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Sample records for runway incursions

  1. Modelling runway incursion severity.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Sabine; Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington Y

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of the causes underlying runway incursions is fundamental for the development of effective mitigation measures. However, there are significant weaknesses in the current methods to model these factors. This paper proposes a structured framework for modelling causal factors and their relationship to severity, which includes a description of the airport surface system architecture, establishment of terminological definitions, the determination and collection of appropriate data, the analysis of occurrences for severity and causes, and the execution of a statistical analysis framework. It is implemented in the context of U.S. airports, enabling the identification of a number of priority interventions, including the need for better investigation and causal factor capture, recommendations for airfield design, operating scenarios and technologies, and better training for human operators in the system. The framework is recommended for the analysis of runway incursions to support safety improvements and the methodology is transferable to other areas of aviation safety risk analysis.

  2. Analysis of Runway Incursion Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    A statistical analysis of runway incursion (RI) events was conducted to ascertain relevance to the top ten challenges of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). The information contained in the RI database was found to contain data that may be relevant to several of the AvSP top ten challenges. When combined with other data from the FAA documenting air traffic volume from calendar year 2000 through 2011, the structure of a predictive model emerges that can be used to forecast the frequency of RI events at various airports for various classes of aircraft and under various environmental conditions.

  3. Runway Incursion Prevention for General Aviation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2006-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) and additional incursion detection algorithm were adapted for general aviation operations and evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the fall of 2005. RIPS has been designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts for general aviation operations. This paper gives an overview of the system, simulation study, and test results.

  4. Runway Incursion Prevention: A Technology Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2001-01-01

    A runway incursion occurs any time an airplane, vehicle, person or object on the ground creates a collision hazard with an airplane that is taking off or landing at an airport under the supervision of Air Traffic Control (ATC). Despite the best efforts of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), runway incursions continue to occur more frequently. The number of incursions reported in the U.S. rose from 186 in 1993 to 431 in 2000, an increase of 132 percent. Recently, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has made specific recommendations for reducing runway incursions including a recommendation that the FAA require, at all airports with scheduled passenger service, a ground movement safety system that will prevent runway incursions; the system should provide a direct warning capability to flight crews. To this end, NASA and its industry partners have developed an advanced surface movement guidance and control system (A-SMGCS) architecture and operational concept that are designed to prevent runway incursions while also improving operational capability. This operational concept and system design have been tested in both full-mission simulation and operational flight test experiments at major airport facilities. Anecdotal, qualitative, and specific quantitative results will be presented along with an assessment of technology readiness with respect to equipage.

  5. Runway Safety Monitor Algorithm for Runway Incursion Detection and Alerting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F., Jr.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Runway Safety Monitor (RSM) is an algorithm for runway incursion detection and alerting that was developed in support of NASA's Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) research conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision System element. The RSM algorithm provides pilots with enhanced situational awareness and warnings of runway incursions in sufficient time to take evasive action and avoid accidents during landings, takeoffs, or taxiing on the runway. The RSM currently runs as a component of the NASA Integrated Display System, an experimental avionics software system for terminal area and surface operations. However, the RSM algorithm can be implemented as a separate program to run on any aircraft with traffic data link capability. The report documents the RSM software and describes in detail how RSM performs runway incursion detection and alerting functions for NASA RIPS. The report also describes the RIPS flight tests conducted at the Dallas-Ft Worth International Airport (DFW) during September and October of 2000, and the RSM performance results and lessons learned from those flight tests.

  6. Electronic System for Preventing Airport Runway Incursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard; Elrod, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system of portable illuminated signs, electronic monitoring equipment, and radio-communication equipment for preventing (or taking corrective action in response to) improper entry of aircraft, pedestrians, or ground vehicles onto active airport runways is described. The main overall functions of the proposed system would be to automatically monitor aircraft ground traffic on or approaching runways and to generate visible and/or audible warnings to affected pilots, ground-vehicle drivers, and control-tower personnel when runway incursions take place.

  7. Runway Incursion Prevention System Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.

    2002-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was evaluated in a full mission simulation study at the NASA Langley Research center in March 2002. RIPS integrates airborne and ground-based technologies to provide (1) enhanced surface situational awareness to avoid blunders and (2) alerts of runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted in a high fidelity simulator. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the RIPS airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts. Eight commercial airline crews participated as test subjects completing 467 test runs. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, simulation study, and test results.

  8. Cockpit Technology for Prevention of General Aviation Runway Incursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Jones, Denise R.

    2007-01-01

    General aviation accounted for 74 percent of runway incursions but only 57 percent of the operations during the four-year period from fiscal year (FY) 2001 through FY2004. Elements of the NASA Runway Incursion Prevention System were adapted and tested for general aviation aircraft. Sixteen General Aviation pilots, of varying levels of certification and amount of experience, participated in a piloted simulation study to evaluate the system for prevention of general aviation runway incursions compared to existing moving map displays. Pilots flew numerous complex, high workload approaches under varying weather and visibility conditions. A rare-event runway incursion scenario was presented, unbeknownst to the pilots, which represented a typical runway incursion situation. The results validated the efficacy and safety need for a runway incursion prevention system for general aviation aircraft.

  9. Runway Incursion Prevention System for General Aviation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel III, Lawrence J.

    2006-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) and additional incursion detection algorithm were adapted for general aviation operations and evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the fall of 2005. RIPS has been designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts for general aviation operations. This paper gives an overview of the system, simulation study, and test results.

  10. Runway Safety Monitor Algorithm for Single and Crossing Runway Incursion Detection and Alerting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Runway Safety Monitor (RSM) is an aircraft based algorithm for runway incursion detection and alerting that was developed in support of NASA's Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) research conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program's Synthetic Vision System project. The RSM algorithm provides warnings of runway incursions in sufficient time for pilots to take evasive action and avoid accidents during landings, takeoffs or when taxiing on the runway. The report documents the RSM software and describes in detail how RSM performs runway incursion detection and alerting functions for NASA RIPS. The report also describes the RIPS flight tests conducted at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport (RNO) and the Wallops Flight Facility (WAL) during July and August of 2004, and the RSM performance results and lessons learned from those flight tests.

  11. Runway Incursion Prevention System Testing at the Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.

    2005-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) integrated with a Synthetic Vision System concept (SVS) was tested at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport (RNO) and Wallops Flight Facility (WAL) in the summer of 2004. RIPS provides enhanced surface situational awareness and alerts of runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using a Gulfstream-V (G-V) aircraft as the test platform and a NASA test aircraft and a NASA test van as incurring traffic. The purpose of the study, from the RIPS perspective, was to evaluate the RIPS airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts, focusing on crossing runway incursion scenarios. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, WAL flight test activities, and WAL test results.

  12. Airborne FLIR sensors for runway incursion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cynthia; White, Joseph; Neece, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) sensors are potential components in hazard monitoring systems for general aviation aircraft. FLIR sensors can provide images of the runway area when normal visibility is reduced by meteorological conditions. We are investigating short wave infrared (SWIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) cameras. Pre-recorded video taken from an aircraft on approach to landing provides raw data for our analysis. This video includes approaches under four conditions: clear morning, cloudy afternoon, clear evening, and clear night. We used automatic object detection techniques to quantify the ability of these sensors to alert the pilot to potential runway hazards. Our analysis is divided into three stages: locating the airport, tracking the runway, and detecting vehicle sized objects. The success or failure of locating the runway provides information on the ability of the sensors to provide situational awareness. Tracking the runway position from frame to frame provides information on the visibility of runway features, such as landing lights or runway edges, in the scene. Detecting small objects quantifies clutter and provides information on the ability of these sensors to image potential hazards. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of sample approach video.

  13. Black Box Testing: Experiments with Runway Incursion Advisory Alerting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes our research findings on the Black box testing of Runway Incursion Advisory Alerting System (RIAAS) and Runway Safety Monitor (RSM) system. Developing automated testing software for such systems has been a problem because of the extensive information that has to be processed. Customized software solutions have been proposed. However, they are time consuming to develop. Here, we present a less expensive, and a more general test platform that is capable of performing complete black box testing. The technique is based on the classification of the anomalies that arise during Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, we also discuss a generalized testing tool (prototype) that we have developed.

  14. Development of a Bayesian Belief Network Runway Incursion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper, a statistical analysis of runway incursion (RI) events was conducted to ascertain their relevance to the top ten Technical Challenges (TC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). The study revealed connections to perhaps several of the AvSP top ten TC. That data also identified several primary causes and contributing factors for RI events that served as the basis for developing a system-level Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) model for RI events. The system-level BBN model will allow NASA to generically model the causes of RI events and to assess the effectiveness of technology products being developed under NASA funding. These products are intended to reduce the frequency of RI events in particular, and to improve runway safety in general. The development, structure and assessment of that BBN for RI events by a Subject Matter Expert panel are documented in this paper.

  15. Prevention of runway incursions due to closed runways or unsuitable runway choices by enhanced crew situational awareness and alerting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Urvoy, Carole; Klingauf, Uwe

    2007-04-01

    Of all incidents on the aerodrome surface, Runway Incursions, i.e. the incorrect presence of an aircraft on a runway, are the by far most safety-critical, resulting in many fatalities if they lead to an accident. A lack of flight crew situational awareness is almost always a causal factor in these occurrences, and like any Runway Incursion, the special case of choosing a closed or unsuitable runway - including mistaking a taxiway for a runway - may have catastrophic consequences, as the Singapore Airlines Flight SQ006 accident at Taipei in 2000 and, most recently, Comair Flight 5191, tragically show. In other incidents, such as UPS Flight 896 at Denver in 2001 departing from a closed runway or China Airlines Flight 11 taking off from a taxiway at Anchorage in 2002, a disaster was only avoided by mere luck. This paper describes how the concept for an onboard Surface Movement Awareness and Alerting System (SMAAS) can be applied to this special case and might help to prevent flight crews from taking off or landing on closed runways, unsuitable runways or taxiways, and presents initial evaluation results. An airport moving map based on an ED-99A/DO- 272A compliant Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB) is used to visualize runway closures and other applicable airport restrictions, based on NOTAM and D-ATIS data, to provide the crew with enhanced situational awareness in terms of position and operational environment. If this is not sufficient to prevent a hazardous situation, e.g. in case the crew is distracted, a tailored alerting concept consisting of both visual and aural alerts consistent with existing warning systems catches the crew's attention. For runway closures and restrictions, particularly those of temporary nature, the key issue for both extended situational awareness and alerting is how to get the corresponding data to the aircraft's avionics. Therefore, this paper also develops the concept of a machine-readable electronic Pre-flight Information Bulletin (e

  16. NASA Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) Dallas-Fort Worth Demonstration Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Esche, Jeff; Sleep, Benjamin; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Program Synthetic Vision System project conducted a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) flight test at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in October 2000. The RIPS research system includes advanced displays, airport surveillance system, data links, positioning system, and alerting algorithms to provide pilots with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warnings of runway incursions. This report describes the aircraft and ground based runway incursion alerting systems and traffic positioning systems (Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Service - Broadcast (TIS-B)). A performance analysis of these systems is also presented.

  17. An assessment of predominant causal factors of pilot deviations that contribute to runway incursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Denado M.

    The aim of this study was to identify predominant causal factors of pilot deviations in runway incursions over a two-year period. Runway incursion reports were obtained from NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), and a qualitative method was used by classifying and coding each report to a specific causal factor(s). The causal factors that were used were substantiated by research from the Aircraft Owner's and Pilot's Association that found that these causal factors were the most common in runway incursion incidents and accidents. An additional causal factor was also utilized to determine the significance of pilot training in relation to runway incursions. From the reports examined, it was found that miscommunication and situational awareness have the greatest impact on pilots and are most often the major causes of runway incursions. This data can be used to assist airports, airlines, and the FAA to understand trends in pilot deviations, and to find solutions for specific problem areas in runway incursion incidents.

  18. Development of the Runway Incursion Advisory and Alerting System (RIAAS): Research Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor); Cassell, Rick

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted on an aircraft based Runway Incursion Advisory and Alerting System (RIAAS) developed under a cooperative agreement between Rannoch Corporation and the NASA Langley Research Center. A summary of RIAAS is presented along with results from simulation and flight testing, safety benefits, and key technical issues.

  19. Simulator Evaluation of Runway Incursion Prevention Technology for General Aviation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2011-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) has been designed under previous research to enhance airport surface operations situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential runway conflict, during transport aircraft category operations, in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operations capability. This study investigated an adaptation of RIPS for low-end general aviation operations using a fixed-based simulator at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of the study was to evaluate modified RIPS aircraft-based incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts for low-end general aviation operations. This paper gives an overview of the system, simulation study, and test results.

  20. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  1. A fresh look at runway incursions: onboard surface movement awareness and alerting system based on SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Mihalic, Lamir; Güttler, Mathias; Klingauf, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Increasing traffic density on the aerodrome surface due to the continuous worldwide growth in the number of flight operations does not only cause capacity and efficiency problems, but also increases the risk of serious incidents and accidents on the airport movement area. Of these, Runway Incursions are the by far most safety-critical. In fact, the worst-ever accident in civil aviation, the collision of two Boeing B747s on Tenerife in 1977 with 583 fatalities, was caused by a Runway Incursion. Therefore, various Runway Safety programs have recently been initiated around the globe, often focusing on ground-based measures such as improved surveillance. However, as a lack of flight crew situational awareness is a key causal factor in many Runway Incursion incidents and accidents, there is a strong need for an onboard solution, which should be capable of interacting cooperatively with ground-based ATM systems, such as A-SMGCS where available. This paper defines the concept of preventive and reactive Runway Incursion avoidance and describes a Surface Movement Awareness & Alerting System (SMAAS) designed to alert the flight crew if they are at risk of infringing a runway. Both the SVS flight deck displays and the corresponding alerting algorithms utilize an ED 99A/RTCA DO-272A compliant aerodrome database, as well as airport operational, traffic and clearance data received via ADS-B or other data links, respectively. The displays provide the crew with enhanced positional, operational, clearance and traffic awareness, and they are used to visualize alerts. A future enhancement of the system will provide intelligent alerting for conflicts caused by surrounding traffic.

  2. FAA evaluation of UV technology for runway incursion prevention and low-visibility landings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Victor J., Jr.

    2003-09-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is currently evaluating a solar blind ultraviolet (UV) technology, called FogEye, that is being developed by Norris Electro Optical Systems. The technology allows for transmission and reception of low level UV signals that are free of any natural background noise. It also offers favorable atmospheric transmission characteristics. Conclusions of the FAA evaluation thus far are that the technology has considerable merit, and that applications such as preventing runway incursions and use as an Integrity Monitor during low visibility landings should be operationally assessed.

  3. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  4. Development of a Bayesian Belief Network Runway Incursion and Excursion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous work, a statistical analysis of runway incursion (RI) event data was conducted to ascertain the relevance of this data to the top ten Technical Challenges (TC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). The study revealed connections to several of the AvSP top ten TC and identified numerous primary causes and contributing factors of RI events. The statistical analysis served as the basis for developing a system-level Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) model for RI events, also previously reported. Through literature searches and data analysis, this RI event network has now been extended to also model runway excursion (RE) events. These RI and RE event networks have been further modified and vetted by a Subject Matter Expert (SME) panel. The combined system-level BBN model will allow NASA to generically model the causes of RI and RE events and to assess the effectiveness of technology products being developed under NASA funding. These products are intended to reduce the frequency of runway safety incidents/accidents, and to improve runway safety in general. The development and structure of the BBN for both RI and RE events are documented in this paper.

  5. Runway Incursion Prevention System ADS-B and DGPS Data Link Analysis Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, J.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas - Ft. Worth International Airport in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. Rockwell Collins provided and supported a prototype Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system using 1090 MHz and a prototype Differential GPS (DGPS) system onboard the NASA Boeing 757 research aircraft. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS flight test, summarizes the development process, and analyzes both ADS-B and DGPS data collected during the flight test. In addition, results are report on interoperability tests conducted between the NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) ADS-B flight test system and the NASA Boeing 757 ADS-B system.

  6. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  7. Runway Incursion: Human Factors In Runway Incursions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-20

    23, 1994. Pt. 1 (p. 913-921), Alexandria, VA: Institute of Navigation. Abstract: This paper describes the prototype GNSS /ADS-based seamless airport...corrections are transmitted on a VHF data link at a 1 Hz. rate using the RTCM -104 format. DGPS position estimates will be within 5 meters of actual aircraft

  8. Pilot Evaluations of Runway Status Light System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, R. Marshall

    1996-01-01

    This study focuses on use of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) Simulator at the Langley Research Center to obtain pilot opinion and input on the Federal Aviation Administration's Runway Status Light System (RWSL) prior to installation in an operational airport environment. The RWSL has been designed to reduce the likelihood of runway incursions by visually alerting pilots when a runway is occupied. Demonstrations of the RWSL in the TSRV Simulator allowed pilots to evaluate the system in a realistic cockpit environment.

  9. Studies of Contaminated Runways,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    CON A INATIONS 11 4.1. Hydrodynamic resistance 11 4.2. Water contaminated runway 11 4.2.1. Viscous hydroplaning 12 4.2.2. Dynamic hydroplaning 13... hydroplaning model 16 5. FRICTION CHARACTERISTICS OF TYPICAL RUNWAYS 17 5.1. Characterization of the surface structure of a runway 17 .5.2. Runway with smooth...of the parameters involved the concepts of "viscous" and "dynamic" hydroplaning have been introduced in the literature. By definition there are

  10. Status of runway slipperiness research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    Runway slipperiness research performed in the United States and Europe since 1968 is reviewed. Topics discussed include: (1) runway flooding during rainstorms; (2) hydroplaning; (3) identification of slippery runways including the results from ground vehicle friction measurements and attempts to correlate these measurements with aircraft stopping performance; (4) progress and problems associated with the development of antihydroplaning runway surface treatments such as pavement grooving and porous friction course (PFC); and (5) runway rubber deposits and their removal.

  11. Tobacco smoke incursions in multiunit housing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen M; Torok, Michelle; McMillen, Robert; Tanski, Susanne; Klein, Jonathan D; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2014-08-01

    We sought to describe the prevalence of secondhand tobacco smoke incursions reported by multiunit housing (MUH) residents, pinpoint factors associated with exposure, and determine whether smoke-free building policy was associated with prevalence of reported tobacco smoke incursions. Data are from a 2011 nationally representative dual-frame survey (random-digit-dial and Internet panels) of US adults aged 18 years and older. Individuals who lived in MUH and who reported no smoking in their homes for the past 3 months, whether or not they reported being smokers themselves, were included in this study. Incursions were defined as smelling tobacco smoke in their building or unit. Of 562 respondents, 29.5% reported smoke incursions in their buildings. Of these, 16% reported incursions in their own unit, 36.2% of which occurred at least weekly. Government-subsidized housing and partial smoke-free policies were associated with a higher likelihood of reporting smoke incursions. Many residents of multiunit housing are exposed to tobacco smoke in their units and buildings. Partial smoke-free policies do not appear to protect residents and might increase the likelihood of incursions in residents' individual units.

  12. Non-Airborne Conflicts: The Causes and Effects of Runway Transgressions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    and O’Hara, Dolores B., "Human Factors Associated with Runway Incursions", NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System: Eighth Quarterly Report, NASA...ararararocearx OUUU13UUK O_<X<X<XCJ<X<X<X 3uaa« a zaacjzcicjzzi zu uzu D <I <I D <I U d <c za <r a. ZUOU.ZUUUIUUUUO t

  13. Development and Execution of the RUNSAFE Runway Safety Bayesian Belief Network Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    One focus area of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to improve aviation safety. Runway safety is one such thrust of investigation and research. The two primary components of this runway safety research are in runway incursion (RI) and runway excursion (RE) events. These are adverse ground-based aviation incidents that endanger crew, passengers, aircraft and perhaps other nearby people or property. A runway incursion is the incorrect presence of an aircraft, vehicle or person on the protected area of a surface designated for the landing and take-off of aircraft; one class of RI events simultaneously involves two aircraft, such as one aircraft incorrectly landing on a runway while another aircraft is taking off from the same runway. A runway excursion is an incident involving only a single aircraft defined as a veer-off or overrun off the runway surface. Within the scope of this effort at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), generic RI, RE and combined (RI plus RE, or RUNSAFE) event models have each been developed and implemented as a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN). Descriptions of runway safety issues from the literature searches have been used to develop the BBN models. Numerous considerations surrounding the process of developing the event models have been documented in this report. The event models were then thoroughly reviewed by a Subject Matter Expert (SME) panel through multiple knowledge elicitation sessions. Numerous improvements to the model structure (definitions, node names, node states and the connecting link topology) were made by the SME panel. Sample executions of the final RUNSAFE model have been presented herein for baseline and worst-case scenarios. Finally, a parameter sensitivity analysis for a given scenario was performed to show the risk drivers. The NASA and LaRC research in runway safety event modeling through the use of BBN technology is important for several reasons. These include: 1) providing a means to clearly

  14. Progress Toward Future Runway Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Atkins, Stephen; Eisenhawer, Stephen W.; Bott, Terrance F.; Long, Dou; Hasan, Shahab

    2011-01-01

    The runway is universally acknowledged as a constraining factor to capacity in the National Airspace System (NAS). It follows that investigation of the effective use of runways, both in terms of selection and assignment, is paramount to the efficiency of future NAS operations. The need to address runway management is not a new idea; however, as the complexities of factors affecting runway selection and usage increase, the need for effective research in this area correspondingly increases. Under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Airspace Systems Program, runway management is a key research area. To address a future NAS which promises to be a complex landscape of factors and competing interests among users and operators, effective runway management strategies and capabilities are required. This effort has evolved from an assessment of current practices, an understanding of research activities addressing surface and airspace operations, traffic flow management enhancements, among others. This work has yielded significant progress. Systems analysis work indicates that the value of System Oriented Runway Management tools is significantly increased in the metroplex environment over that of the single airport case. Algorithms have been developed to provide runway configuration recommendations for a single airport with multiple runways. A benefits analysis has been conducted that indicates the SORM benefits include supporting traffic growth, cost reduction as a result of system efficiency, NAS optimization from metroplex operations, fairness in aircraft operations, and rational decision making.

  15. Conceptual model for collision detection and avoidance for runway incursion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, Bridgette A.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), numerous corporate entities, and research facilities have each come together to determine ways to make air travel safer and more efficient. These efforts have resulted in the development of a concept known as the Next Generation (Next Gen) of Aircraft or Next Gen. The Next Gen concept promises to be a clear departure from the way in which aircraft operations are performed today. The Next Gen initiatives require that modifications are made to the existing National Airspace System (NAS) concept of operations, system level requirements, software (SW) and hardware (HW) requirements, SW and HW designs and implementations. A second example of the changes in the NAS is the shift away from air traffic controllers having the responsibility for separation assurance. In the proposed new scheme of free flight, each aircraft would be responsible for assuring that it is safely separated from surrounding aircraft. Free flight would allow the separation minima for enroute aircraft to be reduced from 2000 nautical miles (nm) to 1000 nm. Simply put "Free Flight is a concept of air traffic management that permits pilots and controllers to share information and work together to manage air traffic from pre-flight through arrival without compromising safety [107]." The primary goal of this research project was to create a conceptual model that embodies the essential ingredients needed for a collision detection and avoidance system. This system was required to operate in two modes: air traffic controller's perspective and pilot's perspective. The secondary goal was to demonstrate that the technologies, procedures, and decision logic embedded in the conceptual model were able to effectively detect and avoid collision risks from both perspectives. Embodied in the conceptual model are five distinct software modules: Data Acquisition, State Processor, Projection, Collision Detection, and Alerting and Resolution. The underlying algorithms in the Projection module are linear projection and Kalman filtering which are used to estimate the future state of the aircraft. The Resolution and Alerting module is comprised of two algorithms: a generic alerting algorithm and the potential fields algorithm [71]. The conceptual model was created using Enterprise Architect RTM and MATLAB RTM was used to code the methods and to simulate conflict scenarios.

  16. National Runway Friction Measurement Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    wet Mu values less than 50. Of the 122 runways with low segments, 64 runways (52.5%) had wet Mu values less than 50 for less than 1000 feet. Other data...friction enhancement due to grooving is greater in areas of rubber accumulation than in uncontaminated areas for most pavement types. 4. For low -use...friction, as identified 4n Fiqure 9, should be considered in the planning and design of rpw -unway surfaces, particularly for low -use runways. 2. The

  17. Controllers and Pilots Play a Key Role in Runway Safety Initiatives Through Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Mike; Bender, Kim

    2004-01-01

    A new and innovative way to evaluate runway safety initiatives for airports is through the use of interactive real-time simulation. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) operates an integrated suite of simulators that can give both pilots and tower controllers the ability to simultaneously "try out" ideas in the safety of virtual reality. In February of 2003, the FAA conducted a demonstration in the NASA facilities for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) of a concept to reduce runway crossings and enhance the efficiency of the airport. Currently DFW experiences about 1,700 runway crossings per day, which contribute to arrival and departure delays and the potential for runway incursions. The proposed concept included the addition of new perimeter taxiways on the East and West sides of the airport. Through use of NASA's unique simulation capabilities, DFW controllers and commercial pilots provided expert feedback on the safety and operational implications by directly experiencing the proposed changes. Overall, the data collected from the participants and the simulators demonstrated that the concept would improve operations at DFW, if implemented. Improvements were observed in many areas including departure rates, taxi duration, runway crossings, and controller and pilot communications.

  18. Controllers and Pilots Play a Key Role in Runway Safety Initiatives Through Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Mike; Bender, Kim

    2004-01-01

    A new and innovative way to evaluate runway safety initiatives for airports is through the use of interactive real-time simulation. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) operates an integrated suite of simulators that can give both pilots and tower controllers the ability to simultaneously "try out" ideas in the safety of virtual reality. In February of 2003, the FAA conducted a demonstration in the NASA facilities for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) of a concept to reduce runway crossings and enhance the efficiency of the airport. Currently DFW experiences about 1,700 runway crossings per day, which contribute to arrival and departure delays and the potential for runway incursions. The proposed concept included the addition of new perimeter taxiways on the East and West sides of the airport. Through use of NASA's unique simulation capabilities, DFW controllers and commercial pilots provided expert feedback on the safety and operational implications by directly experiencing the proposed changes. Overall, the data collected from the participants and the simulators demonstrated that the concept would improve operations at DFW, if implemented. Improvements were observed in many areas including departure rates, taxi duration, runway crossings, and controller and pilot communications.

  19. Tire and runway surface research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    The condition of aircraft tires and runway surfaces can be crucial in meeting the stringent demands of aircraft ground operations, particularly under adverse weather conditions. Gaining a better understanding of the factors influencing the tire/pavement interface is the aim of several ongoing NASA Langley research programs which are described in this paper. Results from several studies conducted at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility, tests with instrumented ground vehicles and aircraft, and some recent aircraft accident investigations are summarized to indicate effects of different tire and runway properties. The Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program is described together with some preliminary test findings. The scope of future NASA Langley research directed towards solving aircraft ground operational problems related to the tire/pavement interface is given.

  20. Preliminary Human-in-the-Loop Assessment of Procedures for Very-Closely-Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita; Lozito, Sandra C.; Ballinger, Deborah S.; Trot, Greg; Hardy, Gordon H.; Panda, Ramesh C.; Lehmer, Ronald D.; Kozon, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Demand in the future air transportation system concept is expected to double or triple by 2025 [1]. Increasing airport arrival rates will help meet the growing demand that could be met with additional runways but the expansion airports is met with environmental challenges for the surrounding communities when using current standards and procedures. Therefore, changes to airport operations can improve airport capacity without adding runways. Building additional runways between current ones, or moving them closer, is a potential solution to meeting the increasing demand, as addressed by the Terminal Area Capacity Enhancing Concept (TACEC). TACEC requires robust technologies and procedures that need to be tested such that operations are not compromised under instrument meteorological conditions. The reduction of runway spacing for independent simultaneous operations dramatically exacerbates the criticality of wake vortex incursion and the calculation of a safe and proper breakout maneuver. The study presented here developed guidelines for such operations by performing a real-time, human-in-the-loop simulation using precision navigation, autopilot-flown approaches, with the pilot monitoring aircraft spacing and the wake vortex safe zone during the approach.

  1. Aerial view of Runway 33 at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This aerial view shows the approach on Runway 33 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The runway is 15,000 feet long, with 1,000-foot paved overruns at each end; 300 feet wide (about length of football field), with 50-foot asphalt shoulders each side; 16 inches thick in the center, and 15 inches thick on sides. It has a slope of 24 inches from the center line to the edge for drainage. The single landing strip is considered two runways, depending on approach -- Runway 15 from northwest, Runway 33 from southeast.

  2. Aerial view of Runway 33 at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This aerial view shows the approach on Runway 33 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The runway is 15,000 feet long, with 1,000-foot paved overruns at each end; 300 feet wide (about length of football field), with 50-foot asphalt shoulders each side; 16 inches thick in the center, and 15 inches thick on sides. It has a slope of 24 inches from the center line to the edge for drainage. The single landing strip is considered two runways, depending on approach -- Runway 15 from northwest, Runway 33 from southeast.

  3. Tire/runway friction interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  4. 14 CFR 151.80 - Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions. 151.80 Section 151.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.80 Runway paving...

  5. 14 CFR 151.79 - Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions. 151.79 Section 151.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.79 Runway paving...

  6. 14 CFR 151.80 - Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions. 151.80 Section 151.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.80 Runway paving...

  7. 14 CFR 151.80 - Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions. 151.80 Section 151.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.80 Runway paving...

  8. 14 CFR 151.79 - Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions. 151.79 Section 151.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.79 Runway paving...

  9. 14 CFR 151.80 - Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions. 151.80 Section 151.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.80 Runway paving...

  10. 14 CFR 151.80 - Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Runway paving: Additional runway; other conditions. 151.80 Section 151.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.80 Runway paving...

  11. 14 CFR 151.79 - Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions. 151.79 Section 151.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.79 Runway paving...

  12. Current Practices in Runway Configuration Management (RCM) and Arrival/Departure Runway Balancing (ADRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Williams, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    Significant air traffic increases are anticipated for the future of the National Airspace System (NAS). To cope with future traffic increases, fundamental changes are required in many aspects of the air traffic management process including the planning and use of NAS resources. Two critical elements of this process are the selection of airport runway configurations, and the effective management of active runways. Two specific research areas in NASA's Airspace Systems Program (ASP) have been identified to address efficient runway management: Runway Configuration Management (RCM) and Arrival/Departure Runway Balancing (ADRB). This report documents efforts in assessing past as well as current work in these two areas.

  13. Spot and Runway Departure Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a research prototype of a decision support tool for ATC tower controllers to assist in manging and controlling traffic on the surface of an airport. SARDA employs a scheduler to generate an optimal runway schedule and gate push-back - spot release sequence and schedule that improves efficiency of surface operations. The advisories for ATC tower controllers are displayed on an Electronic Flight Strip (EFS) system. The human-in-the-loop simulation of the SARDA tool was conducted for east operations of Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) to evaluate performance of the SARDA tool and human factors, such as situational awareness and workload. The results indicates noticeable taxi delay reduction and fuel savings by using the SARDA tool. Reduction in controller workload were also observed throughout the scenario runs. The future plan includes modeling and simulation of the ramp operations of the Charlotte International Airport, and develop a decision support tool for the ramp controllers.

  14. Wet runways. [aircraft landing and directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Aircraft stopping and directional control performance on wet runways is discussed. The major elements affecting tire/ground traction developed by jet transport aircraft are identified and described in terms of atmospheric, pavement, tire, aircraft system and pilot performance factors or parameters. Research results are summarized, and means for improving or restoring tire traction/aircraft performance on wet runways are discussed.

  15. System Oriented Runway Management: A Research Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Stough, Harry P., III; Eisenhawer, Steve; Atkins, Stephen; Long, Dou

    2011-01-01

    The runway configuration used by an airport has significant implications with respect to its capacity and ability to effectively manage surface and airborne traffic. Aircraft operators rely on runway configuration information because it can significantly affect an airline's operations and planning of their resources. Current practices in runway management are limited by a relatively short time horizon for reliable weather information and little assistance from automation. Wind velocity is the primary consideration when selecting a runway configuration; however when winds are below a defined threshold, discretion may be used to determine the configuration. Other considerations relevant to runway configuration selection include airport operator constraints, weather conditions (other than winds) traffic demand, user preferences, surface congestion, and navigational system outages. The future offers an increasingly complex landscape for the runway management process. Concepts and technologies that hold the potential for capacity and efficiency increases for both operations on the airport surface and in terminal and enroute airspace are currently under investigation. Complementary advances in runway management are required if capacity and efficiency increases in those areas are to be realized. The System Oriented Runway Management (SORM) concept has been developed to address this critical part of the traffic flow process. The SORM concept was developed to address all aspects of runway management for airports of varying sizes and to accommodate a myriad of traffic mixes. SORM, to date, addresses the single airport environment; however, the longer term vision is to incorporate capabilities for multiple airport (Metroplex) operations as well as to accommodate advances in capabilities resulting from ongoing research. This paper provides an update of research supporting the SORM concept including the following: a concept of overview, results of a TRCM simulation, single

  16. Late Neogene marine incursions and the ancestral Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, K.

    2008-01-01

    The late Neogene section in the Salton Trough, California, and along the lower Colorado River in Arizona is composed of marine units bracketed by nonmarine units. Microfossils from the marine deposits indicate that a marine incursion inundated the Salton Trough during the late Miocene. Water depths increased rapidly in the Miocene and eventually flooded the region now occupied by the Colorado River as far north as Parker, Arizona. Marine conditions were restricted in the Pliocene as the Colorado River filled the Salton Trough with sediments and the Gulf of California assumed its present configuration. Microfossils from the early part of this incursion include a diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers (Amphistegina gibbosa, Uvigerina peregrina, Cassidulina delicata, and Bolivina interjuncta), planktic foraminifers (Globigerinoides obliquus, G. extremus, and Globigerina nepenthes), and calcareous nannoplankton (Discoaster brouweri, Discoaster aff. Discoaster surculus, Sphenolithus abies, and S. neoabies), whereas microfossils in the final phase contain a less diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifers that are diagnostic of marginal shallow-marine conditions (Ammonia, Elphidium, Bolivina, Cibicides, and Quinqueloculina). Evidence of an earlier middle Miocene marine incursion comes from reworked microfossils found near Split Mountain Gorge in the Fish Creek Gypsum (Sphenolithus moriformis) and near San Gorgonio Pass (Cyclicargolithus floridanus and Sphenolithus heteromorphus and planktic foraminifers). The middle Miocene incursion may also be represented by the older marine sedimentary rocks encountered in the subsurface near Yuma, Arizona, where rare middle Miocene planktic foraminifers are found. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  17. TRIZ Tool for Optimization of Airport Runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Venkata; Selladurai, V.; Saravanan, R.

    TRIZ tool is used for conceptual design and layout of the novel ascending and descending runway model for the effective utilization of short length airports. Handling bigger aircrafts at smaller airports become the necessity for economic consideration and for the benefit of vast airliners and the aspiring air travelers of the region. The authors’ proposal of ascending and descending runway would enable the operational need of wide body aircrafts such as Boeing 747 and Airbus A380-800. Negotiating take-off and landing of bigger aircrafts at less than 10000 feet runway is an optimization solution. This conceptual model and the theoretical design with its layout is dealt in this paper as Part - I. The computer-aided design and analysis using MATLAB with Simulink tool box to confirm the adequacy of the runway length for the bigger aircrafts at smaller airports is however dealt in subsequent papers.

  18. Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a decision support tool to assist airline ramp controllers and ATC tower controllers to manage traffic on the airport surface to significantly improve efficiency and predictability in surface operations. The core function of the tool is the runway scheduler which generates an optimal solution for runway sequence and schedule of departure aircraft, which would minimize system delay and maximize runway throughput. The presentation also discusses the latest status of NASA's current surface research through a collaboration with an airline partner, where a tool is developed for airline ramp operators to assist departure pushback operations. The presentation describes the concept of the SARDA tool and results from human-in-the-loop simulations conducted in 2012 for Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport and 2014 for Charlotte airport ramp tower.

  19. Effect of Uncertainty on Deterministic Runway Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Jung, Yoon C.

    2012-01-01

    Active runway scheduling involves scheduling departures for takeoffs and arrivals for runway crossing subject to numerous constraints. This paper evaluates the effect of uncertainty on a deterministic runway scheduler. The evaluation is done against a first-come- first-serve scheme. In particular, the sequence from a deterministic scheduler is frozen and the times adjusted to satisfy all separation criteria; this approach is tested against FCFS. The comparison is done for both system performance (throughput and system delay) and predictability, and varying levels of congestion are considered. The modeling of uncertainty is done in two ways: as equal uncertainty in availability at the runway as for all aircraft, and as increasing uncertainty for later aircraft. Results indicate that the deterministic approach consistently performs better than first-come-first-serve in both system performance and predictability.

  20. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  1. Runway Scheduling Using Generalized Dynamic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, Justin; Wood, Zachary; Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    A generalized dynamic programming method for finding a set of pareto optimal solutions for a runway scheduling problem is introduced. The algorithm generates a set of runway fight sequences that are optimal for both runway throughput and delay. Realistic time-based operational constraints are considered, including miles-in-trail separation, runway crossings, and wake vortex separation. The authors also model divergent runway takeoff operations to allow for reduced wake vortex separation. A modeled Dallas/Fort Worth International airport and three baseline heuristics are used to illustrate preliminary benefits of using the generalized dynamic programming method. Simulated traffic levels ranged from 10 aircraft to 30 aircraft with each test case spanning 15 minutes. The optimal solution shows a 40-70 percent decrease in the expected delay per aircraft over the baseline schedulers. Computational results suggest that the algorithm is promising for real-time application with an average computation time of 4.5 seconds. For even faster computation times, two heuristics are developed. As compared to the optimal, the heuristics are within 5% of the expected delay per aircraft and 1% of the expected number of runway operations per hour ad can be 100x faster.

  2. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; Verma, Savita Arora

    2011-01-01

    Parallel runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace but poor visibility conditions reduce the use of these operations. The NextGen and SESAR Programs have identified the capacity benefits from increased use of closely-space parallel runway. Previous research examined the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This simulation study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s (+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that was about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation and auto speed control future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Results show the operations in this study were acceptable and safe. Subjective workload, when using the pairing procedures and tools, was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness was typically moderate to high. Pilot workload was influenced by display type and automation condition. Further research on pairing and off-nominal conditions is required however, this investigation identified promising findings about the feasibility of closely-spaced parallel runway operations.

  3. Runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2012-01-01

    More recently, research on enhancing the situational awareness of pilots, especially in poor visibility flight conditions, gains more and more interests. Since pilots may not be able to spot the runway clearly in poor visibility conditions, such as fog, smoke, haze or dim lighting conditions, aviation landing problem can occur due to the (unexpected) presence of objects on the runway. Complicated and trivial instruments, switches, bottoms, plus sudden happenings are enough for the pilots to take care of during landing approach. Therefore, an automatic hazard detection approach that combines non-linear Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) image enhancement, edge detection with basic edge pattern analysis, and image analysis is investigated. The effect of applying the enhancement method is to make the image of the runway almost independent from the poor atmospheric conditions. The following smart edge detection process extracts edge information, which can also reduce the storing space, the comparison and retrieval time, and the effect of sensor noise. After analyzing the features existing in the edge differences occurring in the runway area by digital image processing techniques, the existing potential hazard will be localized and labeled. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective in runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions.

  4. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace (NAS) however, poor visibility conditions reduce this capacity [1]. Much research has been conducted to examine the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s(+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that is about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: Two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation, and a prototype future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Data showed that the operations in this study were found to be acceptable and safe. Workload when using the pairing procedures and tools was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness (SA) was typically moderate to high. There were some differences based upon the display and automation conditions for the pilots. Future research should consider the refinement of the concepts and tools for pilot and controller displays and automation for parallel runway concepts.

  5. Review of factors affecting aircraft wet runway performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems associated with aircraft operations on wet runways are discussed and major factors which influence tire/runway braking and cornering traction capability are identified including runway characteristics, tire hydroplaning, brake system anomalies, and pilot inputs. Research results from investigations conducted at the Langley Aircraft Landing Loads and Traction Facility and from tests with instrumented ground vehicles and aircraft are summarized to indicate the effects of different aircraft, tire, and runway parameters. Several promising means are described for improving tire/runway water drainage capability, brake system efficiency, and pilot training to help optimize aircraft traction performance on wet runways.

  6. Requirements for Instrument Approaches to Converging Runways,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    PERSPECTIVE 2-1 2.1 Definition 2-1 2.2 Types of Converging Runways 2-1 2.2.1 Intersecting Approach Streams 2-3 2.2.2 Intersecting Runways 2-3 2.2.3...Therefore, a methodology to define and characterize ’e converging approaches is presented in this chapter. 2.1 Definition If two runways are not parallel...c nter of ARC, the positive X-direction is paralel to IA, and the positive Y-direction is parallel to TC,i C-1 *z / ,i// \\2D 2B0 C-2 FIUE w 4Z a!w wV

  7. Probabilistic computer model of optimal runway turnoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoen, M. L.; Preston, O. W.; Summers, L. G.; Nelson, B. A.; Vanderlinden, L.; Mcreynolds, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Landing delays are currently a problem at major air carrier airports and many forecasters agree that airport congestion will get worse by the end of the century. It is anticipated that some types of delays can be reduced by an efficient optimal runway exist system allowing increased approach volumes necessary at congested airports. A computerized Probabilistic Runway Turnoff Model which locates exits and defines path geometry for a selected maximum occupancy time appropriate for each TERPS aircraft category is defined. The model includes an algorithm for lateral ride comfort limits.

  8. NASA tire/runway friction projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reviews several aspects of NASA Langley Research Center's tire/runway friction evaluations directed towards improving the safety and economy of aircraft ground operations. The facilities and test equipment used in implementing different aircraft tire friction studies and other related aircraft ground performance investigations are described together with recent workshop activities at NASA Wallops Flight Facility. An overview of the pending Joint NASA/Transport Canada/FM Winter Runway Friction Program is given. Other NASA ongoing studies and on-site field tests are discussed including tire wear performance and new surface treatments. The paper concludes with a description of future research plans.

  9. 14 CFR 151.79 - Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... economic factors of air traffic at the location, justify an additional runway for the airport; and (3) The... consideration to the airport noise factor, topography, soil conditions, and other pertinent factors affecting...

  10. 14 CFR 151.79 - Runway paving: Second runway; wind conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... economic factors of air traffic at the location, justify an additional runway for the airport; and (3) The... consideration to the airport noise factor, topography, soil conditions, and other pertinent factors affecting...

  11. Some effects of grooved runway configurations on aircraft tire braking traction under flooded runway conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrdsong, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effect of grooved runway configurations on aircraft tire braking traction on flooded runway surfaces. The investigation was performed, utilizing size 49 x 17, type VII, aircraft tires with an inflation pressure of 170 lb per square inch at ground speeds up to approximately 120 knots. The results of this investigation indicate that when the runway is flooded, grooved surfaces provide better braking traction than an ungrooved surface and, in general, the level of braking traction was found to improve as the tire bearing pressure was increased because of an increase in the groove area of either the surface or the tire tread. Rounding the groove edges tended to degrade the tire braking capability from that developed on the same groove configuration with sharp edges. Results also indicate that braking friction coefficients for the test tires and runway surfaces decreased as ground speed was increased because of the hydroplaning effects.

  12. X-48C Flies Over Intersecting Runways

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-28

    The X-48C Hybrid Wing Body research aircraft flew over the intersection of several runways adjacent to the compass rose on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base during one of the sub-scale aircraft's final test flights on Feb. 28, 2013.

  13. Machine vision for airport runway identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Matthew; Moore, Andrew J.; Dolph, Chester; Woodell, Glenn

    2015-03-01

    For rigid objects and fixed scenes, current machine vision technology is capable of identifying imagery rapidly and with specificity over a modest range of camera viewpoints and scene illumination. We applied that capability to the problem of runway identification using video of sixteen runway approaches at nine locations, subject to two simplifying assumptions. First, by using approach video from just one of the several possible seasonal variations (no snow cover and full foliage), we artificially removed one source of scene variation in this study. Secondly, by not using approach video at dawn and dusk, we limited the study to two illumination variants (day and night). We did allow scene variation due to atmospheric turbidity by using approach video from rainy and foggy days in some daytime approaches. With suitable ensemble statistics to account for temporal continuity in video, we observed high location specificity (<90% Bayesian posterior probability). We also tested repeatability, i.e., identification of a given runway across multiple videos, and observed robust repeatability only if illumination (day vs. night) was the same and approach visibility was good. Both specificity and repeatability degraded in poor weather conditions. The results of this simplified study show that geolocation via real-time comparison of cockpit image sensor video to a database of runway approach imagery is feasible, as long as the database contains imagery from about the same time of day (complete daylight and nighttime, excluding dawn and dusk) and the weather is clear at the time of the flight.

  14. Economic utilization of general aviation airport runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piper, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The urban general aviation airport economics is studied in detail. The demand for airport services is discussed, and the different types of users are identified. The direct cost characteristics of the airport are summarized; costs to the airport owner are largely fixed, and, except at certain large airports, weight is not a significant factor in airport costs. The efficient use of an existing airport facility is explored, with the focus on the social cost of runway congestion as traffic density at the airport build up and queues form. The tradeoff between aircraft operating costs and airport costs is analyzed in terms of runway length. The transition from theory to practice is treated, and the policy of charging prices only on aircraft storage and fuel is felt likely to continue. Implications of the study from the standpoint of public policy include pricing that spreads traffic peaks to improve runway utilization, and pricing that discriminates against aircraft requiring long runways and causes owners to adopt V/STOL equipment.

  15. Evaluation of Scheduling Methods for Multiple Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolender, Michael A.; Slater, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Several scheduling strategies are analyzed in order to determine the most efficient means of scheduling aircraft when multiple runways are operational and the airport is operating at different utilization rates. The study compares simulation data for two and three runway scenarios to results from queuing theory for an M/D/n queue. The direction taken, however, is not to do a steady-state, or equilibrium, analysis since this is not the case during a rush period at a typical airport. Instead, a transient analysis of the delay per aircraft is performed. It is shown that the scheduling strategy that reduces the delay depends upon the density of the arrival traffic. For light traffic, scheduling aircraft to their preferred runways is sufficient; however, as the arrival rate increases, it becomes more important to separate traffic by weight class. Significant delay reduction is realized when aircraft that belong to the heavy and small weight classes are sent to separate runways with large aircraft put into the 'best' landing slot.

  16. Perseus B Landing on Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Perseus B high-altitude, remotely piloted research vehicle touches down on the runway at Edwards AFB, adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, after a test flight in September 1999. The Perseus B was the third version of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under the Dryden-managed Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third

  17. Perseus B Landing on Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Perseus B high-altitude, remotely piloted research vehicle touches down on the runway at Edwards AFB, adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, after a test flight in September 1999. The Perseus B was the third version of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under the Dryden-managed Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third

  18. Runway Operations Planning: A Two-Stage Solution Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostakis, Ioannis; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    The airport runway is a scarce resource that must be shared by different runway operations (arrivals, departures and runway crossings). Given the possible sequences of runway events, careful Runway Operations Planning (ROP) is required if runway utilization is to be maximized. Thus, Runway Operations Planning (ROP) is a critical component of airport operations planning in general and surface operations planning in particular. From the perspective of departures, ROP solutions are aircraft departure schedules developed by optimally allocating runway time for departures given the time required for arrivals and crossings. In addition to the obvious objective of maximizing throughput, other objectives, such as guaranteeing fairness and minimizing environmental impact, may be incorporated into the ROP solution subject to constraints introduced by Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. Generating optimal runway operations plans was approached in with a 'one-stage' optimization routine that considered all the desired objectives and constraints, and the characteristics of each aircraft (weight class, destination, Air Traffic Control (ATC) constraints) at the same time. Since, however, at any given point in time, there is less uncertainty in the predicted demand for departure resources in terms of weight class than in terms of specific aircraft, the ROP problem can be parsed into two stages. In the context of the Departure Planner (OP) research project, this paper introduces Runway Operations Planning (ROP) as part of the wider Surface Operations Optimization (SOO) and describes a proposed 'two stage' heuristic algorithm for solving the Runway Operations Planning (ROP) problem. Focus is specifically given on including runway crossings in the planning process of runway operations. In the first stage, sequences of departure class slots and runwy crossings slots are generated and ranked based on departure runway throughput under stochastic conditions. In the second stage, the

  19. Optimum runway orientation relative to crosswinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.; Brown, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Specific magnitudes of crosswinds may exist that could be constraints to the success of an aircraft mission such as the landing of the proposed space shuttle. A method is required to determine the orientation or azimuth of the proposed runway which will minimize the probability of certain critical crosswinds. Two procedures for obtaining the optimum runway orientation relative to minimizing a specified crosswind speed are described and illustrated with examples. The empirical procedure requires only hand calculations on an ordinary wind rose. The theoretical method utilizes wind statistics computed after the bivariate normal elliptical distribution is applied to a data sample of component winds. This method requires only the assumption that the wind components are bivariate normally distributed. This assumption seems to be reasonable. Studies are currently in progress for testing wind components for bivariate normality for various stations. The close agreement between the theoretical and empirical results for the example chosen substantiates the bivariate normal assumption.

  20. Formal Verification of the Runway Safety Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siminiceanu, Radu; Ciardo, Gianfranco

    2006-01-01

    The Runway Safety Monitor (RSM) designed by Lockheed Martin is part of NASA's effort to reduce runway accidents. We developed a Petri net model of the RSM protocol and used the model checking functions of our tool SMART to investigate a number of safety properties in RSM. To mitigate the impact of state-space explosion, we built a highly discretized model of the system, obtained by partitioning the monitored runway zone into a grid of smaller volumes and by considering scenarios involving only two aircraft. The model also assumes that there are no communication failures, such as bad input from radar or lack of incoming data, thus it relies on a consistent view of reality by all participants. In spite of these simplifications, we were able to expose potential problems in the RSM conceptual design. Our findings were forwarded to the design engineers, who undertook corrective action. Additionally, the results stress the efficiency attained by the new model checking algorithms implemented in SMART, and demonstrate their applicability to real-world systems.

  1. Runway Operations Planning: A Two-Stage Heuristic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostakis, Ioannis; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    The airport runway is a scarce resource that must be shared by different runway operations (arrivals, departures and runway crossings). Given the possible sequences of runway events, careful Runway Operations Planning (ROP) is required if runway utilization is to be maximized. From the perspective of departures, ROP solutions are aircraft departure schedules developed by optimally allocating runway time for departures given the time required for arrivals and crossings. In addition to the obvious objective of maximizing throughput, other objectives, such as guaranteeing fairness and minimizing environmental impact, can also be incorporated into the ROP solution subject to constraints introduced by Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. This paper introduces a two stage heuristic algorithm for solving the Runway Operations Planning (ROP) problem. In the first stage, sequences of departure class slots and runway crossings slots are generated and ranked based on departure runway throughput under stochastic conditions. In the second stage, the departure class slots are populated with specific flights from the pool of available aircraft, by solving an integer program with a Branch & Bound algorithm implementation. Preliminary results from this implementation of the two-stage algorithm on real-world traffic data are presented.

  2. EXECUTION AND MAINTENANCE OF D-RUNWAY IN HANEDA AIRPORT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Takatoshi; Watabe, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Oku, Nobuyuki; Yamatoya, Ryuji; Watanabe, Masaya

    In the Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), a new runway named "D-runway" was constructed from March 2007 to October 2010. Because some part of the D-runway is located in a river mouth, a hybrid structure consisted of piled pier and reclamation fill was adopted. In the reclamation section, not only the ground improvement technologies (SD, CPD and CDM) but also the new developed construction materials (pneumatic mixing cement treated soil and air-foam treated lightweight soil) were utilized. This technical report describes the outline of the execution, quality control, and maintenance plan of the D-runway structure, from a view point of geotechnical engineering.

  3. DESIGN OF D-RUNWAY IN HANEDA AIRPORT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Takatoshi; Watabe, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sakaiya, Tsunehiro; Kakehashi, Koichiro; Ogura, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Kenta

    In the Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport), a new runway named "D-runway" was planned and constructed from March 2007 to October 2010. Because some part of the D-runway is located in a river mouth, a hybrid structure consisting of piled pier and reclamation fill was adopted. In the reclamation section, not only the ground improvement technologies (SD, CPD and CDM) but also the new developed construction materials (pneumatic mixing cement treated soil and air-foam treated lightweight soil) were utilized. This technical report describes the outline of the project, ground investigation, and design of the D-runway structure, from a geotechnical point of view.

  4. 14 CFR 151.77 - Runway paving: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Runway paving: General rules. 151.77 Section 151.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.77 Runway paving: General...

  5. 14 CFR 151.77 - Runway paving: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Runway paving: General rules. 151.77 Section 151.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.77 Runway paving: General...

  6. 14 CFR 151.77 - Runway paving: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Runway paving: General rules. 151.77 Section 151.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.77 Runway paving: General...

  7. 14 CFR 151.77 - Runway paving: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Runway paving: General rules. 151.77 Section 151.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.77 Runway paving: General...

  8. 14 CFR 151.77 - Runway paving: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Runway paving: General rules. 151.77 Section 151.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project Programming Standards § 151.77 Runway paving: General...

  9. AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING CONCRETE ON RUNWAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING CONCRETE ON RUNWAY KSC-375C-10036.32 108-KSC-375C-10036.32, P-21425, ARCHIVE-04501 Aerial oblique of Shuttle Landing Facility. Pouring concrete on runway. Direction North - Altitude 100'.

  10. 32 CFR 256.6 - Runway classification by aircraft type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Runway classification by aircraft type. 256.6 Section 256.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS AIR INSTALLATIONS COMPATIBLE USE ZONES § 256.6 Runway classification by aircraft...

  11. Iron clad wetlands: Soil iron-sulfur buffering determines coastal wetland response to salt water incursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepfer, Valerie A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Burgin, Amy J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal freshwater wetland chemistry is rapidly changing due to increased frequency of salt water incursion, a consequence of global change. Seasonal salt water incursion introduces sulfate, which microbially reduces to sulfide. Sulfide binds with reduced iron, producing iron sulfide (FeS), recognizable in wetland soils by its characteristic black color. The objective of this study is to document iron and sulfate reduction rates, as well as product formation (acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and chromium reducible sulfide (CRS)) in a coastal freshwater wetland undergoing seasonal salt water incursion. Understanding iron and sulfur cycling, as well as their reduction products, allows us to calculate the degree of sulfidization (DOS), from which we can estimate how long soil iron will buffer against chemical effects of sea level rise. We show that soil chloride, a direct indicator of the degree of incursion, best predicted iron and sulfate reduction rates. Correlations between soil chloride and iron or sulfur reduction rates were strongest in the surface layer (0-3 cm), indicative of surface water incursion, rather than groundwater intrusion at our site. The interaction between soil moisture and extractable chloride was significantly related to increased AVS, whereas increased soil chloride was a stronger predictor of CRS. The current DOS in this coastal plains wetland is very low, resulting from high soil iron content and relatively small degree of salt water incursion. However, with time and continuous salt water exposure, iron will bind with incoming sulfur, creating FeS complexes, and DOS will increase.

  12. Throughput Benefit Assessment for Tactical Runway Configuration Management (TRCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Fenbert, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The System-Oriented Runway Management (SORM) concept is a collection of needed capabilities focused on a more efficient use of runways while considering all of the factors that affect runway use. Tactical Runway Configuration Management (TRCM), one of the SORM capabilities, provides runway configuration and runway usage recommendations, monitoring the active runway configuration for suitability given existing factors, based on a 90 minute planning horizon. This study evaluates the throughput benefits using a representative sample of today's traffic volumes at three airports: Memphis International Airport (MEM), Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), and John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). Based on this initial assessment, there are statistical throughput benefits for both arrivals and departures at MEM with an average of 4% for arrivals, and 6% for departures. For DFW, there is a statistical benefit for arrivals with an average of 3%. Although there is an average of 1% benefit observed for departures, it is not statistically significant. For JFK, there is a 12% benefit for arrivals, but a 2% penalty for departures. The results obtained are for current traffic volumes and should show greater benefit for increased future demand. This paper also proposes some potential TRCM algorithm improvements for future research. A continued research plan is being worked to implement these improvements and to re-assess the throughput benefit for today and future projected traffic volumes.

  13. Evaluation of a tritium runway-lighting system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, E.S.

    1992-04-01

    A tritium powered runway lighting system was installed and evaluated at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine if the tritium runway lighting system would safely support Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 135 commercial operations, during nighttime visual flight rules (VFR) conditions at remote airports. Subject pilots having flight experience levels appropriate for pilots conducting FAR Part 135 air taxi operations were afforded the opportunity of flight testing the system. Results of the evaluation indicate that the tritium runway lighting system does not meet all of the minimum criteria necessary for FAA approval and, therefore, would not guarantee an acceptable level of safety. Tritium Runway Lighting System, Remote Airports.

  14. Review Study on Runway Capacity Parameters and Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrilah; Putra, J. C. P.

    2017-06-01

    The demand of air travel continues to increase over time, due to its short travel time, reliability and safety. Problems then arise when airport capacity, especially airside (mainly runway) capacity cannot cope with the demand. Some airports build the expensive additional infrastructure, while some others believe that manage on system is more efficient and effective. The study gathering information from various source about parameters related to runway capacity so that the improvement made in the future will solve right on target. To accommodate wide number of factors, the study classify the parameters into five categories in which operation/procedure related parameters play an important role (52%). To facilitate future research on runway capacity, the study also tabulates methods used by various scholars to improve runway capacity

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of frost heave effects on a runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenngren, Carl A.

    1998-03-01

    An Airport located inland central Sweden is susceptible to frost heave. The runway is uneven especially at the end of each winter. The Swedish Road and Transportation Institute Laser Profiler was brought to the site in the spring of 1997 in order to study this seasonal effect. Several longitudinal profiles were sampled along the entire length of the runway. The test was then repeated in the fall when the runway had settled. The profiles were then investigated to see if certain criteria were fulfilled, like the International Civil Aviation Organization straightedge guideline. Several different wavelength intervals of unevenness were also examined. It was found that the frost heave affected certain wavelength bands more than others. It was also possible to determine exactly where the most troublesome spots were located and if they would adversely interfere with an expansion of the runway. Data from the profile could also serve as help in preparing guidelines for safety rules related to roughness.

  16. 13. Looking northwest from the 1937 main section runway toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Looking northwest from the 1937 main section runway toward cattle pens (first floor) and the catwalk (second floor) - Ewing Livestock Market, South side of First Avenue North, 500 feet west of Route 724, Ewing, Lee County, VA

  17. Lateral runway approach guidance using Loran-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The design and flight test of a lateral guidance system for flying approaches to a runway by general aviation aircraft are examined. The issue is whether or not good dynamic response can be obtained by exploiting the repeatable accuracy of Loran-C position data and combining it with heading rate data. The pilot needs cross pointer displays so he can keep the aircraft within approx. 75 feet of the runway centerline at approach speeds typical of general aviation aircraft.

  18. Establishment and Discontinuance Criteria for Runway Visual Range (RVR) at Category I Precision Landing System Runway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    System 1W, . . . .7 11-2 Default Runw.a . . ...... 7 III-i Marginal Life. Category I PrEr 12 Tv-i RVR Reporting -. 13 IV-2 Comparison of Values ... 15 ...System at the first two Category I precision instrumented runways at an airport over an economic life-cycle of 15 years. Based on this analysis...is an important variable for most benefits and costs. Benefits and costs are computed for each of 15 years, discounted to present value at the 10

  19. STS-70 Discovery approaches Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery approaches KSC's Runway 33, with the Vehicle Assembly Building in the background, marking a successful conclusion to the STS-70 mission. Discovery landed on orbit 143, during the second opportunity of the day. Main gear touchdown was unofficially listed at 8:02 a.m. EDT on July 22, 1995. The orbiter traveled some 3.7 million statute miles during the nearly nine-day flight, which included a one-day extension because of fog and low visibility conditions at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. STS-70 was the 24th Shuttle landing at KSC and the 70th Space Shuttle mission. The five-member crew deployed the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G (TDRS-G). Crew members were Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks, Pilot Kevin R. Kregel, and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie, Donald A. Thomas and Mary Ellen Weber. STS-70 also was the maiden flight of the new Block 1 orbiter main engine, which flew in the number one position. The other two engines were of the existing Phase II design.

  20. Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles down Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles down Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL- 1) mission. With main gear touchdown at 2:33:11 p.m. EDT, April 8, the STS-83 mission duration was 3 days, 23 hours, 12 minutes. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to a mechanical problem. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  1. Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles down Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With drag chute deployed, the Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles down Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL- 1) mission. With main gear touchdown at 2:33:11 p.m. EDT, April 8, the STS-83 mission duration was 3 days, 23 hours, 12 minutes. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to a mechanical problem. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  2. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  3. Human risk factors associated with pilots in runway excursions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yang, Hui-Hua; Hsiao, Yu-Jung

    2016-09-01

    A breakdown analysis of civil aviation accidents worldwide indicates that the occurrence of runway excursions represents the largest portion among all aviation occurrence categories. This study examines the human risk factors associated with pilots in runway excursions, by applying a SHELLO model to categorize the human risk factors and to evaluate the importance based on the opinions of 145 airline pilots. This study integrates aviation management level expert opinions on relative weighting and improvement-achievability in order to develop four kinds of priority risk management strategies for airline pilots to reduce runway excursions. The empirical study based on experts' evaluation suggests that the most important dimension is the liveware/pilot's core ability. From the perspective of front-line pilots, the most important risk factors are the environment, wet/containment runways, and weather issues like rain/thunderstorms. Finally, this study develops practical strategies for helping management authorities to improve major operational and managerial weaknesses so as to reduce the human risks related to runway excursions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Smoke incursions into urban areas: simulation of a Georgia prescribed burn

    Treesearch

    Y. Liu; S. Goodrick; G. Achtemeier

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates smoke incursion into urban areas by examining a prescribed burn in central Georgia,USA, on 28 February 2007. Simulations were conducted with a regional modeling framework to understand transport, dispersion,and structure of smoke plumes, the air quality effects, sensitivity to emissions,...

  5. Effect of different runway sizes on pilot performance during simulated night landing approaches.

    PubMed

    Mertens, H W; Lewis, M F

    1982-05-01

    Both anecdotal reports from pilots and theories of visual cues would predict lower approaches to narrow or long runways than to wide and short runways. Similar, practice approaches made by pilots to a particular width of runway should lead to an increase in subsequent approach angles flown to wider runways and a decrease in approach angles flown to narrower runways. Two experiments with instrument-rated pilots made quantitative tests and these predictions. In Experiment I, three pilots flew simulated approaches and landings in a fixed-base simulator with a computer-generated image visual display. Practice approaches were flown with an 8,000-ft long runway that was either 75, 150, or 300 ft wide; test approaches were to runways with widths or 75, 100, 150, 200, and 300 ft. In Experiment II, 40 pilots controlled the slant of a moving model runway during simulated night visual approaches. Five different models simulated runways from 100 to 300 ft wide and 3,000 to 9,000 ft long. As predicted, training on a wide runway in Experiment I lowered approach angle in approaches to narrower runways; a narrow practice runway also raised approach angles to wider runways. The magnitude of these practice effects increased as distance from runway threshold decreased. There was also a general tendency for approach angles to decrease as runway width decreased. The latter effect was corroborated in Experiment II; in addition, generated approach angles decreased with increasing runway length. Giving half the pilots information about runway size prior to each approach had no effect on responses. These findings add to the quantitative evidence of danger in night visual approaches due to visual illusions and large variability in the visual perception of approach angle.

  6. Aircraft and Ground Vehicle Winter Runway Friction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of a 5-year, Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program between the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), Transport Canada (TC), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The primary objective of this effort is to perform instrumented aircraft and ground vehicle tests aimed at identifying a common number that all the different ground vehicle devices would report. This number, denoted the International Runway Friction Index (IRFI), will be related to all types of aircraft stopping performance. The range of test equipment, the test sites, test results and accomplishments, the extent of the substantial friction database compiled, and future test plans will be described. Several related studies have also been implemented including the effects of contaminant type on aircraft impingement drag, and the effectiveness of various runway and aircraft de-icing chemical types, and application rates.

  7. A Runway Surface Monitor using Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiano, Amedeo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of runway surfaces, for the detection of ice formation or presence of water, is an important issue for reducing maintenance costs and improving traffic safety. An innovative sensor was developed to detect the presence of ice or water on its surface, and its repeatability, stability and reliability were assessed in different simulations and experiments, performed both in laboratory and in the field. Three sensors were embedded in the runway of the Turin-Caselle airport, in the north-west of Italy, to check the state of its surface. Each sensor was connected to a GPRS modem to send the collected data to a common database. The entire system was installed about three years ago, and up to now it shows correct work and automatic reactivation after malfunctions without any external help. The state of the runway surface is virtual represented in an internet website, using the Internet of Things features and opening new scenarios.

  8. Marking and Lighting of Unpaved Runways - Inservice Testing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    I Cessna 150 3 Cessna 172 2 Piper PA28 2 Homebuilt 2 Twin engine, fixed gear: Islander 1 Question 8. Is your aircraft based at this field? Responses A...Runwav Aignmen *Go-Aroirnd Markers (Yellow and a If aircraft is no firmly on runway at this point I (1/3 of runway),. Right Hand Pattern pilot should...territory, with obstacles, it’s really great to have a visual indication for a safe glide. 2. Do not feel POMOLA is necessary with small aircraft

  9. Aluminum runway surface as possible aid to aircraft braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. D.; Pinkel, I. I.

    1973-01-01

    Several concepts are described for use singly or in combination to improve aircraft braking. All involve a thin layer of aluminum covering all or part of the runway. Advantage would derive from faster heat conduction from the tire-runway interface. Heating of tread surface with consequent softening and loss of friction coefficient should be reduced. Equations are developed indicating that at least 99 percent of friction heat should flow into the aluminum. Preliminary test results indicate a coefficient of sliding friction of 1.4, with predictably slight heating of tread. Elimination of conventional brakes is at least a remote possibility.

  10. Runway width effects in the visual approach to landing.

    PubMed

    Galanis, G; Jennings, A; Beckett, P

    2001-01-01

    The effect of changes in runway width on the perception of glide-slope has been the subject of extensive investigations. Despite considerable research, an explanation of this effect has been elusive. A mathematical model for glide-slope perception was published recently based on the premise that a desirable goal of perception is to form a perception with minimal uncertainty. One of the qualitative predictions of that model was that changes in the aspect ratio of the runway would affect the perceived glide-slope. In this article, the predictions of the model are quantified and are shown to be in close agreement with experimental results in the literature.

  11. Changes in the Albedo of the Pegasus and Phoenix Runways, 2000-2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-18

    of the snow and ice layers that composed the runway, lead- ing to extended shutdowns. In addition, during short warming trends that caused temporary...was slightly colder and stronger. Longer warming trends led to the presence of liquid water on the runway surface, which significantly lowered the...fraction of pixel n that overlaps the runway; and p = the subset of pixels for each individual runway that are cloud - free, high-quality data. Data

  12. Shuttle Challenger landing on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-05-06

    Shuttle Challenger lands on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission. The photo is a rear view of the shuttle landing gear touching the runway, with clouds of dirt trailing behind it. The nose gear is still in the air (071); Side view of the Challenger landing gear touching the runway (072).

  13. Shuttle Challenger landing on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Shuttle Challenger lands on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission. The photo is a rear view of the shuttle landing gear touching the runway, with clouds of dirt trailing behind it. The nose gear is still in the air (071); Side view of the Challenger landing gear touching the runway (072).

  14. Measures to increase airfield capacity by changing aircraft runway occupancy characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, G. D.; Kanafani, A.; Rockaday, S. L. M.

    1981-01-01

    Airfield capacity and aircraft runway occupancy characteristics were studied. Factors that caused runway congestion and airfield crowding were identified. Several innovations designed to alleviate the congestion are discussed. Integrated landing management, the concept that the operation of the final approach and runway should be considered in concert, was identified as underlying all of the innovations.

  15. 76 FR 67018 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Airport In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather... of In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems. SUMMARY: Projects funded under the... Active or Passive In- Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems that meet the requirements...

  16. Runway drainage characteristics related to tire friction performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The capability of a runway pavement to rapidly drain water buildup during periods of precipitation is crucial to minimize tire hydroplaning potential and maintain adequate aircraft ground operational safety. Test results from instrumented aircraft, ground friction measuring vehicles, and NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) track have been summarized to indicate the adverse effects of pavement wetness conditions on tire friction performance. Water drainage measurements under a range of rainfall rates have been evaluated for several different runway surface treatments including the transversely grooved and longitudinally grinded concrete surfaces at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) runway at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The major parameters influencing drainage rates and extent of flooding/drying conditions are identified. Existing drainage test data are compared to a previously derived empirical relationship and the need for some modification is indicated. The scope of future NASA Langley research directed toward improving empirical relationships to properly define runway drainage capability and consequently, enhance aircraft ground operational safety, is given.

  17. Parallel runway requirement analysis study. Volume 2: Simulation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Yaghoob S.; Chun, Ken S.

    1993-01-01

    This document is a user manual for operating the PLAND_BLUNDER (PLB) simulation program. This simulation is based on two aircraft approaching parallel runways independently and using parallel Instrument Landing System (ILS) equipment during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). If an aircraft should deviate from its assigned localizer course toward the opposite runway, this constitutes a blunder which could endanger the aircraft on the adjacent path. The worst case scenario would be if the blundering aircraft were unable to recover and continue toward the adjacent runway. PLAND_BLUNDER is a Monte Carlo-type simulation which employs the events and aircraft positioning during such a blunder situation. The model simulates two aircraft performing parallel ILS approaches using Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) or visual procedures. PLB uses a simple movement model and control law in three dimensions (X, Y, Z). The parameters of the simulation inputs and outputs are defined in this document along with a sample of the statistical analysis. This document is the second volume of a two volume set. Volume 1 is a description of the application of the PLB to the analysis of close parallel runway operations.

  18. General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the aft and starboard side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the port side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  20. General view of the Orbiter Discovery on runway 33 at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Orbiter Discovery on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center shortly after landing. The orbiter is processed and prepared for being towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility for continued post flight processing and pre flight preparations for its next mission. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  1. General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center looking at the ground support equipment and the aft and port side of the Orbiter Discovery as the orbiter is undergoing post flight processing and preparations to be towed to the Orbiter Processing Facility. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. Airport runway detection in satellite images by Adaboost learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongur, Ugur; Halici, Ugur; Aytekin, Orsan; Ulusoy, Ilkay

    2009-09-01

    Advances in hardware and pattern recognition techniques, along with the widespread utilization of remote sensing satellites, have urged the development of automatic target detection systems in satellite images. Automatic detection of airports is particularly essential, due to the strategic importance of these targets. In this paper, a runway detection method using a segmentation process based on textural properties is proposed for the detection of airport runways, which is the most distinguishing element of an airport. Several local textural features are extracted including not only low level features such as mean, standard deviation of image intensity and gradient, but also Zernike Moments, Circular-Mellin Features, Haralick Features, as well as features involving Gabor Filters, Wavelets and Fourier Power Spectrum Analysis. Since the subset of the mentioned features, which have a role in the discrimination of airport runways from other structures and landforms, cannot be predicted trivially, Adaboost learning algorithm is employed for both classification and determining the feature subset, due to its feature selector nature. By means of the features chosen in this way, a coarse representation of possible runway locations is obtained. Promising experimental results are achieved and given.

  3. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-30

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  4. System-Oriented Runway Management Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Atkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This document describes a concept for runway management that maximizes the overall efficiency of arrival and departure operations at an airport or group of airports. Specifically, by planning airport runway configurations/usage, it focuses on the efficiency with which arrival flights reach their parking gates from their arrival fixes and departure flights exit the terminal airspace from their parking gates. In the future, the concept could be expanded to include the management of other limited airport resources. While most easily described in the context of a single airport, the concept applies equally well to a group of airports that comprise a metroplex (i.e., airports in close proximity that share resources such that operations at the airports are at least partially dependent) by including the coordination of runway usage decisions between the airports. In fact, the potential benefit of the concept is expected to be larger in future metroplex environments due to the increasing need to coordinate the operations at proximate airports to more efficiently share limited airspace resources. This concept, called System-Oriented Runway Management (SORM), is further broken down into a set of airport traffic management functions that share the principle that operational performance must be measured over the complete surface and airborne trajectories of the airport's arrivals and departures. The "system-oriented" term derives from the belief that the traffic management objective must consider the efficiency of operations over a wide range of aircraft movements and National Airspace System (NAS) dynamics. The SORM concept is comprised of three primary elements: strategic airport capacity planning, airport configuration management, and combined arrival/departure runway planning. Some aspects of the SORM concept, such as using airport configuration management1 as a mechanism for improving aircraft efficiency, are novel. Other elements (e.g., runway scheduling, which is a part

  5. Drought-induced saltwater incursion leads to increased wetland nitrogen export.

    PubMed

    Ardón, Marcelo; Morse, Jennifer L; Colman, Benjamin P; Bernhardt, Emily S

    2013-10-01

    Coastal wetlands have the capacity to retain and denitrify large quantities of reactive nitrogen (N), making them important in attenuating increased anthropogenic N flux to coastal ecosystems. The ability of coastal wetlands to retain and transform N is being reduced by wetland losses resulting from land development. Nitrogen retention in coastal wetlands is further threatened by the increasing frequency and spatial extent of saltwater inundation in historically freshwater ecosystems, due to the combined effects of dredging, declining river discharge to coastal areas due to human water use, increased drought frequency, and accelerating sea-level rise. Because saltwater incursion may affect N cycling through multiple mechanisms, the impacts of salinization on coastal freshwater wetland N retention and transformation are not well understood. Here, we show that repeated annual saltwater incursion during late summer droughts in the coastal plain of North Carolina changed N export from organic to inorganic forms and led to a doubling of annual NH(4)(+) export from a 440 hectare former agricultural field undergoing wetland restoration. Soil solution NH(4)(+) concentrations in two mature wetlands also increased with salinization, but the magnitude of increase was smaller than that in the former agricultural field. Long-term saltwater exposure experiments with intact soil columns demonstrated that much of the increase in reactive N released could be explained by exchange of salt cations with sediment NH(4)(+). Using these findings together with the predicted flooding of 1661 km(2) of wetlands along the NC coast by 2100, we estimate that saltwater incursion into these coastal areas could release up to 18 077 Mg N, or approximately half the annual NH(4)(+) flux of the Mississippi River. Our results suggest that saltwater incursion into coastal freshwater wetlands globally could lead to increased N loading to sensitive coastal waters.

  6. Circulation regimes associated with incursions of Bluetongue disease to the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Laura; Ekstrom, Marie

    2010-05-01

    Bluetongue, an economically important insect-borne animal disease, can be spread over long distances by carriage of its biting midge vectors on the wind. The weather conditions which influence the midge's flight and subsequent transport are controlled by synoptic scale atmospheric circulations. Results from an atmospheric dispersion model, NAME, were used in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis to determine the main synoptic situations present during times of midge incursions into the UK from the main European continent. The PCA was conducted on high-pass filtered mean sea level pressure data for a domain centred over north-west Europe from 2005 to 2007. A clustering algorithm applied to the PCA scores indicated the data should be divided into 5 classes for which averages were calculated, providing a classification of the main circulation regimes present. Midge incursion events into the UK were found to mainly occur in two categories; 64.8% were associated with a pattern displaying a pressure gradient over the North Atlantic leading to moderate south-westerly flow over the UK and 17.9% of the events occurred when high pressure dominated the region leading to south-easterly or easterly winds in the area at risk. The winds indicated by the pressure maps generally compared well against observations from a surface station and analysis charts. This technique could be used to assess the frequency and timings of disease incursions in the future on seasonal or decadal timescales, currently not possible with dispersion modelling methods.

  7. Review of incursive, hyperincursive and anticipatory systems-foundation of anticipation in electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2000-05-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to show that anticipation is not only a property of biosystems but is also a fundamental property of physical systems. In electromagnetism, the anticipation is related to the Lorentz transform. In this framework the anticipation is a strong anticipation because it is not based on a prediction from a model of the physical system but is embedded in the fundamental system. So, Robert Rosen's anticipatory systems deal with weak anticipation. Contrary to Robert Rosen's affirmation, anticipation is thus not a characteristic of living systems. Finality is implicitly embedded in any system and thus the final cause of Aristotle is implicitly embedded in any physical and biological systems, contrary to what Robert Rosen argued. This paper will review some incursive and hyperincursive systems giving rise to strong anticipation. Space-time incursive parabolic systems show non-local properties. Hyperincursive crisp systems are related to catastrophe theory. Finally it will be shown that incursive and hyperincursive anticipatory systems could model properties of biosystems like free will, game strategy, theorem creation, etc. Anticipation is not only related to predictions but to decisions: hyperincursive systems create multiple choices and a decision process selects one choice. So, anticipation is not a final goal, like in cybernetics and system science, but is a fundamental property of physical and biological systems.

  8. NASA Research For Instrument Approaches To Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Dawn M.; Perry, R. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Within the NASA Aviation Systems Capacity Program, the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Project is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological condition (IMC). The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) research within TAP has focused on an airborne centered approach for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways using Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technologies. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), working in partnership with Honeywell, Inc., completed in AILS simulation study, flight test, and demonstration in 1999 examining normal approaches and potential collision scenarios to runways with separation distances of 3,400 and 2,500 feet. The results of the flight test and demonstration validate the simulation study.

  9. The noise impact of proposed runway alternatives at Craig Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1982-01-01

    Four proposed runway expansion alternatives at Craig Airport in Jacksonville, Florida have been assessed with respect to their forecasted noise impact in the year 2005. The assessment accounts for population distributions around the airport and human subjective response to noise, as well as the distribution of noise levels in the surrounding community (footprints). The impact analysis was performed using the Airport-noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO), an airport community response model recently developd at Langley Research Center.

  10. Runway Detection From Map, Video and Aircraft Navigational Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    FROM MAP, VIDEO AND AIRCRAFT NAVIGATIONAL DATA by Jose R. Espinosa Gloria March 2016 Thesis Advisor: Roberto Cristi Co-Advisor: Oleg...COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RUNWAY DETECTION FROM MAP, VIDEO AND AIRCRAFT NAVIGATIONAL DATA 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR...Mexican Navy, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have been equipped with daylight and infrared cameras. Processing the video information obtained from these

  11. Benefits Assessment for Tactical Runway Configuration Management Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa; Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Lohr, Gary; Fenbert, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The Tactical Runway Configuration Management (TRCM) software tool was developed to provide air traffic flow managers and supervisors with recommendations for airport configuration changes and runway usage. The objective for this study is to conduct a benefits assessment at Memphis (MEM), Dallas Fort-Worth (DFW) and New York's John F. Kennedy (JFK) airports using the TRCM tool. Results from simulations using the TRCM-generated runway configuration schedule are compared with results using historical schedules. For the 12 days of data used in this analysis, the transit time (arrival fix to spot on airport movement area for arrivals, or spot to departure fix for departures) for MEM departures is greater (7%) than for arrivals (3%); for JFK, there is a benefit for arrivals (9%) but not for departures (-2%); for DFW, arrivals show a slight benefit (1%), but this is offset by departures (-2%). Departure queue length benefits show fewer aircraft in queue for JFK (29%) and MEM (11%), but not for DFW (-13%). Fuel savings for surface operations at MEM are seen for both arrivals and departures. At JFK there are fuel savings for arrivals, but these are offset by increased fuel use for departures. In this study, no surface fuel benefits resulted for DFW. Results suggest that the TRCM algorithm requires modifications for complex surface traffic operations that can cause taxi delays. For all three airports, the average number of changes in flow direction (runway configuration) recommended by TRCM was many times greater than the historical data; TRCM would need to be adapted to a particular airport's needs, to limit the number of changes to acceptable levels. The results from this analysis indicate the TRCM tool can provide benefits at some high-capacity airports. The magnitude of these benefits depends on many airport-specific factors and would require adaptation of the TRCM tool; a detailed assessment is needed prior to determining suitability for a particular airport.

  12. Runway Exit Designs for Capacity Improvement Demonstrations. Phase 1: Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trani, A. A.; Hobeika, A. G.; Sherali, H.; Kim, B. J.; Sadam, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to locate and design rapid runway exits under realistic airport conditions. The study developed a PC-based computer simulation-optimization program called REDIM (runway exit design interactive model) to help future airport designers and planners to locate optimal exits under various airport conditions. The model addresses three sets of problems typically arising during runway exit design evaluations. These are the evaluations of existing runway configurations, addition of new rapid runway turnoffs, and the design of new runway facilities. The model is highly interactive and allows a quick estimation of the expected value of runway occupancy time. Aircraft populations and airport environmental conditions are among the multiple inputs to the model to execute a viable runway location and geometric design solution. The results presented suggest that possible reductions on runway occupancy time (ROT) can be achieved with the use of optimally tailored rapid runway designs for a given aircraft population. Reductions of up to 9 to 6 seconds are possible with the implementation of 30 m/sec variable geometry exits.

  13. Parallel runway requirement analysis study. Volume 1: The analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Yaghoob S.

    1993-01-01

    The correlation of increased flight delays with the level of aviation activity is well recognized. A main contributor to these flight delays has been the capacity of airports. Though new airport and runway construction would significantly increase airport capacity, few programs of this type are currently underway, let alone planned, because of the high cost associated with such endeavors. Therefore, it is necessary to achieve the most efficient and cost effective use of existing fixed airport resources through better planning and control of traffic flows. In fact, during the past few years the FAA has initiated such an airport capacity program designed to provide additional capacity at existing airports. Some of the improvements that that program has generated thus far have been based on new Air Traffic Control procedures, terminal automation, additional Instrument Landing Systems, improved controller display aids, and improved utilization of multiple runways/Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) approach procedures. A useful element to understanding potential operational capacity enhancements at high demand airports has been the development and use of an analysis tool called The PLAND_BLUNDER (PLB) Simulation Model. The objective for building this simulation was to develop a parametric model that could be used for analysis in determining the minimum safety level of parallel runway operations for various parameters representing the airplane, navigation, surveillance, and ATC system performance. This simulation is useful as: a quick and economical evaluation of existing environments that are experiencing IMC delays, an efficient way to study and validate proposed procedure modifications, an aid in evaluating requirements for new airports or new runways in old airports, a simple, parametric investigation of a wide range of issues and approaches, an ability to tradeoff air and ground technology and procedures contributions, and a way of considering probable

  14. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Emily G.; Dhand, Navneet; Dürr, Salome; Ward, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information–together with model outputs–would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia’s preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA) in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10–20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community. More than

  15. A Survey of Dog Owners in Remote Northern Australian Indigenous Communities to Inform Rabies Incursion Planning.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Emily G; Dhand, Navneet; Dürr, Salome; Ward, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Australia is underprepared for a rabies incursion due to a lack of information about how a rabies outbreak would spread within the susceptible canine populations and which control strategies would be best to control it. The aim of this study was to collect information to parameterize a recently developed dog rabies spread model as well as use this information to gauge how the community would accept potential control strategies. Such information-together with model outputs-would be used to inform decision makers on the best control strategies and improve Australia's preparedness against a canine rabies incursion. The parameters this study focussed on were detection time, vaccination rates and dog-culling and dog movement restriction compliance. A cross-sectional survey of 31 dog-owners, using a questionnaire, was undertaken in the five communities of the Northern Peninsular Area (NPA) in northern Australia regarding community dog movements, veterinary visits, reporting systems, perceptions of sick dogs and potential human behaviours during hypothetical rabies outbreaks. It highlighted the significant shortfalls in veterinary care that would need to be vastly improved during an outbreak, who educational programs should be targeted towards and which dog movements should be restricted. The results indicate that men were significantly more likely than women to allow their dogs to roam and to move their dogs. The current low vaccination rate of 12% highlighted the limited veterinary services that would need to be substantially increased to achieve effective rabies control. Participation in mass vaccination was accepted by 100% of the respondents. There was lower acceptance for other possible rabies control strategies with 10-20% of the respondents stating a resistance to both a mass culling program and a ban on dog movements. Consequently, movement bans and mass dog culling would have limited effectiveness as a control strategy in the NPA community. More than half of the

  16. Use of Very Weak Radiation Sources to Determine Aircraft Runway Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Fred J., III; Kibort, Bernard R.

    1965-01-01

    Various methods of providing runway information in the cockpit during the take-off and landing roll have been proposed. The most reliable method has been to use runway distance markers when visible. Flight tests were used to evaluate the feasibility of using weak radio-active sources to trigger a runway distance counter in the cockpit. The results of these tests indicate that a weak radioactive source would provide a reliable signal by which this indicator could be operated.

  17. Benefit Assessment for Metroplex Tactical Runway Configuration Management (mTRCM) in a Simulated Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Robbins, Steven W.; Fenbert, James W.; Hartman, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    The System-Oriented Runway Management (SORM) concept is a collection of capabilities focused on a more efficient use of runways while considering all of the factors that affect runway use. Tactical Runway Configuration Management (TRCM), one of the SORM capabilities, provides runway configuration and runway usage recommendations, and monitoring the active runway configuration for suitability given existing factors. This report focuses on the metroplex environment, with two or more proximate airports having arrival and departure operations that are highly interdependent. The myriad of factors that affect metroplex opeations require consideration in arriving at runway configurations that collectively best serve the system as a whole. To assess the metroplex TRCM (mTRCM) benefit, the performance metrics must be compared with the actual historical operations. The historical configuration schedules can be viewed as the schedules produced by subject matter experts (SMEs), and therefore are referred to as the SMEs' schedules. These schedules were obtained from the FAA's Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) database; this is the most representative information regarding runway configuration selection by SMEs. This report focused on a benefit assessment of total delay, transit time, and throughput efficiency (TE) benefits using the mTRCM algorithm at representative volumes for today's traffic at the New York metroplex (N90).

  18. On the Dynamics of an Incursion Describing the Interactions between Functionally Differentiated Subsystems of a Discrete-time Anticipatory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Mark E.

    2010-11-01

    Dubois coined the term incursion, for an inclusive or implicit recursion, to describe a discrete-time anticipatory system which computes its future states by reference to its future states as well as its current and past states. In this paper, we look at a model which has been proposed in the context of a social system which has functionally differentiated subsystems. The model is derived from a discrete-time compartmental SIS epidemic model. We analyse a low order instance of the model both in its form as a recursion with no anticipatory capacity, and also as an incursion with associated anticipatory capacity. The properties of the incursion are compared and contrasted with those of the underlying recursion.

  19. Factors that determine depth perception of trapezoids, windsurfers, runways

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chia-Huei; Gobell, Joetta L.; Sperling, George

    2015-01-01

    We report here a windsurfer1 illusion, a naturally occurring trapezoidal illusion in which the small end of the sail viewed at a distance appears to be pointed away from the observer even when it is closer. This naturally occurring illusion is so compelling that observers are unaware of their gross perceptual misinterpretation of the scene. Four laboratory experiment of this kind of trapezoidal illusion investigated the joint effects of retinal orientation, head position, relative motion, and the relative direction of gravity on automatic depth perception. Observers viewed two adjacent white trapezoids outlined on a black background rotating back and forth ± 20° on a vertical axis much like the sails of two adjacent windsurfers. Observers reported which side of the trapezoids (long or short) appeared to be closer to them (i.e., in front). The longer edge of the trapezoid was reported in front 76 ± 2% of trials (“windsurfer effect”) whether it was on the left or on the right. When the display was rotated 90°to produce a runway configuration, there was a striking asymmetry: the long edge was perceived to be in front 97% when it was on the bottom but only 43% when it was on top (“runway effect”). The runway effect persisted when the head was tilted 90° or when displays on the ceiling were viewed from the floor. Ninety-five percent of the variance of the variance in the strikingly different 3D perceptions produced by the same 2D trapezoid image was quantitatively explained by a model that assumes there are just three additive bias factors that account for perceiving an edge as closer: Implicit linear perspective, lower position on the retina (based on an automatic assumption of viewing from above), and being lower in world coordinates. PMID:26029073

  20. The Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program: NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of the 5-year, Joint National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)/Transport Canada (TC)/Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program. The range of the test equipment, the selected test sites and a tentative test program schedule are described. NASA considers the success of this program critical in terms of insuring adequate ground handling performance capability in adverse weather conditions for future aircraft being designed and developed as well as improving the safety of current aircraft ground operations.

  1. Space shuttle Discovery STS-120 touches down on Runway 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-07

    The drag chute deployed behind space shuttle Discovery helps slow its smooth landing on Runway 33 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, completing the 15-day mission STS-120. Main gear touchdown was 1:01:16 p.m. Wheel stop was at 1:02:07 p.m. Mission elapsed time was 15 days, 2 hours, 24 minutes and 2 seconds. The STS-120 crew continued the construction of the station with the installation of the Harmony Node 2 module and the relocation of the P6 truss.

  2. 32 CFR 256.6 - Runway classification by aircraft type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Class B runways A-1, A-3, A-4, A-5, A-6, F-106, F-5, F-15, F-18, S-3, C-121, EC-121, WC-121, C-123, C..., F-14, F-4, F-8, F-111, T-2, T-38, B-52, B-57, B-57F, C-124, EC-130E, HC-130, C-135, VC-137, YF-12, SR-71, F-100, F-101, F-102, B-66, C-9, C-54, C-97, C-118, C-141, KC-135, EC-135, RC-135, U-2,...

  3. Tests of highly loaded skids on a concrete runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M.; Daugherty, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Skids have been used at various times for aircraft landing gear ever since the Wright Flyer appeared in the early 1900's. Typically, skids have been employed as aircraft landing gear either at low speeds or at low bearing pressures. Tests were conducted to examine the friction and wear characteristics of various metals sliding on a rough, grooved concrete runway. The metals represented potential materials for an overload protection skid for the Space Shuttle orbiter. Data from tests of six skid specimens conducted at higher speeds and bearing pressures than those of previous tests in the open literature are presented. Skids constructed of tungsten with embedded carbide chips exhibited the lowest wear, whereas a skid constructed of Inconel 718 exhibited high wear rates. Friction coefficients for all the skid specimens were moderate and would provide adequate stopping performance on a long runway. Because of its low wear rate, a skid constructed of tungsten with embedded carbide chips is considered to be a likely candidate for an aircraft skid or overload protection skid.

  4. A multi-proxy approach to identifying short-lived marine incursions in the Early Carboniferous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Carys; Davies, Sarah; Leng, Melanie; Snelling, Andrea; Millward, David; Kearsey, Timothy; Marshall, John; Reves, Emma

    2015-04-01

    This study is a contribution to the TW:eed Project (Tetrapod World: early evolution and diversification), which examines the rebuilding of Carboniferous ecosystems following a mass extinction at the end of the Devonian. The project focuses on the Tournaisian Ballagan Formation of Scotland and the Borders, which contains rare fish and tetrapod material. The Ballagan Formation is characterised by sandstones, dolomitic cementstones, paleosols, siltstones and gypsum deposits. The depositional environment ranges from fluvial, alluvial-plain to marginal-marine environments, with fluvial, floodplain and lacustrine deposition dominant. A multi-proxy approach combining sedimentology, palaeontology, micropalaeontology, palynology and geochemistry is used to identify short-lived marine transgressions onto the floodplain environment. Rare marginal marine fossils are: Chondrites-Phycosiphon, Spirorbis, Serpula, certain ostracod species, rare orthocones, brachiopods and putative marine sharks. More common non-marine fauna include Leiocopida and Podocopida ostracods, Mytilida and Myalinida bivalves, plants, eurypterids, gastropods and fish. Thin carbonate-bearing dolomitic cementstones and siltstone contain are the sedimentary deposits of marine incursions and occur throughout the formation. Over 600 bulk carbon isotope samples were taken from the 500 metre thick Norham Core (located near Berwick-Upon-Tweed), encompassing a time interval of around 13 million years. The results range from -26o to -19 δ13Corg, with an average of -19o much lighter than the average value for Early Carboniferous marine bulk organic matter (δ13C of -28 to -30). The isotope results correspond to broad-scale changes in the depositional setting, with more positive δ13C in pedogenic sediments and more negative δ13C in un-altered grey siltstones. They may also relate to cryptic (short-lived) marine incursions. A comparison of δ13C values from specific plant/wood fragments, palynology and bulk

  5. Graphical User Interface Development and Design to Support Airport Runway Configuration Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Debra G.; Lenox, Michelle; Onal, Emrah; Latorella, Kara A.; Lohr, Gary W.; Le Vie, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) System Oriented Runway Management (SORM) decision support tool to support runway management. This tool is expected to be used by traffic flow managers and supervisors in the Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facilities.

  6. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, lands on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California at 8:29:11 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). OV-102's port side is captured in this profile view as its nose landing gear (NLG) glides above the runway before touch down and wheel stop.

  7. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, lands on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California at 8:29:11 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). OV-102's starboard side is captured in this profile view as its nose landing gear (NLG) glides above the runway before touch down and wheel stop.

  8. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, MLG touches down on concrete runway 04 at EAFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 04 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST). This view captures OV-103's profile (port side) as it glides down the runway.

  9. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, MLG touches down on EAFB concrete runway 04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touchdown is documented at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, on concrete runway 04. Views look forward from the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) to the crew compartment as OV-103 glides down the runway. The landing occurred at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST).

  10. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  11. Technical Note: Outlays on Construction of Airport Runways with Prestressed and Dowelled Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Więckowski, Andrzej; Sznurawa, Alicja

    2015-09-01

    For two variants of runways with abrasive concrete pavements in the prestressed and dowelled technologies, analyses have been presented regarding labour, materials, use of machinery, and financial outlays, together with the necessary technological-organisational analyses and assessment of work execution cycles, by the example of construction of a runway at the Katowice Airport.

  12. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, MLG touches down on EAFB concrete runway 04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touchdown is documented at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, on concrete runway 04. Views look forward from the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) to the crew compartment as OV-103 glides down the runway. The landing occurred at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST).

  13. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, MLG touches down on concrete runway 04 at EAFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 04 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST). This view captures OV-103's profile (port side) as it glides down the runway.

  14. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, lands on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California at 8:29:11 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). OV-102's starboard side is captured in this profile view as its nose landing gear (NLG) glides above the runway before touch down and wheel stop.

  15. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  16. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, lands on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California at 8:29:11 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). OV-102's port side is captured in this profile view as its nose landing gear (NLG) glides above the runway before touch down and wheel stop.

  17. Shuttle landing runway modification to improve tire spin-up wear performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of tire spin-up wear tests on a simulated Kennedy Space Center (KSC) runway that were carried out to investigate the tire wear problem for Space Shuttle landings on the KSC runway and to test several modifications of the runway surface designed to alleviate the problem. It was found that the runway surface produced by a concrete smoothing machine using cutters spaced one and three-quarters blades per centimeter provided adequate wet cornering while limiting spin-up wear. Based on the test results, the KSC runway was smoothed for about 1066 m at each end, leaving the original high friction surface, for better wet steering and braking, in the 2438-m central section.

  18. Comparison of Procedures for Dual and Triple Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita; Ballinger, Deborah; Subramanian Shobana; Kozon, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop high fidelity flight simulation experiment was conducted, which investigated and compared breakout procedures for Very Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (VCSPA) with two and three runways. To understand the feasibility, usability and human factors of two and three runway VCSPA, data were collected and analyzed on the dependent variables of breakout cross track error and pilot workload. Independent variables included number of runways, cause of breakout and location of breakout. Results indicated larger cross track error and higher workload using three runways as compared to 2-runway operations. Significant interaction effects involving breakout cause and breakout location were also observed. Across all conditions, cross track error values showed high levels of breakout trajectory accuracy and pilot workload remained manageable. Results suggest possible avenues of future adaptation for adopting these procedures (e.g., pilot training), while also showing potential promise of the concept.

  19. Miocene marine incursions and marine/freshwater transitions: Evidence from Neotropical fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Nathan R.; Albert, James S.; Crampton, William G. R.

    2006-03-01

    Amazonian rivers contain a remarkable fauna of endemic species derived from taxa that generally occur in oceans and seas. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of marine-derived lineages, including opportunistic invasions via estuaries, vicariance related to uplift of the Andes, and vicariance related to Miocene marine incursions and connections. Here, we examine available data for marine-derived lineages of four groups: stingrays (Myliobatiformes), drums (Sciaenidae), anchovies (Engraulididae), and needlefish (Belonidae). Geographic distributions, age estimates (determined using fossils, biogeography, and molecular data sets), and phylogenies for these taxa are most compatible with origination during the Miocene from marine sister groups distributed along the northern coast of South America. We speculate that unique ecological and biogeographic aspects of the Miocene upper Amazonian wetland system, most notably long-term connections with marine systems, facilitated the evolutionary transition from marine to freshwater habitats.

  20. Exploration of the Theoretical Physical Capacity of the John F. Kennedy International Airport Runway System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzke, Kurt W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2014-01-01

    A design study was completed to explore the theoretical physical capacity (TPC) of the John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK) runway system for a northflow configuration assuming impedance-free (to throughput) air traffic control functionality. Individual runways were modeled using an agent-based, airspace simulation tool, the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), with all runways conducting both departures and arrivals on a first-come first-served (FCFS) scheduling basis. A realistic future flight schedule was expanded to 3.5 times the traffic level of a selected baseline day, September 26, 2006, to provide a steady overdemand state for KJFK runways. Rules constraining departure and arrival operations were defined to reflect physical limits beyond which safe operations could no longer be assumed. Safety buffers to account for all sources of operational variability were not included in the TPC estimate. Visual approaches were assumed for all arrivals to minimize inter-arrival spacing. Parallel runway operations were assumed to be independent based on lateral spacing distances. Resulting time intervals between successive airport operations were primarily constrained by same-runway and then by intersecting-runway spacing requirements. The resulting physical runway capacity approximates a theoretical limit that cannot be exceeded without modifying runway interaction assumptions. Comparison with current KJFK operational limits for a north-flow runway configuration indicates a substantial throughput gap of approximately 48%. This gap may be further analyzed to determine which part may be feasibly bridged through the deployment of advanced systems and procedures, and which part cannot, because it is either impossible or not cost-effective to control. Advanced systems for bridging the throughput gap may be conceptualized and simulated using this same experimental setup to estimate the level of gap closure achieved.

  1. KSC off-runway contingency operation - Mode 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, Arthur; Doerr, Donald

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of a mishap during a space shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) dictates the need for plans to rescue astronauts from areas other than the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). All shuttle landings are unpowered, gliding flight maneuvers, and a deviation from the planned flight profile could result in a shuttle landing or crashing somewhere other than the SLF runway. The geography of the Kennedy Space Center makes helicopter airlifting the only universal means of transportation for the rescue crew. This rescue crew is composed of KSC contractor fire-rescuemen who would ride to the crash scene on USAF HH-3 helicopters. These crews are provided with personal protective suits and training in shallow water, swamp, and dry land rescues. They aid the egress of the crew to a safe area for helicopter pickup and subsequent triage and medevac.

  2. KSC off-runway contingency operation - Mode 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, Arthur; Doerr, Donald

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of a mishap during a space shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) dictates the need for plans to rescue astronauts from areas other than the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). All shuttle landings are unpowered, gliding flight maneuvers, and a deviation from the planned flight profile could result in a shuttle landing or crashing somewhere other than the SLF runway. The geography of the Kennedy Space Center makes helicopter airlifting the only universal means of transportation for the rescue crew. This rescue crew is composed of KSC contractor fire-rescuemen who would ride to the crash scene on USAF HH-3 helicopters. These crews are provided with personal protective suits and training in shallow water, swamp, and dry land rescues. They aid the egress of the crew to a safe area for helicopter pickup and subsequent triage and medevac.

  3. Incorporating Active Runway Crossings in Airport Departure Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Jung, Yoon C.

    2010-01-01

    A mixed integer linear program is presented for deterministically scheduling departure and ar rival aircraft at airport runways. This method addresses different schemes of managing the departure queuing area by treating it as first-in-first-out queues or as a simple par king area where any available aircraft can take-off ir respective of its relative sequence with others. In addition, this method explicitly considers separation criteria between successive aircraft and also incorporates an optional prioritization scheme using time windows. Multiple objectives pertaining to throughput and system delay are used independently. Results indicate improvement over a basic first-come-first-serve rule in both system delay and throughput. Minimizing system delay results in small deviations from optimal throughput, whereas minimizing throughput results in large deviations in system delay. Enhancements for computational efficiency are also presented in the form of reformulating certain constraints and defining additional inequalities for better bounds.

  4. Evaluation of high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways, and review of runway slipperiness problems created by rubber contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Griswold, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    A high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar treatment for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways is studied. The results of the evaluation suggest that the treatment is very effective in removing above surface paint and rubber deposits to the point that pavement skid resistance is restored to trafficked but uncontaminated runway surface skid resistance levels. Aircraft operating problems created by runway slipperiness are reviewed along with an assessment of the contributions that pavement surface treatments, surface weathering, traffic polishing, and rubber deposits make in creating or alleviating runway slipperiness. The results suggest that conventional surface treatments for both portland cement and asphaltic concrete runways are extremely vulnerable to rubber deposit accretions which can produce runway slipperiness conditions for aircraft operations as or more slippery than many snow and ice-covered runway conditions. Pavement grooving surface treatments are shown to be the least vulnerable to rubber deposits accretion and traffic polishing of the surface treatments examined.

  5. Wake Encounter Analysis for a Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Paired Approach Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckissick,Burnell T.; Rico-Cusi, Fernando J.; Murdoch, Jennifer; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Stough, Harry P, III; O'Connor, Cornelius J.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous approaches performed by two transport category aircraft from the final approach fix to a pair of closely spaced parallel runways was conducted to explore the aft boundary of the safe zone in which separation assurance and wake avoidance are provided. The simulation included variations in runway centerline separation, initial longitudinal spacing of the aircraft, crosswind speed, and aircraft speed during the approach. The data from the simulation showed that the majority of the wake encounters occurred near or over the runway and the aft boundaries of the safe zones were identified for all simulation conditions.

  6. Construction, Maintenance, and Operation of a Glacial Runway, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Station ""-"- \\ /4 Amundsen - Scott ItS~~ South Pole Station t 01, ",,0 Marble Pt. • "",McMurdo •.•o/j... Scott South Pole Station , Concepts for such runways include "blue-ice"t and Palmer Station on the Antarctic Peninsula runways on glacier ice and runways...February. Numerous LC-130 flights (on wheels) were operated in supplying South Pole station , and a C-130 was operated between Christchurch and

  7. Exotic dust incursions into central Spain: Implications for legislative controls on atmospheric particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Viana, Mar; Gibbons, Wes

    The area of Castilla-La Mancha in central Spain is repeatedly visited by mineral dust incursions from the deserts of NW Africa. Such exotic atmospheric intrusions raise background PM 10 levels, making urban areas much more likely to exceed daily limits of 50 μg m -3 and become subject to fines under European environmental law. Data from a 3-year (2001-2003) study of hourly PM 10 values demonstrate that average background dust levels in remote sites rise from 6-8 μg m -3 when Atlantic-derived W/SW winds are blowing, to 24-7 μg m -3 when African events take place. In four Castilla-La Mancha towns, numbers of exceedence days (ED: when PM 10>50 μg m -3) per year averaged 31 in Guadalajara (suburban site with annual daily PM 10 average ADPM 10=27 μg m -3), 68 in Toledo (ADPM 10=38 μg m -3) and 139 in Albacete (ADPM 10=47 μg m -3; both urban sites), and 151 in Puertollano (industrial urban site with ADPM 10=51 μg m -3). Thirty-four percent of ED occurred during African dust incursions, and current law allows exclusion of such days from annual data (which also reduces the ADPM 10 by 2-4 μg m -3). Rather than simply excluding such days, a more scientifically satisfactory approach would be to allow subtraction of the estimated component of exotic background dust present daily at every urban monitoring station, and thus identify towns subject to high levels of locally derived anthropogenic PM 10. Such an approach reduces ADPM 10 values by the same amount as above (2-4 μg m -3) if only African-derived PM 10 values (as measured at remote background stations) are subtracted, although ΣED shows a relative increase. If, however, an attempt is made to estimate and subtract the total amount of exotic PM 10 (i.e. not just African non-locally derived) at the four sites, this reduces the ADPM 10 by 8-12 μg m -3, and ΣED also drops significantly. Whichever approach is adopted, however, our data confirm that the legally allowable number of ED is far more strict than the

  8. Assessing the Risk of a Canine Rabies Incursion in Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Emily G; Brookes, Victoria J; Ward, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is a globally distributed virus that causes approximately 60,00 human deaths annually with >99% of cases caused by dog bites. Australia is currently canine rabies free. However, the recent eastward spread of rabies in the Indonesian archipelago has increased the probability of rabies entry into northern Australian communities. In addition, many northern Australian communities have large populations of free-roaming dogs, capable of maintaining rabies should an incursion occur. A risk assessment of rabies entry and transmission into these communities is needed to target control and surveillance measures. Illegal transportation of rabies-infected dogs via boat landings is a high-risk entry pathway and was the focus of the current study. A quantitative, stochastic, risk assessment model was developed to evaluate the risk of rabies entry into north-west Cape York Peninsula, Australia, and rabies introduction to resident dogs in one of the communities via transport of rabies-infected dogs on illegal Indonesian fishing boats. Parameter distributions were derived from expert opinion, literature, and analysis of field studies. The estimated median probability of rabies entry into north-west Cape York Peninsula and into Seisia from individual fishing boats was 1.9 × 10(-4)/boat and 8.7 × 10(-6)/boat, respectively. The estimated annual probability that at least one rabies-infected dog enters north-west Cape York Peninsula and into Seisia was 5.5 × 10(-3) and 3.5 × 10(-4), respectively. The estimated median probability of rabies introduction into Seisia was 4.7 × 10(-8)/boat, and the estimated annual probability that at least one rabies-infected dog causes rabies transmission in a resident Seisia dog was 8.3 × 10(-5). Sensitivity analysis using the Sobol method highlighted some parameters as influential, including but not limited to the prevalence of rabies in Indonesia, the probability of a dog on board an Indonesian fishing boat, and the

  9. Assessing the Risk of a Canine Rabies Incursion in Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Emily G.; Brookes, Victoria J.; Ward, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is a globally distributed virus that causes approximately 60,00 human deaths annually with >99% of cases caused by dog bites. Australia is currently canine rabies free. However, the recent eastward spread of rabies in the Indonesian archipelago has increased the probability of rabies entry into northern Australian communities. In addition, many northern Australian communities have large populations of free-roaming dogs, capable of maintaining rabies should an incursion occur. A risk assessment of rabies entry and transmission into these communities is needed to target control and surveillance measures. Illegal transportation of rabies-infected dogs via boat landings is a high-risk entry pathway and was the focus of the current study. A quantitative, stochastic, risk assessment model was developed to evaluate the risk of rabies entry into north-west Cape York Peninsula, Australia, and rabies introduction to resident dogs in one of the communities via transport of rabies-infected dogs on illegal Indonesian fishing boats. Parameter distributions were derived from expert opinion, literature, and analysis of field studies. The estimated median probability of rabies entry into north-west Cape York Peninsula and into Seisia from individual fishing boats was 1.9 × 10−4/boat and 8.7 × 10−6/boat, respectively. The estimated annual probability that at least one rabies-infected dog enters north-west Cape York Peninsula and into Seisia was 5.5 × 10−3 and 3.5 × 10−4, respectively. The estimated median probability of rabies introduction into Seisia was 4.7 × 10−8/boat, and the estimated annual probability that at least one rabies-infected dog causes rabies transmission in a resident Seisia dog was 8.3 × 10−5. Sensitivity analysis using the Sobol method highlighted some parameters as influential, including but not limited to the prevalence of rabies in Indonesia, the probability of a dog on board an Indonesian fishing boat, and the

  10. Holocene beach buildup and coastal aeolian sand incursions off the Nile littoral cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Shtienberg, Gilad; Porat, Naomi; Bookman, Revital

    2017-04-01

    Israel's coastal plain is abundant with sand originating from the Nile littoral cell. The inland windblown loose sand has formed 3-6 km wide lobe-like sand and dune fields currently comprised of foredunes, linear and northeasterly facing transverse and parabolic dunes that are currently stabilized by vegetation. This study reviews the architecture and history of the these dune fields aiming to: (a) Date the timings of beach accretion, and sand and dune incursions. (b) Discriminate between natural and human-induced forcing factors of sand mobilization and stabilization in time and space. (c) Present a model of the dunescape development. (d) Assess scenarios of sand transport in the future charcaterized by intense human impact and climate change. Luminescence ages, radiocarbon dates and relative ages from previously published geological and archaeological reports, historical texts, together with new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages and stratigraphic and sedimentological data are analyzed. The deposition, mobilizations and preservation of the sand bodies, initially induced by the decline in sea level rise at 6-4 ka, were later controlled by historic land-use intensity and modern land-use/negligence practices. At 6 ka, beach sand buildup rapidly started. Where aeolianite ridges bordered the coast, pulses of sand with biogenic carbonate grains unconformably draped the ridges and rapidly consolidated into a distinct sandy calcarenite unit. Further east, sand sheets and low dunes partly pedogenized following their incursion, but did not cement. The water retention capacities of the sand sheets enabled the establishment of a sand-stabilizing vegetation cover that probably became an attractive environment for fuel and grazing. The growing Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine ( 2.4-1.3 ka) populations probably led to increased consumption and massive destruction of sand stabilizing vegetation, enabling sand erodibility and mobilization during winter storms. The sand

  11. Effects of runway shift and stay rules on rats' serial pattern learning in the T-maze.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jerome; Westlake, Kimberly; Szelest, Izabela

    2004-11-01

    Rats received three-trial series on a T-maze consisting of extended visually distinct left-black and right-striped side runways. During the first phase of training, when allowed to select baited runways within these series, they predominantly alternated their choices. During the second phase, rats received forced-choice serial pattern training of series consisting of two rewarded (R) trials and one nonrewarded (N) trial in two fixed orders, RRN and RNR. In Experiment 1, the rats in the runway shift rule group always received the second R trial when forced down a runway opposite that on the preceding trial in the series and the N trial when forced down the same runway. The rats in the runway stay rule group always received the second R trial when forced down the same runway and the N trial when forced down the opposite runway. In Experiment 2, each rat was conditionally trained with both runway outcome rules as determined by the central alley lighting and the type of food in the side alleys. The rats took longer to reduce their running speed on the N trial within each sequence under the runway stay rule than under the runway shift rule. They also took longer to acquire serial pattern responding for the RNR than for the RRN series only under the runway stay rule condition. When subsequently reexposed to series of free-choice trials on the final phase, rats maintained spontaneous alternating choice patterns under the runway shift rule conditions but either seldom alternated their choices (Experiment 1) or greatly reduced choice alternations (Experiment 2) under the runway stay rule condition. We discussed these effects in terms of rats' natural foraging strategies and as a factor that interacts with other within- and between-series variables that affect serial pattern behavior.

  12. Effects of various runway lighting parameters upon the relation between runway visual range and visual range of centerline and edge lights in fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty six students and 54 commercial airline pilots were tested in the fog chamber to determine the effect of runway edge and centerline light intensity and spacing, fog density, ambient luminance level, and lateral and vertical offset distance of the subject from the runway's centerline upon horizontal visual range. These data were obtained to evaluate the adequacy of a balanced lighting system to provide maximum visual range in fog viewing both centerline and runway edge lights. The daytime system was compared against two other candidate lighting systems; the nighttime system was compared against other candidate lighting systems. The second objective was to determine if visual range is affected by lights between the subject and the farthestmost light visible through the fog. The third objective was to determine if college student subjects differ from commercial airline pilots in their horizontal visual range through fog. Two studies were conducted.

  13. STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.

  14. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at International Airports E and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. This report presents the tabulated and plotted data for two international airports (designed airports E and F).

  15. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at international airports G and H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. This report presents the tabulated and plotted data for two international airports (designated airports G and H).

  16. STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-10

    STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.

  17. White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Runway 17/35, Extending 35,000 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Runway 17/35, Extending 35,000 feet north from Range Road 10, beginning approximately 4.2 miles northeast of intersection with Range Road 7, White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  18. STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.

  19. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at international airports I and J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. Tabulated and plotted data for two international airports, (designated I and J), are included.

  20. West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat driven by Holocene warm water incursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Smith, James A.; Hodell, David A.; Greaves, Mervyn; Poole, Christopher R.; Kender, Sev; Williams, Mark; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Jernas, Patrycja E.; Elderfield, Henry; Klages, Johann P.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Gohl, Karsten; Larter, Robert D.; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2017-07-01

    Glaciological and oceanographic observations coupled with numerical models show that warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) incursions onto the West Antarctic continental shelf cause melting of the undersides of floating ice shelves. Because these ice shelves buttress glaciers feeding into them, their ocean-induced thinning is driving Antarctic ice-sheet retreat today. Here we present a multi-proxy data based reconstruction of variability in CDW inflow to the Amundsen Sea sector, the most vulnerable part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, during the Holocene epoch (from 11.7 thousand years ago to the present). The chemical compositions of foraminifer shells and benthic foraminifer assemblages in marine sediments indicate that enhanced CDW upwelling, controlled by the latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, forced deglaciation of this sector from at least 10,400 years ago until 7,500 years ago—when an ice-shelf collapse may have caused rapid ice-sheet thinning further upstream—and since the 1940s. These results increase confidence in the predictive capability of current ice-sheet models.

  1. West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat driven by Holocene warm water incursions.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Smith, James A; Hodell, David A; Greaves, Mervyn; Poole, Christopher R; Kender, Sev; Williams, Mark; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Jernas, Patrycja E; Elderfield, Henry; Klages, Johann P; Roberts, Stephen J; Gohl, Karsten; Larter, Robert D; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2017-07-05

    Glaciological and oceanographic observations coupled with numerical models show that warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) incursions onto the West Antarctic continental shelf cause melting of the undersides of floating ice shelves. Because these ice shelves buttress glaciers feeding into them, their ocean-induced thinning is driving Antarctic ice-sheet retreat today. Here we present a multi-proxy data based reconstruction of variability in CDW inflow to the Amundsen Sea sector, the most vulnerable part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, during the Holocene epoch (from 11.7 thousand years ago to the present). The chemical compositions of foraminifer shells and benthic foraminifer assemblages in marine sediments indicate that enhanced CDW upwelling, controlled by the latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, forced deglaciation of this sector from at least 10,400 years ago until 7,500 years ago-when an ice-shelf collapse may have caused rapid ice-sheet thinning further upstream-and since the 1940s. These results increase confidence in the predictive capability of current ice-sheet models.

  2. Seawater Incursion Events in a Cretaceous Paleo-lake Revealed by Specific Marine Biological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J. F.; Peng, P. A.; Liu, M. Y.; Xi, D. P.; Song, J. Z.; Wan, X. Q.; Wang, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Many large paleo-lakes in North China were formed after the Triassic Era. Seawater incursion events (SWIEs) in these lakes have been extensively discussed in the literature, yet lack reliable methodology and solid evidence, which are essential for reconstructing and confirming SWIEs. The present study employs specific marine biological markers (24-n-propyl and 24-isopropyl cholestanes) to trace SWIEs in a dated core taken from the Songliao Basin (SLB). Two SWIEs were identified. The first SWIE from 91.37 to 89.00 Ma, was continuous and variable but not strong, while the second SWIE from 84.72 to 83.72 Ma was episodic and strong. SWIEs caused high total organic carbon (TOC) and negative δ13Corg values in the sediments, which were interpreted as an indication of high productivity in the lake, due to the enhancement of nutrient supplies as well as high levels of aqueous CO2, due to the mixing of alkaline seawater and acidic lake water. The SWIEs in SLB were controlled by regional tectonic activity and eustatic variation. Movement direction changes of the Izanagi/Kula Plate in 90 Ma and 84 Ma created faults and triggered SWIEs. A high sea level, from 90 to 84 Ma, also facilitated the occurrence of SWIEs in SLB. PMID:25946976

  3. Siliciclastic incursion in southern Florida and development of Florida reefs during late Cenozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, G.S.; Ginsburg, R.N.

    1985-02-01

    Only one major interruption has occurred in the long history of shallow-water carbonate deposition that has prevailed in southern Florida since the Jurassic. This break resulted from a substantial incursion of the finer siliciclastic sands interbedded or mixed with surprisingly coarse quartz sands during the late Cenozoic. Along the southeastern margin, this influx was succeeded by the development of reef during the Quaternary. The siliciclastics occur in the subsursurface beneath a section of Pliocene to Holocene shallow-water carbonates. Recent study of well samples shows that these sediments are thickest (120-200 m) along a north-south trend that extends from the central part of southern Florida to the upper Florida Keys. These sediments are largely composed of quartzose grains ranging in size from very fine sand to granule (0.06-4 mm), with minor proportions of calcareous clays, phosphatic grains, and marine faunal fragments. The medium sand to granule-sized sediments are composed of well-rounded quartzose grains and occur either interbedded or mixed with finer fractions. The sudden influx of siliciclastics in southern Florida beginning in the Miocene is quite unexpected considering the remoteness of the Appalachians, the postulated source. This southward transport may have been accomplished by rivers and/or longshore currents. The siliciclastic section extends southward slightly beyond the curving arc of Quaternary reef deposits. The coincidence of the southeastern edge of siliciclastics with the arc of Quaternary reefs suggests that reef development may have been localized on the siliciclastic margin.

  4. Holocene Paleoenvironments, Relative Sea-Level Changes and Marine Incursions On The Mexican Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, T.

    2008-12-01

    Although the relative sea-level and environment variability have received considerable attention elsewhere, relatively little has been directed toward sea-level and significant environmental changes on the Mexican Pacific coast in the Holocene (11,500 cal yr BP to present) noted in this study. Examination of previous published work and sediment-stratigraphic records of lagoon sediments reveal strong evidence for changes in salinity and environment of lagoonal marshes, which provide scientific bases for past relative sea-level change and marine incursions of the on the Mexican Pacific coast. Sediment records show that sea-level was at or close to the present level by at least c. 4630 yr BP, when the brackish lagoons and beach barriers where established. A marine inundation (evidence of a probable tsunami is presented), that occurred by c. 3400-3500 yr BP. A return to marginal lagoon conditions, indicating a drop in relative sea-level, occurred in the most recent time (c. 2300 yr BP). Climate records in the mid- to late-Holocene, although scarce and clustered in Yucatan, central and northern Mexico, cannot explain the observed environmental changes. In general, most of the Holocene relative sea-level changes observed obscure any climatic signal in this period on the tectonically-active Mexican Pacific coast.

  5. Initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus into European pigs.

    PubMed

    Welsh, M D; Baird, P M; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo, M P; Hanna, A; Reid, S M; Essen, S; Russell, C; Thomas, S; Barrass, L; McNeilly, F; McKillen, J; Todd, D; Harkin, V; McDowell, S; Choudhury, B; Irvine, R M; Borobia, J; Grant, J; Brown, I H

    2010-05-22

    The initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1) into a European pig population is reported. Diagnosis of swine influenza caused by pandemic virus was made during September 2009 following routine submission of samples for differential diagnosis of causative agents of respiratory disease, including influenza A virus. All four pigs (aged six weeks) submitted for investigation from a pig herd of approximately 5000 animals in Northern Ireland, experiencing acute-onset respiratory signs in finishing and growing pigs, were positive by immunofluorescence for influenza A. Follow-up analysis of lung tissue homogenates by real-time RT-PCR confirmed the presence of pH1N1. The virus was subsequently detected on two other premises in Northern Ireland; on one premises, detection followed the pre-export health certification testing of samples from pigs presumed to be subclinically infected as no clinical signs were apparent. None of the premises was linked to another epidemiologically. Sequencing of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes revealed high nucleotide identity (>99.4 per cent) with other pH1N1s isolated from human beings. Genotypic analyses revealed all gene segments to be most closely related to those of contemporary pH1N1 viruses in human beings. It is concluded that all three outbreaks occurred independently, potentially as a result of transmission of the virus from human beings to pigs.

  6. Long-distance aerial dispersal modelling of Culicoides biting midges: case studies of incursions into Australia.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Debbie; Melville, Lorna; Weir, Richard; Davis, Steven; Bellis, Glenn; Zalucki, Myron P; Walker, Peter J; Durr, Peter A

    2014-06-19

    Previous studies investigating long-distance, wind-borne dispersal of Culicoides have utilised outbreaks of clinical disease (passive surveillance) to assess the relationship between incursion and dispersal event. In this study, species of exotic Culicoides and isolates of novel bluetongue viruses, collected as part of an active arbovirus surveillance program, were used for the first time to assess dispersal into an endemic region. A plausible dispersal event was determined for five of the six cases examined. These include exotic Culicoides specimens for which a possible dispersal event was identified within the range of two days--three weeks prior to their collection and novel bluetongue viruses for which a dispersal event was identified between one week and two months prior to their detection in cattle. The source location varied, but ranged from Lombok, in eastern Indonesia, to Timor-Leste and southern Papua New Guinea. Where bluetongue virus is endemic, the concurrent use of an atmospheric dispersal model alongside existing arbovirus and Culicoides surveillance may help guide the strategic use of limited surveillance resources as well as contribute to continued model validation and refinement. Further, the value of active surveillance systems in evaluating models for long-distance dispersal is highlighted, particularly in endemic regions where knowledge of background virus and vector status is beneficial.

  7. Long-distance aerial dispersal modelling of Culicoides biting midges: case studies of incursions into Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies investigating long-distance, wind-borne dispersal of Culicoides have utilised outbreaks of clinical disease (passive surveillance) to assess the relationship between incursion and dispersal event. In this study, species of exotic Culicoides and isolates of novel bluetongue viruses, collected as part of an active arbovirus surveillance program, were used for the first time to assess dispersal into an endemic region. Results A plausible dispersal event was determined for five of the six cases examined. These include exotic Culicoides specimens for which a possible dispersal event was identified within the range of two days – three weeks prior to their collection and novel bluetongue viruses for which a dispersal event was identified between one week and two months prior to their detection in cattle. The source location varied, but ranged from Lombok, in eastern Indonesia, to Timor-Leste and southern Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Where bluetongue virus is endemic, the concurrent use of an atmospheric dispersal model alongside existing arbovirus and Culicoides surveillance may help guide the strategic use of limited surveillance resources as well as contribute to continued model validation and refinement. Further, the value of active surveillance systems in evaluating models for long-distance dispersal is highlighted, particularly in endemic regions where knowledge of background virus and vector status is beneficial. PMID:24943652

  8. Incursions of southern-sourced water into the deep North Atlantic during late Pliocene glacial intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, David C.; Bailey, Ian; Wilson, Paul A.; Chalk, Thomas B.; Foster, Gavin L.; Gutjahr, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The circulation and internal structure of the oceans exert a strong influence on Earth's climate because they control latitudinal heat transport and the segregation of carbon between the atmosphere and the abyss. Circulation change, particularly in the Atlantic Ocean, is widely suggested to have been instrumental in the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation when large ice sheets first developed on North America and Eurasia during the late Pliocene, approximately 2.7 million years ago. Yet the mechanistic link and cause/effect relationship between ocean circulation and glaciation are debated. Here we present new records of North Atlantic Ocean structure using the carbon and neodymium isotopic composition of marine sediments recording deep water for both the Last Glacial to Holocene (35-5 thousand years ago) and the late Pliocene to earliest Pleistocene (3.3-2.4 million years ago). Our data show no secular change. Instead we document major southern-sourced water incursions into the deep North Atlantic during prominent glacials from 2.7 million years ago. Our results suggest that Atlantic circulation acts as a positive feedback rather than as an underlying cause of late Pliocene Northern Hemisphere glaciation. We propose that, once surface Southern Ocean stratification and/or extensive sea-ice cover was established, cold-stage expansions of southern-sourced water such as those documented here enhanced carbon dioxide storage in the deep ocean, helping to increase the amplitude of glacial cycles.

  9. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The main landing gear (MLG) of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, bringing mission STS-31 to an end. The nose landing gear (NLG) is suspended above the runway prior to touchdown and wheel stop which occurred at 6:51:00 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). View shows OV-103's starboard side and deployed rudder/speedbrake. EAFB facilities are seen in the distance.

  10. STS-38 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-11-20

    STS038-S-041 (20 Nov 1990) --- STS-38 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The main landing gear (MLG) has just touched down on the runway surface as the nose landing gear (NLG) glides above it. The Department of Defense (DOD)-devoted mission came to an end (with complete wheel stop) at 4:43:37 pm (Eastern Standard Time (EST)).

  11. STS-34 Atlantis, OV-104, touches down on runway 23 at EAFB, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-23

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, main landing gear (MLG) touches down on Runway 23 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The nose landing gear rides above runway before touchdown as the MLG wheels produce a cloud of dust. OV-104's port side profile is captured as it glides by at a speed of approximately 195 knots (224 miles per hour). The tail section with deployed speedbrake/rudder and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) are visible.

  12. Evaluation of Winter Operational Runway Friction Measurement Equipment, Procedures, and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This document produced by the FAA/Industry Winter Runway Friction Measurement and Reporting Working Group, is designed to provide an overview of current information on the present guidance, practices, and procedures for reporting runway pavement surface conditions during winter operations at airports. It contains recommendations on the desirability of providing the best procedural consistency and standardization and discusses the available means to implement the guidance that will result in improved aviation safety at airports during hazardous winter conditions.

  13. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The main landing gear (MLG) of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, bringing mission STS-31 to an end. The nose landing gear (NLG) is suspended above the runway prior to touchdown and wheel stop which occurred at 6:51:00 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). View shows OV-103's starboard side and deployed rudder/speedbrake. EAFB facilities are seen in the distance.

  14. Incursion and range expansion in the bluetongue vector Culicoides imicola in the Mediterranean basin: a phylogeographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D V; Dallas, J F; Piertney, S B; Mordue Luntz, A J

    2008-12-01

    The bluetongue (BT) vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has undergone widespread range expansion across most of the Mediterranean basin, concomitant with the largest BT epizootic outbreaks on record. Knowledge of the substructure of this vector expansion would be useful for identifying specific source-expansion systems. To this end we analysed the haplotype diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene in 273 C. imicola from 88 Mediterranean sites and outgroups. All the C. imicola haplotypes (n = 26) formed a single, distinct clade in comparison with haplotypes of four other species of the Imicola group from southern Africa, confirming C. imicola as a single phylospecies. Haplotype distribution showed extreme differentiation across the Mediterranean basin, with four common haplotypes each predominating in different areas. Eastern and western areas characterized by distinct BT incursions accounted for most of the molecular variance in haplotype composition. Shared common haplotypes identified one area of incursion and expansion encompassing the western half of the Mediterranean basin, with evidence of population growth, and another system encompassing Anatolian Turkey, the Aegean Islands and mainland Greece. A third area of range expansion was identified in the central Mediterranean, with a possible source in Algeria and unsampled parts of central North Africa. We conclude that the expansion of C. imicola in the Mediterranean basin consists of at least three incursions followed by expansions and that the western system experiences conditions promoting high population growth.

  15. A method for determining landing runway length for a STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.; Moran, J. F.; Warner, D. N., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Based on data obtained from flight tests of the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft, a method is proposed for determining the length of the landing runway for powered-lift STOL aircraft. The suggested method determines runway landing length by summing three segments: the touchdown-dispersion distance, the transition distance from touchdown to application of brakes, and the stopping distance after brakes are applied. It is shown how the landing field length can be reduced either through improved autoland system design or by providing the pilot with appropriate information to allow him to identify a "low probability" long or short landing and to execute a go-around. The proposed method appears to determine a safe runway landing length for the STOL application and offers the potential for reducing runway length if great emphasis is placed on a short-runway capability. FAR Parts 25 and 121 appear conservative and suitable for the situation where no great emphasis is placed on reducing the runway length requirement.

  16. An airport runway centerline location method for one-off aerial imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shule; Xu, Tingfa; Ni, Guoqiang; Shao, Xiaoguang

    2010-11-01

    An airport runway centerline location method is proposed for extracting airport runway in images from one-off aerial imaging system. One-off aerial imaging system captures image at an altitude about one kilometer or below, thus detailed feature of the scenery reveals itself clearly. The proposed method relies on this precondition to detect and locate centerline of airport runway. This method has four steps: edge detection, dominating line orientation extraction, distance histogram building and centerline location. A salient edge detection method is developed with Sobel detector, which could detect edges of runway strips at the disturbance of edges features from surrounding objects. Then, a traditional Hough transform is performed to build a Hough map, within which the dominating line orientation is extracted. After getting the dominating line orientation, a reference straight line is chosen for building distance histogram. This distance histogram is a one-dimensional one, built up with the distance of all edge pixels in the edge map to the reference line. Airport centerline has a three-peak pattern in the one-dimensional distance histogram, and the center peak is corresponding to the centerline of airport runway. Experiments with simulated images show this method could location airport runway centerline effectively.

  17. Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, R. C.; Xia, Dingwu

    2014-02-15

    The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

  18. Runway Independent Aircraft Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David W.; Pasman, Renee

    2004-01-01

    This report Summarizes the work done is support of NASA/Ames Runway Independent Aircraft Research during the summer of 2003. This work centered on the tasks laid out by the Statement of Work, which was to: Identify and assess operational scenarios including airport air and ground operations and how RIA operations would interface; 2) Identify critical technologies and create a list of technologies that might be pushed to provide a quantum jump in operating economy, reliability, and safety should sufficient finding be available; 3) Create public domain powered high lift methodologies; and 4) Identify and assess vehicle concepts that provide innovative approaches to RIA operations. All these tasks were accomplished, with certain areas needing additional exploration in future grant work. Three designs were analyzed to provide strawman configurations for the RIA operations. All three aircraft carried 60 passengers, with a stage length of 1,000 nautical miles. They were capable of operating with a balanced field length of 2000 feet or less. Three different technology approaches were explored. The first, the Model 115, was a mid-wing USB design, developed as a near-term, low risk concept. The second aircraft, the EMAX, used a directed thrust system, was a far-term, high-risk approach. The third configuration was the Model 114, whose development began in summer 2002. In addition, further research was conducted on issues related to STOL operations, such as noise concerns, SNI operations, and other areas of interest.

  19. Space Shuttle Columbia touches down on Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:33:11 p.m. EDT, April 8, to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. At main gear touchdown, the STS-83 mission duration was 3 days, 23 hours, 12 minutes. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to mechanical problems. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L. Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  20. Space Shuttle Columbia prepares to touch down on Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia prepares to touch down on Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility at approximately 2:33 p.m. EDT, April 8, to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. At main gear touchdown, the STS-83 mission duration will be just under four days. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to mechanical problems. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  1. Space Shuttle Columbia touches down on Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:33:11 p.m. EDT, April 8, to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. At main gear touchdown, the STS-83 mission duration was 3 days, 23 hours, 12 minutes. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to mechanical problems. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L. Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  2. STS-94 Columbia Landing at KSC (South Runway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbias 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program.

  3. Space Shuttle Columbia prepares to touch down on Runway 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia prepares to touch down on Runway 33 at KSC''';s Shuttle Landing Facility at approximately 2:33 p.m. EDT, April 8, to conclude the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission. At main gear touchdown, the STS-83 mission duration will be just under four days. The planned 16-day mission was cut short by a faulty fuel cell. This is only the third time in Shuttle program history that an orbiter was brought home early due to mechanical problems. This was also the 36th KSC landing since the program began in 1981. Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. flew Columbia to a perfect landing with help from Pilot Susan L. Still. Other crew members are Payload Commander Janice E. Voss; Mission Specialists Michael L.Gernhardt and Donald A. Thomas; and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. In spite of the abbreviated flight, the crew was able to perform MSL-1 experiments. The Spacelab-module-based experiments were used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station and to conduct combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing investigations.

  4. STS-94 Columbia Landing at KSC (South Runway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia touches down on Runway 33 at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility at 6:46:34 a.m. EDT with Mission Commander James D. Halsell Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still at the controls to complete the STS-94 mission. Also on board are Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K. Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module was used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducted combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. This mission was a reflight of the STS-83 mission that lifted off from KSC in April of this year. That space flight was cut short due to indications of a faulty fuel cell. This was Columbias 11th landing at KSC and the 38th landing at the space center in the history of the Shuttle program.

  5. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  6. Determination of optimal trajectories for an aircraft returning to the runway following a complete loss of thrust after takeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Craig A.

    This thesis examines the ability of a small, single-engine airplane to return to the runway following an engine failure shortly after takeoff. Two sets of trajectories are examined. One set of trajectories has the airplane fly a straight climb on the runway heading until engine failure. The other set of trajectories has the airplane perform a 90° turn at an altitude of 500 feet and continue until engine failure. Various combinations of wind speed, wind direction, and engine failure times are examined. The runway length required to complete the entire flight from the beginning of the takeoff roll to wheels stop following the return to the runway after engine failure is calculated for each case. The optimal trajectories following engine failure consist of three distinct segments: a turn back toward the runway using a large bank angle and angle of attack; a straight glide; and a reversal turn to align the airplane with the runway. The 90° turn results in much shorter required runway lengths at lower headwind speeds. At higher headwind speeds, both sets of trajectories are limited by the length of runway required for the landing rollout, but the straight climb cases generally require a lower angle of attack to complete the flight. The glide back to the runway is performed at an airspeed below the best glide speed of the airplane due to the need to conserve potential energy after the completion of the turn back toward the runway. The results are highly dependent on the rate of climb of the airplane during powered flight. The results of this study can aid the pilot in determining whether or not a return to the runway could be performed in the event of an engine failure given the specific wind conditions and runway length at the time of takeoff. The results can also guide the pilot in determining the takeoff profile that would offer the greatest advantage in returning to the runway.

  7. Aircraft and runway deicers at General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 2. Toxicity of aircraft and runway deicer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven; Hall, David W.; Geis, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    Streams receiving runoff from General Mitchell International Airport (GMIA), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, were studied to assess toxic impacts of aircraft and runway deicers. Elevated levels of constituents related to deicing (propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, and ammonia) were observed in stream samples. The LC50s of type I deicer for Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephelas promelas, Hyalela azteca, and Chironimus tentans and the EC50 for Microtox® were less than 5,000 mg/L of propylene glycol. Concentrations up to 39,000 mg/L were observed at airport outfall sites in samples collected during deicing events. The IC25s of type I deicer for C. dubia and P. promelas were less than 1,500 mg/L of propylene glycol. Concentrations up to 960 mg/L were observed in low-flow samples at an airport outfall site. Measured toxicity of stream water was greatest during winter storms when deicers were applied. Chronic toxicity was observed at airport outfall samples from low-flow periods in the winter and the summer, with the greater toxic impacts from the winter sample. All forms of toxicity in stream-water samples decreased as downstream flows increased.

  8. From Runway to Orbit: Reflections of a NASA Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Peebles, Curtis L.

    2004-01-01

    In his remarkable memoir Runway to Orbit, Dr. Kenneth W. Iliff - the recently retired Chief Scientist of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center- tells a highly personal, yet a highly persuasive account of the last forty years of American aeronautical research. His interpretation of events commands respect, because over these years he has played pivotal roles in many of the most important American aeronautics and spaceflight endeavors. Moreover, his narrative covers much of the second half of the first 100 years of flight, a centennial anniversary being celebrated this year. aerospace knowledge. He arrived at the then NASA Flight Research Center in 1962 as a young aeronautical engineer and quickly became involved in two of the seminal projects of modern flight, the X-15 and the lifting bodies. In the process, he pioneered (with Lawrence Taylor) the application of digital computing to the reduction of flight data, arriving at a method known as parameter estimation, now applied the world over. Parameter estimation not only enabled researchers to acquire stability and control derivatives from limited flight data, but in time allowed them to obtain a wide range of aerodynamic effects. Although subsequently involved in dozens of important projects, Dr. Iliff devoted much of his time and energy to hypersonic flight, embodied in the Shuttle orbiter (or as he refers to it, the world s fastest airplane). To him, each Shuttle flight, instrumented to obtain a variety of data, represents a research treasure trove, one that he has mined for years. This book, then, represents the story of Dr. Ken Iliff s passion for flight, his work, and his long and astoundingly productive career. It can be read with profit not just by scientists and engineers, but equally by policy makers, historians, and journalists wishing to better comprehend advancements in flight during the second half of the twentieth century. Dr. Iliff's story is one of immense contributions to the nation s repository of

  9. Benefits Assessment for Single-Airport Tactical Runway Configuration Management Tool (TRCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa; Phojanamonogkolkij, Nipa; Lohr, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The System-Oriented Runway Management (SORM) concept was developed as part of the Airspace Systems Program (ASP) Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project, and is composed of two basic capabilities: Runway Configuration Management (RCM), and Combined Arrival/Departure Runway Scheduling (CADRS). RCM is the process of designating active runways, monitoring the active runway configuration for suitability given existing factors, and predicting future configuration changes; CADRS is the process of distributing arrivals and departures across active runways based on local airport and National Airspace System (NAS) goals. The central component in the SORM concept is a tool for taking into account all the various factors and producing a recommendation for what would be the optimal runway configuration, runway use strategy, and aircraft sequence, considering as many of the relevant factors required in making this type of decision, and user preferences, if feasible. Three separate tools were initially envisioned for this research area, corresponding to the time scale in which they would operate: Strategic RCM (SRCM), with a planning horizon on the order of several hours, Tactical RCM (TRCM), with a planning horizon on the order of 90 minutes, and CADRS, with a planning horizon on the order of 15-30 minutes[1]. Algorithm development was initiated in all three of these areas, but the most fully developed to date is the TRCM algorithm. Earlier studies took a high-level approach to benefits, estimating aggregate benefits across most of the major airports in the National Airspace Systems (NAS), for both RCM and CADRS [2]. Other studies estimated the benefit of RCM and CADRS using various methods of re-sequencing arrivals to reduce delays3,4, or better balancing of arrival fixes5,6. Additional studies looked at different methods for performing the optimization involved in selecting the best Runway Configuration Plan (RCP) to use7-10. Most of these previous studies were high

  10. Study on the Configuration and Capacity of the Lateral Runway Based on the Airport Green Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiong; Li, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2017-05-01

    Airport as an important transportation infrastructure, its efficient operation, energy saving and emission reduction are of great significance for the sustainable development of the city. The planning of the lateral runway is gradually being applied in the construction of large airports. First, the different utilization modes of the lateral runway and adjacent parallel runway were analyzed. After which four operational correlations and intervals were discussed, i.e.: independent operation, take-off & take-off dependent operation, take-off & landing dependent operation and fully dependent operation. Taking Chengdu new airport as an example, the airfield simulation models were established to evaluate the efficiency of the lateral runway. The simulation result suggests: A group of longitudinal and transverse runways can meet the hourly take-off and landing movements of about 75-77 in the case of independent operation. The take-off & landing dependent operation has relatively large impact on capacity. Under the conditions of fully dependent operation, the hourly movements are only 65, lower by about 16%, 10% and 6% compared with other three modes.

  11. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  12. Dust Concentrations and Composition During African Dust Incursions in the Caribbean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Santos-Figueroa, G.; Morales-Garcia, F.

    2016-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) indicates that exposure to PM10 concentrations higher than 50 µg/m³ 24-hour mean in both developed and developing countries could have an adverse impact on public health. Recent studies showed that in the Caribbean region the PM10 concentrations often exceed the WHO guidelines for PM10. These exceedances are largely driven by the presence of African Dust particles that reach the Caribbean region every year during the summer months. These dust particles also influence the Earth's radiative budget directly by scattering solar radiation in the atmosphere and indirectly by affecting cloud formation and, thus, cloud albedo. In order to have a better understanding of the impacts of African Dust on public health and climate, we determine the concentration of dust particles, the carbonaceous fraction (total, elemental and organic carbon: TC, EC, and OC) and water-soluble ions (e.g., Na+, Cl-, Ca+2, NH4+, SO4-2) of aerosol samples in the presence and absence of African Dust. Samples were collected using a Hi-Vol and Stacked-Filter Units for the sampling of total suspended particles (TSP) at two stations in Puerto Rico: a marine site located at Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ) Nature Reserve, in Fajardo, and an urban site located at the University of Puerto Rico, in San Juan. The presence of African Dust was supported with Saharan Air Layer (SAL) imagery and with the results from the air mass backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT). Preliminary results showed that the total mass concentration of aerosols obtained at the urban site is about two times that at the marine site for SFU samples during African Dust incursions. The average dust concentration obtained at CSJ for Hi Vol samples was 22 µg/m³ during the summer 2015. African Dust concentrations, TC, EC, OC, and ionic speciation results for the marine and urban sites will be presented at the conference.

  13. Runway exit designs for capacity improvement demonstrations. Phase 2: Computer model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trani, A. A.; Hobeika, A. G.; Kim, B. J.; Nunna, V.; Zhong, C.

    1992-01-01

    The development is described of a computer simulation/optimization model to: (1) estimate the optimal locations of existing and proposed runway turnoffs; and (2) estimate the geometric design requirements associated with newly developed high speed turnoffs. The model described, named REDIM 2.0, represents a stand alone application to be used by airport planners, designers, and researchers alike to estimate optimal turnoff locations. The main procedures are described in detail which are implemented in the software package and possible applications are illustrated when using 6 major runway scenarios. The main output of the computer program is the estimation of the weighted average runway occupancy time for a user defined aircraft population. Also, the location and geometric characteristics of each turnoff are provided to the user.

  14. Action-specific effects in aviation: what determines judged runway size?

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob; Navia, José Antonio; Allsop, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that the performance of a skill that involves acting on a goal object can influence one's judgment of the size of that object. The present study investigated this effect in an aviation context. Novice pilots were asked to perform a series of visual approach and landing manoeuvres in a flight simulator. After each landing, participants next performed a task in which runway size was judged for different simulated altitudes. Gaze behaviour and control stick kinematics were also analyzed. There were significant relationships between judged runway size and multiple action-related variables including touchdown velocity, time fixating the runway, and the magnitude and frequency of control inputs. These findings suggest that relationship between the perception of a target object and action is not solely determined by performance success or failure but rather involves a relationship between multiple variables that reflect the actor's ability.

  15. Method and device for landing aircraft dependent on runway occupancy time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghalebsaz Jeddi, Babak (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A technique for landing aircraft using an aircraft landing accident avoidance device is disclosed. The technique includes determining at least two probability distribution functions; determining a safe lower limit on a separation between a lead aircraft and a trail aircraft on a glide slope to the runway; determining a maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate on the runway based on the safe lower limit and the probability distribution functions; directing the trail aircraft to enter the glide slope with a target separation from the lead aircraft corresponding to the maximum sustainable safe attempt-to-land rate; while the trail aircraft is in the glide slope, determining an actual separation between the lead aircraft and the trail aircraft; and directing the trail aircraft to execute a go-around maneuver if the actual separation approaches the safe lower limit. Probability distribution functions include runway occupancy time, and landing time interval and/or inter-arrival distance.

  16. Non-airborne conflicts: The causes and effects of runway transgressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarrel, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    The 1210 ASRS runway transgression reports are studied and expanded to yield descriptive statistics. Additionally, a one of three subset was studied in detail for purposes of evaluating the causes, risks, and consequences behind trangression events. Occurrences are subdivided by enabling factor and flight phase designations. It is concluded that a larger risk of collision is associated with controller enabled departure transgressions over all other categories. The influence of this type is especially evident during the period following the air traffic controllers' strike of 1981. Causal analysis indicates that, coincidentally, controller enabled departure transgressions also, show the strongest correlations between causal factors. It shows that departure errors occur more often when visibility is reduced, and when multiple takeoff runways or intersection takeoffs are employed. In general, runway transgressions attributable to both pilot and controller errors arise from three problem areas: information transfer, awareness, and spatial judgement. Enhanced awareness by controllers will probably reduce controller enabled incidents.

  17. Application of Artificial Neural Network to Predict the use of Runway at Juanda International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, J. C. P.; Safrilah

    2017-06-01

    Artificial neural network approaches are useful to solve many complicated problems. It solves a number of problems in various areas such as engineering, medicine, business, manufacturing, etc. This paper presents an application of artificial neural network to predict a runway capacity at Juanda International Airport. An artificial neural network model of backpropagation and multi-layer perceptron is adopted to this research to learning process of runway capacity at Juanda International Airport. The results indicate that the training data is successfully recognizing the certain pattern of runway use at Juanda International Airport. Whereas, testing data indicate vice versa. Finally, it can be concluded that the approach of uniformity data and network architecture is the critical part to determine the accuracy of prediction results.

  18. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  19. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  20. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  1. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  2. Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPIDR) Experiment and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Capron, William R.

    2012-01-01

    An area in aviation operations that may offer an increase in efficiency is the use of continuous descent arrivals (CDA), especially during dependent parallel runway operations. However, variations in aircraft descent angle and speed can cause inaccuracies in estimated time of arrival calculations, requiring an increase in the size of the buffer between aircraft. This in turn reduces airport throughput and limits the use of CDAs during high-density operations, particularly to dependent parallel runways. The Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPiDR) concept uses a trajectory-based spacing tool onboard the aircraft to achieve by the runway an air traffic control assigned spacing interval behind the previous aircraft. This paper describes the first ever experiment and results of this concept at NASA Langley. Pilots flew CDAs to the Dallas Fort-Worth airport using airspeed calculations from the spacing tool to achieve either a Required Time of Arrival (RTA) or Interval Management (IM) spacing interval at the runway threshold. Results indicate flight crews were able to land aircraft on the runway with a mean of 2 seconds and less than 4 seconds standard deviation of the air traffic control assigned time, even in the presence of forecast wind error and large time delay. Statistically significant differences in delivery precision and number of speed changes as a function of stream position were observed, however, there was no trend to the difference and the error did not increase during the operation. Two areas the flight crew indicated as not acceptable included the additional number of speed changes required during the wind shear event, and issuing an IM clearance via data link while at low altitude. A number of refinements and future spacing algorithm capabilities were also identified.

  3. Reliability Modeling Methodology for Independent Approaches on Parallel Runways Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, P.; Schor, A.; Rosch, G.

    1998-01-01

    This document is an adjunct to the final report An Integrated Safety Analysis Methodology for Emerging Air Transport Technologies. That report presents the results of our analysis of the problem of simultaneous but independent, approaches of two aircraft on parallel runways (independent approaches on parallel runways, or IAPR). This introductory chapter presents a brief overview and perspective of approaches and methodologies for performing safety analyses for complex systems. Ensuing chapter provide the technical details that underlie the approach that we have taken in performing the safety analysis for the IAPR concept.

  4. Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

  5. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Rear view captures OV-103 as it glides past photographer to wheel stop showing the tail section (speedbrake/rudder) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with aircraft hangar appearing in the background.

  6. Air Traffic and Operational Data on Selected US Airports with Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Thomas M.; McGee, Frank G.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents information on a number of airports in the country with parallel runways and focuses on those that have at least one pair of parallel runways closer than 4300 ft. Information contained in the report describes the airport's current operational activity as obtained through contact with the facility and from FAA air traffic tower activity data for FY 1997. The primary reason for this document is to provide a single source of information for research to determine airports where Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) technology may be applicable.

  7. Model experiments to evaluate vortex dissipation devices proposed for installation on or near aircraft runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effectiveness of various vortex dissipation devices proposed for installation on or near aircraft runways is evaluated on basis of results of experiments conducted with a 0.03-scale model of a Boeing 747 transport aircraft in conjunction with a simulated runway. The test variables included type of vortex dissipation device, mode of operation of the powered devices, and altitude, lift coefficient and speed of the generating aircraft. A total of fifteen devices was investigated. The evaluation is based on time sequence photographs taken in the vertical and horizontal planes during each run.

  8. Rapid Runway Repair Program Subtask 1.07 - Rapid Concrete Cutting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    AD-Rl3i 771 RRPID RUNWAY’REPAIR PROGRAM SUBTA5K 187 - RAPID 1/3 CONCRETE CUTTING (U) 8DM CORP MCLEAN YVA RKMOATS ET IL. JUN 83 8DM/W-82-778 TR 7...I RAPID RUNWAY REPAIR PROGRAM SUBTASK 1.07 - RAPID CONCRETE CUTTING MOATS, R.K. [BOM), WANG, F.D., DEARS, WILLIAM (ENGINEERING & SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY...Program Final Technical ReportMarch 1982 - January 1983 -’’ • Subtask 1.07 - Rapid Concrete Cutting 1982N - Janury 1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  9. Expansion of flight simulator capability for study and solution of aircraft directional control problems on runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbee, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and evaluation results of a DC-9-10 runway directional control simulator are described. An existing wide bodied flight simulator was modified to this aircraft configuration. The simulator was structured to use either two of antiskid simulations; (1) an analog mechanization that used aircraft hardware; or (2) a digital software simulation. After the simulation was developed it was evaluated by 14 pilots who made 818 simulated flights. These evaluations involved landings, rejected takeoffs, and various ground maneuvers. Qualitatively most pilots evaluated the simulator as realistic with good potential especially for pilot training for adverse runway conditions.

  10. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-12-09

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is slowed by a red, white, and blue drag chute during its landing on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Main landing gear (MLG) touchdown occurred at 12:43:17 pm (Pacific Standard Time (PST)). This aft view of OV-103 shows the drag chute deployed from its compartment at the base of the vertical tail, the speedbrake/rudder flaps open, and the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Both MLG and nose landing gear (NLG) ride along the runway surface. Desert scrub brush appears in the foreground and mountains are seen in the background.

  11. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Rear view captures OV-103 as it glides past photographer to wheel stop showing the tail section (speedbrake/rudder) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with aircraft hangar appearing in the background.

  12. Runway Exit Designs for Capacity Improvement Demonstrations. Phase 2. Computer Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    same aircraft mix. RGURE 6.4 Schematic of Washington National Airport. 15 i18 Runway 18-36 J 2094 (6,870’) x 46 (150’) Runway 15-33 Remote 1582 ...Mass (In.) Base (m.) Gem (Kg.) Saab 340-2 SAAB-340 12,020 7194 21.44 7.14 90.88 British Aeios. 31 BAE-31 6,600 4,131 15.05 4.60 87.18 Embraer 120 EMB

  13. Final Environmental Assessment for the Runway Extension and New Parking Apron at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    SO 2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (03), and lead ( Pb ). Although the ozone standards are being reduced significantly with... lead ( Pb ). Response: Similar statement modification inserted. Final Environmental Assessment for the Runway Extension and New Parking Apron 29 Final Environmental Assessment for the Runway Extension and New Parking Apron 30

  14. Assessing the consequences of an incursion of a vector-borne disease. II. Spread of bluetongue in Scotland and impact of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Szmaragd, Camille; Gunn, George J; Gubbins, Simon

    2010-09-01

    Bluetongue is a viral disease of ruminants transmitted by Culicoides biting midges, which has spread across Europe over the past decade. The disease arrived in south-east England in 2007, raising the possibility that it could pose a risk to the valuable Scottish livestock industry. As part of an assessment of the economic consequences of a bluetongue virus incursion into Scotland commissioned by Scottish Government, we investigated a defined set of feasible incursion scenarios under different vaccination strategies. Our epidemiological simulations, based on expert knowledge, highlighted that infection will rarely spread in Scotland after the initial incursion and will be efficiently controlled by vaccination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Smoke knows no boundaries: legal strategies for environmental tobacco smoke incursions into the home within multi-unit residential dwellings

    PubMed Central

    Kline, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe legal theories that non-smoking residents of multiple occupancy buildings may employ when affected by environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) from neighbouring units.
DESIGN—Legal research was conducted in several US states. Research was performed among statutes and regulations. State health regulations were examined as well as common law claims of nuisance, warranties of habitability, and the right of quiet enjoyment.
RESULTS—Through the use of state regulations, such as a sanitary code, several states provide general language for protecting the health of residents in multi-unit buildings. State law also supports more traditional claims of nuisance, warranties of habitability, and the right of quiet enjoyment.
CONCLUSIONS—The use of state regulations has the potential to provide an effective, existing vehicle for resolution of ETS incursion problems. The general health protection language of the regulations, in conjunction with the latest evidence of the harmful effects of ETS, gives state agencies authority to regulate environmental tobacco smoke incursions among apartments in multi-unit dwellings. Where state regulations are not available, other common law legal remedies may be available.


Keywords: environmental tobacco smoke; legal strategies; multiple occupancy dwellings PMID:10841857

  16. Marine Incursion: The Freshwater Herring of Lake Tanganyika Are the Product of a Marine Invasion into West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anthony B.; Teugels, Guy G.; Meyer, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyika's biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 25–50MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africa's Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine incursion, a scenario which may also explain the origin of other Tanganyikan endemics. PMID:18431469

  17. Marine incursion: the freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are the product of a marine invasion into west Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anthony B; Teugels, Guy G; Meyer, Axel

    2008-04-23

    The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyika's biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 25-50MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africa's Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine incursion, a scenario which may also explain the origin of other Tanganyikan endemics.

  18. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  19. Environmental Assessment Addressing FTFA07-1174, Repair Approach Lighting System at the North End of Runway 01/19 at Eglin AFB, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    The USAF proposes to repair the approach lighting system at the north end of Runway 01/19 on Eglin AFB, Florida. Based on the age and condition of...the existing runway approach lighting structures, repairing the approach lighting system at the north end of Runway 01/19 is required to provide a safe

  20. Field Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Water Systems for Runway Rubber Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    collected in a Trackjet vacuum chamber. ................................................................... 70 Figure 74. SH8000R removing rubber on Runway...regulations in a given area, this process may also include vacuuming the residue for disposal offsite. This process is also referred to as...to 6 ft. The process involves a system that vacuums the debris, separates the abrasive particles for recycling, and stores the resultant debris

  1. Down-to-the-runway enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) approach test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, John B.; Heidhausen, Eric; Cramer, James A.; Krone, Norris J., Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Flight tests where conducted at Cambridge-Dorchester Airport (KCGE) and Easton Municipal Airport / Newnam Field (KESN) in a Cessna 402B aircraft using a head-up display (HUD) and a Kollsman Enhanced Vision System (EVS-I) infrared camera. These tests were sponsored by the MITRE Corporation's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD) and the Federal Aviation Administration. Imagery of the EVS-I infrared camera, HUD guidance cues, and out-the-window video were each separately recorded at an engineering workstation for each approach, roll-out, and taxi operation. The EVS-I imagery was displayed on the HUD with guidance cues generated by the mission computer. Also separately recorded was the inertial flight path data. Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) approaches were conducted from the final approach fix to runway flare, touchdown, roll-out and taxi using the HUD and EVS-I sensor as the only visual reference. Flight conditions included two-pilot crew, day, night, non-precision course offset approaches, ILS approach, crosswind approaches, and missed approaches. Results confirmed the feasibility for safe conduct of down-to-the-runway precision approaches in low visibility to runways with and without precision approach systems, when consideration is given to proper aircraft instrumentation, pilot training, and acceptable procedures. Operational benefits include improved runway occupancy rates, and reduced delays and diversions.

  2. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-02-23

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5-4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5-40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1-0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects' motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice.

  3. Aircraft and avionic related research required to develop an effective high-speed runway exit system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoen, M. L.; Hosford, J. E.; Graham, J. M., Jr.; Preston, O. W.; Frankel, R. S.; Erickson, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Research was conducted to increase airport capacity by studying the feasibility of the longitudinal separation between aircraft sequences on final approach. The multidisciplinary factors which include the utility of high speed exits for efficient runway operations were described along with recommendations and highlights of these studies.

  4. STS-49 Endeavour, OV-105, landing on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, glides above concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, just before main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. Nose landing gear (NLG) is also deployed during the landing sequence. Landing occurred at 1:36:38 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  5. STS-111 commander, Ken Cockrell, greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 commander Ken Cockrell greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base following the landing of the space shuttle Endeavour on June 19, 2002. Behind Cockrell are (from left) mission specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz and Shuttle pilot Paul Lockhart.

  6. Effect of multiple path approach procedures on runway landing capacity. [under ILS and MLS conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosic, V.; Horonjeff, R.

    1976-01-01

    When using the Instrument Landing System (ILS) all aircraft must follow a straight line approach path before landing. The Microwave Landing System (MLS) will allow use of differing curved approach paths. The objective of this research is to find out whether the introduction of MLS and consequently multiple approach paths can bring an increase in runway landing capacity. A model is developed which is capable of computing the expected ultimate landing runway capacity, under ILS and MLS conditions, when aircraft population characteristics and Air Traffic Control separation rules are given. This model can be applied in situations when only a horizontal separation between aircraft approaching a runway is allowed, as well as when both vertical and horizontal separations are possible. Results suggest that an increase in runway landing capacity, caused by introducing the MLS-described multiple approach paths, is to be expected only when an aircraft population consists of aircraft with significantly differing approach velocities and particularly in situations when a vertical separation can be applied.

  7. Comprehensive and Highly Accurate Measurements of Crane Runways, Profiles and Fastenings.

    PubMed

    Dennig, Dirk; Bureick, Johannes; Link, Johannes; Diener, Dmitri; Hesse, Christian; Neumann, Ingo

    2017-05-13

    The process of surveying crane runways has been continually refined due to the competitive situation, modern surveying instruments, additional sensors, accessories and evaluation procedures. Guidelines, such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 12488-1, define target values that must be determined by survey. For a crane runway these are for example the span, the position and height of the rails. The process has to be objective and reproducible. However, common processes of surveying crane runways do not meet these requirements sufficiently. The evaluation of the protocols, ideally by an expert, requires many years of experience. Additionally, the recording of crucial parameters, e.g., the wear of the rail, or the condition of the rail fastening and rail joints, is not regulated and for that reason are often not considered during the measurement. To solve this deficit the Advanced Rail Track Inspection System (ARTIS) was developed. ARTIS is used to measure the 3D position of crane rails, the cross-section of the crane rails, joints and, for the first time, the (crane-rail) fastenings. The system consists of a monitoring vehicle and an external tracking sensor. It makes kinematic observations with the tracking sensor from outside the rail run, e.g., the floor of an overhead crane runway, possible. In this paper we present stages of the development process of ARTIS, new target values, calibration of sensors and results of a test measurement.

  8. Sensitivity of Runway Occupancy Time (ROT) to Various Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO) Factors. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldthorpe, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    The Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) research program was initiated by NASA to increase the airport capacity for transport aircraft operations. One element of the research program is called Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO). A goal of the LVLASO research is to develop transport aircraft technologies which reduce Runway Occupancy Time (ROT) so that it does not become the limiting factor in the terminal area operations that determine the capacity of a runway. Under LVLASO, the objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of ROT to various factors associated with the Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO) operation for transport aircraft. The following operational factors were studied and are listed in the order of decreasing ROT sensitivity: ice/flood runway surface condition, exit entrance ground speed, number of exits, high-speed exit locations and spacing, aircraft type, touchdown ground speed standard deviation, reverse thrust and braking method, accurate exit prediction capability, maximum reverse thrust availability, spiral-arc vs. circle-arc exit geometry, dry/slush/wet/snow runway surface condition, maximum allowed deceleration, auto asymmetric braking on exit, do not stow reverse thrust before the exit, touchdown longitudinal location standard deviation, flap setting, anti-skid efficiency, crosswind conditions, stopping on the exit and touchdown lateral offset.

  9. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, approaches concrete runway 04 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, approaches runway 04 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. OV-103 with landing gear deployed is silhouetted against the orange sky of a sunset as it glides over the mountains. The landing occurred at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST).

  10. Comprehensive and Highly Accurate Measurements of Crane Runways, Profiles and Fastenings

    PubMed Central

    Dennig, Dirk; Bureick, Johannes; Link, Johannes; Diener, Dmitri; Hesse, Christian; Neumann, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The process of surveying crane runways has been continually refined due to the competitive situation, modern surveying instruments, additional sensors, accessories and evaluation procedures. Guidelines, such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 12488-1, define target values that must be determined by survey. For a crane runway these are for example the span, the position and height of the rails. The process has to be objective and reproducible. However, common processes of surveying crane runways do not meet these requirements sufficiently. The evaluation of the protocols, ideally by an expert, requires many years of experience. Additionally, the recording of crucial parameters, e.g., the wear of the rail, or the condition of the rail fastening and rail joints, is not regulated and for that reason are often not considered during the measurement. To solve this deficit the Advanced Rail Track Inspection System (ARTIS) was developed. ARTIS is used to measure the 3D position of crane rails, the cross-section of the crane rails, joints and, for the first time, the (crane-rail) fastenings. The system consists of a monitoring vehicle and an external tracking sensor. It makes kinematic observations with the tracking sensor from outside the rail run, e.g., the floor of an overhead crane runway, possible. In this paper we present stages of the development process of ARTIS, new target values, calibration of sensors and results of a test measurement. PMID:28505076

  11. 14 CFR 151.15 - Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy... § 151.15 Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking. No project for... remarking if the present marking is obliterated by construction, alteration or repair work included in...

  12. 14 CFR 151.15 - Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy... § 151.15 Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking. No project for... remarking if the present marking is obliterated by construction, alteration or repair work included in...

  13. 14 CFR 151.15 - Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS General Requirements § 151.15 Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking. No project for...

  14. 14 CFR 151.15 - Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS General Requirements § 151.15 Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting runway or taxiway remarking. No project for...

  15. STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, with landing gear deployed glides above EAFB runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1988-10-03

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed glides above dry lakebed runway 17 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. This profile view shows OV-103's port side just before MLG touchdown.

  16. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5–4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5–40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1–0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects’ motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice. PMID:26902717

  17. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, approaches concrete runway 04 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-33 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, approaches runway 04 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. OV-103 with landing gear deployed is silhouetted against the orange sky of a sunset as it glides over the mountains. The landing occurred at 16:31:02 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST).

  18. STS-49 Endeavour, OV-105, landing on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, glides above concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, just before main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. Nose landing gear (NLG) is also deployed during the landing sequence. Landing occurred at 1:36:38 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  19. Response of a WB-47E Airplane to Runway Roughness at Eielson AFB, Alaska, September 1964

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland J.; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to measure the response of a WB-47E airplane to the roughness of the runway at Eielson AFB, Alaska. The acceleration level in the pilot's compartment and the pitching oscillation of the airplane were found to be sufficiently high to possibly cause pilot discomfort and have an adverse effect on the precision of take-off.

  20. Functional Analysis for an Integrated Capability of Arrival/Departure/Surface Management with Tactical Runway Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Okuniek, Nikolai; Lohr, Gary W.; Schaper, Meilin; Christoffels, Lothar; Latorella, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    The runway is a critical resource of any air transport system. It is used for arrivals, departures, and for taxiing aircraft and is universally acknowledged as a constraining factor to capacity for both surface and airspace operations. It follows that investigation of the effective use of runways, both in terms of selection and assignment as well as the timing and sequencing of the traffic is paramount to the efficient traffic flows. Both the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and NASA have developed concepts and tools to improve atomic aspects of coordinated arrival/departure/surface management operations and runway configuration management. In December 2012, NASA entered into a Collaborative Agreement with DLR. Four collaborative work areas were identified, one of which is called "Runway Management." As part of collaborative research in the "Runway Management" area, which is conducted with the DLR Institute of Flight Guidance, located in Braunschweig, the goal is to develop an integrated system comprised of the three DLR tools - arrival, departure, and surface management (collectively referred to as A/D/S-MAN) - and NASA's tactical runway configuration management (TRCM) tool. To achieve this goal, it is critical to prepare a concept of operations (ConOps) detailing how the NASA runway management and DLR arrival, departure, and surface management tools will function together to the benefit of each. To assist with the preparation of the ConOps, the integrated NASA and DLR tools are assessed through a functional analysis method described in this report. The report first provides the highlevel operational environments for air traffic management (ATM) in Germany and in the U.S., and the descriptions of the DLR's A/D/S-MAN and NASA's TRCM tools at the level of details necessary to compliment the purpose of the study. Functional analyses of each tool and a completed functional analysis of an integrated system design are presented next in the report. Future efforts to fully

  1. Pilot perception of light emitting diodes versus incandescent elevated runway guard lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Hilary

    Pilots must understand and be aware of the purpose of each airport sign, light and marking, for there are numerous. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is planning on replacing the current incandescent lighting with far more economical LED airport lighting. In preparation for this change, two experiments were conducted for this thesis. Experiment 1 attempted to determine what pilots know about the meaning of the signs, markings and lights on the taxiways and runways through a questionnaire that was developed with the FAA. Experiment 2 evaluated pilot perception of LED lighting compared to current incandescent elevated runway guard lights. The meaning of airfield lights is not often stressed in pilot training and many pilots are unsure as to the intended purpose of specific lighting. Experiment 1 attempted to evaluate the uncertainty of these caution lights. In experiment 1, a knowledge survey about runway lighting and markings was created. The survey was developed by a flight instructor and approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. The surveys were given to about 150 pilots with varying flight ratings and experience levels. Experiment 1 results determined that there is a need for more intensive or remedial training on some airport signals. Results also showed that some runway signals need to have greater cue salience. Experiment 2 was designed to replace the existing elevated runway guard lights at a local airport from incandescent lights to light emitting diodes. Permission to cross onto the runways from a taxiway at airports must be given by the air traffic (ground) controller. The demarcation between taxiway and runway is indicated by the elevated runway guard light (ERGL), which signals to the taxiing pilot to hold short at the border of the runway until permission to cross the intersection is obtained. Incandescent lights are currently installed in the ERGLs. Experiment 2 of this thesis was designed to evaluate pilot's perceptions of the elevated

  2. Effects of forced-choice runway variations on rats' T-maze serial pattern learning.

    PubMed

    Szelest, Izabela; Cohen, Jerome

    2006-05-01

    Rats learned an ordered RNR/RNN serial pattern task in a T-maze where they were shifted to a different runway on Trial 3 only in the RNR series (shift-win/stay-lose group) or only in the RNN series (stay-win/shift-lose group). The shift-win/stay-lose group developed faster speeds on Trial 3 of the RNR than on Trial 3 of the RNN series more easily than the stay-win/shift-lose group. This difference occurred whether all rats were forced onto the same runway on the first two trials (Experiment 1) or onto a different runway on Trial 2 from that on Trial 1 in each series (Experiment 2). Posttraining probe tests revealed that the shift-win/stay-lose group in each experiment relied on the runway shift event in Trial 3 or on the series position to anticipate the second reward within a series. Such reward expectancies were greater when the runway shift occurred in the same series position as during training. These probe tests revealed that the stay-win/shift-lose group relied only on the series position in Experiment 2. Our findings do not support predictions based on an associative predictive validity model. Rather, they reflect rats' predisposition to spontaneously alternate choices in the T-maze, a tendency corresponding to their inherent win-shift foraging strategy. Rats in each group also reduced their speeds less on the nonrewarded Trial 2 when it preceded a rewarded rather than a nonrewarded Trial 3. This effect suggests that rats were able to determine which series contained a second rewarded trial. We discuss the theoretical implications of this Trial 2 speed effect in terms of rats' uncertainty about where this second rewarded trial might occur in the RNR series.

  3. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  4. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA - Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  5. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA - Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  6. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  7. Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO) Guidance and Information Displays: Effect on Runway Occupancy Time in Simulated Low-Visibility Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.; Hankins, Walter W., III; Barker, L. Keith

    2001-01-01

    This report examines a rollout and turnoff (ROTO) system for reducing the runway occupancy time for transport aircraft in low-visibility weather. Simulator runs were made to evaluate the system that includes a head-up display (HUD) to show the pilot a graphical overlay of the runway along with guidance and steering information to a chosen exit. Fourteen pilots (airline, corporate jet, and research pilots) collectively flew a total of 560 rollout and turnoff runs using all eight runways at Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport. The runs consisted of 280 runs for each of two runway visual ranges (RVRs) (300 and 1200 ft). For each visual range, half the runs were conducted with the HUD information and half without. For the runs conducted with the HUD information, the runway occupancy times were lower and more consistent. The effect was more pronounced as visibility decreased. For the 1200-ft visibility, the runway occupancy times were 13% lower with HUD information (46.1 versus 52.8 sec). Similarly, for the 300-ft visibility, the times were 28% lower (45.4 versus 63.0 sec). Also, for the runs with HUD information, 78% (RVR 1200) and 75% (RVR 300) had runway occupancy times less than 50 sec, versus 41 and 20%, respectively, without HUD information.

  8. Processes Underlying Rabies Virus Incursions across US–Canada Border as Revealed by Whole-Genome Phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Trewby, Hannah; Nadin-Davis, Susan A.; Real, Leslie A.

    2017-01-01

    Disease control programs aim to constrain and reduce the spread of infection. Human disease interventions such as wildlife vaccination play a major role in determining the limits of a pathogen’s spatial distribution. Over the past few decades, a raccoon-specific variant of rabies virus (RRV) has invaded large areas of eastern North America. Although expansion into Canada has been largely prevented through vaccination along the US border, several outbreaks have occurred in Canada. Applying phylogeographic approaches to 289 RRV whole-genome sequences derived from isolates collected in Canada and adjacent US states, we examined the processes underlying these outbreaks. RRV incursions were attributable predominantly to systematic virus leakage of local strains across areas along the border where vaccination has been conducted but also to single stochastic events such as long-distance translocations. These results demonstrate the utility of phylogeographic analysis of pathogen genomes for understanding transboundary outbreaks. PMID:28820138

  9. Prevalence and airborne spore levels of Stachybotrys spp. in 200 houses with water incursions in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ryan C; Trimble, Mingyi W; Hofer, Vasanthi; Lee, Michael; Nassof, Russell S

    2005-01-01

    Two hundred homes with a history of water incursion were sampled for fungi to determine the prevalence and airborne spore levels of Stachybotrys spp. Sampling methods included room air, surface, and wall cavity air sampling. Stachybotrys spp. were detected with at least one of the methods in 58.5% of the houses tested, but only 9.6% of the room air samples contained Stachybotrys spores. Aerosolization of Stachybotrys spores was correlated with both wall cavity and surface contamination. However, after adjustment for the surface effect, Stachybotrys spores detected in wall cavities were not a significant factor contributing to spores detected in room air samples. We conclude that Stachybotrys spp. are commonly found on water-damaged building materials. In addition, the observations made in this study suggest that the impact on the living space air is low if the fungal spores are contained within a wall cavity.

  10. Peritidal stromatolites at the convergence of groundwater seepage and marine incursion: Patterns of salinity, temperature and nutrient variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishworth, Gavin M.; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bornman, Thomas G.; Lemley, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Living peritidal stromatolites forming at the interface of coastal groundwater seepage and regular marine input are known from only a few locations globally, including South Africa, Western Australia and Northern Ireland. In contrast to modern stromatolites from exclusively fresh or marine waters, which persist due to high calcium carbonate saturation states or hypersaline and erosive conditions (which exclude organisms that might disrupt or out-compete the stromatolite-forming benthic microalgae), the factors supporting stromatolite formation at peritidal locations have not been well-documented. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the fine-scale physico-chemical parameters in terms of pool temperature, salinity and nutrient dynamics at three representative sites along the coastline near Port Elizabeth, South Africa. These parameters were assessed with reference to potential physical, meteorological and ocean drivers using a linear or linear mixed-effects modelling approach. Results demonstrate that nutrient inputs into the pools supporting the majority of stromatolite accretion (barrage pools) are driven by groundwater seepage site-specific properties related to anthropogenic occupation (dissolved inorganic nitrogen; DIN) as well as marine water incursion (dissolved inorganic phosphorus; DIP). Pool temperature is a function of seasonal ambient variability while salinity reflects regular state shifts from fresh to marine conditions, which are related to tidal amplitude and swell height. The regular marine incursions likely promote benthic primary biomass in the phosphorus-limited stromatolite pools, as well as preclude organisms which might otherwise outcompete or disrupt the stromatolite microalgae due to intolerances to extreme ( 1.5 to ≥ 30) salinity variability.

  11. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis).

  12. Sand incursion into temperate (Lithuania) and tropical (the Bahamas) maritime vegetation: Georadar visualization of target-rich aeolian lithosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buynevich, Ilya V.; Savarese, Michael; Curran, H. Allen; Bitinas, Albertas; Glumac, Bosiljka; Pupienis, Donatas; Kopcznski, Karen; Dobrotin, Nikita; Gnivecki, Perry; Boush, Lisa Park; Damušytė, Aldona

    2017-08-01

    Interaction of windblown sand with maritime vegetation, either as dune migration or episodic grain transport is a common phenomenon along many sandy coasts. Vegetation introduces antecedent surface roughness, especially when scaled to the landform height, but its role may be concealed if overwhelmed by aeolian incursion and burial. Where field observations and cores lack detail for characterizing this complex process, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) offers continuous visualization of aeolian sequences. Along the Curonian Spit, Lithuania, dune reactivation phases resulted in massive invasion of siliciclastic sand triggered by natural perturbations and land clearance. Massive (>30 m high) dunes entombed mature pine, oak, and alder stands and this process is ongoing. Mid-frequency (200 MHz) georadar surveys reveal landward-dipping lateral accretion surfaces interrupted by high-amplitude point-source anomalies produced by recently buried trees. In tropical regions, dense vegetation and potential for rapid lithification of carbonate sand results in more complex internal structures. Along the windward coast of San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, a massive dune has buried several generations of maritime scrubland, resulting in highly chaotic reflection pattern and high target density. On a nearby Little Exuma Island, numerous reentrants in aeolianites promoted formation of blowouts and incursion of windblown sand 10-25 m into a silver thatch palm forest. High-frequency (800 MHz) GPR images resolve diffractions from trunks and roots buried by > 2 m of oolitic sand. Basal refection morphology helps differentiate the irregular dune/beachrock surface from a smooth palm-frond mat. Aside from detecting and mapping buried vegetation, geophysical images capture its effect on sediment accumulation. This has the potential for differentiating its effect from other discordant structures within dunes (clasts, dissolution voids, trunk molds, burrows, and cultural remains).

  13. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, W. T.; Kerr, P. J.; Jermiin, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the effect of a dynamic preferential runway system upon community noise disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, H. P.; Edmiston, R. P.; Connor, W. K.

    1972-01-01

    A dynamic preferential runway system (DPRS) was developed for John F. Kennedy International Airport for the purpose of controlling short term noise exposure in the neighboring communities. The DPRS is a computer-aided procedure for optimum selection of runways from the standpoint of noise and is based upon a community disturbance model which takes into account flyover levels, size of exposed populations, time of day and week, and persistence of overflights. A preliminary evaluation of the DPRS is presented on the basis of social survey data and telephone complaint records, for the trial period of August and September, 1971. Comparative use is made of data taken in a previous survey of the same community areas in 1969.

  15. An overview of the joint FAA/NASA aircraft/ground runway friction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for information on runways which may become slippery due to various forms and types of contaminants. Experience has shown that since the beginning of all weather aircraft operations, there have been landing and aborted takeoff incidents and/or accidents each year where aircraft have either run off the end or veered off the shoulder of low friction runways. NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Dynamics Branch is involved in several research programs directed towards obtaining a better understanding of how different tire properties interact with varying pavement surface characteristics to produce acceptable performance for aircraft ground handling requirements. One such effort, which was jointly supported by not only NASA and the FAA but by several aviation industry groups including the Flight Safety Foundation, is described.

  16. Design of the optical structure of airfield in-pavement LED runway edge lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodan; Yang, Jianhong; Peng, Jun; Li, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Airfield lighting system is an important aiding system of civil aviation airport that guarantees the taking off, landing, taxiing of airplanes at night, with low visibility, or under other complicated weather conditions. In-pavement LED runway edge lights, with the highest degree of light intensity, are the most important lights for safe civil aviation and are most difficult to design within airfield lighting system. With LED as the source of light and the secondary optical design as the core, in light of basic laws of Fresnel loss and total reflection and the principles of edge-ray etendue conservation and the conservation of energy to design major optical elements as lens, prism of the lamp, the in-pavement LED runway edge lights design successfully solves the designing problem of high-power, high-intensity LED airfield lights with narrow beam angle at closed environment. This success is of great significance for the improvement of LED airfield lighting system in China.

  17. NASA Boeing 737 Aircraft Test Results from 1996 Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    A description of the joint test program objectives and scope is given together with the performance capability of the NASA Langley B-737 instrumented aircraft. The B-737 test run matrix conducted during the first 8 months of this 5-year program is discussed with a description of the different runway conditions evaluated. Some preliminary test results are discussed concerning the Electronic Recording Decelerometer (ERD) readings and a comparison of B-737 aircraft braking performance for different winter runway conditions. Detailed aircraft parameter time history records, analysis of ground vehicle friction measurements and harmonization with aircraft braking performance, assessment of induced aircraft contaminant drag, and evaluation of the effects of other factors on aircraft/ground vehicle friction performance will be documented in a NASA Technical Report which is being prepared for publication next year.

  18. Proceedings of the NASA Workshop on Flight Deck Centered Parallel Runway Approaches in Instrument Meteorological Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C. (Editor); Scanlon, Charles H. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    A Government and Industry workshop on Flight-Deck-Centered Parallel Runway Approaches in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) was conducted October 29, 1996 at the NASA Langley Research Center. This document contains the slides and records of the proceedings of the workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to disclose to the National airspace community the status of ongoing NASA R&D to address the closely spaced parallel runway problem in IMC and to seek advice and input on direction of future work to assure an optimized research approach. The workshop also included a description of a Paired Approach Concept which is being studied at United Airlines for application at the San Francisco International Airport.

  19. Design, Construction, Maintenance, and Evaluation of the McMurdo Sound (Antarctica) Sea Ice Runway for Heavy Wheeled Aircraft Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-19

    adjacent to runway markers while the runway proper and the shoulders are being maintained to the 100 mm (4 in) standard in order to resume...mid-point markers . All markers should be made of durable, lightweight materials. Support posts must be frangible and present a tiny cross-section to...the wind to minimize snow drifting, which should be accomplished by a small diameter and a minimum number of posts; bamboo canes are currently used

  20. Vertical Temperature Simulation of Pegasus Runway, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Polar Programs PSP Precision Spectral Pyranometer SPAWAR Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command ERDC/CRREL TR-15-2 ix Unit Conversion Factors...site was measured (M. Knuth*, pers. comm.) in 15-minute intervals from 29 October 2010 until 5 February 2011. Two broadband pyranometers (Eppley...Precision Spectral Pyranometer ) were mounted on a mast immediately adjacent to the runway. One measured downwelling radiation and the other upwelling

  1. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-03-18

    STS029-S-064 (18 Mar 1989) --- A rear view photographed from the ground just after Discovery's main landing gear touches down on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in California following a successful five-day mission in Earth orbit. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Michael L. Coats, John E. Blaha, James F. Buchli, Robert C. Springer and James P. Bagian. Wheels came to a stop at 6:36:40 a.m. (PST), March 18, 1989.

  2. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-03-18

    STS029-S-063 (18 March 1989) --- Discovery's main landing gear touches down on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in California following a successful five-day mission in Earth orbit. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Michael L. Coats, John E. Blaha, James F. Buchli, Robert C. Springer and James P. Bagian. Wheels came to a stop at 6:36:40 a.m. (PST), March 18, 1989.

  3. Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and the criteria used in selecting an effective runway-surface-texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-knot crosswinds, if desired. This 5-knot increase over the previous 15-knot limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions in which Space Station rendezvous are planned. The paper presents the results of an initial (1988) texture modification to reduce tire spin-up wear and then describes a series of tests that use an instrumented ground-test vehicle to compare tire friction and wear characteristics, at small scale, of proposed texture modifications placed into the SLF runway surface itself. Based on these tests, three candidate surfaces were chosen to be tested at full-scale by using a highly modified and instrumented transport aircraft capable of duplicating full Orbiter landing profiles. The full-scale Orbiter tire testing revealed that tire wear could be reduced approximately by half with either of two candidates. The texture-modification technique using a Humble Equipment Company Skidabrader(trademark) shotpeening machine proved to be highly effective, and the entire SLF runway surface was modified in September 1994. The extensive testing and evaluation effort that preceded the selection of this particular surface-texture-modification technique is described herein.

  4. STS-41 crew poses in front of OV-103 on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 crewmembers pose in front of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, parked on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Having just completed their mission, the crewmembers are still wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs). From left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, Pilot Robert D. Cabana, Commander Richard N. Richards, MS Bruce E. Melnick, and MS William M. Shepherd.

  5. Cockpit Displays for Enhancing Terminal-Area Situational Awareness and Runway Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Paul V.; Otero, Sharon; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2007-01-01

    HUD and PFD displays have been developed to enhance situational awareness and improve runway safety. These displays were designed to seamlessly transition through all phases of flight providing guidance and information to the pilot. This report describes the background of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) HUD and PFD work, the steps required to integrate the displays with those of other LaRC programs, the display characteristics of the several operational modes and the transitional logic governing the transition between displays.

  6. Views of the Columbia sitting on Lakebed runway during crew egress of STS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Greeted by their medical doctor, Astronauts Joe H. Engle and Richard H. Truly egress the capbin of the shuttle Columbia at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of the STS-2 mission. Dr. Charles LaPinta of JSC's Medical Sciences Division is at right (39578); Engle, left, and Truly, still wearing their ejection/escape suits step out on to the runway at Edwards AFB (39579).

  7. Compacted-Snow Runways: Guidelines for Their Design and Construction in Antarctica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    1984) Casey snow runway tests 1983-84. Mel- the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets . IAHS bourne University Programme in Antarctic Stud- Publication No...there was a single annual from the proportions of ice to snow. The average layer of refrozen meltwater ) or at lower altitudes proportion (by volume) of...wheeled aircraft for sites on the Antarctic ice and field studies of snow in its natural and com- sheet or similar locations. A separate report has

  8. STS-43 crewmembers egress Atlantis, OV-104, after landing at KSC runway 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-43 crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, via mobile stairway after landing on runway 15 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Leading the crew and the first to step onto the red carpet is Pilot Michael A. Baker. He is followed by Mission Specialist (MS) Shannon W. Lucid, MS James C. Adamson, MS G. David Low, and Commander John E. Blaha. OV-104's fuselage is visible in the background.

  9. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, landing approach to runway 22 at EAFB, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-05-08

    STS030-S-124 (8 May 1989) --- Its landing gear fully deployed, Space Shuttle Atlantis is lined up for its approach to Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Minutes later, at 12:44:33 (PDT), the spacecraft's wheels had come to a complete stop, marking the successful conclusion for the four-day STS-30 mission. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Ronald J. Grabe, Norman E. Thagard, Mary L. Cleave and Mark C. Lee.

  10. STS-49 crew poses for group portrait on EAFB runway 22 after OV-105 landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 crewmembers pose for post flight group portrait on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) concrete runway 22 in front of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Crewmembers, wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs) and Endeavour caps, are (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) Richard J. Hieb, Pilot Kevin P. Chilton, Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein, MS Thomas D. Akers, MS Pierre J. Thuot, MS Kathryn C. Thornton, and MS Bruce E. Melnick.

  11. Views of the Columbia sitting on Lakebed runway during crew egress of STS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Greeted by their medical doctor, Astronauts Joe H. Engle and Richard H. Truly egress the capbin of the shuttle Columbia at Edwards Air Force Base at the end of the STS-2 mission. Dr. Charles LaPinta of JSC's Medical Sciences Division is at right (39578); Engle, left, and Truly, still wearing their ejection/escape suits step out on to the runway at Edwards AFB (39579).

  12. STS-41 crew poses in front of OV-103 on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 crewmembers pose in front of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, parked on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Having just completed their mission, the crewmembers are still wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs). From left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, Pilot Robert D. Cabana, Commander Richard N. Richards, MS Bruce E. Melnick, and MS William M. Shepherd.

  13. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-12-09

    STS053-S-085 (9 Dec. 1992) --- The drag chute on the space shuttle Discovery is partially deployed during landing on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base. The landing ended an eight-day space mission for the STS-53 crew. Main gear touchdown occurred at 12:43:17 p.m. (PST) on Dec. 9, 1992. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Robert D. Cabana, Guion S. Bluford Jr., James S. Voss and Michael R.U. (Rich) Clifford.

  14. Models for estimating runway landing capacity with Microwave Landing System (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosic, V.; Horonjeff, R.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed which is capable of computing the ultimate landing runway capacity, under ILS and MLS conditions, when aircraft population characteristics and air traffic control separation rules are given. This model can be applied in situations when only a horizontal separation between aircraft approaching a runway is allowed, as well as when both vertical and horizontal separations are possible. It is assumed that the system is free of errors, that is that aircraft arrive at specified points along the prescribed flight path precisely when the controllers intend for them to arrive at these points. Although in the real world there is no such thing as an error-free system, the assumption is adequate for a qualitative comparison of MLS with ILS. Results suggest that an increase in runway landing capacity, caused by introducing the MLS multiple approach paths, is to be expected only when an aircraft population consists of aircraft with significantly differing approach speeds and particularly in situations when vertical separation can be applied. Vertical separation can only be applied if one of the types of aircraft in the mix has a very steep descent angle.

  15. Effects of ATC automation on precision approaches to closely space parallel runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, R.; Lee, K.; Sanford, B.

    1995-01-01

    Improved navigational technology (such as the Microwave Landing System and the Global Positioning System) installed in modern aircraft will enable air traffic controllers to better utilize available airspace. Consequently, arrival traffic can fly approaches to parallel runways separated by smaller distances than are currently allowed. Previous simulation studies of advanced navigation approaches have found that controller workload is increased when there is a combination of aircraft that are capable of following advanced navigation routes and aircraft that are not. Research into Air Traffic Control automation at Ames Research Center has led to the development of the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS). The Final Approach Spacing Tool (FAST) is the component of the CTAS used in the TRACON area. The work in this paper examines, via simulation, the effects of FAST used for aircraft landing on closely spaced parallel runways. The simulation contained various combinations of aircraft, equipped and unequipped with advanced navigation systems. A set of simulations was run both manually and with an augmented set of FAST advisories to sequence aircraft, assign runways, and avoid conflicts. The results of the simulations are analyzed, measuring the airport throughput, aircraft delay, loss of separation, and controller workload.

  16. Perception of runway image shape and approach angle magnitude by pilots in simulated night landing approaches.

    PubMed

    Mertens, H W

    1981-07-01

    One cue for visual judgments of glidepath angle has been referred to as form ratio. Form ratio is defined as the ratio of vertical height of the runway to width of the far end in the runway retinal image. The ability of pilots to judge form ratios was compared with the ability to judge approach angles in the nighttime "black hole" situation in two experiments. Responses in both static and dynamic simulated approach conditions indicated a general tendency to overestimate form ratios and approach angles less than 3 degrees. Intersubject and intrasubject variability of form ratio and approach angle responses were comparable. These findings (i) do not support the utility of form ratio judgments as an aid in selecting approach angle, (ii) add to the empirical evidence of visual illusions and the danger of reliance on visual information for judgment of approach angle in the nighttime "black hole" situation where only runway light are visible, and (iii) point to variability in perception of approach angle as an important part of the problem.

  17. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F; Piller, Werner E

    2016-07-02

    A huge wetland (the 'Pebas system') covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical-tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ(18)O, δ(13)C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  18. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-01-01

    A huge wetland (the ‘Pebas system’) covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical–tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ18O, δ13C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  19. Using national movement databases to help inform responses to swine disease outbreaks in Scotland: the impact of uncertainty around incursion time

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Boden, Lisa A.; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Auty, Harriet K.; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Modelling is an important component of contingency planning and control of disease outbreaks. Dynamic network models are considered more useful than static models because they capture important dynamic patterns of farm behaviour as evidenced through animal movements. This study evaluates the usefulness of a dynamic network model of swine fever to predict pre-detection spread via movements of pigs, when there may be considerable uncertainty surrounding the time of incursion of infection. It explores the utility and limitations of animal movement data to inform such models and as such, provides some insight into the impact of improving traceability through real-time animal movement reporting and the use of electronic animal movement databases. The study concludes that the type of premises and uncertainty of the time of disease incursion will affect model accuracy and highlights the need for improvements in these areas. PMID:26833241

  20. Predicting Incursion of Plant Invaders into Kruger National Park, South Africa: The Interplay of General Drivers and Species-Specific Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pyšek, Petr; Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rouget, Mathieu; MacFadyen, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Background Overcoming boundaries is crucial for incursion of alien plant species and their successful naturalization and invasion within protected areas. Previous work showed that in Kruger National Park, South Africa, this process can be quantified and that factors determining the incursion of invasive species can be identified and predicted confidently. Here we explore the similarity between determinants of incursions identified by the general model based on a multispecies assemblage, and those identified by species-specific models. We analyzed the presence and absence of six invasive plant species in 1.0×1.5 km segments along the border of the park as a function of environmental characteristics from outside and inside the KNP boundary, using two data-mining techniques: classification trees and random forests. Principal Findings The occurrence of Ageratum houstonianum, Chromolaena odorata, Xanthium strumarium, Argemone ochroleuca, Opuntia stricta and Lantana camara can be reliably predicted based on landscape characteristics identified by the general multispecies model, namely water runoff from surrounding watersheds and road density in a 10 km radius. The presence of main rivers and species-specific combinations of vegetation types are reliable predictors from inside the park. Conclusions The predictors from the outside and inside of the park are complementary, and are approximately equally reliable for explaining the presence/absence of current invaders; those from the inside are, however, more reliable for predicting future invasions. Landscape characteristics determined as crucial predictors from outside the KNP serve as guidelines for management to enact proactive interventions to manipulate landscape features near the KNP to prevent further incursions. Predictors from the inside the KNP can be used reliably to identify high-risk areas to improve the cost-effectiveness of management, to locate invasive plants and target them for eradication. PMID:22194893

  1. Impact of climate change on risk of incursion of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in livestock in Europe through migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Gale, P; Stephenson, B; Brouwer, A; Martinez, M; de la Torre, A; Bosch, J; Foley-Fisher, M; Bonilauri, P; Lindström, A; Ulrich, R G; de Vos, C J; Scremin, M; Liu, Z; Kelly, L; Muñoz, M J

    2012-02-01

    To predict the risk of incursion of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in livestock in Europe introduced through immature Hyalomma marginatum ticks on migratory birds under current conditions and in the decade 2075-2084 under a climate-change scenario. A spatial risk map of Europe comprising 14 282 grid cells (25 × 25 km) was constructed using three data sources: (i) ranges and abundances of four species of bird which migrate from sub-Saharan Africa to Europe each spring, namely Willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus), Northern wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe), Tree pipit (Anthus trivialis) and Common quail (Coturnix coturnix); (ii) UK Met Office HadRM3 spring temperatures for prediction of moulting success of immature H. marginatum ticks and (iii) livestock densities. On average, the number of grid cells in Europe predicted to have at least one CCHFV incursion in livestock in spring was 1·04 per year for the decade 2005-2014 and 1·03 per year for the decade 2075-2084. In general with the assumed climate-change scenario, the risk increased in northern Europe but decreased in central and southern Europe, although there is considerable local variation in the trends. The absolute risk of incursion of CCHFV in livestock through ticks introduced by four abundant species of migratory bird (totalling 120 million individual birds) is very low. Climate change has opposing effects, increasing the success of the moult of the nymphal ticks into adults but decreasing the projected abundance of birds by 34% in this model. For Europe, climate change is not predicted to increase the overall risk of incursion of CCHFV in livestock through infected ticks introduced by these four migratory bird species. © 2011 Crown Copyright, AHVLA. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Biosecurity measures to prevent the incursion of invasive alien species into Japan and to mitigate their impact.

    PubMed

    Goka, K

    2010-08-01

    The 2004 Japanese 'Invasive Alien Species Act' was enacted to control invasive alien species and prevent the damage that they cause to ecosystems. The Act defines invasive alien species as those recognised as, or suspected of, causing damage to ecosystems, human safety, agriculture, forestry and fisheries. Invasive alien species are carefully regulated: raising, planting, keeping or transporting them is prohibited without the express permission of the relevant minister. The Act represents a revolutionary advance for biological conservation in Japan. However, enforcing the Act is problematic. Dealing with the European bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), for example, involved resolving a bitter dilemma between biological conservation and agricultural productivity. The Act also has a serious loophole; it does not include alien micro-organisms. The incursion of amphibian chytridiomycosis into Japan caused confusion for scientists and the Japanese Government because control of such an alien micro-organism was not anticipated in the Act. Japan faces particular difficulties in attempting to control alien species because of its reliance on imports.

  3. Sapflow and water use of freshwater wetland trees exposed to saltwater incursion in a tidally influenced South Carolina watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, K.W.; Duberstein, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Sea-level rise and anthropogenic activity promote salinity incursion into many tidal freshwater forested wetlands. Interestingly, individual trees can persist for decades after salt impact. To understand why, we documented sapflow (Js), reduction in Js with sapwood depth, and water use (F) of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.) trees undergoing exposure to salinity. The mean Js of individual trees was reduced by 2.8 g H2O??m-2??s-1 (or by 18%) in the outer sapwood on a saline site versus a freshwater site; however, the smallest trees, present only on the saline site, also registered the lowest Js. Hence, tree size significantly influenced the overall site effect on Js. Trees undergoing perennial exposure to salt used greater relative amounts of water in outer sapwood than in inner sapwood depths, which identifies a potentially different strategy for baldcypress trees coping with saline site conditions over decades. Overall, individual trees used 100 kg H2O??day-1 on a site that remained relatively fresh versus 23.9 kg H2O??day-1 on the saline site. We surmise that perennial salinization of coastal freshwater forests forces shifts in individual-tree osmotic balance and water-use strategy to extend survival time on suboptimal sites, which further influences growth and morphology.

  4. Overview of incursions of Asian H5N1 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza virus into Great Britain, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dennis J; Manvell, Ruth J; Irvine, Richard; Londt, Brandon Z; Cox, Bill; Ceeraz, Vanessa; Banks, Jill; Browna, Ian H

    2010-03-01

    Since 2005 there have been five incursions into Great Britain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of subtype H5N1 related to the ongoing global epizootic. The first incursion occurred in October 2005 in birds held in quarantine after importation from Taiwan. Two incursions related to wild birds: one involved a single dead whooper swan found in March 2006 in the sea off the east coast of Scotland, and the other involved 10 mute swans and a Canada goose found dead over the period extending from late December 2007 to late February 2008 on or close to a swannery on the south coast of England. The other two outbreaks occurred in commercial poultry in January 2007 and November 2007, both in the county of Suffolk. The first of these poultry outbreaks occurred on a large turkey farm, and there was no further spread. The second outbreak occurred on a free-range farm rearing turkeys, ducks, and geese and spread to birds on a second turkey farm that was culled as a dangerous contact. Viruses isolated from these five outbreaks were confirmed to be Asian H5N1 HPAI viruses; the quarantine outbreak was attributed to a clade 2.3 virus and the other four to clade 2.2 viruses. This article describes the outbreaks, their control, and the possible origins of the responsible viruses.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Repair of Airfield Pavement and Lighting, Runway 03R/21L Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, California. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    R e v i s e d F i n a l Environmental Assessment for Repair of Airfield Pavement and Lighting, Runway 03R/21L Travis Air Force Base... I NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE Under the no action alternative, the airfield runway would continue to be used and maintained. The existing runway and...Based on the analyses accomplished as a part of the enviromnental assessment (EA), which is herewith incorporated by reference, I determine that no

  6. Evaluation of two transport aircraft and several ground test vehicle friction measurements obtained for various runway surface types and conditions. A summary of test results from joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Tests with specially instrumented NASA Boeing 737 and 727 aircraft together with several different ground friction measuring devices were conducted for a variety of runway surface types and conditions. These tests are part of joint FAA/NASA Aircraft/Ground Vehicle Runway Friction Program aimed at obtaining a better understanding of aircraft ground handling performance under adverse weather conditions and defining relationships between aircraft and ground vehicle tire friction measurements. Aircraft braking performance on dry, wet, snow and ice-covered runway conditions is discussed as well as ground vehicle friction data obtained under similar runway conditions. For a given contaminated runway surface condition, the correlation between ground vehicles and aircraft friction data is identified. The influence of major test parameters on friction measurements such as speed, test tire characteristics, type and amount of surface contaminant, and ambient temperature are discussed. The effect of surface type on wet friction levels is also evaluated from comparative data collected on grooved and ungrooved concrete and asphalt surfaces.

  7. NASA diagonal-braked test vehicle evaluation of traction characteristics of grooved and ungrooved runway surfaces at Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, 8-9 May 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two runways were evaluated under artificially wetted conditions with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle (DBV). Results of the evaluation which included a pavement drainage analysis, a pavement skid resistance analysis, and a DBV wet/dry stopping distance ratio analysis indicated that the ungrooved runway surfaces had poor water drainage characteristics and poor skid resistance under wet conditions at high speeds especially in rubbercoated areas of the runways. Grooving runways to a transverse 1-1/4 x 1/4 x 1/4 inch pattern greatly improved both the water drainage and pavement skid resistance capability of these asphaltic concrete surfaces.

  8. Information for Lateral Aircraft Spacing Enabling Closely-Spaced Runway Operations During Instrument-Weather Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrush, Trent; Pritchett, Amy; Johnson, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to increase airport capacity, the U.S. plans on investing nearly $6 billion a year to properly maintain and improve the nation's major airports. Current FAA standards however, require a reduction in terminal operations during instrument-weather conditions at many airports, causing delays and reducing airport capacity. NASA, in cooperation with the FAA, has developed the Terminal Area Productivity Program to achieve clear-weather capacity in instrument- weather conditions for all phases of flight. This paper describes a series of experiments planned to investigate the conceptual design of different systems that provide information to flight crews regarding nearby traffic during the approach phase of flight. The purpose of this investigation is to identify and evaluate different display and auditory interfaces to the crew for use in closely-spaced parallel runway operations. Three separate experiments are planned for the investigation. The first two experiments will be conducted using part-task flight simulators located at the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory and at NASA Ames. The third experiment will be conducted in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator, a generic "glass-cockpit" simulator at NASA Ames. Subjects for each experiment will be current glass-cockpit pilots from major U.S. air carriers. Subject crews will fly several experimental scenarios in which pseudo-aircraft are "blundered" into the subject aircraft simulation. Runway spacing, longitudinal aircraft separation, aircraft performance and traffic information will be varied. Analyses of the subject reaction times in evading the blundering aircraft and the resulting closest points of approach will be conducted. This paper presents a preliminary examination of the data recorded during the part-task experiments. The impact of traffic information on closely-spaced parallel runway operations is discussed, cockpit displays to aid these operations are examined, and topics for future research

  9. An Exploratory Study of Runway Arrival Procedures: Time Based Arrival and Self-Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Vincent E.; Barmore, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The ability of a flight crew to deliver their aircraft to its arrival runway on time is important to the overall efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS). Over the past several years, the NAS has been stressed almost to its limits resulting in problems such as airport congestion, flight delay, and flight cancellation to reach levels that have never been seen before in the NAS. It is predicted that this situation will worsen by the year 2025, due to an anticipated increase in air traffic operations to one-and-a-half to three times its current level. Improved arrival efficiency, in terms of both capacity and environmental impact, is an important part of improving NAS operations. One way to improve the arrival performance of an aircraft is to enable the flight crew to precisely deliver their aircraft to a specified point at either a specified time or specified interval relative to another aircraft. This gives the flight crew more control to make the necessary adjustments to their aircraft s performance with less tactical control from the controller; it may also decrease the controller s workload. Two approaches to precise time navigation have been proposed: Time-Based Arrivals (e.g., required times of arrival) and Self-Spacing. Time-Based Arrivals make use of an aircraft s Flight Management System (FMS) to deliver the aircraft to the runway threshold at a given time. Self-Spacing enables the flight crew to achieve an ATC assigned spacing goals at the runway threshold relative to another aircraft. The Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO), a multi-agency initiative established to plan and coordinate the development of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), has asked for data for both of these concepts to facilitate future research and development. This paper provides a first look at the delivery performance of these two concepts under various initial and environmental conditions in an air traffic simulation environment.

  10. The Allocation of Runway Slots by Auction. Volume I. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-15

    7.3 Net Earnings After Slot Payments, After Taxes 32 7.4 Small Communities Average Enplanements/Day 34 Vill I. BACKGROUND The Airline Deregulation Act...34 HUREAU OF TANDARLS 1%3 Volume I The Allocation ofRunway Slots by----IN__ Auction Office of Aviation Policy Washington, D.C. 20590 xecutive Summary...Princeton, NJ 08540 / DOT-FA79WA-4374 , 13 Type of Repor, end Ps.,od Co.e.ed 12. Sp.onseorn Agency Name and Addess Office of Aviation Policy Final Report

  11. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-02

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters.

  12. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rolls along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, after nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. This view looks down OV-103's port side from the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) to the nose section. The SSMEs are gimbaled to their descent position and the rudder/speedbrake is deployed on the vertical stabilizer. Wheel stop occurred at 6:51 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). In the distance EAFB facilities are visible.

  13. STS-31 crew poses on EAFB concrete runway after egressing OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 crewmembers, wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs), pose for an informal portrait on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) concrete runway 22 after egressing Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley, Pilot Charles F. Bolden, MS Kathryn D. Sullivan, Commander Loren J. Shriver, and MS Bruce McCandless II. A service vehicle and OV-103's main landing gear (MLG) are visible in the background. The highly successful five-day mission concluded at EAFB with wheel stop at 6:51:00 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  14. STS-41 crew poses in front of OV-103 on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 crewmembers give 'thumbs up' signal while standing in front of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, parked on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Having just completed their mission, the crewmembers are still wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs). From left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, Pilot Robert D. Cabana, Commander Richard N. Richards, MS Bruce E. Melnick, and MS William M. Shepherd. Set up at OV-103's side hatch is a mobile stairway which the crew uses to egress the vehicle and which technicians use when safing the vehicle during postflight operations.

  15. STS-33 Discovery, OV-103, approaches concrete runway 04 at EAFB, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-11-27

    STS033-S-014 (27 Nov 1989) --- The Space Shuttle Discovery is silhouetted against late afternoon California skies as it approaches the runway for landing at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. A five-member crew aboard was about to complete the DOD-devoted STS-33 mission. The landing occurred at 16:31:02 p.m. (PST), Nov. 27, 1989. Onboard Discovery for the mission were Astronauts Frederick D. Gregory, John E. Blaha, Kathryn C. Thornton, F. Story Musgrave and Manley L. Carter.

  16. STS-30 crew poses with NASA administrators in front of OV-104 on EAFB runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers pose with NASA administrators in front of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. From left to right are Acting NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly, Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, MS Norman E. Thagard, and NASA Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers. OV-104 is undergoing postlanding servicing following its successful landing at 12:44:33 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  17. STS-30 crew poses with NASA administrators in front of OV-104 on EAFB runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 crewmembers pose with NASA administrators in front of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. From left to right are Acting NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly, Commander David M. Walker, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark C. Lee, MS Mary L. Cleave, Pilot Ronald J. Grabe, MS Norman E. Thagard, and NASA Deputy Administrator Dale D. Myers. Crewmembers have just egressed OV-104 via a mobile stairway after the successful landing at 12:44:33 pm (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  18. STS-41 crew poses in front of OV-103 on concrete runway 22 at EAFB, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 crewmembers give 'thumbs up' signal while standing in front of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, parked on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. Having just completed their mission, the crewmembers are still wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs). From left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, Pilot Robert D. Cabana, Commander Richard N. Richards, MS Bruce E. Melnick, and MS William M. Shepherd. Set up at OV-103's side hatch is a mobile stairway which the crew uses to egress the vehicle and which technicians use when safing the vehicle during postflight operations.

  19. STS-31 crew poses on EAFB concrete runway after egressing OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 crewmembers, wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs), pose for an informal portrait on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) concrete runway 22 after egressing Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Left to right are Mission Specialist (MS) Steven A. Hawley, Pilot Charles F. Bolden, MS Kathryn D. Sullivan, Commander Loren J. Shriver, and MS Bruce McCandless II. A service vehicle and OV-103's main landing gear (MLG) are visible in the background. The highly successful five-day mission concluded at EAFB with wheel stop at 6:51:00 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)).

  20. STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rolls along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, after nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. This view looks down OV-103's port side from the space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) to the nose section. The SSMEs are gimbaled to their descent position and the rudder/speedbrake is deployed on the vertical stabilizer. Wheel stop occurred at 6:51 am (Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)). In the distance EAFB facilities are visible.

  1. Effects of drugs on schedule-controlled running of mice in a circular runway.

    PubMed

    Lehr, E; Morse, W H; Dews, P B

    1985-01-01

    Partially food deprived mice ran in a 1-m circular runway. Every 30 circuits, diluted evaporated milk was delivered. Under control conditions mice averaged 0.18 circuits/s for 1 h. The rate was reduced to 0.11 circuits/s 1 h after gavage of Tylose (cellulose derivative) vehicle. Amphetamine, chlordiazepoxide and pentobarbital increased the rate of responding over some dose range, but chlorpromazine, clozapine, imipramine and morphine caused only decreases in responding at effective dose levels. The results are generally similar to reports of effects of the drugs on responses of much briefer duration occurring at similar rates.

  2. An Overview of the Annual NASA Tire/Runway Friction Workshop and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the organization efforts, objectives, scope, agenda, test procedures and results from eleven years of conducting the NASA Tire/Runway Friction Workshop. The paper will also summarize the lessons learned between 1994 and 2004. A description of the various friction, texture and roughness equipment used during these workshops at NASA Wallops Flight Facility on the eastern shore of Virginia will be provided together with the range of test surfaces available for evaluation. The need for friction measuring equipment calibration centers is discussed and plans for future workshops are identified.

  3. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cowled, Brendan D; Garner, M Graeme; Negus, Katherine; Ward, Michael P

    2012-01-16

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  4. Holocene sea level and climate change in the Black Sea: Multiple marine incursions related to freshwater discharge events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, R.E.; Leorri, E.; McLaughlin, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Repeated marine invasions of the Black Sea during the Holocene have been inferred by many eastern scientists as resulting from episodes of marine inflow from the Mediterranean beneath a brackish outflow from the Black Sea. We support this scenario but a fundamental question remains: What caused the repeated marine invasions? We offer an hypothesis for the repeated marine invasions of the Black Sea based on: (1) the overall similarity of sea-level curves from both tectonically quiescent and active margins of the Black Sea and their similarity to a sequence stratigraphic record from the US mid-Atlantic coast. The similarity of the records from two widely-separated regions suggests their common response to documented Holocene climate ocean-atmosphere reorganizations (coolings); (2) the fact that in the modern Black Sea, freshwater runoff from surrounding rivers dominates over evaporation, so that excess runoff might have temporarily raised Black Sea level (although the Black Sea would have remained brackish). Following the initial invasion of the Black Sea by marine Mediterranean waters (through the Marmara Sea) in the early Holocene, repeated marine incursions were modulated, or perhaps even caused, by freshwater discharge to the Black Sea. Climatic amelioration (warming) following each documented ocean-atmosphere reorganization during the Holocene likely shifted precipitation patterns in the surrounding region and caused mountain glaciers to retreat, increasing freshwater runoff above modern values and temporarily contributing to an increase of Black Sea level. Freshwater-to-brackish water discharges into the Black Sea initially slowed marine inflow but upon mixing of runoff with more marine waters beneath them and their eventual exit through the Bosphorus, marine inflow increased again, accounting for the repeated marine invasions. The magnitude of the hydrologic and sea-level fluctuations became increasingly attenuated through the Holocene, as reflected by Black

  5. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  6. Runways at small airports are deteriorating because of deferred maintenance: Action needed by FAA and the Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-09-01

    Runways at many small airports are deteriorating faster than necessary because airport owners--usually local governments--have deferred critical maintenance. The result is damage to the runways' basic structure and a shortened useful life if they are not repaired. Based on GAO's review of 46 airports, studies by others, and the views of FAA officials, deferred maintenance is apparently a longstanding nationwide problem. Lack of funds is cited by airport owners as the primary reason for not performing needed maintenance; however, the Federal Aviation Administration's apathy to bring about satisfactory maintenance is a contributing cause. GAO is recommending actions that FAA can take to help ensure that runways at small airports are properly maintained. The Congress should recognize the airport owners' lack of resources to properly maintain airports when considering future revisions to the Airport Improvement Program.

  7. An investigation of an active landing gear system to reduce aircraft vibrations caused by landing impacts and runway excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Xing, J. T.; Price, W. G.; Li, Weiji

    2008-10-01

    A mathematical model is developed to control aircraft vibrations caused by runway excitation using an active landing gear system. Equations are derived to describe the integrated aircraft-active system. The nonlinear characteristics of the system are modelled and it is actively controlled using a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) strategy. The performance of this system and its corresponding passive system are compared using numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the impact loads and the vertical displacement of the aircraft's centre of gravity caused by landing and runway excitations are greatly reduced using the active system, which result in improvements to the performance of the landing gear system, benefits the aircraft's fatigue life, taxiing performance, crew/passenger comfort and reduces requirements on the unevenness of runways.

  8. Recycle Runway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Nancy Judd has been called a folk artist, an outsider artist, and a designer--all characterizations that she tends to shirk. Perhaps if labels are needed, environmental artist educator is more appropriate. Judd lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She dedicates much of her time to creating art that raises public awareness of environmental…

  9. Recycle Runway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Nancy Judd has been called a folk artist, an outsider artist, and a designer--all characterizations that she tends to shirk. Perhaps if labels are needed, environmental artist educator is more appropriate. Judd lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She dedicates much of her time to creating art that raises public awareness of environmental…

  10. The Dynamic Planner: The Sequencer, Scheduler, and Runway Allocator for Air Traffic Control Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Gregory L.; Denery, Dallas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Dynamic Planner (DP) has been designed, implemented, and integrated into the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS) to assist Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs), in real time, with the task of planning and scheduling arrival traffic approximately 35 to 200 nautical miles from the destination airport. The TMC may input to the DP a series of current and future scheduling constraints that reflect the operation and environmental conditions of the airspace. Under these constraints, the DP uses flight plans, track updates, and Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) predictions to calculate optimal runway assignments and arrival schedules that help ensure an orderly, efficient, and conflict-free flow of traffic into the terminal area. These runway assignments and schedules can be shown directly to controllers or they can be used by other CTAS tools to generate advisories to the controllers. Additionally, the TMC and controllers may override the decisions made by the DP for tactical considerations. The DP will adapt to computations to accommodate these manual inputs.

  11. Enhancement of vision systems based on runway detection by image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulec, N.; Sen Koktas, N.

    2012-06-01

    An explicit way of facilitating approach and landing operations of fixed-wing aircraft in degraded visual environments is presenting a coherent image of the designated runway via vision systems and hence increasing the situational awareness of the flight crew. Combined vision systems, in general, aim to provide a clear view of the aircraft exterior to the pilots using information from databases and imaging sensors. This study presents a novel method that consists of image-processing and tracking algorithms, which utilize information from navigation systems and databases along with the images from daylight and infrared cameras, for the recognition and tracking of the designated runway through the approach and landing operation. Video data simulating the straight-in approach of an aircraft from an altitude of 5000 ft down to 100 ft is synthetically generated by a COTS tool. A diverse set of atmospheric conditions such as fog and low light levels are simulated in these videos. Detection and false alarm rates are used as the primary performance metrics. The results are presented in a format where the performance metrics are compared against the altitude of the aircraft. Depending on the visual environment and the source of the video, the performance metrics reach up to 98% for DR and down to 5% for FAR.

  12. Uncertainty Analysis for the Evaluation of a Passive Runway Arresting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard; Marlowe, Jill M.; Yager, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the stopping distance of an aircraft involved in a runway overrun incident when the runway has been provided with an extension comprised of a material engineered to induce high levels of rolling friction and drag. A formula for stopping distance is derived that is shown to be the product of a known formula for the case of friction without drag, and a dimensionless constant between 0 and 1 that quantifies the further reduction in stopping distance when drag is introduced. This additional quantity, identified as the Drag Reduction Factor, D, is shown to depend on the ratio of drag force to friction force experienced by the aircraft as it enters the overrun area. The specific functional form of D is shown to depend on how drag varies with speed. A detailed uncertainty analysis is presented which reveals how the uncertainty in estimates of stopping distance are influenced by experimental error in the force measurements that are acquired in a typical evaluation experiment conducted to assess candidate overrun materials.

  13. Runway Wake Vortex, Crosswind, and Visibility Detection with a Scintillometer at Schiphol Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, D.; Hartogensis, O. K.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the performance and investigate the capability of a scintillometer to detect wake vortices, crosswind and visibility near an airport runway. An experiment is carried out at Schiphol airport (Amsterdam, The Netherlands), where an optical scintillometer is positioned alongside a runway. An algorithm is developed to detect wake vortices, and also the strength of the wake vortex, from the variance in the scintillation signal. The algorithm shows promising results in detecting wake vortices and their strengths during the night. During the day, the scintillometer signal is dominated by environmental turbulence and wake vortices are no longer detectable. The crosswind measured by the scintillometer is compared with wind-speed and wind-direction data at the airport. Our results show that, after applying an outlier filter, the scintillometer is able to measure the crosswind over the short time period of 3 s required for aviation applications. The outlier filter does not compromise the capability of the scintillometer to obtain the maximum 3 s crosswind over a 10-min time frame correctly. Finally, a transmission method is used to obtain the visibility from the scintillometer signal, which is then compared with that obtained from a visibility sensor. The scintillometer is able to identify periods of low visibility correctly, although it shows a high amount of scatter around the exact visibility value.

  14. Expansion of flight simulator capability for study and solution of aircraft directional control problems on runways, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The MCAIR five-degree-of-freedom motion-base simulator (MBS) was used in combination with a six-degree-of-freedom aircraft mathematical model to demonstrate the simulation adequacy on uncrowned runways, under various conditions. Known aircraft parameters were used where possible to increase program credibility. Tire-runway friction models were coordinated with personnel of NASA, Langley Research Center. The F-4 experienced pilots representing NASA, FAA, and USAF participated in the 130 approach-touchdown-rollout demonstration and verified the simulation adequacy.

  15. Application of modelling to determine the absence of foot-and-mouth disease in the face of a suspected incursion.

    PubMed

    Heuer, C; French, N P; Jackson, R; Mackereth, G F

    2007-12-01

    ongoing surveillance activities in the face of an exotic disease incursion. Results of modelling suggested to start clinical inspection activities at 4 days and to continue regular inspection twice a week for about 35 days after the date of first exposure, to satisfy the required 95% confidence threshold of clinical detection of FMD in cattle herds and sheep flocks.

  16. Decentralized aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuanyuan

    The existing air transportation system is approaching a bottleneck because its dominant hub-and-spoke model results in a concentration of a large percentage of the air traffic at a few hub airports. Advanced technologies are greatly needed to enhance the transportation capabilities of the small airports in the U.S.A., and distribute the high volume of air traffic at the hub airports to those small airports, which are mostly non-controlled airports. Currently, two major focus areas of research are being pursued to achieve this objective. One focus concentrates on the development of tools to improve operations in the current Air Traffic Management system. A more long-term research effort focuses on the development of decentralized Air Traffic Management techniques. This dissertation takes the latter approach and seeks to analyze the degree of decentralization for scheduling aircraft landings in the dynamic operational environment at single runway non-controlled airports. Moreover, it explores the feasibility and capability of scheduling aircraft landings within uninterrupted free-flight environment in which there is no existence of Air Traffic Control (ATC). First, it addresses the approach of developing static optimization algorithms for scheduling aircraft landings and, thus, analyzes the capability of automated aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports. Then, it provides detailed description of the implementation of a distributed Air Traffic Management (ATM) system that achieves decentralized aircraft landing scheduling with acceptable performance whereas a solution to the distributed coordination issues is presented. Finally real-time Monte Carlo flight simulations of multi-aircraft landing scenarios are conducted to evaluate the static and dynamic performance of the aircraft landing scheduling algorithms and operation concepts introduced. Results presented in the dissertation demonstrate that decentralized aircraft landing scheduling

  17. Real-time terminal area trajectory planning for runway independent aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Min

    The increasing demand for commercial air transportation results in delays due to traffic queues that form bottlenecks along final approach and departure corridors. In urban areas, it is often infeasible to build new runways, and regardless of automation upgrades traffic must remain separated to avoid the wakes of previous aircraft. Vertical or short takeoff and landing aircraft as Runway Independent Aircraft (RIA) can increase passenger throughput at major urban airports via the use of vertiports or stub runways. The concept of simultaneous non-interfering (SNI) operations has been proposed to reduce traffic delays by creating approach and departure corridors that do not intersect existing fixed-wing routes. However, SNI trajectories open new routes that may overfly noise-sensitive areas, and RIA may generate more noise than traditional jet aircraft, particularly on approach. In this dissertation, we develop efficient SNI noise abatement procedures applicable to RIA. First, we introduce a methodology based on modified approximated cell-decomposition and Dijkstra's search algorithm to optimize longitudinal plane (2-D) RIA trajectories over a cost function that minimizes noise, time, and fuel use. Then, we extend the trajectory optimization model to 3-D with a k-ary tree as the discrete search space. We incorporate geography information system (GIS) data, specifically population, into our objective function, and focus on a practical case study: the design of SNI RIA approach procedures to Baltimore-Washington International airport. Because solutions were represented as trim state sequences, we incorporated smooth transition between segments to enable more realistic cost estimates. Due to the significant computational complexity, we investigated alternative more efficient optimization techniques applicable to our nonlinear, non-convex, heavily constrained, and discontinuous objective function. Comparing genetic algorithm (GA) and adaptive simulated annealing (ASA

  18. Motivational effects of methamphetamine as measured by the runway method using priming stimulation of intracranial self-stimulation behavior.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Hidenori; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Sendo, Toshiaki; Araki, Hiroaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2008-04-01

    Priming stimulation is known to promote the motivational effects of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) behavior. The runway method using priming stimulation can experimentally distinguish the reward and motivational effects of ICSS behavior. In this study, we examined the motivational effect of a drug as determined by the runway method using priming stimulation of ICSS behavior. Electrodes were implanted chronically into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of the rats. A lever for stimulation of the MFB was set on the opposite side of the start box in the apparatus. The rats were trained to obtain a reward stimulation (50-200 muA, 0.2 ms, 60 Hz) of the MFB by pressing the goal lever, and then priming stimulation of the MFB was applied. After priming stimulation, rats were placed in the start box of the runway apparatus and the time taken by the rat to press the lever was recorded. Priming stimulation frequency was significantly correlated with running speed (r=0.897, p<0.05). Methamphetamine (1, 3 mg/kg) induced an increase in running speed (F(3, 20)=16.257, p<0.01), and was further increased with increase in priming stimulation frequency. In addition, methamphetamine significantly enhanced the motivational effect. These results suggest that the runway method using priming stimulation of ICSS behavior may be an effective way to evaluate the enhancing effect of a drug on motivation.

  19. Expansion of flight simulator capability for study and solution of aircraft directional control problems on runways, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The models used to implement the DC-9-10 aircraft simulation for the Runway Direction Control study are presented. The study was done on the Douglas Aircraft six-degree-of-freedom motion simulator. Documentation of the models was in algebraic form, to the extent possible. Effort was directed toward presenting what was actually done rather than general forms.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Runway 17-35 Closure at Albuquerque International Sunport, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    and reducing maintenance costs . The July 2003 ABQ Master Plan Update revalidated that recommendation. As discussed in the EA, Runway 17/35...35 would not adversely impact operational capacity, and it would increase airfield safety and reduce maintenance costs . IV. ALTERNATIVES...environmental impacts, cost considerations, air traffic capacity/delay factors, airspace utilization, and safety. After a complete consideration of all

  1. Experiment Description and Results for Arrival Operations Using Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPiDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Barmore, Bryan E.; Capron, William R.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Shay, Richard F.; Abbott, Terence S.

    2013-01-01

    The predicted increase in the number of commercial aircraft operations creates a need for improved operational efficiency. Two areas believed to offer increases in aircraft efficiency are optimized profile descents and dependent parallel runway operations. Using Flight deck Interval Management (FIM) software and procedures during these operations, flight crews can achieve by the runway threshold an interval assigned by air traffic control (ATC) behind the preceding aircraft that maximizes runway throughput while minimizing additional fuel consumption and pilot workload. This document describes an experiment where 24 pilots flew arrivals into the Dallas Fort-Worth terminal environment using one of three simulators at NASA?s Langley Research Center. Results indicate that pilots delivered their aircraft to the runway threshold within +/- 3.5 seconds of their assigned time interval, and reported low workload levels. In general, pilots found the FIM concept, procedures, speeds, and interface acceptable. Analysis of the time error and FIM speed changes as a function of arrival stream position suggest the spacing algorithm generates stable behavior while in the presence of continuous (wind) or impulse (offset) error. Concerns reported included multiple speed changes within a short time period, and an airspeed increase followed shortly by an airspeed decrease.

  2. Plastic (wire-combed) grooving of a slip-formed concrete runway overlay at Patrick Henry Airport: An initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlin, E. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A wire-comb technique is described for transversely grooving the surface of a freshly laid (plastic state) slip-formed concrete overlay installed at Patrick Henry Airport. This method of surface texturing yields better water drainage and pavement skid resistance than that obtained with an older conventional burlap drag concrete surface treatment installed on an adjacent portion of the runway.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Repair, Reconstruction, and/or Replacement of the Main Base Runway, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). The NESHAPs were established for benzene, vinyl chloride, radionuclides, mercury , asbestos, beryllium...temporary camps, rock shelters, milling stations, lithic deposits, quarries, cremations , rock features, and rock art. Historic period archaeological sites...Runway Prehistoric period sites include villages, temporary camps, rock shelters, milling stations, lithic deposits, quarries, cremations , rock

  4. Detection of obstacles on runway using Ego-Motion compensation and tracking of significant features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar (Principal Investigator); Camps, Octavia (Principal Investigator); Gandhi, Tarak; Devadiga, Sadashiva

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a method for obstacle detection on a runway for autonomous navigation and landing of an aircraft. Detection is done in the presence of extraneous features such as tiremarks. Suitable features are extracted from the image and warping using approximately known camera and plane parameters is performed in order to compensate ego-motion as far as possible. Residual disparity after warping is estimated using an optical flow algorithm. Features are tracked from frame to frame so as to obtain more reliable estimates of their motion. Corrections are made to motion parameters with the residual disparities using a robust method, and features having large residual disparities are signaled as obstacles. Sensitivity analysis of the procedure is also studied. Nelson's optical flow constraint is proposed to separate moving obstacles from stationary ones. A Bayesian framework is used at every stage so that the confidence in the estimates can be determined.

  5. Air to air view of Endeavour, OV-105, atop SCA approaches Ellington runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Air to air view of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) NASA 911, a modified Boeing 747, approaches touchdown for a brief stopover at Ellington Field, near JSC. Visible below the spacecraft/aircraft combination are the NASA T-38 flight line, NASA aircraft hangars and facilities, and a runway. OV-105 rolled out at Rockwell's Palmdale facility on 04-25-91 to once more bring to four the total of NASA Shuttles available for flight assignment. The spacecraft and aircraft-tandem left Houston later on this day headed for another stop in Mississippi before landing in Florida on 05-07-91. This photograph was taken from a T-38 aircraft by Sheri J. Dunnette of JSC's Image Science Division (ISD).

  6. Air to air view of Endeavour, OV-105, atop SCA approaches Ellington runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    S91-36097 (6 May 1991) --- Air to air view of Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) NASA 911, a modified Boeing 747, approaches touchdown for a brief stopover at Ellington Field, near JSC. Visible below the spacecraft/aircraft combination are the NASA T-38 flight line, NASA aircraft hangars and facilities, and a runway. OV-105 rolled out at Rockwell's Palmdale facility on 04-25-91 to once more bring to four the total of NASA Shuttles available for flight assignment. The spacecraft and aircraft-tandem left Houston later on this day headed for another stop in Mississippi before landing in Florida on 05-07-91. This photograph was taken from a T-38 aircraft by Sheri J. Dunnette of JSC's Image Science Division (ISD).

  7. Aerial view of Endeavour, OV-105, parked on Ellington Field runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This aerial view looks down on Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, atop a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) NASA 911, a modified Boeing 747, parked on an Ellington Field runway. The tail cone added to OV-105 to enhance the aerodynamics of the spacecraft/aircraft transport system is clearly visible. Ground transportation vehicles (cars, trucks) and a crowd surround OV-105 and NASA 911. Ceremonies were held during OV-105's brief stopover at Ellington Field, near JSC. The new space vehicle, sans SCA, was rolled out of Rockwell's Palmdale facility on 04-25-91. This again brings the total of NASA Shuttles available for flight assignment to four. The spacecraft and aircraft-tandem left Houston later on this day headed for a stop in Mississippi before landing in Florida on 05-07-91. This photograph was taken from a NASA T-38 aircraft by Sheri J. Dunnette of JSC's Image Sciences Division (ISD).

  8. Remote sensing of voids in large concrete structures: runways, taxiways, bridges, and building walls and roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Gary J.

    1998-10-01

    Maintenance of our world's infrastructure presents many unique challenges. Engineering and maintenance personnel must maintain around the clock service to millions of people each year while maintaining millions of cubic meters of concrete distributed throughout facilities. This infrastructure includes runways, taxiways, roadways, walkways, bridges, building walls and roofs. Presently only a limited number of accurate and economical techniques exist to test this myriad of concrete structures for integrity and safety as well as insure that they meet original design specifications. Remote sensing, non-destructive testing techniques, such as Infrared Thermography, Ground Penetrating Radar, Magnetometer and Pachometer, measure physical properties affected by the various materials and conditions found within, and under, concrete infrastructure. These techniques have established reputations for accurate investigations of concrete anomalies. This paper will review the applications of different non- destructive testing techniques on many concrete infrastructure components.

  9. Nondestructive testing of airport concrete structures: runways, taxiways, roads, bridges, building walls, and roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Gary J.

    1998-03-01

    Maintenance of airport infrastructure presents many unique challenges. Airport engineering and maintenance personnel must maintain around the clock service to millions of people each year while maintaining millions of cubic meters of concrete distributed throughout the facilities. This infrastructure includes runways, taxiways, roadways, walkways, bridges, building walls and roofs. Presently only a limited number of accurate and economical techniques exist to test this myriad of concrete structures for integrity and safety as well as insure that they meet original design specifications. Remote sensing, non-destructive testing techniques, such as IR thermography, ground penetrating radar, magnetometer and pachometer, measure physical properties affected by the various materials and conditions found within, and under, concrete infrastructure. These techniques have established reputations for accurate investigations of concrete anomalies.

  10. Use of Data Comm by Flight Crew to Conduct Interval Management Operations to Parallel Dependent Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Hubbs, Clay; Shay, Rick; Karanian, James

    2011-01-01

    The Interval Management (IM) concept is being developed as a method to maintain or increase high traffic density airport arrival throughput while allowing aircraft to conduct near idle thrust descents. The Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPiDR1) experiment at NASA Langley Research Center used 24 commercial pilots to examine IM procedures to conduct parallel dependent runway arrival operations while maintaining safe but efficient intervals behind the preceding aircraft. The use of IM procedures during these operations requires a lengthy and complex clearance from Air Traffic Control (ATC) to the participating aircraft, thereby making the use of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) highly desirable as the communication method. The use of CPDLC reduces the need for voice transmissions between controllers and flight crew, and enables automated transfer of IM clearance elements into flight management systems or other aircraft avionics. The result is reduced crew workload and an increase in the efficiency of crew procedures. This paper focuses on the subset of data collected related to the use of CPDLC for IM operations into a busy airport. Overall, the experiment and results were very successful, with the mean time under 43 seconds for the flight crew to load the clearance into the IM spacing tool, review the calculated speed, and respond to ATC. An overall mean rating of Moderately Agree was given when the crews were asked if the use of CPDLC was operationally acceptable as simulated in this experiment. Approximately half of the flight crew reported the use of CPDLC below 10,000 for IM operations was unacceptable, with 83% reporting below 5000 was unacceptable. Also described are proposed modifications to the IM operations that may reduce CPDLC Respond time to less than 30 seconds and should significantly reduce the complexity of crew procedures, as well as follow-on research issues for operational use of CPDLC during IM

  11. Seasonal incursion of Indian Monsoon humidity and precipitation into the southeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau inferred from tree ring δ18O values with intra-seasonal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaomin; Liu, Xiaohong; Evans, Michael N.; Wang, Wenzhi; An, Wenling; Xu, Guobao; Wu, Guoju

    2016-06-01

    Incursion of the Indian Monsoon flow onto the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is an important regional moisture-delivery mechanism, but the causes of intra-seasonal and longer-term variations are poorly understood. We observed a clear intra-seasonal cycle in the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of Smith fir (Abies forrestii var. georgei) growing at two different altitudes (high-elevation site: 29°39‧N, 94°42‧E, 4200 m a.s.l.; low-elevation site: 29°39‧N, 94°43‧E, 3800 m a.s.l.) on a SE-facing slope in the Sygera Mountains, southeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Mechanistic modeling suggests that δ18O of precipitation, which in turn depends on relative humidity and precipitation amount, is important in controlling the intra-seasonal tree-ring isotopic cycle, and we speculate that the same controls also operate on interannual and longer time scales. If so, multi-century δ18O records with intra-seasonal resolution may enable us to infer long-term variations in the incursion of the Indian Monsoon onto the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  12. Re-Evaluating the Geological Evidence for Late Holocene Marine Incursion Events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bianchette, Thomas A; McCloskey, Terrence A; Liu, Kam-Biu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico's Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene.

  13. Effective surveillance strategies following a potential classical Swine Fever incursion in a remote wild pig population in North-Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Leslie, E; Cowled, B; Graeme Garner, M; Toribio, J-A L M L; Ward, M P

    2014-10-01

    Early disease detection and efficient methods of proving disease freedom can substantially improve the response to incursions of important transboundary animal diseases in previously free regions. We used a spatially explicit, stochastic disease spread model to simulate the spread of classical swine fever in wild pigs in a remote region of northern Australia and to assess the performance of disease surveillance strategies to detect infection at different time points and to delineate the size of the resulting outbreak. Although disease would likely be detected, simple random sampling was suboptimal. Radial and leapfrog sampling improved the effectiveness of surveillance at various stages of the simulated disease incursion. This work indicates that at earlier stages, radial sampling can reduce epidemic length and achieve faster outbreak delineation and control, but at later stages leapfrog sampling will outperform radial sampling in relation to supporting faster disease control with a less-extensive outbreak area. Due to the complexity of wildlife population dynamics and group behaviour, a targeted approach to surveillance needs to be implemented for the efficient use of resources and time. Using a more situation-based surveillance approach and accounting for disease distribution and the time period over which an epidemic has occurred is the best way to approach the selection of an appropriate surveillance strategy.

  14. Re-Evaluating the Geological Evidence for Late Holocene Marine Incursion Events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bianchette, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico’s Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene. PMID:27571270

  15. Factors associated with secondhand smoke incursion into the homes of non-smoking residents in a multi-unit housing complex: a cross-sectional study in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, KyooSang

    2017-09-25

    In a multi-unit housing (MUH) complex, secondhand smoke (SHS) can pass from one living space to another. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SHS incursion, and to establish the relationship between SHS incursion and socio-demographic and built environmental factors in MUH in Korea. A population-based sample of 2600 residents (aged ≥19 years) living in MUH from across the city of Seoul, Korea, was obtained through a web-based selection panel. The residents completed a questionnaire detailing socio-demographic factors, smoking status, frequency of SHS incursion, and built environmental factors. The presence of a personal smoke-free home rule was determined by residents declaring that no one smoked inside the home. Of the 2600 participants, non-smoking residents who lived in homes with a personal smoke-free rule were selected for further analysis (n = 1784). In the previous 12 months, 74.7% of residents had experienced SHS incursion ≥1 times. A multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis indicated that residents who spent more time at home, lived with children, supported the implementation of smoke-free regulations in MUH, lived in small homes, lived in homes with natural ventilation provided by opening a front door or the windows and front door, and lived in homes with more frequent natural ventilation were more likely to report SHS incursion into their homes. The majority of the non-smoking residents experienced SHS incursion, even with a personal smoke-free rule in their homes. A smoke-free policy in MUH is needed to protect residents from SHS exposure when they are at home.

  16. Runway Texture and Grid Pattern Effects on Rate-of-Descent Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. A.; Dearing, M. G.; Sweet, B. T.; Kaiser, M. K.; Rutkowski, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To date, perceptual errors occur in determining descent rate from a computer-generated image in flight simulation. Pilots tend to touch down twice as hard in simulation than in flight, and more training time is needed in simulation before reaching steady-state performance. Barnes suggested that recognition of range may be the culprit, and he cited that problems such as collimated objects, binocular vision, and poor resolution lead to poor estimation of the velocity vector. Brown's study essentially ruled out that the lack of binocular vision is the problem. Dorfel added specificity to the problem by showing that pilots underestimated range in simulated scenes by 50% when 800 ft from the runway threshold. Palmer and Petitt showed that pilots are able to distinguish between a 1.7 ft/sec and 2.9 ft/sec sink rate when passively observing sink rates in a night scene. Platform motion also plays a role, as previous research has shown that the addition of substantial platform motion improves pilot estimates of vertical velocity and results in simulated touchdown rates more closely resembling flight. This experiment examined how some specific variations in the visual scene properties affect a pilot's perception of sink rate. It extended another experiment that focused on the visual and motion cues necessary for helicopter autorotations. In that experiment, pilots performed steep approaches to a runway. The visual content of the runway and its surroundings varied in two ways: texture and rectangular grid spacing. Four textures, included a no-texture case, were evaluated. Three grid spacings, including a no-grid case, were evaluated. The results showed that pilot better controlled their vertical descent rates when good texture cues were present. No significant differences were found for the grid manipulation. Using those visual scenes a simple psychophysics, experiment was performed. The purpose was to determine if the variations in the visual scenes allowed pilots to better

  17. Modeling of Instrument Landing System (ILS) localizer signal on runway 25L at Los Angeles International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.; Knox, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    A joint NASA/FAA flight test has been made to record instrument landing system (ILS) localizer receiver signals for use in mathematically modeling the ILS localizer for future simulation studies and airplane flight tracking tasks. The flight test was conducted on a portion of the ILS localizer installed on runway 25L at the Los Angeles International Airport. The tests covered the range from 10 to 32 n.mi. from the localizer antenna. Precision radar tracking information was compared with the recorded localizer deviation data. Data analysis showed that the ILS signal centerline was offset to the left of runway centerline by 0.071 degrees and that no significant bends existed on the localizer beam. Suggested simulation models for the ILS localizer are formed from a statistical analysis.

  18. An analysis of flight data from aircraft landings with and without the aid of a painted diamond on the same runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaroop, R.; Ashworth, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The usefulness of a painted diamond on a runway as a visual aid to perform safe landings of aircraft was studied. Flight data on glideslope intercepts, flight path elevation angles, and touchdown distances were collected and analyzed. It is concluded that an appropriately painted diamond on a runway has the potential of providing glideslope information for the light weight class of general aviation aircraft. This conclusion holds irrespective of the differences in landing techniques used by the pilots.

  19. Indices of extinction-induced "depression" after operant learning using a runway vs. a cued free-reward delivery schedule.

    PubMed

    Topic, Bianca; Kröger, Inga; Vildirasova, Petya G; Huston, Joseph P

    2012-11-01

    Loss of reward is one of the etiological factors leading to affective disorders, such as major depression. We have proposed several variants of an animal model of depression based on extinction of reinforced behavior of rats. A number of behaviors emitted during extinction trials were found to be attenuated by antidepressant treatment and, thus, qualified as indices of extinction-induced "despair". These include increases in immobility in the Morris water maze and withdrawal from the former source of reward as well as biting behavior in operant chambers. Here, we assess the effects of reward omission on behaviors after learning of (a) a cued free-reward delivery in an operant chamber and (b) food-reinforced runway behavior. Sixty adult male Wistar rats were either trained to receive food reinforcement every 90 s (s) after a 5s lasting cue light (FI 90), or to traverse an alley to gain food reward. Daily drug treatment with either the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram or the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (each 10mg/kg) or vehicle was begun either 25 days (operant chamber) or 3 days (runway) prior to extinction. The antidepressants suppressed rearing behavior in both paradigms specifically during the extinction trials, which indicates this measure as a useful marker of depression-related behavior, possibly indicating vertical withdrawal. In the operant chamber, only marginal effects on operant learning responses during extinction were found. In the runway, the operant learned responses run time and distance to the goal, as well as total distance moved, grooming and quiescence were also influenced by the antidepressants, providing a potential set of markers for extinction-induced "depression" in the runway. Both paradigms differ substantially with respect to the anticipation of reward, behaviors that are learned and that accompany extinction. Accordingly, antidepressant treatment influenced different sets of behaviors in these two learning tasks.

  20. Electromechanical imitator of antilock braking modes of wheels with pneumatic tire and its application for the runways friction coefficient measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putov, A. V.; Kopichev, M. M.; Ignatiev, K. V.; Putov, V. V.; Stotckaia, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper it is considered a discussion of the technique that realizes a brand new method of runway friction coefficient measurement based upon the proposed principle of measuring wheel braking control for the imitation of antilock braking modes that are close to the real braking modes of the aircraft chassis while landing that are realized by the aircraft anti-skid systems. Also here is the description of the model of towed measuring device that realizes a new technique of runway friction coefficient measuring, based upon the measuring wheel braking control principle. For increasing the repeatability accuracy of electromechanical braking imitation system the sideslip (brake) adaptive control system is proposed. Based upon the Burkhard model and additive random processes several mathematical models were created that describes the friction coefficient arrangement along the airstrip with different qualitative adjectives. Computer models of friction coefficient measuring were designed and first in the world the research of correlation between the friction coefficient measuring results and shape variations, intensity and cycle frequency of the measuring wheel antilock braking modes. The sketch engineering documentation was designed and prototype of the latest generation measuring device is ready to use. The measuring device was tested on the autonomous electromechanical examination laboratory treadmill bench. The experiments approved effectiveness of method of imitation the antilock braking modes for solving the problem of correlation of the runway friction coefficient measuring.

  1. Effect of a cold, dry air incursion on atmospheric boundary layer processes over a high-altitude lake in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Wen, Lijuan; Zhao, Lin; Ao, Yinhuan; Wang, Shaoying

    2017-03-01

    High-altitude lakes are frequently exposed to extreme meteorological conditions, but the surface and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) processes have received little attention under specific weather conditions. This study used the multi-source field data, re-analysis and remote sensing data to investigate the varying patterns and driving forces of the convective boundary layer (CBL) height over Ngoring Lake in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) before and after the cold air incursion. Daily cumulative surface heat flux and buoyancy flux over the land were markedly larger than those over the lake on a clear summer day, but an opposite pattern was observed accompanied by the cold air incursion. CBLs determined by the potential temperature thinned (depth < 100 m) over the lake in the daytime and thickened (400-600 m) at night on a clear day. Along with the arrival of the cold air, CBL rapidly thickened to 2280 m over the lake, exceeded than the maximum value at adjacent Madoi station. Cold air dramatically cooled the middle-upper atmosphere but the temperature of the lower atmosphere cooled down slowly, partly due to a sharp increase of sensible heat flux over the lake, both of which linked up to weaken the potential temperature gradient. Moreover, increasing wind speed and vertical wind shear further facilitated the buoyancy flux to exert higher heat convection efficiency. All of these factors acted together to cause the rapid growth of CBL over the lake. This investigation provided a more in-depth knowledge of boundary layer dynamics in the lake-rich region of the TP.

  2. Method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from airport runways and roadways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from surfaces such as airport runways and roadways is disclosed. The apparatus includes a large vehicle that has the capacity to be loaded so as to effectively add weight to the rubber cleaning tires of the vehicle. In addition, the vehicle has a water tank and sprinkler system so that the surface may be wetted down in front of the tires as the vehicle proceeds across the surface. The cleaning tires of the apparatus are aligned so that they are at a yaw angle to the direction of travel, and the cleaning tire assembly is attached to the underside of the trailer of the vehicle and positioned between a forward and rear water tank. In addition, this tire assembly is equipped with a means of loading the tires onto the contaminated surface. The method comprises driving such a vehicle at low speeds down the surface as the road is being wet in front of the cleaning tires. The effect of the angled tires is to create a scrubbing action that not only heats the rubber deposits by friction but also causes it to be removed from the surface. The rubber that does not stick to the cleaning tires is then removed from the surface by sweeping.

  3. Simulated Wake Characteristics Data for Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Operations Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Neitzke, Kurt W.

    2012-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to generate and compile wake characteristics data relevant to the evaluation and feasibility analysis of closely spaced parallel runway (CSPR) operational concepts. While the experiment in this work is not tailored to any particular operational concept, the generated data applies to the broader class of CSPR concepts, where a trailing aircraft on a CSPR approach is required to stay ahead of the wake vortices generated by a lead aircraft on an adjacent CSPR. Data for wake age, circulation strength, and wake altitude change, at various lateral offset distances from the wake-generating lead aircraft approach path were compiled for a set of nine aircraft spanning the full range of FAA and ICAO wake classifications. A total of 54 scenarios were simulated to generate data related to key parameters that determine wake behavior. Of particular interest are wake age characteristics that can be used to evaluate both time- and distance- based in-trail separation concepts for all aircraft wake-class combinations. A simple first-order difference model was developed to enable the computation of wake parameter estimates for aircraft models having weight, wingspan and speed characteristics similar to those of the nine aircraft modeled in this work.

  4. Method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from airport runways and roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1993-04-01

    A method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from surfaces such as airport runways and roadways is disclosed. The apparatus includes a large vehicle that has the capacity to be loaded so as to effectively add weight to the rubber cleaning tires of the vehicle. In addition, the vehicle has a water tank and sprinkler system so that the surface may be wetted down in front of the tires as the vehicle proceeds across the surface. The cleaning tires of the apparatus are aligned so that they are at a yaw angle to the direction of travel, and the cleaning tire assembly is attached to the underside of the trailer of the vehicle and positioned between a forward and rear water tank. In addition, this tire assembly is equipped with a means of loading the tires onto the contaminated surface. The method comprises driving such a vehicle at low speeds down the surface as the road is being wet in front of the cleaning tires. The effect of the angled tires is to create a scrubbing action that not only heats the rubber deposits by friction but also causes it to be removed from the surface. The rubber that does not stick to the cleaning tires is then removed from the surface by sweeping.

  5. Method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from airport runways and roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1991-04-01

    A method and apparatus for cleaning rubber deposits from surfaces such as airport runways and roadways is disclosed. The apparatus includes a large vehicle that has the capacity to be loaded so as to effectively add weight to rubber cleaning tires of the vehicle. In addition, the vehicle has a water tank and sprinkler system so that the surface may be wetted down in front of the tires as the vehicle proceeds across the surface. The cleaning tires of the apparatus are aligned so that they are at a yaw angle to the direction of travel, and the cleaning tire assembly is attached to the underside of the trailer of the vehicle and positioned between a forward and rear water tank. In addition, this tire assembly is equipped with a means of loading the tires onto the contaminated surface. The method comprises driving such a vehicle at low speeds down the surface as the road is being wet in front of the cleaning tires. The effect of the angled tires is to create a scrubbing action that not only heats the rubber deposits by friction but also causes it to be removed from the surface. The rubber that does not stick to the cleaning tires is then removed from the surface by sweeping.

  6. The effect of runway surface and braking on Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1992-01-01

    In 1988, a 1067 m long touchdown zone on each end of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) was modified from its original heavy-broom finish with transverse grooves configuration to a longitudinal corduroy surface texture with no transverse grooves. The intent of this modification was to reduce the spin-up wear on the Orbiter main gear tires and provide for somewhat higher crosswind capabilities at that site. The modification worked well, so it was proposed that the remainder of the runway be modified as well to permit even higher crosswind landing capability. Tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) to evaluate the merit of such a modification. This paper discusses the results of these tests, and explains why the proposed modification did not provide the expected improvement and thus was not implemented. Also, in an ongoing program to evaluate the origin of various tire wear phenomenon, a series of tests was conducted to evaluate the effect of braking on tire wear. Finally, a modified tire is discussed in terms of its wear performance under rollout and braking operations.

  7. The effect of runway surface and braking on Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1992-01-01

    In 1988, a 1067 m long touchdown zone on each end of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) was modified from its original heavy-broom finish with transverse grooves configuration to a longitudinal corduroy surface texture with no transverse grooves. The intent of this modification was to reduce the spin-up wear on the Orbiter main gear tires and provide for somewhat higher crosswind capabilities at that site. The modification worked well, so it was proposed that the remainder of the runway be modified as well to permit even higher crosswind landing capability. Tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) to evaluate the merit of such a modification. This paper discusses the results of these tests, and explains why the proposed modification did not provide the expected improvement and thus was not implemented. Also, in an ongoing program to evaluate the origin of various tire wear phenomenon, a series of tests was conducted to evaluate the effect of braking on tire wear. Finally, a modified tire is discussed in terms of its wear performance under rollout and braking operations.

  8. Kinematic Modeling of Separation Compression for Paired Approaches to Closely-Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    In a simultaneous paired approach to closely-spaced parallel runways, a pair of aircraft flies in close proximity on parallel approach paths. The longitudinal separation between the aircraft must be maintained within a range that avoids wake encounters and, if one of the aircraft blunders, avoids collision. To increase operational availability, the approach procedure must accommodate a mixture of aircraft sizes and, consequently, approach speeds. In these procedures, the slower aircraft is placed in the lead position. The faster aircraft maintains separation from the slow aircraft in a dependent operation until final approach and flies independently afterward. Due to the higher approach speed of the fast aircraft, longitudinal separation will decrease during final approach. Therefore, the fast aircraft must position itself before the final approach so that it will remain within the safe range of separation as separation decreases. Given the approach geometry and speed schedule for each aircraft, one can use kinematics to estimate the separation loss between a pair of aircraft. A kinematic model can complement fast-time Monte-Carlo simulations of the approach by enabling a tailored reduction in the variation of starting position for the fast aircraft. One could also implement the kinematic model in ground-based or on-board decision support tools to compute the optimal initial separation for a given pair of aircraft. To better match the auto-coupled flight of real aircraft, the paper derives a kinematic model where the speed schedule is flown using equivalent airspeed. The predicted time of flight using the equivalent airspeed kinematic model compares well against a high-fidelity aircraft simulation performing the same approach. This model also demonstrates a modest increase in the predicted loss of separation when contrasted against a kinematic model that assumes the scheduled speed is true airspeed.

  9. Beacon system based on light-emitting diode sources for runways lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Mario González; Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio A.; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2014-06-01

    New aeronautical ground lighting techniques are becoming increasingly important to ensure the safety and reduce the maintenance costs of the plane's tracks. Until recently, tracks had embedded lighting systems whose sources were based on incandescent lamps. But incandescent lamps have several disadvantages: high energy consumption and frequent breakdowns that result in high maintenance costs (lamp average life-time is ˜1500 operating hours) and the lamp's technology has a lack of new lighting functions, such as signal handling and modification. To solve these problems, the industry has developed systems based on light-emitting diode (LED) technology with improved features: (1) LED lighting consumes one tenth the power, (2) it improves preventive maintenance (an LED's lifetime range is between 25,000 and 100,000 hours), and (3) LED lighting technology can be controlled remotely according to the needs of the track configuration. LEDs have been in use for more than three decades, but only recently, around 2002, have they begun to be used as visual aids, representing the greatest potential change for airport lighting since their inception in the 1920s. Currently, embedded LED systems are not being broadly used due to the specific constraints of the rules and regulations of airports (beacon dimensions, power system technology, etc.). The fundamental requirements applied to embedded lighting systems are to be hosted on a volume where the dimensions are usually critical and also to integrate all the essential components for operation. An embedded architecture that meets the lighting regulations for airport runways is presented. The present work is divided into three main tasks: development of an optical system to optimize lighting according to International Civil Aviation Organization, manufacturing prototype, and model validation.

  10. Preliminary test results of the joint FAA-USAF-NASA runway research program. Part 1: Traction measurements of several runways under wet and dry conditions with a Boeing 727, a diagonal-braked vehicle, and a mu-meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Yager, T. J.; Sleeper, R. K.; Merritt, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    The stopping distance, brake application velocity, and time of brake application were measured for two modern jet transports, along with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle and the British Mu-Meter on several runways, which when wetted, cover the range of slipperiness likely to be encountered in the United States. Tests were designed to determine if correlation between the aircraft and friction measuring vehicles exists. The test procedure, data reduction techniques, and preliminary test results obtained with the Boeing 727, the Douglas DC-9, and the ground vehicles are given. Time histories of the aircraft test run parameters are included.

  11. A Simulation Study of Instrument Meteorological Condition Approaches to Dual Parallel Runways Spaced 3400 and 2500 Feet Apart Using Flight-Deck-Centered Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    A number of our nations airports depend on closely spaced parallel runway operations to handle their normal traffic throughput when weather conditions are favorable. For safety these operations are curtailed in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) when the ceiling or visibility deteriorates and operations in many cases are limited to the equivalent of a single runway. Where parallel runway spacing is less than 2500 feet, capacity loss in IMC is on the order of 50 percent for these runways. Clearly, these capacity losses result in landing delays, inconveniences to the public, increased operational cost to the airlines, and general interruption of commerce. This document presents a description and the results of a fixed-base simulation study to evaluate an initial concept that includes a set of procedures for conducting safe flight in closely spaced parallel runway operations in IMC. Consideration of flight-deck information technology and displays to support the procedures is also included in the discussions. The procedures and supporting technology rely heavily on airborne capabilities operating in conjunction with the air traffic control system.

  12. Estimation of real-time runway surface contamination using flight data recorder parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Donovan

    Within this research effort, the development of an analytic process for friction coefficient estimation is presented. Under static equilibrium, the sum of forces and moments acting on the aircraft, in the aircraft body coordinate system, while on the ground at any instant is equal to zero. Under this premise the longitudinal, lateral and normal forces due to landing are calculated along with the individual deceleration components existent when an aircraft comes to a rest during ground roll. In order to validate this hypothesis a six degree of freedom aircraft model had to be created and landing tests had to be simulated on different surfaces. The simulated aircraft model includes a high fidelity aerodynamic model, thrust model, landing gear model, friction model and antiskid model. Three main surfaces were defined in the friction model; dry, wet and snow/ice. Only the parameters recorded by an FDR are used directly from the aircraft model all others are estimated or known a priori. The estimation of unknown parameters is also presented in the research effort. With all needed parameters a comparison and validation with simulated and estimated data, under different runway conditions, is performed. Finally, this report presents results of a sensitivity analysis in order to provide a measure of reliability of the analytic estimation process. Linear and non-linear sensitivity analysis has been performed in order to quantify the level of uncertainty implicit in modeling estimated parameters and how they can affect the calculation of the instantaneous coefficient of friction. Using the approach of force and moment equilibrium about the CG at landing to reconstruct the instantaneous coefficient of friction appears to be a reasonably accurate estimate when compared to the simulated friction coefficient. This is also true when the FDR and estimated parameters are introduced to white noise and when crosswind is introduced to the simulation. After the linear analysis the

  13. HL-10 in flight, turning to line up with lakebed runway 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This photo shows the HL-10 in flight, turning to line up with lakebed runway 18. The pilot for this flight, the 29th of the HL-10 series, was Bill Dana. The HL-10 reached a peak altitude of 64,590 feet and a top speed of Mach 1.59 on this particular flight. The HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting-body designs flown at NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Northrop Corporation built the HL-10 and M2-F2, the first two of the fleet of 'heavy' lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center. The contract for construction of the HL-10 and the M2-F2 was $1.8 million. 'HL' stands for horizontal landing, and '10' refers to the tenth design studied by engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. After delivery to NASA in January 1966, the HL-10 made its first flight on Dec. 22, 1966, with research pilot Bruce Peterson in the cockpit. Although an XLR-11 rocket engine was installed in the vehicle, the first 11 drop flights from the B-52 launch aircraft were powerless glide flights to assess handling qualities, stability, and control. In the end, the HL-10 was judged to be the best handling of the three original heavy-weight lifting bodies (M2-F2/F3, HL-10, X-24A). The HL-10 was flown 37 times during the lifting body research program and logged the highest altitude and fastest speed in the Lifting Body program. On Feb. 18, 1970, Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag piloted the HL-10 to Mach 1.86 (1,228 mph). Nine days later, NASA pilot Bill Dana flew the vehicle to 90,030 feet, which became the highest altitude reached in the program. Some new and different lessons were learned through the successful flight testing of the HL-10. These lessons, when combined with information from it's sister ship, the M2-F2/F3, provided an excellent starting

  14. Friction evaluation of unpaved, gypsum-surface runways at Northrup Strip, White Sands Missile Range, in support of Space Shuttle Orbiter landing and retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, T. J.; Horne, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Friction measurement results obtained on the gypsum surface runways at Northrup Strip, White Sands Missile Range, N. M., using an instrumented tire test vehicle and a diagonal braked vehicle, are presented. These runways were prepared to serve as backup landing and retrieval sites to the primary sites located at Dryden Flight Research Center for shuttle orbiter during initial test flights. Similar friction data obtained on paved and other unpaved surfaces was shown for comparison and to indicate that the friction capability measured on the dry gypsum surface runways is sufficient for operations with the shuttle orbiter and the Boeing 747 aircraft. Based on these ground vehicle friction measurements, estimates of shuttle orbiter and aircraft tire friction performance are presented and discussed. General observations concerning the gypsum surface characteristics are also included and several recommendations are made for improving and maintaining adequate surface friction capabilities prior to the first shuttle orbiter landing.

  15. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay

  16. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay

  17. The effect of landing system coverage and path geometry on lateral position errors at the runway threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an analytical study performed to determine the effect of the azimuth coverage of a Microwave Landing System (MLS) on the ability of an airplane, with an initial navigation position estimate error, to navigate to the runway threshold are presented. The test path chosen for this study consists of an initial straight segment leading into a 130 deg turn with a 2286 m radius and ending in a straight-in final approach segment. The test path configuration was varied by changing the MLS azimuth coverage angle and the final approach length. The aircraft was positioned with an inital offset to the left or right of the desired path along the line of intersection with the MLS azimuth coverage. A fast time computer simulation program, using a simplistic point mass model of the airplane, was used for this study. The data from this study indicates that the lateral position errors at the runway are primarily a function of the final approach length. The effect of the azimuth coverage on the lateral position errors was restricted by the turn characteristics of the horizontal steering control laws.

  18. 77 FR 26815 - Opportunity To Comment on the Draft Airport Design Advisory Circular 150/5300-13A

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    .... f. The inclusion of Runway Incursion prevention geometry for taxiway to taxiway intersections and... changes include: a. An introduction of the Runway Reference Code (RRC) and the Runway Design Code (RDC). b. An expanded discussion on Declared Distances. c. A clarified discussion on the Runway Protection Zone...

  19. Evaluation of g seat augmentation of fixed-base/moving base simulation for transport landings under two visually imposed runway width conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Steinmetz, G. G.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical-motion cues supplied by a g-seat to augment platform motion cues in the other five degrees of freedom were evaluated in terms of their effect on objective performance measures obtained during simulated transport landings under visual conditions. In addition to evaluating the effects of the vertical cueing, runway width and magnification effects were investigated. The g-seat was evaluated during fixed base and moving-base operations. Although performance with the g-seat only improved slightly over that with fixed-base operation, combined g-seat platform operation showed no improvement over improvement over platform-only operation. When one runway width at one magnification factor was compared with another width at a different factor, the visual results indicated that the runway width probably had no effect on pilot-vehicle performance. The new performance differences that were detected may be more readily attributed to the extant (existing throughout) increase in vertical velocity induced by the magnification factor used to change the runway width, rather than to the width itself.

  20. Approaching the runway after the first evaluation flight of the Quiet Spike project, NASA's F-15B testbed aircraft cruises over Roger's Dry Lakebed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-10

    Approaching the runway after the first evaluation flight of the Quiet Spike project, NASA's F-15B testbed aircraft cruises over Roger's Dry Lakebed near the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Quiet Spike was developed by Gulfstream Aerospace as a means of controlling and reducing the sonic boom caused by an aircraft 'breaking' the sound barrier.

  1. Behavior of aircraft antiskid braking systems on dry and wet runway surfaces - A velocity-rate-controlled, pressure-bias-modulated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, S. M.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    During maximum braking the average ratio of drag-force friction coefficient developed by the antiskid system to maximum drag-force friction coefficient available at the tire/runway interface was higher on dry surfaces than on wet surfaces. The gross stopping power generated by the brake system on the dry surface was more than twice that obtained on the wet surfaces. With maximum braking applied, the average ratio of side-force friction coefficient developed by the tire under antiskid control to maximum side-force friction available at the tire/runway interface of a free-rolling yawed tire was shown to decrease with increasing yaw angle. Braking reduced the side-force friction coefficient on a dry surface by 75 percent as the wheel slip ratio was increased to 0.3; on a flooded surface the coefficient dropped to near zero for the same slip ratio. Locked wheel skids were observed when the tire encountered a runway surface transition from dry to flooded, due in part to the response time required for the system to sense abrupt changes in the runway friction; however, the antiskid system quickly responded by reducing brake pressure and cycling normally during the remainder of the run on the flooded surface.

  2. Water-compatible polymer concrete materials for use in rapid repair systems for airport runways. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.

    1981-03-01

    Water-compatible polymer concrete (PC) formulations have been developed which appear to have potential for use in all-weather rapid repair procedures for bomb-damaged runways. Formulations consisting of furfuryl alcohol, water-saturated aggregate, dry silica flour, promoters, and catalysts produced composites with properties suitable for repair purposes when mixed and polymerized at temperatures from -20/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/C. Calcium-unsaturated polyester complexed PC also produced excellent properties. However, the early strength criteria (2000 psi (13.78 MPa) at 1 h) and other requirements such as compatibility of the formulation with water and practical working times could be attained only at temperatures >20/sup 0/C. This system can be polymerized under water. Studies of the polymerization reaction mechanisms, materials properties, costs, and potential placement methods were performed.

  3. Head-up display (HUD) utility. II - Runway to HUD transitions monitoring eye focus and decision times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weintraub, D. J.; Haines, R. F.; Randle, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment conducted using a head-up display (HUD) suggests that the demonstrated superiority of the HUD over a conventional instrument panel stems from its superior layout of information. A HUD display presents instrument-panel information to pilots in such a way that the symbols appear as a virtual image at optical infinity superimposed on the landscape. In the experiment conducted, the luminance of the display symbology and its angle subtended at the eye remained fixed, while optical distance and gaze angle were varied. Concomitant measures of eye movements, eye accommodative state, and decision-making time concerning airspeed, altitude and runway condition were obtained. It is found that, while looking straight ahead, at zero diopters, the HUD shortens decision time by 80 to 90 msec, not statistically significant at the 0.05 (slope of diopter/gaze interaction) level. The question of a cognitive overload induced by the luminous symbols of the HUD is subsequently addressed.

  4. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA/Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour receives a high-flying salute from its sister shuttle, Columbia, atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, shortly after Endeavor's landing 12 October 1994, at Edwards, California, to complete mission STS-68. Columbia was being ferried from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it will undergo six months of inspections, modifications, and systems upgrades. The STS-68 11-day mission was devoted to radar imaging of Earth's geological features with the Space Radar Laboratory. The orbiter is surrounded by equipment and personnel that make up the ground support convoy that services the space vehicles as soon as they land. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the

  5. The Space Shuttle Endeavour's drag chute deploys to slow the orbiter as it rolls out on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base at the conclusion of its 14-day STS-111 mission to the International Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-19

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour's drag chute deploys to slow the orbiter as it rolls out on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base at the conclusion of its 14-day STS-111 mission to the International Space Station.

  6. Flight simulation study to determine MLS lateral course width requirements on final approach for general aviation. [runway conditions affecting microwave landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumrine, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of various lateral course widths and runway lengths for manual CAT I Microwave Landing System instrument approaches was carried out with instrument rated pilots in a General Aviation simulator. Data are presented on the lateral dispersion at the touchdown zone, and the middle and outer markers, for approaches to 3,000, 8,000 (and trial 12,000 foot) runway lengths with full scale angular lateral course widths of + or - 1.19 deg, + or - 2.35 deg, and + or - 3.63 deg. The distance from touchdown where the localizer deviation went to full scale was also recorded. Pilot acceptance was measured according to the Cooper-Harper rating system.

  7. The effect of measurement errors and computational approximations on a perspective ILM radar image. [airport runways and the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was examined of aircraft position and attitude, of measurement errors, and of computational approximations on the size, shape, and position of a perspective radar image of an airport runway as might be displayed by an independent landing monitor in transport aircraft. The effect on runway image geometry was examined for different aircraft attitudes and different aircraft positions relative to a standard three degree glide slope. Measurement errors investigated were errors in radar azimuth angle and range, and errors in those aircraft parameters supplied to the radar for use in converting the radar image into a perspective format (namely pitch, roll, and altitude). Also investigated were the effects of using certain mathematical approximations, such as small angle, in the coordinate transformation which converts the image to a perspective format.

  8. Behavior of aircraft antiskid braking systems on dry and wet runway surfaces. A slip-velocity-controlled, pressure-bias-modulated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, S. M.; Tanner, J. A.; Smith, E. G.

    1979-01-01

    The braking and cornering response of a slip velocity controlled, pressure bias modulated aircraft antiskid braking system is investigated. The investigation, conducted on dry and wet runway surfaces, utilized one main gear wheel, brake, and tire assembly of a McDonnell Douglas DC 9 series 10 airplane. The landing gear strut was replaced by a dynamometer. The parameters, which were varied, included the carriage speed, tire loading, yaw angle, tire tread condition, brake system operating pressure, and runway wetness conditions. The effects of each of these parameters on the behavior of the skid control system is presented. Comparisons between data obtained with the skid control system and data obtained from single cycle braking tests without antiskid protection are examined.

  9. Studies in short haul air transportation in the California corridor: Effects of design runway length; community acceptance; impact of return on investment and fuel cost increases, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevell, R. S.; Jones, D. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of design runway length on the economics and traffic demand of a 1985 short haul air transportation system in the California Corridor was investigated. The community acceptance of new commercial airports for short haul service was studied. The following subjects were analyzed: (1) travel demand, (2) vehicle technology, (3) infrastructure, (4) systems analysis, and (5) effects on the community. The operation of the short haul system is compared with conventional airline operations.

  10. Environmental Assessment for Conversion of the Existing Aero Club Runway to Emergency Helipad for David Grant Medical Center Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, California Contract No. GS-10F-132K Delivery Order No. FA4427-08-F-0133 Submitted to U. S. Air Force Center for...Engineering and the Environment Travis Air Force Base, California July 2010 2485 Natomas Park Drive Suite 600 Sacramento, CA 95833 Report...Club Runway to Emergency Helipad for David Grant Medical Center Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, California 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  11. A model-based approach for detection of runways and other objects in image sequences acquired using an on-board camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Tang, Yuan-Liang

    1994-01-01

    This research was initiated as a part of the Advanced Sensor and Imaging System Technology (ASSIST) program at NASA Langley Research Center. The primary goal of this research is the development of image analysis algorithms for the detection of runways and other objects using an on-board camera. Initial effort was concentrated on images acquired using a passive millimeter wave (PMMW) sensor. The images obtained using PMMW sensors under poor visibility conditions due to atmospheric fog are characterized by very low spatial resolution but good image contrast compared to those images obtained using sensors operating in the visible spectrum. Algorithms developed for analyzing these images using a model of the runway and other objects are described in Part 1 of this report. Experimental verification of these algorithms was limited to a sequence of images simulated from a single frame of PMMW image. Subsequent development and evaluation of algorithms was done using video image sequences. These images have better spatial and temporal resolution compared to PMMW images. Algorithms for reliable recognition of runways and accurate estimation of spatial position of stationary objects on the ground have been developed and evaluated using several image sequences. These algorithms are described in Part 2 of this report. A list of all publications resulting from this work is also included.

  12. A model-based approach for detection of runways and other objects in image sequences acquired using an on-board camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Tang, Yuan-Liang

    1994-08-01

    This research was initiated as a part of the Advanced Sensor and Imaging System Technology (ASSIST) program at NASA Langley Research Center. The primary goal of this research is the development of image analysis algorithms for the detection of runways and other objects using an on-board camera. Initial effort was concentrated on images acquired using a passive millimeter wave (PMMW) sensor. The images obtained using PMMW sensors under poor visibility conditions due to atmospheric fog are characterized by very low spatial resolution but good image contrast compared to those images obtained using sensors operating in the visible spectrum. Algorithms developed for analyzing these images using a model of the runway and other objects are described in Part 1 of this report. Experimental verification of these algorithms was limited to a sequence of images simulated from a single frame of PMMW image. Subsequent development and evaluation of algorithms was done using video image sequences. These images have better spatial and temporal resolution compared to PMMW images. Algorithms for reliable recognition of runways and accurate estimation of spatial position of stationary objects on the ground have been developed and evaluated using several image sequences. These algorithms are described in Part 2 of this report. A list of all publications resulting from this work is also included.

  13. Limited Production (LP) Precision Runway Monitor (PRM) Operational Test and Evaluation integration and OT and E Operational Test Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Jeffrey

    1995-05-01

    This document defines the Test Plan and corresponding Test Verification Requirements Traceability Matrix (TVRTM) that will be used to conduct the Limited Production (LP) Precision Runway Monitor (PRM) Operational Test and Evaluation (OT and E) Integration and OT and E Operational tests. These tests will be conducted at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport following the Contractor Site Acceptance Test. The LP PRM OT and E test effort will concentrate on Operational Effectiveness and Suitability. The Operational Effectiveness Test consists of a review of the contractor performed Development Test and Evaluation (DT and E) and Site Acceptance Tests. This review will evaluate whether each of the Measures of Effectiveness had been satisfactorily tested and whether the results meet the Minimum Acceptable Operational REquirements MAORs). This review will be conducted solely by test engineers and does not require the PRM system. The Operational Suitability Tests will expose the test participants (Air Traffic (AT) Controllers and Airway Facilities (AF) Technicians) to the PRM system in an operational environment while they perform specified operational procedures. These tests will be conducted in two separate phases: AT Suitability and AF Suitability. Each of these phases is focused on the specific test participants.

  14. Usability Evaluation of Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) Concept in Dallas/Fort Worth Airport Tower Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon C.; Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a proposed decision-support tool for air traffic control tower controllers for reducing taxi delay and optimizing the departure sequence. In the present study, the tool's usability was evaluated to ensure that its claimed performance benefits are not being realized at the cost of increasing the work burden on controllers. For the evaluation, workload ratings and questionnaire responses collected during a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment were analyzed to assess the SARDA advisories' effects on the controllers' ratings on cognitive resources (e.g., workload, spare attention) and satisfaction. The results showed that SARDA reduced the controllers' workload and increased their spare attention. It also made workload and attention levels less susceptible to the effects of increases in the traffic load. The questionnaire responses suggested that the controllers generally were satisfied with the ease of use of the tool and the objectives of the SARDA concept, but with some caution. To gain more trust from controllers, the the reasoning behind advisories may need to be made more transparent to them.

  15. A worker attaches covers for the nose pitot boom before removing the unpiloted X-40 from the runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A worker attaches covers for the nose pitot boom before removing the unpiloted X-40 from the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, following its successful free-flight on March 14, 2001. The unpiloted X-40 is a risk-reduction vehicle for the X-37, which is intended to be a reusable space vehicle. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala, manages the X-37 project. At Dryden, the X-40A underwent a series of ground and air tests to reduce possible risks to the larger X-37, including drop tests from a helicopter to check guidance and navigation systems planned for use in the X-37. The X-37 is designed to demonstrate technologies in the orbital and reentry environments for next-generation reusable launch vehicles that will increase both safety and reliability, while reducing launch costs from $10,000 per pound to $1,000 per pound. The X-37, carried into orbit by the Space Shuttle, is planned to fly two orbital missions to test reusable launch vehicle technologies.

  16. An effective method to detect straight lines from high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery and its applications for runway extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Xingyue

    2007-06-01

    It has always been an important low-level operation to extract edges from images in the fields of computer vision and image procession, in which straight line extraction is typical and representative. Because most man-made spatial objects, e.g. buildings, roads, etc. often take on near straight-line boundaries, extracting straight lines is often the first step to extract these targets. Straight lines can then be looked as the elementary units for other higher level image interpretations. In this paper, a straight line extraction method combining edge detection and depth-first searching on the vector line layer is proposed and applied to extract runways of airports. The steps include: 1) edges are found with the Canny operator and vectorirzed. The reason to use the Canny operator is because it is designed to be an optimal edge detector, which gives very good results on detecting step or slop like edges. It takes as input a grey scale image, and produces as output an image showing the positions of tracked intensity discontinuities. After this operation, we then vectorize the edge points to be a vector layer with edge tracing.2) With the vector-formatted edge lines, the straight line searching can then be carried out. In order to complete this, topology between arcs should be cleaned and rebuilt, which includes the deletion of repetitive, one-node arcs, and splitting on the intersections, etc. 3) Straight lines are detected with the depth-first searching strategy. With the rebuilt topology, we can easily obtain the begin, end nodes of every line. If the distances of its all vertices to the line connecting the begin, end nodes of an arc are less than some pre-defined threshold, it could be looked as a 'straight line' and extracted. Besides, we are certainly only interested in the straight lines with lengths larger than certain threshold, thus a minimum length threshold should be specified to delete these very short lines. In the searching of straight lines, some arcs

  17. An Overview of a Trajectory-Based Solution for En Route and Terminal Area Self-Spacing to Include Parallel Runway Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an algorithm specifically designed to support NASA's Airborne Precision Spacing concept. This airborne self-spacing concept is trajectory-based, allowing for spacing operations prior to the aircraft being on a common path. This implementation provides the ability to manage spacing against two traffic aircraft, with one of these aircraft operating to a parallel dependent runway. Because this algorithm is trajectory-based, it also has the inherent ability to support required-time-of-arrival (RTA) operations

  18. Measurement and analysis of aircraft engine PM emissions downwind of an active runway at the Oakland International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of commercial aviation has fueled concerns over air quality around airports and the surrounding communities. Airports must expand their operations to meet the increase in air traffic, but expansion plans have been delayed or canceled due to concerns over local air quality. This paper presents the methodology for real-time measurements of aircraft engine specific Particulate Matter (PM) emissions and analysis of the associated high resolution data acquired during normal Landing and Take-Off (LTO) operations 100-300 m downwind of an active taxi-/runway at the Oakland International Airport. The airframe-engine combinations studied included B737-300 with CFM56-3B engines, B737-700/800 with CFM56-7B engines, A320 with V2500-A5 engines, MD-80 with JT-8D engines, A300 with CF6-80 engines, DC-10 with CF6-50 engines, and CRJ-100/200 with CF34-3B engines. For all engine types studied, the size distributions were typically bimodal in nature with a nucleation mode comprised of freshly nucleated PM and an accumulation mode comprised mostly of PM soot with some condensed volatile material. The PM number-based emission index observed ranged between 7 × 1015-3 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at idle/taxi and between 4 × 1015-2 × 1017 particles kg-1 fuel burned at take-off, and the associated PM mass-based emission index (EIm) ranged between 0.1 and 0.7 g kg-1 fuel burned at both the idle/taxi and take-off conditions. Older technology engines such as the CFM56-3B and JT8D engines were observed to have as much as 3× higher PM EIm values at take-off compared to newer engine technology such as the CFM56-7B engine. The results from this study provide information for better characterizing evolving PM emissions from in-service commercial aircraft under normal LTO operations and assessing their impact on local and regional air quality and health related impacts.

  19. Altus aircraft on runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The remotely piloted Altus aircraft flew several developmental test flights from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., in 1996. The Altus--the word is Latin for 'high'--is a variant of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. It is designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and is powered by a turbocharged four-cylinder piston engine. The first Altus was developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, while a second Altus was built for a Naval Postgraduate School/Department of Energy program. A pilot in a control station on the ground flew the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system. Equipped with a single-stage turbocharger during the 1996 test flights, the first Altus reached altitudes in the 37,000-foot range, while the similarly-equipped second Altus reached 43,500 feet during developmental flights at Dryden in the summer of 1997. The NASA Altus also set an endurance record of more than 26 hours while flying a science mission in late 1996 and still had an estimated 10 hours of fuel remaining when it landed. Now equipped with a two-stage turbocharger, the NASA Altus maintained an altitude of 55,000 feet for four hours during flight tests in 1999.

  20. Rapid Runway Repair Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report describes a series of tests to evaluate a system for rapidly repairing airfield pavement using polymer concrete (synthetic polymer plus...aggregate), thermally cured by microwave power. The technique, developed by the Syracuse University Research Corporation (SURC) for highway...maintenance, uses a truck-mounted 50-kilowatt microwave generator to irradiate areas patched with polymer concrete . Test results indicate that the polymer

  1. Coordinated Parallel Runway Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, Steve

    1996-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Expected future increases in air traffic will put additional pressures on the National Airspace System (NAS) and will further compound the high costs associated with airport delays. To address this problem, NASA has embarked on a program to address Terminal Area Productivity (TAP). The goals of the TAP program are to provide increased efficiencies in air traffic during the approach, landing, and surface operations in low-visibility conditions. The ultimate goal is to achieve efficiencies of terminal area flight operations commensurate with Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) at current or improved levels of safety.

  2. Altus aircraft on runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The remotely piloted Altus aircraft flew several developmental test flights from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., in 1996. The Altus--the word is Latin for 'high'--is a variant of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. It is designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and is powered by a turbocharged four-cylinder piston engine. The first Altus was developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, while a second Altus was built for a Naval Postgraduate School/Department of Energy program. A pilot in a control station on the ground flew the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system. Equipped with a single-stage turbocharger during the 1996 test flights, the first Altus reached altitudes in the 37,000-foot range, while the similarly-equipped second Altus reached 43,500 feet during developmental flights at Dryden in the summer of 1997. The NASA Altus also set an endurance record of more than 26 hours while flying a science mission in late 1996 and still had an estimated 10 hours of fuel remaining when it landed. Now equipped with a two-stage turbocharger, the NASA Altus maintained an altitude of 55,000 feet for four hours during flight tests in 1999.

  3. Snow Roads and Runways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    9 Effect of time and tem perature...ice strength .......................................................................... 13 19. Effect of time on the strength of processed snow as a...function of temperature ......... 14 20. Effect of time on the strength of processed snow as a function of snow density ........ 14 21. Combined

  4. Effects of D(1) receptor agonist SKF 38393 on male rat sexual behavior and postcopulatory departure in the goal compartment-runway paradigm.

    PubMed

    Beck, Józef; Biały, Michal; Kostowski, Wojciech

    2002-05-01

    Male rats were tested in an apparatus in which the goal compartment of the runway was connected with the start compartment by a one-way door. In this apparatus, the male spontaneously left the goal compartment containing the estrous female after a mount bout (the cluster of one or more copulatory events) and a new run started. This effect (the postcopulatory departure) seems to be due to the competition between the incentive value of the stimulus female and the runway. The dopamine D(1) receptor agonist SKF 38393 at the doses of 1-5 mg/kg sc significantly prolonged the time spent by the male in the goal compartment, while both run latency and run duration remained unaffected. Further analysis showed that the prolongation of the time in goal compartment results from increased duration of copulatory behavior accompanied by increased number of copulatory events. Although SKF 38393 did not influence the latency of postcopulatory departures, incomplete departures occurred in five out of eight males. In the free access to female conditions, the SKF 38393 did not influence copulatory performance, except for a reduction in the number of intromissions at the dose of 1 mg/kg sc. On the other hand, a significant reduction of postejaculatory ultrasonic vocalization was observed.

  5. Benefits of continuous deflection profile analysis: a case study of runway 17R-35L at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport using the rolling dynamic deflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turen, Tracy A.; Dossey, Terry; McCullough, B. F.

    1998-03-01

    A research project was undertaken by the The University of Texas at Austin's Center for Transportation Research to assess the condition and remaining life of a large section of Runway (RW) 17R-35L and taxiway L at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Concrete fatigue was determined from fatigue testing of RW core samples and from deflection data obtained from an experimental testing device called the Rolling Dynamic Deflectometer (RDD). The RDD is a truck-mounted device that measures continuous deflection profiles of pavements. The RDD appears to be a very promising device for use in pavement performance analysis. The RDD gives much more comprehensive deflection data than devices currently in use such as the Falling Weight Deflectometer and the Dynaflect and the data collection procedure is quicker and more efficient. Additionally, continuous deflection profiles provide more ways of assessing the in-place structural adequacy of pavements. For this research, RDD data from one section approximately 305 m (1000 ft.) was selected to illustrate several possible ways to analyze the data. Due to the large amount of data collected by sampling every 152 mm (6 in.) on a runway over a mile in length, a program called RDD3 was developed to perform the analysis. Results of this analysis are presented here.

  6. Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Landing on Runway at Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Ru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Tupolev Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory rolls down the runway at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow, Russia, after a 1998 test flight. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in production-model aircraft. Fifty experiments

  7. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf, AFB, Alaska. Final baseline risk assessment for the southeast runway fuel spill site and the control tower drum storage area, south

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The addendum (Volume 4) presents an assessment of the current and possible future risks to human health and the environment potentially attributable to two additional IRP sites at Galena Airport: (1) The Southeast Runway Fuel Spill; and (2) The Control Tower Drum Storage Area, South (CTDSA).

  8. Late Pleistocene Magnitude Glacial Incursions of Southern Component Water to the Deep North Atlantic Resolved Using Nd Isotopes during the Intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (3.3 to 2.4 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, D.; Bailey, I.; Wilson, P. A.; Foster, G. L.; Gutjahr, M.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean, through its ability to globally redistribute heat and partition carbon dioxide, is believed to play a key role in driving and amplifying climate change during Quaternary glaciations on orbital to millennial timescales. Relatively little is known, however, about changes in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) associated with the Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (iNHG). To help fill this gap in our knowledge we present a new high resolution (~6 ka) record of the Nd isotope composition of the deep North Atlantic between ~3.3 and 2.4 Ma, measured on fish debris at IODP Site U1313 (3426 m, 41°N, 32.5°W). This record represents the first orbital-resolution record of variations in watermass mixing in this region for iNHG independent of changes in the carbon cycle and, in contrast to existing benthic foraminiferal δ13C records for this time interval, our Nd dataset contains evidence for late Pleistocene magnitude incursions of Southern Component Waters to the deep North Atlantic Ocean during key glacial periods through this time. We therefore infer an important role for AMOC variability in amplifying Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles

  9. Evaluation of the effects of one year's operation of the dynamic preferential runway system. [human reactions to overflight air traffic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    The FAA introduced an experimental aircraft operations program at JFK Airport called the Dynamic Preferential Runway System (DPRS) in the summer of 1971. The program is designed to distribute air traffic as equally as possible over the surrounding communities, to limit periods of continuous overflight and to vary the same hours of overflight from day to day. After a full year's operation, an evaluation was made of the system's effectiveness. All of the operation's goals were moderately achieved with the greatest relief in reduced overflight afforded the most heavily impacted areas. Few residents, however, were aware of DPRS or felt that it had greatly reduced annoyance or represented a major effort by the aircraft authorities. Statistical analyses of reported annoyance obtained from two independent surveys in 1969 and 1972 reveal limited reductions in annoyance in 1972, with shifts from reported high annoyance to moderate annoyance.

  10. The sun rises on the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rests on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, after a safe landing August 9, 2005

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-09

    The sun rises on the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rests on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, after a safe landing August 9, 2005 to complete the STS-114 mission. Space Shuttle Discovery landed safely at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 5:11:22 a.m. PDT this morning, following the very successful 14-day STS-114 return to flight mission. During their two weeks in space, Commander Eileen Collins and her six crewmates tested out new safety procedures and delivered supplies and equipment the International Space Station. Discovery spent two weeks in space, where the crew demonstrated new methods to inspect and repair the Shuttle in orbit. The crew also delivered supplies, outfitted and performed maintenance on the International Space Station. A number of these tasks were conducted during three spacewalks. In an unprecedented event, spacewalkers were called upon to remove protruding gap fillers from the heat shield on Discovery's underbelly. In other spacewalk activities, astronauts installed an external platform onto the Station's Quest Airlock and replaced one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes. Inside the Station, the STS-114 crew conducted joint operations with the Expedition 11 crew. They unloaded fresh supplies from the Shuttle and the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. Before Discovery undocked, the crews filled Raffeallo with unneeded items and returned to Shuttle payload bay. Discovery launched on July 26 and spent almost 14 days on orbit.

  11. Behavior of aircraft antiskid breaking systems on dry and wet runway surfaces: A slip-ratio-controlled system with ground speed reference from unbraked nose wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility to study the braking and cornering response of a slip ratio controlled aircraft antiskid braking system with ground speed reference derived from an unbraked nose wheel. The investigation, conducted on dry and wet runway surfaces, utilized one main gear wheel, brake, and tire assembly of a DC-9 series 10 airplane. During maximum braking, the average ratio of the drag force friction coefficient developed by the antiskid system to the maximum drag force friction coefficient available was higher on the dry surface than on damp and flooded surfaces, and was reduced with lighter vertical loads, higher yaw angles, and when new tire treads were replaced by worn treads. Similarly, the average ratio of side force friction coefficient developed by the tire under antiskid control to the maximum side force friction coefficient available to a freely rolling yawed tire decreased with increasing yaw angle, generally increased with ground speed, and decreased when tires with new treads were replaced by those with worn treads.

  12. Aircraft and runway deicers at General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 1. Biochemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen in receiving streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Booth, N.L.; Hall, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft and runway deicers are used during cold weather at many of the world's airports to facilitate safe air travel. Propylene glycol-, ethylene glycol-, and urea-based deicers are known to have very high biochemical oxygen demand. At General Mitchell International Airport (GMIA) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, deicer application, water chemistry, and dissolved oxygen (DO) data were collected for two deicing seasons in order to evaluate and define premanagement water quality parameters prior to the implementation of a glycol management program. Calculations using stream-monitoring data during a controlled release of deicer provided an estimate of 0.8/d for the first-order decay rate constant, substantially higher than published laboratory test results. For eight precipitation events with deicing activities, between 2.4 and 99% of propylene and ethylene glycol applied to aircraft was delivered directly to receiving streams. The percentage of glycol runoff during an event increased with increasing storm-flow volume. Elevated concentrations of glycol and biochemical oxygen demand were measured downstream from the airport. However, the frequency of low DO concentrations in the receiving streams is comparable with that at an upstream reference site. This is possibly due to slowed bacteria metabolism at low water temperatures, short travel times, and dilution from downstream tributaries.

  13. SURF IA Conflict Detection and Resolution Algorithm Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Chartrand, Ryan C.; Wilson, Sara R.; Commo, Sean A.; Barker, Glover D.

    2012-01-01

    The Enhanced Traffic Situational Awareness on the Airport Surface with Indications and Alerts (SURF IA) algorithm was evaluated in a fast-time batch simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. SURF IA is designed to increase flight crew situation awareness of the runway environment and facilitate an appropriate and timely response to potential conflict situations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the SURF IA algorithm under various runway scenarios, multiple levels of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) system equipage, and various levels of horizontal position accuracy. This paper gives an overview of the SURF IA concept, simulation study, and results. Runway incursions are a serious aviation safety hazard. As such, the FAA is committed to reducing the severity, number, and rate of runway incursions by implementing a combination of guidance, education, outreach, training, technology, infrastructure, and risk identification and mitigation initiatives [1]. Progress has been made in reducing the number of serious incursions - from a high of 67 in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 to 6 in FY2010. However, the rate of all incursions has risen steadily over recent years - from a rate of 12.3 incursions per million operations in FY2005 to a rate of 18.9 incursions per million operations in FY2010 [1, 2]. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) also considers runway incursions to be a serious aviation safety hazard, listing runway incursion prevention as one of their most wanted transportation safety improvements [3]. The NTSB recommends that immediate warning of probable collisions/incursions be given directly to flight crews in the cockpit [4].

  14. Space Shuttle Atlantis landing at 12:33 p.m. February 20, 2001, on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-20

    Space Shuttle Atlantis landed at 12:33 p.m. February 20, 2001, on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located. The mission, which began February 7, logged 5.3 million miles as the shuttle orbited earth while delivering the Destiny science laboratory to the International Space Station. Inclement weather conditions in Florida prompted the decision to land Atlantis at Edwards. The last time a space shuttle landed at Edwards was Oct. 24, 2000.

  15. STS-135 Landing: Runway Remarks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The STS-135 astronauts get a close-up look at space shuttle Atlantis, hear from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and speak to assembled employees, guests and media after landing at Kennedy Space C...

  16. Pathfinder over runway in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  17. Lockheed Electra - takeoff from runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 15-second movie clip shows the National Science Foundation Lockheed Electra rotate, lift off, and stow its landing gear on takeoff. On March 24, 1998, an L-188 Electra aircraft owned by the National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia and operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, flew near Boulder with an Airborne Coherent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for Advanced In-flight Measurement. This aircraft was on its first flight to test its ability to detect previously invisible forms of clear air turbulence. Coherent Technologies Inc., Lafayette, Colorado, built the LiDAR device for the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. NASA Dryden participated in this effort as part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, for which the lead center was Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Results of the test indicated that the device did successfully detect the clear air turbulence.

  18. Pathfinder over runway in Hawaii

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-28

    Pathfinder, NASA's solar-powered, remotely-piloted aircraft is shown while it was conducting a series of science flights to highlight the aircraft's science capabilities while collecting imagery of forest and coastal zone ecosystems on Kauai, Hawaii. The flights also tested two new scientific instruments, a high-spectral-resolution Digital Array Scanned Interferometer (DASI) and a high-spatial-resolution Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). The remote sensor payloads were designed by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, to support NASA's Mission to Planet Earth science programs.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new control tower is nearing completion at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. It will replace the old tower in use since 1987. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The existing control tower seen here at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility is being replaced. In use since 1987, the old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The existing control tower seen here at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility is being replaced. In use since 1987, the old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two control towers are seen at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, the old one in front and the nearly completed new tower in back. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two control towers are seen at the edge of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, the old one in front and the nearly completed new tower in back. The old tower stands only 20 feet above the runway surface, too low to see the launch pads to the east. During nighttime landing operations, those inside the tower have been hindered by the eight-billion candlepower xenon lights that illuminate the runway. The new control tower is built atop an existing mound, rising nearly 100 feet over the midpoint of the runway. The height gives controllers a spectacular 360-degree view of NASA-KSC and northern Brevard County. The new facility will also replace the SLF Operations Building. The operations building is home to the Military Radar Unit that monitors NASA-KSC airspace 24 hours a day, as well as runway light controls, navigational aids, weather and wind speed instrumentation, and gate controls. In the new tower, the computer displays will be fully modernized to Federal Aviation Administration standards with touch-screen technology. Construction on the new facility began in February 2003 and is nearly ready for occupancy. Only some final inspections and approvals remain. A support building and Public Affairs viewing deck, to be used for observing future landing operations, will be added and are already in work.

  2. A worker attaches covers for the nose pitot boom before removing the unpiloted X-40 from the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, following its successful free-flight on March 14, 2001

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-14

    A worker attaches covers for the nose pitot boom before removing the unpiloted X-40 from the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, following its successful free-flight on March 14, 2001. The unpiloted X-40 is a risk-reduction vehicle for the X-37, which is intended to be a reusable space vehicle. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala, manages the X-37 project. At Dryden, the X-40A will undergo a series of ground and air tests to reduce possible risks to the larger X-37, including drop tests from a helicopter to check guidance and navigation systems planned for use in the X-37. The X-37 is designed to demonstrate technologies in the orbital and reentry environments for next-generation reusable launch vehicles that will increase both safety and reliability, while reducing launch costs from $10,000 per pound to $1,000 per pound.

  3. The X-40 sub-scale technology demonstrator and its U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter mothership fly over a dry lakebed runway during a captive-carry test flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-08

    The X-40 sub-scale technology demonstrator and its U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter mothership fly over a dry lakebed runway during a captive-carry test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-40 is attached to a sling which is suspended from the CH-47 by a 110-foot-long cable during the tests, while a small parachute trails behind to provide stability. The captive carry flights are designed to verify the X-40's navigation and control systems, rigging angles for its sling, and stability and control of the helicopter while carrying the X-40 on a tether. Following a series of captive-carry flights, the X-40 made free flights from a launch altitude of about 15,000 feet above ground, gliding to a fully autonomous landing. The X-40 is an unpowered 82 percent scale version of the X-37, a Boeing-developed spaceplane designed to demonstrate various advanced technologies for development of future lower-cost access to space vehicles.

  4. Ecological recovery in an Arctic delta following widespread saline incursion.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Trevor C; Kokelj, Steve V; Fraser, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Arctic ecosystems are vulnerable to the combined effects of climate change and a range of other anthropogenic perturbations. Predicting the cumulative impact of these stressors requires an improved understanding of the factors affecting ecological resilience. In September of 1999, a severe storm surge in the Mackenzie Delta flooded alluvial surfaces up to 30 km inland from the coast with saline waters, driving environmental impacts unprecedented in the last millennium. In this study we combined field monitoring of permanent sampling plots with an analysis of the Landsat archive (1986-2011) to explore the factors affecting the recovery of ecosystems to this disturbance. Soil salinization following the 1999 storm caused the abrupt dieback of more than 30,000 ha of tundra vegetation. Vegetation cover and soil chemistry show that recovery is occurring, but the rate and spatial extent are strongly dependent on vegetation type, with graminoid- and upright shrub-dominated areas showing recovery after a decade, but dwarf shrub tundra exhibiting little to no recovery over this period. Our analyses suggest that recovery from salinization has been strongly influenced by vegetation type and the frequency of freshwater flooding following the storm. With increased ocean storm activity, rising sea levels, and reduced sea ice cover, Arctic coastal ecosystems will be more likely to experience similar disturbances in the future, highlighting the importance of combining field sampling with regional-scale remote sensing in efforts to detect, understand, and anticipate environmental change.

  5. Materials for Emergency Repair of Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-30

    such as boric acid or borax , but only at the expense of the early strength develop- ment. (Figs. 4 and 5) Considering the shortness of the setting times...hint from the manufacturer of SET-45 is that boric acid is added which presumably have similar retarding effect as borax . In addition to the above...with water rapidly producing strength and heat. The hot weather formula also contains boric acid as a set retarder. The aluminum phosphate (ALP) mixture

  6. Materials for Emergency Repair of Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-20

    for the SET-45 cold mortar under identical conditions. This is attributed to the presence of borax ( boric acid ) in the hot mixture. Similar liquifying...Chemically active part of SET-45 mixtures consists of MgO grains and NH4H2 PO4 solid particles. Boric acid or borax may or may not be present. The...hot weather formula also contains boric acid as set retarder. pA, o - ~ ~ ~ - - -.-- 7~~ - . - Vi Mechanical Testing A major portion of the mechanical

  7. Improved Acrylic Systems for Rapid Runway Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Concrete * Fast-Setting Concrete N Acrylic Polymer Research * 1 k UST mACV lC@ea. ON -- -0 - OW. 00....Y d*Ip OF 40 domb) The objectives of this...available to the general public, including foreign nationals. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. DANIEL J. PIERRE, Capt...resins. The aggregate and resin might be premixed for placement or (as in the research reported herein) the cap might be formed by percolation of liquid

  8. Portable Runway Intersection Display and Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Elrod, Susan Vinz (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which an apparatus located on an airfield provides information to pilots in aircraft on the ground and simultaneously gathers information on the motion and position of the aircraft for controllers.

  9. Eating Disorders Rampant on The Runway

    MedlinePlus

    ... In a survey, more than half of the models questioned said they face constant pressure to be dangerously thin or change the shape of their body. "While acknowledgment of disordered eating within the ... shows the lengths that models are willing to take to achieve the industry's ...

  10. FOD Cover Analysis for Rapid Runway Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-30

    tested as shown in Figure 7. The plastic sheet was much thinner and weaker than the T17 POD cover material, but nevertheless acts as a mem- brane and...Analysis Based on the preliminary analysis of the POD cover and the simple thin plastic sheet tests, it was agreed that a minimum of 7 1 5 35 87 -65...c.hange -h rt.: the analysis. c. Jet Blast Analyses The main objectives of this portion of the POD o,.,r ,rn~’>,:’ are to explore the advantages gained by

  11. Ice Runways Near the South Pole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    further trial landings. A 1000-gallon fuel cache was, however, placed by LC-130 beside Lhasa Nunatak and this proved a great help for flights in connection...obstructions were too short. Site 11: Davis Nunataks (Plunket Point map sheet) 85037’S, 167001 E, elevation 2400 m (7900 ft), TMA 775 F33 122. The main...could be found to permanent building sites on adjacent nunataks . The upper part of Reedy Glacier is badly crevassed, so it would not be easy to establish

  12. Hard-Surface Runways in Antarctica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    out face winds funneled and accelerated by moun- in the Pensacola Mountains. Two suitable sites tains, nunataks or significant surface relief. The were...be worth turbulence, and threaten parked aircraft, surveying to establish distances, approach (3) Nearby mountains and nunataks can ob- slopes, and

  13. Chevron cutting: Experiment with new runway mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyran, K. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    Chevron cutting is shown to occur in different forms depending on the type of tire and the rubber on the running surface. Hardest wear is shown by the main tires of the B-747. Four defects occurred, in the form of two rip separation and two breakouts of the running surface. Tires capped by Thompson are more affected than any of the other rubber-capping fabrics. For Thompson tires, Chevron Cutting is greatly reduced with a fiberglass-rubber mixture. For Goodyear tires, it is eliminated with spiral wrap rubbercapping; resistance to damages through cuts seems to be more positive for Goodyear tires. For Mader tires, the extent of Chevron Cutting is generally smaller than for Thompson cappings.

  14. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    translation freedoms, - Aircraft flexible normal modes. - Nose and main gear lever rotations. - Several tyre models. - Brake torque time- history ... history of a force or acceleration (see Figure 3) at som point of interest on the aircraft. Figure 3 also shows a comparison of computed versus measured...EXPERIMENTAL PSA CBA 0 5 10 TIME ISECI Fix.3 Plotted time history vertical accelerations READ PROFILE READ AIRCRAFT CONFIGURATION DELTA = 0 ~1

  15. Polymer Research in Rapid Runway Repair Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    to asphalt and Portland cement concrete and gcod wear characteristics were demonstrated. Flexural strength properties are satis- factory after cool...20 5.3.2 Substrate Selection ..... ............... ... 22 5.3.3 Results of Bonding Study .... ............. ... 22 5.4 Adhesive Strength to Asphalt ...32 4. Flexural Testing of Beams ...... .................. ... 32 5. Device for Durability Tests ...... ................. ... 36 6. Asphalt

  16. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability On or Near the Airport Surface, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. The term ATMA was created to reflect the fact that the CD&R concept area of operation is focused near the airport within the terminal maneuvering area. In the following, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS).

  17. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  18. Development of a Laboratory for Improving Communication between Air Traffic Controllers and Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brammer, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Runway incursions and other surface incidents are known to be significant threats to aviation safety and efficiency. Though the number of near mid-air collisions in U.S. air space has remained unchanged during the last five years, the number of runway incursions has increased and they are almost all due to human error. The three most common factors contributing to air traffic controller and pilot error in airport operations include two that involve failed auditory communication. This project addressed the problems of auditory communication in air traffic control from an acoustical standpoint, by establishing an acoustics laboratory designed for this purpose and initiating research into selected topics that show promise for improving voice communications between air traffic controllers and pilots.

  19. NextGen Avionics Roadmap Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-24

    was delivered in September 2007 to JPDO on a CD ROM and contains: • Spreadsheet tool • Data sheets • References • A methodology paper • A set of...RBA assessment. This is generally a 3-10 page paper that provides both qualitative and quantitative data on the rationale for evaluating the risks... Paper : Runway Incursions A Call to Action, March 2007). Thus ownship with proximate traffic would lie between the 28 percent value and the 95

  20. Prototype Stop Bar System Evaluation at John F. Kennedy International Airport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    2 Red Stop Bar Visual Presentation 4 3 Green Stop Bar Visual Presentation 5 4 Photographs of Red and Green Inset Stop Bar Lights 6 5 Photographs of...to green. This provides pilots with a visual confirmation of the controller’s verbal clearance and is intended to prevent runway incursions. The Port...34 colocated with the red lights. The visual presentation of an individual stop bar appears as either five red lights (see figure 2), or five green

  1. Enhancing pilot situational awareness of the airport surface movement area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. R.; Young, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two studies are being conducted to address airport surface movement area safety and capacity issues by providing enhanced situational awareness information to pilots. One study focuses on obtaining pilot opinion of the Runway Status Light System (RSLS). This system has been designed to reduce the likelihood of runway incursions by informing pilots when a runway is occupied. The second study is a flight demonstration of an rate integrated system consisting of an electronic moving map in the cockpit and display of the aircraft identification to the controller. Taxi route and hold warning information will be sent to the aircraft data link for display on the electronic moving map. This paper describes the plans for the two studies.

  2. Directional molecular sliding at room temperature on a silicon runway.

    PubMed

    Bouju, Xavier; Chérioux, Frédéric; Coget, Sébastien; Rapenne, Gwénaël; Palmino, Frank

    2013-08-07

    The design of working nanovehicles is a key challenge for the development of new devices. In this context, 1D controlled sliding of molecules on a silicon-based surface is successfully achieved by using an optimized molecule-substrate pair. Even though the molecule and surface are compatible, the molecule-substrate interaction provides a 1D template effect to guide molecular sliding along a preferential surface orientation. Molecular motion is monitored by STM experiments under ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Molecule-surface interactions are elucidated by semi-empirical calculations.

  3. Development of Environmentally Benign and Reduced Corrosion Runway Deicing Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    galvanized steel . More recently, two additional serious material compatibility problems, not addressed by the AMS 1435 standards, have emerged. First...2009. Cycling Cadmium Corrosion Test. The AMS 1435 cadmium (Cd) corrosion test follows ASTM F 1111. Coupons of 4130 steel , 1- x 2-in. by 0.048-in...and Alclad) (b) Total immersion corrosion of Al, Mg, Ti alloys, and carbon steel (c) Low-embrittling Cd plate and Hydrogen embrittlement (d) Stress

  4. A Computer Model to Aid the Planning of Runway Attacks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Listing 85 *j. . PROGRAM RAM DIMENSION NUMBOM(20)*AIMLOC(20) DIMENSION NPEfRCT(201 COMMON PROSEC (20920 ,2) COMMON /IN~PUT/ RUNLEtJRUNUIDTOLENTOUIDUCEP...CALL MONOR(BRiBONOP) 9W CALL MONOR(OLiBOND PCRONDR-iONDL- RETURN END SUBROUTINE PROCAL(NUMAIMAlMLOC) DIMENSION AIMLOC(201,DAMLOC(20) COMMON PROSEC ...PROS’EC(1,X291 )PRL PROSEC ( Ii 12,2)=PRR 40 CONTINUE 50 CONTINUE RETURN Efa 88 SUBROUTINE UNlON(NKJMAIMehUMBOM9AIML0C9PC) DIMENlSION NUMaOM(2OAIMLC20O

  5. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the crash. Perseus B is flown remotely by a pilot from a mobile flight control station on the ground. A Global Positioning System (GPS) unit provides navigation data for continuous and precise location during flight. The ground control station features dual independent consoles for aircraft control and systems monitoring. A flight termination system, required for all remotely piloted aircraft being flown in military-restricted airspace, includes a parachute system deployed on command plus a C-Band radar beacon and a Mode-C transponder to aid in location. Dryden has provided hanger and office space for the Perseus B aircraft and for the flight test development team when on site for flight or ground testing. NASA's ERAST project is developing aeronautical technologies for a new generation of remotely piloted and autonomous aircraft for a variety of upper-atmospheric science missions and commercial applications. Dryden is the lead center in NASA for ERAST management and operations. Perseus B is approximately 25 feet long, has a wingspan of 71.5 feet, and stands 12 feet high. Perseus B is powered by a Rotax 914, four-cylinder piston engine mounted in the mid-fuselage area and integrated with an Aurora-designed three-stage turbocharger, connected to a lightweight two-blade propeller.

  6. Test of LOX compatibility for asphalt and concrete runway materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, C. V.; Bryan, C. J.; Lockhart, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey and a telephone canvass of producers and users of LOX is reported which yielded one report of an accident resulting from a LOX spill on asphalt, one discussion of hazardous conditions, and an unreferenced mention of an incident. Laboratory tests using standard LOX impact apparatus yielded reactions with both old and new alphalt, but none with concrete. In the final test, using a larger sample of asphalt, the reaction caused extensive damage to equipment. Initial field experiments using 2-meter square asphalt slabs covered with LOX, conducted during rainy weather, achieved no reaction with plummets, and limited reaction with a blasting cap as a reaction initiator. In a final plummet-initiated test on a dry slab, a violent reaction, which appeared to have propagated over the entire slab surface, destroyed the plummet fixture and threw fragments as far as 48 meters.

  7. Real-Life Research: Project Runway Makeover Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Paige; Nesi, Olga M.

    2014-01-01

    Real-life research is incredibly varied. We research cars. We research lawn problems. We research child behavior problems, health issues, possible vacation destinations, and prices to stretch our budgets. No two scenarios are ever alike, and no two health issues should be assumed to be the same. That is reality, and that is a picture of what the…

  8. Altus I aircraft taking off from lakebed runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft takes off from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet.

  9. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system.

  10. Potential Use of Geotechnical Fabric in Airfield Runway Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    punching shear resistance developed by the standard base material. Empirical correlations for different CBR values, concerning thick- ness of base... CBR value is a relative num- ber and field correlations rather than soil stress-strain theory are used 20 to determine design requirements. The method...normal CBR design assumptions [8] are not realized, a typical empirical correlation was developed by Hammitt )] as: t = 0.176 log C + 0.120 P A (2.1

  11. Heat - Initiated Furan Resin for Rapid Runway Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    previous work on the ongoing bomb damage repair (dDR) program at Battelle, furan ( furfuryl alcohol-based) prepolymers had shown excellent potential for...All but one of these (Delta Airkure 06-00, a proprietary blend of furfuryl alcohol monoher) are of the urea-formaldehydu turfury] alcohol typo used...CANDIDATES [Designation Type Manufacturer Airkure-k6-00 - Furfuryl alcohol monomer with Delta Resin & Refractories proprietary cross-linking agent AirkurO

  12. Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) In-House Test and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    AG Allaother editions are obsolete. 1I~rI ABSCT FIED "UNCLASSIFIED 59CUMIl", CLASSIPICATIONi OF rMiS V&G9 The final test series evaluated the proposed...Before Traffic, 0 F-4 Loadcart Cover- ages ’Repositioned Slabs), 12 F-4 Loadcart Cover- ages ,% ?4 F-4 Loadcar-t Cover- ages ). Longitudinal C Test 2A-2 -0- 0...57 ’Leveling Course (Before Traffic, (3 F-4 Loadcar-t .overaqps ’Reoositioned Slabs), 1*? F-4 Loadcart Cov-ros ?’ ’-4 oadcart Cover- ages ). 50 0j

  13. Aerodynamic study on wing and tail small UAV without runways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetanto, Maria F.; R., Randy; Alfan M., R.; Dzaldi

    2016-06-01

    This paper consists of the design and analysis of the aerodynamics of the profiles of wing and tail of a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). UAV is a remote-controlled aircraft that can carry cameras, sensors and even weapons on an area that needed aerial photography or aerial video [1]. The aim of this small UAV is for used in situations where manned flight is considered too risky or difficult, such as fire fighting or surveillance, while the term 'small means the design of this UAV has to be relatively small and portable so that peoples are able to carry it during their operations [CASR Part 101.240: it is a UAV which is has a launch mass greater than 100 grams but less than 100 kilograms] [2]. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) method was used to analyze the fluid flow characteristics around the aerofoil's profiles, such as the lift generation for each angle of attack and longitudinal stability caused by vortex generation on trailing edge. Based on the analysis and calculation process, Clark-Y MOD with aspect ratio, AR = 4.28 and taper ratio, λ = 0.65 was chosen as the wing aerofoil and SD 8020 with AR = 4.8 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the horizontal tail, while SD 8020 with AR = 1.58 and λ = 0.5 was chosen as the vertical tail. The lift and drag forces generated for wing and tail surfaces can be determined from the Fluent 6.3 simulation. Results showed that until angle of attack of 6 degrees, the formation of flow separation is still going on behind the trailing edge, and the stall condition occurs at 14 degrees angle of attack which is characterized by the occurrence of flow separation at leading edge, with a maximum lift coefficient (Cl) obtained = 1.56. The results of flight tests show that this small UAV has successfully maneuvered to fly, such as take off, some acrobatics when cruising and landing smoothly, which means that the calculation and analysis of aerodynamic aerofoil's profile used on the wing and tail of the Small UAV were able to be validated.

  14. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged and Repaired Runways.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    simulations pour 6valuer un systime d’atterrisseur. - - -: Avec le programme IMPACT noun effectuons css simulations dynamiques & un prix raisonnable...X et de sea d~rivaea,- du braquage do gouverne ot des ordres pilotes et 6ventuellenent de la fonction do transfert des commandos do vol ileotriques

  15. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio signals, using visual cues from a video camera in the nose of the Altus and information from the craft's air data system.

  16. Runway Rubber Removal Specification Development: Field Evaluation Procedures Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Administration, Hampton, Virginia, 1983. 7. Moore, 0. F., The Friction of Pneumatic Tyres , Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, New York, New York, 1975...The Friction of Pneumatic Tyres , Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, New York, New York, 1975. 8. Kummer, H. W., Unified Theory of Rubber and Tire...Ref. 10) on pneumatic tire hydroplaning, states there are three types of hydroplaning, viz., dynamic, viscous, and reverted tire rubber hydroplaning

  17. Ultraviolet Curable Resin System for Rapid Runway Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    31 B-7 Furfuryl Alcohol UV Spectrun ...... ............. 32 B-8 Corelube®CLl-1000 UV Spectrum ... ............ .. 33 B-9 Airkure 06-22 UV...high reactivity of furan resins (and furfuryl alcohol ) should also provide for continued furan resin polymerization after removal of the initiating UV... furfuryl alcohol ) and the primary epoxy resin candidate from the previous BDR program (2 parts Epon 828 + 1 part Heloxy 69) were found to have acceptably

  18. North Field 󈨛 Rapid Runway Repair Test Report. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    provided Prime Base Engineer Emergency Force ( BEEF ) personnel as the test team. Finally, the test was supported by various organizations, including 3246 TW...the grass , south of the repair site. Paint, polymer, and solvent, as well as storage drums for paint and polymer wastes, were stored in a designated...crater was repaired by AFESC/RDCO personnel and inembers of the Prime BEEF team. The general sequence of crater repair is shown in Figures 6 through 13

  19. Altus I aircraft taking off from lakebed runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft takes off from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet.

  20. Radioluminescent lighting for Alaskan runway lighting and marking

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Leonard, L.E.

    1985-03-01

    Alaska and other far northern areas have special logistical, environmental, and economic problems that make radioluminescent (RL) lighting applications, especially in the area of airport lighting, an attractive alternative to electrical systems and flare pots. Tests and demonstrations of prototype systems conducted in Alaska over the past two years have proved the basic technological worth of RL airport lighting systems for civilian and military use. If regulatory issues and other factors identified during these tests can be favorably resolved and if the system and its components can be refined through production engineering, attractive applications for RL airfield lighting systems in Alaska and other remote locations could result.

  1. Program Management Plan (PMP) for Rapid Runway Repair (RRR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-15

    E. -~SH 6.4 00Q. 1 Cal:2 CL w Ca, 10 ULJ c c- U, 0 IV A w - A 26I existing technology, such as soil stabilization, can be used effectively . Advances...accomplished I in a rapid, responsive, and cost- effective manner. Integration functions will be accomplished to coordinate the final product in terms of...capabilities (24 hours a day, all year), application in expected climatic extremes, cost- effectiveness , capability to recover from all expected levels of

  2. X-40A on runway after Free Flight #2A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Second free-flight of the X-40A at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, on Edwards AFB, Calif., was made on Apr. 12, 2001. The unpowered X-40A, an 85 percent scale risk reduction version of the proposed X-37, proved the capability of an autonomous flight control and landing system in a series of glide flights at Edwards. The April 12 flight introduced complex vehicle maneuvers during the landing sequence. The X-40A was released from an Army Chinook helicopter flying 15,050 feet overhead. Ultimately, the unpiloted X-37 is intended as an orbital testbed and technology demonstrator, capable of landing like an airplane and being quickly serviced for a follow-up mission. This X-40A free flight was made on the 20th anniversary of the first launch of the space shuttle.

  3. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-04-30

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  4. Evaluation of Dual Drum Vibratory Rollers for Rapid Runway Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    9 5 Pettibone C-44 ............ ........................ 10 6 Pettibone C-33 ......... ........................ .... 11 7 Gradation of...Exploded Crater After Compaction and Grading ............ ... 19 13 Pettibone C-44 Grading and Compacting .... ............ ... 20 14 Pettibone C-44...Grading and Compacting .... ............ ... 20 15 Pettibone C-44 Grading and Compacting .... ............ ... 20 16 Course Used for Travel Speed Test

  5. Feasibility of Computing Residual Displacements in Runways and Crater Repairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    seem to be unreasonable. A possible field check to determine proper compaction of pushback material would be to employ a cone penetrometer. Sanglerat ...671, pp. 84-91. 12. Sanglerat , G., The Penetrometer and Soil Exploration, New York: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, 1972. 52 13. Selig

  6. North End Runway Material Extraction and Transport Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Contaminants include chlorinated solvent products and hydrocarbons, primarily benzene (EAFB, 2003). Levels of chlorinated solvents at FT23 must attenuate to... etg . 0 a l.SY~3~ {\\(SYJL ..------ v~&;41r~ eobr) (a =t= I ,-·- ~~ t2-- ------ ~8~\\e.,. Hydric Soil Indicators: _& Histosol _ Concretions Histic

  7. The Effects of Weather on Rapid Runway Repair. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    specific application (airbase operational engineering), and to integrate these disciplines into a coherent whole that permits assessment of weather...activities require considerable . "inactive" outdoor work in which the body does not warm itself through * exercise. Also, they require exposure of the hands...sensitive to the cold are ready for use. Drivers must be familiar with driving and operating the vehicle under the low temperature conditions. The impact of

  8. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST project. The Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft first flew in November 1991 and made three low-altitude flights within a month to validate the Perseus aerodynamic model and flight control systems. Next came the redesigned Perseus A, which incorporated a closed-cycle combustion system that mixed oxygen carried aboard the aircraft with engine exhaust to compensate for the thin air at high altitudes. The Perseus A was towed into the air by a ground vehicle and its engine started after it became airborne. Prior to landing, the engine was stopped, the propeller locked in horizontal position, and the Perseus A glided to a landing on its unique bicycle-type landing gear. Two Perseus A aircraft were built and made 21 flights in 1993-1994. One of the Perseus A aircraft reached over 50,000 feet in altitude on its third test flight. Although one of the Perseus A aircraft was destroyed in a crash after a vertical gyroscope failed in flight, the other aircraft completed its test program and remains on display at Aurora's facility in Manassas. Perseus B first flew Oct. 7, 1994, and made two flights in 1996 before being damaged in a hard landing on the dry lakebed after a propeller shaft failure. After a number of improvements and upgrades-including extending the original 58.5-foot wingspan to 71.5 feet to enhance high-altitude performance--the Perseus B returned to Dryden in the spring of 1998 for a series of four flights. Thereafter, a series of modifications were made including external fuel pods on the wing that more than doubled the fuel capacity to 100 gallons. Engine power was increased by more than 20 percent by boosting the turbocharger output. Fuel consumption was reduced with fuel control modifications and a leaner fuel-air mixture that did not compromise power. The aircraft again crashed on Oct. 1, 1999, near Barstow, California, suffering moderate damage to the aircraft but no property damage, fire, or injuries in the area of the crash. Perseus B is flown remotely by a pilot from a mobile flight control station on the ground. A Global Positioning System (GPS) unit provides navigation data for continuous and precise location during flight. The ground control station features dual independent consoles for aircraft control and systems monitoring. A flight termination system, required for all remotely piloted aircraft being flown in military-restricted airspace, includes a parachute system deployed on command plus a C-Band radar beacon and a Mode-C transponder to aid in location. Dryden has provided hanger and office space for the Perseus B aircraft and for the flight test development team when on site for flight or ground testing. NASA's ERAST project is developing aeronautical technologies for a new generation of remotely piloted and autonomous aircraft for a variety of upper-atmospheric science missions and commercial applications. Dryden is the lead center in NASA for ERAST management and operations. Perseus B is approximately 25 feet long, has a wingspan of 71.5 feet, and stands 12 feet high. Perseus B is powered by a Rotax 914, four-cylinder piston engine mounted in the mid-fuselage area and integrated with an Aurora-designed three-stage turbocharger, connected to a lightweight two-blade propeller.

  9. X-40A on runway after Free Flight #2A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-12

    Second free-flight of the X-40A at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, on Edwards AFB, Calif., was made on Apr. 12, 2001. The unpowered X-40A, an 85 percent scale risk reduction version of the proposed X-37, is proving the capability of an autonomous flight control and landing system in a series of glide flights at Edwards. The April 12 flight introduced complex vehicle maneuvers during the landing sequence. The X-40A was released from an Army Chinook helicopter flying 15,050 feet overhead. Ultimately, the unpiloted X-37 is intended as an orbital testbed and technology demonstrator, capable of landing like an airplane and being quickly serviced for a follow-up mission.

  10. [Knowledge derived from studies on crack: an incursion into Brazilian dissertations and theses].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Diego Schaurich; Backes, Dirce Stein; Freitas, Hilda Maria Barbosa de; Zamberlan, Claudia; Gelhen, Maria Helena; Colomé, Juliana Silveira

    2012-05-01

    This is a systematic review based on the integrative review method, which sought to analyze the characteristics of knowledge produced by studies on crack, in Brazilian Master's and Doctoral courses. The investigation comprised 33 studies (18 dissertations and 15 theses). Among them, 51.5% were from the Health Science area with emphasis on the Postgraduate Program in Psychiatry (and Medical Psychology), which provided five dissertations/theses. Most of the knowledge on the epidemic (51.5%) are from the Universidade Federal de São Paulo and Universidade de São Paulo, with the largest number of studies (81.8%) concentrated in the southeast. The themes most analyzed were: organic alterations, drug trafficking and crack use, HIV/Aids, types and strategies of treatment. The results showed that Brazilian stricto sensu knowledge about crack is still incipient, sketchy and ineffectual, albeit promising due to demands and implications that this epidemic imposes upon society.

  11. Ecology, Behaviour and Control of Apis cerana with a Focus on Relevance to the Australian Incursion

    PubMed Central

    Koetz, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    Apis cerana Fabricius is endemic to most of Asia, where it has been used for honey production and pollination services for thousands of years. Since the 1980s, A. cerana has been introduced to areas outside its natural range (namely New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Australia), which sparked fears that it may become a pest species that could compete with, and negatively affect, native Australian fauna and flora, as well as commercially kept A. mellifera and commercial crops. This literature review is a response to these concerns and reviews what is known about the ecology and behaviour of A. cerana. Differences between temperate and tropical strains of A. cerana are reviewed, as are A. cerana pollination, competition between A. cerana and A. mellifera, and the impact and control strategies of introduced A. cerana, with a particular focus on gaps of current knowledge. PMID:26462524

  12. [The symbolic cartography of epidemiological risk: an incursion into the thinking of Boaventura de Sousa Santos].

    PubMed

    Sevalho, Gil; Stotz, Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, the concept of epidemiological risk is critically discussed. The work of Elizabeth Teixeira, who uses the ideas of Boaventura de Sousa Santos, is presented. The proposal for symbolic cartography of epidemiological risk is sketched out, defining analytical scales ranging from exteriority and distancing from the field of science to the proximity of territory and place, conceptualized on the basis of the geography of Milton Santos, in which conceptions of risk are drawn up from the perspective of the everyday routine of social existence. Questions relating to space, territoriality, subjectivity and time give meaning to a cartography of risk which is proposed as a model for epidemiological investigations.

  13. The Cambodian Incursion: Tactical and Operational Success and Its Effects on Vietnamization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    California: Presidio Press, 1985),337. 2. Harry G. Summers, Historical Atlas of the Vietnam War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995), 156. 3. Philip B...Kent State (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books, 1990),26-30. 70. Kissinger, Ending the Vietnam War, 167-168. 71. "The Aftermath ofKent State." The...University of South Carolina Press, 1975. Gordon, William A. The Fourth ofMay: Killings and Coverups at Kent State. Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books

  14. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schivley, James D.

    1994-03-01

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations that are invisible to the eye. For this reason an IR thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminations and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be reviled in this paper.

  15. Evidence for a marine incursion along the lower Colorado River corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, Kristin; Martínez, Adriana Yanet Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Foraminiferal assemblages in the stratigraphically lower part of the Bouse Formation in the Blythe Basin indicate marine conditions whereas assemblages in the upper part of the Bouse Formation indicate lacustrine conditions and suggest the presence of a saline lake. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the lower part of the Bouse Formation are similar to lagoonal and inner neritic biofacies of the modern Gulf of California. Evidence suggesting a change from marine to lacustrine conditions includes the highest occurrence of planktic foraminifers at an elevation of 123 m asl, the change from low diversity to monospecific foraminiferal assemblages composed only of Ammonia beccarii (between 110 to126 m asl), an increase in abundance of A. beccarii specimens (above ~110 m asl), increased number of deformed tests (above ~123 m asl), first appearance of Chara (at ~85 m asl), lowest occurrence of reworked Cretaceous coccoliths (at ~110 m), a decrease in strontium isotopic values (between 70-120 m), and δ18O and δ13C values similar to sea water (between 70-100 m asl). Planktic foraminifers indicate a late Miocene age between 8.10 and 5.3 Ma for the oldest part of the Bouse Formation in the southern part of the Blythe Basin. Benthic and planktic foraminifers correlate with other late Miocene sections and suggest that the basal Bouse Formation in the Blythe Basin was deposited at the northern end of the proto-Gulf of California. After the marine connection was restricted or eliminated, the Colorado River flowed into the Blythe Basin forming a saline lake. This lake supported a monospecific foraminiferal assemblage of A. beccarii until the lake spilled into the Salton Trough and the Colorado River became a through-flowing river.

  16. Gut microbiota of a long-distance migrant demonstrates resistance against environmental microbe incursions.

    PubMed

    Risely, Alice; Waite, David; Ujvari, Beata; Klaassen, Marcel; Hoye, Bethany

    2017-08-16

    Migratory animals encounter suites of novel microbes as they move between disparate sites during their migrations, and are frequently implicated in the global spread of pathogens. Although wild animals have been shown to source a proportion of their gut microbiota from their environment, the susceptibility of migrants to enteric infections may be dependent upon the capacity of their gut microbiota to resist incorporating encountered microbes. To evaluate migrants' susceptibility to microbial invasion, we determined the extent of microbial sourcing from the foraging environment, and examined how this influenced gut microbiota dynamics over time and space in a migratory shorebird, the Red-necked stint. Contrary to previous studies on wild, non-migratory hosts, we found that stint on their non-breeding grounds obtained very little of their microbiota from their environment, with most individuals sourcing only 0.1% of gut microbes from foraging sediment. This microbial resistance was reflected at the population level by only weak compositional differences between stint flocks occupying ecologically-distinct sites, and by our finding that stint that had recently migrated 10,000 km did not differ in diversity or taxonomy from those that had inhabited the same site for a full year. However, recent migrants had much greater abundances of the genus Corynebacterium, suggesting a potential microbial response to either migration or exposure to a novel environment. We conclude that the gut microbiota of stint is largely resistant to invasion from ingested microbes, and that this may have implications for their susceptibility to enteric infections during migration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schivley, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations which are ``invisible`` to the eye. For this reason an infrared thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminates and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be revealed in this paper. At the time of publication, authorization has not been obtained to release photographs or drawings.

  18. Flipside of the COIN: Israel’s Lebanese Incursion Between 1982-2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    be a belief that this time the highly trained forces of the militarily powerful have somehow found the elusive recipe for military victory against...sent the Soviet Union scrambling to address inadequacies in what it thought was a virtually impregnable air defense system (and had the US begging... egg scenario. As Rabil argues, Syria, Iran, and Hezbollah had “no neat overlap of their interests.”54 Hezbollah was not about to kick a Syrian or

  19. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. Commando Hunt VI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-07-07

    29 90 204 134 1192 Sec Exp 381 224 138 540 1497 781 3561 __ Defenses Guns Des 62 34 31 9 18 19 173 I Guns Dam 8 9 8 17 12 4 58 Fires 137 7 0 1 2 0 147...presence south of 20 degrees north, and two MIG incursions into Laos. Four . hangarettes were built at Quang Lang, the runway at Dong Hoi was extend- i...ABFs on Da Nang 7/ AB and Bien Hoa AB on 3 October did not cause any casualties. Operation LAM SON 810 began on 6 September in western Quang Tri 3

  20. Modifying and Testing ATC Controller Interface (CI) for Data Link Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Controller-Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) and Air Traffic Control workstation research was conducted as part of the 1997 NASA Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) demonstration program at Atlanta Hartsfield airport. Research activity under this grant increased the sophistication of the Controllers' Communication and Situational Awareness Terminal (C-CAST) and developed a VHF Data Link -Mode 2 communications platform. The research culminated with participation in the 2000 NASA Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision System (SVS) / Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) flight demonstration at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

  1. Flight Test Evaluation of Situation Awareness Benefits of Integrated Synthetic Vision System Technology f or Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III

    2005-01-01

    Research was conducted onboard a Gulfstream G-V aircraft to evaluate integrated Synthetic Vision System concepts during flight tests over a 6-week period at the Wallops Flight Facility and Reno/Tahoe International Airport. The NASA Synthetic Vision System incorporates database integrity monitoring, runway incursion prevention alerting, surface maps, enhanced vision sensors, and advanced pathway guidance and synthetic terrain presentation. The paper details the goals and objectives of the flight test with a focus on the situation awareness benefits of integrating synthetic vision system enabling technologies for commercial aircraft.

  2. Fusion of Synthetic and Enhanced Vision for All-Weather Commercial Aviation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence, III

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing revolutionary crew-vehicle interface technologies that strive to proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the full realization of the next-generation air transportation system. A piloted simulation experiment was conducted to evaluate the complementary use of Synthetic and Enhanced Vision technologies. Specific focus was placed on new techniques for integration and/or fusion of Enhanced and Synthetic Vision and its impact within a two-crew flight deck during low visibility approach and landing operations. Overall, the experimental data showed that significant improvements in situation awareness, without concomitant increases in workload and display clutter, could be provided by the integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies for the pilot-flying and the pilot-not-flying. During non-normal operations, the ability of the crew to handle substantial navigational errors and runway incursions were not adversely impacted by the display concepts although the addition of Enhanced Vision did not, unto itself, provide an improvement in runway incursion detection.

  3. Flight Test Comparison Between Enhanced Vision (FLIR) and Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2005-01-01

    Limited visibility and reduced situational awareness have been cited as predominant causal factors for both Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) and runway incursion accidents. NASA s Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing practical application technologies with the goal of eliminating low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced pathway guidance. A flight test evaluation was conducted in the summer of 2004 by NASA Langley Research Center under NASA s Aviation Safety and Security, Synthetic Vision System - Commercial and Business program. A Gulfstream G-V aircraft, modified and operated under NASA contract by the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, was flown over a 3-week period at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport and an additional 3-week period at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility to evaluate integrated Synthetic Vision System concepts. Flight testing was conducted to evaluate the performance, usability, and acceptance of an integrated synthetic vision concept which included advanced Synthetic Vision display concepts for a transport aircraft flight deck, a Runway Incursion Prevention System, an Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS), and real-time Database Integrity Monitoring Equipment. This paper focuses on comparing qualitative and subjective results between EVS and SVS display concepts.

  4. Commercial Flight Crew Decision-Making during Low-Visibility Approach Operations Using Fused Synthetic/Enhanced Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2007-01-01

    NASA is investigating revolutionary crew-vehicle interface technologies that strive to proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the full realization of the next-generation air transportation system. A fixed-based piloted simulation experiment was conducted to evaluate the complementary use of Synthetic and Enhanced Vision technologies. Specific focus was placed on new techniques for integration and/or fusion of Enhanced and Synthetic Vision and its impact within a two-crew flight deck on the crew's decision-making process during low-visibility approach and landing operations. Overall, the experimental data showed that significant improvements in situation awareness, without concomitant increases in workload and display clutter, could be provided by the integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies for the pilot-flying and the pilot-not-flying. During non-normal operations, the ability of the crew to handle substantial navigational errors and runway incursions were neither improved nor adversely impacted by the display concepts. The addition of Enhanced Vision may not, unto itself, provide an improvement in runway incursion detection without being specifically tailored for this application. Existing enhanced vision system procedures were effectively used in the crew decision-making process during approach and missed approach operations but having to forcibly transition from an excellent FLIR image to natural vision by 100 ft above field level was awkward for the pilot-flying.

  5. Flight test comparison between enhanced vision (FLIR) and synthetic vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2005-05-01

    Limited visibility and reduced situational awareness have been cited as predominant causal factors for both Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) and runway incursion accidents. NASA"s Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing practical application technologies with the goal of eliminating low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced pathway guidance. A flight test evaluation was conducted in the summer of 2004 by NASA Langley Research Center under NASA's Aviation Safety and Security, Synthetic Vision System - Commercial and Business program. A Gulfstream G-V aircraft, modified and operated under NASA contract by the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, was flown over a 3-week period at the Reno/Tahoe International Airport and an additional 3-week period at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility to evaluate integrated Synthetic Vision System concepts. Flight testing was conducted to evaluate the performance, usability, and acceptance of an integrated synthetic vision concept which included advanced Synthetic Vision display concepts for a transport aircraft flight deck, a Runway Incursion Prevention System, an Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS), and real-time Database Integrity Monitoring Equipment. This paper focuses on comparing qualitative and subjective results between EVS and SVS display concepts.

  6. Evaluation of Fused Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Display Concepts for Low-Visibility Approach and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Wilz, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA is developing revolutionary crew-vehicle interface technologies that strive to proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the full realization of the next generation air transportation system. A piloted simulation experiment was conducted to evaluate the complementary use of Synthetic and Enhanced Vision technologies. Specific focus was placed on new techniques for integration and/or fusion of Enhanced and Synthetic Vision and its impact within a two-crew flight deck during low-visibility approach and landing operations. Overall, the experimental data showed that significant improvements in situation awareness, without concomitant increases in workload and display clutter, could be provided by the integration and/or fusion of synthetic and enhanced vision technologies for the pilot-flying and the pilot-not-flying. Improvements in lateral path control performance were realized when the Head-Up Display concepts included a tunnel, independent of the imagery (enhanced vision or fusion of enhanced and synthetic vision) presented with it. During non-normal operations, the ability of the crew to handle substantial navigational errors and runway incursions were neither improved nor adversely impacted by the display concepts. The addition of Enhanced Vision may not, of itself, provide an improvement in runway incursion detection without being specifically tailored for this application.

  7. Statistical Analysis of ITRAX XRF Data to Identify Marine Incursion, Sediment Source, and Saltwater Leaching in Tsunami Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, C. L.; Chague-Goff, C.; Goff, J. R.; Gadd, P.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical investigation of fine-grained tsunami sediments has found that a characteristic salinity signature can be commonly found in tsunami deposits and underlying soils following an event. We extend this method to assess historic and paleotsunami deposits and investigate a wider range of particle sizes, with the aim of identifying whether salinity signatures are present and determining the source material of the deposits. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of seven short cores was undertaken at four sites in New Zealand, where historic and/or palaeotsunami deposits were present as sand, silt or gravel layers intercalated between soils. Geochemical signatures were measured using a high-resolution ITRAX X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanner and results were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). We were able to explore the signatures of historical events, verify that prehistoric deposits were laid down by tsunamis, and compare these sediments with the background depositional environment. A t-test of means was applied for salinity marker elements (S, Cl, Br) in the soils immediately above and below tsunami sand layers, to test for evidence of saltwater leaching. The dominant mineralogy of the sediments was determined using portable X-ray diffraction and the data used to consider source material and interpret the corresponding XRF data. Geochemical signatures were found to be site specific, depending primarily on the composition of the material. PCA and HCA results clearly distinguished the signature of the tsunami deposits from the background material at each individual site and were able to confirm or deny palaeodeposits as tsunami-related, by comparison with the signatures of known events in the same core or nearby.

  8. Radiocarbon Dates Link Marine Incursion and Neoglacial Ice Terminus Advance With Tlingit Ethnohistory and Archeology in Lower Glacier Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C. L.; Monteith, D.; Howell, W.; Strevelar, G.; Leirer, M.

    2004-12-01

    Radiocarbon dates from wood, organic sediments, and marine shells were collected from eroded beach terraces and upper beach sediments in the Beardslee Islands and Berg Bay in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska. These provide a timetable for the the outwash plain construction and final advance of the Late Neoglacial glacier front over this outwash plain into lower Glacier Bay. On Kidney Island in the central Beardslee Islands, marine sediments containing Macoma baltica shells were deposited 4310 +/- 40 years BP. Outwash from advancing up-bay glaciers, buried these sediments and created terrestrial substrates upon which forests existed by 1630 +/- 60 BP and 1300 +/- 50 yrs BP. Final ice advance over this forested outwash plain occurred after 430 +/- 60 BP (1430 to 1510 AD) on Kidney Island. This ice arrived at the southern edge of Lester Island in Bartlett Cove after 370 +/- 50 BP (1440 to 1520 AD); preceding the arrival of George Vancouver in 1794 AD. In nearby Icy Straits, archeological investigations have yielded some of the oldest dates of human occupation in the region at 10,180 +/- 800 uncorrected years BP (Ackerman, 1968). In Glacier Bay's ethno-historically rich areas of Bartlett Cove, the Beardslee Islands and Berg Bay the Huna people have names for places and narratives that describe late Neoglacial landscapes. S'é Shuyee is the "area at the end of the glacial mud", L'awsha Shakee Aan "town on top of the glacial sand dunes". There are accounts of villages overrun by surging glaciers, and a name for the bay Sit' eeti Geeyi that translates as "bay in place of the glacier". These dates provide linkage between the geological, archeological, and ethnohistorical evidence that chronicles the history of the Huna people in this dynamic glacier marine environment.

  9. Beyond the Levant: First Evidence of a Pre-Pottery Neolithic Incursion into the Nefud Desert, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Crassard, Rémy; Petraglia, Michael D.; Parker, Adrian G.; Parton, Ash; Roberts, Richard G.; Jacobs, Zenobia; Alsharekh, Abdullah; Al-Omari, Abdulaziz; Breeze, Paul; Drake, Nick A.; Groucutt, Huw S.; Jennings, Richard; Régagnon, Emmanuelle; Shipton, Ceri

    2013-01-01

    Pre-Pottery Neolithic assemblages are best known from the fertile areas of the Mediterranean Levant. The archaeological site of Jebel Qattar 101 (JQ-101), at Jubbah in the southern part of the Nefud Desert of northern Saudi Arabia, contains a large collection of stone tools, adjacent to an Early Holocene palaeolake. The stone tool assemblage contains lithic types, including El-Khiam and Helwan projectile points, which are similar to those recorded in Pre-Pottery Neolithic A and Pre-Pottery Neolithic B assemblages in the Fertile Crescent. Jebel Qattar lies ∼500 kilometres outside the previously identified geographic range of Pre-Pottery Neolithic cultures. Technological analysis of the typologically diagnostic Jebel Qattar 101 projectile points indicates a unique strategy to manufacture the final forms, thereby raising the possibility of either direct migration of Levantine groups or the acculturation of mobile communities in Arabia. The discovery of the Early Holocene site of Jebel Qattar suggests that our view of the geographic distribution and character of Pre-Pottery Neolithic cultures may be in need of revision. PMID:23894294

  10. Epidemiological characteristics and clinicopathological features of bluetongue in sheep and cattle, during the 2014 BTV serotype 4 incursion in Greece.

    PubMed

    Katsoulos, Panagiotis-Dimitrios; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Chaintoutis, Serafeim C; Dovas, Chrysostomos I; Kiossis, Evangelos; Tsousis, Georgios; Psychas, Vassilios; Vlemmas, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Theologos; Papadopoulos, Orestis; Zientara, Stéphan; Karatzias, Harilaos; Boscos, Constantinos

    2016-03-01

    During 2014, an outbreak of Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections attributed to serotype 4 occurred in Greece and spread to south-eastern Europe. In the present article, the clinical and epidemiological data of 15 sheep flocks and 5 dairy cattle herds affected in Greece are described. In sheep, the most frequent clinical signs observed were fever, hyporexia, and edema of the face. A number of clinically affected sheep had chronic laminitis resulting in chronic lameness. Confirmation of suspect clinical cases was performed using BTV-specific real-time RT-PCR, and serotype 4-specific RT-PCR. The average morbidity of bluetongue in the sheep flocks was estimated to be 15.3 % (95 % C.I. 6.8-23.8 %) and the average mortality and case fatality were 4.5 % (95 % C.I. 1.5-7.6 %) and 32.0 % (95 % C.I. 18.1-42.9 %), respectively. The BTV seroprevalence and the ratio of clinical manifestations-to-infections determined in seven of these flocks, were on average 36.5 % (95 % C.I. 15.7-57.3 %) and 24.6 % (95 % C.I. 12.8-36.3 %). BTV ratio of clinical manifestations-to-infections was higher in the imported western European sheep breeds examined compared to the local ones. In dairy cattle, the average herd prevalence of viremia was 48.8 % (95 % C.I. 15.3-82.4 %) and none had signs associated with bluetongue. The results of this study indicate that the 2014 Greek BTV-4 has significant impact on the health status and the viability of sheep in affected flocks but does not cause clinical signs in cattle, despite the high prevalence of viremia.

  11. Beyond the Levant: first evidence of a pre-pottery Neolithic incursion into the Nefud Desert, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Crassard, Rémy; Petraglia, Michael D; Parker, Adrian G; Parton, Ash; Roberts, Richard G; Jacobs, Zenobia; Alsharekh, Abdullah; Al-Omari, Abdulaziz; Breeze, Paul; Drake, Nick A; Groucutt, Huw S; Jennings, Richard; Régagnon, Emmanuelle; Shipton, Ceri

    2013-01-01

    Pre-Pottery Neolithic assemblages are best known from the fertile areas of the Mediterranean Levant. The archaeological site of Jebel Qattar 101 (JQ-101), at Jubbah in the southern part of the Nefud Desert of northern Saudi Arabia, contains a large collection of stone tools, adjacent to an Early Holocene palaeolake. The stone tool assemblage contains lithic types, including El-Khiam and Helwan projectile points, which are similar to those recorded in Pre-Pottery Neolithic A and Pre-Pottery Neolithic B assemblages in the Fertile Crescent. Jebel Qattar lies ∼500 kilometres outside the previously identified geographic range of Pre-Pottery Neolithic cultures. Technological analysis of the typologically diagnostic Jebel Qattar 101 projectile points indicates a unique strategy to manufacture the final forms, thereby raising the possibility of either direct migration of Levantine groups or the acculturation of mobile communities in Arabia. The discovery of the Early Holocene site of Jebel Qattar suggests that our view of the geographic distribution and character of Pre-Pottery Neolithic cultures may be in need of revision.

  12. Predicting soybean rust incursions into the North American continental interior using crop monitoring, spore trapping, and aerobiological modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Between 2005 and 2009, millions of U.S. and Canadian soybean acres that would have received fungicide application remained untreated for soybean rust due to information disseminated through the Integrated Pest Management Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education (ipmPIPE), increasing Nor...

  13. Inferring the distribution and demography of an invasive species from sighting data: the red fox incursion into Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Caley, Peter; Ramsey, David S L; Barry, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has inferred that the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is now widespread in Tasmania as of 2010, based on the extraction of fox DNA from predator scats. Heuristically, this inference appears at first glance to be at odds with the lack of recent confirmed discoveries of either road-killed foxes--the last of which occurred in 2006, or hunter killed foxes--the most recent in 2001. This paper demonstrates a method to codify this heuristic analysis and produce inferences consistent with assumptions and data. It does this by formalising the analysis in a transparent and repeatable manner to make inference on the past, present and future distribution of an invasive species. It utilizes Approximate Bayesian Computation to make inferences. Importantly, the method is able to inform management of invasive species within realistic time frames, and can be applied widely. We illustrate the technique using the Tasmanian fox data. Based on the pattern of carcass discoveries of foxes in Tasmania, we infer that the population of foxes in Tasmania is most likely extinct, or restricted in distribution and demographically weak as of 2013. It is possible, though unlikely, that that population is widespread and/or demographically robust. This inference is largely at odds with the inference from the predator scat survey data. Our results suggest the chances of successfully eradicating the introduced red fox population in Tasmania may be significantly higher than previously thought.

  14. Meteoric incursion and oxygen fronts in the Dalradian metamorphic belt, southwest Scotland: a new hypothesis for regional gold mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    1996-07-01

    Post-metamorphic quartz veins which occur over hundreds of square kilometres in the biotite zone of the Dalradian metamorphic belt consist of three principal types: anhedral quartz with pyrite, anhedral quartz with hematite, and prismatic quartz with hematite or rutile. The oxide minerals in anhedral veins have formed by oxidation of pre-existing sulphides, and gold was mobilized during this oxidation. Anhedral quartz veins formed from an aqueous fluid with up to 5 wt% dissolved salts and 16 wt% CO2 at about 300 °C. Texturally later prismatic quartz crystals formed from a compositionally similar fluid which was undergoing phase separation at the H2O-CO2 solvus at 160 200 °C and 500 to 1200 bars fluid pressure. Oxygen isotope ratios for quartz from the veins range from 12.0 to 15.3‰, with hematite-bearing veins generally isotopically heavier than pyrite-bearing veins. Calculated fluid oxygen isotope ratios range from +8‰ for pyrite-bearing veins to -2‰ for late prismatic crystals. The mineralizing fluid contained a substantial component of meteoric water whose isotopic and chemical composition evolved with progressive water-rock interaction. Evolution of meteoric fluid composition involved migration of oxidation and oxygen isotope fronts in the down-flow direction as head-driven water passed through structurally controlled fractures in the schist pile. A gold solubility trough occurs for the observed fluid in the oxidation frontal zone. Gold remobilization and reprecipitation occurred progressively as the oxidation front migrated through the schist pile.

  15. Ostracod stable isotope ratios indicate marine incursions in the Dacian Basin during the Upper Miocene and Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floroiu, Alina; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Stoica, Marius; van Baak, Christiaan; de Leeuw, Arjan; Krijgsman, Wout; Mulch, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Dacian Basin (Romania) was part of the former Paratethys Sea that stretched over Eurasia during the Miocene to Pliocene. During that time connection of the Paratethys to the open ocean was highly variable which hampers the correlation of regional and global climatic and biotic events. Additionally, the high degree of endemism typically limits the possibility for oxygen and carbon isotope comparisons on foraminifera. Here, we present the first stable ostracod isotope (δ18O and δ13C) data of the Dacian Basin covering the latest Miocene to Pliocene. Next to mollusks, ostracods currently provide the only continuous biogenic carbonate record in the Dacian Basin. The high-resolution ostracod δ18O and δ13C data were obtained from the well-dated, thick Slanicul de Buzau section (e.g. van Baak, et al., 2015) and compared to the strontium isotope data from the same section (Grothe et al., 2016). To minimize the effects of species-dependent biosynthetic fractionation on the δ18O and δ13C values we target single specimen measurements, preferentially on Cyprideis sp.,and Tyrrhenocythere sp. Collectively, these data provide a first-order reconstruction of the most significant changes affecting the basin during the 6.3 to 3.3 Ma time interval. The δ18O and δ13C records from Slanicul de Buzau show both very large variations attaining up to 13‰ (from around -11‰ to 2) over the sampled 3 Myr interval. Such large changes cannot be explained only by interspecies dependent variations in the biosynthetic fractionation. More likely, they indicate important changes in δ18O of Dacian Basin water and carbon cycling. In particular, two intervals have much higher δ18O values (attaining up to 0 and +2 ) when compared to the rest of the record. The first occurs at ˜5.4 Ma and coincides with the 'Bosphorian Flood', an interval that is also marked by elevated 87Sr/86Sr values close to those recorded in the oceanic waters at that time (Grothe et al., 2016). We interpret this interval as a time when an influx of saltier, possibly also warmer water, affected the Dacian Basin. The second one, at around 3.4-3.3 Ma, is also marked by somehow higher 87Sr/86Sr. Because the timing of this younger interval with higher δ18O values coincides with the Mid Pliocene Warm period we speculate that an influx of warmer, possibly also saltier water, affected the Dacian Basin at that time. The δ13C data do not follow the δ18O record. At 5.5 Ma (during the 'Bosphorian Flood') the highest δ13C values are recorded (+2 ). After this interval, until the end of our record at 3.3 Ma we observe a consistent decrease in the δ13C values (up to -11 ). We interpret this δ13C decrease as a steady change in the environmental conditions of the Dacian Basin, from more eutrophic at 5.5 Ma to more oligotrophic towards 3.3 Ma.

  16. Inferring the Distribution and Demography of an Invasive Species from Sighting Data: The Red Fox Incursion into Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Peter; Ramsey, David S. L.; Barry, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has inferred that the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is now widespread in Tasmania as of 2010, based on the extraction of fox DNA from predator scats. Heuristically, this inference appears at first glance to be at odds with the lack of recent confirmed discoveries of either road-killed foxes—the last of which occurred in 2006, or hunter killed foxes—the most recent in 2001. This paper demonstrates a method to codify this heuristic analysis and produce inferences consistent with assumptions and data. It does this by formalising the analysis in a transparent and repeatable manner to make inference on the past, present and future distribution of an invasive species. It utilizes Approximate Bayesian Computation to make inferences. Importantly, the method is able to inform management of invasive species within realistic time frames, and can be applied widely. We illustrate the technique using the Tasmanian fox data. Based on the pattern of carcass discoveries of foxes in Tasmania, we infer that the population of foxes in Tasmania is most likely extinct, or restricted in distribution and demographically weak as of 2013. It is possible, though unlikely, that that population is widespread and/or demographically robust. This inference is largely at odds with the inference from the predator scat survey data. Our results suggest the chances of successfully eradicating the introduced red fox population in Tasmania may be significantly higher than previously thought. PMID:25602618

  17. Practising pastoralism in an agricultural environment: An isotopic analysis of the impact of the Hunnic incursions on Pannonian populations.

    PubMed

    Hakenbeck, Susanne E; Evans, Jane; Chapman, Hazel; Fóthi, Erzsébet

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a multi-isotope study of five fifth-century AD cemeteries in modern-day Hungary to determine relationships between nomadic-pastoralist incomers-the historically documented Huns and other nomadic groups-and the sedentary agricultural population of the late Roman province of Pannonia. Contemporary historical sources describe this relationship as adversarial and destructive for the late Roman population, but archaeological evidence indicates high levels of hybridity between different groups. We undertook carbon, nitrogen, strontium and oxygen isotope analyses of bone collagen, dentine and tooth enamel at Keszthely-Fenékpuszta, Hács-Béndekpuszta, Győr-Széchenyi Square, Mözs and Szolnok-Szanda to examine these relationships through past subsistence practices. The patterns at all sites indicate medium to high animal protein consumption with little evidence for a significant contribution of aquatic resources. All populations relied to a great extent on C4 plants, most likely millet. Within each population, diet was heterogeneous, with significant variations in terms of animal protein and C3 and C4 plant consumption. High levels of intra-population and individual variability suggest that populations made use of a range of subsistence strategies, with many individuals exhibiting significant changes over their lifetimes. Rather than being characterised only by violence, the historically-documented influx of nomadic populations appears to have led to widespread changes in subsistence strategies of populations in the Carpathian basin. Nomadic-pastoralist groups may have switched to smaller herds and more farming, and, conversely, local populations may have integrated with a new economic system based on animal herding.

  18. Practising pastoralism in an agricultural environment: An isotopic analysis of the impact of the Hunnic incursions on Pannonian populations

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jane; Chapman, Hazel; Fóthi, Erzsébet

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a multi-isotope study of five fifth-century AD cemeteries in modern-day Hungary to determine relationships between nomadic-pastoralist incomers—the historically documented Huns and other nomadic groups—and the sedentary agricultural population of the late Roman province of Pannonia. Contemporary historical sources describe this relationship as adversarial and destructive for the late Roman population, but archaeological evidence indicates high levels of hybridity between different groups. We undertook carbon, nitrogen, strontium and oxygen isotope analyses of bone collagen, dentine and tooth enamel at Keszthely-Fenékpuszta, Hács-Béndekpuszta, Győr-Széchenyi Square, Mözs and Szolnok-Szanda to examine these relationships through past subsistence practices. The patterns at all sites indicate medium to high animal protein consumption with little evidence for a significant contribution of aquatic resources. All populations relied to a great extent on C4 plants, most likely millet. Within each population, diet was heterogeneous, with significant variations in terms of animal protein and C3 and C4 plant consumption. High levels of intra-population and individual variability suggest that populations made use of a range of subsistence strategies, with many individuals exhibiting significant changes over their lifetimes. Rather than being characterised only by violence, the historically-documented influx of nomadic populations appears to have led to widespread changes in subsistence strategies of populations in the Carpathian basin. Nomadic-pastoralist groups may have switched to smaller herds and more farming, and, conversely, local populations may have integrated with a new economic system based on animal herding. PMID:28328951

  19. An incursion of dust in the southwestern United States from April 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, L. A.; Roquemore, G. R.; St.amand, P.; Gibson, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An intrusion of volcanic dust occurred over the northern Mojave Desert, one month before the explosive eruption of 18 May 1980. Visibility was reduced to 15 to 30 miles during meteorological conditions that should have yielded a visibility in excess of 100 miles. This intrusion was documented by particle size distributions, scanning electron microscope analysis of Nuclepore filter samples, insolation measurements, observations by Navy and NASA aircraft, and meteorological data. No further incidents have been observed to date because of a lack of simultaneous volcanic activity with the particular wind patterns that existed in April. Therefore, under certain meteorological conditions, the desert of the southwestern United States could be significantly affected by volcanic ash from an eruption of Mount St. Helens.

  20. Using avian surveillance in Ecuador to assess the imminence of West Nile virus incursion to Galápagos.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Goodman, Simon J; Hilgert, Nancy; Cruz, Marilyn; Kramer, Laura D; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Infectious disease emergence represents a global threat to human, agricultural animal and wildlife health. West Nile virus (WNV) first emerged in the Americas in 1999 following its introduction to New York from the Old World. This flavivirus rapidly spread across much of North America, causing human, equine and avian mortalities and population declines of multiple wild bird species. It has now spread to Central and South America, and there is concern that the virus will reach the Galápagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage Site famous for its unique biodiversity, with potentially catastrophic results. Here, we use wild bird surveillance to examine the current WNV status in the Galapagos Islands and around the Ecuadorian city of Guayaquil (the main air and sea port serving Galápagos). We conducted serosurveys of wild birds on three Galápagos Islands (Baltra, San Cristobal and Santa Cruz) with direct transport links to the South American continent. In addition, dead birds killed by car collisions on Santa Cruz were tested for WNV infection. On mainland Ecuador, serosurveys of wild birds were conducted at three sites around Guayaquil. No evidence of WNV seropositivity or infection was detected. Although wider testing is recommended on the mainland, the study highlights a limit of WNV spread within South America. Our results indicate the continued absence of WNV on Galápagos and suggest the current likelihood of human-mediated transport of WNV to Galápagos to be low. The risk of emergence will almost certainly increase over time, however, and stringent biosecurity and surveillance measures should be put in place to minimise the risk of the introduction of WNV (and other alien pathogens) to Galápagos.