard, Matthew; Criddle, Arthur; Wraith, Megan; Taddei, Kevin; Martins, Georgia; Paton, Athena; Shah, Tejal; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Foster, Jonathan K.; Martins, Ian J.; Lautenschlager, Nicola T.; Mastaglia, Francis; Laws, Simon M.; Martins, Ralph N.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been associated with genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors. A number of potentially modifiable risk factors should be taken into account when preventive or ameliorative interventions targeting dementia and its preclinical stages are investigated. Bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition are two such potentially modifiable risk factors, and their association with cognitive decline was investigated in this study. 164 participants, aged 34–87 years old (62.78 ± 9.27), were recruited for this longitudinal study and underwent cognitive and clinical examinations at baseline and after 3 years. Blood samples were collected for apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was conducted at the same day as cognitive assessment. Using hierarchical regression analysis, we found that BMD and lean body mass, as measured using DXA were significant predictors of episodic memory. Age, gender, APOE status, and premorbid IQ were controlled for. Specifically, the List A learning from California Verbal Learning Test was significantly associated with BMD and lean mass both at baseline and at follow up assessment. Our findings indicate that there is a significant association between BMD and lean body mass and episodic verbal learning. While the involvement of modifiable lifestyle factors in human cognitive function has been examined in different studies, there is a need for further research to understand the potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:25741279

  19. Usefulness of bone density measurement in fallers.

    PubMed

    Blain, Hubert; Rolland, Yves; Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cedric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Benetos, Athanase; Berrut, Gilles; Audran, Maurice; Bendavid, Sauveur; Bousson, Valérie; Briot, Karine; Brazier, Michel; Breuil, Véronique; Chapuis, Laure; Chapurlat, Roland; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Cortet, Bernard; Dargent, Patricia; Fardellone, Patrice; Feron, Jean-Marc; Gauvain, Jean-Bernard; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Hanon, Olivier; Laroche, Michel; Kolta, Sami; Lespessailles, Eric; Letombe, Brigitte; Mallet, Eric; Marcelli, Christian; Orcel, Philippe; Puisieux, François; Seret, Patrick; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Sutter, Bruno; Trémollières, Florence; Weryha, Georges; Roux, Christian; Thomas, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review is to discuss the latest French recommendation issued in 2012 that a fall within the past year should lead to bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This recommendation rests on four facts. First, osteoporosis and fall risk are the two leading risk factors for nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal women. Second, BMD measurement using DXA supplies significant information on the fracture risk independently from the fall risk. Thus, when a fall occurs, the fracture risk increases as BMD decreases. Third, osteoporosis drugs have been proven effective in preventing fractures only in populations with osteoporosis defined based on BMD criteria. Finally, the prevalence of osteoporosis is high in patients who fall and increases in the presence of markers for frailty (e.g., recurrent falls, sarcopenia [low muscle mass and strength], limited mobility, and weight loss), which are risk factors for both osteoporosis and falls. Nevertheless, life expectancy should be taken into account when assessing the appropriateness of DXA in fallers, as osteoporosis treatments require at least 12months to decrease the fracture risk. Another relevant factor is the availability of DXA, which may be limited due to geographic factors, patient dependency, or severe cognitive impairments, for instance. Studies are needed to better determine how the fall risk and frailty should be incorporated into the fracture risk evaluation based on BMD and the FRAX® tool. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Bone mineral density testing in social context.

    PubMed

    Kazanjian, A; Green, C J; Bassett, K; Brunger, F

    1999-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) testing of healthy women continues to increase, despite widespread discrediting of this test as a valid means to predict fracture risk. To find an explanation for this expanding utilization, we turn to the literature of sociology and political science. Two interdisciplinary approaches proved particularly useful in critical examination of technologies related to women and aging: feminist analysis and cross-cultural analysis. BMD testing has grown because it is marketed in ways that draw upon and perpetuate two trends in western popular culture: a) the medical model of the aging female body; and b) the fear of aging, with its associated disability, dependency, and immobility. The feedback loop between popular and scientific knowledge has created and perpetuated the notion that the aging female body is a diseased body. The trend toward defining osteoporosis entirely on the basis of BMD diagnostic criteria has resulted in the transformation of a risk factor into a disease entity. As the onus for managing risk falls increasingly on women as individuals, and as they strive to reach the preferred ideal of normality, the area that defines normality on the continuum is shrinking, while that defining abnormality is increasing. The power relations and private interests served by this altered continuum remain largely unexamined. The effect, however, is to encourage the demand for screening and diagnostic technologies, giving rise to the rapid diffusion of such technologies, even where the research evidence does not support their use.

  1. Bone turnover predicts change in volumetric bone density and bone geometry at the radius in men.

    PubMed

    Pye, S R; Ward, K A; Cook, M J; Laurent, M R; Gielen, E; Borghs, H; Adams, J E; Boonen, S; Vanderschueren, D; Wu, F C; O'Neill, T W

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the distal and midshaft radius were performed in 514 European men aged 40-79 years at baseline and a median of 4.3 years later. Age-related changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone geometry were greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline. This study aimed to determine prospective change in bone density and geometry at the radius in men and examine the influence of bone turnover markers and sex hormones on that change. Men aged 40-79 years were recruited from population registers in Manchester (UK) and Leuven (Belgium). At baseline, markers of bone formation (P1NP and osteocalcin) and resorption (β-cTX and ICTP) were assessed. Total and bioavailable testosterone and oestradiol were also measured. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to scan the radius at distal and midshaft sites at the baseline assessment and a median of 4.3 years later. Five hundred fourteen men, mean (SD) age of 59.6 (10.5) years, contributed to the data. At the midshaft site, there was a significant decrease in mean cortical vBMD (-0.04 %/year), bone mineral content (BMC) (-0.1 %/year) and cortical thickness (-0.4 %/year), while total and medullary area increased (+0.5 and +2.4 %/year respectively). At the distal radius, total vBMD declined (-0.5 %/year) and radial area increased (+0.6 %/year). Greater plasma concentrations of bone resorption and formation markers were associated with greater decline in BMC and cortical area at the midshaft and total vBMD at the distal site. Increased bone resorption was linked with an increase in total and medullary area and decrease in cortical thickness at the midshaft. Sex hormone levels were unrelated to change in pQCT parameters. Age-related changes in vBMD and bone geometry are greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline. Sex hormones have little influence on change in pQCT parameters.

  2. Low bone mineral density among young healthy adult Saudi women

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Zeidan A.; Sultan, Intisar E.; Guraya, Shaista S.; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H.; Khoshhal, Khalid I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To screen for low bone mineral density among young adult Saudi women using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and exploring the high risk groups. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 279, 20-36 years old female students and employees of Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January and May 2014. The study included bone status assessed using QUS, a structured self-reported questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and evaluation of bone markers of bone metabolism. Results: The prevalence of low bone mineral density was 9%. Serum osteocalcin was found significantly higher in candidates with low bone mineral density, 20.67 ng/ml versus 10.7 ng/ml, and it was negatively correlated with T-scores. At any given point in time the exposed subjects to low calcium intake and inadequate sun exposure in the population were 11 times and 3 times more likely to have low bone mineral density, (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 11.0; 95%confidence interval [CI]=3.16, 38.34; p=0.001) and (adjusted OR, 3.32, 95%CI=1.27, 8.66, p<0.01). Conclusion: Early detection screening programs for low bone mineral density are needed in Saudi Arabia as it affects young Saudi women specially the high-risk group that includes young women with insufficient calcium intake and insufficient sun exposure. Serum osteocalcin as a biomarker for screening for low bone mineral density could be introduced. PMID:27761561

  3. Does bone mineral density affect hip fracture severity?

    PubMed

    Spencer, Simon J; Blyth, Mark J G; Lovell, Frances; Holt, Graeme

    2012-06-01

    The association between hip fracture and reduced bone mineral density is well documented, with reduced bone mineral density predisposing to fracture. However, it is unknown whether an association exists between the magnitude of bone density lost and the severity of the hip fracture sustained. One hundred forty-two patients (96 women, 46 men) with a mean age of 74 years (range, 49-92 years) who sustained a hip fracture following a simple ground-level fall and were treated for this injury were reviewed. All patients had undergone dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry bone scanning of the contralateral hip and lumbar spine. Fractures were classified as intra- or extracapsular or subtrochanteric and then subclassified by degree of severity as simple (stable) or multifragmentary (unstable) fracture patterns.Although a low hip bone mineral density (T- or Z score <2.5) was associated with an increased risk of extracapsular fracture (P=.025) compared with other fracture types, no association existed between bone mineral density and the severity of the resultant hip fracture. Although an association exists between bone mineral density and the risk of fragility fractures, the results of the current study suggest that the severity of hip fractures does not follow this correlation. Therefore, no assumption can be made about bone mineral density of the proximal femur based on the severity of the fracture observed on plain radiographs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Correlation of different bone markers with bone density in patients with rheumatic diseases on glucocorticoid therapy.

    PubMed

    Loddenkemper, Konstanze; Bohl, Nicole; Perka, Carsten; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2006-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common concomitant disease in patients with rheumatic diseases on glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. Bone status is usually evaluated by determination of bone density in combination with clinical examinations and laboratory tests. However, the strength of individual biochemical bone makers in GC-induced osteoporosis has yet to be fully clarified. For this reason, different bone markers were investigated in correlation with bone density in patients with rheumatic diseases. Approximately 238 patients (212 women, 26 men) with a rheumatic disease and under GC therapy were examined consecutively for the first time with regard to bone density (BMD) and bone markers [osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (precipitation method/tandem-MP ostase), crosslinks [pyridinoline (PYD), deoxypyridinoline (DPX), N-terminal telopeptide (NTX)

  5. Bone density, bone quality, and FRAX: changing concepts in osteoporosis management.

    PubMed

    Licata, Angelo A

    2013-02-01

    Bone densitometry was originally developed to diagnose a high risk for fragility fractures in older postmenopausal women who may have primary osteoporosis. Its widespread availability, however, has led to its use in healthy peri- and premenopausal patients and the unexpected findings of low bone density in this group of patients. Their low bone density caused much uncertainty about the likelihood of fracture risk and what treatment might be needed. Conceptually, bone density reflected bone strength, and so a low density reflected increased fracture risk. Clinical experience and the results of pivotal studies of therapy for osteoporosis suggested that bone density was only partly responsible for skeletal strength. Many structural and material properties of bone, not measured by bone density, made it resist fracturing. Clinical risk factors helped determine these characteristics, albeit imperfectly, and aided clinicians decide whether and what treatment was needed. But now, new fracture risk assessment protocols (namely, FRAX, the WHO risk assessment tool) are available to help resolve this dilemma. This paper reviews some of the clinical observations that led to rethinking the concept bone density and bone strength and how it changes the clinical approach to therapy for the healthy young patient.

  6. Calcium renal lithiasis and bone mineral density. Importance of bone metabolism in urinary lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, M Á; Sierra Girón-Prieto, M; Orgaz-Molina, J; Zuluaga-Gómez, A; Arias-Santiago, S; Arrabal-Martín, M

    2013-06-01

    Calcium Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease; in its pathophysiology is involved various minerals and metabolic factors that may be altered, including bone and phosphor-calcium metabolism. To establish the scientific evidence and demonstrate the relationship between calcium nephrolithiasis and bone mineral density loss, through the use of bone turnover markers, serum and urinary metabolites. We performed a PubMed literature review using different MeSH Terms like "Nephrolithiasis", "Bone mineral density", "Urinary stones", "Calcium", Bone resorption" and "Bone formation", with different combinations. We only selected articles with abstracts in English or Spanish and discarded clinical cases and articles with inappropriate statistical study. A total of 40 articles were selected. In different studies reviewed have been observed that patients with hypercalciuria have a higher bone mineral density loss with respect to normocalciuric. Among patients with calcium stones (normocalciuric or hypercalciuric), there is loss of bone mineral density, being more evident in patients with stones and hypercalciuria. This mineral density loss is marked and important in patients with recurrent calcium stones. Increased markers like fasting calcium/creatinine and β-CrossLaps are determinant of nephrolithiasis and mineral density loss in these patients. We recommend perform markers of bone turnover and fasting calcium/creatinine in patients with recurrent calcium stones by the significant presence of bone mineral density loss, with a level of evidence III. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone mineral density testing after fragility fracture

    PubMed Central

    Posen, Joshua; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Sale, Joanna; Bogoch, Earl R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with fragility fractures who can be expected to have low bone mineral density (BMD) at the time of fracture and to assist FPs in deciding whether to refer patients for BMD testing. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from the earliest available dates through September 2009. Study selection English-language articles reporting BMD test results of patients with fragility fractures who were managed in an orthopedic environment (eg, fracture clinic, emergency management by orthopedic surgeons, inpatients) were eligible for review. While the orthopedic environment has been identified as an ideal point for case finding, FPs are often responsible for investigation and treatment. Factors that potentially influenced BMD test results (eg, selection of fracture types, exclusion criteria) were identified. Studies with 2 or more selection factors of potential influence were flagged, and rates of low BMD were calculated including and excluding these studies. Synthesis The distribution of the proportion of persons with low BMD was summarized across studies using descriptive statistics. We calculated lower boundaries on this distribution, using standard statistical thresholds, to determine a lower threshold of the expected rate of low BMD. Conclusion Family physicians evaluating patients with fragility fractures can expect that at least two-thirds of patients with fragility fractures who are older than 50 years of age will have low BMD (T score ≤ −1.0). With this a priori expectation, FPs might more readily conduct a fracture risk assessment and pursue warranted fracture risk reduction strategies following fragility fracture. PMID:24336562

  8. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  9. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  10. Postmenopausal bone density and milk consumption in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sandler, R B; Slemenda, C W; LaPorte, R E; Cauley, J A; Schramm, M M; Barresi, M L; Kriska, A M

    1985-08-01

    Skeletal mass is a major determinant of susceptibility to osteoporotic fracture in menopause. At menopause, the skeletal mass is the resultant of the Peak Skeletal Mass (PSM) reached early adulthood minus the bone mass lost through the process of Adult Bone Loss (ABL). Current interventions for the maintenance of skeletal resilience in advanced age address the ABL peri- or postmenopausally. This study indicates that the effects of milk consumption in childhood and adolescence on bone density may manifest as higher bone density decades later in menopause. The assumed mechanism of the reported effect is through augmentation of the PSM, and acquisition of favorable nutritional habits which may influence the extent of ABL.

  11. Bone density in women receiving depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception.

    PubMed Central

    Cundy, T; Evans, M; Roberts, H; Wattie, D; Ames, R; Reid, I R

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine if the use of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA), which reduces ovarian oestrogen production, is associated with changes in bone density. DESIGN--Population study. DMPA users were compared with two control groups selected from larger population studies and individually matched for several putative determinants of bone density (age, race, body mass index, and years of oestrogen deficiency). Controls and DMPA users were matched without prior knowledge of their bone density measurements. SETTING--Teaching hospital and community family planning clinics. SUBJECTS--30 current users of DMPA with a minimum five years' previous use, 30 premenopausal controls, and 30 postmenopausal controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density assessed by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. RESULTS--Compared with premenopausal controls matched for age, race, and body mass index, DMPA users had significantly reduced bone density in the lumbar spine (mean difference 7.5% (95% confidence interval 1.9% to 13.1%), p = 0.002) and in the femoral neck (6.6%, (0.8% to 12.3%), p = 0.007). Compared with postmenopausal controls matched for body mass index and duration of oestrogen deficiency, DMPA users had greater bone density in the lumbar spine (8.9% (4.3% to 13.5%), p = 0.001), but in the femoral neck the difference in bone density was less (4.0% (-0.4% to 8.5%), p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS--Women using DMPA have bone density values intermediate between those of normal premenopausal and postmenopausal controls; thus, the degree of oestrogen deficiency induced by DMPA may have an adverse effect on bone density. PMID:1830502

  12. Impact exercise and bone density in premenopausal women with below average bone density for age.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Kathleen G; Walkley, Jeff W; Rich, Peter A

    2015-11-01

    To study the effects of two home-based impact exercise programs on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) in adult premenopausal women with below average aBMD for age (negative Z-scores; 40.8 years; n = 107). Two unilateral impact exercise programs were employed, one targeting the total hip and lumbar spine (n = 42 pairs), the other the distal radius (n = 24 pairs) with some individuals performing both. Force plate data were used to establish exercise loading characteristics (peak loads, time to peak), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) provided bone data. Calcium intake, health and extraneous physical activity (PA) were determined by survey. Exercise for both hip and spine consisted of unilateral landings from adjustable steps (maximum height 63.5 cm) while impacts were delivered to the forearm by arresting falls against a wall. An exercise log was used to provide the exercise prescription, record each exercise bout and any injuries. Participants were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups and pair-matched (age, BMI, Z-score, aBMD). Compliance was calculated as the number of sessions completed divided by the total prescribed number (mean ~50 %). The programs delivered significant gains pre to post at each site compared with significant losses in controls (forearm: 3.9 vs -3.9 %; total hip: 2.0 vs -2.6 %; lumbar spine: 2.8 vs -2.9 % exercise and controls, respectively, all p < 0.001). No exerciser lost bone at the target site regardless of compliance which was strongly correlated with bone gains (R (2) = 0.53-0.68, all p < 0.001). Impact exercise provides an effective means of improving below average aBMD without supervision in this at risk population.

  13. Effects of genistein on vertebral trabecular bone microstructure, bone mineral density, microcracks, osteocyte density, and bone strength in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruchun; Ma, Yulin; Sheng, Zhifeng; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Yuhai; Fang, Lingna; Fan, Huijie; Liao, Eryuan

    2008-01-01

    Until now, the effects of phytoestrogen on bone in both women and ovarian hormone-deficient animal models of osteoporosis have remained uncertain. We have aimed here to investigate the effect of genistein (GEN) on trabecular bone quality in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty 7-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: OVX, sham-operated (SHAM), treated with 17beta-estradiol (EST, 10 microg x kg(-1) x day(-1)), and GEN (5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)). At 15 weeks postoperation, the compressive test was performed on the L5 vertebral body; additionally, microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) assessment was performed to estimate the bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure parameters of the L6 vertebral body. After fatigue damage testing, the L6 vertebral body was bulk-stained in 1% basic fuchsin and embedded in methylmethacrylate. The L4 vertebral body was embedded in methylmethacrylate for dynamic histomorphometry analysis without staining. Mounted bone slices were used to measure microcrack parameters, empty osteocyte lacuna density (e.Lc.Dn), and osteocyte density (Ot.N/T.Ar). Maximum loading (ML) and Ot.N/T.Ar were significantly lower in the OVX group than in the other groups. E.Lc.Dn was significantly decreased in GEN and EST groups compared to the OVX group. ML was significantly decreased in the GEN group compared to the SHAM group. Microcrack density, microcrack surface density, and microcrack length were significantly increased in the OVX group compared to the other groups. Mineral apposition rate was significantly decreased in the OVX group compared to the SHAM and GEN groups. Bone formation rate was significantly decreased in the OVX group compared to other groups. There were no significant differences with regard to mineralizing surface among the four groups. Volumetric BMD at organ was significantly lower in OVX, EST, and GEN groups than in the SHAM group. Bone mineral content was significantly lower in the OVX

  14. Functional trade-offs in the limb bones of dogs selected for running versus fighting.

    PubMed

    Kemp, T J; Bachus, K N; Nairn, J A; Carrier, D R

    2005-09-01

    The physical demands of rapid and economical running differ from the demands of fighting in ways that may prevent the simultaneous evolution of optimal performance in these two behaviors. Here, we test an hypothesis of functional trade-off in limb bones by measuring mechanical properties of limb bones in two breeds of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris L.) that have undergone intense artificial selection for running (greyhound) and fighting (pit bull) performance. The bones were loaded to fracture in three-point static bending. To correct for the effect of shear, we estimated the shear stress in the cross section and added energy due to shear stress to the tensile energy. The proximal limb bones of the pit bulls differed from those of the greyhounds in having relatively larger second moments of area of mid-diaphyseal cross sections and in having more circular cross-sectional shape. The pit bulls exhibited lower stresses at yield, had lower elastic moduli and failed at much higher levels of work. The stiffness of the tissue of the humerus, radius, femur and tibia was 1.5-2.4-fold greater in the greyhounds than in the pit bulls. These bones from the pit bulls absorbed 1.9-2.6-fold more energy before failure than did those of the greyhounds. These differences between breeds were not observed in the long bones of the feet, metacarpals and metatarsals. Nevertheless, the results of this analysis suggest that selection for high-speed running is associated with the evolution of relatively stiff, brittle limb bones, whereas selection for fighting performance leads to the evolution of limb bones with relatively high resistance to failure.

  15. Hyoid bone fusion and bone density across the lifespan: prediction of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ellie; Austin, Diane; Werner, Helen M; Chuang, Ying Ji; Bersu, Edward; Vorperian, Houri K

    2016-06-01

    The hyoid bone supports the important functions of swallowing and speech. At birth, the hyoid bone consists of a central body and pairs of right and left lesser and greater cornua. Fusion of the greater cornua with the body normally occurs in adulthood, but may not occur at all in some individuals. The aim of this study was to quantify hyoid bone fusion across the lifespan, as well as assess developmental changes in hyoid bone density. Using a computed tomography imaging studies database, 136 hyoid bones (66 male, 70 female, ages 1-to-94) were examined. Fusion was ranked on each side and hyoid bones were classified into one of four fusion categories based on their bilateral ranks: bilateral distant non-fusion, bilateral non-fusion, partial or unilateral fusion, and bilateral fusion. Three-dimensional hyoid bone models were created and used to calculate bone density in Hounsfield units. Results showed a wide range of variability in the timing and degree of hyoid bone fusion, with a trend for bilateral non-fusion to decrease after age 20. Hyoid bone density was significantly lower in adult female scans than adult male scans and decreased with age in adulthood. In sex and age estimation models, bone density was a significant predictor of sex. Both fusion category and bone density were significant predictors of age group for adult females. This study provides a developmental baseline for understanding hyoid bone fusion and bone density in typically developing individuals. Findings have implications for the disciplines of forensics, anatomy, speech pathology, and anthropology.

  16. Molecular Genetic Studies of Bone Mechanical Strain and of Pedigrees with Very High Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    30-46 Col8a1 EphA3 Pit1 Increased in bone in response to mechanical loading. Involved in tooth development. Mediates bone formation by...osteoclast resorption . KO mice show increased bone density and cortical thickness. Involved in MEKK3 signaling and apoptosis. Important in...osteoclastogenesis. Involved in tooth development. Involved in angiogenesis of bone. Involved in skeletal development. 18 15-40 Lox Pdgfrb Adrb2 Mc4r

  17. Three-dimensional lumbar spine vertebral motion during running using indwelling bone pins.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Bruce A; Rozumalski, Adam; Swanson, Andrew N; Wervey, Roy; Dykes, Daryll C; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H

    2014-12-15

    Eight healthy volunteers participated in this observational study. Quantify 3-dimensional motions of the lumbar vertebrae during running via direct in vivo measurement and compare these motions to walking data from the same technique and running data from a skin-mounted technique. Lumbar spine motions in running are only reported in 1 series of articles using a skin-mounted technique subject to overestimation and only instrumented a single vertebra. Reflective marker triads were attached to Kirschner wires inserted into the spinous processes of L1-S1. Anatomic registration between each vertebra and attached triad was achieved using spinal computed tomographic scans. Skin-mounted trunk markers were used to assess thoracic motions. Subjects ran several times in a calibrated volume at self-selected speed while 3-dimensional motion data were collected. Lumbar spine flexion and pelvic rotation patterns in running were reversed compared with walking. Increased lumbar spine motions during running occurred at the most inferior segments. Thoracic spine, lumbar spine and pelvis exhibited significantly greater range of sagittal plane motion with running. The pelvis had significantly greater range of frontal plane motion, and the thoracic spine had significantly greater range of transverse plane motion with running. Skin-mounted studies reported as much as 4 times the motion range determined by the indwelling bone pin techniques, indicating that the skin motion relative to the underlying bone during running was greater than the motion of the underlying vertebrae. The lumbar spine acts as a distinct functional segment in the spine during running, chiefly contributing lateral flexion to balance the relative motions between the trunk and pelvis. The lumbar spine is also shown to oppose thoracic spine sagittal flexion. While the lumbar spine chiefly contributes to frontal plane motion, the thoracic spine contributes the majority of the transverse plane motion. N/A.

  18. Change of bone mineral density with valgus knee bracing.

    PubMed

    Katsuragawa, Y; Fukui, N; Nakamura, K

    1999-01-01

    We assessed the clinical knee score and bone mineral density of the proximal tibia in an attempt to evaluate the efficacy of valgus knee bracing. The knee score improved after 3 months, and increases in bone mineral density were seen more in the lateral tibial condyle than in the medial. These results suggest that the brace acts by transferring the forces across the knee joint from the medial to the lateral side.

  19. Chocolate consumption and bone density in older women.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Devine, Amanda; Burke, Valerie; Dick, Ian M; Prince, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    Nutrition is important for the development and maintenance of bone structure and for the prevention of osteoporosis and fracture. The relation of chocolate intake with bone has yet to be investigated. We investigated the relation of chocolate consumption with measurements of whole-body and regional bone density and strength. Randomly selected women aged 70-85 y (n=1460) were recruited from the general population to a randomized controlled trial of calcium supplementation and fracture risk. We present here a cross-sectional analysis of 1001 of these women. Bone density and strength were measured with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and quantitative ultrasonography. Frequency of chocolate intake was assessed with the use of a questionnaire and condensed into 3 categories: <1 time/wk, 1-6 times/wk, >or=1 time/d. Higher frequency of chocolate consumption was linearly related to lower bone density and strength (P<0.05). Daily (>or=1 times/d) consumption of chocolate, in comparison to <1 time/wk, was associated with a 3.1% lower whole-body bone density; with similarly lower bone density of the total hip, femoral neck, tibia, and heel; and with lower bone strength in the tibia and the heel (P<0.05, for all). Adjustment for covariates did not influence interpretation of the results. Older women who consume chocolate daily had lower bone density and strength. Additional cross-sectional and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these observations. Confirmation of these findings could have important implications for prevention of osteoporotic fracture.

  20. Bioactive silica based nanoparticles stimulate bone forming osteoblasts, suppress bone esorbing osteoclasts, and enhance bone mineral density in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beck, George R.; Ha, Shin-Woo; Camalier, Corinne E.; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Li, Yan; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Weitzmann, M. Neale

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes renewal throughout life by a process whereby osteoclasts resorb worn bone and osteoblasts synthesize new bone. Imbalances in bone turnover lead to bone loss and development of osteoporosis and ultimately fracture, a debilitating condition with high morbidity and mortality. Silica is a ubiquitous biocontaminant that is considered to have high biocompatibility. We report that silica nanoparticles mediate potent inhibitory effects on osteoclasts and stimulatory effects on osteoblasts in vitro. The mechanism of bioactivity is a consequence of an intrinsic capacity to antagonize activation of NF-κB, a signal transduction pathway required for osteoclastic bone resorption, but inhibitory to osteoblastic bone formation. We further demonstrate that silica nanoparticles promote a significant enhancement of bone mineral density (BMD) in mice in vivo providing a proof of principle for the potential application of silica nanoparticles as a pharmacological agent to enhance BMD and protect against bone fracture. PMID:22100753

  1. Evaluation of bone mineral density in chronic glue sniffers.

    PubMed

    Dündaröz, M Ruşen; Sarici, S Umit; Türkbay, Tümer; Baykal, Barboros; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Aydin, H Ibrahim; Gökçay, Erdal

    2002-01-01

    Although acute and chronic toxic effects of inhalant (glue) abuse have been well demonstrated on many organ systems, the effects on the skeletal system and bone mineral content of young people with this addiction have, to our knowledge, not yet been investigated by bone mineral density measurement. In the present study bone mineral density was measured by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry method in 25 children and adolescents with inhalant abuse and compared with that of a control group (n=30) to detect whether there was any delay in bone development or any decrease in bone mass. Chronological age, height and weight, serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels of the study group were not significantly different from those of the control group (p>0.05), whereas bone mineral density was significantly reduced in the study group (p=0.001). Teenagers with glue vapor abuse may carry an increased risk of future fracture even though the exact mechanism(s) responsible for the toxicitiy of glue vapor on bone metabolism remains to be determined. To ascertain the exact component of glue responsible for bone demineralisation may be of value in proposing a change in the composition of the glue. Education and/or rehabilitation programs currently have the greatest importance in preventing and overcoming the harmful effects of this public health problem which is so common in young children and adolescents.

  2. Diagnosing osteoporosis: A new perspective on estimating bone density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassia-Moura, R.; Ramos, A. D.; Sousa, C. S.; Nascimento, T. A. S.; Valença, M. M.; Coelho, L. C. B. B.; Melo, S. B.

    2007-07-01

    Osteoporosis may be characterized by low bone density and its significance is expected to grow as the population of the world both increases and ages. Our purpose here is to model human bone mineral density estimated through dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, using local volumetric distance spline interpolants. Interpolating the values means the construction of a function F(x,y,z) that mimics the relationship implied by the data (xi,yi,zi;fi), in such a way that F(xi,yi,zi)=fi, i=1,2,…,n, where x,y and z represent, respectively, age, weight and height. This strategy greatly enhances the ability to accurately express the patient's bone density measurements, with the potential to become a framework for bone densitometry in clinical practice. The usefulness of our model is demonstrated in 424 patients and the relevance of our results for diagnosing osteoporosis is discussed.

  3. The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density

    SciTech Connect

    Trzcinka-Ochocka, M.; Jakubowski, M.; Szymczak, W.; Janasik, B.; Brodzka, R.

    2010-04-15

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction ({beta}{sub 2}M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and {beta}{sub 2}M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone

  4. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism and bone mass.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, Nicholaos I; Blair, Harry C; Kypreos, Kyriakos E; Papachristou, Dionysios J

    2017-05-01

    It is well appreciated that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and bone physiology and pathology are tightly linked. Studies, primarily in mouse models, have shown that dysfunctional and/or disturbed HDL can affect bone mass through many different ways. Specifically, reduced HDL levels have been associated with the development of an inflammatory microenvironment that affects the differentiation and function of osteoblasts. In addition, perturbation in metabolic pathways of HDL favors adipoblastic differentiation and restrains osteoblastic differentiation through, among others, the modification of specific bone-related chemokines and signaling cascades. Increased bone marrow adiposity also deteriorates bone osteoblastic function and thus bone synthesis, leading to reduced bone mass. In this review, we present the current knowledge and the future directions with regard to the HDL-bone mass connection. Unraveling the molecular phenomena that underline this connection will promote the deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of bone-related pathologies, such as osteoporosis or bone metastasis, and pave the way toward the development of novel and more effective therapies against these conditions. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Plasma copper and bone mineral density in osteopenia: an indicator of bone mineral density in osteopenic females.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, M Anwar; Kemmler, W; Harsch, Igor; Watling, R J

    2009-01-01

    Copper concentrations in blood plasma have been determined in 25 osteopenic females using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. A high degree of correlations has been demonstrated between the copper concentrations in plasma and the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine as measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative computerized tomography. Results clearly indicate the involvement of copper in bone health and osteopenia. It is further suggested that plasma copper might be useful as a cheap and simple method indicative of bone mineral density in osteopenic postmenopausal females.

  6. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Chirchir, Habiba

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis) in a sample of N = 20 individuals (11 males and 9 females). pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm(3)) and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm(3)) displayed significantly greater (p < 0.01) trabecular bone density than other elements, whereas there was no significant variation among the rest of the elements (p > 0.01). The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p > 0.05) suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions.

  7. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chirchir, Habiba

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis) in a sample of N = 20 individuals (11 males and 9 females). pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm3) and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm3) displayed significantly greater (p < 0.01) trabecular bone density than other elements, whereas there was no significant variation among the rest of the elements (p > 0.01). The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p > 0.05) suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions. PMID:27148458

  8. Bone mineral density in estrogen-deficient young women.

    PubMed

    Popat, Vaishali B; Calis, Karim A; Vanderhoof, Vien H; Cizza, Giovanni; Reynolds, James C; Sebring, Nancy; Troendle, James F; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2009-07-01

    Osteoporosis primarily affects postmenopausal women. However, young women with estrogen deficiency also are at increased risk for low bone density. The aim of the study was to assess bone density and associated risk factors for reduced bone density in young, estrogen-deficient women using primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as the disease model. We conducted a cross-sectional study at a tertiary care research center. We studied women with POI (n = 442), concurrent controls (n = 70), and matched controls from NHANES III (n = 353). We measured bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Patients on average had 2-3% lower BMD at L1-L4, femoral neck, and total hip (P < 0.01 at all sites). The modifiable risk factors for BMD below the expected range for age (Z-score <-2) were: more than 1-yr delay in diagnosis of estrogen deficiency (P = 0.018), low (<32 ng/ml) vitamin D levels (P = 0.002), estrogen replacement nonadherence (P = 0.002), low calcium intake (P = 0.005), and lack of exercise (P = 0.005). As compared to Caucasians, African-American and Asian women with POI were 3.18 and 4.34 times more likely, respectively, to have Z-scores below -2 (P = < 0.0001 for both). Race was an overall risk factor, but on regression modeling, not an independent predictor of low bone density. Women with POI have lower bone density compared to regularly menstruating women. Compared to Caucasians, minority women with estrogen deficiency are more likely to have BMD below the expected range for age. This racial disparity appears to be related to a combined effect of several modifiable risk factors. Delay in diagnosis of POI also contributes to reduced bone density by delaying proper therapy.

  9. The effect of nutritional rickets on bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Thacher, Tom D; Fischer, Philip R; Pettifor, John M

    2014-11-01

    Nutritional rickets is caused by impaired mineralization of growing bone. The effect of nutritional rickets on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) has not been established. Our objective was to determine if aBMD is lower in children with active rickets than in healthy control children. We expected that the reduction in aBMD would vary between the radial and ulnar metaphyses near the growth plates and the proximal diaphyses. Case-control study. Primary care outpatient department of a teaching hospital in Jos, Nigeria. Nigerian children with radiographically-confirmed rickets were compared with a reference group of control children without rickets from the same community. Forearm bone density measurements were performed in all children with pDXA. Age, sex, and height-adjusted bone density parameters were compared between children with rickets and control subjects. A total of 264 children with active rickets (ages 13-120 months) and 660 control children (ages 11-123 months) were included. In multivariate analyses controlling for height, age, and gender, rickets was associated with a 4% greater bone area and 7% lower aBMD of the radial and ulnar metaphyses compared with controls (P < .001). The effects of rickets on the diaphyses of the radius and ulna were more pronounced with an 11% greater bone area, 21% lower aBMD, and 24% lower bone mineral apparent density than controls (P < .001). In children with rickets, aBMD values were unrelated to dairy product intake or serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Metaphyseal aBMD was positively associated with radiographic severity score, attributed to bone edge detection artifact by densitometry in active rickets. Rickets results in increased bone area and reduced aBMD, which are more pronounced in the diaphyseal than in the metaphyseal regions of the radius and ulna, consistent with secondary hyperparathyroidism, generalized osteoid expansion and impaired mineralization.

  10. Strontium ranelate normalizes bone mineral density in osteopenic patients.

    PubMed

    Malaise, Olivier; Bruyere, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2007-08-01

    To assess the capacity of strontium ranelate to restore normal bone mineral density (WHO definition: T-score >or=-1) in post-menopausal osteopenic women (T-score between -1 and -2.5) at baseline. Post-hoc analysis from SOTI and TROPOS studies of 1428 patients randomly assigned to receive either 2 g of strontium ranelate a day or placebo for three years. Bone mineral density was measured at baseline and each year for three years. Results were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. At lumbar spine, after one, two and three years of treatment with strontium ranelate, 26.4, 42.1 and 58.2% respectively of osteopenic patients normalized their bone mineral density, compared with 6.6, 8.9 and 11.9% in the placebo group (all p<0.001). At total hip, the percentage of patients normalizing their bone mineral density was 5.4, 10.0 and 19.6% in the strontium ranelate group and 1.8, 1.4 and 1.6% in the placebo one (all p<0.001). Strontium ranelate is able to normalize bone mineral density in a significant proportion of osteopenic patients after one, two and three years of treatment. The clinical relevance of these results should be confirmed by direct demonstration of the anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate in osteopenic patients.

  11. Bone-Density Tests: When You Need Them - and When You Don't

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos Lists Search Patient Resources Bone-Density Tests Bone-Density Tests When you need a test and ... FROM CONSUMER REPORTS How can you keep your bones strong? The following steps can help you build ...

  12. [Quantitative analysis of bone density in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Bagni, B; Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Bonaccorsi, G; Valpondi, V; Calisesi, M; Spanedda, R

    1990-10-01

    Bone lesions are the main sign of neoplastic proliferation of multiple myeloma (MM), a disseminated malignant disease which originates in, invades and replaces normal bone marrow. The most characteristic radiographic pattern is a focal lytic lesion, well-defined or "punched-out", generally with no surrounding bone reaction. The association is confirmed between MM and osteoporosis, as reduced bone density (osteopenia) and pathologic fractures (ribs, spine). This paper is aimed at evaluating the importance of osteopenia in both diagnosis and prognosis of MM. Eighteen patients affected with MM were examined with quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) for bone densitometry in lumbar spine and proximal femur. The patients (12 males and 6 females) were classified according to Durie's clinical criteria and to the radiographic patterns suggested by Merlini. The results indicate the patients with an advanced clinical stage (III) and scintigraphic expansion of bone marrow to have low densitometric values on both QCT and DEXA. There was substantial agreement between the 2 methods, but DEXA had a higher number of false positives. Instrumental diagnostic protocol may be thus planned as follows: 1) conventional radiography; 2) bone marrow scintigraphy; 3) bone densitometry of lumbar spine, with QCT. The patient is then to be followed with conventional and/or digital radiography in symptomatic locations, and with bone scintigraphy.

  13. Osteoprotective effect of hormone therapy on bone microarchitecture before impaired bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Hasan; Çırpan, Teksin; Terzi, Rabia; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Aktuğ, Hüseyin; Bilgin, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of hormone replacement therapy on bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats. Material and Methods: In the Animal Ethics Committee approved-study, the effect of treatment with 17 β-estradiol 50 μg/kg and medroxyprogesterone 2.5 mg/kg on bone architecture and bone mineral density in rats versus ovariectomized control rats over the course of 20 days were evaluated. Femoral and lumbar bone mineral density levels and morphometric measurements were performed. Results: There were no significant differences in the femoral and lumbar bone mineral density levels between the groups. In the intact control group, the trabecular structures were significantly superior to those in the other groups. Additionally, the osteoblast count was significantly higher while the osteoclast count was significantly lower than in all other groups. Two parameters reflecting trabecular bone microarchitecture, which include the trabecular count and the trabecular area, demonstrated significant improvement in the hormone replacement group when compared to the ovariectomized control group. In the hormone replacement groups, the osteoblast count was significantly higher while the osteoclast count was significantly lower than in the ovariectomized control group. Conclusion: We suggest that offering estrogen alone or in combination with progestogen can be a beneficial approach in preventing early postmenopausal bone loss regardless of bone mineral density. PMID:24592053

  14. Quantitative evaluation of bone density using the Hounsfield index.

    PubMed

    Shapurian, Tannaz; Damoulis, Petros D; Reiser, Gary M; Griffin, Terrence J; Rand, William M

    2006-01-01

    The primary aims of this retrospective study were to: (1) evaluate bone quality in different segments of the edentulous jaw and correlate it with demographic data and (2) establish a quantitative and objective assessment of bone quality based on the Hounsfield scale. One hundred one randomly selected computerized tomographic (CT) scans were used for the analysis. Edentulous segments ranging from 10 to 30 mm were selected for evaluation, and the findings were analyzed and correlated to demographics. Implant recipient sites were evaluated visually for bone classification by 2 independent examiners. The same sites were subsequently evaluated digitally using the Hounsfield scale, and the results were correlated with the visual classification. The 4 quadrants of the mouth displayed Hounsfield unit (HU) values ranging from -240 HU to 1,159 HU. The highest unit/mean density value (559 +/- 208 HU) was found in the anterior mandible, followed by 517 +/- 177 HU for the anterior maxilla, 333 +/- 199 HU for the posterior maxilla, and 321 +/- 132 HU for the posterior mandible. There was no association between the Hounsfield value and density and age or gender. When subjective bone quality was correlated to Hounsfield index findings, only the relationship between HU and type 4 bone was found to be significant. Knowledge of the Hounsfield value as a quantitative measurement of bone density can be helpful as a diagnostic tool. It can provide the implant surgeon with an objective assessment of bone density, which could result in modification of surgical techniques or extended healing time, especially in situations where poor bone quality is suspected.

  15. [Effects on rats' bone mineral density and bone biomechanics by suspensory simulated weightlessness and removing suspension].

    PubMed

    Tong, Hai-ying; Hu, Su-min; Zhou, Peng; Fu, Qian; Li, Jin; Gao, Xue-min; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2008-04-01

    To study the effects on rats' bone mineral density and bone biomechanics by suspensory simulated weightlessness and removing suspension. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into two groups randomly as control group and model group. Suspend the model group rats for 14 days, then remove suspension and continue to feed for another 14 days. Feed control group rats for 28 days. Detect the bone mineral density (BMD) in vivo of cranial bone, second thoracic vertebra, fourth lumbar vertebra, pelvis, right radioulna and right femoral bone of each group at the 14th day. At the 28th day,execute all the rats and take out of right femoral bone and fourth lumbar vertebra for detecting BMD and the intensity of biomechanics. At the 14th day in experiment, being compared with control group,the BMD of femoral bone, pelvis and lumbar vertebra in model group decreased significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.01) and the change of BMD of cranial bone, thoracic vertebra and radioulna in model group was not remarkable (P > 0.05). At the 28th day in experiment, the BMD of femoral bone and lumbar vertebra, the maximal load of femoral bone decreased significantly in model group as compared with control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.01). BMD in vive body showed that suspensory simulated weightlessness for 14 days could cause disorder of bone metabolism and remarkable mineral loss of weight bearing bone, even BMD and biomechanical intensity of weight bearing bone decrease obviously when removing suspension for 14 days. The results suggest that the disorder of bone metabolism could not be recovered in short time.

  16. Challenges of Estimating Fracture Risk with DXA: Changing Concepts About Bone Strength and Bone Density.

    PubMed

    Licata, Angelo A

    2015-07-01

    Bone loss due to weightlessness is a significant concern for astronauts' mission safety and health upon return to Earth. This problem is monitored with bone densitometry (DXA), the clinical tool used to assess skeletal strength. DXA has served clinicians well in assessing fracture risk and has been particularly useful in diagnosing osteoporosis in the elderly postmenopausal population for which it was originally developed. Over the past 1-2 decades, however, paradoxical and contradictory findings have emerged when this technology was widely employed in caring for diverse populations unlike those for which it was developed. Although DXA was originally considered the surrogate marker for bone strength, it is now considered one part of a constellation of factors-described collectively as bone quality-that makes bone strong and resists fracturing, independent of bone density. These characteristics are beyond the capability of routine DXA to identify, and as a result, DXA can be a poor prognosticator of bone health in many clinical scenarios. New clinical tools are emerging to make measurement of bone strength more accurate. This article reviews the historical timeline of bone density measurement (dual X-ray absorptiometry), expands upon the clinical observations that modified the relationship of DXA and bone strength, discusses some of the new clinical tools to predict fracture risk, and highlights the challenges DXA poses in the assessment of fracture risk in astronauts.

  17. Bone mineral density in children and adolescents with juvenile diabetes: selective measurement of bone mineral density of trabecular and cortical bone using peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lettgen, B; Hauffa, B; Möhlmann, C; Jeken, C; Reiners, C

    1995-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) was studied in 21 children and adolescents with type I diabetes and in age- and sex-matched healthy controls. BMD was selectively measured in trabecular and total bone using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Cortical bone density was calculated. There was a decrease of trabecular bone density (-18.9%, p < 0.01), total bone density (-9.0%, NS) and cortical bone density (-5.1%, NS) in diabetes. Trabecular bone density was inversely correlated with the duration of diabetes and the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1) (r = -0.48, p = 0.027 and r = -0.63, p = 0.002, respectively). Total BMD correlated inversely with HbA1 (r = -0.52, p = 0.017). pQCT allows the selective measurement of metabolically active trabecular bone where changes of mineralization first occur. We conclude that pQCT is a useful method for investigating BMD in diabetes.

  18. Is There an Association Between Bone Mineral Density and Mammographic Density? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Min; Holley, Susan; Appleton, Catherine; Toriola, Adetunji T

    2017-04-01

    Both bone mineral density (BMD) and breast density are related to reproductive hormone levels. This suggests that BMD and breast density could be meaningfully associated, and serve as surrogate markers for breast cancer risk. However, few studies have investigated the association of BMD with percent mammographic density, making it difficult to draw meaningful conclusions. We conducted a systematic review of studies published in electronic databases till April 2016 using the following search terms: "bone density," "bone mineral density," "mammographic breast density," "breast density," and "mammographic density." We identified 203 articles, of which 8 met the inclusion criteria for this review. BMD does not appear to be associated with percent mammographic density. BMD at the spine was weakly positively associated with percent mammographic density among postmenopausal women who were not hormone users, while BMD at the hip and legs was positively associated with percent mammographic density among premenopausal women. On the other hand, one study reported an inverse association of BMD at the spine and hip with percent mammographic density among perimenopausal women. In this review, we found no evidence of an association between BMD and percent mammographic density.

  19. Coregistered photoacoustic and ultrasonic signatures of early bone density variations.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the application of backscattered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) signals for assessment of bone structure and density variations. Both methods were applied in the frequency-domain, employing linear frequency modulation chirps. A near-IR laser (800 nm) was used for inducing the PA signal. The backscattered pressure waves were detected with a 2.2-MHz US transducer. Experiments were focused on detection and evaluation of PA and US signals from in-vitro animal and human bones with cortical and trabecular sublayers. It was shown that PA signals can be detected as deep as a few millimeters below trabecular and cortical layers. The occurrence of multiple scattering was demonstrated in PA detected signals from cancellous bone. Osteoporotic changes in the bone were simulated by using a very mild demineralization ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid solution. Changes in the time-domain signals as well as integrated backscattering spectra were compared for the samples before and after demineralization. The results demonstrated the sensitivity of PA to variations in bone minerals. In comparison to PA, US was capable of generating detectable signals from deeper bone sublayers (few centimeters). However, while US signal variations with changes in the cortical layer were insignificant, PA proved to be sensitive even to minor variations of the cortical bone density.

  20. WNT16 Influences Bone Mineral Density, Cortical Bone Thickness, Bone Strength, and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Joel; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Bergström, Ulrica; Kähönen, Mika; Leo, Paul J.; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Viikari, Jorma; Ladouceur, Martin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Prince, Richard L.; Sievanen, Harri; Leslie, William D.; Mellström, Dan; Eisman, John A.; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Goltzman, David; Hanley, David A.; Jones, Graeme; St. Pourcain, Beate; Xiao, Yongjun; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Reid, Ian R.; Ring, Susan M.; Sambrook, Philip N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Dennison, Elaine M.; Kemp, John P.; Danoy, Patrick; Sayers, Adrian; Wilson, Scott G.; Nethander, Maria; McCloskey, Eugene; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Eastell, Richard; Liu, Jeff; Spector, Tim; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Brommage, Robert; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Brown, Matthew A.; Ohlsson, Claes; Richards, J. Brent; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT) and bone mineral density (BMD) by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466) located in the WNT16 gene (7q31), associated with CBT (effect size of −0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2×10−9). This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg), also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (−0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3×10−12, and −0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2×10−15, respectively). Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3×10−9), with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9×10−6 and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2×10−6). We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16−/− mice had 27% (P<0.001) thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%–61% (6.5×10−13bone strength, and risk of fracture. PMID:22792071

  1. WNT16 influences bone mineral density, cortical bone thickness, bone strength, and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hou-Feng; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma; Evans, David M; Eriksson, Joel; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Bergström, Ulrica; Kähönen, Mika; Leo, Paul J; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Viikari, Jorma; Ladouceur, Martin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Prince, Richard L; Sievanen, Harri; Leslie, William D; Mellström, Dan; Eisman, John A; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Goltzman, David; Hanley, David A; Jones, Graeme; St Pourcain, Beate; Xiao, Yongjun; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Reid, Ian R; Ring, Susan M; Sambrook, Philip N; Karlsson, Magnus; Dennison, Elaine M; Kemp, John P; Danoy, Patrick; Sayers, Adrian; Wilson, Scott G; Nethander, Maria; McCloskey, Eugene; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Eastell, Richard; Liu, Jeff; Spector, Tim; Mitchell, Braxton D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Brommage, Robert; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Brown, Matthew A; Ohlsson, Claes; Richards, J Brent; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT) and bone mineral density (BMD) by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466) located in the WNT16 gene (7q31), associated with CBT (effect size of -0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2 × 10(-9)). This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg), also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (-0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3 × 10(-12), and -0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2 × 10(-15), respectively). Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3 × 10(-9)), with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9 × 10(-6) and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2 × 10(-6)). We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16(-/-) mice had 27% (P<0.001) thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%-61% (6.5 × 10(-13)bone strength, and risk of fracture.

  2. The influence of vegan diet on bone mineral density and biochemical bone turnover markers.

    PubMed

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Gajewska, Joanna; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Franek, Edward; Laskowska-Klita, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarian diets can be healthy when they are well balanced and if a variety of foods is consumed. However, elimination of animal products from the diet (vegan diets) decreases the intake of some essential nutrients and may influence the bone metabolism. This is especially important in childhood and adolescence, when growth and bone turnover are most intensive. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of vegan diet on bone density (BMD) density and serum concentrations of bone metabolism markers. We examined a family on vegan diet which consisted of parents and two children. Dietary constituents were analysed using a nutritional program. Total and regional BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Concentrations of calcium and phosphate in serum obtained from fasting patients were determined by colorimetric methods, 25-hydroxyvitamin D by the chemiluminescence method and bone turnover markers by specific enzyme immunoassays. In studied vegans, the dietary intake of phosphate was adequate while calcium and vitamin D were below the recommended range. Concentrations of calcium, phosphate and bone turnover markers in the serum of all subjects were within the physiological range, but 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was low. Age-matched Z-score total BMD was between -0.6 and 0.3 in adults, however in children it was lower (-0.9 and -1.0). Z-score BMD lumbar spine (L2-L4) was between -0.9 to -1.9 in parents and -1.5 to -1.7 in children. Our results suggest that an inadequate dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D may impair the bone turnover rate and cause a decrease in bone mineral density in vegans. The parameters of bone density and bone metabolism should be monitored in vegans, especially children, in order to prevent bone abnormalities.

  3. Can Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assess Bone Mineral Density?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mineral density distribution of bone tissue is altered by active bone modeling and remodeling due to bone complications including bone disease and implantation surgery. Clinical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been examined whether it can assess oral bone mineral density (BMD) in patient. It has been indicated that CBCT has disadvantages of higher noise and lower contrast than conventional medical computed tomography (CT) systems. On the other hand, it has advantages of a relatively lower cost and radiation dose but higher spatial resolution. However, the reliability of CBCT based mineral density measurement has not yet been fully validated. Thus, the objectives of this review are to discuss 1) why assessment of BMD distribution is important and 2) whether the clinical CBCT can be used as a potential tool to measure the BMD. Brief descriptions of image artefacts associated with assessment of gray value, which has been used to account for mineral density, in CBCT images are provided. Techniques to correct local and conversion errors in obtaining the gray values in CBCT images are also introduced. This review can be used as a quick reference for users who may encounter these errors during analysis of CBCT images. PMID:25006568

  4. Prediction of osteoporotic fractures by postural instability and bone density.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T; Sambrook, P; Kelly, P; Jones, G; Lord, S; Freund, J; Eisman, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the utility of risk factors such as bone mineral density, lifestyle, and postural stability in the prediction of osteoporotic fractures. DESIGN--Longitudinal, epidemiological, and population based survey. SETTING--City of Dubbo, New South Wales. SUBJECTS--All residents of Dubbo aged > or = 60 on 1 January 1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Incidence of fracture for individual subjects. RESULTS--The overall incidence of atraumatic fractures in men and women was 1.9% and 3.1% per annum respectively. The predominant sites of fracture were hip (18.9%), distal radius (18.5%), ribs and humerus (11.9% in each case), and ankle and foot (9.1% and 6.6% respectively). Major predictors of fractures in men and women were femoral neck bone mineral density, body sway, and quadriceps strength. Age, years since menopause, height, weight, and lifestyle factors were also correlated with bone mineral density and body sway and hence were indirect risk factors for fracture. Discriminant function analysis correctly identified 96% and 93% (sensitivities 88% and 81%) of men and women, respectively, who subsequently developed atraumatic fractures. Predictions based on this model indicated that a woman with a bone mineral density in the lowest quartile in the hip together with high body sway had a 8.4% probability of fracture per annum. This represented an almost 14-fold increase in risk of fracture compared with a woman in the highest bone mineral density quartile with low postural sway. An individual with all three predictors in the "highest risk" quartile had a 13.1% risk of fracture per annum. CONCLUSIONS--Bone mineral density, body sway, and muscle strength are independent and powerful synergistic predictors of fracture incidence. PMID:8251809

  5. Bone density in elite judoists and effects of weight cycling on bone metabolic balance.

    PubMed

    Prouteau, Stephanie; Pelle, Anne; Collomp, Katia; Benhamou, Laurent; Courteix, Daniel

    2006-04-01

    Weight cycling has been shown to exert negative effects on bone metabolism and bone mass, whereas weight-bearing activity is positively associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Bone health in judoists and effects of weight cycling on bone metabolism have not previously been investigated. To examine potential disrupter and stimulators of bone integrity, this study analyzed bone parameters at baseline and the effects of the first weight cycle of the season on bone metabolic status in 48 male and female elite judoists. Body composition and lumbar, femoral, and total body BMD were evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Cortisol, osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), and bone uncoupling index (UI) were measured in judoists at normal body weight, after weight reduction, and after regaining weight. As a comparison, a control group of moderately active students was included at baseline. Training, menstrual status, and calcium intake were assessed by questionnaires. EUweighted judoists displayed high BMD and an increased rate of bone formation. Precompetitive weight loss averaged 4 +/- 0.3% of body weight and induced an acute rise in cortisol (81%, P < 0.05) and CTx (33%, P < 0.0001), with a metabolic imbalance in favor of bone resorption. A 4 +/- 0.5% weight regain restored a positive UI in favor of bone formation. Metabolic responses were not dependent on gender. BMD was unaltered by weight cycling. Increased bone formation rate pertaining to judo athletes lent protection from alterations in bone metabolic balance associated with weight cycling. This observation suggests that powerful osteogenic stimuli provided by judo's unique biomechanical environment may help prevent bone loss associated with weight loss.

  6. [Effect of vitamin D on bone mineral density; bone strength and fracture prevention].

    PubMed

    Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Atsushi

    2006-07-01

    Although vitamin D improves bone mineral density 0.66% per year at spine site and 1.23% per year at femoral neck site, respectively, vitamin D is useful for preventing osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures in the elderly. Vitamin D affects microstructure and bone turnover for osteoporotic bone to become strong bone. And vitamin D improves muscle function to prevent falls in the elderly. Moreover the appropriate amount and treatment target of vitamin D must be considered for the elderly with many different diseases.

  7. Bone mineral density, Bone mineral contents, MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels in Human Mandible and alveolar bone: Simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep; Catalina, Maria

    Exposure to microgravity has been associated with several physiological changes in astronauts and cosmonauts, including an osteoporosis-like loss of bone mass. It has been reported that head-down tilt bed-rest studies mimic many of the observations seen in flights. There is no study on the correlation on effects of mandibular bone and alveolar bone loss in both sex in simulating microgravity. This study was designed to determine the Bone mineral density and GCF MMP-8 MMP-9 in normal healthy subject of both sexes in simulated microgravity condition of -6 head-down-tilt (HDT) bed rest. The subjects of this investigation were 10 male and 10 female volunteers participated in three weeks 6 HDT bed-rest exposure. The Bone density and bone mineral contents were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry before and in simulated microgravity. The GCF MMP-8 MMP-8 were measured by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (Human Quantikine MMP-8,-9 ELISA kit). The bone mineral density and bone mineral contents levels were significantly decreased in simulated microgravity condition in both genders, although insignificantly loss was higher in females as compared to males. MMP-8 MMP-9 levels were significantly increased in simulated microgravity as compared to normal condition although insignificantly higher in females as compared to males. Further study is required on large samples size including all factors effecting in simulated microgravity and microgravity. Keys words-Simulated microgravity condition, head-down-tilt, Bone loss, MMP-8, MMP-9, Bone density, Bone mineral contents.

  8. Brief Report: HIV Infection Is Associated With Worse Bone Material Properties, Independently of Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Robert; Molina, Daniel; Villar-García, Judit; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Nogués, Xavier; González-Mena, Alicia; Guelar, Ana; Trenchs-Rodríguez, Marta; Herrera-Fernández, Sabina; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Knobel, Hernando

    2016-07-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected individuals has been documented in an increasing number of studies. However, it is not clear whether it is the infection itself or the treatment that causes bone impairment. Microindentation measures bone material strength (Bone Material Strength index) directly. We recruited 85 patients, 50 infected with HIV and 35 controls. Median Bone Material Strength index was 84.5 (interquartile range 83-87) in HIV-infected patients and 90 (88.5-93) in controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences in BMD between cases and controls at any of the sites examined (total hip, femoral neck, and lumbar spine). HIV infection is associated with bone damage, independently of BMD.

  9. Preliminary report: effect of adrenal androgen and estrogen on bone maturation and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Arisaka, O; Hoshi, M; Kanazawa, S; Numata, M; Nakajima, D; Kanno, S; Negishi, M; Nishikura, K; Nitta, A; Imataka, M; Kuribayashi, T; Kano, K

    2001-04-01

    To clarify the independent physiological roles of adrenal androgen and estrogen on bone growth, we compared the lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in prepubertal girls with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) (n = 17) and girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) (n = 18). When BMD was analyzed according to chronologic age, no significant differences were found between CPP and CAH patients. However, when adjusted to bone age, BMD was statistically higher in CAH than in CPP subjects. This finding suggests that adrenal androgen, as well as estrogen, plays an important role in increasing BMD. Adrenal androgen may act on bone not only as androgen, but as estrogen after having been metabolized into an aromatized bone-active compound in peripheral tissues, such as bone and fat. Therefore, adrenal androgen may have a more important role in increasing BMD than previously realized.

  10. A semi-mechanistic model of bone mineral density and bone turnover based on a circular model of bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    van Schaick, Erno; Zheng, Jenny; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Gieschke, Ronald; Jacqmin, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Development of novel therapies for bone diseases can benefit from mathematical models that predict drug effect on bone remodeling biomarkers. Therefore, a bone cycle model (BCM) was developed that takes into consideration the concept of the basic multicellular unit and the dynamic equilibrium of bone remodeling. The model is a closed form cyclical model with four compartments representing resorption, formation, primary mineralization, and secondary mineralization. Equations describing the time course of bone turnover biomarkers were developed using the flow rate of bone cycle units (BCU) between the compartments or the amount of BCU in each compartment. A disease progression model representing bone loss in osteoporosis, a vitamin D and calcium supplementation (placebo) model, and a drug model for antiresorptive treatments were added to the model. Initial model parameter values were derived from published bone turnover data. The BCM accurately described biomarker-time profiles in postmenopausal women receiving either placebo or bisphosphonate treatment. The slow continual increase in bone mineral density (BMD) observed after 1 year of treatment was accurately described when changes in bone turnover were combined with increases in mineralization. For this purpose, the secondary mineralization compartment was replaced by three catenary chain compartments representing increasing mineral content. The refined BCM satisfactorily predicted biomarker profiles after long-term (10-year) bisphosphonate treatment. Furthermore, the model successfully described individual bone turnover markers and BMD results following treatment with denosumab in postmenopausal women. Analyses with this model could be used to optimize dosing regimens and to predict effects of novel osteoporotic treatments.

  11. Bone contact forces on the distal tibia during the stance phase of running.

    PubMed

    Sasimontonkul, Siriporn; Bay, Brian K; Pavol, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Although the tibia is a common site of stress fractures in runners, the loading of the tibia during running is not well understood. An integrated experimental and modeling approach was therefore used to estimate the bone contact forces acting on the distal end of the tibia during the stance phase of running, and the contributions of external and internal sources to these forces. Motion capture and force plate data were recorded for 10 male runners as they ran at 3.5-4 m/s. From these data, the joint reaction force (JRF), muscle forces, and bone contact force on the tibia were computed at the ankle using inverse dynamics and optimization methods. The distal end of the tibia was compressed and sheared posteriorly throughout most of stance, with respective peak forces of 9.00+/-1.13 and 0.57+/-0.18 body weights occurring during mid stance. Internal muscle forces were the primary source of tibial compression, whereas the JRF was the primary source of tibial shear due to the forward inclination of the leg relative to the external ground reaction force. The muscle forces and JRF both acted to compress the tibia, but induced tibial shear forces in opposing directions during stance, magnifying tibial compression and reducing tibial shear. The superposition of the peak compressive and posterior shear forces at mid stance may contribute to stress fractures in the posterior face of the tibia. The implications are that changes in running technique could potentially reduce stress fracture risk.

  12. Effect of carbohydrate feeding on the bone metabolic response to running.

    PubMed

    Sale, Craig; Varley, Ian; Jones, Thomas W; James, Ruth M; Tang, Jonathan C Y; Fraser, William D; Greeves, Julie P

    2015-10-01

    Bone resorption is increased after running, with no change in bone formation. Feeding during exercise might attenuate this increase, preventing associated problems for bone. This study investigated the immediate and short-term bone metabolic responses to carbohydrate (CHO) feeding during treadmill running. Ten men completed two 7-day trials, once being fed CHO (8% glucose immediately before, every 20 min during, and immediately after exercise at a rate of 0.7 g CHO · kg body mass(-1) · h(-1)) and once being fed placebo (PBO). On day 4 of each trial, participants completed a 120-min treadmill run at 70% of maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2 max). Blood was taken at baseline (BASE), immediately after exercise (EE), after 60 (R1) and 120 (R2) min of recovery, and on three follow-up days (FU1-FU3). Markers of bone resorption [COOH-terminal telopeptide region of collagen type 1 (β-CTX)] and formation [NH2-terminal propeptides of procollagen type 1 (P1NP)] were measured, along with osteocalcin (OC), parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium (ACa), phosphate, glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin, cortisol, leptin, and osteoprotogerin (OPG). Area under the curve was calculated in terms of the immediate (BASE, EE, R1, and R2) and short-term (BASE, FU1, FU2, and FU3) responses to exercise. β-CTX, P1NP, and IL-6 responses to exercise were significantly lower in the immediate postexercise period with CHO feeding compared with PBO (β-CTX: P = 0.028; P1NP: P = 0.021; IL-6: P = 0.036), although there was no difference in the short-term response (β-CTX: P = 0.856; P1NP: P = 0.721; IL-6: P = 0.327). No other variable was significantly affected by CHO feeding during exercise. We conclude that CHO feeding during exercise attenuated the β-CTX and P1NP responses in the hours but not days following exercise, indicating an acute effect of CHO feeding on bone turnover.

  13. Bone density, strength, and formation in adult cathepsin K (-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Pennypacker, B; Shea, M; Liu, Q; Masarachia, P; Saftig, P; Rodan, S; Rodan, G; Kimmel, D

    2009-02-01

    Cathepsin K (CatK) is a cysteine protease expressed predominantly in osteoclasts, that plays a prominent role in degrading Type I collagen. Growing CatK null mice have osteopetrosis associated with a reduced ability to degrade bone matrix. Bone strength and histomorphometric endpoints in young adult CatK null mice aged more than 10 weeks have not been studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe bone mass, strength, resorption, and formation in young adult CatK null mice. In male and female wild-type (WT), heterozygous, and homozygous CatK null mice (total N=50) aged 19 weeks, in-life double fluorochrome labeling was performed. Right femurs and lumbar vertebral bodies 1-3 (LV) were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). The trabecular region of the femur and the cortical region of the tibia were evaluated by histomorphometry. The left femur and sixth lumbar vertebral body were tested biomechanically. CatK (-/-) mice show higher BMD at the central and distal femur. Central femur ultimate load was positively influenced by genotype, and was positively correlated with both cortical area and BMC. Lumbar vertebral body ultimate load was also positively correlated to BMC. Genotype did not influence the relationship of ultimate load to BMC in either the central femur or vertebral body. CatK (-/-) mice had less lamellar cortical bone than WT mice. Higher bone volume, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number were observed at the distal femur in CatK (-/-) mice. Smaller marrow cavities were also present at the central femur of CatK (-/-) mice. CatK (-/-) mice exhibited greater trabecular mineralizing surface, associated with normal volume-based formation of trabecular bone. Adult CatK (-/-) mice have higher bone mass in both cortical and cancellous regions than WT mice. Though no direct measures of bone resorption rate were made, the higher cortical bone quantity is associated with a smaller

  14. Difference in Bone Mineral Density between Young versus Midlife Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Sonya; Anderson, Pamela S.; Benton, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older age is a risk factor for low bone mineral density (BMD). Older women have been found to have lower BMD than younger women. Recent trends for decreased calcium consumption and physical activity may place younger women at greater risk than previously anticipated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age…

  15. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  16. Difference in Bone Mineral Density between Young versus Midlife Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Sonya; Anderson, Pamela S.; Benton, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older age is a risk factor for low bone mineral density (BMD). Older women have been found to have lower BMD than younger women. Recent trends for decreased calcium consumption and physical activity may place younger women at greater risk than previously anticipated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age…

  17. Onion consumption and bone density in laying hens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Onion and its flavonoid component, quercetin, are associated with increased bone density in humans, rabbits, and rodents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a similar effect of onion on laying hens. Thirty-two Hy-line W36 White Leghorn hens at 30 weeks of age were randomly d...

  18. Evaluation of milk basic protein supplementation on bone density and bone metabolism in Chinese young women.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xian-Rong; Xu, Rui; Ma, Le; Li, Ying; Wang, Ming-Fang

    2009-08-01

    Milk is a good source of bioavailable calcium compared with other foods. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that milk whey protein, especially its basic protein fraction (milk basic protein, MBP), contains several components capable of promoting bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of MBP on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism of healthy young women. Eighty-four healthy young women were randomly assigned to three groups: control group, whole milk group or MBP group treated with milk containing 40 mg MBP for 8 months. The bone mineral density of total body, the lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 and the left forearm of each subject were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) at 0 and 8 months of treatment. Serum indexes of bone metabolism were measured at 0, 3, 6 and 8 months. Eighty-one subjects who completed the study in accordance with the protocol were included in the analysis. Total BMD in all groups significantly increased compared with baseline values. However, no significant difference on the mean rate of gain of total BMD was observed among the MBP group (2.19%), the whole milk group (2.63%) and the control group (1.61%). Serum cross-linked N-teleopeptides of type-I collagen (NTx) in MBP group at 8 months and in whole milk group at 6 months were significantly decreased from baseline. There were no significant differences between whole milk group and MBP group; however, after combining the milk groups, NTx had significantly decreased from baseline. No significant increase was observed in serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) in both whole milk group and MBP group. No significant effect of MBP on bone mineral density and bone metabolism was observed, but milk supplementation was effective in suppressing bone resorption.

  19. Effect of Probiotics Supplementation on Bone Mineral Content and Bone Mass Density

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Karimi, Golgis; Erfani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A few studies in animals and a study in humans showed a positive effect of probiotic on bone metabolism and bone mass density. Most of the investigated bacteria were Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium . The positive results of the probiotics were supported by the high content of dietary calcium and the high amounts of supplemented probiotics. Some of the principal mechanisms include (1) increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids; (2) producing phytase enzyme by bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate; (3) reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density; (4) hydrolysing glycoside bond food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria. These mechanisms lead to increase bioavailability of the minerals. In conclusion, probiotics showed potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms with outstanding results in the animal model. The results also showed that postmenopausal women who suffered from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bioavailability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density. PMID:24587733

  20. Effect of probiotics supplementation on bone mineral content and bone mass density.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Karimi, Golgis; Erfani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A few studies in animals and a study in humans showed a positive effect of probiotic on bone metabolism and bone mass density. Most of the investigated bacteria were Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. The positive results of the probiotics were supported by the high content of dietary calcium and the high amounts of supplemented probiotics. Some of the principal mechanisms include (1) increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids; (2) producing phytase enzyme by bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate; (3) reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density; (4) hydrolysing glycoside bond food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria. These mechanisms lead to increase bioavailability of the minerals. In conclusion, probiotics showed potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms with outstanding results in the animal model. The results also showed that postmenopausal women who suffered from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bioavailability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density.

  1. Effect of fasting versus feeding on the bone metabolic response to running.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan P R; Sale, Craig; Greeves, Julie P; Casey, Anna; Dutton, John; Fraser, William D

    2012-12-01

    Individuals often perform exercise in the fasted state, but the effects on bone metabolism are not currently known. We compared the effect of an overnight fast with feeding a mixed meal on the bone metabolic response to treadmill running. Ten, physically-active males aged 28 ± 4y (mean ±SD) completed two, counterbalanced, 8d trials. After 3d on a standardised diet, participants performed 60 min of treadmill running at 65% VO(2max) on Day 4 following an overnight fast (FAST) or a standardised breakfast (FED). Blood samples were collected at baseline, before and during exercise, for 3h after exercise, and on four consecutive follow-up days (FU1-FU4). Plasma/serum were analysed for the c-terminal telopeptide region of collagen type 1 (β-CTX), n-terminal propeptides of procollagen type 1 (P1NP), osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium, phosphate, osteoprotegerin (OPG), cortisol, leptin and ghrelin. Only the β-CTX response was significantly affected by feeding. Pre-exercise concentrations decreased more in FED compared with FAST (47% vs 26%, P<0.001) but increased during exercise in both groups and were not significantly different from baseline at 1h post-exercise. At 3h post-exercise, concentrations were decreased (33%, P<0.001) from baseline in FAST and significantly lower (P<0.001) than in FED. P1NP and PTH increased, and OC decreased during exercise. Bone markers were not significantly different from baseline on FU1-FU4. Fasting had only a minor effect on the bone metabolic response to subsequent acute, endurance exercise, reducing the duration of the increase in β-CTX during early recovery, but having no effect on changes in bone formation markers. The reduced duration of the β-CTX response with fasting was not fully explained by changes in PTH, OPG, leptin or ghrelin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantification of bone mineral density to define osteoporosis in rat.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M; Mandal, S K; Sengupta, S; Arshad, M; Singh, M M

    2008-05-01

    The diagnosis of osteoporosis centers on assessment of bone mass and quality. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines to assess bone status in laboratory animals and unsuitability of use of T-/Z-scores meant for clinical application in animal studies, most investigators involved in new drug research and development employ clinical biomarkers and kits to assess bone turnover rate and portray change in bone mineral density (BMD) as percentage of increase/decrease, making comparative assessment of the effect highly impractical. This study proposes threshold boundaries of BMD (rT-score) in colony-bred Sprague-Dawley rats, distinct from those used clinically. Boundaries were obtained keeping fixed Type-I error (alpha=0.025). Femur neck was considered best for defining bone status using BMD measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Findings demonstrate that BMD-1.96 and <-0.80 rT-score as osteopenia. Performance of boundaries to ascertain bone status was examined through simulation under different physiological/ hormonal states viz. estrogen deficiency, ageing, estrus cycle, pregnancy, and lactation. The Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.98 obtained using BMD of femur neck, being close to unity, shows excellent ability of the proposed rT-score to effectively identify osteoporosis. Further studies using certain hierarchical measures of bone quality such as histomorphometry, mechanical testing etc. could supplement these findings. Since, unlike humans, most laboratory animals including rats only exhibit osteopenia and do not fracture their bones, the proposed thresholds are intended to serve as categorical tools to define bone quality and not to predict fracture risk.

  3. Bone loading during young adulthood predicts bone mineral density in physically active, middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert S; Hinton, Pamela S

    2010-06-01

    Physical activity during growth induces skeletal adaptations that increase bone strength; however, it remains unclear whether these benefits persist into middle age. We sought to determine if bone loading during adolescence (ages 13-18 years) or young adulthood (ages 19-29 years) in men is associated with greater bone mineral density (BMD) and reduced risk of low bone density in adulthood. We also sought to determine if participation in high-impact activities (ie, those that produce a ground reaction force [GRF] > 4 times the individual's body weight] during adolescence and/or young adulthood has a lasting positive effect on adult BMD. Eighty-six, apparently healthy, physically active men (aged 30-60 years) participated in this cross-sectional study. Bone loading during adolescence, young adulthood, and adulthood were calculated based on GRFs of the reported physical activities. Whole body, lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck BMD were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Multiple linear regression was used to examine relationships between BMD and bone loading, including body weight and/or age as covariates; logistic regression was used to predict low bone density for age. Participants were grouped based on participation in high-impact activity (never [n = 42], adolescence only [n = 19], or both adolescence and young adulthood [n=23]), and BMDs were compared. Bone loading during young adulthood, but not adolescence, was a significant positive predictor of adult BMD, with the full models explaining 33.4%, 31.7%, 44.6%, and 50.6% of the variance in whole body, lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck BMD, respectively. Ten participants (11.6%) had low bone density for age based on z scores of the hip or spine. Body weight and lean body mass, but not bone loading, were associated with reduced risk of low bone density for age. Individuals who participated in high-impact activity during both adolescence and young adulthood had greater BMD at all

  4. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  5. Quantitative assessment of interradicular bone density in the maxilla and mandible: implications in clinical orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone density at the interradicular area plays an important role during orthodontic treatment. In view of this fact, the study was designed to quantitatively evaluate the bone density at the interradicular areas of the alveolar and basal bones of maxilla and mandible by computed tomography. Methods One hundred and nine computed tomographic images were randomly selected, and bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU) with bone mineral density software (Siemens VA20A_SP3A). The sample consisted of 78 males (mean age 29.5 years, range 20 to 40 years) and 31 females (mean age 27.6 years, range 20 to 40 years). Cortical and cancellous bone density was measured at the interradicular areas at the alveolar and basal bone levels of the maxilla and mandible, and the data was subjected to statistical analysis for comparisons. Results The highest cortical bone density was observed between the second premolar and first molar at the alveolar bone level and between the first and second molars at the basal bone level in the maxilla. Maxillary tuberosity showed the least bone density. The density of the cortical bone was greater in the mandible than in the maxilla and showed a progressive increase from the incisor to the retromolar area. The basal bone showed a higher density thanthe alveolar bone. Conclusion Different qualities of the bone were found in the anatomic regions studied, which confirms the importance of knowledge of site-specific bone tissue density to correlate with various clinical findings. PMID:24325883

  6. Milk basic protein increases bone mineral density and improves bone metabolism in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, K; Ishida, H; Toba, Y; Aoe, S; Itabashi, A; Takada, Y

    2007-03-01

    Effect of milk basic protein on bone metabolism in healthy young women. Milk has more beneficial effects on bone health than other food sources. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that milk whey protein, especially its basic protein fraction (milk basic protein, MBP), contains several components capable of promoting bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption. The object of this study was to examine the effect of MBP on the bone mineral density and bone metabolism of healthy young women. Thirty-five healthy young women were randomly assigned to treatment with either placebo or MBP (40 mg per day) for 6 months. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 of each subject was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at 0 and 6 months of treatment. Serum and urine indexes of bone metabolism were measured at 0, 3 and 6 months. All subjects completed the study in accordance with the protocol. The mean rate of gain of lumbar BMD in the MBP group (1.57%) was significantly higher than in the placebo group (0.13%, P=0.042). When compared with the placebo group, urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type-I collagen (NTx) were significantly decreased, and serum osteocalcin was significantly increased in the MBP group at 6 months. These results suggested that MBP supplementation was effective in increasing BMD in young women and that this increase in BMD may be primarily mediated through the promotion of bone formation and inhibition of bone resorption by MBP supplementation.

  7. The Tarsometatarsus of the Ostrich Struthio camelus: Anatomy, Bone Densities, and Structural Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Meagan M; Snively, Eric; Cotton, John

    2016-01-01

    The ostrich Struthio camelus reaches the highest speeds of any extant biped, and has been an extraordinary subject for studies of soft-tissue anatomy and dynamics of locomotion. An elongate tarsometatarsus in adult ostriches contributes to their speed. The internal osteology of the tarsometatarsus, and its mechanical response to forces of running, are potentially revealing about ostrich foot function. Computed tomography (CT) reveals anatomy and bone densities in tarsometatarsi of an adult and a young juvenile ostrich. A finite element (FE) model for the adult was constructed with properties of compact and cancellous bone where these respective tissues predominate in the original specimen. The model was subjected to a quasi-static analysis under the midstance ground reaction and muscular forces of a fast run. Anatomy-Metatarsals are divided proximally and distally and unify around a single internal cavity in most adult tarsometatarsus shafts, but the juvenile retains an internal three-part division of metatarsals throughout the element. The juvenile has a sparsely ossified hypotarsus for insertion of the m. fibularis longus, as part of a proximally separate third metatarsal. Bone is denser in all regions of the adult tarsometatarsus, with cancellous bone concentrated at proximal and distal articulations, and highly dense compact bone throughout the shaft. Biomechanics-FE simulations show stress and strain are much greater at midshaft than at force applications, suggesting that shaft bending is the most important stressor of the tarsometatarsus. Contraction of digital flexors, inducing a posterior force at the TMT distal condyles, likely reduces buildup of tensile stresses in the bone by inducing compression at these locations, and counteracts bending loads. Safety factors are high for von Mises stress, consistent with faster running speeds known for ostriches. High safety factors suggest that bone densities and anatomy of the ostrich tarsometatarsus confer strength

  8. The Tarsometatarsus of the Ostrich Struthio camelus: Anatomy, Bone Densities, and Structural Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Meagan M.; Snively, Eric; Cotton, John

    2016-01-01

    Background The ostrich Struthio camelus reaches the highest speeds of any extant biped, and has been an extraordinary subject for studies of soft-tissue anatomy and dynamics of locomotion. An elongate tarsometatarsus in adult ostriches contributes to their speed. The internal osteology of the tarsometatarsus, and its mechanical response to forces of running, are potentially revealing about ostrich foot function. Methods/Principal Findings Computed tomography (CT) reveals anatomy and bone densities in tarsometatarsi of an adult and a young juvenile ostrich. A finite element (FE) model for the adult was constructed with properties of compact and cancellous bone where these respective tissues predominate in the original specimen. The model was subjected to a quasi-static analysis under the midstance ground reaction and muscular forces of a fast run. Anatomy–Metatarsals are divided proximally and distally and unify around a single internal cavity in most adult tarsometatarsus shafts, but the juvenile retains an internal three-part division of metatarsals throughout the element. The juvenile has a sparsely ossified hypotarsus for insertion of the m. fibularis longus, as part of a proximally separate third metatarsal. Bone is denser in all regions of the adult tarsometatarsus, with cancellous bone concentrated at proximal and distal articulations, and highly dense compact bone throughout the shaft. Biomechanics–FE simulations show stress and strain are much greater at midshaft than at force applications, suggesting that shaft bending is the most important stressor of the tarsometatarsus. Contraction of digital flexors, inducing a posterior force at the TMT distal condyles, likely reduces buildup of tensile stresses in the bone by inducing compression at these locations, and counteracts bending loads. Safety factors are high for von Mises stress, consistent with faster running speeds known for ostriches. Conclusions/Significance High safety factors suggest that bone

  9. Gemstone spectral imaging for measuring adult bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei-Guang; Liu, Dian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the bone Ca2+ content of L3 vertebrae in adults by gemstone spectral computed tomography. In total, 235 patients were selected and divided into age groups of 10 years each. The scanning data were used to detect the water-based and Ca2+-based substance levels on the L3 vertebral cancellous bone images. The results indicated that there were significant differences in vertebral Ca2+-water and water-Ca2+ densities determined by gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) between males and females in subjects aged 50–59 years, 60–69 years, 70–79 years and ≥80 years (P<0.05). The ages of male and female participants were negatively correlated with vertebral Ca2+-water density (P<0.01) and water-Ca2+ density (P<0.01). In conclusion, GSI may be used as a novel method of measuring the vertebral adult bone mineral density. PMID:27703518

  10. Low bone density in children with hypercalciuria and/or nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Schwaderer, Andrew L; Cronin, Robert; Mahan, John D; Bates, Carlton M

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify how many children with hypercalciuria and/or nephrolithiasis have a low bone density and whether the risk of low bone density can be identified by 24-h urine stone-risk profiles and/or growth parameters. A retrospective chart review was performed on 110 idiopathic hypercalciuria and/or kidney stone patients who received both a 24-h urine for stone-risk profile and a dual-energy X-ray densitometry scan. Patients were divided into low bone density vs. normal bone density groups and hypercalcuria verus nephrolithiasis groups and analyzed for differences in growth parameters, urine stone-risk profiles, and bone densities. Overall, 47% had a bone density z score < -1, and 26% had a bone density z score < -2. Patients with a low bone density had a higher body mass index and lower urine creatinine and ammonium than those with a normal bone density. Patients with nephrolithiasis had a lower bone density z score than patients with hypercalcuria and no nephrolithiasis. Clinicians should be aware of the increased incidence of low bone density in children with hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis. The effect of hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis treatment on bone density and the natural progression of the bone density in the studied patient population warrants further investigation.

  11. Bone-composition imaging using coherent-scatter computed tomography: Assessing bone health beyond bone mineral density

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Dabrowski, Waldemar; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2006-04-15

    Quantitative analysis of bone composition is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases. Accurate assessment of the bone mineralization state is the first requirement for a comprehensive analysis. In diagnostic imaging, x-ray coherent scatter depends upon the molecular structure of tissues. Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) exploits this feature to identify tissue types in composite biological specimens. We have used CSCT to map the distributions of tissues relevant to bone disease (fat, soft tissue, collagen, and mineral) within bone-tissue phantoms and an excised cadaveric bone sample. Using a purpose-built scanner, we have measured hydroxyapatite (bone mineral) concentrations based on coherent-scatter patterns from a series of samples with varying hydroxyapatite content. The measured scatter intensity is proportional to mineral density in true g/cm{sup 3}. Repeated measurements of the hydroxyapatite concentration in each sample were within, at most, 2% of each other, revealing an excellent precision in determining hydroxyapatite concentration. All measurements were also found to be accurate to within 3% of the known values. Phantoms simulating normal, over-, and under-mineralized bone were created by mixing known masses of pure collagen and hydroxyapatite. An analysis of the composite scatter patterns gave the density of each material. For each composite, the densities were within 2% of the known values. Collagen and hydroxyapatite concentrations were also examined in a bone-mimicking phantom, incorporating other bone constituents (fat, soft tissue). Tomographic maps of the coherent-scatter properties of each specimen were reconstructed, from which material-specific images were generated. Each tissue was clearly distinguished and the collagen-mineral ratio determined from this phantom was also within 2% of the known value. Existing bone analysis techniques cannot determine the collagen-mineral ratio in intact

  12. Bone mineral density and history of oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Fortney, J A; Feldblum, P J; Talmage, R V; Zhang, J; Godwin, S E

    1994-02-01

    To examine the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use and bone mineral density (BMD), we conducted a cross-sectional study on 352 white, nonsmoking, perimenopausal women aged 40-54 years. We measured bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae 2-4 with dual photon absorptiometry and mid-radius and distal radius with single photon absorptiometry. After controlling for age, body mass, current physical activity, current calcium intake and history of breastfeeding, our analysis did not find substantial differences in BMD at any site between OC ever users and never users. However, OC ever users had slightly higher lumbar BMD among premenopausal women. No significant association was identified between recency of OC use and BMD. The results of our study suggest that when other factors are accounted for, OC use is not strongly associated with BMD among perimenopausal women, although we cannot exclude a slight beneficial effect.

  13. Optical studies of changes in bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Matcher, Stephen J.; Attenburrow, Don P.

    2003-07-01

    The ability to measure changes in bone-mineral-density (BMD) in-vivo has potential applications in monitoring stress-induced bone remodelling in, for example, competition race horses. In this study we have begun to investigate the potential of optical techniques to monitor such changes via changes in bone optical scattering. Using integrating spheres, we have investigated the optical properties of bone samples taken from the leg of the horse. Since our samples have stable characteristics over the time, we are able to use a single integrating-sphere technique. Diffuse reflection and transmission coefficients have been measured over the wavelength range 520 to 960 nm. Measurements were made on samples immersed in formic acid solution for different lengths of time; this was to investigate the effect of reduction in BMD on the optical properties. The experimental results and a Monte-Carlo based inversion method were used to extract the absorption coefficient and unmodified scattering coefficient of the samples. After full demineralisation scattering coefficient fell by a factor 4. This shows that the calcium-content in bone influences its optical properties considerably. Our experiments confirm the possibility of using optical techniques to determine changes in the BMD of samples.

  14. Recent origin of low trabecular bone density in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Chirchir, Habiba; Kivell, Tracy L; Ruff, Christopher B; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Carlson, Kristian J; Zipfel, Bernhard; Richmond, Brian G

    2015-01-13

    Humans are unique, compared with our closest living relatives (chimpanzees) and early fossil hominins, in having an enlarged body size and lower limb joint surfaces in combination with a relatively gracile skeleton (i.e., lower bone mass for our body size). Some analyses have observed that in at least a few anatomical regions modern humans today appear to have relatively low trabecular density, but little is known about how that density varies throughout the human skeleton and across species or how and when the present trabecular patterns emerged over the course of human evolution. Here, we test the hypotheses that (i) recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the upper and lower limbs compared with other primate taxa and (ii) the reduction in trabecular density first occurred in early Homo erectus, consistent with the shift toward a modern human locomotor anatomy, or more recently in concert with diaphyseal gracilization in Holocene humans. We used peripheral quantitative CT and microtomography to measure trabecular bone of limb epiphyses (long bone articular ends) in modern humans and chimpanzees and in fossil hominins attributed to Australopithecus africanus, Paranthropus robustus/early Homo from Swartkrans, Homo neanderthalensis, and early Homo sapiens. Results show that only recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the limb joints. Extinct hominins, including pre-Holocene Homo sapiens, retain the high levels seen in nonhuman primates. Thus, the low trabecular density of the recent modern human skeleton evolved late in our evolutionary history, potentially resulting from increased sedentism and reliance on technological and cultural innovations.

  15. Recent origin of low trabecular bone density in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Chirchir, Habiba; Kivell, Tracy L.; Ruff, Christopher B.; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Carlson, Kristian J.; Zipfel, Bernhard; Richmond, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unique, compared with our closest living relatives (chimpanzees) and early fossil hominins, in having an enlarged body size and lower limb joint surfaces in combination with a relatively gracile skeleton (i.e., lower bone mass for our body size). Some analyses have observed that in at least a few anatomical regions modern humans today appear to have relatively low trabecular density, but little is known about how that density varies throughout the human skeleton and across species or how and when the present trabecular patterns emerged over the course of human evolution. Here, we test the hypotheses that (i) recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the upper and lower limbs compared with other primate taxa and (ii) the reduction in trabecular density first occurred in early Homo erectus, consistent with the shift toward a modern human locomotor anatomy, or more recently in concert with diaphyseal gracilization in Holocene humans. We used peripheral quantitative CT and microtomography to measure trabecular bone of limb epiphyses (long bone articular ends) in modern humans and chimpanzees and in fossil hominins attributed to Australopithecus africanus, Paranthropus robustus/early Homo from Swartkrans, Homo neanderthalensis, and early Homo sapiens. Results show that only recent modern humans have low trabecular density throughout the limb joints. Extinct hominins, including pre-Holocene Homo sapiens, retain the high levels seen in nonhuman primates. Thus, the low trabecular density of the recent modern human skeleton evolved late in our evolutionary history, potentially resulting from increased sedentism and reliance on technological and cultural innovations. PMID:25535354

  16. Combination of Micronutrients for Bone (COMB) Study: Bone Density after Micronutrient Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Bouchard, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Along with other investigations, patients presenting to an environmental health clinic with various chronic conditions were assessed for bone health status. Individuals with compromised bone strength were educated about skeletal health issues and provided with therapeutic options for potential amelioration of their bone health. Patients who declined pharmacotherapy or who previously experienced failure of drug treatment were offered other options including supplemental micronutrients identified in the medical literature as sometimes having a positive impact on bone mineral density (BMD). After 12 months of consecutive supplemental micronutrient therapy with a combination that included vitamin D3, vitamin K2, strontium, magnesium and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), repeat bone densitometry was performed. The results were analyzed in a group of compliant patients and demonstrate improved BMD in patients classified with normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic bone density. According to the results, this combined micronutrient supplementation regimen appears to be at least as effective as bisphosphonates or strontium ranelate in raising BMD levels in hip, spine, and femoral neck sites. No fractures occurred in the group taking the micronutrient protocol. This micronutrient regimen also appears to show efficacy in individuals where bisphosphonate therapy was previously unsuccessful in maintaining or raising BMD. Prospective clinical trials are required to confirm efficacy. PMID:22291722

  17. Genetic and Dynamic Analyses of Murine Peak Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    4 vBMD loci shared with femurs (1, 4, 14, & 18) and 2 unique loci (Chr 7 & 9). Lastly, a new DEXA instrument for mice, the PIXhnus, has been...late 1999. The summarized results for the femoral total BMD analyses were: a) Genome wide scans for co-segregation of genetic marker data with high or...possible tools for drug discovery aimed at exogenous manipulation of bone density. New Instrumentation - PIXImus DEXA . We have been testing a dual energy

  18. Bone Density in Peripubertal Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; Gates, Amy; Ferrone, Christine; Lee, Hang; Misra, Madhusmita

    2013-01-01

    We determined whether bone mineral density (BMD) is lower in boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than controls, and also assessed variables that may affect BMD in ASD. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 18 boys with ASD and 19 controls 8-14 years old. Boys with ASD had lower BMD Z-scores at the spine, hip and…

  19. Bone Density in Peripubertal Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; Gates, Amy; Ferrone, Christine; Lee, Hang; Misra, Madhusmita

    2013-01-01

    We determined whether bone mineral density (BMD) is lower in boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than controls, and also assessed variables that may affect BMD in ASD. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 18 boys with ASD and 19 controls 8-14 years old. Boys with ASD had lower BMD Z-scores at the spine, hip and…

  20. Quantifying Mineralization Utilizing Bone Mineral Density Distribution in the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Donneys, Alexis; Nelson, Noah S.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Farberg, Aaron S.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Microcomputed Tomography (μCT) is an efficient method for quantifying the density and mineralization of mandibular microarchitecture. Conventional radiomorphometrics such as Bone and Tissue Mineral Density are useful in determining the average, overall mineral content of a scanned specimen; however, solely relying on these metrics has limitations. Utilizing Bone Mineral Density Distribution (BMDD), the complex array of mineralization densities within a bone sample can be portrayed. This information is particularly useful as a computational feature reflective of the rate of bone turnover. Here we demonstrate the utility of BMDD analyses in the rat mandible and generate a platform for further exploration of mandibular pathology and treatment. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=8) underwent μCT and histogram data was generated from a selected volume of interest. A standard curve was derived for each animal and reference criteria were defined. An average histogram was produced for the group and descriptive analyses including the means and standard deviations are reported for each of the normative metrics. Results Mpeak (3444 Hounsfield Units, SD =138) and Mwidth (2221 Hounsfield Units SD =628) are two metrics demonstrating reproducible parameters of BMDD with minimal variance. A total of eight valuable metrics quantifying biologically significant events concerning mineralization are reported. Conclusion Here we quantify the vast wealth of information depicted in the complete spectrum of mineralization established by the BMDD analysis. We demonstrate its potential in delivering mineralization data that encompasses and enhances conventional reporting of radiomorphometrics. Moreover, we explore its role and translational potential in craniofacial experimentation. PMID:22976646

  1. Hormone Treatment Restores Bone Density for Young Women with Menopause-Like Condition (Primary Ovarian Insufficiency)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Monday, June 9, 2014 Hormone treatment restores bone density for young women with ... and lower spine to determine the effects of hormone treatment on bone mineral density of women with ...

  2. Acceleration slope of exercise-induced impacts is a determinant of changes in bone density.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Riikka; Vihriälä, Erkki; Vainionpää, Aki; Korpelainen, Raija; Jämsä, Timo

    2007-01-01

    High acceleration levels (>4g) seen during impact exercises have been shown to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in premenopausal women. The aim of this study was to examine how the other acceleration signal characteristics, i.e. the slope, area and energy of the signal are related to changes in bone density, using long-term quantification of physical activity. Daily physical activity was continuously assessed with a waist-worn accelerometer-based body movement monitor in 64 premenopausal women participating in a 12-month population-based exercise trial. The daily number of exercise-induced impacts at different slope, area and energy levels of the acceleration signal was analyzed. Physical activity inducing slopes 1000 m/s(3), acceleration peak areas 2m/s or signal energies 75 m(2)/s(3) was associated with BMD change in the hip (p<0.05). Impacts with the smallest slopes (<1000 m/s(3)) were positively associated with changes in calcaneal speed of ultrasound, while impacts with slopes 1500 m/s(3) or areas 4m/s were positively correlated with broadband ultrasound attenuation changes (p<0.05). We conclude that the acceleration slope of exercise-induced impacts is an important determinant of bone density. The slope threshold for improving BMD at the hip is 1000 m/s(3), which can be achieved during normal exercise including fast movements such as running and jumping.

  3. [Bone mineral density as a sign of age-related involution of human bones].

    PubMed

    Iurchenko, M A; Zolotenkova, G V; Pigolkin, Iu I; Fedulova, M V

    2013-01-01

    This review of the literature analyzes the current state of a problem of application of various morphological methods for the investigation of age-related involution of human bone system and their use in the course of forensic personality identification. The difficulties of the application of the available methods of quantitative morphology in determination of biological age, are emphasized. The possibilities of the practical use of radiological methods to study the skeleton, including the determination of the bone mineral density as an indicator of age-related changes of bone tissue, are analyzed. An ambiguity of the research results obtained is noted, and the possible reasons for and the factors contributing to the results variability are considered. It is concluded that the application of computer tomogram densitometry to the various regions of the bone skeleton in complex with some other methods, is promising for the determination of age interval in forensic identification examinations.

  4. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation on bone mineral density, bone markers, and body composition in older adults

    PubMed Central

    von Mühlen, D.; Laughlin, G. A.; Kritz-Silverstein, D.; Bergstrom, J.; Bettencourt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We present results of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to examine the effect of 50 mg daily oral DHEA supplementation for one year on bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism and body composition in 225 healthy adults aged 55 to 85 years. Introduction Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels decline dramatically with age, concurrent with the onset of osteoporosis, suggesting a role for DHEA supplementation in preventing age-related bone loss. Methods We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to examine the effect of 50 mg daily oral DHEA supplementation for one year on bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism and body composition in 225 healthy adults aged 55 to 85 years. Results DHEA treatment increased serum DHEA and DHEA sulfate levels to concentrations seen in young adults. Testosterone, estradiol and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) levels increased in women (all p<0.001), but not men, receiving DHEA. Serum C-terminal telopeptide of type-1 collagen levels decreased in women (p=0.03), but not men, whereas bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels were not significantly altered in either sex. After 12 months, there was a positive effect of DHEA on lumbar spine BMD in women (p=0.03), but no effect was observed for hip, femoral neck or total body BMD, and no significant changes were observed at any site among men. Body composition was not affected by DHEA treatment in either sex. Conclusion Among older healthy adults, daily administration of 50 mg of DHEA has a modest and selective beneficial effect on BMD and bone resorption in women, but provides no bone benefit for men. PMID:18084691

  5. Axial and appendicular bone density predict fractures in older women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Cummings, S. R.; Genant, H. K.; Nevitt, M. C.; Palermo, L.; Browner, W.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether measurement of hip and spine bone mass by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) predicts fractures in women and to compare the predictive value of DEXA with that of single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) of appendicular sites, we prospectively studied 8134 nonblack women age 65 years and older who had both DEXA and SPA measurements of bone mass. A total of 208 nonspine fractures, including 37 wrist fractures, occurred during the follow-up period, which averaged 0.7 years. The risk of fracture was inversely related to bone density at all measurement sites. After adjusting for age, the relative risks per decrease of 1 standard deviation in bone density for the occurrence of any fracture was 1.40 for measurement at the proximal femur (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.63) and 1.35 (1.15-1.58) for measurement at the spine. Results were similar for all regions of the proximal femur as well as SPA measurements at the calcaneus, distal radius, and proximal radius. None of these measurements was a significantly better predictor of fractures than the others. Furthermore, measurement of the distal radius was not a better predictor of wrist fracture (relative risk 1.64: 95% CI 1.13-2.37) than other sites, such as the lumbar spine (RR 1.56; CI 1.07-2.26), the femoral neck (RR 1.65; CI 1.12-2.41), or the calcaneus (RR 1.83; CI 1.26-2.64). We conclude that the inverse relationship between bone mass and risk of fracture in older women is similar for absorptiometric measurements made at the hip, spine, and appendicular sites.

  6. Axial and appendicular bone density predict fractures in older women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Cummings, S. R.; Genant, H. K.; Nevitt, M. C.; Palermo, L.; Browner, W.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether measurement of hip and spine bone mass by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) predicts fractures in women and to compare the predictive value of DEXA with that of single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) of appendicular sites, we prospectively studied 8134 nonblack women age 65 years and older who had both DEXA and SPA measurements of bone mass. A total of 208 nonspine fractures, including 37 wrist fractures, occurred during the follow-up period, which averaged 0.7 years. The risk of fracture was inversely related to bone density at all measurement sites. After adjusting for age, the relative risks per decrease of 1 standard deviation in bone density for the occurrence of any fracture was 1.40 for measurement at the proximal femur (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.63) and 1.35 (1.15-1.58) for measurement at the spine. Results were similar for all regions of the proximal femur as well as SPA measurements at the calcaneus, distal radius, and proximal radius. None of these measurements was a significantly better predictor of fractures than the others. Furthermore, measurement of the distal radius was not a better predictor of wrist fracture (relative risk 1.64: 95% CI 1.13-2.37) than other sites, such as the lumbar spine (RR 1.56; CI 1.07-2.26), the femoral neck (RR 1.65; CI 1.12-2.41), or the calcaneus (RR 1.83; CI 1.26-2.64). We conclude that the inverse relationship between bone mass and risk of fracture in older women is similar for absorptiometric measurements made at the hip, spine, and appendicular sites.

  7. [Cross sectional study of the relationship between bone density to diet and life style using ultrasound bone densitometry].

    PubMed

    Higashi, A; Ikeda, J; Watanabe, Y; Ozasa, K; Shimouchi, A; Hayashi, K; Kiyama, T; Nakatani, K; Shigeto, K; Noto, T; Matsuno, K; Fujita, K; Yoshida, K; Kawai, K

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between bone density to diet and life style was investigated in pre- and postmenopausal women in Kyoto Prefecture in 1994 by a cross-sectional study. Bone densities of 453 women aged 30-86 years were measured by ultrasound bone densitometry. History of pregnancy and delivery, menstruation, medical history, bone and arthral symptoms, life style, food intake frequency, current and past intake of dairy products, and physical activity were examined by self-administered questionnaire. Analysis of covariance and multiple-regression analysis were performed to determine the relation between bone density and life style adjusted for age and obesity index among 151 premenopausal women (PRE), 244 postmenopausal but not sedentary (under 65 years of age) women (POST), and 58 sedentary (older than 65 years of age) women (SED). The results were as follows; 1) A marked age-related decline in bone density was observed at 45-55 years of age. The correlation coefficient between age and bone density was significant at -0.65 (p < 0.01). 2) Obesity index and bone density were positively correlated in each group. 3) Among the PRE group women, there was no relation between life style and bone density. Those who experienced bone fractures tended toward low bone density. Among the POST group, time since menopause, exercise, and current milk intake were significantly correlated with bone density. In the SED group, women with arthralgia showed significantly lower densities. 4) From multiple-regression analysis, age, obesity index, and milk intake during childhood were shown to be related to bone density in each group.

  8. Bone Density After Teriparatide Discontinuation in Premenopausal Idiopathic Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kamanda-Kosseh, Mafo; Recker, Robert. R.; Lappe, Joan M.; Dempster, David W.; Zhou, Hua; Cremers, Serge; Bucovsky, Mariana; Stubby, Julie; Shane, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Context: Without antiresorptive therapy, postmenopausal women lose bone mass after teriparatide (TPTD) discontinuation; estrogen treatment prevents bone loss in this setting. It is not known whether premenopausal women with regular menses lose bone mass after teriparatide discontinuation. Objective: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that normally menstruating premenopausal women with idiopathic osteoporosis (IOP) will maintain teriparatide-associated bone mineral density (BMD) gains after medication cessation. Design: Twenty-one premenopausal IOP women previously enrolled in an open-label pilot study of teriparatide (20 mcg for 18–24 mo), had substantial BMD increases at the lumbar spine (LS; 10.8 ± 8.3%), total hip (TH; 6.2 ± 5.6%), and femoral neck (7.6 ± 3.4%). For this study, BMD was remeasured 2.0 ± 0.6 years after teriparatide cessation. Participants: Fifteen women, who had gained 11.1 ± 7.2% at LS and 6.1 ± 6.5% at TH and were premenopausal at teriparatide completion, were followed without antiresorptive treatment. Results: Two years after completing teriparatide, BMD declined by 4.8 ± 4.3% (P = .0007) at the LS. In contrast, BMD remained stable at the femoral neck (−1.5 ± 4.2%) and TH (−1.1 ± 3.7%). Those who sustained LS bone loss >3% (−7.3 ± 2.9%; n = 10), did not differ from those with stable LS BMD (0.1 ± 1.1%; n=5) with regard to baseline body mass index, BMD at any site, or duration of followup, but were significantly older at re-evaluation (46 ± 3 vs 38 ± 7; P = .046), had larger increases in LS BMD during teriparatide treatment and higher cancellous bone remodeling on transiliac biopsy at baseline and completion of teriparatide treatment. Serum bone turnover markers did not differ at baseline or teriparatide completion, but tended to be higher at the re-evaluation timepoint in those with post-teriparatide bone loss. Conclusions: These findings lead us to conclude that premenopausal women with IOP, particularly those over

  9. Fitting of bone mineral density with consideration of anthropometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Short, D. F.; Zemel, B. S.; Gilsanz, V.; Kalkwarf, H. J.; Lappe, J. M.; Mahboubi, S.; Oberfield, S. E.; Shepherd, J. A.; Winer, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A new model describing normal values of bone mineral density in children has been evaluated, which includes not only the traditional parameters of age, gender, and race, but also weight, height, percent body fat, and sexual maturity. This model may constitute a better comparative norm for a specific child with given anthropometric values. Introduction Previous descriptions of children's bone mineral density (BMD) by age have focused on segmenting diverse populations by race and gender without adjusting for anthropometric variables or have included the effects of anthropometric variables over a relatively homogeneous population. Methods Multivariate semi-metric smoothing (MS2) provides a way to describe a diverse population using a model that includes multiple effects and their interactions while producing a result that can be smoothed with respect to age in order to provide connected percentiles. We applied MS2 to spine BMD data from the Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study to evaluate which of gender, race, age, height, weight, percent body fat, and sexual maturity explain variations in the population's BMD values. By balancing high adjusted R2 values and low mean square errors with clinical needs, a model using age, gender, race, weight, and percent body fat is proposed and examined. Results This model provides narrower distributions and slight shifts of BMD values compared to the traditional model, which includes only age, gender, and race. Thus, the proposed model might constitute a better comparative standard for a specific child with given anthropometric values and should be less dependent on the anthropometric characteristics of the cohort used to devise the model. Conclusions The inclusion of multiple explanatory variables in the model, while creating smooth output curves, makes the MS2 method attractive in modeling practically sized data sets. The clinical use of this model by the bone research community has yet to be fully established. PMID

  10. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  11. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up.

  12. Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Female Adolescents According to Age, Bone Age and Pubertal Breast Stage

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, M.R; Silva, C.C; Kurokawa, C.S; Fortes, C.M; Capela, R.C; Teixeira, A.S; Dalmas, J.C; Goldberg, T.B

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy female Brazilian adolescents in five groups looking at chronological age, bone age, and pubertal breast stage, and determining BMD behavior for each classification. Methods: Seventy-two healthy female adolescents aged between 10 to 20 incomplete years were divided into five groups and evaluated for calcium intake, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), pubertal breast stage, bone age, and BMD. Bone mass was measured by bone densitometry (DXA) in lumbar spine and proximal femur regions, and the total body. BMI was estimated by Quetelet index. Breast development was assessed by Tanner’s criteria and skeletal maturity by bone age. BMD comparison according to chronologic and bone age, and breast development were analyzed by Anova, with Scheffe’s test used to find significant differences between groups at P≤0.05. Results: BMD (g·cm-2) increased in all studied regions as age advanced, indicating differences from the ages of 13 to 14 years. This group differed to the 10 and 11 to 12 years old groups for lumbar spine BMD (0.865±0.127 vs 0.672±0.082 and 0.689±0.083, respectively) and in girls at pubertal development stage B3, lumbar spine BMD differed from B5 (0.709±0.073 vs 0.936±0.130) and whole body BMD differed from B4 and B5 (0.867±0.056 vs 0.977±0.086 and 1.040±0.080, respectively). Conclusion: Bone mineralization increased in the B3 breast maturity group, and the critical years for bone mass acquisition were between 13 and 14 years of age for all sites evaluated by densitometry. PMID:21966336

  13. [Bone mineral density, biochemical bone turnover markers and factors associated with bone health in young Korean women].

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Lee, Sook Ja; Shin, Nah Mee; Shin, Hyunjeong; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Cho, Yunjung; Jeon, Songi; Cho, Inhae

    2014-10-01

    This study was done to assess the bone mineral density (BMD), biochemical bone turnover markers (BTMs), and factors associated with bone health in young Korean women. Participants were 1,298 women, ages 18-29, recruited in Korea. Measurements were BMD by calcaneus quantitative ultrasound, BTMs for Calcium, Phosphorus, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide cross-links (CTX), body composition by physical measurements, nutrients by food frequency questionnaire and psychosocial factors associated with bone health by self-report. The mean BMD (Z-score) was -0.94. 8.7% women had lower BMD (Z-score≤-2) and 14.3% women had higher BMD (Z-score≥0) than women of same age. BTMs were not significantly different between high-BMD (Z-score≥0) and low-BMD (Z-score<0) women. However, Osteocalcin and CTX were higher in women preferring caffeine intake, sedentary lifestyle and alcoholic drinks. Body composition and Calcium intake were significantly higher in high-BMD. Low-BMD women reported significantly higher susceptibility and barriers to exercise in health beliefs, lower bone health self-efficacy and promoting behaviors. Results of this study indicate that bone health of young Korean women is not good. Development of diverse strategies to intervene in factors such as exercise, nutrients, self-efficacy, health beliefs and behaviors, shown to be important, are needed to improve bone health.

  14. Bone mineral density and metabolism in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Maayan, C; Bar-On, E; Foldes, A J; Gesundheit, B; Pollak, R Dresner

    2002-05-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) patients suffer from multiple fractures and have reduced bone pain, which defers the diagnosis. The pathogenesis of bone fragility in FD is unknown. This study aimed to characterize bone mineral metabolism and density in FD. Seventy-nine FD patients aged 8 months to 48 years (mean age 13.9 +/- 10.4 years, median 12.3) were studied. Clinical data included weight, height, bone age, weekly physical activity and history of fractures. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (n = 43), femoral neck (n = 26), total hip (n = 22) and whole body (n = 15) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP), parathyroid hormone and urinary N-telopeptide cross-linked type 1 collagen (NTx) were determined in 68 patients and age- and sex-matched controls. Forty-two of 79 patients (53%) sustained 75 fractures. Twenty-four of 43 patients had a spine Z-score < -2.0, and 13 of 26 had a femoral neck Z-score < -2.0. Mean femoral neck BMD Z-score was lower in patients with fractures compared with those without (-2.5 +/- 0.9 vs -1.5 +/- 1.0, p = 0.01). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 16 kg/m2 in prepubertal patients and 18.4 kg/m2 in postpubertal patients. Bone age was significantly lower than chronological age (75.5 vs 99.3 months in prepubertal patients, p < 0.001; 151 vs 174 in postpubertal patients, p < 0.05). NTx and osteocalcin levels were higher in FD patients compared with controls (400 +/- 338 vs 303 +/- 308, BCE/mM creatinine p < 0.02; 90 +/- 59.5 vs 61.8 +/- 36.9 ng/ml, p < 0.001, respectively). B-ALP was lower in FD patients compared with controls (44.66 +/- 21.8 vs 55.36 +/- 36.6 ng/ml, p < 0.04). Mean spine Z-score was significantly lower in physically inactive compared with active patients (-3.00 +/- 1.70 vs -1.77 +/- 1.3, respectively, p = 0.05). We conclude that fractures in FD patients are associated with reduced BMD. FD patients have increased NTx and osteocalcin

  15. On the Use of Bone Remodelling Models to Estimate the Density Distribution of Bones. Uniqueness of the Solution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reina, Javier; Ojeda, Joaquín; Mayo, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodelling models are widely used in a phenomenological manner to estimate numerically the distribution of apparent density in bones from the loads they are daily subjected to. These simulations start from an arbitrary initial distribution, usually homogeneous, and the density changes locally until a bone remodelling equilibrium is achieved. The bone response to mechanical stimulus is traditionally formulated with a mathematical relation that considers the existence of a range of stimulus, called dead or lazy zone, for which no net bone mass change occurs. Implementing a relation like that leads to different solutions depending on the starting density. The non-uniqueness of the solution has been shown in this paper using two different bone remodelling models: one isotropic and another anisotropic. It has also been shown that the problem of non-uniqueness is only mitigated by removing the dead zone, but it is not completely solved unless the bone formation and bone resorption rates are limited to certain maximum values.

  16. Bone mineral density in premenopausal women receiving levothyroxine suppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, V; Lupoli, G; Esposito Del Puente, A; Rampone, E; Carpinelli, A; Del Puente, A E; Oriente, P

    1998-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a well-known complication of thyrotoxicosis. Prolonged subclinical hyperthyroidism due to L-thyroxine treatment has been associated with reduced bone mass and thus with the potential risk of premature development of osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a chronic L-thyroxine suppressive treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) in a group of premenopausal women. Forty consecutive patients (mean age +/- SE = 40.95 +/- 1.56 years) affected by non-toxic goiter underwent bone mineral densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DEXA) of the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and right femoral neck. At the time of the study the patients had been under thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy for 74.95 +/- 10.34 months (range 17-168 months). Baseline levels of free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), TSH, calcium and phosphorus were measured and correlated with BMD. The age of starting, duration of treatment, main daily dose, cumulative dose of treatment and body mass index (BMI) were also correlated with BMD. Statistical analysis was performed by multiple linear regression. BMD among female patients was not significantly different from that of the general population matched for age and sex. With the use of the regression model, no significant correlation was found between BMD and the variables considered. In conclusion, our data suggest that L-thyroxine suppressive therapy, if carefully carried out and monitored, has no significant effect on bone mass.

  17. Reduced bone density at completion of chemotherapy for a malignancy.

    PubMed

    Arikoski, P; Komulainen, J; Riikonen, P; Jurvelin, J S; Voutilainen, R; Kröger, H

    1999-02-01

    Osteoporosis and pathological fractures occur occasionally in children with malignancies. This study was performed to determine the degree of osteopenia in children with a malignancy at completion of chemotherapy. Lumbar spine (L2-L4) bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) and femoral neck BMD were measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry in 22 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), and in 26 children with other malignancies. Apparent volumetric density was calculated to minimise the effect of bone size on BMD. Results were compared with those of 113 healthy controls and expressed as age and sex standardised mean Z scores. Patients with ALL had significantly reduced lumbar volumetric (-0.77) and femoral areal and volumetric BMDs (-1.02 and -0.98, respectively). In patients with other malignancies, femoral areal and apparent volumetric BMDs were significantly decreased (-0.70 and -0.78, respectively). The results demonstrate that children with a malignancy are at risk of developing osteopenia. A follow up of BMD after the completion of chemotherapy should facilitate the identification of patients who might be left with impaired development of peak bone mass, and who require specific interventions to prevent any further decrease in their skeletal mass and to preserve their BMD.

  18. Bone mineral density in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Ghada Mohamed; El-Hawy, Mahmoud Ahmed; El-Hefnawy, Sally Mohamed; Mohamed, Sanaa Mansour

    To assess bone mineral density (BMD) in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS) and normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Cross-sectional case-control study carried out on 50 children: 25 cases of NS (16 steroid-sensitive [SSNS] and nine steroid-resistant [SRNS] under follow up in the pediatric nephrology unit of Menoufia University Hospital, which is tertiary care center, were compared to 25 healthy controls with matched age and sex. All of the participants were subjected to complete history taking, thorough clinical examination, laboratory investigations (serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen [BUN], phosphorus [P], total and ionized calcium [Ca], parathyroid hormone [PTH], and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]). Bone mineral density was measured at the lumbar spinal region (L2-L4) in patients group using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Total and ionized Ca were significantly lower while, serum P, ALP, and PTH were higher in SSNS and SRNS cases than the controls. Osteopenia was documented by DXA scan in 11 patients (44%) and osteoporosis in two patients (8%). Fracture risk was mild in six (24%), moderate in two (8%), and marked in three (12%) of patients. Bone mineralization was negatively affected by steroid treatment in children with NS. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Bone mineral density in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carfì, A; Liperoti, R; Fusco, D; Giovannini, S; Brandi, V; Vetrano, D L; Meloni, E; Mascia, D; Villani, E R; Manes Gravina, E; Bernabei, R; Onder, G

    2017-07-06

    This study analyzed data of bone mineral density (BMD) from a large cohort of adults with Down syndrome (DS). BMD was found to decrease with age more rapidly in these subjects than in the general population, exposing adults with DS to an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture. Down syndrome (DS) in adulthood presents with a high prevalence of osteoporosis. However, in DS, bone mineral density (BMD) can be underestimated due to short stature. Furthermore, the rate of age-related decline in BMD and its association with gender in DS has been rarely evaluated or compared with the general population. The present study is aimed at assessing the variation of BMD with age and gender in a sample of adults with DS and to compare these data with those of the general population, after adjusting for anthropometric differences. Adults with DS, aged 18 or older, were assessed dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) at the femoral neck and at the lumbar spine. They were compared with the general population enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 dataset. Bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) was calculated for each individual. DXA was evaluated in 234 subjects with DS (mean age 36.93 ± 11.83 years, ranging from 20 to 69 years; 50.4% females). In the lumbar spine both mean BMD (DS 0.880 ± 0.141 vs. NHANES 1.062 ± 0.167, p < 0.001) and BMAD (DS 0.138 ± 0.020 vs. NHANES 0.152 ± 0.020, p < 0.001) were significantly lower in the DS sample than in the NAHNES cohort. The same trend was observed at the femoral neck in both BMD (DS 0.658 ± 0.128 vs. NHANES 0.835 ± 0.137, p < 0.001) and BMAD (DS 0.151 ± 0.030 vs. NHANES 0.159 ± 0.028, p<0.001). Age was associated with lower femoral neck BMAD in both samples; importantly, this association was significantly stronger in the DS sample. In the lumbar spine region, no significant association between BMAD and age could be observed in both samples. Adults with DS

  20. Bone mineral density and functional measures in patients with arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Hillard T; Bowen, Richard E; Caputo, Kimberly; Green, Terri A; Lawrence, John F

    2010-01-01

    Patients with arthrogryposis often report decreased ambulation and physical activity. Given that skeletal mineralisation is responsive to force, we identified the need to characterize bone mineral density and functional measures in this population, and conducted a cross-sectional study to establish a reference for future investigations. Thirty consecutive patients aged 5 to 18 years with either the diagnosis of amyoplasia or nonsyndromic arthrogryposis with predominantly lower extremity involvement underwent bone densitometry testing, and lumbar spine Z-scores were calculated against an age and sex-matched control population as is customary in children. Pediatric outcomes data collection instrument (PODCI) and functional independence measure for Children (WeeFIM) assessment forms were completed. Mean Z-scores, PODCI, and WeeFIM scores were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to compare lumbar spine Z-scores between patients divided by ambulatory status and to correlate WeeFIM and PODCI scores. Mean lumbar spine Z-score was -0.47, with 73% of Z-scores being <0. Mean Z-score among nonambulators or home ambulators was -1.05, as compared to a mean Z-score among limited and unlimited community ambulators of -0.14 with a trend toward significance (P=0.10), and a dose-response relationship between higher bone density and increasing ambulatory function. Mean WeeFIM self-care and mobility quotient scores were 67.5/100 and 70.9/100, respectively. PODCI normative scores were decreased for upper extremity (10/50), transfer/basic mobility (-17/50), and sports/physical function (4/50), but normal in pain/comfort (45/50) and happiness (49/50). A linear relationship was noted between functional ambulation level and WeeFIM quotient and PODCI normative scores. There was good correlation between WeeFIM mobility and PODCI transfers and basic mobility standardised scores (R=0.86). This is the first study to measure bone mineral density in children with arthrogryposis, and

  1. Distal radius bone mineral density estimation using the filling factor of trabecular bone in the x-ray image.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeul; Jeong, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jeong Won; Yoo, Done-Sik; Kim, Seunghwan

    2006-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by an abnormal loss of bone mineral content, which leads to a tendency to non-traumatic bone fractures or to structural deformations of bone. Thus, bone density measurement has been considered as a most reliable method to assess bone fracture risk due to osteoporosis. In past decades, X-ray images have been studied in connection with the bone mineral density estimation. However, the estimated bone mineral density from the X-ray image can undergo a relatively large accuracy or precision error. The most relevant origin of the accuracy or precision error may be unstable X-ray image acquisition condition. Thus, we focus our attentions on finding a bone mineral density estimation method that is relatively insensitive to the X-ray image acquisition condition. In this paper, we develop a simple technique for distal radius bone mineral density estimation using the trabecular bone filling factor in the X-ray image and apply the technique to the wrist X-ray images of 20 women. Estimated bone mineral density shows a high linear correlation with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (r=0.87).

  2. Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied. PMID:25961322

  3. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-07

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  4. Osteoarthritis and bone mineral density: are strong bones bad for joints?

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Sarah A; Dieppe, Paul; Gregson, Celia L; Davey Smith, George; Tobias, Jon H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and disabling joint disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. In OA, pathological changes are seen in all of the joint tissues including bone. Although both cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological studies have consistently demonstrated an association between higher bone mineral density (BMD) and OA, suggesting that increased BMD is a risk factor for OA, the mechanisms underlying this observation remain unclear. Recently, novel approaches to examining the BMD-OA relationship have included studying the disease in individuals with extreme high bone mass, and analyses searching for genetic variants associated with both BMD variation and OA, suggesting possible pleiotropic effects on bone mass and OA risk. These studies have yielded valuable insights into potentially relevant pathways that might one day be exploited therapeutically. Although animal models have suggested that drugs reducing bone turnover (antiresorptives) may retard OA progression, it remains to be seen whether this approach will prove to be useful in human OA. Identifying individuals with a phenotype of OA predominantly driven by increased bone formation could help improve the overall response to these treatments. This review aims to summarise current knowledge regarding the complex relationship between BMD and OA.

  5. Effect of bone mineral density and amorphous diamond coatings on insertion torque of bone screws.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Arto; Santavirta, Seppo S; Kröger, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the potential of high-quality amorphous diamond (AD) coatings in reducing the torque and failures of bone screws was studied. Torque values were recorded for 32 stainless steel screws, 2.7 or 3.5 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length. Half of the screw sets were coated with the AD coating before installing in predrilled holes of human cadaveric femoral bone samples. The bone samples were selected from two groups of four persons with mean ages of 34 years (range 25-41 years) and 75 years (range 73-77 years), respectively. The bone mineral density (BMD) values of the samples were determined exactly at the screw insertion site by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). In the mechanical tests, insertion and removal torques were measured. BMD had a significant effect on insertion torque; the maximum torque (adjusted with respect to the screw diameter) was significantly higher for the young bone than for the old bone (p < 0.05). By using a polished AD coating, insertion torque was decreased even up to 50% in comparison with the screws without coating. The results suggest that AD coating provides a stable, smooth surface and reduces the risk of screw failures.

  6. Bone mineral density, quantitative ultrasound parameters and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with depression.

    PubMed

    Atteritano, Marco; Lasco, Antonino; Mazzaferro, Susanna; Macrì, Ida; Catalano, Antonino; Santangelo, Antonino; Bagnato, Gianluca; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Frisina, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Low bone mineral density, which increases the risk of stress fragility fractures, is a frequent, often persistent finding in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The clinical association between major depressive disorder and osteopenia is still unclear, although several factors are associated with a loss of bone mass. The aim of our study, therefore, was to evaluate bone mineral density and bone metabolism in patients with MDD. Bone mineral density was evaluated in fifty postmenopausal women with MDD, and in 50 matched postmenopausal control women by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and femur, and by ultrasonography of the calcaneus and phalanges. Serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D, parathyroid hormone, Osteoprotegerin/Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand ratio, bone turnover markers, serum and urinary cortisol were examined. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMD: 0.72 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.09 g/cm(2), p < 0.001), femoral neck (BMD: 0.58 ± 0.04 vs. 0.71 ± 0.07 g/cm(2), p < 0.001) and total femur (BMD 0.66 ± 0.09 vs. 0.54 ± 0.06 g/cm(2), p < 0.001); and ultrasound parameters at calcaneus (SI: 81.30 ± 6.10 vs. 93.80 ± 7.10, p < 0.001) and phalanges (AD-SOS: 1915.00 ± 37.70 vs. 2020.88 ± 39.46, p < 0.001; BTT : 1.30 ± 0.8 vs. 1.45 ± 0.9, p < 0.001) are significantly lower in patients with MDD compared with controls. Moreover bone turnover markers, parathyroid hormone levels and Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand are significantly higher in MDD patients compared with controls, while serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D and osteoprotegerin are significantly lower. There are no differences in urinary excretion and serum cortisol between groups. Postmenopausal women with depressive disorder have an elevated risk for osteoporosis. Our data suggest that a high level of parathyroid hormone may play a role in the pathogenetic process underlying osteopenia in these patients.

  7. Bone Density Following Long Duration Space Flight and Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amin, Shreyasee; Achenbach, Sara J.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Khosla, Sundeep; Sibonga, Jean

    2010-01-01

    At approx.12 months, Bone Mineral Density (BMD) at most sites in men remained lower than would be predicted, raising concerns for long-term bone health consequences following space flight. Additional analyses based on longer follow-up are being conducted. Although the N is too small for definitive conclusions, women had lower rates of loss at load-bearing sites of the hip and spine immediately post-flight relative to men and smaller differences between observed vs. predicted BMD at most sites, both immediately and 12 months post-flight, relative to men. The role of other exposures/risk factors need to be explored to further understand these possible gender differences in BMD loss and recovery following long-duration space flight.

  8. Lactose intolerance: an unnecessary risk for low bone density.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    The potential for lactose intolerance causes 25-50 million Americans and an unknown number of people around the world to avoid milk. Milk avoidance is a significant risk factor for low bone density. Individuals who avoid milk, due to intolerance or learned aversion, consume significantly less calcium and have poorer bone health and probable higher risk of osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance is easily managed by: (1) regular consumption of milk that adapts the colon bacteria and facilitates digestion of lactose; (2) consumption of yogurts and cheeses and other dairy foods low in lactose; consumption of dairy foods with meals to slow transit and maximize digestion, and use of lactose-digestive aids. As dairying spreads around the world to new markets and dairy foods become the dominant source of calcium in these markets, the potential for lactose intolerance will grow. Management of lactose intolerance globally will require both education and product development.

  9. Acute effects of plyometric jumping and intermittent running on serum bone markers in young males.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Fu; Huang, Tsang-hai; Tu, Kuo-Cheng; Lin, Linda L; Tu, Yi-Hsuan; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether different modes of single-bout exercise would cause different responses in short-term bone metabolism. 24 untrained male college students (19.1 ± 0.1 years old) were recruited and randomly assigned to three groups: (1) a single-bout plyometric exercise group (the PL group, n = 8), (2) a 200-meter × 10 intermittent running group (the IR group, n = 8) and (3) a sedentary control group, which followed the same time schedule of experimentation without performing any exercise (the CON group, n = 8). Serial blood samples were collected before (baseline) and 5 min, 15 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after exercise trials. Within 15 min of exercise, the PL and IR groups showed significantly higher serum phosphorus than did the control group (P < 0.05). Osteocalcin levels were significantly higher in the PL group at 5 min and 1 h after exercise (P < 0.05), while serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) showed no differences among groups. Exercises with different mechanical impact levels responded differently in serum bone formation markers as shown by osteocalcin. Because the increase in osteocalcin in the PL group was revealed shortly after the exercise bout, the changes might due to an exercise-induced mechanical impact rather than bone cellular activities.

  10. Effect of intravenous pamidronate on bone markers and local bone mineral density in fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Muriel S; Oliveri, Beatriz; Mautalen, Carlos A

    2003-10-01

    Bisphosphonates have proven to be effective in patients with fibrous dysplasia of the bone (FD) as shown by their effect on bone pain, markers of bone turnover, or radiological changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of measuring bone mineral density (BMD) of affected bones to assess the efficacy of bisphosphonate treatment. Seven patients (mean age 26 years) received courses of 180 mg intravenous infusion of pamidronate every 6 months (60 mg/day during 3 days). Clinical symptoms, serum alkaline phosphatase, and urinary C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen were assessed every 3 months. BMD of total skeleton and X-rays of FD areas (FDa) were performed at baseline and at 12 months. BMD of FDa was compared with the contralateral side (CL) using the region of interest program on the total skeleton scan. BMD of total skeleton was normal at baseline. Average BMD of FDa was -11.4% compared with CL, a significantly greater difference than that observed between the left and right sides in healthy controls, -0.7% (P < 0.02). At 12 months bone pain diminished in all patients. Bone turnover markers decreased. Mean total skeleton BMD increased 3.3% (P < 0.02). Subregions of the total skeleton scan presenting FD lesions augmented: arms +9.6% (P < 0.02), legs +4.2%, and pelvis +3.5% (P < 0.05). The increase in mean BMD of FDa was +6.8% compared with +2.6% in CL. No changes were observed on the X-ray. These results indicate that simultaneous determination of markers of bone turnover and BMD of FDa is useful in short-term follow-up to determine the efficacy of intravenous pamidronate.

  11. Gonadal steroid–dependent effects on bone turnover and bone mineral density in men

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joel S.; Lee, Hang; Leder, Benjamin Z.; Goldstein, David W.; Hahn, Christopher W.; Hirsch, Sarah C.; Linker, Alex; Perros, Nicholas; Servais, Andrew B.; Taylor, Alexander P.; Webb, Matthew L.; Youngner, Jonathan M.; Yu, Elaine W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Severe gonadal steroid deficiency induces bone loss in adult men; however, the specific roles of androgen and estrogen deficiency in hypogonadal bone loss are unclear. Additionally, the threshold levels of testosterone and estradiol that initiate bone loss are uncertain. METHODS. One hundred ninety-eight healthy men, ages 20–50, received goserelin acetate, which suppresses endogenous gonadal steroid production, and were randomized to treatment with 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 grams of testosterone gel daily for 16 weeks. An additional cohort of 202 men was randomized to receive these treatments plus anastrozole, which suppresses conversion of androgens to estrogens. Thirty-seven men served as controls and received placebos for goserelin and testosterone. Changes in bone turnover markers, bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and BMD by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were assessed in all men. Bone microarchitecture was assessed in 100 men. RESULTS. As testosterone dosage decreased, the percent change in C-telopeptide increased. These increases were considerably greater when aromatization of testosterone to estradiol was also suppressed, suggesting effects of both testosterone and estradiol deficiency. Decreases in DXA BMD were observed when aromatization was suppressed but were modest in most groups. QCT spine BMD fell substantially in all testosterone-dose groups in which aromatization was also suppressed, and this decline was independent of testosterone dose. Estradiol deficiency disrupted cortical microarchitecture at peripheral sites. Estradiol levels above 10 pg/ml and testosterone levels above 200 ng/dl were generally sufficient to prevent increases in bone resorption and decreases in BMD in men. CONCLUSIONS. Estrogens primarily regulate bone homeostasis in adult men, and testosterone and estradiol levels must decline substantially to impact the skeleton. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00114114

  12. Electromagnetic field versus circuit weight training on bone mineral density in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Elsisi, Hany Farid Eid Morsy; Mousa, Gihan Samir Mohamed; ELdesoky, Mohamed Taher Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder with costly complications and a global health problem and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Magnetic field therapy and physical activity have been proven as beneficial interventions for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women to either low-frequency low-intensity pulsed magnetic field (LFLIPMF) or circuit weight training (CWT) on short-run basis (after 12 weeks). Patients and methods Thirty elderly women, aged 60–70 years, were randomly assigned into two groups (magnetic field and CWT) (n=15 each group). The session was performed three times per week for magnetic field and CWT groups, for 12 weeks. BMD and bone mineral content of lumbar spine (L2–L4) and femoral neck, trochanter, and Ward’s triangle were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of treatment. Results Both magnetic field and CWT for 12 weeks in elderly women seem to yield beneficial and statistically significant increasing effect on BMD and bone mineral content (P<0.05). But magnetic field seems to have more beneficially and statistically significant effect than does CWT. Conclusion It is possible to conclude that LFLIPMF and CWT programs are effective modalities in increasing BMD but LFLIPMF is more effective in elderly women. PMID:25834412

  13. Regional differences in bone density of young men involved in different exercises.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, R C; Anderson, J S; Whalen, K E; Harvill, L M

    1994-07-01

    In this cross-sectional, retrospective study, the bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) of the whole skeleton, upper limbs, lower limbs, femoral neck, and lumbar vertebrae were measured using dual photon absorptiometry and the results compared in healthy young males involved in: weight-lifting, running, cross-training, or recreational exercises. When adjusted for body weight, the upper limb BMD was highest in those engaged solely in weight-lifting (mean 1.021, SE 0.019, and 95% CI 0.981-1.061) and lowest in runners (mean 0.908, SE 0.019 and 95% CI 0.869-0.946). These differences were significant (P = 0.0004). There were no significant differences in upper limb BMD between weight-lifters and cross-trained athletes and between runners and those engaged in recreational exercises. Significant differences in BMD were observed between weight-lifters and recreational athletes (P = 0.001) and between cross-trained athletes and runners (P = 0.03). No other significant differences were observed. These data suggest that healthy, young, adult males reporting a history of intensive weight-lifting had significantly greater bone mass of the upper limb bones than those reporting a history of non-weight-lifting exercises. These results imply a specific versus generalized effect of mechanical load on bones of the skeleton.

  14. Updated association of tea consumption and bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao-Fei; Yang, Jun-Long; Jiang, Huan-Chang; Lai, Zheng; Wu, Feng; Liu, Zhi-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Current studies evaluating the association of tea consumption and bone mineral density (BMD) have yielded inconsistent findings. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between tea consumption and BMD. Methods: The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were comprehensively searched, and a meta-analysis performed of all observational studies assessing the association of tea consumption and BMD. Forest plots were used to illustrate the results graphically. The Q-test and I2 statistic were employed to evaluate between-study heterogeneity. Potential publication bias was assessed by the funnel plot. Results: Four cohort, 1 case–control, and 8 cross-sectional studies including a total of 12,635 cases were included. Tea consumption was shown to prevent bone loss [odds ratio (OR): 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47–0.94; P = 0.02], yielding higher mineral densities in several bones, including the lumbar spine [standardized mean difference (SMD): 0.19; 95% CI, 0.08–0.31; P = 0.001], hip (SMD: 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05–0.34; P = 0.01), femoral neck [mean difference (MD): 0.01; 95% CI, 0.00–0.02; P = 0.04], Ward triangle (MD: 0.02; 95% CI, 0.01–0.04; P = 0.001), and greater trochanter (MD: 0.03; 95% CI, 0.02–0.04; P < 0.00001), than the non-tea consumption group. Conclusion: This meta-analysis provided a potential trend that tea consumption might be beneficial for BMD, especially in the lumbar spine, hip, femoral neck, Ward triangle, and greater trochanter, which might help prevent bone loss. PMID:28328853

  15. Bone density in proton pump inhibitors users: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ozdil, Kamil; Kahraman, Resul; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Calhan, Turan; Gozden, Erdem H; Akyuz, Umit; Erer, Burak; Sokmen, Mehmet H

    2013-09-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) receive long-term therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) agents. Several studies have recently been published suggesting that treatment with PPI may cause bone fractures, although the number of prospective studies in this regard is limited. The aim of this study is to prospectively investigate the effect of PPIs on bone density. Between March 2009 and January 2011, 114 GERD patients (18-56 years) and 110 healthy controls were included in the present study. Bone mineral densitometry (BMD) by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was assessed at lumbar spine and femur neck. BMD measurements were performed on all subjects at the beginning of the study. The patients were divided according to three drugs by their treatment with esomeprazole, lansoprazole, or pantoprazole. The study group was followed for at least 6 months on PPI therapy, and then BMD measurements were repeated. The mean duration of treatment with PPIs was 8.5 ± 2.3 months. In patients receiving PPIs, the mean reduction in total vertebra T score following treatment compared to pre-treatment values was 00.23 ± 0.42 units (95 % CI 0.15-0.30) (p < 0.01), while the mean reduction in the femur T score was 0.10 ± 0.40 units (95 % CI 0.03-0.18) (p = 0.03). Reduction following treatment in L4 and total vertebra T scores of lansoprazole group was significantly higher than of pantoprazole group (p = 0.04). Reduction in femur T score of esomeprazole group was higher than of lansoprazole group and pantroprazole group, but it is not statistically significant. Treatment with a PPI results in a significant reduction in bone density. Close monitoring is beneficial for patients who are to receive long-term treatment with PPI.

  16. Bone Mineral Density Response from Teriparatide in Patients with Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Young; Zhang, Meng; Bockman, Richard

    2017-07-01

    A review of data from large clinical trials reported more than 90% of subjects significantly improved their bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) with teriparatide (TPTD) (bone 39:1268-1275, 1). However, our clinical experience suggests that many patients may be non-responders, raising questions as to the true efficacy of TPTD in improving BMD in osteoporotic patients. The purpose of the study is to determine the rate of improvement in BMD following 18-24 months of teriparatide (TPTD) in patients with osteoporosis within an orthopedic hospital setting. This is a retrospective chart review of patients with osteoporosis who completed 18-24 months of TPTD therapy. The primary endpoint was the change in BMD at lumbar spine (LS) and hip-femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) following treatment. Secondary endpoints included the effect of prior bisphosphonate therapy, age, body mass index (BMI) and family history of fracture on BMD response, and the changes in bone-specific markers during active treatment. Seventy-eight women and men with mean T-scores at the LS = -2.63 met the inclusion criteria. The overall group showed a 10.7% increase in LS-BMD after 24 months of TPTD. Eighty-three percent were considered responders defined as ≥3.0% increase in LS-BMD. Non-responders (16.7%) had mean LS-BMD change = -1.41%. No difference in baseline vitamin D, calcium, creatinine, BMI, age, gender, prior fracture history, or bisphosphonate use was observed between responders and non-responders. No consistent pattern of change in measures of bone markers was noted between responders and non-responders. Eighty-three percent of patients with osteoporosis showed a >3% increase in BMD after TPTD treatment. Baseline parameters, prior bisphosphonate therapy, and the changes in bone markers showed no correlation with final BMD outcome.

  17. Study of Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hatinder Jeet; Nimarpreet, Kaur; Ashima; Das, Sibadatta; Kumar, Ashok; Prakash, Shesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by spine and sacroiliac joint involvement that mainly affects young male subjects. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) loss occurs in AS disease course. Bone loss in AS appears to be multifactorial and perhaps involves different mechanisms at different stages of disease. The disease typically affects young males and is associated with progressive functional impairment, increased work disability and decreased quality of life. Osteoporosis is frequent in AS and there is a close association of bone mineral density, bone metabolism and inflammatory activity. Osteoporosis is frequently associated with AS and BMD decreased predominantly in patients with active disease. Aims & Objectives: The aim of the present study was to study bone mineral density in cases of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) in comparison to age and sex matched controls. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted on 100 established cases of AS based on modified New York criteria and 150 controls healthy, age, race, socio-economic matched controls patients. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Hundred cases of AS were subjected to undergo BMD by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA) scan of different age groups in cases 35.19± 8.23(min age 23- max age 67years) and controls 33.27±5.22(min age 22years - max age 44years) with height observed in cases is 169.67±6-87 and controls 170.99±7.16 with weight varied in cases 65.63±10.27 and controls 70.14±10.67. Conclusion: Osteoporosis is a significant complication in ankylosing spondylitis and needs to be monitored and managed at the earliest. Significant osteoporosis can occur even in early disease. Osteoporosis of spine is much more prevalent than femur.BMD spine is still the most important site to define osteoporosis in ankylosing spondylitis. Rise in BMD in LS spine with duration, is not exclusive for subjects with radiologically evident syndesmophytes

  18. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density are lower in older than in younger females with Rett syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although bone mineral deficits have been identified in Rett syndrome (RTT), the prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and its association with skeletal fractures and scoliosis has not been characterized fully in girls and women with RTT. Accordingly, we measured total body bone mineral conten...

  19. New Osseodensification Implant Site Preparation Method to Increase Bone Density in Low-Density Bone: In Vivo Evaluation in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Trisi, Paolo; Falco, Antonello; Podaliri Vulpiani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a new surgical technique for implant site preparation that could allow to enhance bone density, ridge width, and implant secondary stability. Materials and Methods: The edges of the iliac crests of 2 sheep were exposed and ten 3.8 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the left sides using the conventional drilling method (control group). Ten 5 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the right sides (test group) using the osseodensification procedure (Versah). After 2 months of healing, the sheep were killed, and biomechanical and histological examinations were performed. Results: No implant failures were observed after 2 months of healing. A significant increase of ridge width and bone volume percentage (%BV) (approximately 30% higher) was detected in the test group. Significantly better removal torque values and micromotion under lateral forces (value of actual micromotion) were recorded for the test group in respect with the control group. Conclusion: Osseodensification technique used in the present in vivo study was demonstrated to be able to increase the %BV around dental implants inserted in low-density bone in respect to conventional implant drilling techniques, which may play a role in enhancing implant stability and reduce micromotion. PMID:26584202

  20. New Osseodensification Implant Site Preparation Method to Increase Bone Density in Low-Density Bone: In Vivo Evaluation in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Trisi, Paolo; Berardini, Marco; Falco, Antonello; Podaliri Vulpiani, Michele

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new surgical technique for implant site preparation that could allow to enhance bone density, ridge width, and implant secondary stability. The edges of the iliac crests of 2 sheep were exposed and ten 3.8 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the left sides using the conventional drilling method (control group). Ten 5 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the right sides (test group) using the osseodensification procedure (Versah). After 2 months of healing, the sheep were killed, and biomechanical and histological examinations were performed. No implant failures were observed after 2 months of healing. A significant increase of ridge width and bone volume percentage (%BV) (approximately 30% higher) was detected in the test group. Significantly better removal torque values and micromotion under lateral forces (value of actual micromotion) were recorded for the test group in respect with the control group. Osseodensification technique used in the present in vivo study was demonstrated to be able to increase the %BV around dental implants inserted in low-density bone in respect to conventional implant drilling techniques, which may play a role in enhancing implant stability and reduce micromotion.

  1. Proximal tibia volumetric bone mineral density is correlated to the magnitude of local acceleration in male long-distance runners

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Bijan; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Crettenand, Antoinette; Gobelet, Charles; Aminian, Kamiar; Rizzoli, René; Gremion, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effect of physical exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) is at least partly explained by the forces exerted directly on the bones. Male runners present generally higher BMD than sedentary individuals. We postulated that the proximal tibia BMD is related to the running distance, as well as to the magnitude of the shocks (while running) in male runners. A prospective study (three yearly measurements) included 81 healthy male subjects: 16 sedentary lean subjects, and 3 groups of runners (5–30 km/wk, n = 19; 30–50 km/wk, n = 29; 50–100 km/wk, n = 17). Several measurements were performed at the proximal tibia level: volumetric BMD (vBMD) and cortical index (CI), i.e., an index of cortical bone thickness and peak accelerations (an index of shocks during heel strike) while running (measured by a three-dimensional accelerometer). A general linear model assessed the prediction of vBMD or CI by 1) simple effects (running distance, peak accelerations, time); and 2) interactions (for instance, if vBMD prediction by peak acceleration depends on running distance). CI and vBMD 1) increase with running distance to reach a plateau over 30 km/wk; and 2) are positively associated with peak accelerations over 30 km/wk. Running may be associated with high peak accelerations to have beneficial effects on BMD. More important strains are needed to be associated with the same increase in BMD during running sessions of short duration than those of long duration. CI and vBMD are associated with the magnitude of the shocks during heel strike in runners. PMID:20133440

  2. Ethnic and sex differences in bone marrow adipose tissue and bone mineral density relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Gantz, M.; Punyanitya, M.; Heymsfield, S. B.; Gallagher, D.; Albu, J.; Engelson, E.; Kotler, D.; Pi-Sunyer, X.; Shapses, S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue and bone mineral density is different between African Americans and Caucasians as well as between men and women. This suggests that the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation and proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells may differ in these populations. Introduction It has long been established that there are ethnic and sex differences in bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk. Recent studies suggest that bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. It is unknown whether ethnic and sex differences exist in the relationship between BMAT and BMD. Methods Pelvic BMAT was evaluated in 455 healthy African American and Caucasian men and women (age 18–88 years) using whole-body T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. BMD was measured using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results A negative correlation was observed between pelvic BMAT and total body BMD or pelvic BMD (r=−0.533, −0.576, respectively; P<0.001). In multiple regression analyses with BMD as the dependent variable, ethnicity significantly entered the regression models as either an individual term or an interaction with BMAT. Menopausal status significantly entered the regression model with total body BMD as the dependent variable. African Americans had higher total body BMD than Caucasians for the same amount of BMAT, and the ethnic difference for pelvic BMD was greater in those participants with a higher BMAT. Men and premeno-pausal women had higher total body BMD levels than postmenopausal women for the same amount of BMAT. Conclusions An inverse relationship exists between BMAT and BMD in African American and Caucasian men and women. The observed ethnic and sex differences between BMAT and BMD in the present study suggest the possibility that the mechanisms regulating the differentiation and proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells may differ in these populations. PMID

  3. Genetic predisposition for adult lactose intolerance and relation to diet, bone density, and bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara M; Bonelli, Christine M; Walter, Daniela E; Kuhn, Regina J; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Berghold, Andrea; Goessler, Walter; Stepan, Vinzenz; Dobnig, Harald; Leb, Georg; Renner, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    Evidence that genetic disposition for adult lactose intolerance significantly affects calcium intake, bone density, and fractures in postmenopausal women is presented. PCR-based genotyping of lactase gene polymorphisms may complement diagnostic procedures to identify persons at risk for both lactose malabsorption and osteoporosis. Lactase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive condition resulting in decreased intestinal lactose degradation. A -13910 T/C dimorphism (LCT) near the lactase phlorizin hydrolase gene, reported to be strongly associated with adult lactase nonpersistence, may have an impact on calcium supply, bone density, and osteoporotic fractures in the elderly. We determined LCT genotypes TT, TC, and CC in 258 postmenopausal women using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Genotypes were related to milk intolerance, nutritional calcium intake, intestinal calcium absorption, bone mineral density (BMD), and nonvertebral fractures. Twenty-four percent of all women were found to have CC genotypes and genetic lactase deficiency. Age-adjusted BMD at the hip in CC genotypes and at the spine in CC and TC genotypes was reduced by -7% to -11% depending on the site measured (p = 0.04). LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphisms alone accounted for 2-4% of BMD in a multiple regression model. Bone fracture incidence was significantly associated with CC genotypes (p = 0.001). Milk calcium intake was significantly lower (-55%, p = 0.004) and aversion to milk consumption was significantly higher (+166%, p = 0.01) in women with the CC genotype, but there were no differences in overall dietary calcium intake or in intestinal calcium absorption test values. The LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphism is associated with subjective milk intolerance, reduced milk calcium intake, and reduced BMD at the hip and the lumbar spine and may predispose to bone fractures. Genetic testing for lactase deficiency may complement indirect methods in the detection of individuals at risk for both lactose

  4. Dietary pseudopurpurin effects on bone mineral density and bone geometry architecture in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chen; Li, Xiao-Bing; Han, Tie-Suo; Li, Peng; Liu, Guo-Wen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate whether feeding pseudopurpurin affects bone mineral density and bone geometry architecture in rats. Pseudopurpurin was extracted, analyzed and purified using an HLPC-ESI-MS. Rats were given 0% and 0.5% pseudopurpurin powder in their diet. Femurs of rats were examined at 0.5, 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Compared with rats in the group 0%, the bone mineral density, and the calcium, magnesium, zinc and manganese concentrations in the rats femur in the group 0.5% increased significantly at 1 month and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Analytical results of micro-computed tomography showed that the group 0.5% displayed an increase in the trabecular volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular number of the distal femur at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding, and the mean thickness, inner perimeter, outer perimeter, and area of the femur diaphysis were significantly increased at 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding compared with the group 0%. In parallel, the trabecular separation and structure model index of the distal femur were decreased, compared with the group 0% at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. In the 0.5% and 0% groups, there was no damage to kidney and liver by histopathology analysis. The long-term feeding of pseudopurpurin is safe for rats. The feeding of 0.5% pseudopurpurin which has specific chemical affinities for calcium for bone improvement and level of bone mineral density, enhances the geometry architecture compared with the 0% group.

  5. Effects of denosumab on bone mineral density and bone turnover in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wensel, Terri M; Iranikhah, Maryam M; Wilborn, Teresa W

    2011-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease affecting approximately 10 million American adults. Several options are available to prevent development of the disease or slow and even stop its progression. Nonpharmacologic measures include adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D, exercise, fall prevention, and avoidance of tobacco and excessive alcohol intake. Current drug therapy includes bisphosphonates, calcitonin, estrogen or hormone therapy, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. Denosumab, a receptor activator of nuclear factor-K B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor, was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Patients treated with denosumab experienced significant gains in bone mineral density, rapid reductions in markers of bone turnover, and a reduced risk for new vertebral fracture. Compared with placebo, patients receiving denosumab 60 mg subcutaneously once every 6 months experienced gains in bone mineral density of 6.5-11% when treated for 24-48 months. One trial demonstrated the superiority of denosumab compared with alendronate, but the differences were small. The most common adverse reactions to denosumab include back pain, pain in extremities, musculoskeletal pain, and cystitis. Serious, but rare, adverse reactions include the development of serious infections, dermatologic changes, and hypocalcemia. The recommended dosing of denosumab is 60 mg every 6 months as a subcutaneous injection in the upper arm, upper thigh, or abdomen. Although beneficial effects on bone mineral density and fracture rate have been established in clinical trials, the risks associated with denosumab must be evaluated before therapy initiation. Of concern is the risk of infection, and denosumab should likely be avoided in patients taking immunosuppressive therapy or at high risk for infection. Therefore, bisphosphonates will likely remain as first-line therapy. Denosumab should be considered in

  6. Serum Bone Markers Levels and Bone Mineral Density in Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Teoman; Taspınar, Ozgur; Akbal, Yildiz; Peru, Celaleddin; Guler, Mustafa; Uysal, Omer; Yakıcıer, M. Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to measure bone mineral density, serum and urinary bone turnover parameters, and to evaluate the influence of demographic and genetic factors on these parameters in FMF patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven attack-free patients who were diagnosed with FMF (in accordance with Tel Hashomer criteria) were recruited at outpatient rheumatology clinics. We investigated whether there were any differences between the FMF patients and a control group in terms of lumbar and femur bone mineral density (BMD), standard deviation scores (Z scores and T scores) and bone markers. [Results] In terms of the median values of lumbar BMD (p = 0.21), lumbar T (p = 0.098) and Z (p = 0.109) scores, femoral neck BMD, femoral T and Z scores and total femur BMD, T (p = 0.788) and Z scores, there were no significant differences. [Conclusion] In our study, no statistically significant differences were found between FMF patients and a control group in terms of osteoporosis. The 25-OH vitamin D was found to be significantly lower in FMF patients than in the control group. PMID:25276036

  7. Autologous implantation of BMP2-expressing dermal fibroblasts to improve bone mineral density and architecture in rabbit long bones.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2015-10-01

    Cell-mediated gene therapy may treat bone fragility disorders. Dermal fibroblasts (DFb) may be an alternative cell source to stem cells for orthopedic gene therapy because of their rapid cell yield and excellent plasticity with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) gene transduction. Autologous DFb or BMP2-expressing autologous DFb were administered in twelve rabbits by two delivery routes; a transcortical intra-medullar infusion into tibiae and delayed intra-osseous injection into femoral drill defects. Both delivery methods of DFb-BMP2 resulted in a successful cell engraftment, increased bone volume, bone mineral density, improved trabecular bone microarchitecture, greater bone defect filling, external callus formation, and trabecular surface area, compared to non-transduced DFb or no cells. Cell engraftment within trabecular bone and bone marrow tissue was most efficiently achieved by intra-osseous injection of DFb-BMP2. Our results suggested that BMP2-expressing autologous DFb have enhanced efficiency of engraftment in target bones resulting in a measurable biologic response by the bone of improved bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. These results support that autologous implantation of DFb-BMP2 warrants further study on animal models of bone fragility disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and osteoporosis to potentially enhance bone quality, particularly along with other gene modification of these diseases. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  9. Bone density in chronic low back pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gaber, T A Z K; McGlashan, K A; Love, S; Jenner, J R; Crisp, A J

    2002-12-01

    Levels of physical activity in chronic low back pain patients are relatively low due to their fear of provoking pain. This may have a secondary impact on maintenance of bone mass. The objective of this study is to determine if patients with chronic low back pain are at a higher risk of bone demineralization. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 25 chronic low back pain patients at the lumbar spine, hip and distal forearm. A university hospital. Twenty-five chronic low back pain patients (mean age 45 years) enrolled on a residential back pain rehabilitation programme. Thirteen patients (52%) were osteopenic or osteoporotic in one or more sites. BMD at the lumbar spine was generally lower than the mean BMD of age-matched subjects (p = 0.04). There was no significant relationship between BMD and duration of pain, disability, sex or previous surgical intervention. Chronic low back pain patients have an increased incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis. This finding reinforces the importance of motivating patients to incorporate exercise into daily life. Given the limited set of subjects used in the present study, further studies are required.

  10. Bone mineral density-affecting genes in Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Gordon; Haynatzki, Gleb; Haynatzka, Vera; Howell, Ryan; Kosoko-Lasaki, Sade; Fu, Yun-Xin; Yu, Fei; Gallagher, John C.; Wilson, M. Roy

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have recently reported the role of environmental exposure in the ethnic diversity of bone mineral density (BMD). Potential genetic difference has not been adequately assessed. PURPOSE: To determine allele frequencies of BMD-affecting genes and their association with BMD in Africans. METHODS: Allele frequencies at 18 polymorphic sites in 13 genes that affect BMD in Asians and/or Caucasians were determined in 143 recent immigrants (55 men and 88 women, 18-51 years of age) from sub-Saharan Sudan to the United States. Genetic association studies were performed. RESULTS: Among the 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 10 were significantly different in allele frequency between Sudanese and Asians, and 10 between Sudanese and Caucasians. Only the osteocalcin gene was not significantly different in allele frequency among Sudanese, Asians and Caucasians. Allele frequencies in the TGFB, COL1A1 and CSR genes were extremely low (<0.04) in the Sudanese. Frequencies of microsatellite alleles in four genes were significantly different among Sudanese, Asians and Caucasians. SNPs in the VDR and ERalpha genes were associated with BMD and/or BMC (bone mineral content) at several bone sites. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic difference may play a role in the ethnic diversity in BMD and/or BMC. PMID:16895279

  11. Bone Mineral Density and Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Silvia; Hersberger, Martin; Fischler, Manuel; Huber, Lars C; Senn, Oliver; Treder, Ursula; Speich, Rudolf; Schmid, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in chronic lung diseases and associated with reduced quality of life. Little is known about BMD in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods: Steroid-naïve patients with PH (n=34; 19 idiopathic, 15 chronic thromboembolic) had BMD measured by DXA at the time of diagnostic right heart catheterization. Exercise capacity, quality of life and various parameters related to PH severity and bone metabolism were also assessed. 24 patients with left heart failure (LHF) were similarly assessed as controls. Results: The prevalence of osteopenia was high both in PH (80%) and in controls with LHF (75%). Low BMD was associated with lean body mass, age, lower BMI, impaired exercise capacity and in PH with higher pulmonary vascular resistance. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) was elevated and considerably higher in PH than in LHF (above normal, in 55 vs 29%). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was not related to impaired renal function but possibly to low vitamin D status. Conclusions: Osteopenia is common in PH and in chronically ill patients with LHF. Osteopenia is associated with known risk factors but in PH also with disease severity. Preventive measures in an increasingly chronic ill PH population should be considered. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is highly prevalent in PH and might contribute to bone and possibly pulmonary vascular disease. Whether adequate vitamin D substitution could prevent low BMD in PH remains to be determined. PMID:19461899

  12. Serum Bicarbonate and Bone Mineral Density in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Melamed, Michal L.; Abramowitz, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic metabolic acidosis leads to bone mineral loss and results in lower bone mineral density (BMD), which is a risk factor for osteoporosis-related fractures. The effect of low-level metabolic acidosis on bone density in the general population is unknown. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 9,724 nationally representative adults aged 20 years or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Factor Serum bicarbonate level. Outcomes Lumbar and total BMD as well as low lumbar and total bone mass defined as 1.0 SD below sex-specific mean of young adults. Measurements BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum bicarbonate levels were measured in all participants. Results Both men and women with lower serum bicarbonate levels were more likely to be current smokers and had higher body mass index and estimated net endogenous acid production. There was a significant linear trend across quartiles of serum bicarbonate with lumbar BMD among the total population as well as in sex-specific models (p=0.02 for all three models, p=0.1 for interaction). For total BMD, a significant association was seen with serum bicarbonate levels among women but not men (p=0.02 and p=0.1, respectively; p=0.8 for interaction); and a significant association was seen among post-menopausal women but not pre-menopausal women (p=0.02 and p=0.2, respectively; p=0.5 for interaction). Compared to women with serum bicarbonate level <24 mEq/L, those with serum bicarbonate ≥27 mEq/L had 0.018 g/cm2 higher total BMD (95% CI, 0.004-0.032; p=0.01) and had 31% lower odds of having low total bone mass (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99; p=0.05). Limitations Cross-sectional study using a single measurement of serum bicarbonate level. The subgroup differences are not definitive. Conclusions Lower serum bicarbonate levels are associated with lower BMD in US adults. Further studies should examine whether serum bicarbonate levels should be

  13. Serum bicarbonate and bone mineral density in US adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Melamed, Michal L; Abramowitz, Matthew K

    2015-02-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis leads to bone mineral loss and results in lower bone mineral density (BMD), which is a risk factor for osteoporosis-related fractures. The effect of low-level metabolic acidosis on bone density in the general population is unknown. Cross-sectional study. 9,724 nationally representative adults 20 years or older in NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 1999-2004. Serum bicarbonate level. Lumbar and total BMD, as well as low lumbar and total bone mass, defined as 1.0 SD below the sex-specific mean value of young adults. BMD was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and serum bicarbonate was measured in all participants. Both men and women with lower serum bicarbonate levels were more likely to be current smokers and had higher body mass index and estimated net endogenous acid production. There was a significant linear trend across quartiles of serum bicarbonate with lumbar BMD in the total population, as well as in sex-specific models (P=0.02 for all 3 models, P=0.1 for interaction). For total BMD, a significant association was seen with serum bicarbonate level for women but not men (P=0.02 and P=0.1, respectively; P=0.8 for interaction), and a significant association was seen for postmenopausal women but not premenopausal women (P=0.02 and P=0.2, respectively; P=0.5 for interaction). Compared with women with serum bicarbonate levels <24mEq/L, those with serum bicarbonate levels ≥27mEq/L had 0.018-g/cm(2) higher total BMD (95% CI, 0.004-0.032; P=0.01) and 31% lower odds of having low total bone mass (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99; P=0.049). Cross-sectional study using a single measurement of serum bicarbonate. Subgroup differences are not definitive. Lower serum bicarbonate levels are associated with lower BMD in US adults. Further studies should examine whether serum bicarbonate levels should be incorporated into the diagnostic assessment and management of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation

  14. Soy protein is beneficial but high-fat diet and voluntary running are detrimental to bone structure in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated the effects of diet (AIN93G or high-fat), physical activity (sedentary or voluntary running) and protein source (casein or soy protein isolate) and their interactions on bone microstructural changes in distal femurs in male C57BL/6 mice by using micro-computed tomography. After 14 w...

  15. Mandibular bone mineral density as a predictor of skeletal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Horner, K; Devlin, H; Alsop, C W; Hodgkinson, I M; Adams, J E

    1996-11-01

    A considerable amount of work has been performed on methods of detecting individuals with low bone mass at an early stage. Some researchers have considered if dental radiographs could have a role in the detection of individuals with osteoporosis. A basic requirement for this would be that bone mass in the jaw relates significantly to that of other skeletal sites in which osteoporosis is a significant problem. The first aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mandibular bone mineral density (BMD) and that of other skeletal sites commonly used for bone densitometry in the detection of osteoporosis. The second aim was to assess the validity of mandibular BMD as a predictor of BMD in these other sites. 40 edentulous females underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), DXA of the right femoral neck, single photon absorptiometry (SPA) of the proximal and distal forearm and DXA of the mandible. Significant correlations were observed between BMD in the mandibular body, ramus and symphysis and all other skeletal sites (p < 0.02). Five patients (12.5%) had age matched Z-scores of -1.0 or lower in all three non-mandibular sites (lumbar spine, femoral neck and forearm). Using these patients as the proportion of the population with a positive finding of "low bone mass", the sensitivity and specificity of mandibular BMD in predicting low bone mass for these patients was determined. Where a diagnostic threshold for low mandibular BMD was set at one standard deviation below the mean, the mandibular body BMD measurement gave high sensitivity (0.8) and specificity (0.97), the symphysis BMD low sensitivity (0.4) but a high specificity (0.77), while the ramus BMD had a moderate level of sensitivity (0.6) and high specificity (0.91). It is concluded that mandibular BMD assessed by DXA correlates significantly with BMD measurements of other important skeletal sites. The higher correlation coefficients and the greater sensitivity and

  16. Bone Mineral Density in Elite DanceSport Athletes.

    PubMed

    Kruusamäe, Helena; Maasalu, Katre; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2016-03-01

    This study compared bone mineral density (BMD) variables of female and male elite dancesport athletes with untrained control subjects of the same gender. Sixty-six elite dancesport athletes (M 33, F 33) and 64 untrained controls (M 34, F 31) participated in this study. Elite dancesport athletes were dancing couples competing at the international level. Whole-body bone mineral content and whole-body, forearm, lumbar-spine, and femoral-neck BMD, as well as whole-body fat mass and fat free mass, were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. There were no differences (p>0.05) in height and body mass between dancers and controls of the same gender, but percent body fat was lower (p<0.05) in dancers of both genders than in untrained controls. Elite dancesport athletes had significantly higher femoral-neck BMD, and male dancers also higher whole-body BMD values when compared with controls of the same gender. All other measured bone mineral values did not differ between the groups of the same gender. In addition, training experience was positively correlated with whole-body BMD (r=0.27; p<0.05) in dancesport athletes. Based on this study, it can be concluded that elite dancesport athletes have higher BMD values at the weight-bearing site (femoral-neck BMD), while other measured areas and whole-body bone mineral values do not differ from the corresponding values of healthy sedentary controls of the same gender. According to our results, low BMD is not an issue for elite female dancesport athletes, despite their lower percent body fat values.

  17. Asymptomatic vertebral fractures in patients with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, Caio Cesar Leite de; Berigo, Marina Guareschi; Dominoni, Robson Luiz; Vargas, Deisi Maria

    2016-04-01

    Vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) is a test technique that can be used to detect asymptomatic vertebral fractures (AVF). It uses dual energy X-ray bsorptiometry (DXA) and can be performed concurrently with bone densitometry. This study aims to assess the prevalence of AVF in patients with low bone mass. Cross-sectional study including 135 individuals with low bone mineral density (BMD) with a T-score < -2.0 standard deviation (SD) in a densitometry clinic located in the city of Blumenau (state of Santa Catarina). Anthropometric, clinical and lifestyle variables were obtained from history-taking and physical examination. Densitometric variables were obtained by bone mineral densitometry and VFA (Explorer, Hollogic®). Vertebral fractures were classified according to the Genant criteria. Student's t, chi-square and logistic regression were performed for statistical analysis. AVFs occurred in 24.4% of the subjects. They were older compared to those without AVF (65±9.25 versus 60.1±8.66; p=0.005), and had a history of lowimpact fractures (38.24% versus 19.8%; OR 2.5; p=0.03). Half of the patients that reported steroid therapy had AVFs, compared to one fifth of those who did not use steroids (50% versus 21.49%; OR 3.6; p=0.01). Asymptomatic vertebral fractures were present in approximately one fourth of patients. The risk factors associated were history of low-impact fracture, use of steroids and age > 61 years.

  18. Intermittent Pneumatic Compression and Bone Mineral Density: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Almstedt, Hawley Chase; Lewis, Zakkoyya H

    2016-02-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) is a common therapeutic modality used to reduce swelling after trauma and prevent thrombosis due to postsurgical immobilization. Limited evidence suggests that IPC may decrease the time needed to rehabilitate skeletal fractures and increase bone remodeling. To establish feasibility and explore the novel use of a common therapeutic modality, IPC, on bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip of noninjured volunteers. Within-subjects intervention. University research laboratory. Noninjured participants (3 male, 6 female) completed IPC treatment on 1 leg 1 h/d, 5 d/wk for 10 wk. Pressure was set to 60 mm Hg when using the PresSsion and Flowtron Hydroven compression units. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess BMD of the hip in treated and nontreated legs before and after the intervention. Anthropometrics, regular physical activity, and nutrient intake were also assessed. The average number of completed intervention sessions was 43.4 (± 3.8) at an average duration of 9.6 (± 0.8) wk. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated a significant time-by-treatment effect at the femoral neck (P = .023), trochanter (P = .027), and total hip (P = .008). On average, the treated hip increased 0.5-1.0%, while the nontreated hip displayed a 0.7-1.9% decrease, depending on the bone site. Results of this exploratory investigation suggest that IPC is a therapeutic modality that is safe and feasible for further investigation on its novel use in optimizing bone health.

  19. Bone morphometry and mineral density measurement using quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of bone structure and density was explored and developed. A review of bone mineral densitometry (BMD) methodology and general principles of quantitative CT (QCT) are presented. A method for QCT of the spine was developed using a flexible tissue equivalent reference placed adjacent to the patient. A methodology for the development and production of tissue equivalent materials is also presented. Patient equivalent phantoms were used to characterize the method, and phantom studies were performed at five clinical sites. A protocol is defined for measuring the inside diameter of the lumbar pedicular canal. Data generated from this study has proven invaluable in the planning for lumbar fusion surgery when screws are to be used for immobilization. Pedicular canal data from 33 patients is presented. QCT was also used to quantify several parameters of the femoral shaft for use in hip replacement surgical planning. Parameters studied include inside diameter, BMD, endosteal BMD and proximal shaft morphology. The structure and trabecular BMD of the proximal femur was extensively studied using QCT. A large variation was found in the fat content of marrow within the proximal femur, and phantom studies were performed to quantify the effect of fat on trabecular QCT BMD. Cadaveric trabecular bone samples with marrow were analyzed physically to determine water, fat, non-fat soft tissue, and ash content. Multiple thin-slice CT studies were performed on cadaveric femurs. A structural model of the proximal femur was developed in which the structural support is provided primarily by trabecular bone. This model may have profound implications in the study of femoral fractures and prosthetic hardware design.

  20. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) use, fracture and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lana J; Pasco, Julie A; Henry, Margaret J; Sanders, Kerrie M; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Kotowicz, Mark A; Berk, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Paracetamol is the most widely prescribed simple analgesic and antipyretic. It exerts its effects via cyclooxygenase and endocannabinoid pathways, which may affect signalling in bone cells and hence influence bone metabolism. Given the high rates of paracetamol use in the community and the evidence linking its mechanism of action to bone metabolism, we aimed to investigate the association between paracetamol use, fracture, and bone mineral density (BMD) in women participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study (GOS). Cases (n = 569) were women aged ≥ 50 years identified from radiological reports as having sustained a fracture between 1994 and 1996. Controls (n = 775) were women without fracture recruited from the same region during this period. BMD was measured at the spine, hip, total body and forearm using dual energy absorptiometry. Medication use, medical history and lifestyle factors were self-reported. There were 69 (12.1%) paracetamol users among the cases and 63 (8.1%) among the controls. Paracetamol use increased the odds for fracture (OR = 1.56, 95%CI 1.09-2.24, p = 0.02). Adjustment for BMD at the spine, total hip and forearm did not confound the association. However, incorporating total body BMD into the model attenuated the association (adjusted OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.00-2.14, p = 0.051). Further adjustment for age, weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, calcium intake, medication use, medical conditions, falls and previous fracture did not explain the association. These data suggest that paracetamol use is a risk factor for fracture, although the mechanism of action remains unclear.

  1. CINACALCET IMPROVES BONE DENSITY IN POST KIDNEY TRANSPLANT HYPERPARATHYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cho, ME; Duan, Z; Chamberlain, CE; Reynolds, JC; Ring, MS; Wright, EC; Mannon, RB

    2010-01-01

    The recent availability of cinacalcet has provided a possible alternative to parathyroidectomy in kidney transplant patients with persistent hyperparathyroidism, but its effect on bone mass density (BMD) is unknown. From our database containing 163 kidney transplants performed at our center from 1999-2007, we compared recipients who received cinacalcet for persistent hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism following renal tx (n=8; CIN) with up to 2 other post tx patients matched for age, sex, race, and graft function (n=15; CON). The outcome of the study was BMD changes from baseline to 12, 24, and 36 months post renal tx. Repeated Measures Mixed model was used to assess the difference of BMD change between two groups. Cinacalcet therapy was started at a median of 9 months (range; 1, 24 months) post tx with a mean dose 56±29 mg/d (mean duration; 1.6 years, range; 1, 2.1). Cinacalcet therapy was associated with significant reduction of serum calcium compared to control. Cinacalcet therapy was associated with greater BMD increase at the hip over the 36-month post transplant period. Cinacalcet was well tolerated. Our results suggest that cinacalcet may have a small but favorable effect on bone density following kidney transplantation. PMID:21094814

  2. Bone density and cortical structure after pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, Anniek M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Foster, Bethany J; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Leonard, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure.

  3. Cinacalcet improves bone density in post-kidney transplant hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Cho, M E; Duan, Z; Chamberlain, C E; Reynolds, J C; Ring, M S; Mannon, R B

    2010-11-01

    The recent availability of cinacalcet has provided a possible alternative to parathyroidectomy in kidney transplant patients with persistent hyperparathyroidism, but its effect on bone mass density (BMD) is unknown. From our database containing 163 kidney transplants performed at our center from 1999 to 2007, we compared recipients who received cinacalcet for persistent hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism following renal transplantation (n = 8) with up to two other posttransplant patients matched for age, sex, race, and graft function (n = 15). The outcome of the study was BMD changes from baseline to 12, 24, and 36 months post-renal transplantation. Repeated-measures mixed model was used to assess the difference of BMD change between two groups. Cinacalcet therapy was started at a median of 9 (range = 1 to 24) months posttransplant with a mean dose 56 ± 29 mg/d (mean duration = 1.6; range = 1 to 2.1 years). Cinacalcet therapy was associated with significant reduction of serum calcium compared to control. Cinacalcet therapy was associated with greater BMD increase at the hip over the 36-month posttransplant period. Cinacalcet was well tolerated. Our results suggest that cinacalcet may have a small but favorable effect on bone density following kidney transplantation.

  4. Bone Density and Cortical Structure after Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Anniek M.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S.; Wetzsteon, Rachel J.; Foster, Bethany J.; Strife, C. Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of renal transplantation on trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical structure is unknown. We obtained quantitative computed tomography scans of the tibia in pediatric renal transplant recipients at transplantation and 3, 6, and 12 months; 58 recipients completed at least two visits. We used more than 700 reference participants to generate Z-scores for trabecular BMD, cortical BMD, section modulus (a summary measure of cortical dimensions and strength), and muscle and fat area. At baseline, compared with reference participants, renal transplant recipients had significantly lower mean section modulus and muscle area; trabecular BMD was significantly greater than reference participants only in transplant recipients younger than 13 years. After transplantation, trabecular BMD decreased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure. Cortical BMD increased significantly in association with greater glucocorticoid exposure and greater decreases in parathyroid hormone levels. Muscle and fat area both increased significantly, but section modulus did not improve. At 12 months, transplantation associated with significantly lower section modulus and greater fat area compared with reference participants. Muscle area and cortical BMD did not differ significantly between transplant recipients and reference participants. Trabecular BMD was no longer significantly elevated in younger recipients and was low in older recipients. Pediatric renal transplant associated with persistent deficits in section modulus, despite recovery of muscle, and low trabecular BMD in older recipients. Future studies should determine the implications of these data on fracture risk and identify strategies to improve bone density and structure. PMID:22282589

  5. Bone impacted fibular free flap: a novel technique to increase bone density for dental implantation in osseous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dziegielewski, Peter T; Mlynarek, Alex M; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hrdlicka, Adam; Barber, Brittany; Al-Qahtani, Khalid; Wolfaardt, John; Raboud, Don; Seikaly, Hadi

    2014-11-01

    Fibular free flap (FFF) bone has thick cortical bone surrounding a fatty marrow. The cortex has sufficient density for dental implantation, but the marrow limits bone stock. A novel technique was devised to increase bone density: the bone-impacted fibular free flap (BIFFF). The purpose of this study was to: (1) describe the BIFFF technique; (2) evaluate the bone density of BIFFF; and (3) evaluate the stability/success of implants placed in BIFFFs. Patients undergoing maxillary/mandibular reconstruction with FFFs were prospectively enrolled from 1998 to 2008. Two cohorts were compared: BIFFF and nonmodified FFF. The main outcome was bone density as seen on CT scans. Primary dental implant stability was determined via Periotest. Thirty-eight patients were included in this study. BIFFFs achieved higher bone density versus unmodified FFFs (p < .05). Greater primary dental implant stability occurred in BIFFFs (p < .05). One hundred percent of BIFFF and 59% of nonmodified FFF implants were successful at 1 year. BIFFF increases reconstructed bone density, initial dental implant stability, and 1-year implant success. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Prevalence of low bone mineral density in female dancers.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Tânia; Wyon, Matthew; Maia, José; Machado, José Carlos; Marques, Franklim; Metsios, George S; Flouris, Andreas D; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2015-02-01

    While some authors report that dancers have reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of osteoporosis, others have stressed the positive effects of dance training on developing healthy BMD. Given the existing controversy, the aim of this systematic review was to examine the best evidence-based information available in relation to female dancers. Four databases (Web of Science, PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus) and two dance science journals (Journal of Dance Medicine and Science and Medical Problems of Performing Artists) were searched for relevant material using the keywords "dance", "ballet", "BMD", "bone density", "osteoporosis" and "female athlete triad syndrome". A total of 257 abstracts were screened using selected inclusion (studies involving bone measurements in dancers) and exclusion (editorials, opinion papers, chapters in books, narrative reviews and non-English language papers) criteria according to PRISMA guidelines. Following the above screening, a total of 108 abstracts were identified as potentially relevant. After the exclusion of conference proceedings, review papers, studies focusing only in male dancers and studies in which dancers' information were combined with other athletes, the eligible papers were subsequently assessed using the GRADE system and grouped according to: (1) prevalence of low BMD and associated factors, (2) incidence of low BMD and risk factors, (3) prevention/treatment of low BMD in dancers, and (4) other studies. Of the 257 abstracts that were initially screened, only 35 studies were finally considered. Only one of these 35 was of high quality, while the remaining 34 were of relatively low quality. Seven studies reported prevalence of low BMD and associated factors, 10 reported associated factors with no prevalence data, while one reported prevalence with no associated factors data. One study cited risk factors, while another one elaborated on the treatment of low BMD in dancers. The remaining 15 studies were classified as

  7. [Effect of multiparity on bone mineral density, evaluated with bone turnover markers].

    PubMed

    Terzi, Hasan; Terzi, Rabia; Kale, Ebru; Kale, Ahmet

    2015-09-07

    Our aim was to investigate the effect of parity on osteoporosis by evaluating bone mineral density, markers of bone turn-over and other factors that are effective in osteoporosis in multiparous (5 deliveries or more) and nulliparous women in the post-menopausal period. A total of 91 multiparous (5 deliveries or more) and 31 nulliparous postmenopausal women were included in this study. All patients were interviewed on sociodemographic characteristics, gynecologic history, personal habits, levels of physical activity, and life-long intake of calcium. Bone mineral density was measured at lumbar (L1-4) and femoral neck regions with Dexa. The mean age of multiparous women was 58.79±7.85 years, and the mean age of nulliparous women was 55,84±7,51. The femoral BMD was 0,94±0,16 and lumbar BMD 1,01±0,16 in multiparous women, femoral BMD was 0,99±0,16 and lumbar BMD 1,07±0,14 in nulliparous women. There were no statistical differences between the femoral and lumbar T scores and BMD values of the two groups. Lumbar T scores and lumbar BMD showed a decrease with increasing total duration of breast-feeding in multiparous women. The independent risk factors for osteoporosis in the regression analysis of multiparous women were found to be the duration of menopause and body weight of 65kg and less. There is no difference between the bone mineral densities of multiparous and nulliparous women. Females with lower body-weight and longer duration of menopause should be followed-up more carefully for development of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Participation in high-impact sports predicts bone mineral density in senior olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Leigey, Daniel; Irrgang, James; Francis, Kimberly; Cohen, Peter; Wright, Vonda

    2009-11-01

    Loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and resultant fractures increase with age in both sexes. Participation in resistance or high-impact sports is a known contributor to bone health in young athletes; however, little is known about the effect of participation in impact sports on bone density as people age. To test the hypothesis that high-impact sport participation will predict BMD in senior athletes, this study evaluated 560 athletes during the 2005 National Senior Games (the Senior Olympics). Cross-sectional methods. The athletes completed a detailed health history questionnaire and underwent calcaneal quantitative ultrasound to measure BMD. Athletes were classified as participating in high impact sports (basketball, road race [running], track and field, triathalon, and volleyball) or non-high-impact sports. Stepwise linear regression was used to determine the influence of high-impact sports on BMD. On average, participants were 65.9 years old (range, 50 to 93). There were 298 women (53.2%) and 289 men (51.6%) who participated in high-impact sports. Average body mass index was 25.6 ± 3.9. The quantitative ultrasound-generated T scores, a quantitative measure of BMD, averaged 0.4 ± 1.3 and -0.1 ± 1.4 for the high-impact and non-high-impact groups, respectively. After age, sex, obesity, and use of osteoporosis medication were controlled, participation in high-impact sports was a significant predictor of BMD (R(2) change 3.2%, P < .001). This study represents the largest sample of BMD data in senior athletes to date. Senior participation in high-impact sports positively influenced bone health, even in the oldest athletes. These data imply that high-impact exercise is a vital tool to maintain healthy BMD with active aging.

  9. The relationship between breast density and bone mineral density in never users of postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Seckin, Berna; Pekcan, Meryem Kuru; Inal, Hasan Ali; Gulerman, Cavidan

    2017-06-01

    Estrogen is known to affect both mammographic breast density and bone mineral density (BMD), but there are inconsistent results about the association of these density measurements in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, there are scarce data on the relationship between breast density and BMD in never users of postmenopausal hormone therapy. In this study, we examined the relationship between mammographic breast density and BMD in postmenopausal women who were never hormone replacement therapy users. A total of 293 postmenopausal women were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Mammograms and BMD measurements for screening purposes were obtained. Assessment of mammographic breast density was performed by using breast imaging reporting and data system classification. The BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Grade 1 breast density was observed in 64 women (21.8 %), grade 2 in 113 women (38.6 %) and grades 3 and 4 in 116 (39.6 %) women. Breast density decreased with increasing age and body mass index (BMI). Meanwhile, no significant differences were detected in BMD measures of the hip (p = 0.14) and lumbar spine (p = 0.29) among the breast density categories. After adjusting for age and BMI, the differences in the mean BMD at the hip and lumbar spine across the breast density categories remained insignificant (p = 0.26 and 0.11, respectively). There is no evidence of a relationship between mammographic breast density and BMD in postmenopausal women who had never used hormone replacement therapy.

  10. Longitudinal evolution of bone mineral density and bone markers in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Mondy, Kristin; Yarasheski, Kevin; Powderly, William G; Whyte, Michael; Claxton, Sherry; DeMarco, Debra; Hoffmann, Mary; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-02-15

    The underlying mechanisms of several bone disorders in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and any relation to antiretroviral therapy have yet to be defined. A longitudinal study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in HIV-infected persons; to assess bone mineralization, metabolism, and histomorphometry over time; and to evaluate predisposing factors. A total of 128 patients enrolled the study, and 93 were observed for 72 weeks. "Classic" risk factors (low body mass index, history of weight loss, steroid use, and smoking) for low bone mineral density (BMD) and duration of HIV infection were strongly associated with osteopenia. There was a weak association between low BMD and receipt of treatment with protease inhibitors; this association disappeared after controlling for the above factors. Markers of bone turnover tended to be elevated in the whole cohort but were not associated with low BMD. BMD increased slightly during follow-up. Traditional risk factors and advanced HIV infection play a more significant pathogenic role in the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis associated with HIV infection than do treatment-associated factors.

  11. Vitamin K2 improves femoral bone strength without altering bone mineral density in gastrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Gastrectomy (GX) induces osteopenia in rats. The present study examined the skeletal effects of vitamin K2 in GX rats. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 wk old) were randomized by the stratified weight method into the following three groups of 10 animals each: sham operation (control) group; GX group; and GX+oral vitamin K2 (menatetrenone, 30 mg/kg, 5 d/wk) group. Treatment was initiated at 1 wk after surgery. After 6 wk of treatment, the bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), and mechanical strength of the femoral diaphysis and distal metaphysis were determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography and mechanical strength tests, respectively. GX induced decreases in the BMC, BMD, and ultimate force of the femoral diaphysis and distal metaphysis. Vitamin K2 did not significantly influence the BMC or BMD of the femoral diaphysis or distal metaphysis in GX rats, but attenuated the decrease in the ultimate force and increased the stiffness of the femoral diaphysis. The present study showed that administration of vitamin K2 to GX rats improved the bone strength of the femoral diaphysis without altering the BMC or BMD, suggesting effects of vitamin K2 on the cortical bone quality.

  12. The relationship between bone mineral density and mammographic density in Korean women: the Healthy Twin study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi; Stone, Jennifer; Lee, Kayoung

    2011-09-01

    Mammographic density is one of the strong risk factors for breast cancer. A potential mechanism for this association is that cumulative exposure to mammographic density may reflect cumulative exposure to hormones that stimulate cell division in breast stroma and epithelium, which may have corresponding effects on breast cancer development. Bone mineral density (BMD), a marker of lifetime estrogen exposure, has been found to be associated with breast cancer. We examined the association between BMD and mammographic density in a Korean population. Study subjects were 730 Korean women selected from the Healthy Twin study. BMD (g/cm(2)) was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Mammographic density was measured from digital mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Linear mixed model considering familial correlations and a wide range of covariates was used for analyses. Quantitative genetic analysis was completed using SOLAR. In premenopausal women, positive associations existed between absolute dense area and BMD at ribs, pelvis, and legs, and between percent dense area and BMD at pelvis and legs. However, in postmenopausal women, there was no association between BMD at any site and mammographic density measures. An evaluation of additive genetic cross-trait correlation showed that absolute dense area had a weak-positive additive genetic cross-trait correlation with BMD at ribs and spines after full adjustment of covariates. This finding suggests that the association between mammographic density and breast cancer could, at least in part, be attributable to an estrogen-related hormonal mechanism.

  13. Greater association of peak neuromuscular performance with cortical bone geometry, bone mass and bone strength than bone density: A study in 417 older women.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Blenk, Tilo; Bock, Oliver; Börst, Hendrikje; Kocakaya, Emine; Luhn, Franziska; Rantalainen, Timo; Rawer, Rainer; Tomasius, Frederike; Willnecker, Johannes; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated which aspects of neuromuscular performance are associated with bone mass, density, strength and geometry. 417 women aged 60-94years were examined. Countermovement jump, sit-to-stand test, grip strength, forearm and calf muscle cross-sectional area, areal bone mineral content and density (aBMC and aBMD) at the hip and lumbar spine via dual X-ray absorptiometry, and measures of volumetric vBMC and vBMD, bone geometry and section modulus at 4% and 66% of radius length and 4%, 38% and 66% of tibia length via peripheral quantitative computed tomography were performed. The first principal component of the neuromuscular variables was calculated to generate a summary neuromuscular variable. Percentage of total variance in bone parameters explained by the neuromuscular parameters was calculated. Step-wise regression was also performed. At all pQCT bone sites (radius, ulna, tibia, fibula), a greater percentage of total variance in measures of bone mass, cortical geometry and/or bone strength was explained by peak neuromuscular performance than for vBMD. Sit-to-stand performance did not relate strongly to bone parameters. No obvious differential in the explanatory power of neuromuscular performance was seen for DXA aBMC versus aBMD. In step-wise regression, bone mass, cortical morphology, and/or strength remained significant in relation to the first principal component of the neuromuscular variables. In no case was vBMD positively related to neuromuscular performance in the final step-wise regression models. Peak neuromuscular performance has a stronger relationship with leg and forearm bone mass and cortical geometry as well as proximal forearm section modulus than with vBMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Determinants of Trabecular and Cortical Volumetric Bone Mineral Densities and Bone Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Sievänen, Harri; Viikari, Jorma; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mellström, Dan; Karlsson, Magnus; Ljunggren, Östen; Grundberg, Elin; Kemp, John P.; Sayers, Adrian; Nethander, Maria; Evans, David M.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Tobias, Jon H.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2013-01-01

    Most previous genetic epidemiology studies within the field of osteoporosis have focused on the genetics of the complex trait areal bone mineral density (aBMD), not being able to differentiate genetic determinants of cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD), trabecular vBMD, and bone microstructural traits. The objective of this study was to separately identify genetic determinants of these bone traits as analysed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Separate GWA meta-analyses for cortical and trabecular vBMDs were performed. The cortical vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n = 5,878) followed by replication (n = 1,052) identified genetic variants in four separate loci reaching genome-wide significance (RANKL, rs1021188, p = 3.6×10−14; LOC285735, rs271170, p = 2.7×10−12; OPG, rs7839059, p = 1.2×10−10; and ESR1/C6orf97, rs6909279, p = 1.1×10−9). The trabecular vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n = 2,500) followed by replication (n = 1,022) identified one locus reaching genome-wide significance (FMN2/GREM2, rs9287237, p = 1.9×10−9). High-resolution pQCT analyses, giving information about bone microstructure, were available in a subset of the GOOD cohort (n = 729). rs1021188 was significantly associated with cortical porosity while rs9287237 was significantly associated with trabecular bone fraction. The genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus was associated with fracture risk in the MrOS Sweden cohort (HR per extra T allele 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.93) and GREM2 expression in human osteoblasts. In conclusion, five genetic loci associated with trabecular or cortical vBMD were identified. Two of these (FMN2/GREM2 and LOC285735) are novel bone-related loci, while the other three have previously been reported to be associated with aBMD. The genetic variants associated with cortical and trabecular bone parameters differed, underscoring the complexity of the genetics of bone parameters. We propose that a genetic

  15. Early decrements in bone density after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in pediatric bone sarcoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone mineral density (BMD) accrual during childhood and adolescence is important for attaining peak bone mass. BMD decrements have been reported in survivors of childhood bone sarcomas. However, little is known about the onset and development of bone loss during cancer treatment. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate BMD in newly diagnosed Ewing's and osteosarcoma patients by means of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods DXA measurements of the lumbar spine (L2-4), both femora and calcanei were performed perioperatively in 46 children and adolescents (mean age: 14.3 years, range: 8.6-21.5 years). Mean Z-scores, areal BMD (g/cm2), calculated volumetric BMD (g/cm3) and bone mineral content (BMC, g) were determined. Results Lumbar spine mean Z-score was -0.14 (95% CI: -0.46 to 0.18), areal BMD was 1.016 g/cm2 (95% CI: 0.950 to 1.082) and volumetric BMD was 0.330 g/cm3 (95% CI: 0.314 to 0.347) which is comparable to healthy peers. For patients with a lower extremity tumor (n = 36), the difference between the affected and non-affected femoral neck was 12.1% (95% CI: -16.3 to -7.9) in areal BMD. The reduction of BMD was more pronounced in the calcaneus with a difference between the affected and contralateral side of 21.7% (95% CI: -29.3 to -14.0) for areal BMD. Furthermore, significant correlations for femoral and calcaneal DXA measurements were found with Spearman-rho coefficients ranging from ρ = 0.55 to ρ = 0.80. Conclusions The tumor disease located in the lower extremity in combination with offloading recommendations induced diminished BMD values, indicating local osteopenia conditions. However, the results revealed no significant decrements of lumbar spine BMD in pediatric sarcoma patients after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, it has to be taken into account that bone tumor patients may experience BMD decrements or secondary osteoporosis in later life

  16. Influence of heredity and environment on peak bone density: a review of studies in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Cvijetić Avdagić, Selma; Colić Barić, Irena; Keser, Irena; Rumbak, Ivana; Šatalić, Zvonimir

    2012-01-01

    One of the main determinants of who will develop osteoporosis is the amount of bone accumulated at peak bone density. There is poor agreement, however, on when peak bone density occurs. Ethnic differences were observed in age at peak bone density and their correlates. Since the diagnosis of osteoporosis and osteopaenia is based on the comparison between patients' bone mineral density (BMD) and optimal peak bone density in healthy young people (T-score), it is of great importance that each country should provide its own reference peak bone density data.This review article presents our published results on peak bone density in Croatia and compares them with findings in other populations. Our research included 18 to 25-year-old students from Zagreb University and their parents. The results showed that peak bone mass in young Croatian women was achieved before the age of twenty, but BMD continued to increase after the mid-twenties in the long-bone cortical skeleton. BMD was comparable to the values reported by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and other studies that included the same age groups, except for the cortical part of the radius, where it was significantly lower. Men achieved peak bone density in the spine later than women, which cannot be explained by different diet or physical activity. As expected, heredity was more important for peak bone density than the environmental factors known to be important for bone health. However, the influence of heredity was not as strong as observed in most other populations. It was also weaker in the cortical than in the trabecular parts of the skeleton. Future research should include young adolescent population to define the exact age of achieving peak bone density in different skeletal sites.

  17. Correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters with density and microarchitectural parameters in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, correlations of linear and nonlinear ultrasound parameters (speed of sound, normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation, and nonlinear parameter B/A) with bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters were investigated in 28 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in vitro. All three ultrasound parameters exhibited relatively high correlation coefficients with the indexes of bone quantity (bone mineral density and bone volume fraction) and lower correlation coefficients with the remaining microarchitectural parameters. These results suggest that B/A, in addition to speed of sound and attenuation, may have potential as an index for the assessment of bone status and osteoporosis.

  18. Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abshire, Demetrius A; Moser, Debra K; Clasey, Jody L; Chung, Misook L; Pressler, Susan J; Dunbar, Sandra B; Heo, Seongkum; Lennie, Terry A

    2016-07-10

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations among bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, body mass index (BMI), and body composition in patients with heart failure (HF). A total of 119 patients (age = 61 ± 12 years, 65% male) underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to determine bone mineral density and body composition. In multivariable linear regressions, BMI, relative skeletal muscle index (RSMI), and mineral-free lean mass were positively associated with total body bone mineral density. Mineral-free lean mass was most strongly associated with bone mineral density (β = .398). In multivariable logistic regressions, higher BMI, RSMI, and mineral-free lean mass were associated with lower odds for osteopenia/osteoporosis. Fat mass was not associated with total body bone mineral density or osteopenia/osteoporosis. These results suggest that muscle mass may be the important component of body mass associated with bone mineral density in patients with HF.

  19. Preoperative Computed Tomography-Derived Bone Densities in Hounsfield Units at Implant Sites Acquired Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hiasa, Kyou; Abe, Yasuhiko; Okazaki, Yohei; Nogami, Keisuke; Mizumachi, Wataru; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative CT-derived bone densities in Hounsfield units (HU) at implant sites that acquired primary stability, and to compare these values to the optimal bone densities proposed in the literature. Fifty-one patients, 18 males (37 implant sites) and 33 females (67 implant sites) between 2003 and 2010 were assessed. CT data for different jaw sections, regions, and operating procedures were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Scheffe's test for multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). The mean bone density in the maxilla was significantly lower than that in the mandible (P < 0.05); the mean bone densities in the 4 jaw regions decreased in the following order: anterior mandible > anterior maxilla > posterior mandible > posterior maxilla. The bone densities assessed by HU fell into the range of optimal bone densities associated with acquired primary implant stability proposed in the literature. PMID:22203910

  20. Low bone mineral density in adult patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Waszczuk, Ewa; Jakubowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D malabsorption in coeliac disease (CD) predispose to skeletal demineralisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium deficiencies in adult patients with CD and assess whether a gluten-free diet is sufficiently effective for BMD restoration. BMD and biochemical parameters of bone and mineral metabolism were measured in 35 adult CD patients receiving (19) or not receiving (16) a gluten-free diet (GFD) and in 36 controls. Then the CD patients were treated with a GFD and calcium (1.0 g/day) plus alfacalcidol (0.25-1 μg/day) for one year. Reduced BMD was diagnosed in 57-77% of the patients. Mean calcaemia, calciuria, and 25(OH) vitamin D were lower, but serum PTH and bone-turnover markers (ALP, osteocalcin, ICTP) were significantly higher in the CD patients than in the controls. In the patients on the diet (GFD(+)), BMD was higher than in the GFD(-) patients, but lower than in the controls. The biochemical parameters were normal in the GFD(+) patients except for diminished calciuria. Mean BMD after one year of treatment significantly increased (p < 0.05), mostly in the lumbar spine (mean: 7.3%), but decreased in five patients who did not strictly adhere to the GFD. Deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, and BMD are very common in adult CD patients. Gluten avoidance increased BMD, although the values remained markedly lower in several patients. Because of chronic calcium deficiency despite GFD, calcium and vitamin D supplementation in most adult CD patients is proposed.

  1. Bone mineral density and blood metals in premenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.Z.; Mumford, S.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Yeung, E.; Mendola, P.; Mattison, D.R.; Schisterman, E.F.

    2013-01-15

    Exposure to metals, specifically cadmium, lead, and mercury, is widespread and is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in older populations, but the associations among premenopausal women are unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between these metals in blood and BMD (whole body, total hip, lumbar spine, and non-dominant wrist) quantified by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 248 premenopausal women, aged 18-44. Participants were of normal body mass index (mean BMI 24.1), young (mean age 27.4), 60% were white, 20% non-Hispanic black, 15% Asian, and 6% other race group, and were from the Buffalo, New York region. The median (interquartile range) level of cadmium was 0.30 {mu}g/l (0.19-0.43), of lead was 0.86 {mu}g/dl (0.68-1.20), and of mercury was 1.10 {mu}g/l (0.58-2.00). BMD was treated both as a continuous variable in linear regression and dichotomized at the 10th percentile for logistic regression analyses. Mercury was associated with reduced odds of decreased lumbar spine BMD (0.66, 95% confidence interval: 0.44, 0.99), but overall, metals at environmentally relevant levels of exposure were not associated with reduced BMD in this population of healthy, reproductive-aged women. Further research is needed to determine if the blood levels of cadmium, lead, and mercury in this population are sufficiently low that there is no substantive impact on bone, or if effects on bone can be expected only at older ages.

  2. Cannabis use and bone mineral density: NHANES 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Donald; Plinke, Wesley; Hooker, Elizabeth R; Nielson, Carrie M

    2017-12-01

    Cannabis use is rising in the USA. Its relationship to cannabinoid signaling in bone cells implies its use could affect bone mineral density (BMD) in the population. In a national survey of people ages 20-59, we found no association between self-reported cannabis use and BMD of the hip or spine. Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the USA, and its recreational use has recently been approved in several US states. Cannabinoids play a role in bone homeostasis. We aimed to determine the association between cannabis use and BMD in US adults. In the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010, 4743 participants between 20 and 59 years old, history of cannabis use was categorized into never, former (previous use, but not in last 30 days), light (1-4 days of use in last 30 days), and heavy (≥5 days of use in last 30 days). Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between cannabis use and DXA BMD of the proximal femur and lumbar spine with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and race/ethnicity among other BMD determinants. Sixty percent of the population reported ever using cannabis; 47% were former users, 5% were light users, and 7% were heavy users. Heavy cannabis users were more likely to be male, have a lower BMI, increased daily alcohol intake, increased tobacco pack-years, and were more likely to have used other illegal drugs (cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamines). No association between cannabis and BMD was observed for any level of use (p ≥ 0.28). A history of cannabis use, although highly prevalent and related to other risk factors for low BMD, was not independently associated with BMD in this cross-sectional study of American men and women.

  3. Reproductive factors affecting the bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ferda; Demirbag, Derya; Rodoplu, Meliha

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis has been defined as a metabolic bone disease characterized by a loss of bone mineral density (BMD) greater than 2.5 standard deviations below young adult peak bone mass or the presence of fracture. By considering that some factors related to female reproductive system might influence the ultimate risk of osteoporosis, we aimed to investigate if a relationship exists between the present BMD of postmenopausal women with their past and present reproductive characteristics. The present study focused on how BMD could be affected by the following factors in postmenopausal women, such as age at menarche, age at first pregnancy, the number of pregnancies and total breast-feeding time. We reviewed detailed demographic history of 303 postmenopausal women. According to the results of the present study, a negative correlation was found between the number of parities and BMD. The BMD values decreased as the number of pregnancies increased. When the BMD values for lumbar vertebrae 2 and Ward's triangle were investigated, it was observed that a significant difference exists between the women with no child birth and those with more than five parities. There was a significant relationship between age at first pregnancy and BMD values at the lumbar vertebrae 2 and Ward's triangle. Women who had five or more abortions were found to have significantly lower spine BMD values compared to women who had no abortions or women who had one or two abortions. These findings indicate that the increased risk of osteoporosis is associated with the increased number of pregnancies and abortions and higher age at first pregnancy.

  4. Relationship between bone turnover biomarkers, mandibular bone mineral density, and systemic skeletal bone mineral density in premenopausal and postmenopausal Indian women.

    PubMed

    Makker, Annu; Singh, Man Mohan; Mishra, Geetanjali; Singh, Balendra Pratap; Jain, Girish Kumar; Jadhav, Satyawan

    2012-06-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is one of the most common metabolic bone disorders. Osteoporosis is reported to cause bone loss in the alveolar processes of maxilla and mandible, which provide bony framework for tooth anchorage. However, the association between systemic osteoporosis and oral health remains controversial. Available evidence suggests that Indian women have lower peak bone mass than their Western/other Asian counterparts. The present study evaluated the relationship between mandibular bone mineral density (mBMD), systemic skeletal BMD, and bone metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal Indian women. One hundred twenty-four premenopausal and 247 postmenopausal healthy women were included in the study. The BMD of the body of mandible, radius ultradistal, total hip, femur neck, and lateral spine were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Serum and urine biomarkers were determined using commercial kits. Univariate regression analysis followed by stepwise multivariate regression analysis to obtain the best fit model demonstrated the BMD of radius ultradistal, serum inorganic phosphorus, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin as significant predictors of mBMD in premenopausal women. The BMD of femur neck, serum ionized calcium, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and urine total pyridinoline were significantly associated with mBMD in postmenopausal women. The significant association between mBMD and number of teeth present was observed in the whole group of premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Varied predictors of mBMD were observed in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The results suggest that the screening for these biomarkers and serum ionized calcium should be useful (1) to assess the status of mBMD particularly in women requiring surgical dental intervention that include bone manipulation and (2) for early detection and management of women with the risk of developing osteoporosis.

  5. The relationship between calcium kidney stones, arterial stiffness and bone density: unraveling the stone-bone-vessel liaison.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Comellato, Gabriele; Caletti, Chiara; Fantin, Francesco; Zaza, Gianluigi; Zamboni, Mauro; Lupo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Kidney stone disease is associated with a higher incidence of cardio-vascular (CV) events for still unclear reasons. Reduced bone density is also a frequent finding in calcium kidney stones. The association of reduced bone density with increased vascular stiffness and calcification has been discovered in a number of conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that patients with calcium kidney stones have increased arterial stiffness, which would be associated with reduced bone density and higher CV risk. We compared measures of arterial stiffness [carotid-radial pulse-wave velocity (CR-PWV), carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (CF-PWV) and augmentation index (AI)] and of bone density (T-scores determined at lumbar spine, neck and hip) among 42 idiopathic calcium stone formers compared with 42 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Stone formers had higher values of CR-PWV, CF-PWV and AI, and lower values of all T-scores. Furthermore, the prevalence of abnormal arterial stiffness and reduced bone density was significantly higher among stone formers. Statistical adjustment for age, sex, body mass index and other covariates did not change the results. Our study confirms that stone formers have increased arterial stiffness and reduced bone density. Abnormal arterial stiffness appears to be independent of reduced bone density and may explain the higher CV risk observed in stone formers.

  6. Plasma homocysteine, B vitamins and bone mineral density in osteoporosis: a possible risk for bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Ebesunun, M O; Umahoin, K O; Alonge, T O; Adebusoye, L A

    2014-03-01

    Changes in plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6 in individuals with osteoporosis are reported to impair collagen cross-linking and contribute to low bone mineral density (BMD). There is paucity of information on these associations in osteoporotic patients at risk of bone fractures in Nigeria. The study evaluated plasma tHcy, folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6, in relation to BMD in individuals with osteoporosis. Fifty osteoporotic patients age 57.05 +/- 1.9 years were selected and fifty non osteoporotic volunteer's age 54.8 +/- 0.9 years were included as controls. The osteoporotic group consisted of 11 males and 39 females (1:3.5) while the controls consisted of 13 males and 37 females (1:2.8) respectively. Bone mineral density, anthropometric indices plasma tHcy, folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6, were determined using standard procedures. The results showed remarkably significant increase in plasma tHcy (p < 0.001) (180%) compared with the control value. Striking significant decreases were observed in folic acid (62%), vitamins B12 (42%), B6 (59%) and BMI p < 0.001) compared with control values. Positive correlation was obtained between vitamin B12 and BMD (r = 0.311, p < 0.05). Significant increase in tHcy with corresponding decreases in folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6 are related to decrease in BMD in osteoporotic patients. These changes could be important risk factors for bone fracture in osteoporotic Nigerians. Supplementation with the B vitamins may be beneficial to the patients.

  7. Growth hormone therapy and bone mineral density in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bakalov, Vladimir K; Van, Phillip L; Baron, Jeffrey; Reynolds, James C; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2004-10-01

    In a previous report, preliminary data showed a significant reduction in cortical bone mineral density (BMD) in women with Turner syndrome that had been treated with GH compared with women with Turner syndrome that had not been treated. To clarify this point, we have investigated the effects of GH treatment at multiple sites in this case-control, cross-sectional study. There were 23 women per group, who were similar in age, height, body mass index, estrogen use, and ethnic makeup. Median age (range) at start and duration of GH treatment was 9 (3-17) and 5 (2-9) yr, respectively. GH-treated women had a slightly greater ( approximately 8%, P = 0.03) width of the radial shaft, but otherwise there were no significant differences between groups in bone dimensions or BMD at the distal radius, lumbar spine, or femoral neck. Furthermore, regression analysis in a linear model including independent variables of age, age at diagnosis, body mass index, presence of spontaneous puberty, and GH use confirmed that GH use did not contribute to variation in BMD.

  8. Resistance training and bone mineral density during growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Z; Goettsch, B M; Van Ramshorst, R D; O'Brien, J A; Jaque, S V; Sumida, K D

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the efficacy of two different resistance training programs in enhancing bone modeling and bone mineral density (BMD) in maturating rats. One exercise mode involved lifting a lighter weight with more repetitions (LI), while the other regimen involved lifting a heavier weight with fewer repetitions (HI) where the total volume of work between exercise programs was equivalent by design. Twenty-three male rats were randomly divided into control (Con, n = 8), LI (n = 7), and HI (n = 8) groups. The LI and HI groups were conditioned to climb a vertical ladder with weights appended to their tail 4 days/wk for 6 wks. After training, serum osteocalcin (OC) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both HI (45.2 +/- 1.7 ng/ml) and LI (39.1 +/- 2.2 ng/ml) when compared to Con (29.9 +/- 0.9 ng/ml). Left tibial BMD was significantly (p < 0.05) greater for HI (0.231 +/- 0.004 g/cm (2)) when compared to both LI (0.213 +/- 0.003 g/cm (2)) and Con (0.206 +/- 0.005 g/cm (2)) with no significant difference between LI and Con. The results indicate that both HI and LI are effective in elevating serum OC, implicating an osteogenic response; however, only HI resulted in a significant elevation in BMD.

  9. Determinants of bone mineral density in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Cheung, E Y N; Ho, A Y Y; Lam, K F; Tam, S; Kung, A W C

    2005-12-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are increasing among Asian populations in both genders, but the risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) in Asian men is unclear. To determine the hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for low BMD in Asian men, we studied 407 community-dwelling southern Chinese men aged 50 years and above. Medical history and lifestyle habits were obtained with a structured questionnaire. Dietary calcium and phytoestrogen intake were assessed by a semi-quantitative questionnaire. BMD at the spine and hip were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fasting blood was analyzed for 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), total and bioavailable estradiol (bio-E) and testosterone (bio-T). The mean age of the cohort was 68.42+/-10.4 (50-96) years. In the linear regression model, weight, age, body mass index (BMI), bio-E, PTH, cigarette smoking and weight-bearing exercise were significant determinants of total hip BMD. Together they explained 55% of the total variance of hip BMD, with body weight being the most important determining factor. With age and weight adjustment, height, bio-T and flavonoid intake were identified as additional determinants of total hip BMD. Strategies to prevent bone loss and osteoporosis in Asian men should include lifestyle modification and maintenance of hormonal sufficiency.

  10. Duck gait: Relationship to hip angle, bone ash, bone density, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Robison, Cara I; Rice, Meredith; Makagon, Maja M; Karcher, Darrin M

    2015-05-01

    The rapid growth meat birds, including ducks, undergo requires skeletal integrity; however, fast growth may not be conducive to adequate bone structure. A relationship likely exists between skeletal changes and duck mobility. Reduced mobility in meat ducks may have impacts on welfare and production. This study examined the relationships among gait score, bone parameters, and hip angle. Commercial Pekin ducks, ages 14 d (n = 100), 21 d (n = 100), and 32 d (n = 100) were weighed and gait scored with a 3-point gait score system by an observer as they walked over a Tekscan gait analysis system. Gait was scored as GS0, GS1, or GS2 with a score of GS0 defined as good walking ability and a score of GS2 as poorest walking ability. Ducks were humanely euthanized, full body scanned using quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and the right femur and tibia were extracted. Leg bones were cleaned, measured, fat extracted, and ashed. QCT scans were rendered to create computerized 3D models where pelvic hip angles and bone density were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using PROC MIXED with age and gait score in the model. Body weight increased with age, but within an age, body weight decreased as walking ability became worse (P < 0.01). As expected, linear increases in tibia and femur bone width and length were observed as the ducks aged (P < 0.01). Right and left hip angle increased with duck age (P < 0.01). Additionally, ducks with a GS2 had wider hip angles opposed to ducks with a GS0 (P < 0.01). Bone density increased linearly with both age and gait score (P < 0.05). Femur ash content was lowest in 32-day-old ducks and ducks with GS1 and GS2 (P < 0.0001). Tibia ash content increased with age, but decreased as gait score increased (P < 0.001). The observation that right hip angle changed with gait scores merits further investigation into the relationship between duck mobility and skeletal changes during growth.

  11. Bone density and fragility fractures in patients with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Leslie, W D; Pahlavan, P S; Roe, E B; Dittberner, K

    2009-03-01

    We investigated prior fractures, osteoporosis risk factors, and bone mineral density (BMD) in 107 institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities. We found a very high prevalence of BMD in the osteoporotic range and a significant correlation between lower BMD and prior fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors contributing to osteoporosis and fragility fractures among developmentally disabled adults. Adults from a residential center participated in a prospective study in which bone mineral density (BMD) at the forearm and heel were measured with a portable X-ray densitometer. Prior fragility fractures were identified from chart review. Among 107 participants, 84 (78.5%) had a measurement within the osteoporotic range. The heel was more severely abnormal (mean T-score -3.1 +/- 1.5) than the forearm (-1.6 +/- 1.3, p < .0.0001). Radiographically confirmed prior fragility fractures (17 [16.3%]) were associated with lower heel (p = 0.0155) and forearm (p = 0.0172) T-scores. In multiple regression analysis, there were independent associations between forearm BMD and prior fragility fractures (p = 0.0126) and between heel BMD and prior fragility fractures (p = 0.0291). The odds ratio for prior fracture increased by 2.02 (95% CI 1.12-3.64) for each standard deviation (SD) decrease in heel T-score and by 2.39 (95% CI 1.08-5.32) for each SD decrease in forearm T-score. We found a very high prevalence of osteoporotic BMD measurements in institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities. Lower heel and forearm BMD measurements were significantly and independently associated with prior fragility fractures in this population.

  12. The effects of caffeine administration on the early stage of bone healing and bone density A histometric study in rats.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Bezerra, Joyce Pinho; Bastos, Marta Ferreira

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the daily administration of high doses of caffeine on the early stages of bone healing and on bone density in rats. Twenty-four Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: Non-caffeine group (n=12): animals without caffeine ingestion; Caffeine group (n=12): 10mg/100g body weight/day of caffeine via drinking water for 56 days. Forty-eight days after the beginning of caffeine intake, a critical-size surgical defect was created in the right tibia of both groups, while the contralateral tibia was left without defect. Eight days later, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens processed in order to obtain decalcified sections. The area of new bone formation in the right tibia and the bone density in the left tibia were histometrically evaluated in the medular bone. At 8 days post-operative, the caffeine group presented a significantly lower area of new bone formation, when compared to the non-caffeine group (p<0.001). In addition, the administration of caffeine during 56 days did not alter the bone density. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that a high daily caffeine intake may disturb the early stages of bone healing, but does not alter bone density after a period of 56 days of administration.

  13. Precision of pQCT-measured total, trabecular and cortical bone area, content, density and estimated bone strength in children

    PubMed Central

    Duff, W.R.D.; Björkman, K.M.; Kawalilak, C.E.; Kehrig, A.M.; Wiebe, S.; Kontulainen, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To define pQCT precision errors, least-significant-changes, and identify associated factors for bone outcomes at the radius and tibia in children. Methods: We obtained duplicate radius and tibia pQCT scans from 35 children (8-14yrs). We report root-mean-squared coefficient of variation (CV%RMS) and 95% limits-of-agreement to characterize repeatability across scan quality and least-significant-changes for bone outcomes at distal (total and trabecular area, content and density; and compressive bone strength) and shaft sites (total area and content; cortical area content, density and thickness; and torsional bone strength). We used Spearman’s rho to identify associations between CV% and time between measurements, child’s age or anthropometrics. Results: After excluding unanalyzable scans (6-10% of scans per bone site), CV%RMS ranged from 4% (total density) to 19% (trabecular content) at the distal radius, 4% (cortical content) to 8% (cortical thickness) at the radius shaft, 2% (total density) to 14% (trabecular content) at the distal tibia and from 2% (cortical content) to 6% (bone strength) at the tibia shaft. Precision errors were within 95% limits-of-agreement across scan quality. Age was associated (rho -0.4 to -0.5, p <0.05) with CV% at the tibia. Conclusion: Bone density outcomes and cortical bone properties appeared most precise (CV%RMS <5%) in children. PMID:28574412

  14. Assessing Bone Quality in Terms of Bone Mineral Density, Buckling Ratio and Critical Fracture Load

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, D

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone mineral density (BMD) is used as a sole parameter in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Due to the ease of acquirement of BMD, clinical diagnosis still involves its usage although the limitations of BMD are quite well-established. Therefore, this preliminary study hoped to reduce the errors introduced by BMD alone by incorporating geometric and structural predictors simultaneously to observe if strength was implicitly dependent on the geometry and BMD. Hence, we illustrated the triadic relationship between BMD, buckling ratio (BR) and critical fracture load (Fcr). Methods The geometric predictor was the BR as it involves both the changes in the periosteum and the cortical thickness. Also, structural changes were monitored by finite element (FE) analysis-predicted Fcr. These BR and Fcr measurements were plotted with their respective femoral neck BMD values in elderly female patients (n=6) in a 3-year follow-up study, treated with ibandronate. Results In all the three-dimensional plots (baseline, mid and final year), high Fcr values were found at regions containing high BMD and low BR values. Quantitatively, this was also proven where an averaged highest Fcr across the three years had a relatively higher BMD (46%) and lower BR (19%) than that of the averaged lowest Fcr. The dependence of FE predicted strength on both the geometry and bone density was illustrated. Conclusions We conclude that use of triadic relationships for the evaluation of osteoporosis and hip fractures with the combination of strength, radiology-derived BR and bone density will lay the foundation for more accurate predictions in the future. PMID:25489572

  15. Bone geometry, bone mineral density, and micro-architecture in patients with myelofibrosis: a cross-sectional study using DXA, HR-pQCT, and bone turnover markers.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Sarah; Vestergaard, Hanne; Hansen, Stinus; Shanbhogue, Vikram Vinod; Shanbhoque, Vikram Vinod; Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (MF) is a severe chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm, progressing towards a terminal stage with insufficient haematopoiesis and osteosclerotic manifestations. Whilst densitometry studies have showed MF patients to have elevated bone mineral density, data on bone geometry and micro-structure assessed with non-invasive methods are lacking. We measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Bone geometry, volumetric BMD, and micro-architecture were measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). We compared the structural parameters of bones by comparing 18 patients with MF and healthy controls matched for age, sex, and height. Blood was analysed for biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with MF. There were no significant differences in measurements of bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density, and micro-structure between MF patients and matched controls. Estimated bone stiffness and bone strength were similar between MF patients and controls. The level of pro-collagen type 1 N-terminal pro-peptide (P1NP) was significantly increased in MF, which may indicate extensive collagen synthesis, one of the major diagnostic criteria in MF. We conclude that bone mineral density, geometry, and micro-architecture in this cohort of MF patients are comparable with those in healthy individuals.

  16. Carbonated beverage consumption and bone mineral density among older women: the Rancho Bernardo Study.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Morton, D J; Barrett-Connor, E L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The association between carbonated beverage consumption and bone mineral density was examined in a community-based cohort of older White women. METHODS: One thousand women 44 to 98 years of age had bone mineral density measured at four sites and provided medical and behavioral histories, including type and quantity of carbonated beverages consumed. RESULTS: Bone mineral density levels were not associated with intake of any type of carbonated beverage after adjustment for age, obesity, calcium intake, exercise, and current use of tobacco and alcohol, thiazides, estrogen, or thyroid hormone. CONCLUSIONS: Modest intake of carbonated beverages does not appear to have adverse effects on bone mineral density in older women. PMID:9103110

  17. Exercise Training Alters the Bone Mineral Density of Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Sandra M; Moraes, Cristiane; Barbosa, Jorge Eduardo Dos Santos Monteiro; Carraro Eduardo, José Carlos; Fouque, Denis; Pelletier, Solenne; Mafra, Denise

    2016-10-01

    Marinho, SM, Moraes, C, Barbosa, JEdSM, Eduardo, JCC, Fouqe, D, Pelletier, S, and Mafra, D. Exercise training alters the bone mineral density of hemodialysis patients. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2918-2923, 2016-Patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis (HD) frequently present low bone mineral density (BMD), and exercise may be useful for treating bone loss. This study aimed to assess the effects of an intradialytic resistance exercise training program (RETP) on BMD in HD patients. Twenty-one patients were enrolled into 2 groups; 10 patients performed exercise (80.0% men; 46.9 ± 12.1 years; 27.0 ± 3.4 kg·m) and 11 patients were in the control group (54.5% men; 50.5 ± 11.5 years; 24.1 ± 8.7 kg·m). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the BMD, lean mass, and body fat before and after the supervised RETP (performed with elastic bands and ankle cuffs in both lower limbs 3 times a week for 24 weeks-72 sessions). In the exercise group, 30.0% of patients presented with osteopenia and 20.0% osteoporosis and in the control group, 45.5% osteopenia and 36.4% osteoporosis. Only in the exercise group, the osteoporosis percentage was reduced to 10.0% and the femoral neck BMD and T-score improved from 0.89 ± 0.1 to 0.93 ± 0.1 g·cm and from -1.3 ± 0.8 to -1.0 ± 0.8 g·cm (p ≤ 0.05), respectively, after the intervention. In contrast, these parameters were reduced in the control group. The results suggest that resistance exercise may be useful for improving the BMD in HD patients. In summary, 24 weeks of the supervised RETP played a role in improving the BMD of HD patients.

  18. Bone mineral density in vocational and professional ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Amorim, T; Koutedakis, Y; Nevill, A; Wyon, M; Maia, J; Machado, J C; Marques, F; Metsios, G S; Flouris, A D; Adubeiro, N; Nogueira, L; Dimitriou, L

    2017-06-27

    According to existing literature, bone health in ballet dancers is controversial. We have verified that, compared to controls, young female and male vocational ballet dancers have lower bone mineral density (BMD) at both impact and non-impact sites, whereas female professional ballet dancers have lower BMD only at non-impact sites. The aims of this study were to (a) assess bone mineral density (BMD) in vocational (VBD) and professional (PBD) ballet dancers and (b) investigate its association with body mass (BM), fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM), maturation and menarche. The total of 152 VBD (13 ± 2.3 years; 112 girls, 40 boys) and 96 controls (14 ± 2.1 years; 56 girls, 40 boys) and 184 PBD (28 ± 8.5 years; 129 females, 55 males) and 160 controls (27 ± 9.5 years; 110 female, 50 males) were assessed at the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN), forearm and total body by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Maturation and menarche were assessed via questionnaires. VBD revealed lower unadjusted BMD at all anatomical sites compared to controls (p < 0.001); following adjustments for Tanner stage and gynaecological age, female VBD showed similar BMD values at impact sites. However, no factors were found to explain the lower adjusted BMD values in VBD (female and male) at the forearm (non-impact site), nor for the lower adjusted BMD values in male VBD at the FN. Compared to controls, female PBD showed higher unadjusted and adjusted BMD for potential associated factors at the FN (impact site) (p < 0.001) and lower adjusted at the forearm (p < 0.001). Male PBD did not reveal lower BMD than controls at any site. Both females and males VBD have lower BMD at impact and non-impact sites compared to control, whereas this is only the case at non-impact site in female PBD. Maturation seems to explain the lower BMD at impact sites in female VBD.

  19. Dietary Strontium Increases Bone Mineral Density in Intact Zebrafish (Danio rerio): A Potential Model System for Bone Research

    PubMed Central

    Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Garris, Heath W.; Nagy, Tim R.; D'Abramo, Louis R.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skeletal bone possesses properties similar to human bone, which suggests that they may be used as a model to study mineralization characteristics of the human Haversian system, as well as human bone diseases. One prerequisite for the use of zebrafish as an alternative osteoporotic bone model is to determine whether their bone displays functional plasticity similar to that observed in other bone models. Strontium citrate was supplemented into a laboratory-prepared diet (45% crude protein) to produce dietary strontium levels of 0%, 0.63%, 1.26%, 1.89%, and 2.43% and fed ad libitum twice daily for 12 weeks to 28-day-old intact zebrafish. Length was determined at 4-week intervals, and both weight and length were recorded at 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, seven zebrafish from each dietary level were analyzed for total bone mineral density by microcomputed tomography. Dietary strontium citrate supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) increased zebrafish whole-body and spinal column bone mineral density. In addition, trace amounts of strontium were incorporated into the scale matrix in those zebrafish that consumed strontium-supplemented diets. These findings suggest that zebrafish bone displays plasticity similar to that reported for other bone models (i.e., rat, mouse, and monkey) that received supplements of strontium compounds and zebrafish should be viewed as an increasingly valuable bone model. PMID:20874492

  20. Dietary strontium increases bone mineral density in intact zebrafish (Danio rerio): a potential model system for bone research.

    PubMed

    Siccardi, Anthony J; Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Garris, Heath W; Nagy, Tim R; D'Abramo, Louis R; Watts, Stephen A

    2010-09-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) skeletal bone possesses properties similar to human bone, which suggests that they may be used as a model to study mineralization characteristics of the human Haversian system, as well as human bone diseases. One prerequisite for the use of zebrafish as an alternative osteoporotic bone model is to determine whether their bone displays functional plasticity similar to that observed in other bone models. Strontium citrate was supplemented into a laboratory-prepared diet (45% crude protein) to produce dietary strontium levels of 0%, 0.63%, 1.26%, 1.89%, and 2.43% and fed ad libitum twice daily for 12 weeks to 28-day-old intact zebrafish. Length was determined at 4-week intervals, and both weight and length were recorded at 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, seven zebrafish from each dietary level were analyzed for total bone mineral density by microcomputed tomography. Dietary strontium citrate supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) increased zebrafish whole-body and spinal column bone mineral density. In addition, trace amounts of strontium were incorporated into the scale matrix in those zebrafish that consumed strontium-supplemented diets. These findings suggest that zebrafish bone displays plasticity similar to that reported for other bone models (i.e., rat, mouse, and monkey) that received supplements of strontium compounds and zebrafish should be viewed as an increasingly valuable bone model.

  1. Differences by sex and handedness in right and left femur bone mineral densities.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali; Dane, Senol; Seven, Bedri; Akar, Sedat; Yildirim, Serap

    2009-12-01

    Left-handedness was reported to be a risk factor for accident-related injuries, head injuries, traumatic brain injuries, sport-related injuries, and bone breaks and fractures. As decreased bone mineral density is a good marker of bone fractures, the femoral bone mineral densities of normal left-handed university students were compared with those of right-handed students. Hand preference of 66 men and 47 women was assessed using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Measures of bone mineral density with a Hologic QDR-4500W (S/N 48403) densitometer showed bone mineral densities of both right and left proximal femur regions were higher in right-handed than in left-handed students. These results are consistent with the claim that left-handed participants had higher trauma and injury risk. Also, these results may explain the sex-related differences by handedness for susceptibility in accident-related injuries such as bone fractures.

  2. Bone mineral density in children and adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Garcia Alves Junior, Paulo Alonso; Schueftan, Daniel Luis Gilban; de Mendonça, Laura Maria Carvalho; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Beserra, Izabel Calland Ricarte

    2014-01-01

    Chronic glucocorticoid therapy is associated with reduced bone mineral density. In paediatric patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, increased levels of androgens could not only counteract this effect, but could also advance bone age, with interference in the evaluation of densitometry. We evaluate bone mineral density in paediatric patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia taking into account chronological and bone ages at the time of the measurement. Patients aged between 5 and 19 years underwent radiography of the hand and wrist followed by total body and lumbar spine densitometry. Chronological and bone ages were used in the scans interpretation. In fourteen patients, mean bone mineral density Z-score of total body to bone age was -0.76 and of lumbar spine to bone age was -0.26, lower than those related to chronological age (+0.03 and +0.62, resp.). Mean Z-score differences were statistically significant (P = 0.004 for total body and P = 0.003 for lumbar spine). One patient was classified as having low bone mineral density only when assessed by bone age. We conclude that there was a reduction in the bone mineral density Z-score in classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia paediatric patients when bone age was taken into account instead of chronological age.

  3. Heterogeneity of yield strain in low-density versus high-density human trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Bevill, Grant; Farhamand, Farhad; Keaveny, Tony M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the off-axis behavior of trabecular yield strains may lend unique insight into the etiology of fractures since yield strains provide measures of failure independent of elastic behavior. We sought to address anisotropy of trabecular yield strains while accounting for variations in both density and anatomic site and to determine the mechanisms governing this behavior. Cylindrical specimens were cored from vertebral bodies (n=22, BV/TV=0.11±0.02) and femoral necks (n=28, BV/TV=0.22±0.06) with the principal trabecular orientation either aligned along the cylinder axis (on-axis, n=22) or at an oblique angle of 15° or 45° (off-axis, n=28). Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT, mechanically compressed to failure, and analyzed with nonlinear micro-CT-based finite element analysis. Yield strains depended on anatomic site (p=0.03, ANOVA), and the effect of off-axis loading was different for the two sites (p=0.04) – yield strains increased for off-axis loading of the vertebral bone (p=0.04), but were isotropic for the femoral bone (p=0.66). With sites pooled together, yield strains were positively correlated with BV/TV for on-axis loading (R2=58%, p<0.0001), but no such correlation existed for off-axis loading (p=0.79). Analysis of the modulus-BV/TV and strength-BV/TV relationships indicated that, for the femoral bone, the reduction in strength associated with off-axis loading was greater than that for modulus, while the opposite trend occurred for the vertebral bone. The micro-FE analyses indicated that these trends were due to different failure mechanisms for the two types of bone and the different loading modes. Taken together, these results provide unique insight into the failure behavior of human trabecular bone and highlight the need for a multiaxial failure criterion that accounts for anatomic site and bone volume fraction. PMID:19700162

  4. Impaired Vestibular Function and Low Bone Mineral Density: Data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; Anson, Eric; du Lac, Sascha; Ferrucci, Luigi; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that experimentally induced vestibular ablation leads to a decrease in bone mineral density, through mechanisms mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Loss of bone mineral density is a common and potentially morbid condition that occurs with aging, and we sought to investigate whether vestibular loss is associated with low bone mineral density in older adults. We evaluated this question in a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), a large, prospective cohort study managed by the National Institute on Aging (N = 389). Vestibular function was assessed with cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs), a measure of saccular function. Bone mineral density was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). In two-way t test analysis, we observed that individuals with reduced vestibular physiologic function had significantly lower bone mineral density. In adjusted multivariate linear regression analyses, we observed that older individuals with reduced vestibular physiologic function had significantly lower bone mineral density, specifically in weight-bearing hip and lower extremity bones. These results suggest that the vestibular system may contribute to bone homeostasis in older adults, notably of the weight-bearing hip bones at greatest risk of osteoporotic fracture. Further longitudinal analysis of vestibular function and bone mineral density in humans is needed to characterize this relationship and investigate the potential confounding effect of physical activity.

  5. Compressive axial mechanical properties of rat bone as functions of bone volume fraction, apparent density and micro-ct based mineral density.

    PubMed

    Cory, Esther; Nazarian, Ara; Entezari, Vahid; Vartanians, Vartan; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2010-03-22

    Mechanical testing has been regarded as the gold standard to investigate the effects of pathologies on the structure-function properties of the skeleton. With recent advances in computing power of personal computers, virtual alternatives to mechanical testing are gaining acceptance and use. We have previously introduced such a technique called structural rigidity analysis to assess mechanical strength of skeletal tissue with defects. The application of this technique is predicated upon the use of relationships defining the strength of bone as a function of its density for a given loading mode. We are to apply this technique in rat models to assess their compressive skeletal response subjected to a host of biological and pharmaceutical stimulations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to derive a relationship expressing axial compressive mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone as a function of equivalent bone mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a range of normal and pathologic bones. We used bones from normal, ovariectomized and partially nephrectomized animals. All specimens underwent micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess bone morphometric and densitometric indices and uniaxial compression to failure. We obtained univariate relationships describing 71-78% of the mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone based on equivalent mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a wide range of density and common skeletal pathologies. The relationships reported in this study can be used in the structural rigidity analysis introduced by the authors to provide a non-invasive method to assess the compressive strength of bones affected by pathology and/or treatment options.

  6. No change detected by DEXA in bone mineral density after periacetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Mechlenburg, Inger; Kold, Søren; Søballe, Kjeld

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess acetabular bone mineral density after periacetabular osteotomy and to examine whether bone mineral density correlates with postoperative migration of the osteotomised acetabular fragment. Twenty-five female and three male patients scheduled for periacetabular osteotomy were consecutively included. The patients were scanned by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) at 1 week, 1 year, and 2 1/2 years after surgery. Radiostereometric analyses (RSA) were done at 1, 4, 8, and 24 weeks after surgery. Two and a half years after periacetabular osteotomy, no significant changes in bone mineral density or any biological effect on bone remodelling due a changed loading pattern in the acetabulum could be detected. There was no significant correlation between bone mineral density and migration of the acetabulum. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is not an appropriate method to demonstrate the changes in bone mineral density after periacetabular osteotomy or to predict postoperative acetabular migration.

  7. Characteristics of bone turnover in the long bone metaphysis fractured patients with normal or low Bone Mineral Density (BMD).

    PubMed

    Wölfl, Christoph; Schweppenhäuser, Daniela; Gühring, Thorsten; Takur, Caner; Höner, Bernd; Kneser, Ulrich; Grützner, Paul Alfred; Kolios, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures increases as our population ages. Until now, the exact biochemical processes that occur during the healing of metaphyseal fractures remain unclear. Diagnostic instruments that allow a dynamic insight into the fracture healing process are as yet unavailable. In the present matched pair analysis, we study the time course of the osteoanabolic markers bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), as well as the osteocatabolic markers crosslinked C-telopeptide of type-I-collagen (β-CTX) and serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5b), during the healing of fractures that have a low level of bone mineral density (BMD) compared with fractures that have a normal BMD. Between March 2007 and February 2009, 30 patients aged older than 50 years who suffered a metaphyseal fracture were included in our study. BMDs were verified by dual energy Xray absorptiometry (DXEA) scans. The levels of BTMs were examined over an 8-week period. Osteoanabolic BAP levels in those with low levels of BMD were significantly different from the BAP levels in those with normal BMD. BAP levels in the former group increased constantly, whereas the latter group showed an initial strong decrease in BAP followed by slowly rising values. Osteocatabolic β-CTX increased in the bone of the normal BMD group constantly, whereas these levels decreased significantly in the bone of the group with low BMD from the first week. TRAP5b was significantly reduced in the low level BMD group. With this work, we conduct first insights into the molecular biology of the fracture healing process in patients with low levels of BMD that explains the mechanism of its fracture healing. The results may be one reason for the reduced healing qualities in bones with low BMD.

  8. [Is there a relation between weight in rats, bone density, ash weight and histomorphometric indicators of trabecular volume and thickness in the bones of extremities?].

    PubMed

    Zák, J; Kapitola, J; Povýsil, C

    2003-01-01

    Authors deal with question, if there is possibility to infer bone histological structure (described by histomorphometric parameters of trabecular bone volume and trabecular thickness) from bone density, ash weight or even from weight of animal (rat). Both tibias of each of 30 intact male rats, 90 days old, were processed. Left tibia was utilized to the determination of histomorphometric parameters of undecalcified bone tissue patterns by automatic image analysis. Right tibia was used to the determination of values of bone density, using Archimedes' principle. Values of bone density, ash weight, ash weight related to bone volume and animal weight were correlated with histomorphometric parameters (trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness) by Pearson's correlation test. One could presume the existence of relation between data, describing bone mass at the histological level (trabecular bone of tibia) and other data, describing mass of whole bone or even animal mass (weight). But no statistically significant correlation was found. The reason of the present results could be in the deviations of trabecular density in marrow of tibia. Because of higher trabecular bone density in metaphyseal and epiphyseal regions, the histomorphometric analysis of trabecular bone is preferentially done in these areas. It is possible, that this irregularity of trabecular tibial density could be the source of the deviations, which could influence the results of correlations determined. The values of bone density, ash weight and animal weight do not influence trabecular bone volume and vice versa: static histomorphometric parameters of trabecular bone do not reflect bone density, ash weight and weight of animal.

  9. Impact of pioglitazone on bone mineral density and bone marrow fat content.

    PubMed

    Pop, L M; Lingvay, I; Yuan, Q; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Maalouf, N M

    2017-07-22

    Pioglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of fractures. In this randomized, placebo-controlled study, pioglitazone use for 12 months was associated with a significant increase in bone marrow fat content at the femoral neck, accompanied by a significant decrease in total hip bone mineral density. The change in bone marrow fat with pioglitazone use was predominantly observed in female vs. male participants. Use of the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone is associated with greater fracture incidence, although the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. This study aimed to assess the effect of pioglitazone treatment on femoral neck bone marrow (BM) fat content and on bone mineral density (BMD), and to establish if any correlation exists between the changes in these parameters. In this double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 42 obese volunteers with metabolic syndrome were randomized to pioglitazone (45 mg/day) or matching placebo for 1 year. The following measurements were conducted at baseline and during the treatment: liver, pancreas, and femoral neck BM fat content (by magnetic resonance spectroscopy), BMD by DXA, abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat, and beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Results were available for 37 subjects who completed the baseline and 1-year evaluations. At 12 months, BM fat increased with pioglitazone (absolute change, +4.1%, p = 0.03), whereas BM fat content in the placebo group decreased non-significantly (-3.1%, p = 0.08) (p = 0.007 for the pioglitazone-placebo response difference). Total hip BMD declined in the pioglitazone group (-1.4%) and increased by 0.8% in the placebo group (p = 0.03 between groups). The change in total hip BMD was inversely and significantly correlated with the change in BM fat content (Spearman rho = -0.56, p = 0.01) in the pioglitazone group, but not within the placebo group (rho = -0.29, p = 0.24). Changes in BM fat with pioglitazone were predominantly

  10. Preoperative Periarticular Knee Bone Mineral Density in Osteoarthritic Patients Undergoing TKA

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Sato, Junko; Todoroki, Koji; Ezawa, Nobukazu; Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preoperative periarticular bone quality is affected by joint loading. The purpose of this study was to determine the periarticular bone mineral density of the knee joint of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, and whether the location of the load-bearing axis correlates with the measured bone mineral density. Materials and Methods: The bone mineral densities of the medial and lateral femoral condyles and the medial and lateral tibial condyles were analyzed in consecutive 116 osteoarthritic patients (130 knees) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results: The median bone mineral density values in the condyles were 1.138 in femoral medial, 0.767 in femoral lateral, 1.056 in tibial medial, and 0.714 in tibial lateral. The medial condyles showed significantly higher bone mineral densities than the lateral condyles in both the femur and tibia. In addition, the femoral medial showed significantly higher bone mineral density levels than the tibial medial, and the femoral lateral condyle had higher bone mineral density levels than the tibial lateral. The bone mineral density Medial/Lateral ratio was significantly negatively correlated with the location (tibial medial edge 0%, lateral edge 100%) of the load-bearing axis in the femur and tibia. Conclusion: Preoperative bone mineral density values may provide against the changes in bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty by reflecting the correlation with joint loading axis. These results help explain why total knee arthroplasty has such good long-term clinical outcomes with a low frequency of component loosening and periarticular fractures despite a high degree of postoperative bone loss. PMID:27583058

  11. Alveolar bone level is not associated with vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism and bone density in mandible.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Francisco; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Souki, Nizar; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Olmo, Asunción; O'Valle, Francisco; Bravo, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine, using digital panoramic radiographs, whether the bone level at the alveolar crest is related to the mandibular bone density and/or to vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms. We analyzed 319 digital panoramic radiographs from the same number of patients. Alveolar bone level was expressed as percentage of root length. The mandibular cortical width index was calculated as a measure of mandibular bone density, and, in 72 randomly selected cases, the haplotype of the VDR gene (BsmL) was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Alveolar bone level was not related to the mandibular cortical width index (p = 0.568) or VDR gene expression (p = 0.575). Bone loss was greater in smokers than in non-smokers (p = 0.036), and the mandibular cortical width index was higher in males (p = 0.04), the older age group (p = 0.032), and in those with more teeth (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed the association between these variables and alveolar bone loss. Alveolar bone loss showed no significant relationship with the mandibular bone density evaluated on digital panoramic radiographs or with VDR genotype (BsmL) in Caucasian females and males aged under 47 years.

  12. Serum leptin, bone mineral density and the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Linjuan; Pan, Zhanpeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2015-11-16

    Previously reported fracture rates in patients with spinal cord injury range from 1% to 20%. However, the exact role of spinal cord injury in bone metabolism has not yet been clarified. In order to investigate the effects of serum leptin and bone mineral density on the healing of long bone fractures in men with spinal cord injury, 15 male SCI patients and 15 matched controls were involved in our study. The outcome indicated that at 4 and 8 weeks after bone fracture, callus production in patients with spinal cord injury was lower than that in controls. Besides, bone mineral density was significantly reduced at 2, 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, it was found that at each time point, patients with spinal cord injury had significantly higher serum leptin levels than controls and no association was found between serum leptin level and bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae. Moreover, bone mineral density was positively correlated with bone formation in both of the groups. These findings suggest that in early phases i.e. week 4 and 8, fracture healing was impaired in patients with spinal cord injury and that various factors participated in the complicated healing process, such as hormonal and mechanical factors.

  13. Metabolic bone disease and bone mineral density in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Álvarez-Domínguez, Enriqueta; Pérez-Fernández, José M; Moretones-Suñol, Gloria; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Botet-Mussons, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in preterm neonates at discharge and identify the optimum cutoff values for serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and phosphorus (P) concentrations to diagnose the severity of metabolic bone disease of prematurity. A total of 336 preterm neonates (≤ 31 weeks' gestation and birth weight ≤ 1500 g) were prospectively evaluated for BMD before discharge using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD reference values (at ALP ≤ 500 IU/L) were measured in 279 patients. BMD was classified as poor (<10th percentile) at <0.068 g/cm(2), fair (10th-25th percentile) at 0.068-0.081 g/cm(2), good (25th-75th percentile) at 0.081-0.112 g/cm(2), and very good (>75th percentile) at >0.112 g/cm(2). Increased BMD was associated with a higher birth weight, short duration of parenteral nutrition, and the absence of small for gestational age status, patent ductus arteriosus, intraventricular hemorrhage, and other clinical variables. Metabolic bone disease of prematurity was absent (ALP ≤ 500 IU/L) in 279 cases (83.0%), mild (ALP >500 IU/L and P ≥ 4.5 mg/dL) in 46 cases (13.7%), and severe (ALP >500 IU/L and P <4.5 mg/dL) in 11 cases (3.3%). A BMD >0.068 g/cm(2) at discharge indicated a 90.3% probability of not developing metabolic bone disease of prematurity. The factors independently associated with increased BMD included higher birth weight, short duration of parenteral nutrition, absence of intraventricular hemorrhage, exclusive feeding of fortified breast milk, and older age at discharge. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Derangements in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density in south Indian subjects on antiepileptic medications

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, George; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Alexander, Mathew; Thomas, Maya; Aaron, Sanjith; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there are reports describing the association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients with long-term anticonvulsant therapy, there are only limited Indian studies which have looked at this aspect. Objectives: This study was done to compare the prevalence of changes in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) in ambulant individuals on long-term anticonvulsant therapy with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: There were 55 men (on medications for more than 6 months) and age- and BMI-matched 53 controls. Drug history, dietary calcium intake (DCI), and duration of sunlight exposure were recorded. Bone mineral parameters and BMD were measured. Results: The control group had a significantly higher daily DCI with mean ± SD of 396 ± 91 mg versus 326 ± 101 mg (P = 0.007) and more sunlight exposure of 234 ± 81 vs 167 ± 69 min (P = 0.05). BMD at the femoral neck was significantly lower in cases (0.783 ± 0.105 g/cm2) when compared to controls (0.819 ± 0.114 g/cm2). Majority of the patients (61%) had low femoral neck BMD (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) between cases (n = 32) and controls (n = 37) (P = 0.234). Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was seen in both the groups in equal proportions, highlighting the existence of a high prevalence of this problem in India. Low femoral neck BMD found in cases may stress the need for supplementing calcium and treating vitamin D deficiency in this specific group. However, the benefit of such intervention has to be studied in a larger proportion of epileptic patients. PMID:25221394

  15. Effects of a 'drug holiday' on bone mineral density and bone turnover marker during bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sung Yeol; Kim, Dae Young; Han, Eun Jin; Park, So Young; Yim, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Koo

    2013-05-01

    Recently long-term safety of bisphosphonate raises issues about the duration of therapy. We examined the effects of a drug holiday (DH) on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers. In Korean, 125 women of 50 years of age or older with T-score≤-3.0 of their lumbar or left femoral BMD initiated bisphosphonate from 1999 based on retrospective chart review. 125 patients who had used bisphosphonate≥5 years started DH in 2006. Lumbar (L1-4), left femoral neck, total BMD, serum parameter (β-crossLaps [CTx], phosphorus, total calcium, total alkaline phosphatase), and urinary parameter (calcium/creatinine ratio) were measured before, the time of starting, and after DH. After DH, lumbar, femoral neck and total BMD did not change significantly (0.757±0.093→0.747±0.102, P=0.135, 0.567±0.079→0.560±0.082, P=0.351, 0.698±0.008→0.691±0.090 g/cm(2), P=0.115, respectively). Serum CTx and total alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly (0.205±0.120→0.791±0.44 ng/mL, P<0.001, 54.52±13.40→60.42±15.543 IU/L, P=0.001, respectively). Urinary calcium/creatinine ratio increased significantly (0.132±0.076→0.156±0.093, P=0.012). A DH could be cautiously considered in patients with long-term use of bisphosphonate if there is a concern about severe suppression of bone turnover with respect to long-term use because insignificant changes of BMD and significant increase of bone turnover markers are shown during the period.

  16. Quantifying Leisure Physical Activity and Its Relation to Bone Density and Strength

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purpose: Compare three published methods of quantifying physical activity (total activity, peak strain, and bone loading exposure [BLE] scores) and identify their associations with areal bone mineral density (aBMD), volumetric BMD (vBMD), and bone strength. Methods: Postmenopausal women (N = 239; me...

  17. Longitudinal study of bone density and its determinants in women in peri- or early menopause.

    PubMed

    Picard, D; Imbach, A; Couturier, M; Lepage, R; Ste Marie, L G

    2000-11-01

    The evolution of bone mass across menopause as well as the factors related to bone loss were studied in 141 women already assessed 10 years ago while in premenopause. Bone density of the lumbar spine was measured by dual photon absorptiometry. Nutrient intakes, lifestyle habits, data on menopause, and hormone replacement therapy were obtained by questionnaires. Present bone density was related significantly to past and current calcium intake, current vitamin D intake, and leisure physical activity level, as well as bone density measured in premenopause. Average bone loss was related to time elapsed without estrogens, age at menopause and present age, as well as serum levels of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Bone loss was inversely related to calcium and vitamin D intakes and to serum 25-OH vitamin D (25OHD) levels. By multiple regression analyses, only bone density in premenopause, time without estrogens, weight, vitamin D intake, and serum ALP levels remained as independent predictors of present bone mass or bone loss. This study emphasizes the importance of building a good bone mass before menopause, of having adequate vitamin D intake, and of beginning estrogen replacement therapy as soon as possible to minimize bone loss in the first years of menopause.

  18. Relation between body composition and bone mineral density in young undregraduate students with different nutritional status

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Edil de Albuquerque; dos Santos, Marcos André Moura; da Silva, Amanda Tabosa Pereira; Farah, Breno Quintella; Costa, Manoel da Cunha; Campos, Florisbela de Arruda Camara e Siqueira; Falcão, Ana Patrícia Siqueira Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the relationship between total and segmental body fat, bone mineral density and bone mineral content in undergraduate students stratified according to nutritional status. Methods The study included 45 male undergraduate students aged between 20 and 30 years. Total and segmental body composition, bone mineral density and bone mineral content assessments were performed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subjects were allocated into three groups (eutrophic, overweight and obese). Results With the exception of upper limb bone mineral content, significantly higher (p<0.05) mean bone mineral density, bone mineral content, and relative body fat values were documented in the obese group. Total body and segmental relative body fat (lower limbs and trunk) were positively correlated (p<0.05) with bone mineral density in the overweight group. Upper limb fat was negatively correlated (p<0.05) with bone mineral content in the normal and eutrophic groups. Conclusion Total body and segmental body fat were correlated with bone mineral density and bone mineral content in male undergraduate students, particularly in overweight individuals. PMID:27074228

  19. Relation between body composition and bone mineral density in young undregraduate students with different nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Edil de Albuquerque; Santos, Marcos André Moura Dos; Silva, Amanda Tabosa Pereira da; Farah, Breno Quintella; Costa, Manoel da Cunha; Campos, Florisbela de Arruda Camara E Siqueira; Falcão, Ana Patrícia Siqueira Tavares

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between total and segmental body fat, bone mineral density and bone mineral content in undergraduate students stratified according to nutritional status. The study included 45 male undergraduate students aged between 20 and 30 years. Total and segmental body composition, bone mineral density and bone mineral content assessments were performed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subjects were allocated into three groups (eutrophic, overweight and obese). With the exception of upper limb bone mineral content, significantly higher (p<0.05) mean bone mineral density, bone mineral content, and relative body fat values were documented in the obese group. Total body and segmental relative body fat (lower limbs and trunk) were positively correlated (p<0.05) with bone mineral density in the overweight group. Upper limb fat was negatively correlated (p<0.05) with bone mineral content in the normal and eutrophic groups. Total body and segmental body fat were correlated with bone mineral density and bone mineral content in male undergraduate students, particularly in overweight individuals.

  20. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on bone mineral density and bone metabolism in children: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Yu-xin; Zhu, Jun-ming; Zhang, Jian-min; Zheng, Zhe

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to assess the effects of antiepileptic drugs on bone mineral density and bone metabolism in epileptic children. Searches of PubMed and Web of Science were undertaken to identify studies evaluating the association between antiepileptic drugs and bone mineral density and bone metabolism. A total of 22 studies with 1492 subjects were included in our research. We identified: (1) a reduction in bone mineral density at lumbar spine (standardized mean difference (SMD)=-0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) [-0.61, -0.05]), trochanter (mean difference (MD)=-0.07, 95% CI [-0.10, -0.05]), femoral neck (MD=-0.05, 95% CI [-0.09, -0.02]), and total body bone mineral density (MD=-0.33, 95% CI [-0.51, -0.15]); (2) a reduction in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (MD=-3.37, 95% CI [-5.94, -0.80]) and an increase in serum alkaline phosphatase (SMD=0.71, 95% CI [0.38, 1.05]); (3) no significant changes in serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, or phosphorus. Our meta-analysis suggests that treatment with antiepileptic drugs may be associated with decreased bone mineral density in epileptic children.

  1. Assessing Bone Mineral Density Following Acute Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wiggin, Molly; Hemmati, Pouya; Switzer, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In older patients, bone mineral density (BMD) diminishes with age, increasing susceptibility to femoral neck fractures. Evidence has emerged that patients who should have dual x-ray absorptiometry scans to evaluate their bone health are not doing so. Because computed tomography (CT) attenuation has now been correlated with BMD thresholds relating to osteoporosis, virtually any existing CT scan that includes the L1 vertebra can be used to assess BMD. This study evaluates the utility of CT attenuation in characterizing BMD in patients after femoral neck fractures. Methods: The electronic medical records of adults who presented to a level I trauma center with hip fractures were evaluated for eligibility. Those with a CT scan of the abdomen or other CT scan with a complete view of the L1 vertebra were included. To measure attenuation, a region of interest was selected to include the body of the L1 vertebra in the axial plane and exclude the cortices and posterior venous complex. Results: Of the 589 patients reviewed, 217 met inclusion criteria; 112 were aged 18 to 64, while 105 were ≥65. Eight (7.1%) patients in the younger cohort had a mean CT attenuation below the 110-HU threshold set for 90% specificity, whereas 31 (29.5%) patients in the older cohort had a mean CT attenuation below this threshold. Using the 160-HU threshold set for 90% sensitivity, 39 (34.8%) patients of the younger cohort and 74 (70%) patients of the older cohort were osteoporotic; all differences in CT attenuation by age were strongly significant (P < .0001). Conclusions: A significantly larger proportion of older patients with hip fractures had osteoporosis, helping validate the utility of CT attenuation in this context. In addition, a large proportion of these patients already had these images available, thus potentially helping limit cost and unnecessary medical investigations. PMID:26246948

  2. Bone mineral density predicts fractures in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    West, Sarah L; Lok, Charmaine E; Langsetmo, Lisa; Cheung, Angela M; Szabo, Eva; Pearce, Dawn; Fusaro, Maria; Wald, Ron; Weinstein, Jordan; Jamal, Sophie A

    2015-05-01

    Fractures are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The optimal methods by which to assess fracture risk are unknown, in part, due to a lack of prospective studies. We determined if bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and/or high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) could predict fractures in men and women ≥18 years old with stages 3 to 5 CKD. BMD was measured by DXA (at the total hip, lumbar spine, ultradistal, and 1/3 radius) and by HRpQCT (at the radius), and subjects were followed for 2 years for incident morphometric spine fractures and low-trauma clinical fractures. The mean age of the subjects was 62 years with equal numbers having stages 3, 4, and 5 CKD. Over 2 years there were 51 fractures in 35 subjects. BMD by DXA at baseline was significantly lower at all sites among those with incident fractures versus those without. For example, the mean BMD at the total hip in those with incident fractures was 0.77 g/cm2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 0.80) and in those without fracture was 0.95 g/cm2 (95% CI, 0.92 to 0.98). Almost all baseline HRpQCT measures were lower in those with incident fracture versus those without. For example, volumetric BMD in those with incident fractures was 232 mg HA/cm3 (95% CI, 213 to 251) and in those without fracture was 317.6 mg HA/cm3 (95% CI, 306 to 329.1). Bone loss occurred in all subjects, but was significantly greater among those with incident fractures. Our data demonstrate that low BMD (by DXA and HRpQCT) and a greater annualized percent decrease in BMD are risk factors for subsequent fracture in men and women with predialysis CKD.

  3. Cow's Milk Allergy and Bone Mineral Density in Prepubertal Children.

    PubMed

    Mailhot, Genevieve; Perrone, Vanessa; Alos, Nathalie; Dubois, Josée; Delvin, Edgard; Paradis, Louis; Des Roches, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Recent data suggest that cow's milk allergy (CMA) has become more persistent, prolonging treatment via strict elimination of cow's milk products into a period of skeletal growth. The objectives of this study were to compare bone mineral density (BMD), vitamin D status, and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D between prepubertal children with persistent CMA and those with non-cow's milk food allergies (NCMA) as control subjects and to assess the use of and compliance to calcium and vitamin D supplementation among children with persistent CMA. Fifty-two children with persistent CMA and 29 with NCMA were recruited. BMD was measured by using dual energy radiograph absorptiometry, and vitamin D status was assessed by using plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. Calcium and vitamin D intakes, as well as compliance to calcium and vitamin D supplementation, were recorded. Lumbar spine BMD z scores were significantly lower in children with CMA. Low bone mass was detected in 6% of the CMA group compared with none in the NCMA group. Children with CMA displayed significantly lower calcium intakes than control subjects. Vitamin D status was not reduced in children with CMA compared with control subjects. Fewer than one-half of children with CMA reported the use of calcium and vitamin D supplements. However, adherence was high among supplement users, with a mean compliance rate of 5.5 days per week. These prepubertal children with persistent CMA had lower lumbar spine BMD z scores than children with NCMA, which likely resulted from lower calcium intake. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Bone mineral density in collegiate female athletes: comparisons among sports.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Lanay M; Fornetti, Willa; Pivarnik, James M

    2007-01-01

    Some female athletes may have decreased bone mineral density (BMD), which puts them at higher risk for stress fractures and future osteoporosis. To compare site-specific BMD among National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I varsity female athletes and to determine predictor variables of BMD measurements. Between-groups design. University health care system. All women varsity athletes were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Of 12 sports, we obtained complete data from 99 women (mean age = 20.2 +/- 1.3 years) representing gymnastics, softball, cross-country, track, field hockey, soccer, crew, and swimming/diving. Each participant was weighed, measured, and questioned about her menstrual status. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, we measured total-body BMD and region-of-interest scores for lumbar spine, pelvis, and average leg (average from right and left leg measurements) BMD. Using analyses of covariance, we compared BMD measurements among sports at each site while controlling for menstrual status and mass, and we performed a stepwise regression analysis to determine significant predictors of BMD at each site. Twenty-three athletes were oligomenorrheic or amenorrheic. Runners had the lowest total-body (1.079 +/- 0.055 g.cm (-2)) and site-specific ( P < .01) BMD values for every site except average leg score when compared with gymnasts and softball players. Swimmers and divers had significantly lower average leg BMD (1.117 +/- 0.086 g.cm (-2)) than athletes in every other sport except runners and rowers ( P < .01). Regression analysis revealed only mass and sport as significant predictors of total-body BMD. Runners and swimmers and divers demonstrated some deficits in site-specific BMD values when compared with athletes in other sports. When treating a female varsity athlete, athletic trainers should consider her mass and sport type with regard to her bone health.

  5. Bone mass density in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sarrai, Mona; Duroseau, Herold; D'Augustine, Jean; Moktan, Sabita; Bellevue, Rita

    2007-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) leads to many complications including osteoporosis and osteopenia. We studied the prevalence and predisposing factors of low bone mass density (BMD) in adults with SCD. In this retrospective study, dual X-ray absorptiometry bone scans were used to determine BMD in the lumbar spine, femoral neck and ultra distal radius of 103 patients (73 females, 30 males, aged 15-80 years). Chart reviews and a patient questionnaire were used to collect patient characteristics, disease course and severity, and low BMD risk factors. The 79.6% of patients (mean age 36.5 +/- 12.5 years) had an abnormal BMD, with a predilection for the lumbar spine (P = 0.001). Analysis by 3 (low BMD versus very low BMD versus normal) or by 2 groups (abnormal versus normal) showed that abnormal BMD was associated with lower body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.003), lower Hb level (P = 0.001) and higher ferritin (P = 0.003). Low BMD patients were more likely to be SS, SC or Sbeta(0)thal than Sbeta(+)thal (P = 0.022). Abnormal BMD was not related to age, sex, menarche, SCD complications, number of crises, iron overload, treatment with hydroxycarbamide or desferal, renal disease, smoking or alcohol. Patients treated with hydroxycarbamide for at least 6 months were more likely to have an abnormal BMD. In this SCD population, abnormal BMD seemed to be independent of sex, age and menopause, whereas BMI, ferritin level, Hb type and level appeared to play a major role.

  6. Low bone mineral density in achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Kadono, Izumi; Sugiura, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Sachi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH) and hypochondroplasia (HCH) are the most common form of short-limb skeletal dysplasias caused by activated fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling. Although decreased bone mass was reported in gain-of-function mutation in Fgfr3 mice, both disorders have never been described as osteoporotic. In the present study, we evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) in ACH and HCH patients. We measured spinal BMD (L1-L4) in 18 ACH and four HCH patients with an average age of 19.8 ± 7.5 years (range, 10-33 years). BMD Z-score in each individual was calculated for normalizing age and gender. Correlation between body mass index (BMI) and BMD was analyzed. Moreover, BMD and Z-score were compared between ACH patients and HCH patients. The average BMD of ACH/HCH patients was 0.805 ± 0.141 g/cm(2) (range, 0.554-1.056 g/cm(2) ), resulting in an average Z-score of -1.1 ± 0.8 (range, -2.4 to 0.6) of the standard value. A slightly positive correlation was observed between BMI and BMD (r = 0.45; P = 0.13). There was no significant difference in BMD and Z-score between ACH and HCH patients. Spinal BMD was reduced in ACH/HCH patients, and was mildly correlated with individual BMI. We should carefully monitor BMD and examine osteoporosis-related symptoms in adolescent and adult ACH/HCH patients. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. A detailed assessment of alterations in bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and bone density in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Black, A J; Topping, J; Durham, B; Farquharson, R G; Fraser, W D

    2000-03-01

    The effects of pregnancy on bone turnover and the potential risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture in pregnancy are controversial. Utilizing biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), bone turnover before, during, and after pregnancy was studied in detail. Ten women (mean age 30 years; range 23-40) were recruited. Prepregnancy data were obtained and then a review was performed at 2-week intervals , once pregnancy was confirmed, until 14 weeks of gestation and thereafter monthly until term. Bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated by DEXA scanning of hip, spine, and forearm preconception and postpartum. In addition, BMD of the forearm at 14 weeks and 28 weeks gestation was obtained. All pregnancies had a successful outcome. Urinary free pyridinium cross-links, free pyridinoline (fPyr) and free deoxypyridinoline (fDPyr), were normal prepregnancy (mean [+/-SD]) 14.6 nmol/mmol (1.8) and 5.0 nmol/mmol (1.0) creat, respectively. By 14 weeks, they had increased to 20.8 nmol/mmol (4.3) and 6.1 nmol mmol (1.4) (both p < 0.02) and by 28 weeks to 26.3 nmol/mmol (5.6) and 7.4 nmol/mmol (1.6) (both p < 0.01). The ratio of fPyr to fDPyr remained constant. A similar significant increase was observed in N-telopeptide (NTx). Bone formation was assessed by measurement of carboxyterminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (P1CP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP). Neither were altered significantly before 28 weeks, but subsequently mean P1CP increased from 110 microg/liter (23) to 235 microg/liter (84) at 38 weeks and mean BSAP increased from 11.1 U/liter (5.0) to 28.6 U/liter (11.1) (p < 0.01 for both variables). Lumbar spine (L1-L4) BMD decreased from a prepregnancy mean of 1.075 g/cm (0.115) to 1.054 g/cm2 (0.150) postpartum (p < 0.05). Total hip BMD decreased from a prepregnancy mean of 0.976 g/cm2 (0.089) to 0.941 g/cm2 (0.097) (p < 0.05). Forearm BMD at midradius, one-third distal and ultradistal decreased but

  8. Bone Density Changes After Radiation for Extremity Sarcomas: Exploring the Etiology of Pathologic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Chen, Jeffrey; McCance, Sean; Rosier, Randy; O'Keefe, Regis; Constine, Louis S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The incidental irradiation (RT) of adjacent bone that takes place during treatment of soft tissue extremity sarcomas is generally presumed to 'weaken' the bone by decreasing its density, which subsequently increases the risk for pathologic fracture. This investigation intended to assess the relative effects on bone density of both RT and diminished mechanical loading secondary to tumor-induced and therapy-induced functional extremity impairment. Methods and Materials: 19 patients treated with surgical excision and RT for soft tissue extremity sarcomas had bone density measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at four sites: the irradiated (A) and contralateral (B) bone, and an uninvolved bone (C) in the treated extremity and its contralateral counterpart (D). Analysis included (1) [A-B], (2) [C-D], (3) [(A-B), - (C-D)], and (4) [(A-B)/B - (C-D)/D]. Results: The mean bone density for all irradiated sites was increased 0.08 {+-} 0.22 g/cm{sup 2} (variance) compared to the contralateral unirradiated side when corrected for weight-bearing effects (3). An average increase in bone density of 9 {+-} 22% (p = 0.08) was also seen when the differences were divided by individual control densities to normalize variation in density of different anatomic sites (4). Conclusions: RT does not routinely decrease bone density when corrected for weight bearing or mechanical effects. The pathogenesis for the known increased risk of pathologic fracture in irradiated bones is likely multifactorial, including possible alterations in bone remodeling that can result in stable, or even increased, bone density. Further clinical and basic studies are needed to confirm our unexpected findings.

  9. Bone mineral density deficits and fractures in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carmen L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2013-12-01

    Although substantial increases in survival rates among children diagnosed with cancer have been observed in recent decades, survivors are at risk of developing therapy-related chronic health conditions. Among children and adolescents treated for cancer, acquisition of peak bone mass may be compromised by cancer therapies, nutritional deficiencies, and reduced physical activity. Accordingly, failure to accrue optimal bone mass during childhood may place survivors at increased risk for deficits in bone density and fracture in later life. Current recommendations for the treatment of bone density decrements among cancer survivors include dietary counseling and supplementation to ensure adequate calcium and vitamin D intake. Few strategies exist to prevent or treat bone loss. Moving forward, studies characterizing the trajectory of changes in bone density over time will facilitate the development of interventions and novel therapies aimed at minimizing bone loss among survivors of childhood cancer.

  10. Increases in bone density during treatment of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Doppelt, S.H.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Segre, G.V.; Crowley, W.F. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    To assess the effects of gonadal steroid replacement on bone density in men with osteoporosis due to severe hypogonadism, we measured cortical bone density in the distal radius by 125I photon absorptiometry and trabecular bone density in the lumbar spine by quantitative computed tomography in 21 men with isolated GnRH deficiency while serum testosterone levels were maintained in the normal adult male range for 12-31 months (mean +/- SE, 23.7 +/- 1.1). In men who initially had fused epiphyses (n = 15), cortical bone density increased from 0.71 +/- 0.02 to 0.74 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density did not change (116 +/- 9 compared with 119 +/- 7 mg/cm3). In men who initially had open epiphyses (n = 6), cortical bone density increased from 0.62 +/- 0.01 to 0.70 +/- 0.03 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density increased from 96 +/- 13 to 109 +/- 12 mg/cm3 (P less than 0.01). Cortical bone density increased 0.03 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 in men with fused epiphyses and 0.08 +/- 0.02 g/cm2 in men with open epiphyses (P less than 0.05). Despite these increases, neither cortical nor trabecular bone density returned to normal levels. Histomorphometric analyses of iliac crest bone biopsies demonstrated that most of the men had low turnover osteoporosis, although some men had normal to high turnover osteoporosis. We conclude that bone density increases during gonadal steroid replacement of GnRH-deficient men, particularly in men who are skeletally immature.

  11. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. On the Use of Bone Remodelling Models to Estimate the Density Distribution of Bones. Uniqueness of the Solution

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Reina, Javier; Ojeda, Joaquín; Mayo, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodelling models are widely used in a phenomenological manner to estimate numerically the distribution of apparent density in bones from the loads they are daily subjected to. These simulations start from an arbitrary initial distribution, usually homogeneous, and the density changes locally until a bone remodelling equilibrium is achieved. The bone response to mechanical stimulus is traditionally formulated with a mathematical relation that considers the existence of a range of stimulus, called dead or lazy zone, for which no net bone mass change occurs. Implementing a relation like that leads to different solutions depending on the starting density. The non-uniqueness of the solution has been shown in this paper using two different bone remodelling models: one isotropic and another anisotropic. It has also been shown that the problem of non-uniqueness is only mitigated by removing the dead zone, but it is not completely solved unless the bone formation and bone resorption rates are limited to certain maximum values. PMID:26859888

  13. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with low bone mineral density in obese children.

    PubMed

    Pardee, P E; Dunn, W; Schwimmer, J B

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. Liver disease can be a cause of low bone mineral density. Whether or not NAFLD influences bone health is not known. To evaluate bone mineral density in obese children with and without NAFLD. Thirty-eight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD were matched for age, gender, race, ethnicity, height and weight to children without evidence of liver disease from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Age and gender-specific bone mineral density Z-scores were calculated and compared between children with and without NAFLD. After controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity and total per cent body fat, the relationship between bone mineral density and the severity of histology was analysed in children with NAFLD. Obese children with NAFLD had significantly (P < 0.0001) lower bone mineral density Z-scores (-1.98) than obese children without NAFLD (0.48). Forty-five per cent of children with NAFLD had low-bone mineral density for age, compared to none of the children without NAFLD (P < 0.0001). Among those children with NAFLD, children with NASH had a significantly (P < 0.05) lower bone mineral density Z-score (-2.37) than children with NAFLD who did not have NASH (-1.58). The NAFLD was associated with poor bone health in obese children. More severe disease was associated with lower bone mineralisation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms and consequences of poor bone mineralisation in children with NAFLD. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease is Associated with Low Bone Mineral Density in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Perrie E.; Dunn, Winston; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. Liver disease can be a cause of low bone mineral density. Whether NAFLD influences bone health is unknown. AIM To evaluate bone mineral density in obese children with and without NAFLD. METHODS Thirty-eight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD were matched for age, sex, race, ethnicity, height, and weight to children without evidence of liver disease from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Age and sex-specific bone mineral density Z-scores were calculated and compared between children with and without NAFLD. After controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and total percent body fat, the relationship between bone mineral density and the severity of histology was analyzed in children with NAFLD. RESULTS Obese children with NAFLD had significantly (p<0.0001) lower bone mineral density Z-scores (−1.98) than obese children without NAFLD (0.48). Forty-five percent of children with NAFLD had low bone mineral density for age, compared to none of the children without NAFLD (p < 0.0001). Among those children with NAFLD, children with NASH had a significantly (p< 0.05) lower bone mineral density Z-score (−2.37) than children with NAFLD who did not have NASH (−1.58). CONCLUSIONS NAFLD was associated with poor bone health in obese children. More severe disease was associated with lower bone mineralization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms and consequences of poor bone mineralization in children with NAFLD. PMID:22111971

  15. Bone Mineral Density in Sheehan's Syndrome; Prevalence of Low Bone Mass and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Chihaoui, Melika; Yazidi, Meriem; Chaker, Fatma; Belouidhnine, Manel; Kanoun, Faouzi; Lamine, Faiza; Ftouhi, Bochra; Sahli, Hela; Slimane, Hedia

    2016-10-01

    Hypopituitarism is a known cause of bone mineral loss. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with Sheehan's syndrome (SS) and to determine the risk factors. This is a retrospective study of 60 cases of SS that have had a bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Clinical, biological, and therapeutic data were collected. The parameters of osteodensitometry at the femoral neck and the lumbar spine of 60 patients with SS were compared with those of 60 age-, height-, and weight-matched control women. The mean age at BMD measurement was 49.4 ± 9.9 yr (range: 25-76 yr). The mean duration of SS was 19.3 ± 8.5 yr (range: 3-41 yr). All patients had corticotropin deficiency and were treated with hydrocortisone at a mean daily dose of 26.3 ± 4.1 mg. Fifty-seven patients (95%) had thyrotropin deficiency and were treated with thyroxine at a mean daily dose of 124.3 ± 47.4 µg. Thirty-five of the 49 patients, aged less than 50 yr at diagnosis and having gonadotropin deficiency (71.4%), had estrogen-progesterone substitution. Osteopenia was present in 25 patients (41.7%) and osteoporosis in 21 (35.0%). The BMD was significantly lower in the group with SS than in the control group (p < 0.001). The odds ratio of osteopenia-osteoporosis was 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-6.8) at the femoral neck and 3.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.7-7.8) at the lumbar spine. The lumbar spine was more frequently affected by low bone mineral mass (p < 0.05). The duration of the disease and the daily dose of hydrocortisone were independently and inversely associated with BMD at the femoral neck. The daily dose of thyroxine was independently and inversely associated with BMD at the lumbar spine. Estrogen-progesterone replacement therapy was not associated with BMD. Low bone mineral mass was very common in patients with SS. The lumbar spine was more frequently affected. The duration of the disease and the doses of

  16. Quantitative Percussion Diagnostics and Bone Density Analysis of the Implant-Bone Interface in a Pre- and Postmortem Human Subject

    PubMed Central

    Hui, DiDi; Bajaj, Vaibhav; Earthman, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been hypothesized that a correlation exists between the density of surrounding cortical bone and the stability of an implant under percussion loading that can be used to quantify the implant's osseointegration. The purpose of the present research was to explore whether quantitative percussion testing of dental implants gives reasonable indications of the level of osseointegration that are consistent with bone configuration and its influence on osseointegration quality. Material and Methods Data from percussion testing of a live human subject, obtained using the Periometer®, were compared with corresponding bone density estimates from high-resolution computer tomography images and postmortem percussion probe data. Results The results confirm the hypothesis that the nature of an implant’s response to percussion is determined by its cortical bone support. Conclusions The findings suggest that the cortical bone supporting the crestal and apical regions of the implant is primarily responsible for structural stability. PMID:24278927

  17. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  18. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. [Physical activity/sports and bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Takeaki

    2008-09-01

    This study observed the amount of exercise of Japanese schoolchildren as recorded by pedometer. Schools are necessary venues to increase children's mobility, but home environments are hotbeds for lack of exercise on weekends and during holidays and vacations. This research measured the L(2 - 4)BMD of 185 male and female primary schoolchildren using a DEXA method. Results showed significant partial correlations for measurements of boys' grip strength, boys' standing broad jump, and girls' grip strength, indicating the influence of mechanical stress. In a parallel study, L(2 - 4)BMD measurements for high school athletic club members (14 and 10 sports for boys and girls respectively) were taken, and it was found that the L(2 - 4)BMD (60 kg/weight) values were significantly higher than the control values for boys' boxing and weightlifting but significantly lower for boys' sumo. No significance was found in L(2 - 4)BMD (50 kg/weight) among the different girls' sports. From both studies, it was concluded that with approximately 2 hours of moderate play and exercise daily, the bone density of children rises with increase of overall muscle quantity, resulting in higher athletic ability and overall physical strength.

  20. Bone mineral density in elite junior Olympic weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Conroy, B P; Kraemer, W J; Maresh, C M; Fleck, S J; Stone, M H; Fry, A C; Miller, P D; Dalsky, G P

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of bone mineral density (BMD) to muscular strength in highly trained young male athletes in order to gain insights concerning the influence of heavy resistance training on BMD. Twenty-five elite junior weightlifters (age, 17.4 +/- 1.4 yr) and 11 age-matched controls (16.9 +/- 1.1 yr) volunteered for this investigation. Measurements of BMD (g.cm-2) utilizing dual energy x-ray absorptiometry were obtained for the lumbar spine (L2-4) and the proximal femur (neck; trochanter, Ward's triangle). The BMD values for the junior lifters were found to be significantly greater at all sites for the junior weightlifters compared with their age-matched control group. The BMD values of the spine and femoral neck of the junior weightlifters when compared with adult reference data (i.e., 20-39 yr old men) were found to be significantly greater. Both simple and multiple regression analyses demonstrated significant relationships of BMD with strength accounting for 30-65% of the variance. These data suggest that in elite junior weightlifters, muscle strength, highly specific to the sport of weightlifting, has a major influence on BMD due to the influence of the chronic overloads experienced in training.

  1. FRAX and fracture prediction without bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Johansson, H; Odén, A; Leslie, W D; McCloskey, E V

    2015-01-01

    The major application of FRAX in osteoporosis is to direct pharmacological interventions to those at high risk of fracture. Whereas the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment, with the possible exception of alendronate, is largely independent of baseline bone mineral density (BMD), it remains a widely held perception that osteoporosis therapies are only effective in the presence of low BMD. Thus, the use of FRAX in the absence of BMD to identify individuals requiring therapy remains the subject of some debate and is the focus of this review. The clinical risk factors used in FRAX have high evidence-based validity to identify a risk responsive to intervention. The selection of high-risk individuals with FRAX, without knowledge of BMD, preferentially selects for low BMD and thus identifies a risk that is responsive to pharmacological intervention. The prediction of fractures with the use of clinical risk factors alone in FRAX is comparable to the use of BMD alone to predict fractures and is suitable, therefore, in the many countries where facilities for BMD testing are sparse. In countries where access to BMD is greater, FRAX can be used without BMD in the majority of cases and BMD tests reserved for those close to a probability-based intervention threshold. Thus concerns surrounding the use of FRAX in clinical practice without information on BMD are largely misplaced.

  2. Effect of Clothing on Measurement of Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Anna Z; Malabanan, Alan O; Abate, Ejigayehu G; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Yano-Litwin, Amanda; Dorazio, Jolene; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether allowing patients to have BMD (bone mineral density) studies acquired while wearing radiolucent clothing adlib contributes appreciably to the measurement error seen. To examine this question, a spine phantom was scanned 30 times without any clothing, while draped with a gown, and while draped with heavy winter clothing. The effect on mean BMD and on SD (standard deviation) was assessed. The effect of clothing on mean or SD of the area was not significant. The effect of clothing on mean and SD for BMD was small but significant and was around 1.6% for the mean. However, the effect on BMD precision was much more clinically important. Without clothing the spine phantom had an least significant change of 0.0077 gm/cm(2), while when introducing variability of clothing the least significant change rose as high as 0.0305 gm/cm(2). We conclude that, adding clothing to the spine phantom had a small but statistically significant effect on the mean BMD and on variance of the measurement. It is unlikely that the effect on mean BMD has any clinical significance, but the effect on the reproducibility (precision) of the result is likely clinically significant.

  3. [Relationship between sex steroids and bone density in elderly men].

    PubMed

    Basurto, Lourdes; Saucedo, Renata; Galván, Rosa; Vargas, Columba; Córdova, Nydia; Campos, Sandra; Vega, Sara; Moreno, Erika; Avelar, Francisco; Zárate, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relationship between serum estradiol level (ESL) and testosterone serum level (TSL) with bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly men. Cross-sectional study including 127 healthy men aged 60 years and over. BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured. ESL, TSL and sex hormone binding globulin were estimated by radioimmunoassay. Free testosterone level (FTL) was calculated. The ESL and BMD correlation at the spine was r = 0.288, (p < 0.01) and at the femoral neck was r = 0.224, (p < 0.01). These correlations remained significant after adjustment for BMI and age. By contrast, no correlation was found between TSL and BMD. However FTL were associated with BMD at the spine (r = 0.288, p < 0.01) and at the femoral neck (r = 0.190, p < 0.05). ESL and FTL are associated with BMD in elderly men. This effect may be partially mediated by the peripheral conversion of testosterone into estradiol.

  4. Effect of Multiparity and Prolonged Lactation on Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Natung, Tanie; Barooah, Rituparna; Ahanthem, Santa Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was done to determine the effect of multiparity and prolonged lactation on bone mineral density (BMD). Methods This cross-sectional study included 196 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women aged 40 to 60 years old. Age, body mass index (BMI), menopausal status, duration of menopause, parity and total duration of lactation, nutritional history were recorded. Lumbar spine (LS; L2-L4) and femur neck (FN) BMD were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Correlation of parity and lactation with BMD were investigated using multiple regression analysis. Results Parity was inversely correlated to BMD for LS (β = −0.266, P = 0.001) and FN (β = −0.380, P = 0.000). This relation remained significant even after adjusting for age, BMI and duration of menopause. Duration of lactation was inversely correlated with BMD for LS (β = −0.271, P = 0.001) but no for FN (β = −0.124, P = 0.130). Conclusions Multiparity and prolonged lactation have negative impact on BMD especially with in a socioeconomic group whose nutritional intake is borderline. Our data support that parity and duration of lactation can be associated with future osteoporosis. PMID:28119896

  5. Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva; Meher, Lalit; Modi, Kirtikumar

    2013-07-01

    Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients. Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD. Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041). Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of parathyroid hormone in bone metabolism and health.

  6. Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva; Meher, Lalit; Modi, Kirtikumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients. Materials and Methods: Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD. Results: Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041). Conclusion: Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of

  7. Accurate quantification of width and density of bone structures by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Thomas N; Short, David F

    2007-10-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the representation of edges between objects of different densities is influenced by the limited spatial resolution of the scanner. This results in the misrepresentation of density of narrow objects, leading to errors of up to 70% and more. Our interest is in the imaging and measurement of narrow bone structures, and the issues are the same for imaging with clinical CT scanners, peripheral quantitative CT scanners or micro CT scanners. Mathematical models, phantoms and tests with patient data led to the following procedures: (i) extract density profiles at one-degree increments from the CT images at right angles to the bone boundary; (ii) consider the outer and inner edge of each profile separately due to different adjacent soft tissues; (iii) measure the width of each profile based on a threshold at fixed percentage of the difference between the soft-tissue value and a first approximated bone value; (iv) correct the underlying material density of bone for each profile based on the measured width with the help of the density-versus-width curve obtained from computer simulations and phantom measurements. This latter curve is specific to a certain scanner and is not dependent on the densities of the tissues within the range seen in patients. This procedure allows the calculation of the material density of bone. Based on phantom measurements, we estimate the density error to be below 2% relative to the density of normal bone and the bone-width error about one tenth of a pixel size.

  8. Accurate quantification of width and density of bone structures by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hangartner, Thomas N.; Short, David F.

    2007-10-15

    In computed tomography (CT), the representation of edges between objects of different densities is influenced by the limited spatial resolution of the scanner. This results in the misrepresentation of density of narrow objects, leading to errors of up to 70% and more. Our interest is in the imaging and measurement of narrow bone structures, and the issues are the same for imaging with clinical CT scanners, peripheral quantitative CT scanners or micro CT scanners. Mathematical models, phantoms and tests with patient data led to the following procedures: (i) extract density profiles at one-degree increments from the CT images at right angles to the bone boundary; (ii) consider the outer and inner edge of each profile separately due to different adjacent soft tissues; (iii) measure the width of each profile based on a threshold at fixed percentage of the difference between the soft-tissue value and a first approximated bone value; (iv) correct the underlying material density of bone for each profile based on the measured width with the help of the density-versus-width curve obtained from computer simulations and phantom measurements. This latter curve is specific to a certain scanner and is not dependent on the densities of the tissues within the range seen in patients. This procedure allows the calculation of the material density of bone. Based on phantom measurements, we estimate the density error to be below 2% relative to the density of normal bone and the bone-width error about one tenth of a pixel size.

  9. Changes in bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, and vertebral fracture risk reduction with once weekly teriparatide.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiro; Kuroda, Tatsuhiko; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Shiraki, Masataka

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the surrogacy of bone mineral density and bone turnover markers for incident vertebral fracture using data from 237 patients treated with once weekly 56.5 μg teriparatide or placebo. This analysis was conducted using data from the Teriparatide Once-Weekly Efficacy Research trial, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial for patients with severe osteoporosis in Japan. A total of 237 subjects (placebo group, n = 130; teriparatide group, n = 107) were assessed at baseline and at 72 weeks. Main outcome measures included estimation of the treatment effects of once weekly teriparatide on vertebral fracture risk reduction using percentage changes in lumbar bone mineral density and bone turnover markers. The percentage change in lumbar bone mineral density was 6.69% in the teriparatide group compared with 0.28% in the placebo group (p < 0.01). One incident vertebral fracture occurred in the teriparatide group compared with 16 in the placebo group. The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios of the teriparatide group compared with the placebo group were 0.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.01 to 0.56) and 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.06 to 6.36), respectively. The proportion of treatment effect explained by changes in lumbar bone mineral density was 83% (Freedman's method) and 66% (Chen's method). There were no notable changes in hazard ratios if we adjusted for bone turnover markers. Most of the vertebral fracture risk reduction with once weekly 56.5 μg teriparatide is explained by changes in lumbar bone mineral density rather than changes in bone turnover markers.

  10. Investigation of the relationship between low environmental exposure to metals and bone mineral density, bone resorption and renal function.

    PubMed

    Callan, A C; Devine, A; Qi, L; Ng, J C; Hinwood, A L

    2015-07-01

    Environmental exposure to metals has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Exposure to cadmium has been associated with decreased bone density, an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture and possible renal dysfunction. Older women are a group at risk of renal and bone density impacts and exposure to metals may be an important risk factor for these health outcomes. This study was a cross sectional study of 77 women aged 50 years and above examining the relationship between metals exposure and renal and bone health. Urinary and blood metals concentrations, plasma creatinine, iron, ferritin and transferrin were measured in these subjects. Bone biomarkers assessed included the pyridinium crosslinks, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline measured by ELISA. Renal function was assessed using eGFR and KIM-1. Whole body, hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density was assessed using DEXA. Blood and urinary metals concentrations were generally low in the subjects, with a median urinary cadmium concentration of 0.26 μg/g creatinine (range <0.065-1.03 μg/g). Urinary cadmium was found to be a significant predictor of bone mineral density at whole body, lumber spine, total hip and femoral neck, with increasing urinary Cd concentrations associated with decreased bone density. Urinary cadmium and aluminium concentrations were positively correlated with bone resorption whilst blood zinc and mercury concentrations were negatively correlated. Urinary aluminium was positively correlated with KIM-1 concentrations, a marker of early kidney damage, however blood zinc concentrations were significantly negatively correlated with this biomarker. This study provides additional support for low cadmium exposure being of concern for the health of older women. Further investigation into the role of exposure to other metals on bone and renal health is warranted.

  11. Relationship between mechanical properties and bone mineral density of human femoral bone retrieved from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haba, Yvonne; Lindner, Tobias; Fritsche, Andreas; Schiebenhöfer, Ann-Kristin; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Skripitz, Ralf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse retrieved human femoral bone samples using three different test methods, to elucidate the relationship between bone mineral density and mechanical properties. Human femoral heads were retrieved from 22 donors undergoing primary total hip replacement due to hip osteoarthritis and stored for a maximum of 24 hours postoperatively at + 6 °C to 8 °C.Analysis revealed an average structural modulus of 232±130 N/mm(2) and ultimate compression strength of 6.1±3.3 N/mm(2) with high standard deviations. Bone mineral densities of 385±133 mg/cm(2) and 353±172 mg/cm(3) were measured using thedual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), respectively. Ashing resulted in a bone mineral density of 323±97 mg/cm(3). In particular, significant linear correlations were found between DXA and ashing with r = 0.89 (p < 0.01, n = 22) and between structural modulus and ashing with r = 0.76 (p < 0.01, n = 22).Thus, we demonstrated a significant relationship between mechanical properties and bone density. The correlations found can help to determine the mechanical load capacity of individual patients undergoing surgical treatments by means of noninvasive bone density measurements.

  12. [Development of a Novel Body Phantom with Bone Equivalent Density for Evaluation of Bone SPECT].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hajime; Miwa, Kenta; Matsutomo, Norikazu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Kato, Toyohiro; Shimada, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    We developed a custom-designed phantom for bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-specific radioactivity distribution and linear attenuation coefficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the phantom. The lumbar phantom consisted of the trunk of a body phantom (background) containing a cylinder (vertebral body), a sphere (tumor), and a T-shaped container (processus). The vertebral body, tumor, and processus phantoms contained a K(2)HPO(4) solution of bone equivalent density and 50, 300 and 50 kBq/mL of (99m)Tc, respectively. The body phantom contained 8 kBq/mL of (99m)Tc solution. SPECT images were acquired using low-energy high-resolution collimation, a 128 × 128 matrix and 120 projections over 360° with a dwell time of 15 sec/view × 4 times. Thereafter, CT images were acquired at 130 kV and 70 ref mAs using adaptive dose modulation. The SPECT data were reconstructed with ordered subset expectation maximization with three-dimensional, scatter, and CT-based attenuation correction. Count ratio, linear attenuation coefficient (LAC), and full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) were measured. Count ratios between the background, the vertebral body, and the tumor in SPECT images were 463.8: 2888.0: 15150.3 (1: 6.23: 32.7). The LAC of the background and vertebral body in the CT-derived attenuation map were 0.155 cm⁻¹ and 0.284 cm⁻¹, respectively, and the FWHM measured from the processus was 15.27 mm. The precise counts and LAC indicated that the phantom was accurate and could serve as a tool for evaluating acquisition, reconstruction parameters, and quantitation in bone SPECT images.

  13. Allelic determinants of vitamin d insufficiency, bone mineral density, and bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Trummer, Olivia; Schwetz, Verena; Walter-Finell, Daniela; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Renner, Wilfried; Gugatschka, Markus; Dobnig, Harald; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-07-01

    Low 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH) vitamin D] status is known to play an important role in many diseases with focus on bone health. Based on recently reported genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency, we aimed to analyze genetic variants of group-specific component (GC), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), and cytochrome P450IIR-1 (CYP2R1) for association with vitamin D levels, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone fractures. We conducted a cross-sectional BMD and fracture study and a prospective cohort study. The cross-sectional study comprised participants of a BMD screening study, and the prospective cohort study comprised nursing home subjects. The cross-sectional study included 342 subjects (mean age, 55.3 ± 12.0 yr), and the prospective study included 1093 subjects (mean age, 84.0 ± 6.0 yr). Patients were stratified by GC, DHCR7, and CYP2R1 genotypes. For each gene, the allele associated with lower 25(OH) vitamin D levels was designated as "risk allele." The potential role of these risk alleles in fracture risk was analyzed by logistic regression analysis including age and sex as confounders. We measured BMD and fractures. GC genotypes were significantly associated with lower mean 25(OH) vitamin D levels in both cohorts (P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively). There was no significant association of BMD with any of the genotypes. None of the alleles was associated with past fractures, whereas the DHCR7 G-allele was significantly associated with prospective fractures (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.92; P = 0.011). The DHCR7 gene polymorphism may be a predictor for fracture risk.

  14. [Bone mineral density in pregnant women from Moscow: possible effects of pregnancy dynamics and nutrient intake].

    PubMed

    Kon, I Ya; Safronova, A I; Gmoshinskaya, M V; Shcheplyagina, L A; Korosteleva, M M; Toboleva, M A; Aleshina, I V; Kurkova, V I; Larionova, Z G

    2014-01-01

    Supporting of bone health is one of the main approaches to provide health in pregnant women considering intensive calcium and other mineral mobilization from mass bone that is necessary forforming fetus bone. This mobilization may lead to decrease of bone mineral density and development of osteopenia and osteoporosis. The important factors of development of bone impairment in pregnancy are nutrition and particular deficient consumption of protein, Ca, vitamin D. The possible role of reduced intake of pregnant women other nutrients remains unexplored. The aim of the research was estimating the prevalence of bone mineral density decrease in regard to the particular course of pregnancy and studying possible effects of key nutrients on bone mineral density in pregnant women. 131 women at different stages of pregnancy were involved in the survey. The bone density assessment was conducted using Bone Densitometer Omnisense 7000. As a criterion for bone density decrease in women used a Z-score, which was considered as normal to -1.0, as reduced from -1.0 to -2,0, and as significantly reduced when Z-score was less than -2,0. Analysis of the actual nutrition was performed by a 24-hour recording of 58 pregnant women. Normal bone mineral density was detected in 54 women or 41% of the total number of women surveyed. In 51 (39%) pregnant women reduced bone mineral density was discovered, and in 26 (20%) patients--significantly reduced bone density. There was a considerable deviation in pregnant patients' diet from the nutrition guidelines, which include, in particular, the high content of fat and saturated fatty acid, reduced intake of some micronutrients such as calcium, zinc, folic acid, β-carotene, vitamins A, B1, E. However, differences in the actual consumption of nutrients in women with varying bone mineral density have been identified only in case of consumption of fat and energy value of diets, also Mn and I. So, it may be suggested that the differences in bone mineral

  15. Comparison of bone mineral density in the jaws of patients with and without chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk Tonguç, M; Ş Büyükkaplan, U; Fentoğlu, Ö; A Gümüş, B; S Çerçi, S; Y Kırzıoğlu, F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Although several studies have addressed the relationship between systemic bone mineral status and the severity of periodontitis, there is little knowledge of the relationship between periodontal disease and locally detected bone mineral density. The aim of this study was to compare the mandibular bone mineral density of patients with chronic periodontitis with that of periodontally healthy subjects. Methods 48 systemically healthy subjects were included in the study and underwent a periodontal examination to determine their status. 24 subjects were periodontally healthy and the other 24 had moderate or severe chronic periodontitis. The mandibular bone mineral density of the subjects was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The region of interest on the body of the mandible was independently determined on the dual energy absorptiometry radiographs, and a computer calculated the bone mineral density of these regions. Results The mandibular bone mineral density of the subjects with periodontitis was significantly lower than that of the periodontally healthy subjects (p < 0.01). There were significant negative correlations between the mandibular bone mineral density values and parameters related to the amount of periodontal destruction. Conclusions Low bone mineral density in the jaw may be associated with chronic periodontitis. PMID:22241867

  16. Trabecular bone of precocials at birth; Are they prepared to run for the wolf(f)?

    PubMed Central

    Wolschrijn, Claudia F.; van Vilsteren, Anouk A.M.; van Rietbergen, Bert; van Weeren, P. René

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bone is a dynamic tissue adapting to loading according to “Wolff's law of bone adaptation.” During very early life, however, such a mechanism may not be adequate enough to adapt to the dramatic change in environmental challenges in precocial species. Their neonates are required to stand and walk within hours after birth, in contrast to altricial animals that have much more time to adapt from the intrauterine environment to the outside world. In this study, trabecular bone parameters of the talus and sagittal ridge of the tibia from stillborn but full‐term precocials (calves and foals) were analyzed by micro‐CT imaging in order to identify possible anticipatory mechanisms to loading. Calculated average bone volume fraction in the Shetland pony (49–74%) was significantly higher compared to Warmblood foals (28–51%). Bovine trabecular bone was characterized by a low average bone volume fraction (22–28%), however, more directional anisotropy was found. It is concluded that anticipatory strategies in skeletal development exist in precocial species, which differ per species and are most likely related to anatomical differences in joint geometry and related loading patterns. The underlying regulatory mechanisms are still unknown, but they may be based on a genetic blueprint for the development of bone. More knowledge, both about a possible blueprint and its regulation, will be helpful in understanding developmental bone and joint diseases. J. Morphol. 277:948–956, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27098190

  17. Dietary l-carnitine supplementation improves bone mineral density by suppressing bone turnover in aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Shirin; Balakrishnan, Anju; Clark, Richard M; Owen, Kevin Q; Koo, Sung I; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2008-08-01

    Postmenopausal bone loss is a major public health concern. Although drug therapies are available, women are interested in alternative/adjunct therapies to slow down the bone loss associated with ovarian hormone deficiency. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation of l-carnitine can influence bone density and slow the rate of bone turnover in an aging ovariectomized rat model. Eighteen-month-old Fisher-344 female rats were ovariectomized and assigned to two groups: (1) a control group in which rats were fed ad libitum a carnitine-free (-CN) diet (AIN-93M) and (2) another fed the same diet but supplemented with l-carnitine (+CN). At the end of 8 weeks of feeding, animals were sacrificed and bone specimens were collected for measuring bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Femoral microarchitectural properties were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Femoral mRNA levels of selected bone matrix proteins were determined by northern blot analysis. Data showed that tibial BMD was significantly higher in the rat fed the +CN diet than those fed the -CN (control) diet. Dietary carnitine significantly decreased the mRNA level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), an indicator of bone resorption by 72.8%, and decreased the mRNA abundance of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen type-1 (COL), measures of bone formation by 63.6% and 61.2%, respectively. The findings suggest that carnitine supplementation slows bone loss and improves bone microstructural properties by decreasing bone turnover.

  18. Milk calcium taken with cheese increases bone mineral density and bone strength in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken; Takada, Yukihiro; Matsuyama, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Aoe, Seiichiro; Yano, Hideo; Toba, Yasuhiro

    2002-11-01

    We investigated the calcium bioavailability of milk calcium, taken with or without cheese. Twenty-four 6-week-old male rats for a meal-feeding experiment were trained to consume an AIN-76 diet within 2 h (2 times per day) for 2 weeks. The rats were then divided into three experimental groups, each fed 2 types of experimental diets: Control group, Cheese group, and Ca-Cheese group. The rats were each alternately given 2 types of experimental diets at 2-h meal-feeding for 31 days. The breaking force and energy of the femur in the Ca-Cheese group were significantly higher than in the control group. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and the femur in the Ca-Cheese group was also significantly higher than in the other two groups. These results indicate that milk calcium taken with cheese increases bone strength and BMD efficiently, results that may be useful for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  19. Bone Mineral Density in Collegiate Female Athletes: Comparisons Among Sports

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Lanay M; Fornetti, Willa; Pivarnik, James M

    2007-01-01

    Context: Some female athletes may have decreased bone mineral density (BMD), which puts them at higher risk for stress fractures and future osteoporosis. Objective: To compare site-specific BMD among National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I varsity female athletes and to determine predictor variables of BMD measurements. Design: Between-groups design. Setting: University health care system. Patients or Other Participants: All women varsity athletes were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Of 12 sports, we obtained complete data from 99 women (mean age = 20.2 ± 1.3 years) representing gymnastics, softball, cross-country, track, field hockey, soccer, crew, and swimming/diving. Main Outcome Measure(s): Each participant was weighed, measured, and questioned about her menstrual status. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, we measured total-body BMD and region-of-interest scores for lumbar spine, pelvis, and average leg (average from right and left leg measurements) BMD. Using analyses of covariance, we compared BMD measurements among sports at each site while controlling for menstrual status and mass, and we performed a stepwise regression analysis to determine significant predictors of BMD at each site. Results: Twenty-three athletes were oligomenorrheic or amenorrheic. Runners had the lowest total-body (1.079 ± 0.055 g·cm −2) and site-specific ( P < .01) BMD values for every site except average leg score when compared with gymnasts and softball players. Swimmers and divers had significantly lower average leg BMD (1.117 ± 0.086 g·cm −2) than athletes in every other sport except runners and rowers ( P < .01). Regression analysis revealed only mass and sport as significant predictors of total-body BMD. Conclusions: Runners and swimmers and divers demonstrated some deficits in site-specific BMD values when compared with athletes in other sports. When treating a female varsity athlete, athletic trainers should consider her mass and

  20. Alteration of femoral bone morphology and density in COX-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Galen; Xie, Chao; Chen, Di; Awad, Hani; Schwarz, Edward M.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Zhang, Xinping

    2009-01-01

    A role of COX-2 in pathological bone destruction and fracture repair has been established; however, few studies have been conducted to examine the involvement of COX-2 in maintaining bone mineral density and bone micro-architecture. In this study, we examined bone morphology in multiple trabecular and cortical regions within the distal and diaphyseal femur of 4-month-old wild-type and COX-2−/− mice using micro-computed tomography. Our results demonstrated that while COX-2−/− female mice had normal bone geometry and trabecular microarchitecture at 4 months of age, the male knockout mice displayed reduced bone volume fraction within the distal femoral metaphysis. Furthermore, male COX-2−/− mice had a significant reduction in cortical bone mineral density within the central cortical diaphysis and distal epiphysis and metaphysis. Consistent with the observed reduction in cortical mineral density, biomechanical testing via 4-point-bending showed that male COX-2−/− mice had a significant increase in postyield deformation, indicating a ductile bone phenotype in male COX-2−/− mice. In conclusion, our study suggests that genetic ablation of COX-2 may have a sex-related effect on cortical bone homeostasis and COX-2 plays a role in maintaining normal bone micro-architecture and density in mice. PMID:16731065

  1. Alteration of femoral bone morphology and density in COX-2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Galen; Xie, Chao; Chen, Di; Awad, Hani; Schwarz, Edward M; O'Keefe, Regis J; Guldberg, Robert E; Zhang, Xinping

    2006-10-01

    A role of COX-2 in pathological bone destruction and fracture repair has been established; however, few studies have been conducted to examine the involvement of COX-2 in maintaining bone mineral density and bone micro-architecture. In this study, we examined bone morphology in multiple trabecular and cortical regions within the distal and diaphyseal femur of 4-month-old wild-type and COX-2-/- mice using micro-computed tomography. Our results demonstrated that while COX-2-/- female mice had normal bone geometry and trabecular microarchitecture at 4 months of age, the male knockout mice displayed reduced bone volume fraction within the distal femoral metaphysis. Furthermore, male COX-2-/- mice had a significant reduction in cortical bone mineral density within the central cortical diaphysis and distal epiphysis and metaphysis. Consistent with the observed reduction in cortical mineral density, biomechanical testing via 4-point-bending showed that male COX-2-/- mice had a significant increase in postyield deformation, indicating a ductile bone phenotype in male COX-2-/- mice. In conclusion, our study suggests that genetic ablation of COX-2 may have a sex-related effect on cortical bone homeostasis and COX-2 plays a role in maintaining normal bone micro-architecture and density in mice.

  2. Bone density, microarchitecture and stiffness in Caucasian and Caribbean Hispanic postmenopausal American women

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Ji; Stein, Emily M; Zhang, Zhendong; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Zhang, Chiyuan A; Nickolas, Thomas L; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X Edward

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic Americans of Caribbean origin are a fast-growing subset of the US population, but there are no studies on bone density, microstructure and biomechanical integrity in this minority group. In this study, we aimed to compare Caucasian and Caribbean Hispanic postmenopausal American women with respect to these characteristics. Thirty-three Caribbean Hispanics were age-matched to thirty-three Caucasian postmenopausal women. At the lumbar spine, the Hispanic women had significantly lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD). At the radius by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), there were minimal differences between Hispanic and Caucasian women. At the tibia, Hispanic women had lower trabecular volumetric bone density and trabecular number, and higher trabecular separation. Individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) analyses indicated that at the tibia, Hispanic women not only had significantly lower bone volume fraction, but also had significantly lower rod bone volume fraction, plate trabecular number, rod trabecular number and lower plate–plate, plate–rod and rod–rod junction densities compared to Caucasian women. The differences in bone quantity and quality contributed to lower whole bone stiffness at the radius, and both whole bone and trabecular bone stiffness at the tibia in Hispanic women. In conclusion, Hispanic women had poorer bone mechanical and microarchitectural properties than Caucasian women, especially at the load-bearing distal tibia. PMID:26273525

  3. Aggravated bone density decline following symptomatic osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, Marissa A H; Pluijm, Saskia M F; te Winkel, Mariël L; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Fiocco, Martha; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Leeuw, Jan A; Bruin, Marrie C A; van der Sluis, Inge M; Bresters, Dorien; Lequin, Maarten H; Roos, Jan C; Veerman, Anjo J P; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis and decline of bone density are serious side effects during and after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is unknown whether osteonecrosis and low bone density occur together in the same patients, or whether these two osteogenic side-effects can mutually influence each other's development. Bone density and the incidence of symptomatic osteonecrosis were prospectively assessed in a national cohort of 466 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4-18 years of age) who were treated according to the dexamethasone-based Dutch Child Oncology Group-ALL9 protocol. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDLS) (n=466) and of the total body (BMDTB) (n=106) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Bone density was expressed as age- and gender-matched standard deviation scores. Thirty patients (6.4%) suffered from symptomatic osteonecrosis. At baseline, BMDLS and BMDTB did not differ between patients who did or did not develop osteonecrosis. At cessation of treatment, patients with osteonecrosis had lower mean BMDLS and BMDTB than patients without osteonecrosis (respectively, with osteonecrosis: -2.16 versus without osteonecrosis: -1.21, P<0.01 and with osteonecrosis: -1.73 versus without osteonecrosis: -0.57, P<0.01). Multivariate linear models showed that patients with osteonecrosis had steeper BMDLS and BMDTB declines during follow-up than patients without osteonecrosis (interaction group time, P<0.01 and P<0.01). We conclude that bone density status at the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not seem to influence the occurrence of symptomatic osteonecrosis. Bone density declines from the time that osteonecrosis is diagnosed; this suggests that the already existing decrease in bone density during acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy is further aggravated by factors such as restriction of weight-bearing activities and destruction of bone architecture due to osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis can, therefore, be considered a risk

  4. Reduced mechanical load decreases the density, stiffness, and strength of cancellous bone of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Giesen, E B W; Ding, M; Dalstra, M; van Eijden, T M G J

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the influence of decreased mechanical loading on the density and mechanical properties of the cancellous bone of the human mandibular condyle. Destructive compressive mechanical tests were performed on cancellous bone specimens.Background. Reduced masticatory function in edentate people leads to a reduction of forces acting on the mandible. As bone reacts to its mechanical environment a change in its material properties can be expected. Cylindrical bone specimens were obtained from dentate and edentate embalmed cadavers. Mechanical parameters were determined in the axial and in the transverse directions. Subsequently, density parameters were determined according to a method based on Archimedes' principle. The apparent density and volume fraction of the bone were about 18% lower in the edentate group; no age-related effect on density was found. The decrease of bone in the edentate group was associated with a lower stiffness and strength (about 22% and 28%, respectively). The ultimate strain, however, did not differ between the two groups. Both groups had similar mechanical anisotropy; in axial loading the bone was stiffer and stronger than in transverse loading. Reduced mechanical load had affected the density and herewith the mechanical properties of condylar cancellous bone, but not its anisotropy. The change in material properties of the cancellous bone after loss of teeth indicate that the mandibular condyle is sensitive for changes in its mechanical environment. Therefore, changes in mechanical loading of the condyle have to be accounted for in surgical procedures of the mandible.

  5. Volumetric bone mineral density and bone structure in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wetzsteon, Rachel J; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S; Foster, Bethany J; Griffin, Lindsay; Strife, C Frederic; Foerster, Debbie L; Jean-Pierre, Darlene K; Leonard, Mary B

    2011-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased fracture risk and skeletal deformities. The impact of CKD on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and cortical dimensions during growth is unknown. Tibia quantitative computed tomographic scans were obtained in 156 children with CKD [69 stages 2 to 3, 51 stages 4 to 5, and 36 stage 5D (dialysis)] and 831 healthy participants aged 5 to 21 years. Sex-, race-, and age- or tibia length-specific Z-scores were generated for trabecular BMD (TrabBMD), cortical BMD (CortBMD), cortical area (CortArea) and endosteal circumference (EndoC). Greater CKD severity was associated with a higher TrabBMD Z-score in younger participants (p < .001) compared with healthy children; this association was attenuated in older participants (interaction p < .001). Mean CortArea Z-score was lower (p < .01) in CKD 4-5 [-0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.80, -0.18)] and CKD 5D (-0.49, 95% CI -0.83, -0.15) compared with healthy children. Among CKD participants, parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were positively associated with TrabBMD Z-score (p < .01), and this association was significantly attenuated in older participants (interaction p < .05). Higher levels of PTH and biomarkers of bone formation (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) and resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen) were associated with lower CortBMD and CortArea Z-scores and greater EndoC Z-score (r = 0.18-0.36, all p ≤ .02). CortBMD Z-score was significantly lower in CKD participants with PTH levels above versus below the upper limit of the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) CKD stage-specific target range: -0.46 ± 1.29 versus 0.12 ± 1.14 (p < .01). In summary, childhood CKD and secondary hyperparathyroidism were associated with significant reductions in cortical area and CortBMD and greater TrabBMD in younger children. Future studies are needed to establish the fracture implications of these

  6. Analogy of strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm and structural topology optimization.

    PubMed

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong; Kwak, Byung Ban

    2009-01-01

    In bone-remodeling studies, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its internal mechanical loads. From the 1970s, high computing power enabled quantitative studies in the simulation of bone remodeling or bone adaptation. Among them, Huiskes et al. (1987, "Adaptive Bone Remodeling Theory Applied to Prosthetic Design Analysis," J. Biomech. Eng., 20, pp. 1135-1150) proposed a strain energy density based approach to bone remodeling and used the apparent density for the characterization of internal bone morphology. The fundamental idea was that bone density would increase when strain (or strain energy density) is higher than a certain value and bone resorption would occur when the strain (or strain energy density) quantities are lower than the threshold. Several advanced algorithms were developed based on these studies in an attempt to more accurately simulate physiological bone-remodeling processes. As another approach, topology optimization originally devised in structural optimization has been also used in the computational simulation of the bone-remodeling process. The topology optimization method systematically and iteratively distributes material in a design domain, determining an optimal structure that minimizes an objective function. In this paper, we compared two seemingly different approaches in different fields-the strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm (biomechanical approach) and the compliance based structural topology optimization method (mechanical approach)-in terms of mathematical formulations, numerical difficulties, and behavior of their numerical solutions. Two numerical case studies were conducted to demonstrate their similarity and difference, and then the solution convergences were discussed quantitatively.

  7. Effect of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior with enamel matrix derivative.

    PubMed

    Miron, Richard J; Caluseru, Oana M; Guillemette, Vincent; Zhang, Yufeng; Buser, Daniel; Chandad, Fatiha; Sculean, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Bone replacement grafting materials play an important role in regenerative dentistry. Despite a large array of tested bone-grafting materials, little information is available comparing the effects of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to compare the effects of cells seeded on bone grafts at low and high density in vitro for osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The response of osteoblasts to the presence of a growth factor (enamel matrix derivative, (EMD)) in combination with low (8 mg per well) or high (100 mg per well) bone grafts (BG; natural bone mineral, Bio-Oss®) density, was studied and compared for osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation as assessed by real-time PCR. Standard tissue culture plastic was used as a control with and without EMD. The present study demonstrates that in vitro testing of bone-grafting materials is largely influenced by bone graft seeding density. Osteoblast adhesion was up to 50 % lower when cells were seeded on high-density BG when compared to low-density BG and control tissue culture plastic. Furthermore, proliferation was affected in a similar manner whereby cell proliferation on high-density BG (100 mg/well) was significantly increased when compared to that on low-density BG (8 mg/well). In contrast, cell differentiation was significantly increased on high-density BG as assessed by real-time PCR for markers collagen 1 (Col 1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OC) as well as alizarin red staining. The effects of EMD on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation further demonstrated that the bone graft seeding density largely controls in vitro results. EMD significantly increased cell attachment only on high-density BG, whereas EMD was able to further stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on control culture plastic and low-density BG when compared to high-density BG. The results

  8. Impact of pharmacist-led community bone mineral density screenings.

    PubMed

    Summers, Kelly M; Brock, Tina Penick

    2005-02-01

    Osteoporosis-associated fractures burden both individuals and the overall healthcare system. Bone mineral density (BMD) screening remains the gold standard measure for identifying patients at risk. To determine the impact of convenient, pharmacist-led BMD screening and counseling sessions on identification and education of patients at risk for or with osteoporosis. Nonpregnant persons >18 years of age were eligible for enrollment in this descriptive study. At an urban retail pharmacy, participants underwent risk factor assessment, peripheral BMD scanning, and personalized counseling. At 3 and 6 months after screening, subjects were questioned by telephone regarding any subsequent primary care provider (PCP) interactions, as well as any behaviors initiated and/or medications modified. Of the 102 subjects screened, 22.6% and 11.7% were identified as being at medium risk (T score -1.0 to -2.5) and high risk (T score -2.5 or less) for osteoporosis, respectively. By 6 months, 42.5% of the participants reported increasing their dietary intake of calcium, 29.3% began or increased calcium supplements, and 54.9% positively modified smoking status, exercise level, alcohol consumption, or caffeine intake. Additionally, 24 of 52 subjects who had discussed their results with a PCP by 6 months also received a treatment recommendation. Eighty-nine participants reported the community location increased their likelihood of receiving a BMD scan. Overall, pharmacist-led BMD screenings that include individualized counseling sessions appear convenient, accessible, and beneficial for patients. With the establishment of clinical benefit of and positive reception to such screenings, pharmacists can now look toward securing consistent reimbursement for this vital pharmaceutical care service.

  9. Bone mineral density in postmenopausal Caucasian, Filipina, and Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Morton, Deborah J; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Wingard, Deborah L; Schneider, Diane L

    2003-02-01

    Previous bone mineral density (BMD) studies have suggested Asian women have lower BMD and Hispanic women have similar or higher BMD compared with Caucasian women, partially explained by ethnic differences in body size. This study compared the effect of different variables representing body size on BMD in postmenopausal women aged 50-69 years from three ethnic groups in San Diego County, CA: 354 Caucasians, 285 Filipinas, and 164 Hispanics. In all three groups, BMD was measured by DXA (Hologic 2000) at the hip, lumbar spine, and total body. Lifestyle variables and anthropometric measures were assessed by standard methodology; medication and supplement use were validated by a nurse. Regardless of the variables used to represent body size in the regression modelling, either body mass index or lean and fat tissue mass, ethnic differences were minimal across the three groups. The only significant differences observed using the two fully adjusted models (age, height, body mass index or lean and fat tissue mass, smoking, alcohol, exercise, current oestrogen and calcium supplement use, and osteoarthritis) were at the total body BMD site where Filipinas had significantly higher BMD than the Caucasians or Hispanics, whose total body BMD was similar to one another. The independent variables in the fully adjusted models explained approximately 20-40% of the variation in BMD at each of the four sites. Income or occupation did not help explain BMD differences, but a pattern of increased BMD among those with some college education in all three groups was observed. Accounting for body size using either body mass index or fat and lean tissue mass along with height and other lifestyle variables minimizes ethnic differences and explains a considerable amount of variation in mean BMD among older ethnic minority and Caucasian women.

  10. Quantitative computed tomography for measuring bone mineral density in athletes.

    PubMed

    Dinç, H; Savci, G; Demirci, A; Sadikoğlu, M Y; Tuncel, E; Yavuz, H

    1996-06-01

    We studied the effect of different training patterns on vertebral trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) in male athletes using quantitative computed tomography. Vertebral trabecular (t) and cortical (c) BMDs of the first three lumbar vertebrae were measured using single energy quantitative computed tomography in 51 athletes including 10 weight lifters (mean age 20 years), 13 soccer players (mean age 27 years), 28 wrestlers (mean age 17 years), and 45 age-matched volunteers (mean age 21 years). Measured BMDs were correlated with age, body height and weight, training hours per week, sports years, and type of physical activity. Vertebral tBMDs were found to be 44%, 23%, and 24% higher in the weight lifters, soccer players, and wrestlers, respectively, compared with the volunteers. The corresponding cBMDs were 18%, 6%, and 11% higher than that of volunteers. There was significant correlation between the trabecular and cBMD, and height of the athletes, sports years, training hours per week, and physical activity. The most significant correlation with BMD was the type of physical activity. Both the height of the subjects and physical activity variables showed variations of 47% and 32% in trabecular and cBMD, respectively. According to the multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) only the physical activity factor was effective, with a significance level of P < 0.01; the other factors and interactions were not effective (P > 0.05) on trabecular and cBMD. Different training patterns have a different anabolic effect on both trabecular and cBMDs of the vertebrae, and this effect is more pronounced on the trabecular compartment. Weight lifting showed the highest anabolic effect on both trabecular and cBMDs compared with soccer playing and wrestling. Of the independent variables, physical activity showed the highest anabolic effect on the vertebrae. These results may have implications for devising exercise strategies to reduce the possibility of fracture in old age.

  11. Explore the effectors of bone mineral density in community women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Fang

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological studies that involve Asian women have revealed that their bone mineral density (BMD) is lower than that of European and American women. Few studies have simultaneously investigated the cognition, beliefs and behavior that affect BMD. The first aim of this study was to elucidate the relationships between demographics, knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs about osteoporosis, health-related behavior and BMD. The secondary goal was to explore the major predictive factors that affect the BMD of women in Community. This was an exploratory, community-based, cross-sectional study. Participants (N = 98) completed the osteoporosis related questionnaire and were invited to undergo BMD examinations using quantitative ultrasound (QUS). Overall, 73.4% of the participants had heard of the disease but the proportion of correct responses to the questions that tested knowledge of osteoporosis was only 44.0%. The investigation into osteoporosis-related beliefs revealed that women held quite accurate beliefs regarding the prevention of osteoporosis, but only 23.6% of them had undergone a BMD examination. An adjusted odds ratio indicated that if women had normal BMD then they were 1.57 times (95% CI: 1.08-2.29), 1.10 times (95% CI: 1.00-1.12) and 2.74 (95% CI: 1.09-6.86) times than their counterparts, respectively. The results revealed that women with normal BMD were more likely to have positively self-rated health, knowledge of osteoporosis and preventive behavior than their counterparts. The findings indicated that BMD was subjectively determined by a combination of cognitive and behavioral factors. Early detection was the key to preventing osteoporosis.

  12. Bone mineral density in cystic fibrosis: benefit of exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Jonathan D; Barry, Sinead C; Barry, Rupert B M; Cawood, Tom J; McKenna, Malachi J; Gallagher, Charles G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and objective maximal exercise measurements in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Twenty-five CF patients (19 males, 6 females, mean age 25.5 yr, range: 17-52) underwent BMD assessment and maximal-cycle ergometer exercise testing. We examined the relationship between gas exchange (% peak-predicted O(2) uptake, CO(2) output, O(2) saturation), exercise performance (maximum power, exercise duration), and respiratory mechanics (tidal volume, rate) with lumbar spine and total proximal femur BMD. The strongest clinical correlate with BMD was forced expiratory volume at 1s (lumbar spine Z-score, r=0.36; total proximal femur Z-score, r=0.68, p<0.01). The strongest exercise correlate was % peak-predicted O(2) uptake (lumbar spine Z-score, r=0.44, p<0.01; total proximal femur Z-score, r=0.59, p<0.01). There was a closer association between exercise parameters and total proximal femur BMD (r=0.43-0.60) than with lumbar spine BMD (r=0.04-0.45). Multiple regression analysis revealed VO(2) to be the strongest independent predictor of BMD (R(2)=0.86, p<0.001) followed by petCO(2) and body mass index (R(2)=0.7 and 0.5, respectively, p<0.01). Exercise appears to influence total proximal femur BMD more than lumbar spine BMD in CF. Exercise rehabilitation programs focusing on peripheral strength training may benefit those CF patients with low total proximal femur BMD.

  13. Bone mineral density in elite adolescent female figure skaters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elite adolescent figure skaters must accommodate both the physical demands of competitive training and the accelerated rate of bone growth that is associated with adolescence. Although, these athletes apparently undergo sufficient physical activity to develop healthy bones, it is possible that other...

  14. Application of quantitative computed tomography for assessment of trabecular bone mineral density, microarchitecture and mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song Shou; Li, Dong; Luo, Yanting; Syed, Younus Saleem; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disease, causing increased skeletal fragility characterized by a low bone mass and trabecular microarchitectural deterioration. Assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) is the primary determinant of skeletal fragility. Computed tomography (CT)-based trabecular microarchitectural and mechanical assessments are important methods to evaluate the skeletal strength. In this review, we focus the feasibility of QCT BMD measurement using a calibration phantom or phantomless. The application of QCT could extend the bone mineral density assessment to all patients who underwent a heart, lung, whole-body, and as well as all routine clinical implications of CT scan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of trunk stabilization exercise on bone density after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of low intensity exercise on bone density by conducting trunk stabilization exercise on females after menopause for 24 weeks. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty three female subjects over 47 years old and under the age of 53 were selected and 16 for experimental group and 17 for control group were randomly selected. Experimental group had performed spinal and pelvic stabilization exercise 30 minutes a day, 5times a week, for 24 weeks. Except for the daily life, control group did not participate in any characteristic movement. Bone density of every member in experimental group was measured using average value of bone density of 1st–4th lumbar through quantitative computer tomography. [Results] There was a meaningful difference in only control group about measured value of bone density within each group, experimental and control group, but there was no meaningful difference in measured value of bone density between two groups, experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Through this research, we could see the fact that although trunk stability exercise could not change bone density meaningfully, it could maintain bone density. In the future, it is randomly necessary to study things related this because results of researches can show different results according to exercise intensity, exercise period, age, weight, hormone status and mediation period. It is considered that it will help to prevent and treat patients with osteoporosis a lot. PMID:26834370

  16. The effects of trunk stabilization exercise on bone density after menopause.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of low intensity exercise on bone density by conducting trunk stabilization exercise on females after menopause for 24 weeks. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty three female subjects over 47 years old and under the age of 53 were selected and 16 for experimental group and 17 for control group were randomly selected. Experimental group had performed spinal and pelvic stabilization exercise 30 minutes a day, 5times a week, for 24 weeks. Except for the daily life, control group did not participate in any characteristic movement. Bone density of every member in experimental group was measured using average value of bone density of 1st-4th lumbar through quantitative computer tomography. [Results] There was a meaningful difference in only control group about measured value of bone density within each group, experimental and control group, but there was no meaningful difference in measured value of bone density between two groups, experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Through this research, we could see the fact that although trunk stability exercise could not change bone density meaningfully, it could maintain bone density. In the future, it is randomly necessary to study things related this because results of researches can show different results according to exercise intensity, exercise period, age, weight, hormone status and mediation period. It is considered that it will help to prevent and treat patients with osteoporosis a lot.

  17. Bone Density in Chronic Schizophrenia with Long-Term Antipsychotic Treatment: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Young; Chung, Hae-Kyung; Choi, Jin-Hee; Kim, Tae-Yong; So, Hyung-Seok

    2010-01-01

    Objective Decreased bone mineral density has been found in the chronic schizophrenic patients who have been given a long-term administration of antipsychotics. Hyperprolactinemia from the antipsychotics and the negative symptom of schizophrenia were considered as the causes for this finding. In this study, the effect of hyperprolactinemia and the negative symptom of schizophrenia on bone mineral density was investigated on male schizophrenic patients. Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out with the subjects of 45 male schizophrenic patients who have undertaken the monotherapy with risperidone, olanzapine and clozapine for at least one year. The demographic factors, clinical symtoms, bone mineral density and hematological test were examined for all the subjects. Results No significant relationship was found between hyperprolactinemia and the decreased bone mineral density in the subjects. The negative schizophrenia symptom of the subjects showed a significant effect on the decreased bone mineral density. Conclusion The decreased bone mineral density finding in the male schizophrenic patients may be caused by the negative schizophrenia symptom rather than the hyperprolactinemia due to the antipsychotics. Additional studies are further required regarding other factors that may affect the decreased bone mineral density such as activity, calcium intake and exposure to sunlight. PMID:21253412

  18. Relationship of serum GDF11 levels with bone mineral density and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yusi; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Min; Song, Shumin; Quan, Tonggui; Zhao, Tiepeng; Li, Hongliang; Guo, Lijuan; Jiang, Tiejian; Wang, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is an important circulating factor that regulates aging. However, the role of GDF11 in bone metabolism remains unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between serum GDF11 level, bone mass, and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal Chinese women. Serum GDF11 level, bone turnover biochemical markers, and bone mineral density (BMD) were determined in 169 postmenopausal Chinese women (47–78 years old). GDF11 serum levels increased with aging. There were negative correlations between GDF11 and BMD at the various skeletal sites. After adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI), the correlations remained statistically significant. In the multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, age or years since menopause, BMI, GDF11, and estradiol were independent predictors of BMD. A significant negative correlation between GDF11 and bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) was identified and remained significant after adjusting for age and BMI. No significant correlation was noted between cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX) and GDF11. In conclusion, GDF11 is an independent negative predictor of BMD and correlates with a biomarker of bone formation, BAP, in postmenopausal Chinese women. GDF11 potentially exerts a negative effect on bone mass by regulating bone formation. PMID:27408764

  19. Prolactinoma: A Massive Effect on Bone Mineral Density in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This case highlights a prolactinoma in a young male, and its impact on bone health. Osteoporosis has been noted to be an issue in postmenopausal women with prolactinomas. This case shows a similar impact on bone health in a young male resulting in low bone mineral density for age based on Z-score. This case report highlights the possible mechanisms for the bone loss in the setting of prolactinoma and the need for assessing bone health in such patients. Furthermore it highlights the need for a thorough evaluation in such patients. PMID:27446618

  20. Anthropometric and fitness variables associated with bone mineral density and broadband ultrasound attenuation in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-ling; Ke, Jyh-yuh; Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Chao-jan; Wu, Ching-yi; Liu, Wen-yu

    2011-05-01

    We investigated anthropometric and fitness variables associated with areal bone mineral densities and broadband ultrasound attenuation in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Thirty-four children with cerebral palsy, aged 4-12 years, and 33 normal development children were collected. There were significant differences in femoral bone densities and calcaneus broadband ultrasound attenuation, but not in lumbar bone densities, between cerebral palsy and normal groups. Regression analysis revealed that different anthropometric and fitness variables were linked to bone densities of different skeletal regions in children with cerebral palsy (adjusted r(2) = .41-.67). Growth variables were mainly related to femoral and lumbar bone densities, while muscular endurance was mainly related to femoral and calcaneus bone densities. These findings suggest multiple complex variables can contribute to bone density variations among different skeleton areas in these children. These data can allow clinicians to identifying early these children at risk for low bone density.

  1. Jumping exercise preserves bone mineral density and mechanical properties in osteopenic ovariectomized rats even following established osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Okubo, R; Sanada, L S; Castania, V A; Louzada, M J Q; de Paula, F J A; Maffulli, N; Shimano, A C

    2017-04-01

    The effects of jump training on bone structure before and after ovariectomy-induced osteopenia in rats were investigated. Jumping exercise induced favorable changes in bone mineral density, bone mechanical properties, and bone formation/resorption markers. This exercise is effective to prevent bone loss after ovariectomy even when osteopenia is already established.

  2. Bone mineral density in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.

    PubMed

    Minarich, Laurie A; Kirpich, Alexander; Fiske, Laurie M; Weinstein, David A

    2012-04-05

    Purpose:The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogenesis of low bone mineral density in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.Methods:A retrospective chart review performed at the University of Florida Glycogen Storage Disease Program included patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib for whom dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis was performed. A Z-score less than -2 SD was considered low. Analysis for association of bone mineral density with age, gender, presence of complications, mean triglyceride and 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy, and history of corticosteroid use was performed.Results:In glycogen storage disease Ia, 23/42 patients (55%) had low bone mineral density. Low bone mineral density was associated with other disease complications (P = 0.02) and lower mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (P = 0.03). There was a nonsignificant trend toward lower mean triglyceride concentration in the normal bone mineral density group (P = 0.1).In patients with glycogen storage disease type Ib, 8/12 (66.7%) had low bone mineral density. We did not detect an association with duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy (P = 0.68), mean triglyceride level (P = 0.267), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.3), or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (P = 0.63) concentration, and there was no evidence that corticosteroid therapy was associated with lower bone mineral density (P = 1).Conclusion:In glycogen storage disease type Ia, bone mineral density is associated with other complications and 25-hydroxyvitamin D status. In glycogen storage disease type Ib, bone mineral density was not associated with any covariates analyzed, suggesting multifactorial etiology or reflecting a small sample.Genet Med advance online publication 5 April 2012.

  3. Creatine monohydrate and resistance training increase bone mineral content and density in older men.

    PubMed

    Chilibeck, P D; Chrusch, M J; Chad, K E; Shawn Davison, K; Burke, D G

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation combined with resistance training on bone mineral content and density in older men. Twenty-nine older men (age 71 y) were randomized (double blind) to receive creatine (0.3 g/kg creatine for 5 d and 0.07 g/kg thereafter) or placebo while participating in resistance training (12 weeks). Bone mineral content and density were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after training. There was a time main effect for whole-body and leg bone mineral density (p < or = 0.05) with these measures increasing by approximately 0.5%, and 1%, respectively in the combined groups. There was a group by time interaction for arms bone mineral content, with the group receiving creatine increasing by 3.2% (p < 0.01) and the group receiving placebo decreasing by 1.0% (not significant). Changes in lean tissue mass of the arms correlated with changes in bone mineral content of the arms (r = 0.67; p < 0.01). Resistance training of 12 weeks increases bone mineral density in older men and creatine supplementation may provide an additional benefit for increasing regional bone mineral content. The increase in bone mineral content may be due to an enhanced muscle mass with creatine, with potentially greater tension on bone at sites of muscle attachment.

  4. Some basic relationships between density values in cancellous and cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Cook, Richard B; Hutchinson, John R

    2008-01-01

    Density is a salient property of bone and plays a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of both its cancellous and cortical structural forms. Density is defined in a number of ways at either the bone tissue (D(app), apparent) or the bone material level (D(mat), material). The concept of density is relatively simple, but measuring it in the context of bone is a complex issue. The third dimension of the problem is the concept of porosity, or BV/TV (ratio of bone material volume over tissue volume). Recent investigations from our laboratory have revealed an interdependence of D(app) and D(mat) in the cancellous bone of at least four different cohorts of human patients. To clarify the underlying causes of this behaviour, we produced here equivalent relationships from specimens originating from cortical and cancellous areas of the same bone. Plots of D(app) vs. D(mat) showed that D(mat) was not a monotonic function of increasing D(app), but instead showed a 'boomerang'-like pattern. By empirically dissecting the data in two regions for D(app) above and below a value equal to 1.3gcm(-3), we were able to objectively isolate the bone in trabecular and compact forms. Our findings may have implications not only for the segregation of bone in these two structural forms, but also for the mechanobiological and physiological processes that govern the regulation of compact and trabecular bone areas.

  5. Varying ratios of omega-6: omega-3 fatty acids on the pre-and postmortem bone mineral density, bone ash, and bone breaking strength of laying chickens.

    PubMed

    Baird, H T; Eggett, D L; Fullmer, S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of varying ratios of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids in the diets of White Leghorn chickens on tibia bone characteristics [bone mineral density, bone mineral content (BMC), ash bone mineral content, bone morphology, and cortical thickness] and tibia bone strength parameters (ultimate force, bending stress, maximum strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, area under the curve, and moment of inertia). Seventy-five 16-wk-old female White Leghorn chickens were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 dietary ratios of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids: 47.8:1, 18.0:1, 7.6:1, 5.9:1, or 4.7:1. Corn oil was the n-6 fatty acid source, whereas flax oil provided the n-3 fatty acids. Bone density was measured on the left tibia via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) prior to killing and after excision. Bones were ashed in a muffle furnace at 500 degrees F. Tibia bones were broken by using a 3-point bending rig. Results showed no significant effect of diet on bone characteristics. There were no significant differences among diet groups for parameters of bone strength except cortical thickness (P < or = 0.01). Bone mineral content determined by ashing was significantly different by 9.2% (P < or = 0.0001) from BMC determined in vivo by DXA; however, there were no differences in ex vivo BMC and BMC ash, although they were highly correlated (r = 0.99, P < or = 0.0001). We concluded that there was no effect of n-3 fatty acids on tibia bone in mature White Leghorn chickens. The GE Lunar Prodigy DXA instrument significantly underestimated the in vivo BMC in chickens.

  6. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-11-16

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression.

  7. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression. PMID:26580614

  8. Influence of yard work and weight training on bone mineral density among older U.S. women.

    PubMed

    Turner, Lori W; Bass, Martha A; Ting, Ling; Brown, Barry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of type of physical activity on bone mineral density among older U.S. women. Findings from the present study indicate that jogging, swimming and calisthenics were weak predictors for high bone density values. Bicycling, aerobics, walking and dancing were moderate predictors for positive bone density. Yard work and weight training were strong and independent predictors for positive bone density.

  9. Bone density and hyperlipidemia: the T-lymphocyte connection.

    PubMed

    Graham, Lucia S; Tintut, Yin; Parhami, Farhad; Kitchen, Christina M R; Ivanov, Yevgeniv; Tetradis, Sotirios; Effros, Rita B

    2010-11-01

    Osteoporosis, which contributes to morbidity and mortality, often coexists with cardiovascular disease, especially atherosclerosis. We have reported recently that in vitro exposure of human T-lymphocytes to oxidized lipids induced expression of a key osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Our previous studies have shown that mice fed an atherogenic high-fat diet developed osteopenia and that bone marrow preosteoclasts from these hyperlipidemic mice have increased osteoclastic potential. To investigate the role of T-lymphocytes in the diet-induced bone loss, C57BL/6 mice were fed either chow or a high-fat diet, and bone parameters and T-lymphocyte activation were assessed at 6 and 11 months. Consistent with our previous findings, peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) analysis showed that mice in the high-fat group had lower bone mineral content than mice in the chow group. Furthermore, histomorphometric analysis showed decreased structural parameters in the high-fat group. Coculture studies showed that bone marrow cells isolated from the high-fat group, which contained increased levels of activated memory T-lymphocytes compared with bone marrow cells from the chow mice, supported osteoclastic differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, RANKL expression was upregulated significantly in the T-lymphocytes isolated from the bone marrow of the high-fat group. Splenic T-lymphocytes isolated from the high-fat group also had increased expression of transcripts for the receptor for oxidized lipids (LOX-1) as well as for inflammatory and osteoclastogenic cytokines, including RANKL, interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), IL-1β, and interferon γ (IFN-γ). Together these findings suggest that T-lymphocytes play a key role in the osteoclastogenesis induced by a high-fat diet and may contribute to the bone loss associated with diet-induced osteopenia. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. Use of digital panoramic radiology in presurgical implant treatment planning to accurately assess bone density.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Niranjan Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Das, Samiran; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dutta, Kaushik; Goel, Preeti

    2016-08-01

    No cost-effective method of ascertaining bone density from 2-dimensional radiographic images is currently available for dental implants before surgery. The purpose of this in vivo study was to use digital panoramic radiology and dental computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the bone density of specific points in the jaw near the tooth-bearing areas. The objective was to determine whether digital panoramic radiology can be used in assessing bone density as an alternative to a more expensive and complex dental CT. This study involved determining bone densities at predetermined anatomic landmarks near tooth-bearing areas of the jaws of 20 participants, using digital panoramic radiology in gray-level scale with a lead step wedge. Subsequently, the bone densities of the same points were determined in Hounsfield units (Hu) with dental CT. The data collected after interpretation of the panoramic radiograph and CT were tabulated and analyzed statistically. Bone density measured using CT correlated with the first 3 steps of (A, B, and C) the digital scale of gray. Further analysis conducted using the Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant association between step A to detect D4 bone, step B to detect D3 bone, and step C to detect D2 type bone. The digital scale of gray obtained from a lead step wedge can be effectively used with digital orthopanoramic radiology to assess bone density before the placement of implants, but with certain restrictions. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Single x-ray transmission system for bone mineral density determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Mendoza, Daniel; Vargas-Vazquez, Damian; Giraldo-Betancur, Astrid L.; Hernandez-Urbiola, Margarita I.; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E.

    2011-12-15

    Bones are the support of the body. They are composed of many inorganic compounds and other organic materials that all together can be used to determine the mineral density of the bones. The bone mineral density is a measure index that is widely used as an indicator of the health of the bone. A typical manner to evaluate the quality of the bone is a densitometry study; a dual x-ray absorptiometry system based study that has been widely used to assess the mineral density of some animals' bones. However, despite the success stories of utilizing these systems in many different applications, it is a very expensive method that requires frequent calibration processes to work properly. Moreover, its usage in small species applications (e.g., rodents) has not been quite demonstrated yet. Following this argument, it is suggested that there is a need for an instrument that would perform such a task in a more reliable and economical manner. Therefore, in this paper we explore the possibility to develop a new, affordable, and reliable single x-ray absorptiometry system. The method consists of utilizing a single x-ray source, an x-ray image sensor, and a computer platform that all together, as a whole, will allow us to calculate the mineral density of the bone. Utilizing an x-ray transmission theory modified through a version of the Lambert-Beer law equation, a law that expresses the relationship among the energy absorbed, the thickness, and the absorption coefficient of the sample at the x-rays wavelength to calculate the mineral density of the bone can be advantageous. Having determined the parameter equation that defines the ratio of the pixels in radiographies and the bone mineral density [measured in mass per unit of area (g/cm{sup 2})], we demonstrated the utility of our novel methodology by calculating the mineral density of Wistar rats' femur bones.

  12. Single x-ray transmission system for bone mineral density determination.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Mendoza, Daniel; Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego G; Giraldo-Betancur, Astrid L; Hernandez-Urbiola, Margarita I; Vargas-Vazquez, Damian; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E

    2011-12-01

    Bones are the support of the body. They are composed of many inorganic compounds and other organic materials that all together can be used to determine the mineral density of the bones. The bone mineral density is a measure index that is widely used as an indicator of the health of the bone. A typical manner to evaluate the quality of the bone is a densitometry study; a dual x-ray absorptiometry system based study that has been widely used to assess the mineral density of some animals' bones. However, despite the success stories of utilizing these systems in many different applications, it is a very expensive method that requires frequent calibration processes to work properly. Moreover, its usage in small species applications (e.g., rodents) has not been quite demonstrated yet. Following this argument, it is suggested that there is a need for an instrument that would perform such a task in a more reliable and economical manner. Therefore, in this paper we explore the possibility to develop a new, affordable, and reliable single x-ray absorptiometry system. The method consists of utilizing a single x-ray source, an x-ray image sensor, and a computer platform that all together, as a whole, will allow us to calculate the mineral density of the bone. Utilizing an x-ray transmission theory modified through a version of the Lambert-Beer law equation, a law that expresses the relationship among the energy absorbed, the thickness, and the absorption coefficient of the sample at the x-rays wavelength to calculate the mineral density of the bone can be advantageous. Having determined the parameter equation that defines the ratio of the pixels in radiographies and the bone mineral density [measured in mass per unit of area (g/cm(2))], we demonstrated the utility of our novel methodology by calculating the mineral density of Wistar rats' femur bones.

  13. Single x-ray transmission system for bone mineral density determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Mendoza, Daniel; Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego G.; Giraldo-Betancur, Astrid L.; Hernandez-Urbiola, Margarita I.; Vargas-Vazquez, Damian; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E.

    2011-12-01

    Bones are the support of the body. They are composed of many inorganic compounds and other organic materials that all together can be used to determine the mineral density of the bones. The bone mineral density is a measure index that is widely used as an indicator of the health of the bone. A typical manner to evaluate the quality of the bone is a densitometry study; a dual x-ray absorptiometry system based study that has been widely used to assess the mineral density of some animals' bones. However, despite the success stories of utilizing these systems in many different applications, it is a very expensive method that requires frequent calibration processes to work properly. Moreover, its usage in small species applications (e.g., rodents) has not been quite demonstrated yet. Following this argument, it is suggested that there is a need for an instrument that would perform such a task in a more reliable and economical manner. Therefore, in this paper we explore the possibility to develop a new, affordable, and reliable single x-ray absorptiometry system. The method consists of utilizing a single x-ray source, an x-ray image sensor, and a computer platform that all together, as a whole, will allow us to calculate the mineral density of the bone. Utilizing an x-ray transmission theory modified through a version of the Lambert-Beer law equation, a law that expresses the relationship among the energy absorbed, the thickness, and the absorption coefficient of the sample at the x-rays wavelength to calculate the mineral density of the bone can be advantageous. Having determined the parameter equation that defines the ratio of the pixels in radiographies and the bone mineral density [measured in mass per unit of area (g/cm2)], we demonstrated the utility of our novel methodology by calculating the mineral density of Wistar rats' femur bones.

  14. Relationship of Bone Mineralization Density Distribution (BMDD) in Cortical and Cancellous Bone Within the Iliac Crest of Healthy Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Dempster, D. W.; Zhou, Hua; Roschger, P.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Fratzl, P.; Silverberg, S. J.; Shane, E.; Cohen, A.; Stein, E.; Nickolas, T. L.; Recker, R. R.; Lappe, J.; Bilezikian, J. P.; Klaushofer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) is an important determinant of bone mechanical properties. The most available skeletal site for access to the BMDD is the iliac crest. Compared to cancellous bone much less information on BMDD is available for cortical bone. Hence, we analyzed complete transiliac crest bone biopsy samples from premenopausal women (n = 73) aged 25–48 years, clinically classified as healthy, by quantitative backscattered electron imaging for cortical (Ct.) and cancellous (Cn.) BMDD. The Ct.BMDD was characterized by the arithmetic mean of the BMDD of the cortical plates. We found correlations between Ct. and Cn. BMDD variables with correlation coefficients r between 0.42 and 0.73 (all p < 0.001). Additionally to this synchronous behavior of cortical and cancellous compartments, we found that the heterogeneity of mineralization densities (Ct.CaWidth), as well as the cortical porosity (Ct.Po) was larger for a lower average degree of mineralization (Ct.CaMean). Moreover, Ct.Po correlated negatively with the percentage of highly mineralized bone areas (Ct.CaHigh) and positively with the percentage of lowly mineralized bone areas (Ct.CaLow). In conclusion, the correlation of cortical with cancellous BMDD in the iliac crest of the study cohort suggests coordinated regulation of bone turnover between both bone compartments. Only in a few cases, there was a difference in the degree of mineralization of >1wt % between both cortices suggesting a possible modeling situation. This normative dataset of healthy premenopausal women will provide a reference standard by which disease- and treatment-specific effects can be assessed at the level of cortical bone BMDD. PMID:25134800

  15. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) ethanol extract increases bone mineral density and improves bone properties in growing female rats.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ying; Feng, Xin; Zhao, Pengling; Wu, Zhenghao; Xu, Hao; Fang, Yuehui; Hou, Yangfeng; Denney, Liya; Xu, Yajun; Feng, Haotian

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. It is generally accepted that acquisition of a high peak bone mass (PBM) early in life can reduce the risk of osteoporosis later in life. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) ethanol extract on bone mineral density and its mechanical properties in growing female rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The rats were given different doses of FLL extract mixed with AIN-93G formula (0.40, 0.65 and 0.90 %), and a group given AIN-93G diet treatment only was used as control. The intervention lasted for 16 weeks until the animals were about 5 months old, the time when the animals almost reach their PBM. Our results showed that FLL treatment increased bone mineral density and improved bone mechanical properties in the growing female rats in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, FLL treatment significantly decreased the serum bone-resorbing marker, CTX-I, while significantly increasing serum 25(OH)D3 and thereby increasing Ca absorption and Ca retention. Intriguingly, both in vivo and in vitro results demonstrated that FLL treatment could reduce the RANKL/OPG ratio. In conclusion, FLL ethanol extract exerted beneficial effects on peak bone mass acquisition and the improvement of bone mechanical properties by favoring Ca metabolism and decreasing the RANKL/OPG ratio.

  16. Calcium phosphate metabolism and bone mineral density with nocturnal hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Nigel; Boddington, Janeane; Simmonds, Rosemary; Waldron, Claire; Somerville, Christine; Agar, John

    2006-07-01

    An elevated calcium x phosphate product (Ca x P) is an independent risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular death in dialysis patients. More physiological dialysis in patients undergoing nocturnal hemodialysis (NHD) has been shown to produce biochemical advantages compared with conventional hemodialysis (CHD) including superior phosphate (P) control. Benefits of dialysate with greater calcium (Ca) concentration are also reported in NHD to prevent Ca depletion and subsequent hyperparathyroidism, but there are concerns that a higher dialysate Ca concentration may contribute to raised serum Ca levels and greater Ca x P and vascular disease. The NHD program at our unit has been established for 4 years, and we retrospectively analyzed Ca and P metabolism in patients undergoing NHD (8-9 h/night, 6 nights/week). Our cohort consists of 11 patients, mean age 49.3 years, who had been on NHD for a minimum of 12 months, mean 34.3 months. Commencement was with low-flux (LF) NHD and 1.5 mmol/L Ca dialysate concentration, with conversion to high-flux (HF) dialyzers after a period (mean duration 18.7 months). We compared predialysis serum albumin, intact parathyroid hormone, P, total corrected Ca, and Ca x P at baseline on CHD, after conversion to LF NHD and during HF NHD. We also prospectively measured bone mineral density (BMD) on all patients entering the NHD program. Bone densitometry (DEXA) scans were performed at baseline (on CHD) and yearly after commencement of NHD. With the introduction of HF dialyzers, the Ca dialysate concentration was concurrently raised to 1.75 mmol/L after demonstration on DEXA scans of worsening osteopenia. Analysis of BMD, for all parameters, revealed a decrease over the first 12 to 24 months (N = 11). When the dialysate Ca bath was increased, the median T and Z scores subsequently increased (data at 3 years, N = 6). The mean predialysis P levels were significantly lower on LF NHD vs. CHD (1.51 vs. 1.77 mmol/L, p = 0.014), while on

  17. Does Salivary Calcium and Phosphate Concentrations Adequately Reflect Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis?

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Somaye Ansari; Zakeri, Zahra; Fakour, Sirous Risbaf; Moghaddam, Alireza Ansari

    2016-10-01

    Periodontitis is the inflammation of the periodontal supporting tissues. The response of periodontal tissues to local bacteria leads to bone resorption and destruction of periodontal junction. Given the possible association between periodontitis and low bone mineral density, the aim of present study was to find if measurement of salivary biomarkers as a less invasive method, can provide an appropriate screening method for assessment of bone mineral density in patients with chronic periodontitis? A case-control study was conducted on 53 people, including 28 patients with severe chronic periodontitis and 25 healthy people between April 2014 to March 2015 in Zahedan (southeast of Iran). Following Periodontal examination, salivary samples were collected, and the concentration of salivary calcium and phosphate were measured and reported as mg/dl. Bone mineral density of participants was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and reported as gr/cm2. No significant association was found between concentrations of salivary calcium and phosphate levels with bone mineral density in either healthy people or in patients with severe chronic periodontitis, despite a significant bone density reduction (in the femur neck and lumbar spine L2-L4) in the periodontitis group compared to healthy people (P=0.006, and P=0.009 respectively). Concentration of salivary calcium and phosphate do not appear to be good indicators of bone mineral density. Further prospective studies with larger sample size are recommended.

  18. Associations of lifestyle factors with bone mineral density among male university students in Japan.

    PubMed

    Egami, Isuzu; Wakai, Kenji; Kunitomo, Hirotada; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ando, Masahiko; Nakayama, Toshiko; Ohno, Yoshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    To investigate associations of lifestyle factors with bone mineral density among young men in Japan, we measured bone mineral density of the second metacarpal bone in 143 male university students, aged 18-22 years, by the computed X-ray densitometry. The subjects completed a lifestyle questionnaire including a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Their mean+/-standard deviation of bone mineral density was 2.61+/-0.23 mmAl. Body mass index (Spearman's rho=0.232, p=0.006), daily walking time (rho=0.186, p=0.028), and milk consumption at junior (rho=0.250, p=0.003) and senior (rho=0.195, p=0.020) high school were significantly correlated with the bone mineral density. For nutritional variables, the bone mineral density was positively correlated with energy-adjusted intakes of calcium (Pearson's r=0.302, p=0.0002), potassium (r=0.265, p=0.001), saturated fatty acids (r=0.211, p=0.011), and magnesium (r=0.173, p=0.039), and with those of milk and dairy products (r=0.228, p=0.006) and fruits (r=0.205, p=0.014), while being negatively associated with energy-adjusted noodle consumption (r=-0.185, p=0.027). The positive correlation of milk consumption at junior high school with the bone mineral density was not materially altered by adjustment for the body mass index, calcium intake, and walking time. Single-life students had lower bone mineral density compared with those lived with families (p=0.044). Bone mineral density could be increased by modifying dietary habits in young men.

  19. Genetic variants in adult bone mineral density and fracture risk genes are associated with the rate of bone mineral density acquisition in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Nicole M.; Kemp, John P.; Tilling, Kate; Tobias, Jonathan H.; Evans, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified 63 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in adults. These SNPs are thought to reflect variants that influence bone maintenance and/or loss in adults. It is unclear whether they affect the rate of bone acquisition during adolescence. Bone measurements and genetic data were available on 6397 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children at up to five follow-up clinics. Linear mixed effects models with smoothing splines were used for longitudinal modelling of BMD and its components bone mineral content (BMC) and bone area (BA), from 9 to 17 years. Genotype data from the 63 adult BMD associated SNPs were investigated individually and as a genetic risk score in the longitudinal model. Each additional BMD lowering allele of the genetic risk score was associated with lower BMD at age 13 [per allele effect size, 0.002 g/cm2 (SE = 0.0001, P = 1.24 × 10−38)] and decreased BMD acquisition from 9 to 17 years (P = 9.17 × 10−7). This association was driven by changes in BMC rather than BA. The genetic risk score explained ∼2% of the variation in BMD at 9 and 17 years, a third of that explained in adults (6%). Genetic variants that putatively affect bone maintenance and/or loss in adults appear to have a small influence on the rate of bone acquisition through adolescence. PMID:25941325

  20. [Evaluation of bone mineral density using digital image processing in children receiving anticonvulsants].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiko; Ueda, Satoru; Umezu, Ryouji; Matsuoka, Hisafumi; Sugihara, Shigetaka

    2007-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) increases rapidly in a biphasic manner in childhood. During and after adolescence, BMD correlates more closely with bone age than chronological age. Digital image processing (DIP) allows the rapid assessment of BMD and bone age on one X-ray film. Herein, using DIP methods, the effects of various anticonvulsants on chronological and bone age were evaluated in 98 epilepsy patients (age range, 3-15 years) with no intellectual or motor disorders or diseases affecting bone metabolism. All patients were taking one or a combination of the following anticonvulsants: valproate sodium (VPA); carbamazepine (CBZ); and phenobarbital (PB). Bone maturation scores for radius-ulnar-short bones (RUS) were calculated using Tanner-Whitehouse 2 methods. Bone age was determined based on standard Japanese bone-maturation scores. In each patient, Z-scores for chronological and bone ages were calculated by subtracting standard BMD for gender and age from each BMD, then dividing the result by the standard deviation. The Z-score for each drug in relation to the administration period was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. For chronological age, significant differences in BMD were observed regarding the administration periods in children taking multiple drugs, but not in children on VPA, CBZ, or PB monotherapy. For bone age, no significant differences in BMD were observed regarding the administration periods for all drugs. Children taking multiple drugs showed a significant negative correlation between administration period and Z-scores for BMD calculated based on chronological age (Spearman rank correlation: - 0.457, p = 0.008), but not bone age. Among children receiving long-term VPA administration, bone age was delayed approximately 1 year, and bone maturation may have been delayed. No delay in bone age was noted among children receiving long-term administration of multiple drugs, suggesting that these anticonvulsants do not influence bone maturity. These

  1. Value of bone scintigraphy for detection and ageing of vertebral fractures in patients with severe osteoporosis and correlation between bone scintigraphy and mineral bone density.

    PubMed

    Kucukalic-Selimovic, Elma; Begic, Amela

    2004-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common of the metabolic bone diseases, and is an important cause of morbidity in the elderly. Bone scintigraphy is used to detect skeletal lesions at the earliest possible time, to monitor the course of the skeletal discase and to evaluate the metabolic activity of skeletal lesions. The aim of this study was to determine, by using the bone scan age of vertebral fractures in patients with severe osteoporosis, and make correlation between bone scintigraphy and mineral bone density. Material and methods 30 female patients were studied with bone scintigraphy after BMD.BMD was measurred with DEXA Hologic QDR 4500 Elite System. Correlation between T-score and uptake of radiofarmaceutical (Tc-99mMDP) was 0.849, and it was high. Intensity of uptake of Tc-99m MDP scintigraphy is an accurate method for the detection and ageing of fractures in osteoporotic patients.

  2. The effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness on micromotion and peri-implant bone strain distribution in an immediately loaded implant: a nonlinear finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effects of bone density and crestal cortical bone thickness at the implant-placement site on micromotion (relative displacement between the implant and bone) and the peri-implant bone strain distribution under immediate-loading conditions. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of the posterior mandible with an implant was constructed. Various bone parameters were simulated, including low or high cancellous bone density, low or high crestal cortical bone density, and crestal cortical bone thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mm. Delayed- and immediate-loading conditions were simulated. A buccolingual oblique load of 200 N was applied to the top of the abutment. Results The maximum extent of micromotion was approximately 100 μm in the low-density cancellous bone models, whereas it was under 30 μm in the high-density cancellous bone models. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum micromotion in the low-density cancellous bone models. The minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone was affected by the density of the crestal cortical bone and cancellous bone to the same degree for both delayed and immediate loading. In the low-density cancellous bone models under immediate loading, the minimum principal strain in the peri-implant cortical bone decreased with an increase in crestal cortical bone thickness. Conclusions Cancellous bone density may be a critical factor for avoiding excessive micromotion in immediately loaded implants. Crestal cortical bone thickness significantly affected the maximum extent of micromotion and peri-implant bone strain in simulations of low-density cancellous bone under immediate loading. PMID:27382504

  3. Involuntary wheel running improves but does not fully reverse the deterioration of bone structure of obese rats despite decreasing adiposity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jay J; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated whether exercise or antioxidant supplementation with vitamin C and E during exercise affects bone structure and markers of bone metabolism in obese rat. Sprague-Dawley rats, 6-week old, were fed a normal-fat diet (NF, 10 % kcal as fat) and a high-fat diet (HF, 45 % with extra fat from lard) ad libitum for 14 weeks. Then, rats on the high-fat diet were assigned randomly to three treatment groups for additional 12 weeks with forced exercise: HF; HF + exercise (HF + Ex); and HF with vitamin C (0.5 g ascorbate/kg diet) and vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg diet) supplementation + exercise (HF + Ex + VCE). At the end of the study, body weight and fat (%) were similar among NF, HF + Ex, and HF + Ex + VCE, whereas HF had greater body weight and fat (%) than other groups. Compared to NF, HF had elevated serum leptin, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and IGF-1; increased trabecular separation and structural model index; and lowered bone mineral density, trabecular connectivity density, and trabecular number in distal femur, while HF + Ex and HF + Ex + VCE had elevated serum TRAP and decreased bone volume/total volume and trabecular number of distal femurs. Compared to HF, HF + Ex and HF + Ex + VCE had decreased serum TRAP and osteocalcin and improved bone structural properties of the distal femur. These findings suggest that exercise, while decreasing body fat, does not fully protect against the negative skeletal effects of existing obesity induced by a high-fat diet. Furthermore, vitamin C and E supplementation has no additional benefits on bone structural properties during exercise.

  4. The Soy Isoflavones to Reduce Bone Loss (SIRBL) Study: Three Year Effects on pQCT Bone Mineral Density and Strength Measures in Postmenopausal Women

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soy isoflavones exert inconsistent bone density preserving effects, but the bone strength preserving effects in humans are unknown. Our double-blind randomized controlled trial examined 2 soy isoflavone doses (80 or 120 mg/d) vs placebo tablets on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and strength ...

  5. Tibial subchondral bone mineral density: sources of variability and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Boudenot, A; Pallu, S; Toumi, H; Loiseau Peres, S; Dolleans, E; Lespessailles, E

    2013-10-01

    It has been shown that subchondral bone mineral density (sBMD) measurement may be a relevant parameter of osteoarthritis (OA) progression. However, factors implicating the reproducibility and contributing to the variability of the measurement have not been fully described. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the reproducibility of sBMD by Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and to further examine its sources of variability. In this study, short-term, intra and inter-observer reproducibility of sBMD was examined on knee images obtained on DXA scans. The influence of software (lumbar spine and forearm modes), knee positioning (flexion or extension), site and size of regions of interest (ROI) and use of rice, on both lateral and medial tibial sBMD, were assessed. Root mean square coefficient of variation (RMS CV) and least significant changes (LSC) were calculated. The short-term precision of sBMD ranged between 2.24% and 5.12% for RMS CV and between 0.053 and 0.135 g/cm(2) for LSC. Good intra-observer precision was found for knee flexion conditions whatever the software used (RMS CV ranging from 0.43 to 1.41%). The reproducibility was dependant from the ROI size (the ROI including joint space exhibiting better precision results than ROI including solely the subchondral plate). For a constant size of the ROI, the precision results were site-dependant. Inter-observer RMS CV results ranged from 0.59 to 5.01% according to ROI and software used. For the specific task of monitoring medial sBMD in the ROI including solely subchondral plate, forearm flexion condition produced the highest intra-observer and short-term precision (respectively RMS CV: 0.45% and 2.77%; LSC: 0.013 and 0.080 g/cm(2)). Taking account into the excellent precision of the sBMD measurements expressed as RMS CV with the protocol proposed in the present study, clinical application of these measurements might be envisaged. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

  6. Longitudinal bone mineral density changes in female child artistic gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Nickols-Richardson, S M; O'Connor, P J; Shapses, S A; Lewis, R D

    1999-06-01

    Changes in bone mineral density (BMD), and related factors, in female child artistic gymnasts (n = 9) and their age- (+/-0.3 years), height- (+/-2.8 cm), and weight- (+/-1.7 kg) matched controls (n = 9) were prospectively examined. It was hypothesized that gymnasts would possess higher BMD at baseline, 6, and 12 months later and have greater gains in BMD over 1 year compared with controls. BMD (g/cm2) of the total proximal femur (TPF), Ward's triangle (WT), trochanter (Troch), femoral neck (FN), lumbar spine (LS, L1-L4), and total body (TB) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Physical activity was measured by a 7-day recall; daily dietary intakes of energy and nutrients were estimated from 3-day records. Serum osteocalcin and urinary pyridinium cross-links were measured by radioimmunoassay and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Gymnasts versus controls possessed significantly higher BMD at all sites measured. Although not significantly different (p > 0.05), gymnasts compared with controls had moderately larger percentage changes in Troch (% Delta = 8.6 +/- 3.0 vs. 3.8 +/- 5.1%, d = 0.41), FN (% Delta = 6.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 3.9 +/- 1.6%, d = 0.55), LS (% Delta = 7.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.6%, d = 0.26), and TB BMD (% Delta = 5.6 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.4 +/- 0.7%, d = 0.98) as evidenced by the magnitude of the effect sizes (d). Gymnasts versus controls possessed a lower percentage body fat (p < 0.01) and engaged in more hours of very hard activity (p < 0.0001). Calcium, as a percentage of adequate intake, decreased over 12 months (p < 0.01), and urinary cross-links significantly decreased over 6 months in both groups. Female child gymnasts possess higher BMD at the TPF and related sites, LS, and TB compared with nongymnast controls, and 1 year of gymnastics training moderately increases Troch, FN, LS, and TB BMD for gymnasts compared with controls. These findings lend support to the idea that gymnastics training in childhood helps maximize peak BMD.

  7. Bone Density and Clinical Periodontal Attachment in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Penoni, D C; Fidalgo, T K S; Torres, S R; Varela, V M; Masterson, D; Leão, A T T; Maia, L C

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and has been considered a risk factor for periodontal disease. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to verify the scientific evidence for the association of periodontal attachment loss with low BMD in postmenopausal women. A systematic search of the literature was performed in databases until August 2016, in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Eligibility criteria included studies that compared clinical attachment loss (CAL) between postmenopausal women with low and normal BMD. Studies using similar methodology, with lower and higher risk of bias, were pooled into 3 different meta-analyses to compare CAL among women with normal BMD, osteoporosis, and osteopenia. In the first meta-analysis, mean CAL was compared among groups. In the other 2 meta-analyses, the mean percentages of sites with CAL ≥4 mm and ≥6 mm were respectively compared among groups. From 792 unique citations, 26 articles were selected for the qualitative synthesis. Eleven of the studies were appraised as presenting low risk of bias, and the association between low BMD and CAL was observed in 10 of these studies. Thirteen cross-sectional articles were included in the meta-analysis for osteoporosis and 9 in the osteopenia analysis. Women with low BMD presented greater mean CAL than those with normal BMD (osteoporosis = 0.34 mm [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.20-0.49], P < 0.001; osteopenia = 0.07 mm [95% CI, 0.01-0.13], P = 0.02). Only studies with lower risk of bias were available for the analysis of CAL severity. Women with low BMD presented more severe attachment loss, represented as mean percentage of sites with CAL ≥4 mm (osteoporosis = 3.04 [95% CI, 1.23-4.85], P = 0.001; osteopenia = 1.74 [95% CI, 0.36-3.12], P = 0.01) and CAL ≥6 mm (osteoporosis = 5.07 [95% CI, 2.74-7.40], P < 0.001). This systematic review

  8. Peri-acetabular bone mineral density in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, L.; Dinh, L.; Beaulé, P. E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify and compare peri-acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) between a monoblock acetabular component using a metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing and a modular titanium shell with a polyethylene (PE) insert. The secondary outcome was to measure patient-reported clinical function. Methods A total of 50 patients (25 per group) were randomised to MoM or metal-on-polyethlene (MoP). There were 27 women (11 MoM) and 23 men (14 MoM) with a mean age of 61.6 years (47.7 to 73.2). Measurements of peri-prosthetic acetabular and contralateral hip (covariate) BMD were performed at baseline and at one and two years’ follow-up. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score, Harris hip score, and RAND-36 were also completed at these intervals. Results At two years, only zone 1 showed a loss in BMD (-2.5%) in MoM group compared with a gain in the MoP group (+2.2%). Zone 2 showed loss in both groups (-2.2% for MoM; -3.9% for MoP) and zones 3 and 4 a gain in both groups (+0.1% for MoM; +3.3% for MoP). No other between-group differences were detected. When adjusting for BMD of the contralateral hip, no differences in BMD were observed. The only significant differences in functional scores at two years were higher UCLA activity (7.3 (sd 1.2) vs 6.1 (sd 1.5); p = 0.01) and RAND-36 physical function (82.1 (sd 13.0) vs 64.5 (sd 26.4); p = 0.02) for MoM bearings versus MoP. One revision was performed in the MoM group, for aseptic acetabular loosening at 11 months. Conclusions When controlling for systemic BMD, there were no significant differences between MoM and MoP groups in peri-acetabular BMD. However, increasing reports of adverse tissue reactions with large head MoM THR have restricted the use of the monoblock acetabular component to resurfacing only. PMID:23913361

  9. Effect of zoledronic acid compared with raloxifene on bone turnover markers in postmenopausal women with low bone density.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Gloria; Kriegman, Audrey; Gonçalves, Joana; Kianifard, Farid; Warren, Michelle; Simon, James A

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of zoledronic acid and raloxifene on bone turnover markers. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind study involved 110 postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density who received either a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg or 6 months of daily oral raloxifene 60 mg. The primary efficacy variable was change from baseline in the bone resorption marker urine N-telopeptide of type I collagen. The secondary efficacy variable was change from baseline in the bone formation marker serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. Analysis time points were at 2, 4, and 6 (primary) months. At 6 months, zoledronic acid produced a significantly greater reduction than did raloxifene in urine N-telopeptide of type I collagen (P < 0.001). Zoledronic acid also yielded significantly greater decreases in urine N-telopeptide of type I collagen at 2 and 4 months and in serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase at all time points (P < 0.001 vs raloxifene for all comparisons). Both treatments were well tolerated. More adverse events occurred in the zoledronic acid group; these were primarily transient postdose symptoms that occurred within the first 3 days after the infusion. Zoledronic acid demonstrated significantly greater decreases in bone turnover markers than did raloxifene in postmenopausal women with low bone mass.

  10. The role of Dkk1 in bone mass regulation: correlating serum Dkk1 expression with bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Butler, Joseph S; Murray, David W; Hurson, Conor J; O'Brien, Julie; Doran, Peter P; O'Byrne, John M

    2011-03-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a major signaling cascade in bone biology, playing a key role in regulating bone development and remodeling, with aberrations in signaling resulting in disturbances in bone mass. The objectives of our study were to correlate serum Dkk1 expression with bone mineral density (BMD) and assess the potential role of Dkk1 as a serological marker of bone mass. Serum was collected from a cohort of patients (n = 36), 18 patients with a reduced BMD and 18 control patients. Serum Dkk1 expression as quantified by ELISA was correlated with lumbar and femoral t- and z-scores. Serum Dkk1 concentration in the osteoporosis group was significantly higher than control group (941 ± 116 vs. 558 ± 47 pg/ml, p < 0.01). Serum Dkk1 expression was highly correlated with bone mass variables with inverse associations found between serum Dkk1 expression and lumbar t-score (r = -0.34, p = 0.00433), lumbar z-score (r = -0.22, p = 0.1907), femur t-score (r = -0.42, p = 0.0101), and femur z-score (r = -0.43, p = 0.0089). Our data further emphasizes the pivotal role played by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in bone mass regulation. Dkk1, a powerful antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling, may have a role to play as a serological marker for disorders of bone mass, warranting further evaluation.

  11. Visceral adiposity is negatively associated with bone density and muscle attenuation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Peterson, Mark; Su, Grace L; Wang, Stewart C

    2015-02-01

    The storage of adipose tissue in ectopic compartments is a hallmark attribute linking greater body mass index (BMI) with cardiometabolic diseases. Despite ample evidence to confirm that increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) deposition occurs with obesity, the interrelations between altered fat partitioning and regional muscle and bone quality are less well understood. We examined the association between adiposity and spinal muscle and bone quality across a large, heterogeneous cohort of adults. We identified 8833 thoracic or abdominal computed tomography scans from patients in the University of Michigan Health System who were aged 18-64.9 y. We measured trabecular bone densities, cortical bone densities, VAT areas, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) areas at vertebral levels T7 to L5. Psoas muscle attenuation (an indicator of fat infiltration in muscle) was measured at the L4 level. Muscle attenuation as well as trabecular and cortical bone densities revealed negative correlations with BMI, SAT, and VAT. The correlation between BMI and psoas attenuation was -0.321, between BMI and the density of cortical bone was -0.250, and between BMI and trabecular bone was -0.143 (all P < 0.001). However, correlations between VAT and lower muscle attenuation were stronger as were those between VAT and lower bone densities. Inverse correlations between VAT and densities of psoas muscle and cortical and trabecular bone were -0.460, -0.407, and -0.434, respectively (P < 0.001). Even after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, partial correlations between VAT, muscle attenuation, and bone densities remained significant at -0.250, -0.119, and -0.216, respectively (P < 0.001). Contrary to previous reports that high body mass is associated with increased bone quality, our data show a significant negative association between BMI and muscle and bone densities, suggesting fat infiltration into these tissues. More importantly, correlations between VAT and decreased bone and muscle

  12. Bone mineral density and osteoporosis after preterm birth: the role of early life factors and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire L; Wood, Alexander M; Harker, Caroline; Embleton, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    The effects of preterm birth and perinatal events on bone health in later life remain largely unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis risk may be programmed by early life factors. We summarise the existing literature relating to the effects of prematurity on adult BMD and the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis and programming of bone growth. Metabolic bone disease of prematurity and the influence of epigenetics on bone metabolism are discussed and current evidence regarding the effects of breastfeeding and aluminium exposure on bone metabolism is summarised. This review highlights the need for further research into modifiable early life factors and their effect on long-term bone health after preterm birth.

  13. Effects of Condensation on Peri-implant Bone Density and Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wu, Y; Perez, K C; Hyman, S; Brunski, J B; Tulu, U; Bao, C; Salmon, B; Helms, J A

    2017-04-01

    Bone condensation is thought to densify interfacial bone and thus improve implant primary stability, but scant data substantiate either claim. We developed a murine oral implant model to test these hypotheses. Osteotomies were created in healed maxillary extraction sites 1) by drilling or 2) by drilling followed by stepwise condensation with tapered osteotomes. Condensation increased interfacial bone density, as measured by a significant change in bone volume/total volume and trabecular spacing, but it simultaneously damaged the bone. On postimplant day 1, the condensed bone interface exhibited microfractures and osteoclast activity. Finite element modeling, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemical analyses at multiple time points throughout the osseointegration period demonstrated that condensation caused very high interfacial strains, marginal bone resorption, and no improvement in implant stability. Collectively, these multiscale analyses demonstrate that condensation does not positively contribute to implant stability.

  14. Comparison of radiograph-based texture analysis and bone mineral density with three-dimensional microarchitecture of trabecular bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjanomennahary, P.; Ghalila, S. Sevestre; Malouche, D; Marchadier, A.; Rachidi, M.; Benhamou, Cl.; Chappard, C.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Hip fracture is a serious health problem and textural methods are being developed to assess bone quality. The authors aimed to perform textural analysis at femur on high-resolution digital radiographs compared to three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture comparatively to bone mineral density. Methods: Sixteen cadaveric femurs were imaged with an x-ray device using a C-MOS sensor. One 17 mm square region of interest (ROI) was selected in the femoral head (FH) and one in the great trochanter (GT). Two-dimensional (2D) textural features from the co-occurrence matrices were extracted. Site-matched measurements of bone mineral density were performed. Inside each ROI, a 16 mm diameter core was extracted. Apparent density (D{sub app}) and bone volume proportion (BV/TV{sub Arch}) were measured from a defatted bone core using Archimedes' principle. Microcomputed tomography images of the entire length of the core were obtained (Skyscan 1072) at 19.8 {mu}m of resolution and usual 3D morphometric parameters were computed on the binary volume after calibration from BV/TV{sub Arch}. Then, bone surface/bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, and trabecular number were obtained by direct methods without model assumption and the structure model index was calculated. Results: In univariate analysis, the correlation coefficients between 2D textural features and 3D morphological parameters reached 0.83 at the FH and 0.79 at the GT. In multivariate canonical correlation analysis, coefficients of the first component reached 0.95 at the FH and 0.88 at the GT. Conclusions: Digital radiographs, widely available and economically viable, are an alternative method for evaluating bone microarchitectural structure.

  15. Comparison of radiograph-based texture analysis and bone mineral density with three-dimensional microarchitecture of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Ranjanomennahary, P; Ghalila, S Sevestre; Malouche, D; Marchadier, A; Rachidi, M; Benhamou, Cl; Chappard, C

    2011-01-01

    Hip fracture is a serious health problem and textural methods are being developed to assess bone quality. The authors aimed to perform textural analysis at femur on high-resolution digital radiographs compared to three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture comparatively to bone mineral density. Sixteen cadaveric femurs were imaged with an x-ray device using a C-MOS sensor. One 17 mm square region of interest (ROI) was selected in the femoral head (FH) and one in the great trochanter (GT). Two-dimensional (2D) textural features from the co-occurrence matrices were extracted. Site-matched measurements of bone mineral density were performed. Inside each ROI, a 16 mm diameter core was extracted. Apparent density (Dapp) and bone volume proportion (BV/TV(Arch)) were measured from a defatted bone core using Archimedes' principle. Microcomputed tomography images of the entire length of the core were obtained (Skyscan 1072) at 19.8 microm of resolution and usual 3D morphometric parameters were computed on the binary volume after calibration from BV/TV(Arch). Then, bone surface/bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, and trabecular number were obtained by direct methods without model assumption and the structure model index was calculated. In univariate analysis, the correlation coefficients between 2D textural features and 3D morphological parameters reached 0.83 at the FH and 0.79 at the GT. In multivariate canonical correlation analysis, coefficients of the first component reached 0.95 at the FH and 0.88 at the GT. Digital radiographs, widely available and economically viable, are an alternative method for evaluating bone microarchitectural structure.

  16. The influence of ibandronate treatment on bone density and biochemical bone markers in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Ipach, Ingmar; Kluba, Torsten; Wolf, Petra; Pontz, Bertram; Mittag, Falk

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by different signs including increased bone fragility, short stature, blue sclera, abnormal tooth growth and often secondary immobility. No curative therapy has been found for this rare disease up to now, and different pharmacological substances have been tried as treatment for severe forms of OI. Promising results were seen with intravenous bisphosphonates in the treatment of patients with OI. The aim of present study was to show the effect of intravenous ibandronate therapy on bone density and bone metabolism markers. We analyzed the data of 27 patients with the diagnosis of OI who were treated off-label with intravenous ibandronate. Ibandronate was administered by intravenous infusion every three months at a dosage of 0.3–2 mg. Bone turnover markers and bone density were measured before starting therapy and every three months during treatment. Bone density was measured by using an ultrasound imaging system providing an accurate image of the calcaneus and by evaluating broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA). Twenty-seven patients were treated with intravenous ibandronate during the observation period. 18 were female. The mean age of all patients was 23.9 years ± 19.6 (range 4–63). Seventeen patients were categorized to have OI Type I, 5 patients to have OI Type III and 5 patients to have OI Type IV. There was a statistically significant decrease in total alkaline phosphatase (P<0.0001). We detected also a statistically significant decrease in the ratio urinary deoxypyridinoline/urinary creatinine (P=0.0048) and the ratio urinary pyridinoline/urinary creatinine (P<0.0001) respectively. There was also a statistically significant increase in serum magnesium (P=0.034) and BUA (P=0.0071). No statistically significant changes were seen for total serum calcium (P=0.16), the ratio of urine calcium/urine creatinine (P=0.29), alkaline phosphatase (isoform bone) (P=0.3), procollagen-I-peptide (P=0.5), osteocalcin (P=0

  17. Prior ankle fractures in postmenopausal women are associated with low areal bone mineral density and bone microstructure alterations.

    PubMed

    Biver, E; Durosier, C; Chevalley, T; Herrmann, F R; Ferrari, S; Rizzoli, R

    2015-08-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis in postmenopausal women, prior ankle fractures were associated with lower areal bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone alterations compared to no fracture history. Compared to women with forearm fractures, microstructure alterations were of lower magnitude. These data suggest that ankle fractures are another manifestation of bone fragility. Whether ankle fractures represent fragility fractures associated with low areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and/or bone microstructure alterations remains unclear, in contrast to the well-recognised association between forearm fractures and osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to investigate aBMD, vBMD and bone microstructure in postmenopausal women with prior ankle fracture in adulthood, compared with women without prior fracture or with women with prior forearm fractures, considered as typically of osteoporotic origin. In a cross-sectional analysis in the Geneva Retirees Cohort study, 63 women with ankle fracture and 59 with forearm fracture were compared to 433 women without fracture (mean age, 65 ± 1 years). aBMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; distal radius and tibia vBMD and bone microstructure were measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Compared with women without fracture, those with ankle fractures had lower aBMD, radius vBMD (-7.9%), trabecular density (-10.7%), number (-7.3%) and thickness (-4.6%) and higher trabecular spacing (+14.5%) (P < 0.05 for all). Tibia trabecular variables were also altered. For 1 standard deviation decrease in total hip aBMD or radius trabecular density, odds ratios for ankle fractures were 2.2 and 1.6, respectively, vs 2.2 and 2.7 for forearm fracture, respectively (P ≤ 0.001 for all). Compared to women with forearm fractures, those with ankle fractures had similar spine and hip aBMD, but microstructure alterations of lower magnitude

  18. The influence of ibandronate treatment on bone density and biochemical bone markers in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Ipach, Ingmar; Kluba, Torsten; Wolf, Petra; Pontz, Bertram; Mittag, Falk

    2012-09-04

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by different signs including increased bone fragility, short stature, blue sclera, abnormal tooth growth and often secondary immobility. No curative therapy has been found for this rare disease up to now, and different pharmacological substances have been tried as treatment for severe forms of OI. Promising results were seen with intravenous bisphosphonates in the treatment of patients with OI. The aim of present study was to show the effect of intravenous ibandronate therapy on bone density and bone metabolism markers. We analyzed the data of 27 patients with the diagnosis of OI who were treated off-label with intravenous ibandronate. Ibandronate was administered by intravenous infusion every three months at a dosage of 0.3-2 mg. Bone turnover markers and bone density were measured before starting therapy and every three months during treatment. Bone density was measured by using an ultrasound imaging system providing an accurate image of the calcaneus and by evaluating broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA). Twenty-seven patients were treated with intravenous ibandronate during the observation period. 18 were female. The mean age of all patients was 23.9 years ± 19.6 (range 4-63). Seventeen patients were categorized to have OI Type I, 5 patients to have OI Type III and 5 patients to have OI Type IV. There was a statistically significant decrease in total alkaline phosphatase (P<0.0001). We detected also a statistically significant decrease in the ratio urinary deoxypyridinoline/urinary creatinine (P=0.0048) and the ratio urinary pyridinoline/urinary creatinine (P<0.0001) respectively. There was also a statistically significant increase in serum magnesium (P=0.034) and BUA (P=0.0071). No statistically significant changes were seen for total serum calcium (P=0.16), the ratio of urine calcium/urine creatinine (P=0.29), alkaline phosphatase (isoform bone) (P=0.3), procollagen-I-peptide (P=0.5), osteocalcin (P=0.9), serum

  19. Strong familial association of bone mineral density between parents and offspring: KNHANES 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Choi, H S; Park, J H; Kim, S H; Shin, S; Park, M J

    2017-03-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of offspring was significantly associated with their parents' BMD. Parental BMD Z-score ≤-1 was a significant predictor for BMD Z-score ≤-1 in their offspring. Peak bone mass acquisition during early adulthood is more substantially influenced by genetic factors rather than lifestyle or environmental factors.

  20. Adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and total volumetric bone density in postmenopausal South Asian women with small bone size.

    PubMed

    Darling, Andrea L; Hakim, Ohood A; Horton, Khim; Gibbs, Michelle A; Cui, Liang; Berry, Jacqueline L; Lanham-New, Susan A; Hart, Kathryn H

    2013-07-01

    There is some evidence that South Asian women may have an increased risk of osteoporosis compared with Caucasian women, although whether South Asians are at increased risk of fracture is not clear. It is unknown whether older South Asian women differ from Caucasian women in bone geometry. This is the first study, to the authors' knowledge, to use peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) to measure radial and tibial bone geometry in postmenopausal South Asian women. In comparison to Caucasian women, Asian women had smaller bone size at the 4% (-18% p<0.001) and 66% radius (-15% p=0.04) as well as increased total density at the 4% (+13% p=0.01) radius. For the tibia, they had a smaller bone size at the 4% (-16% p=0.005) and 14% (-38% p=0.002) sites. Also, Asians had increased cortical thickness (-17% p=0.04) at the 38% tibia, (in proportion to bone size (-30% p=0.003)). Furthermore, at the 4% and 14% tibia there were increased total densities (+12% to +29% p<0.01) and at the 14% tibia there was increased cortical density (+5% p=0.005) in Asians. These differences at the 14% and 38% (but not 4%) remained statistically significant after adjustment for Body Mass Index (BMI). These adaptations are similar to those seen previously in Chinese women. Asian women had reduced strength at the radius and tibia, evidenced by the 20-40% reduction in both polar Strength Strain Index (SSIp) and fracture load (under bending). Overall, the smaller bone size in South Asians is likely to be detrimental to bone strength, despite some adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and tibial and radial density which may partially compensate for this.

  1. Relationship between Urinary Calcium and Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Calcium Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Sakhaee, Khashayar; Maalouf, Naim M; Poindexter, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Moe, Orson W

    2017-06-01

    Calcium nephrolithiasis is associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Hypercalciuria has been assumed to be pathogenic for bone loss in kidney stone formers, although this association was shown in small cross-sectional studies. We explored the association of urine calcium with bone mineral density in kidney stone formers. We retrospectively studied bone mineral density in kidney stone formers. Excluded were subjects with hypercalcemia, chronic bowel disease, primary hyperparathyroidism, distal renal tubular acidosis or endogenous creatinine clearance less than 40 ml per minute. We included 250 males and 182 females subdivided into 145 who were estrogen treated and postmenopausal, and 37 who were nonestrogen treated and postmenopausal. We assessed the association of lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density with 24-hour urine calcium on random and restricted diets, and while fasting using univariable and multivariable models adjusting for body mass index, urine sodium and sulfate. On multivariable analysis no significant association was found between urine calcium on a random or a restricted diet, or during fasting conditions and femoral neck or lumbar spine bone mineral density in men and estrogen treated women. In estrogen untreated women lumbar spine bone mineral density inversely correlated with urine calcium on the restricted diet (r = -0.38, p = 0.04 and adjusted r = -0.45, p = 0.02) and in the fasting state (r = -0.42, p = 0.05). Unlike in previous small cross-sectional studies we found no significant relationship between urine calcium and bone mineral density in a large group of calcium kidney stone formers. However, a significant inverse relationship was found in estrogen untreated kidney stone formers only. This study suggests that mechanism(s) other than hypercalciuria explain the lower bone mineral density and the higher fracture risk in patients who are kidney stone formers. It also highlights the role of estrogen on bone

  2. [Dietary patterns in college freshmen and its relation to bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Mu, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Shu, Long; Li, Qingyan; Li, Yingchun

    2012-07-01

    In order to investigate the bone density of freshmen, and to analyze the association between dietary pattern and bone mineral density (BMD). A questionnaire survey on the situation of dietary pattern was conducted in 1414 freshmen. Effective dietary survey questionnaires and bone mineral density measurements were completed for 1319 participants. Bone mass was assessed by using an Ultrasound Bone Densitometer on the right calcaneus (CM-200, Furuno Electric Corporation, Japan), and the speed of sound (SOS, m/s) was used as an indicator for bone density. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to identify the dietary patterns. After adjusting for confounders, covariance with Bonferroni's was used to further examine the associations between dietary patterns and bone mineral density (BMD). (1) Four major dietary patterns were noticed. Western food pattern (high consumption in hamburger, fried food, nuts, biscuit, chocolate, cola, coffee, sugars). Animal protein pattern (high consumption in pork, mutton, beef, poultry meat, animal liver). Calcium pattern (high consumption in fresh fruits, eggs, fish and shrimps, kelp laver and sea fish, milk and dairy products, beans and bean products). Traditional Chinese pattern (high consumption in rice and grain, fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, pork). (2) No association was observed between the western food pattern and bone mineral density. High animal protein pattern showed lower SOS value compared with low animal protein pattern. High calcium pattern showed higher SOS value compared with low calcium pattern. High traditional Chinese pattern showed higher SOS value compared with the low traditional Chinese pattern. Dietary patterns are closely related with bone mineral density (BMD) of freshmen.

  3. Bone Mineral Density and Vitamin D Status Among African American Children With Forearm Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Teach, Stephen J.; Singer, Steven A.; Wood, Rachel; Freishtat, Robert; Wright, Joseph L.; McCarter, Robert; Tosi, Laura; Chamberlain, James M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether African American children with forearm fractures have decreased bone mineral density and an increased prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≤20 ng/mL) compared with fracture-free control patients. METHODS: This case-control study in African American children, aged 5 to 9 years, included case patients with forearm fracture and control patients without fracture. Evaluation included measurement of bone mineral density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to test for associations between fracture status and 2 measures of bone health (bone mineral density and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level) while controlling for other potential confounders. RESULTS: The final sample included 76 case and 74 control patients. There were no significant differences between case and control patients in age, gender, parental education level, enrollment season, outdoor play time, height, or mean dietary calcium nutrient density. Cases were more likely than control patients to be overweight (49.3% vs 31.4%, P = .03). Compared with control patients, case patients had lower whole body z scores for bone mineral density (0.62 ± 0.96 vs 0.98 ± 1.09; adjusted odds ratio 0.38 [0.20–0.72]) and were more likely to be vitamin D deficient (47.1% vs 40.8%; adjusted odds ratio 3.46 [1.09–10.94]). CONCLUSIONS: These data support an association of lower bone mineral density and vitamin D deficiency with increased odds of forearm fracture among African American children. Because suboptimal childhood bone health also negatively impacts adult bone health, interventions to increase bone mineral density and correct vitamin D deficiency are indicated in this population to provide short-term and long-term benefits. PMID:22926174

  4. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Markers in HIV-infected Youth.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Allison Ross; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Rosebush, Julia C; Ruff, Joshua H; Chahroudi, Ann; Labbato, Danielle; Daniels, Julie E; Uribe-Leitz, Monika; Tangpricha, Vin; McComsey, Grace A

    2017-09-11

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a significant co-morbidity in HIV. However, studies evaluating vitamin D supplementation on bone health in this population are limited. This study investigates changes in bone health parameters after 12 months of supplementation in HIV-infected youth with vitamin D insufficiency. This is a randomized, active-control, double-blind trial investigating changes in bone parameters with 3 different vitamin D3 doses [18,000 (standard/control dose), 60,000 (moderate dose) and 120,000 IU/monthly (high dose)] in HIV-infected youth 8-25 years old with baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations <30 ng/mL. Bone mineral density and bone turnover markers were measured at baseline and 12 months. One hundred and two subjects enrolled. Over 12 months, serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased with all doses, but the high dose (i.e. 120,000 IU/monthly) maintained serum 25(OH)D concentrations in an optimal range (≥30 ng/mL or ≥20 ng/mL) throughout the study period for more subjects (85% and 93%, respectively) compared to either the moderate (54% and 88%, respectively) or standard dose (63% and 80%, respectively). All dosing groups showed some improvement in BMD; however, only the high-dose arm showed significant decreases in bone turnover markers for both procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (-3.7 ng/mL; P=0.001) and Β-CrossLaps (-0.13 ng/mL; P=0.0005). High dose vitamin D supplementation (120,000 IU/month) given over 12 months decreases bone turnover markers in HIV-infected youth with vitamin D insufficiency, which may represent an early, beneficial effect on bone health. High vitamin D doses are needed to maintain optimal serum 25(OH)D concentrations.

  5. Bone marker and bone density responses to dopamine agonist therapy in hyperprolactinemic males.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Di Sarno, A; Klain, M; Landi, M L; Facciolli, G; Pivonello, R; Panza, N; Salvatore, M; Lombardi, G

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) at lumbar spine and femoral neck levels and biochemical parameters of bone turnover in 20 consecutive hyperprolactinemic males before and after an 18-month treatment with different dopamine agonists. Six patients received bromocriptine at a dose of 2.5-10 mg/day; 7 patients received quinagolide at a dose of 0.075-0.3 mg/day; 7 patients received cabergoline at a dose of 0.5-1.5 mg/week. BMD, serum PRL, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and osteocalcin (OC), and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (Ntx) levels were measured before and every 6 months during treatment. At study entry, BMD values were lower in patients than controls at both lumbar spine (0.82 +/- 0.03 vs. 1.18 +/- 0.01 g/cm2; P < 0.001) and femoral neck (0.85 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.92 +/- 0.02 g/cm2; P < 0.05) levels. Osteopenia or osteoporosis was diagnosed in 16 patients at the lumbar spine and in 6 of them at the femoral neck level. A significant inverse correlation was found between lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD values and both PRL levels and disease duration (P < 0.01). In the 20 patients, serum OC levels were significantly lower (2.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 9.3 +/- 2.4 microg/L; P < 0.01), whereas Ntx levels were significantly higher (157.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 96.4 +/- 7.4 nmol bone collagen equivalent/mmol creatinine; P < 0.001) than control values. A significant inverse correlation was found between serum PRL and OC (P < 0.01), but not Ntx, levels. After 18 months of treatment, serum PRL levels were suppressed, and gonadal function was restored in all 20 patients, as shown by the normalization of serum T (from 2.2 +/- 0.2 to 5.0 +/- 0.2 microg/L) and dihydrotestosterone (0.3 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.5 +/- 0.01 nmol/L) levels, without any significant difference among groups. A progressive significant increase in serum OC levels together with a significant decrease in Ntx levels were observed after 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment

  6. Bone and high-density lipoprotein: The beginning of a beautiful friendship

    PubMed Central

    Papachristou, Dionysios J; Blair, Harry C

    2016-01-01

    There is a tight link between bone and lipid metabolic pathways. In this vein, several studies focused on the exploration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the pathobiology of bone diseases, with emphasis to the osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis, the most common bone pathologies. Indeed, epidemiological and in vitro data have connected reduced HDL levels or dysfunctional HDL with cartilage destruction and OA development. Recent studies uncovered functional links between HDL and OA fueling the interesting hypothesis that OA could be a chronic element of the metabolic syndrome. Other studies have linked HDL to bone mineral density. Even though at epidemiological levels the results are conflicting, studies in animals as well as in vitro experiments have shown that HDL facilitates osteoblastogensis and bone synthesis and most probably affects osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast bone resorption. Notably, reduced HDL levels result in increased bone marrow adiposity affecting bone cells function. Unveiling the mechanisms that connect HDL and bone/cartilage homeostasis may contribute to the design of novel therapeutic agents for the improvement of bone and cartilage quality and thus for the treatment of related pathological conditions. PMID:26925377

  7. Low Bone Density and Bisphosphonate Use and the Risk of Kidney Stones.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Megan; Taylor, Eric; Vaidya, Anand; Curhan, Gary

    2017-08-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated lower bone density in patients with kidney stones, but no longitudinal studies have evaluated kidney stone risk in individuals with low bone density. Small studies with short follow-up reported reduced 24-hour urine calcium excretion with bisphosphonate use. We examined history of low bone density and bisphosphonate use and the risk of incident kidney stone as well as the association with 24-hour calcium excretion. We conducted a prospective analysis of 96,092 women in the Nurses' Health Study II. We used Cox proportional hazards models to adjust for age, body mass index, thiazide use, fluid intake, supplemental calcium use, and dietary factors. We also conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2294 participants using multivariable linear regression to compare 24-hour urinary calcium excretion between participants with and without a history of low bone density, and among 458 participants with low bone density, with and without bisphosphonate use. We identified 2564 incident stones during 1,179,860 person-years of follow-up. The multivariable adjusted relative risk for an incident kidney stone for participants with history of low bone density compared with participants without was 1.39 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.20 to 1.62). Among participants with low bone density, the multivariable adjusted relative risk for an incident kidney stone for bisphosphonate users was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48 to 0.98). In the cross-sectional analysis of 24-hour urine calcium excretion, the multivariable adjusted mean difference in 24-hour calcium was 10 mg/d (95% CI, 1 to 19) higher for participants with history of low bone density. However, among participants with history of low bone density, there was no association between bisphosphonate use and 24-hour calcium with multivariable adjusted mean difference in 24-hour calcium of -2 mg/d (95% CI, -25 to 20). Low bone density is an independent risk factor for incident kidney stone and is associated with

  8. [Bone density in osteoarthritic femoral heads: quantitative assessment by histomorphologic and histomorphometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-fei; Fornasier, Victor L

    2003-05-01

    To determine whether bone density is related to osteoarthritis and to compare osteoarthritis with osteoporotic fracture of the femoral neck. All 165 femoral heads removed at joint replacement surgery were divided into 4 groups according to radiographic features of hip (osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, cysts and femoral head deformity). The individual femoral head was divided into 5 zones histologically. Sections were studied histomorphologically, and quantitation was performed using the computer-assisted system to determine the bone density of the femoral head. The values of bone density in weight-bearing, super lateral non weight-bearing (SL) and inferior medial non weight-bearing (IM) areas after femoral neck fracture in patients with osteoarthritis were lower than normal. The values of bone density in weight bearing area were increased in patients with osteoarthritis in all four groups but lower than normal in one group (I), and higher than normal in other 2 groups (III, IV). The values of bone density in SL and IM areas except IM area in group IV were lower than normal (P > 0.05). The values of bone density in the central area in the 4 groups were relatively consistent and normal. The density of Haversian canals was increased in the 4 groups indicating osteoporosis of the femoral head. The average age of patients with femoral neck fracture associated with OA (group I) was significantly higher than that of group II, III, IV (P < 0.05). Bone density is different in the femoral head and neck. Dividing the weight bearing joint into distinct zones is a method for laboratory and clinical study. Femoral neck fracture associated with OA was caused by osteoporosis which is related to the age of the patient. The data of this study can be regarded as a potential indicator of implant/host bone relations with morphological, morphometric implications.

  9. Bone mineral density level by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Makhdoom, Asadullah; Rahopoto, Muhammad Qasim; Awan, Shazia; Tahir, Syed Muhammad; Memon, Shazia; Siddiqui, Khaleeque Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To observe the level of bone mineral density by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The observational study was conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan, from January 2011 to December 2014. Bone mineral density was measured from the femoral neck, ward's triangle and lumbar spine, in patients 25-55 years of age, who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. All the cases were assessed for bone mineral density from appendicular as well as axial skeleton. Data was collected through a designed proforma and analysis was performed using SPSS 21. Of the 229 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 33(14.4%) were males. Five (15.1%) males had normal bone density, 14(42.4%) had osteopenia and 14(42.4%) had osteoporosis. Of the 196(85.5%) females, 45(29.9%) had normal bone density, 72 (37.7%) had osteopenia and 79(40.30%) had osteoporosis. Of the 123(53.7%) patients aged 30-50 years, 38(30.9%) had normal bone density, 59(48.0%) had osteopenia, and 26(21.1%) had osteoporosis. Of the 106(46.3%) patients over 50 years, 12(11.3%) had normal bone density, 27 (25.5%) had osteopenia and 67(63.2%) had osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteopenia were most common among rheumatoid arthritis patients. Assessment of bone mineral density by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry can lead to quick relief in the clinical symptoms with timely therapy.

  10. [Practice of martial arts and bone mineral density in adolescents of both sexes].

    PubMed

    Ito, Igor Hideki; Mantovani, Alessandra Madia; Agostinete, Ricardo Ribeiro; Costa Junior, Paulo; Zanuto, Edner Fernando; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between martial arts practice (judo, karate and kung-fu) and bone mineral density in adolescents. The study was composed of 138 (48 martial arts practitioners and 90 non-practitioners) adolescents of both sexes, with an average age of 12.6 years. Bone mineral density was measured using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in arms, legs, spine, trunk, pelvis and total. Weekly training load and previous time of engagement in the sport modality were reported by the coach. Partial correlation tested the association between weekly training load and bone mineral density, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Analysis of covariance was used to compare bone mineral density values according to control and martial arts groups, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Significant relationships between bone mineral density and muscle mass were inserted into a multivariate model and the slopes of the models were compared using the Student t test (control versus martial art). Adolescents engaged in judo practice presented higher values of bone mineral density than the control individuals (p-value=0.042; Medium Effect size [Eta-squared=0.063]), while the relationship between quantity of weekly training and bone mineral density was significant among adolescents engaged in judo (arms [r=0.308] and legs [r=0.223]) and kung-fu (arms [r=0.248] and spine [r=0.228]). Different modalities of martial arts are related to higher bone mineral density in different body regions among adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Practice of martial arts and bone mineral density in adolescents of both sexes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Igor Hideki; Mantovani, Alessandra Madia; Agostinete, Ricardo Ribeiro; Costa, Paulo; Zanuto, Edner Fernando; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between martial arts practice (judo, karate and kung-fu) and bone mineral density in adolescents. Methods: The study was composed of 138 (48 martial arts practitioners and 90 non-practitioners) adolescents of both sexes, with an average age of 12.6 years. Bone mineral density was measured using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in arms, legs, spine, trunk, pelvis and total. Weekly training load and previous time of engagement in the sport modality were reported by the coach. Partial correlation tested the association between weekly training load and bone mineral density, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Analysis of covariance was used to compare bone mineral density values according to control and martial arts groups, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Significant relationships between bone mineral density and muscle mass were inserted into a multivariate model and the slopes of the models were compared using the Student t test (control versus martial art). Results: Adolescents engaged in judo practice presented higher values of bone mineral density than the control individuals (p-value=0.042; Medium Effect size [Eta-squared=0.063]), while the relationship between quantity of weekly training and bone mineral density was significant among adolescents engaged in judo (arms [r=0.308] and legs [r=0.223]) and kung-fu (arms [r=0.248] and spine [r=0.228]). Conclusions: Different modalities of martial arts are related to higher bone mineral density in different body regions among adolescents. PMID:27017002

  12. Bone mineral density and serum testosterone in chronically trained, high mileage 40–55 year old male runners

    PubMed Central

    MacKelvie, K; Taunton, J; McKay, H; Khan, K

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To identify physical activity that is beneficial for the maintenance of bone strength with increasing age by examining the relation between bone mineral density (BMD) and chronic endurance training in men. BMD at the proximal femur, its subregions, and the lumbar spine, and serum testosterone were compared between two groups of long distance runners with more than 20 years of training experience and non-athletic controls. Methods—Runners (n = 12) were divided into (a) high volume runners (n = 7), running 64–80 km a week, and (b) very high volume runners (n = 5), running more than 95 km a week, and compared with non-athletic male controls, exercising in non-endurance oriented activities two to four times a week. BMD (g/cm2) at the total proximal femur, femoral neck, trochanteric region, and lumbar spine was measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. Total testosterone (nmol/l) and free testosterone (pmol/l) in serum were measured by radioimmunoassay from single fasting blood samples. Results—Height, weight, and age (range = 40–55 years) were not significantly different between groups. The high volume runners had significantly higher BMD at the total proximal femur (1.09 (0.17) v 0.94 (0.056)), femoral neck (0.91 (0.16) v 0.78 (0.071)), and trochanteric region (0.85 (0.14) v 0.73 (0.053)) than controls (p<0.05). The differences in BMD for the proximal femur between the very high volume runners and the other two groups were not significant. There was no difference in lumbar spine BMD, total testosterone, or free testosterone between groups. However, there was a significant negative correlation between total testosterone (r = -0.73, p<0.01) and free testosterone (r = -0.79, p<0.005) and running volume in the distance runners. Conclusions—Long term distance running with training volumes less than 80 km a week had a positive effect on BMD of the proximal femur. With running volumes greater than 64 km a week, training was inversely related to

  13. The influence of bone-density on in vivo K x-ray fluorescence bone-lead measurements.

    PubMed

    Lodwick, Camille J; Lodwick, Jeffrey C; Spitz, Henry B

    2011-05-01

    Mathematical simulations and benchmark measurements were performed to assess the impact that normal variations in human calcium content have on in vivo K x-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone. Four sets of cortical bone tissue simulants were fabricated containing from 20.8% to 23.8% calcium (by weight) for measurement in a surrogate (phantom) of the human leg. The net counts detected in the coherent backscatter peak at 88.034 keV using a Cd source indicate a positive trend, with a variability of up to 17% over the range of assessed calcium content. Mathematical simulations confirm this trend and also demonstrate that the contribution of 87.3 keV Pb Kβ2 counts, which are unresolved in measurements, do not contribute significantly to the coherent peak at low levels of bone-lead content. Both measurements and simulations confirm that calcium is a statistically significant parameter in predicting the K-XRF response and suggest that lead levels may be over-predicted for individuals having low bone density compared to the calibration matrix. Simulations identify a 4.5% negative bias in measured lead values for each 1% increase in calcium weight percent in the bone matrix as compared to the calibration matrix. It is therefore important to accommodate this uncertainty when performing epidemiological studies of populations having a wide range of bone densities.

  14. Making Robots Mill Bone More Like Human Surgeons: Using Bone Density and Anatomic Information to Mill Safely and Efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Neal P.; Fichera, Loris; Wellborn, Patrick S.; Labadie, Robert F.; Webster, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Surgeons and robots typically use different approaches for bone milling. Surgeons adjust their speed and tool incidence angle constantly, which enables them to efficiently mill porous bone. Surgeons also adjust milling parameters such as speed and depth of cut throughout the procedure based on proximity to sensitive structures like nerves and blood vessels. In this paper we use image-based bone density estimates and segmentations of vital anatomy to make a robot mill more like a surgeon and less like an industrial computer numeric controlled (CNC) milling machine. We produce patient-specific plans optimizing velocity and incidence angles for spherical cutting burrs. These plans are particularly useful in bones of variable density and porosity like the human temporal bone. They result in fast milling in non-critical areas, reducing overall procedure time, and lower forces near vital anatomy. We experimentally demonstrate the algorithm on temporal bone phantoms and show that it reduces mean forces near vital anatomy by 63% and peak forces by 50% in comparison to a CNC-type path, without adding time to the procedure. PMID:28824818

  15. Are individuals with severe haemophilia A prone to reduced bone density?

    PubMed

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan; Rezaieyazdi, Zahra; Badiei, Zahra

    2008-09-01

    Individuals with severe haemophilia A may be at risk for reduced bone mineral density because of reduced weight-bearing exercise and hepatitis C infection. For confirming the reduced bone density, in the current cross-sectional study, we tried to address bone mineral density in individuals with severe haemophilia A and surveyed the relation of reduced bone density with hepatitis C viruses. To fulfil these aims, bone density and biochemical indexes in 18 individuals with severe haemophilia A and also in 18 individuals matched for age, sex, weight and height, as the control group, were examined. The obtained results showed that individuals with severe haemophilia A had reduced bone density (1.136 +/- 0.118, 0.801 +/- 0.238) in lumbar and femur regions, respectively, in comparison with the age- and sex-matched group (1.299 +/- 0.237, 1.458 +/- 0.505). The major complications of coagulation disorders are various types of excessive bleeding. The current study describes an association between severe haemophilia A and osteopenia, specifically at both the femur and the lumbar spine.

  16. Low bone mass and high material bone density in two patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome caused by transforming growth factor beta receptor 2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, I Mouna; Edouard, Thomas; Glorieux, Francis H; Chabot, Gilles; Tischkowitz, Marc; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the genes encoding transforming growth factor beta receptor 1 or 2 (TGFBR1 or TGFBR2). Although an association between LDS and osteoporosis has been reported, the skeletal phenotype regarding bone mass is not well characterized. Here, we report on two LDS patients with mutations in TGFBR2. Patient 1 was a 24-year-old man who had a total of three fractures involving the left radius, the left metacarpal, and the right femur. At the age of 14 years, lumbar spine areal bone mineral density Z-score was -4.0 and iliac bone histomorphometry showed elevated bone turnover (bone formation rate per bone surface: 91 µm³/µm²/year; age-matched control values 37 [10], mean [SD]) and mildly low trabecular bone volume per tissue volume (17.2%; age-matched control values 25.7 [5.3]). Bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in trabecular bone was increased (Ca(Peak) 22.70 wt% Ca; age-matched control values 21.66 [0.52]). Patient 2, a 17-year-old girl, suffered from diffuse bone pain but had not sustained fractures. At 14 years of age, her lumbar spine areal bone mineral density Z-score was -3.4. Iliac bone histomorphometry at that age confirmed low bone mass (bone volume to tissue volume 10.1%, same control values as above) and high bone turnover (bone formation rate per bone surface 70 µm³/µm²/year). BMDD in trabecular bone was significantly shifted toward increased mineralization (Ca(Peak) 22.36 wt% Ca). Thus, it appears that LDS can be associated with low bone mass and high bone turnover but increased matrix mineralization of trabecular bone. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Human Bone in Cryoprobe Freezing as Related to Density.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kyle E; Baldini, Todd; Lindeque, Bennie G

    2016-12-09

    Cryoprobes create localized cell destruction through freezing. Bone is resistant to temperature flow but is susceptible to freezing necrosis at warmer temperatures than tumor cells. Few studies have determined the thermal conductivity of human bone. No studies have examined conductivity as related to density. The study goal was to examine thermal conductivity in human bone while comparing differences between cancellous and cortical bone. An additional goal was to establish a relationship between bone density and thermal conductivity. Six knee joints from 5 cadavers were obtained. The epiphyseal region was sliced in half coronally prior to inserting an argon-circulating cryoprobe directed away from the joint line. Thermistor thermometers were placed perpendicularly at measured increments, and the freezing cycle was recorded until steady-state conditions were achieved. For 2 cortical samples, the probe was placed intramedullary in metaphyseal samples and measurements were performed radially from the central axis of each sample. Conductivity was calculated using Fournier's Law and then plotted against measured density of each sample. Across samples, density of cancellous bone ranged from 0.86 to 1.38 g/mL and average thermal conductivity ranged between 0.404 and 0.55 W/mK. Comparatively, cortical bone had a density of 1.70 to 1.86 g/mL and thermal conductivity of 0.0742 to 0.109 W/mK. A strong 2-degree polynomial correlation was seen (R(2)=0.8226, P<.001). Bone is highly resistant to temperature flow. This resistance varies and inversely correlates strongly with density. This information is clinically relevant to maximize tumor ablation while minimizing morbidity through unnecessary bone loss and damage to surrounding structures. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  18. Longitudinal bone mineral content and density in Rett syndrome and their contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Amanda; Fyfe, Sue; Downs, Jenny; Woodhead, Helen; Jacoby, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2015-05-01

    Bone mass and density are low in females with Rett syndrome. This study used Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry to measure annual changes in z-scores for areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in the lumbar spine and total body in an Australian Rett syndrome cohort at baseline and then after three to four years. Bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) was calculated in the lumbar spine. Annual changes in lean tissue mass (LTM) and bone area (BA) were also assessed. The effects of age, genotype, mobility, menstrual status and epilepsy diagnosis on these parameters were also investigated. The baseline sample included 97 individuals who were representative of the total live Australian Rett syndrome population under 30years in 2005 (n=274). Of these 74 had a follow-up scan. Less than a quarter of females were able to walk on their own at follow-up. Bone area and LTM z-scores declined over the time between the baseline and follow-up scans. Mean height-standardised z-scores for the bone outcomes were obtained from multiple regression models. The lumbar spine showed a positive mean annual BMAD z-score change (0.08) and a marginal decrease in aBMD (-0.04). The mean z-score change per annum for those 'who could walk unaided' was more positive for LS BMAD (p=0.040). Total body BMD mean annual z-score change from baseline to follow-up was negative (-0.03). However this change was positive in those who had achieved menses prior to the study (0.03, p=0,040). Total body BMC showed the most negative change (-0.60), representing a decrease in bone mineral content over time. This normalised to a z-score change of 0.21 once adjusted for the reduced lean tissue mass mean z-score change (-0.21) and bone area mean z-score change (-0.14). Overall, the bone mineral content, bone mineral density, bone area and lean tissue mass z-scores for all outcome measures declined, with the TB BMC showing significant decreases. Weight, height and muscle mass appear to have

  19. Automated measurement of bone-mineral-density (BMD) values of vertebral bones based on X-ray torso CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Hayashi, T; Chen, H; Hara, T; Yokoyama, R; Kanematsu, M; Hoshi, H; Fujita, H

    2009-01-01

    Bone is one of the most important anatomical structures in humans and osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Osteoporosis is a main target disease of bone, which can be detected by medical image techniques. The purpose of this study is to develop a fully automated computer scheme to measure bone-mineral-density (BMD) values for vertebral trabecular bones. This scheme will aid osteoporosis diagnosis performed using computer tomography (CT) images. This scheme includes the following processing steps: segmentation of the bone region, recognition of the skeletal structures and measurement of the BMD value in vertebral trabecular bone of each vertebral body. The proposed scheme was applied to 20 X-ray torso CT cases to measure the BMD values for vertebral trabecular bones. The experimental results show that the mean and standard deviation of the difference between the BMD values measured by using the proposed method and those measured using a manual segmentation method were 6.93 mg/cm(3) and 6.82 mg/cm(3) respectively. The accuracy of the proposed scheme satisfied the requirement for a computer-aided system used in osteoporosis diagnosis.

  20. Automated, foot-bone registration using subdivision-embedded atlases for spatial mapping of bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Commean, Paul K; Hildebolt, Charles; Sinacore, Dave; Prior, Fred; Carson, James P; Kakadiaris, Ioannis; Ju, Tao

    2013-06-01

    We present an atlas-based registration method for bones segmented from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans, with the goal of mapping their interior bone mineral densities (BMDs) volumetrically. We introduce a new type of deformable atlas, called subdivision-embedded atlas, which consists of a control grid represented as a tetrahedral subdivision mesh and a template bone surface embedded within the grid. Compared to a typical lattice-based deformation grid, the subdivision control grid possesses a relatively small degree of freedom tailored to the shape of the bone, which allows efficient fitting onto subjects. Compared with previous subdivision atlases, the novelty of our atlas lies in the addition of the embedded template surface, which further increases the accuracy of the fitting. Using this new atlas representation, we developed an efficient and fully automated pipeline for registering atlases of 12 tarsal and metatarsal bones to a segmented QCT scan of a human foot. Our evaluation shows that the mapping of BMD enabled by the registration is consistent for bones in repeated scans, and the regional BMD automatically computed from the mapping is not significantly different from expert annotations. The results suggest that our improved subdivision-based registration method is a reliable, efficient way to replace manual labor for measuring regional BMD in foot bones in QCT scans.

  1. Can acetazolamide be used to treat diseases involving increased bone mineral density?

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Juan David; Luis-Yanes, María Isabel; Inglés-Torres, Esther; Arango-Sancho, Pedro; Cabrera-Sevilla, José Eugenio; Duque-Fernández, María Rosario; Gil-Sánchez, Salvador; García-Nieto, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sclerosing bone dysplasias are a series of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases characterized by functional failure of the osteoclasts in bone resorption, leading to an excessive amount of bone mineral density (BMD) which could have serious clinical consequences. We treated three children affected with seriously high levels of BMD with acetazolamide, with the intention of inducing metabolic acidosis, thus increasing bone resorption and reducing BMD. All our patients tolerated and followed the treatment well and the clinical response was satisfactory in all cases. PMID:27904825

  2. The Relationship of Disordered Eating Attitudes with Stress Level, Bone Turnover Markers, and Bone Mineral Density in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Okbay Güneş, Aslı; Alikaşifoğlu, Müjgan; Şen Demirdöğen, Ezgi; Erginöz, Ethem; Demir, Türkay; Kucur, Mine; Ercan, Oya

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of stress caused by disordered eating attitudes on bone health in obese adolescents. A cross-sectional study comprising 80 obese adolescents was performed from November 2013 to September 2014. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol levels were measured as a biological marker of stress. Bone turnover was evaluated using bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide concentrations. Bone mineral density was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, Children's Depression Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children were used to assess eating disorders, depression, and anxiety. Psychiatric examinations were performed for binge eating disorders. In the Pearson's correlation test, a positive correlation was found between the 24-hour urinary cortisol level and Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire total and restrained eating subscale scores (p<0.05 for both). In linear regression analyses, the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire total and restrained eating subscale scores were found to be significant contributors for urinary cortisol level (β=1.008, p=0.035; β=2.296, p=0.014, respectively). The femoral neck areal bone mineral density was found to be significantly higher in subjects who had binge eating disorder compared with those without binge eating disorder (p=0.049). Despite the lack of apparent effects on bone turnover and bone mineral density in our obese adolescents at the time of the study, our results suggest that disordered eating attitudes, and especially restrained eating attitudes, might be a source of stress. Therefore, studies in this area should continue.

  3. Estrogen levels influence medullary bone quantity and density in female house finches and pine siskins.

    PubMed

    Squire, Maria E; Veglia, Megan K; Drucker, Kevin A; Brazeal, Kathleen R; Hahn, Thomas P; Watts, Heather E

    2017-05-15

    Medullary bone, a non-structural osseous tissue, serves as a temporary storage site for calcium that is needed for eggshell production in a number of avian species. Previous research focusing primarily on domesticated species belonging to the Anseriformes, Galliformes, and Columbiformes has indicated that rising estrogen levels are a key signal stimulating medullary bone formation; Passeriformes (which constitute over half of extant bird species and are generally small) have received little attention. In the current study, we examined the influence of estrogen on medullary bone and cortical bone in two species of Passeriformes: the Pine Siskin (Spinus pinus) and the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus). Females of these species received either an estradiol implant or were untreated as a control. After 4.5-5months, reproductive condition was assessed and leg (femora) and wing (humeri) bones were collected for analysis using high-resolution (10μm) micro-computed tomography scanning. We found that in both species estradiol-treated females had significantly greater medullary bone quantity in comparison to untreated females, but we found no differences in cortical bone quantity or microarchitecture. We were also able to examine medullary bone density in the pine siskins and found that estradiol treatment significantly increased medullary bone density. Furthermore, beyond the effect of the estradiol treatment, we observed a relationship between medullary bone quantity and ovarian condition that suggests that the timing of medullary bone formation may be related to the onset of yolk deposition in these species. Further research is needed to better understand the precise timing and endocrine regulation of medullary bone formation in Passerines and to determine the extent to which female Passerines rely on medullary bone calcium during the formation of calcified eggshells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between dietary antioxidant quality score (DAQs) and bone mineral density in Spanish women.

    PubMed

    Rivas, A; Romero, A; Mariscal-Arcas, M; Monteagudo, C; López, G; Lorenzo, Ma L; Ocaña-Peinado, F M; Olea-Serrano, F

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a tight association between oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in humans. The intake of antioxidants may influence Bone Mineral Density by acting as free radical scavengers, preventing oxidation-induced damage to bone cells. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the Dietary Antioxidant Quality Score and bone mineral density in a sample of healthy women. A total of 280 women were grouped into three major groups: women aged ≤ 35 years; women aged 36-45, and finally women aged >45 years. Calcaneous Bone Mineral Density (g/cm²) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Data on the eating habits of each participant were collected with a structured 24-hour diet recall questionnaire. A Dietary Antioxidant Quality Score was used to calculate antioxidant-nutrient intake. A significant and positive association was observed among Bone Mineral Density and dietary intake of vitamin C and selenium. Zinc intake was significantly related to Bone Mineral Density in the youngest group. Low antioxidant consumers were considered individuals whose Dietary Antioxidant Quality Score was lower or equal than the median (3.5), and high antioxidant consumers were those whose Dietary Antioxidant Quality Score were higher than 3.5. Bone Mineral Density was higher in the participants defined as high antioxidant consumers in all aged groups. The study showed that there is an association between Bone Mineral Density and the Dietary Antioxidant Quality Score in all the women studied. Therefore, new therapies for osteoporosis based on higher dietary antioxidant intakes might be developed basing on the results obtained in this study.

  5. [Bone mineral density in children. Association with musculoskeletal pain and/or joint hypermobility].

    PubMed

    Roberto, Adriana Madureira; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Szejnfeld, Vera; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2002-01-01

    Joint hypermobility can be associated with benign musculoskeletal pain. The relation between hypermobility and low bone mineral density is still unknown. Osteoporosis can be observed in some genetic syndromes associated with joint hypermobility. The aim of our study was to detect the possible relation between joint hypermobility, benign musculoskeletal pain and bone mineral density in children. Ninety-three children from 5 to 10 years of age were evaluated concerning the presence of joint hypermobility and the presence of musculoskeletal pain based on a questionnaire directed to parents. We also performed densitometry to measure bone mineral density. All children underwent an L2-L4 lumbar bone densitometry. Children were distributed into four groups according to the presence or not of joint hypermobility associated or not with musculoskeletal pain: 29 (31.2%) with hypermobility and pain, 20 (21.5%) with hypermobility and without pain, 22 (23.6%) without hypermobility and with pain and 22 (23.6%) without hypermobility and without pain (control group). Twenty-four children (25.8%) presented reduction in bone mineral density over 10% related to the adequate bone mineral density for age and gender. Bone mineral density was significantly lower in relation to the controls in the following groups: with hypermobility (independently of the presence of pain), with pain (independently of the presence of hypermobility), with hypermobility and without pain and without hypermobility and with pain. Bone mineral density may be lower in children with joint hypermobility (independently of musculoskeletal pain) and in children with pain (independently of hypermobility) when compared to controls.

  6. The effects of progressive resistance training on bone density: a review.

    PubMed

    Layne, J E; Nelson, M E

    1999-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem that is characterized by low bone mass and increased susceptibility to fractures, primarily of the hip, spine, and wrist. It is estimated to cause 1.5 million fractures annually in the United States in people aged 50 yr and older. Physical activity, particularly weight-bearing exercise, is thought to provide the mechanical stimuli or "loading" important for the maintenance and improvement of bone health, whereas physical inactivity has been implicated in bone loss and its associated health costs. Both aerobic and resistance training exercise can provide weight-bearing stimulus to bone, yet research indicates that resistance training may have a more profound site specific effect than aerobic exercise. Over the past 10 years, nearly two dozen cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown a direct and positive relationship between the effects of resistance training and bone density. Conversely, a handful of other studies have reported little or no effect on bone density. However, these results may be partially attributable to the study design, intensity and duration of the exercise protocol, and the bone density measurement techniques used. High-intensity resistance training, in contrast to traditional pharmacological and nutritional approaches for improving bone health in older adults, has the added benefit of influencing multiple risk factors for osteoporosis including improved strength and balance and increased muscle mass.

  7. Genetic and Dynamic Analysis of Murine Peak Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    parameters of tibia in C3H and B6 mice. Conversely, calcium deficient animals develop secondary hyperparathyroidism , which is a potent stimulus of...depletion causes hypocalcemia, which leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism , subsequently resulting in increased bone resorption. Conversely, dietary

  8. Metabolic and Clinical Consequences of Hyperthyroidism on Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Jagoda; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1891, Von Recklinghausen first established the association between the development of osteoporosis in the presence of overt hyperthyroidism. Subsequent reports have demonstrated that BMD loss is common in frank hyperthyroidism, and, to a lesser extent, in subclinical presentations. With the introduction of antithyroid medication in the 1940s to control biochemical hyperthyroidism, the accompanying bone disease became less clinically apparent as hyperthyroidism was more successfully treated medically. Consequently, the impact of the above normal thyroid hormones in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis may be presently underrecognized due to the widespread effective treatments. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of hyperthyroidism on bone metabolism. The vast number of recent papers touching on this topic highlights the recognized impact of this common medical condition on bone health. Our focus in this review was to search for answers to the following questions. What is the mechanisms of action of thyroid hormones on bone metabolism? What are the clinical consequences of hyperthyroidism on BMD and fracture risk? What differences are there between men and women with thyroid disease and how does menopause change the clinical outcomes? Lastly, we report how different treatments for hyperthyroidism benefit thyroid hormone-induced osteoporosis. PMID:23970897

  9. Neonatal and infant feeding: effect on bone density at 4 years.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosemary J; Antonson, Dean L; Ferguson, Paul W; Murray, Nancy D; Merkel, Kim; Moore, Timothy E

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the type of feeding during the first 4 months of life affects bone mineral density at 4 years of age. Healthy 4-year-old children were recruited from the offices of primary health care providers. After confirming the type of infant feeding by history, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry analysis was obtained at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and evaluated by a radiologist blinded as to feeding type. One hundred and seventy-eight children completed the study (58% male, 85% Caucasian; mean age, 4.5 years). All children had exclusively consumed human milk (n = 57), an infant formula containing no palm olein oil (n = 56) or an infant formula containing palm olein oil (n = 65) during the first 4 months of life. At 4 years of age, no significant differences were noted in bone mineral content or bone mineral density (P = 0.51 and 0.89, respectively) among the three feeding groups as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Total body bone mineral content and bone mineral density varied by gender, with males having significantly higher values than females regardless of feeding type (P = 0.028 and P < 0.001, respectively). There is no association between the use of palm olein formula during the first 4 months of life and subsequent bone mineral content and bone mineral density in healthy 4-year-old children.

  10. Do metabolic syndrome and its components have an impact on bone mineral density in adolescents?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Valéria Nóbrega; Fiorelli, Luciana Nunes Mosca; da Silva, Carla Cristiane; Kurokawa, Cilmery Suemi; Goldberg, Tamara Beres Lederer

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing concern about the occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) at an early age and its effects on bone mass in adolescents. Adolescence is considered a critical period for bone mass gain. Impaired bone acquisition during this phase can lead to "suboptimal" peak bone mass and increase the risk of osteopenia/osteoporosis and fractures in old age. The objective of this review was to perform a critical analysis of articles that specifically focus on this age group, evaluating the influence of MetS and its components on bone mineral density in adolescents. A possible relationship between this syndrome and bone mass has been demonstrated, but the number of studies addressing this topic in adolescents is small. Despite the scarcity of evidence, the results of those studies show that Metabolic Syndrome is negatively correlated with bone mass and also that some components of MetS are negatively correlated with bone mineral density in adolescents. However, the associations between MetS and bone mass development need to be further explored in the age group corresponding to adolescence. Further good-quality studies are necessary to complement the understanding of this relationship.

  11. Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography Measurement Precision for Volumes and Densities of Tarsal and Metatarsal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Commean, Paul K.; Kennedy, Jared A.; Bahow, Karen A.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Liu, Lu; Smith, Kirk E.; Hastings, Mary K.; Ju, Tao; Prior, Fred W.; Sinacore, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot diseases, such as ulcerations, infections, and neuropathic (Charcot’s) arthropathy are major complications of diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy and may cause osteolysis (bone loss) in foot bones. The purposes of our study were to make computed tomography (CT) measurements of foot-bone volumes and densities and to determine measurement precision (percent coefficients of variation for root mean square-standard deviations) and least significant changes in these percentages that could be considered biologically real with 95% confidence. Volumetric quantitative CT scans were performed and repeated on 10 young, healthy subjects and 13 subjects with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Two raters used the original- and repeat-scan data sets to make measurements of volumes and bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the tarsal and metatarsal bones of the two feet (24 bones). Precisions for the bones ranged from 0.1% to 0.9% for volume measurements and from 0.6% to 1.9% for BMD measurements. The least significant changes ranged from 0.4% to 2.5% for volume measurements and from 1.5% to 5.4% for BMD measurements. Volumetric quantitative CT provides precise measurements of volume and BMD for metatarsal bones and tarsal bones where diabetic foot diseases commonly occur. PMID:21723764

  12. Minodronic acid (ONO-5920/YM529) prevents decrease in bone mineral density and bone strength, and improves bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Makoto; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Masuda, Taisei; Ochi, Yasuo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kishikawa, Katsuya; Ito, Masako; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2008-11-01

    This study examined the effect of the highly potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, minodronic acid (ONO-5920/YM529), on bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover, bone microarchitecture and bone strength in ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys. Skeletally mature female cynomolgus monkeys, aged 9-17 years, were ovariectomized or sham-operated. Minodronic acid was administered orally once a day in doses of 0, 0.015, and 0.15 mg/kg from the day after surgery for 17 months. Bone resorption markers (urinary N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen and deoxypyridinoline), bone formation markers (serum osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and lumbar vertebral BMD were measured at baseline and at 4, 8, 12 and 16 months after surgery. Treatment with minodronic acid dose-dependently inhibited OVX-induced increase in bone turnover markers and decrease in lumbar vertebral BMD, and minodronic acid at 0.15 mg/kg completely prevented these changes. At 17 months after surgery, minodronic acid also suppressed bone resorption (Oc.S/BS and N.Oc/BS) and bone formation (OS/BS, MS/BS, MAR, BFR/BS, and BFR/BV) in the lumbar vertebral bodies and tibia. In the mechanical tests, ultimate load on lumbar vertebral bodies and femoral neck of the OVX-control animals were significantly reduced compared to the sham animals. Minodronic acid prevented these reductions in bone strength at 0.15 mg/kg. There was significant correlation between BMD and bone strength, suggesting that the increase in bone strength was associated with the increase in BMD produced by minodronic acid. In micro-CT analysis of the lumbar vertebral bodies, minodronic acid improved trabecular architecture, converting rod structures into plate structures, and preventing the increase in trabecular disconnectivity at 0.15 mg/kg. In conclusion, similar to patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis, reduction in bone strength of lumbar vertebral bodies and femoral neck was clearly demonstrated in OVX

  13. The Impairment of Osteogenesis in Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) Knockout Calvaria Cell Cultures Is Cell Density Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Guenaelle; Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Thomas, Mireille; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Aubin, Jane E.; Vico, Laurence; Marchat, David; Malaval, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) belongs to the "small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein" (SIBLING) family, whose members interact with bone cells and bone mineral. BSP is strongly expressed in bone and we previously showed that BSP knockout (BSP-/-) mice have a higher bone mass than wild type (BSP+/+) littermates, with lower bone remodelling. Because baseline bone formation activity is constitutively lower in BSP-/- mice, we studied the impact of the absence of BSP on in vitro osteogenesis in mouse calvaria cell (MCC) cultures. MCC BSP-/- cultures exhibit fewer fibroblast (CFU-F), preosteoblast (CFU-ALP) and osteoblast colonies (bone nodules) than wild type, indicative of a lower number of osteoprogenitors. No mineralized colonies were observed in BSP-/- cultures, along with little/no expression of either osteogenic markers or SIBLING proteins MEPE or DMP1. Osteopontin (OPN) is the only SIBLING expressed in standard density BSP-/- culture, at higher levels than in wild type in early culture times. At higher plating density, the effects of the absence of BSP were partly rescued, with resumed expression of osteoblast markers and cognate SIBLING proteins, and mineralization of the mutant cultures. OPN expression and amount are further increased in high density BSP-/- cultures, while PHEX and CatB expression are differentiatlly regulated in a manner that may favor mineralization. Altogether, we found that BSP regulates mouse calvaria osteoblast cell clonogenicity, differentiation and activity in vitro in a cell density dependent manner, consistent with the effective skeletogenesis but the low levels of bone formation observed in vivo. The BSP knockout bone microenvironment may alter the proliferation/cell fate of early osteoprogenitors. PMID:25710686

  14. Smokers with emphysema and small airway disease on computed tomography have lower bone density.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Esther; de Jong, Pim A; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Gallardo Estrella, Leticia; de Jong, Werner U; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; van Ginneken, Bram; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus Aa

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is more common in patients with COPD and in smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether measures of emphysema and airway disease on computed tomography (CT) were associated with lower bone density or vertebral fractures in smokers with and without COPD. For this purpose, we included participants from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Bone density was measured as Hounsfield Units in the first lumbar vertebra, and vertebral fractures were assessed semiquantitatively. The 15th percentile method (Perc15) was used to assess emphysema, and the airway lumen perimeter (Pi10) was used for airway wall thickness. Expiratory/inspiratory-ratiomean lung density (E/I-ratioMLD) was used as a measure for air trapping and tracheal index to assess tracheal deformity. Linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between CT biomarkers, bone density, and presence of fractures. Exactly 1,093 male participants were eligible for analysis. Lower Perc15 and higher E/I-ratioMLD were significantly associated with lower bone density (b=-1.27, P=0.02 and b=-0.37, P=0.02, respectively). Pi10 and tracheal index were not associated with bone density changes. CT-derived biomarkers were not associated with fracture prevalence. Bone density is lower with increasing extent of emphysema and small airway disease but is not associated with large airway disease and tracheal deformity. This may indicate the necessity to measure bone density early in smokers with emphysema and air trapping to prevent vertebral fractures.

  15. Bone density assessment for evaluation of gender differences in cervical vertebral maturation: A computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Usha, K.; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Nagarajan, D.; Selvarani, R.; Vijjaykanth, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method is a vital tool for assessing the biological maturation of the orthodontic patient to evaluate the amount of mandibular bone growth left. Aim: To assess and visualize the cervical vertebral morphology (bone density) of orthodontic patients of the age group 9,16,27 years. Material and Methods: Twenty four subjects with age group of 9,16,27 who were randomly selected and subjected to 3d tomographic study to estimate the biological age of the orthodontic patients by analyzing c1 c2 and c3 vertebrae. Result: The results showed that bone density of males is lesser than females in 9 and 16 years, whereas they have more bone density than females in 27 years. Conclusion: The study provides qualitative method of assessing the biological age of the patient by using images of cervical vertebrae by three dimensional approach. Hence it can be useful for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. PMID:27829750

  16. Effect of Methionine Restriction on Bone Density and NK Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jingming

    2016-01-01

    Methionine restriction (MR) is proven to increase the lifespan; and it also affects the bone density and the innate immune system. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of methionine restriction on bone density and natural killer (NK) cells. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to either basal diet (BD, containing 0.80% methionine) or methionine-restricted diet (containing 0.14% methionine). Mice with MR diet displayed reduced bone mass and decrease in the cytotoxicity of NK from the spleen, compared to BD animals. Also, mice with MR diet had an inferior body weight (P < 0.05) and higher plasma levels of adiponectin and FGF21 (P < 0.05) but lower concentrations of leptin and IGF-1 (P < 0.05). Overall, the investigation shows that methionine affects bone density and NK cell cytotoxicity. PMID:27882323

  17. Relationship between body composition and bone mineral density, related to physical activity, in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Muriel; Ndangang, Marie; Riaudel, Typhaine; de Decker, Laure; Benichou, Jacques; Berrut, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Changes in body composition, including a decrease in muscle and bone mass, accompany aging. Analyse the influence of lean mass on bone mineral density, related to physical activity, in elderly women. 37 women were included in this study via an osteoporosis consultation. Body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed using Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry methodology (DXA). The BMD was measured at the femoral neck. Each participant had a physical activity test to respond and had to perform handgrip, a four meter walk and one leg balance. Simple regression analyze showed a positive association between lean masse et BMD; after multiple linear regression analysis, we found a positive association between BMD, lean mass, and one leg balance; lean masse and one leg balance were two independent variable. Bone Mineral density was signicantly associated to lean mass and one leg balance.

  18. Physical activity and lifestyle effects on bone mineral density among young adults: sociodemographic and biochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Gabr, Sami A.; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the possible role of physical activities, calcium consumption and lifestyle factors in both bone mineral density and bone metabolism indices in 350 young adult volunteers. [Subjects and Methods] All volunteers were recruited for the assessment of lifestyle behaviors and physical activity traits using validated questioners, and bone mineral density (BMD), serum osteocalcin (s-OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and calcium were estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis, and immunoassay techniques. [Results] Male participants showed a significant increase in BMD along with an increase in bone metabolism markers compared with females in all groups. However, younger subjects showed a significant increase in BMD, OC, BAP, and calcium compared with older subjects. Osteoporosis was more common in older subjects linked with abnormal body mass index and waist circumference. Bone metabolism markers correlated positively with BMD, physically activity and negatively with osteoporosis in all stages. Also, moderate to higher calcium and milk intake correlated positively with higher BMD. However, low calcium and milk intake along with higher caffeine, and carbonated beverage consumption, and heavy cigarette smoking showed a negative effect on the status of bone mineral density. Stepwise regression analysis showed that life style factors including physical activity and demographic parameters explained around 58–69.8% of the bone mineral density variation in young adults especially females. [Conclusion] body mass index, physical activity, low calcium consumption, and abnormal lifestyle have role in bone mineral density and prognosis of osteoporosis in young adults. PMID:26311965

  19. Bone density changes in premature ovarian insufficiency patients who have had term pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Mariana; Holloway, Debra; Rymer, Janice

    2014-12-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency affects 1% of women under the age of 40 and is associated with a hypoestrogenic state, potentially leading to multiple comorbidities including reduced bone density and fertility. An unpredictable ovarian function is observed in 50% of patients with 5-10% being able to achieve a pregnancy. Longitudinal studies have shown a temporary decline in bone mineral density of up to 5% during pregnancy and lactation in healthy women, with the loss of bone density post-partum being proportional to the period of breastfeeding. Effects of pregnancy in women with premature ovarian insufficiency have not been widely documented. Nevertheless, a lower bone mineral density baseline has been observed pre-conceptually, associated with both the hypoestrogenic state of the condition and the possibility that premature ovarian insufficiency was developed prior to achieving peak bone mass. This may suggest that breastfeeding could cause further deterioration in bone mineral density that may not be easy to recover from due to the reduced baseline levels.

  20. Age and gender effects on bone mass density variation: finite elements simulation.

    PubMed

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Ben Kahla, Rabeb; Merzouki, Tarek; Hambli, Ridha

    2017-04-01

    Bone remodeling is a physiological process by which bone constantly adapts its structure to changes in long-term loading manifested by interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. This process can be influenced by many local factors, via effects on bone cells differentiation and proliferation, which are produced by bone cells and act in a paracrine or autocrine way. The aim of the current work is to provide mechanobiological finite elements modeling coupling both cellular activities and mechanical behavior in order to investigate age and gender effects on bone remodeling evolution. A series of computational simulations have been performed on a 2D and 3D human proximal femur. An age- and gender-related impacts on bulk density alteration of trabecular bone have been noticed, and the major actors responsible of this phenomenon have been then discussed.

  1. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, p<0.001). Nevertheless, SED gradients in the marrow were shown to be the best predictor of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity (R(2)=0.83 and 0.60, respectively, p<0.001). These data suggest that the mechanical environment of the bone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  2. Bone geometry, volumetric density, microarchitecture, and estimated bone strength assessed by HR-pQCT in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Brixen, Kim; Gravholt, Claus H

    2014-11-01

    Although the expected skeletal manifestations of testosterone deficiency in Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) are osteopenia and osteoporosis, the structural basis for this is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), microarchitecture, and estimated bone strength using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in patients with KS. Thirty-one patients with KS confirmed by lymphocyte chromosome karyotyping aged 35.8 ± 8.2 years were recruited consecutively from a KS outpatient clinic and matched with respect to age and height with 31 healthy subjects aged 35.9 ± 8.2 years. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and HR-pQCT were performed in all participants, and blood samples were analyzed for hormonal status and bone biomarkers in KS patients. Twenty-one KS patients were on long-term testosterone-replacement therapy. In weight-adjusted models, HR-pQCT revealed a significantly lower cortical area (p < 0.01), total and trabecular vBMD (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04), trabecular bone volume fraction (p = 0.04), trabecular number (p = 0.05), and estimates of bone strength, whereas trabecular spacing was higher (p = 0.03) at the tibia in KS patients. In addition, cortical thickness was significantly reduced, both at the radius and tibia (both p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in indices of bone structure, estimated bone strength, or bone biomarkers in KS patients with and without testosterone therapy. This study showed that KS patients had lower total vBMD and a compromised trabecular compartment with a reduced trabecular density and bone volume fraction at the tibia. The compromised trabecular network integrity attributable to a lower trabecular number with relative preservation of trabecular thickness is similar to the picture found in women with aging. KS patients also displayed a reduced cortical area and thickness at the tibia, which in

  3. Age-related decrements in bone mineral density in women over 65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiger, P.; Cummings, S. R.; Black, D. M.; Spencer, N. E.; Genant, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    Age-related changes in bone density contribute to the risk of fractures. To describe the relationship between age and bone mass in elderly women, we studied a large cohort of women over age 65 years who were recruited from population-based lists in four cities in the United States. Bone density in g/cm2 was measured by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the distal and proximal radius, the calcaneus, the lumbar spine, and the proximal femur. Centralized data collection was used to control data quality and consistency. We found a strong inverse relationship between bone density and age for most sites. Decrements in bone density between women aged 65-69 years and women 85 years and older exceeded 16% in all regions except the spine, where the difference between the two age groups was 6%. Ward's triangle and the calcaneus exhibited the largest decrements, with 26 and 21%, respectively. The estimates of annual changes in bone mineral density by linear regression at sites other than the spine ranged from -0.82% at the femoral neck and trochanter to -1.30% at Ward's triangle. Correlations between the different regions ranged from r = 0.51 between the proximal radius and Ward's triangle to r = 0.66 between the distal radius and calcaneus. We conclude that the inverse relationship between age and bone mass measured by absorptiometry techniques in white women continues into the ninth decade of life. The relationship is strongest for bone density of Ward's triangle and the calcaneus and weakest for the spine.

  4. Age-related decrements in bone mineral density in women over 65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiger, P.; Cummings, S. R.; Black, D. M.; Spencer, N. E.; Genant, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    Age-related changes in bone density contribute to the risk of fractures. To describe the relationship between age and bone mass in elderly women, we studied a large cohort of women over age 65 years who were recruited from population-based lists in four cities in the United States. Bone density in g/cm2 was measured by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the distal and proximal radius, the calcaneus, the lumbar spine, and the proximal femur. Centralized data collection was used to control data quality and consistency. We found a strong inverse relationship between bone density and age for most sites. Decrements in bone density between women aged 65-69 years and women 85 years and older exceeded 16% in all regions except the spine, where the difference between the two age groups was 6%. Ward's triangle and the calcaneus exhibited the largest decrements, with 26 and 21%, respectively. The estimates of annual changes in bone mineral density by linear regression at sites other than the spine ranged from -0.82% at the femoral neck and trochanter to -1.30% at Ward's triangle. Correlations between the different regions ranged from r = 0.51 between the proximal radius and Ward's triangle to r = 0.66 between the distal radius and calcaneus. We conclude that the inverse relationship between age and bone mass measured by absorptiometry techniques in white women continues into the ninth decade of life. The relationship is strongest for bone density of Ward's triangle and the calcaneus and weakest for the spine.

  5. Influence of bone mineral density measurement on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in postmenopausal Indian women.

    PubMed

    Daswani, Bhavna; Desai, Meena; Mitra, Sumegha; Gavali, Shubhangi; Patil, Anushree; Kukreja, Subhash; Khatkhatay, M Ikram

    2016-03-01

    Fracture risk assessment tool® calculations can be performed with or without addition of bone mineral density; however, the impact of this addition on fracture risk assessment tool® scores has not been studied in Indian women. Given the limited availability and high cost of bone mineral density testing in India, it is important to know the influence of bone mineral density on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in Indian women. Therefore, our aim was to assess the contribution of bone mineral density in fracture risk assessment tool® outcome in Indian women. Apparently healthy postmenopausal Indian women (n = 506), aged 40-72 years, without clinical risk factors for bone disease, were retrospectively selected, and their fracture risk assessment tool® scores calculated with and without bone mineral density were compared. Based on WHO criteria, 30% women were osteoporotic, 42.9% were osteopenic and 27.1% had normal bone mineral density. Fracture risk assessment tool® scores for risk of both major osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture significantly increased on including bone mineral density (P < 0.0001). When criteria of National Osteoporosis Foundation, US was applied number of participants eligible for medical therapy increased upon inclusion of bone mineral density, (for major osteoporotic fracture risk number of women eligible without bone mineral density was 0 and with bone mineral density was 1, P > 0.05, whereas, for hip fracture risk number of women eligible without bone mineral density was 2 and with bone mineral density was 17, P < 0.0001). Until the establishment of country-specific medication intervention thresholds, bone mineral density should be included while calculating fracture risk assessment tool® scores in Indian women. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Genetic and Dyanmic Analysis of Murine Peak Bone Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Animal Care and Use, Human Subjects, civil Rights, Handicapped Individuals, Sex Discrimination, Scientific Fraud (Misconduct) Assurance, Delinquent ...B6CASTF2 cross served its purposes fully and will not be pursued further at this time. Biological stimulus tests show that genetic differences ...and endosteal surfaces of tibias. These data primarily reflect changes in cortical bone compartment. Genetic differences discriminating C57BL/6J from

  7. Bone density benefits with periodic fluid redistribution during diminished muscular activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Federenko, Yuri F; Charapakhin, Kyrill P; Yaroshenko, Yuri N; Denogratov, Sergei K

    2015-01-01

    Bone loss is an established reaction to diminished muscular activity (Hypokinesia; HK). It has been assumed that periodic fluid redistribution (PFR) could contribute to vascular volume. The fluid volume expansion would then increase tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that chronic PFR could contribute to or increase bone density during HK. Therefore we investigated the potential benefits of bone density with chronic PFR during HK. Studies were conducted on 40 male volunteers. They were equally divided into four groups: active control subjects (ACS), hypokinetic subjects (HKS), periodic fluid redistribution control subjects (PFRCS) and periodic fluid redistribution hypokinetic subjects (PFRHS). The density of lumbar vertebrae (Ll-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula were measured during pre-experimental period of 390 days and experimental period of 360 days. Density of lumbar vertebrae (L1 -L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula increased (p<0.05) in the PFRHS group compared to the HKS group. Density of lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula decreased (p<0.05) in the HKS group compared to their pre-experimental levels and the values in the other groups. In the PFRCS group lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula density were improve much less than in the PFRHS group. Bone density was not affected in the ACS group compared to their pre-experimental levels. The current study shows that bone density increases with chronic PFR suggesting potential benefits of bone density with chronic PFR during diminished muscular activity.

  8. Variations in bone density across the body of the immature human mandible.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Erin F; Farella, Mauro; Hoffman, Jakobus; Kramer, Beverley

    2017-03-03

    During growth the mandible accommodates increases in biomechanical loading resulting from changes in the function of structures of the oral cavity. Biomechanical loads are thought to play an intricate and vital role in the modelling and remodelling of bone, with site-specific effects on bone mineral density. It is anticipated that the effects of this loading on bone mineral density are intensified during the functional transition from prenatal to postnatal stages. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate changes in bone mineral density across the body of the immature human mandible during the early stages of dental development. The study sample included 45 human mandibles, subdivided into three age groups: prenatal (30 gestational weeks to birth; n = 15); early postnatal (birth to 12 months; n = 18); and late postnatal (1-5 years; n = 12). Mandibles were scanned using X-ray micro-computed tomography. Eight landmarks were selected along the buccal/labial and lingual surfaces of each dental crypt for evaluation of the bone mineral density. Bone mineral density values were calculated using a reference standard and analysed using multivariate statistics. The bone mineral density of the lingual surface was found to be significantly higher (P ≤ 0.000) than that of the buccal/labial surface. Furthermore, bone mineral density in the alveolar region of the buccal/labial surface of the deciduous central incisor (P ≤ 0.001), the deciduous first molar (P ≤ 0.013) and lingual alveolar area of the deciduous second molar (P ≤ 0.032) were significantly greater in the early postnatal period than in the prenatal period. While changes in bone mineral density across the lingual surface were consistent with the progression of development and the biomechanical demand of the tongue as previously demonstrated, changes observed across the buccal/labial surface of the mandible appeared to accompany the advancing dental development. Thus, changes in bone mineral density across the

  9. Hounsfield units for assessing bone mineral density and strength: a tool for osteoporosis management.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Joseph J; Anderson, Paul A; Rosas, Humberto G; Buchholz, Avery L; Au, Anthony G

    2011-06-01

    Measurements obtained from clinical computed tomography examinations may yield information leading to the diagnosis of decreased bone mineral density, without added expense to the patient. The purpose of the present study was to determine if Hounsfield units, a standardized computed tomography attenuation coefficient, correlate with bone mineral density and compressive strength. Twenty-five patients (including eighteen female and seven male patients with a mean age of 71.3 years) undergoing both lumbar spine dual x-ray absorptiometry scans and computed tomography imaging were evaluated to determine if Hounsfield units correlated with bone mineral density and T-scores. Normative data were generated from lumbar spine computed tomography examinations for eighty consecutive trauma patients and were stratified by age and sex. Separately, polyurethane foam blocks of varying densities were imaged with computed tomography and were subjected to mechanical testing to determine compressive strength. Compressive strength values and Hounsfield units were analyzed for correlation. Significant correlations were found between Hounsfield units and bone mineral density, age, and T-scores and between Hounsfield units and compressive strength (p < 0.001). Hounsfield units obtained from clinical computed tomography scans that are made for other purposes correlate with dual x-ray absorptiometry scores as well as compressive strengths based on osseous models and potentially provide an alternative method for determining regional bone mineral density at no additional cost to the patient. The information could conceivably be applied toward fracture risk assessment, diagnosis of osteoporosis, and early initiation of needed treatment.

  10. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  11. Clodronate stimulates bone formation as well as inhibits bone resorption and increases bone mineral density in rats fed a low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Horie, Daisuke; Takahashi, Mariko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi

    2003-03-01

    The pharmacological actions of bisphosphonates are due to the inhibitory effects on bone resorption, but little is known about the bisphosphonate action on bone formation. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the actions of bisphosphonates, clodronate, on bone formation in the experimental in vivo and in vitro rat models. The bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased in the rats fed a low-calcium diet (0.05% Ca) for 6 days compared with the rats fed a normal-calcium diet (0.5% Ca). The decrease in BMD was suppressed in the 2 mgP/day and the 4 mgP/day clodronate administrations. Bone formation rate (BFR) in rats fed a low-calcium diet was significantly increased compared with the rats fed a normal-calcium diet, and the 2 mgP clodronate administration further increased the BFR. In the cultured rat bone marrow cells, the area of mineralized nodules was significantly increased at 10(-7) and 10(-6) M clodronate, but high concentration of clodronate decreased the area. From these results, it is concluded that clodronate stimulates bone formation when the drug was given to a rat with a relatively lower dose that is sufficient to prevent bone resorption and that this effect may be due to the stimulatory effect on the differentiation process of osteoblasts.

  12. Local Variation in Femoral Neck Cortical Bone: In Vitro Measured Bone Mineral Density, Geometry and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Louise V; Jenkins, Thomas; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dunlop, Doug G; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Thurner, Philipp J

    2015-12-17

    Age- and disease (osteoporotic fractured and osteoarthritic tissue)-related changes in the distribution of cortical bone were examined, using a multimodality approach, including measurement of local density, geometry and mechanical properties, where changes in these properties can give rise to instability and increasing probability of fracture. In contrast to the majority of previously reported research, this study also focuses on the characteristic non-circular femoral neck cross-sectional geometry and variation in bone mineral density (BMD) around the femoral neck. Twenty-two osteoarthritic and 7 osteoporotic femoral neck slices, collected from elective and trauma-related arthroplasty, and 16 cadaveric donor tissue controls were tested mechanically using Reference Point Indentation (BioDent™, Active Life Technologies®, Santa Barbara, CA) and then scanned with in vitro-based radiography intended to replicate the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry technique. All parameters were measured regionally around the circumference of the femoral neck, allowing examination of spatial variability within the cortical bone. Fractured tissue was less resistant to indentation in the thinner superolateral segment compared to other segments and other groups. BMD around the fractured femoral necks appeared more consistent than that of nonfractured tissue, where BMD was reduced in the superolateral segment for the other groups. Cortical bone was thin in the superolateral segment for all groups except for the osteoarthritic group, and was thicker in the inferomedial segment for both osteoarthritic and fractured groups, resulting in the largest variation in buckling ratio (ratio of cortical bone diameter to cortical bone thickness) around the femoral neck for the fractured group. With age, healthy controls appeared to have lower inferomedial cortical thickness, whereas no significant differences in Reference Point Indentation measurements and density were observed. The study has

  13. Effect of Denosumab on Peripheral Compartmental Bone Density, Microarchitecture and Estimated Bone Strength in De Novo Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Bonani, Marco; Meyer, Ursina; Frey, Diana; Graf, Nicole; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Wüthrich, Rudolf P

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled clinical trial in kidney transplant recipients (NCT01377467) we have recently shown that RANKL inhibition with denosumab significantly improved areal bone mineral density (aBMD) when given during the first year after transplantation. The effect of denosumab on skeletal microstructure and bone strength in kidney transplant recipients is not known. The purpose of the present bone microarchitecture ancillary study was to investigate high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) data from the distal tibia and distal radius in 24 study patients that had been randomized to receive either two injections of denosumab 60 mg at baseline and after 6 months (n=10) or no treatment (n=14). Consistent with the full trial findings, denosumab reduced biomarkers of bone turnover, and significantly increased aBMD at the lumbar spine (median difference of 4.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6 - 7.8; p<0.001). Bone quality as assessed by total and cortical volumetric bone mineral density (Tot. vBMD, Ct.vBMD) and cortical thickness (Ct.Th) increased significantly at the tibia, while changes at the radius were less pronounced. The trabecular volumetric BMD (Tb.vBMD), thickness (Tb. Th), separation (Tb.Sp) and number (Tb.N) and the cortical porosity (Ct.Po) at the tibia and the radius did not significantly change in both treatment groups. Micro-finite element analysis (µFEA) showed that bone stiffness increased significantly at the tibia (median difference 5.6%; 95% CI 1.8% - 9.2%; p=0.002) but not at the radius (median difference 2.9%, 95% CI -3.7% - 9.1%; p=0.369). Likewise, failure load increased significantly at the tibia (median difference 5.1%; 95% CI 2.1% - 8.1%; p=0.002) but not at the radius (median difference 2.4%, 95% CI -3.2% - 8.5%; p=0.336). These findings demonstrate that denosumab improves bone density and bone quality in first-year kidney transplant recipients at risk to develop osteoporosis. © 2016 The Author

  14. Electrical and dielectric properties of bovine trabecular bone--relationships with mechanical properties and mineral density.

    PubMed

    Sierpowska, J; Töyräs, J; Hakulinen, M A; Saarakkala, S; Jurvelin, J S; Lappalainen, R

    2003-03-21

    Interrelationships of trabecular bone electrical and dielectric properties with mechanical characteristics and density are poorly known. While electrical stimulation is used for healing fractures, better understanding of these relations has clinical importance. Furthermore, earlier studies have suggested that bone electrical and dielectric properties depend on the bone density and could, therefore, be used to predict bone strength. To clarify these issues, volumetric bone mineral density (BMDvol), electrical and dielectric as well as mechanical properties were determined from 40 cylindrical plugs of bovine trabecular bone. Phase angle, relative permittivity, loss factor and conductivity of wet bovine trabecular bone were correlated with Young's modulus, yield stress, ultimate strength, resilience and BMDvol. The reproducibility of in vitro electrical and dielectric measurements was excellent (standardized coefficient of variation less than 1%, for all parameters), especially at frequencies higher than 1 kHz. Correlations of electrical and dielectric parameters with the bone mechanical properties or density were frequency-dependent. The relative permittivity showed the strongest linear correlations with mechanical parameters (r > 0.547, p < 0.01, n = 40, at 50 kHz) and with BMDvol (r = 0.866, p < 0.01, n = 40, at 50 kHz). In general, linear correlations between relative permittivity and mechanical properties or BMDvol were highest at frequencies over 6 kHz. In addition, a significant site-dependent variation of electrical and dielectric characteristics, mechanical properties and BMDvol was revealed in bovine femur (p < 0.05, Kruskall-Wallis H-test). Based on the present results, we conclude that the measurement of electrical and dielectric properties provides quantitative information that is related to bone quantity and quality.

  15. Digestive efficiency mediated by serum calcium predicts bone mineral density in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Michael R; Power, Michael L; Layne-Colon, Donna G; Tardif, Suzette D

    2013-02-01

    Two health problems have plagued captive common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) colonies for nearly as long as those colonies have existed: marmoset wasting syndrome and metabolic bone disease. While marmoset wasting syndrome is explicitly linked to nutrient malabsorption, we propose metabolic bone disease is also linked to nutrient malabsorption, although indirectly. If animals experience negative nutrient balance chronically, critical nutrients may be taken from mineral stores such as the skeleton, thus leaving those stores depleted. We indirectly tested this prediction through an initial investigation of digestive efficiency, as measured by apparent energy digestibility, and serum parameters known to play a part in metabolic bone mineral density of captive common marmoset monkeys. In our initial study on 12 clinically healthy animals, we found a wide range of digestive efficiencies, and subjects with lower digestive efficiency had lower serum vitamin D despite having higher food intakes. A second experiment on 23 subjects including several with suspected bone disease was undertaken to measure digestive and serum parameters, with the addition of a measure of bone mineral density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Bone mineral density was positively associated with apparent digestibility of energy, vitamin D, and serum calcium. Further, digestive efficiency was found to predict bone mineral density when mediated by serum calcium. These data indicate that a poor ability to digest and absorb nutrients leads to calcium and vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D absorption may be particularly critical for indoor-housed animals, as opposed to animals in a more natural setting, because vitamin D that would otherwise be synthesized via exposure to sunlight must be absorbed from their diet. If malabsorp