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Sample records for ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform

  1. The safety of Pipeline flow diversion in fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysms: a consecutive case series with longer-term follow-up from a single US center.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Lin, Ning; Sonig, Ashish; Rai, Ansaar T; Carpenter, Jeffrey S; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Pessimism exists regarding flow diversion for posterior circulation aneurysms because of reports of perforator territory infarcts and delayed ruptures. The authors report the results of patients who underwent Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) flow diversion using novel strategies for treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms, and compare these results with those from previously reported series. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of data from consecutive patients with fusiform vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms treated with the PED. RESULTS This review resulted in the identification of 12 such patients (mean [± SD] age 55.1 ± 14.1 years). Eleven patients had symptoms; 1 had a dissecting aneurysm identified on imaging for neck pain. The average aneurysm size was 13.25 ± 4.5 mm. None of the aneurysms were ruptured or previously treated. The average clinical follow-up duration was 22.1 ± 10.7 months and radiological follow-up was 14.5 ± 11.1 months from the index PED treatment. One patient suffered a perforator stroke and had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 4 at last follow-up. Another patient had a retained stent pusher requiring retrieval via surgical cut-down but recovered to an mRS score of 0 at last follow-up. Eleven (91.7%) of 12 patients recovered to an mRS score of 0 or 1. Two patients had aneurysmal remnants at 7 and 10 months, respectively, after the index PED, which were retreated with PEDs. At last follow-up, all 12 aneurysms were occluded and PEDs were patent. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months from the index PED treatment; no patient experienced delayed hemorrhage, stroke, or in-stent stenosis. CONCLUSIONS Flow diversion with selective adjunctive techniques is evolving to become a safer treatment option for posterior circulation aneurysms. This is the longest clinical follow-up duration reported for a single-center experience of flow-diversion treatment of these aneurysms.

  2. Treatment of Ruptured Saccular Aneurysms of the Fenestrated Vertebrobasilar Junction with Balloon Remodeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek; Ahuja, Chirag K; Khandelwal, N; Kumar, Ajay; Gupta, S K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fenestration of the intracranial arteries is a relatively common occurrence. This anatomic variation may predispose to aneurysm formation at certain sites. Treatment of such aneurysms is difficult as it may occlude one of the limbs of fenestration with resultant deficit. Thus, preservation of both the limbs with adequate exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation should be the aim of any treatment. We describe a series of four cases of ruptured aneurysms arising from a fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction treated with endovascular balloon remodeling technique. PMID:24070077

  3. Vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency; Posterior circulation ischemia; Beauty parlor syndrome; TIA - vertebrobasilar insufficiency; Dizziness - vertebrobasilar insufficiency; Vertigo - vertebrobasilar insufficiency

  4. Tailored PICA Revascularization for Unusual Ruptured Fusiform Vertebro-PICA Origin Aneurysms: Rationale and Case Illustrations.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrew P

    2015-11-01

    Ruptured fusiform aneurysms of the vertebral artery involving posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) origin are difficult to manage without sacrificing PICA. In this report, two very unusual cases are described which highlight different revascularization strategies that may be required. The first case initially appeared to be a small saccular PICA origin aneurysm, but detailed angiography showed a serpentine recanalization of a fusiform aneurysm. This was treated with PICA-PICA anastomosis and trapping of the aneurysm. The second case is a dissecting vertebral aneurysm with both PICA and the anterior spinal artery originating from the dome. PICA was found to be a bihemispheric variant, so no in situ bypass was available, and an occipital artery to PICA bypass was performed. The vertebral artery was occluded proximally only and follow-up angiography showed remodeling of the distal vertebral artery with the anterior spinal artery filling by retrograde flow from the distal vertebral artery. These cases illustrate both the anatomic variability of this region as well as the need to be familiar with multiple treatment strategies including revascularization techniques to be able to successfully treat these aneurysms.

  5. Ruptured cerebral fusiform aneurysm with mucopolysaccharide deposits in the tunica media in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshitaka; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kurose, Akira; Kakino, Shunsuke; Tomitsuka, Nobuhiko; Ogawa, Akira

    2009-03-01

    Although aortic or cardiac complications are common in patients with Marfan syndrome, the presence of an intracranial aneurysm is comparatively rare. In this study, the authors report on their experience with resection of a ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 30-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome. Microscopic examination of the resected tissue showed many Alcian blue-staining deposits, consistent with the presence of mucopolysaccharide in the tunica media and focal fragmentation of the internal elastic lamina.

  6. Persistent Aneurysm Growth Following Pipeline Embolization Device Assisted Coiling of a Fusiform Vertebral Artery Aneurysm: A Word of Caution!

    PubMed Central

    Kerolus, Mena; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2015-01-01

    The complex morphology of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms makes them one of the most challenging lesions treated by neurointerventionists. Different management strategies in the past included parent vessel occlusion with or without extra-intracranial bypass surgery and endovascular reconstruction by conventional stents. Use of flow diversion has emerged as a promising alternative option with various studies documenting its efficacy and safety. However, there are various caveats associated with use of flow diversion in patients with fusiform vertibrobasilar aneurysms especially in patients presenting with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report a rare case of persistent aneurysmal growth after coiling and placement of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) for SAH from a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. As consequences of aneurysm rupture can be devastating especially in patients with a prior SAH, the clinical relevance of recognizing and understanding such patterns of failure cannot be overemphasized as highlighted in the present case. PMID:25763295

  7. Successful endovascular treatment of a growing megadolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery aneurysm by flow diversion using the "diverter-in-stent" technique.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Giant dolichoectatic and fusiform aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar artery are among the most difficult and dangerous aneurysms to treat. Conservative management may be reasonable in asymptomatic elderly patients. Nevertheless, due to the frequent presence of mass effect on the brainstem and the risks of thromboembolic events and rupture, these aneurysms often demand treatment rather than observation. With the advancement of endovascular techniques some of these lesions have become treatable without the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with open surgical treatment. When dealing with giant, progressively enlarging symptomatic aneurysms, more limited therapeutic alternatives are available. The authors present a case of a growing megadolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery aneurysm causing major disability due to increasing mass effect in a 51-year-old man. The aneurysm was treated with flow diversion by placing multiple telescoped stents and diverters ("diverter-in-stent" technique), achieving thrombosis of the aneurysm and reduction of the mass effect on the brainstem, with neurological improvement. The successful clinical and angiographic results observed in our case of giant dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar aneurysm contribute to the literature on giant aneurysms treated by means of flow diversion.

  8. Betahistine in vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Henryk; Pawlak-Osińska, Katarzyna; Kaźmierczak, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the usefulness of betahistine dihydrochloride--Betaserc--in therapy for vestibular disorders in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Two groups of patients, in each of which were 150 patients (mean age, 52.2 years), were tested on the basis of videonystagmography and stabilometry. Betaserc was administrated in two separate doses: 8 mg three times daily and 16 mg three times daily for 120-180 days (mean, 132 days). In every case before and after therapy, visuo-oculomotor and vestibulo-oculomotor reflexes were tested, and amplitude and velocity of the sway were measured during dynamic posturographic testing. After Betaserc treatment, pathological visuo-oculomotor reactions and pathological cervical test results disappeared in most cases: Smooth pursuit improved in 59.9% of cases and saccadic movements in 55.9% of patients, and cervical nystagmus disappeared in 62.2% of tested people. During stabilometry, mean and maximal platform amplitude and mean head velocity decreased as compared with results from tests performed before treatment. These observations were significant after the greater dose of Betaserc; nonetheless, improvement was noted after both doses. The usefulness of Betaserc in vertebrobasilar insufficiency was proved, 4-6 months' therapy was sufficient, and the effect on central compensation seemed to be most probable.

  9. Dolichoectatic aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system: clinical and radiographic factors that predict poor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, David S; Levitt, Michael R; Kalani, M Yashar S; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Mulholland, Celene B; Abecassis, Isaac J; Morton, Ryan P; Nerva, John D; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Spetzler, Robert F; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G

    2017-04-07

    OBJECTIVE Fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar aneurysms are rare, challenging lesions. The natural history of these lesions and medium- and long-term patient outcomes are poorly understood. The authors sought to evaluate patient prognosis after diagnosis of fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar aneurysms and to identify clinical and radiographic predictors of neurological deterioration. METHODS The authors reviewed multiple, prospectively maintained, single-provider databases at 3 large-volume cerebrovascular centers to obtain data on patients with unruptured, fusiform, basilar artery dolichoectatic aneurysms diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2015. RESULTS A total of 50 patients (33 men, 17 women) were identified; mean clinical follow-up was 50.1 months and mean radiographic follow-up was 32.4 months. At last follow-up, 42% (n = 21) of aneurysms had progressed and 44% (n = 22) of patients had deterioration of their modified Rankin Scale scores. When patients were dichotomized into 2 groups- those who worsened and those who did not-univariate analysis showed 5 variables to be statistically significantly different: sex (p = 0.007), radiographic brainstem compression (p = 0.03), clinical posterior fossa compression (p < 0.001), aneurysmal growth on subsequent imaging (p = 0.001), and surgical therapy (p = 0.006). A binary logistic regression was then created to evaluate these variables. The only variable found to be a statistically significant predictor of clinical worsening was clinical symptoms of posterior fossa compression at presentation (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar aneurysms carry a poor prognosis, with approximately one-half of the patients deteriorating or experiencing progression of their aneurysm within 5 years. Despite being high risk, intervention-when carefully timed (before neurological decline)-may be beneficial in select patients.

  10. Research Progress on Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Jie; Xu, Kan; Luo, Qi; Yu, Jin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a rare disease characterized by significant expansion, elongation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. Current data regarding VBD are very limited. Here we systematically review VBD incidence, etiology, characteristics, clinical manifestations, treatment strategies, and prognosis. The exact incidence rate of VBD remains unclear, but is estimated to be 1.3% of the population. The occurrence of VBD is thought to be due to the cooperation of multiple factors, including congenital factors, infections and immune status, and degenerative diseases. The VBD clinical manifestations are complex with ischemic stroke as the most common, followed by progressive compression of cranial nerves and the brain stem, cerebral hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus. Treatment of VBD remains difficult. Currently, there are no precise and effective treatments, and available treatments mainly target the complications of VBD. With the development of stent technology, however, it may become an effective treatment for VBD. PMID:25136259

  11. Trigeminal Neuralgia due to Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Wuilker Knoner; Guasti, André Accioly; da Silva, Benjamin Franklin; Guasti, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We presented a case of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, a rare condition characterized by enlargement, tortuosity, or elongation of intracranial arteries. Dolichoectatic vessels can cause dysfunction of cranial nerves through direct vascular compression. The relationships of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia with the particularities of neurovascular conflict and images findings are discussed. PMID:22937350

  12. Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars Meyn, Hannes; Nordmeyer, Simone; Kempkes, Udo; Piroth, Werner

    2012-06-15

    Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

  13. Trigeminal hypoplasia due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Gupta, Prakhar; Haroon, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurav; Gupta, Gagan; Khalid, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The term “vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia” refers to anomalous dilatation of the intracranial arteries associated with elongation or tortuosity of the affected vessels. The etiology of the disease is unknown and is usually detected incidentally. The predominant clinical manifestations arise due to the mass effect of the dilated vessels and may include cranial nerve compression, extrinsic aqueductal compression, motor and sensory disturbances. Trigeminal hypoplasia is a very uncommon condition, usually described in association with Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome and has not yet been attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. The current case report highlights this rare association of trigeminal nerve hypoplasia and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, leading to hemifacial and corneal anesthesia. PMID:26167222

  14. Hemodynamic Features of Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Du, Xinjian; Rose-Finnell, Linda; Pandey, Dilip K.; Richardson, DeJuran; Thulborn, Keith R.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Liebeskind, David S.; Silver, Frank L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Aletich, Victor A.; Caplan, Louis R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Gorelick, Philip B; Charbel, Fady T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar (VB) disease is an important etiology of posterior circulation stroke. To examine the role of hemodynamic compromise, a prospective multi-center study, Vertebrobasilar Flow Evaluation and Risk of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke (VERiTAS), was conducted. Here we report clinical features and vessel flow measurements from the study cohort. Methods Patients with recent VB TIA or stroke and ≥50% atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion in vertebral (VA) and/or basilar (BA) arteries were enrolled. Large vessel flow in the VB territory was assessed using quantitative MRA. Results The cohort (n=72, 44% female) had a mean age of 65.6 years; 72% presented with ischemic stroke. Hypertension (93%) and hyperlipidemia (81%) were the most prevalent vascular risk factors. BA flows correlated negatively with percentage stenosis in the affected vessel, and positively to the minimal diameter at the stenosis site (p<0.01). A relative threshold effect was evident, with flows dropping most significantly with ≥80% stenosis/occlusion (p<0.05). Tandem disease involving the BA and either/both VAs had the greatest negative impact on immediate downstream flow in the BA (43 ml/min vs. 71 ml/min, p=0.01). Distal flow status assessment, based on an algorithm incorporating collateral flow by examining distal vessels (BA and posterior cerebral arteries), correlated neither with multifocality of disease nor severity of the maximal stenosis. Conclusions Flow in stenotic posterior circulation vessels correlates with residual diameter, and drops significantly with tandem disease. However, distal flow status, incorporating collateral capacity, is not well predicted by the severity or location of the disease. PMID:25977279

  15. Far-lateral approach for surgical treatment of fusiform PICA aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Neil, Jayson A

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured fusiform posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms can be technically challenging lesions. Surgeons must be ready to employ a variety of strategies in the successful treatment of these aneurysms. Strategies include complex clip techniques including clip-wrapping or trapping and revascularization. The case presented here is of a man with subarachnoid hemorrhage from a fusiform ruptured PICA aneurysm. The technique demonstrated is a far-lateral approach and a clip-wrap technique using muslin gauze. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively in preparation for possible occipital-PICA bypass if direct repair was not feasible. It is the authors' preference to perform direct vessel repair as a primary goal and use bypass techniques when this is not possible. Vessel patency was evaluated after clip-wrapping using intraoperative Doppler. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is used in such cases. The patient recovered well. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/iwLqufH47Ds .

  16. Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia Induced Hydrocephalus: the Water-Hammer Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Ntouniadaki, Aikaterini; Aggelidakis, Panagiotis; Siatouni, Anna; Gatzonis, Stylianos; Tavernarakis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia is a clinical entity associated rarely with obstructive hydrocephalus. We present a 48-year old male with a profound dilatation of the ventricular system due to a dolichoectatic basilar artery, as appeared in imaging studies. The patient suffered from longstanding hydrocephalus and presenile dementia. The underlying mechanism for obstructive hydrocephalus due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia is considered to be both a water-hammer effect and a direct compression of adjacent structures. We suggest prompt surgical intervention upon diagnosis as a first choice treatment in order to avoid further complications. PMID:26236456

  17. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-15

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  18. Giant serpentine aneurysm of vertebrobasilar artery mimicking dolichoectasia--an unusual complication of pediatric AIDS. Report of a case with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, A; Tagore, R; Siddappa, N B; Santosh, V; Yasha, T C; Ranga, U; Chandramouli, B A; Shankar, S K

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in children differ strikingly from adults. Developmental delay, subacute AIDS encephalitis and basal ganglia calcification are common in children, in contrast to opportunistic infections and dementia in adults. Intracranial aneurysms are being recognized with increasing frequency in pediatric AIDS. Fusiform dilatation of vessels of circle of Willis to form large aneurysms, termed cerebral aneurysmal childhood arteriopathy, is an exceedingly rare complication of pediatric AIDS. We report a case of massive fusiform dilatation of vertebrobasilar system mimicking congenital dolichoectasia with evidence suggesting direct causation by HIV-1 Clade C virus. In view of scant literature that exists on this unusual complication of pediatric AIDS, we present a detailed review of all previously recorded cases and review the etiopathogenesis. There are 20 reports (32 cases) on record till date that have mostly involved the anterior circulation, occurring between 4-15 years of age. Occurrence is associated with profound immunosuppression, and perinatally acquired HIV with latent interval of 5.5-11 years to onset of symptoms. Direct causation by HIV is favored as reports demonstrate presence of virus in affected vessels, association with high viral load and, more conclusively, arrest in progression or reversal with early initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The fusiform nature and location of these aneurysms makes any form of surgical intervention or embolization impossible. High degree of clinical suspicion and awareness of this entity is, therefore, important as this can place young patients at risk for major cerebrovascular accidents.

  19. Fusiform Correlates of Facial Memory in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Trontel, Haley G.; Duffield, Tyler C.; Bigler, Erin D.; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly B.D.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Travers, Brittany G.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Alexander, Andrew; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that performance on standardized measures of memory in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is substantially reduced in comparison to matched typically developing controls (TDC). Given reported deficits in face processing in autism, the current study compared performance on an immediate and delayed facial memory task for individuals with ASD and TDC. In addition, we examined volumetric differences in classic facial memory regions of interest (ROI) between the two groups, including the fusiform, amygdala, and hippocampus. We then explored the relationship between ROI volume and facial memory performance. We found larger volumes in the autism group in the left amygdala and left hippocampus compared to TDC. In contrast, TDC had larger left fusiform gyrus volumes when compared with ASD. Interestingly, we also found significant negative correlations between delayed facial memory performance and volume of the left and right fusiform and the left hippocampus for the ASD group but not for TDC. The possibility of larger fusiform volume as a marker of abnormal connectivity and decreased facial memory is discussed. PMID:24761228

  20. Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

  1. Mechanical Removal of Migrated Onyx Due to Microcatheter Rupture During AVM Embolization: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Cagin

    2015-12-01

    We report a case where migrated Onyx could be removed safely with a mechanical thrombectomy device after withdrawal of the damaged microcatheter. A microcatheter was retained in the superior cerebellar artery with attached Onyx fragments on its tip during embolization of a bled cerebellar AVM. During retrieval maneuvers microcatheter shaft was ruptured and Onyx fragments were released into the vertebrobasilar system causing occlusion. Finally, Onyx fragment on tip of the microcatheter could be detached with dimethyl sulfoxide injection and the microcatheter could be withdrawn. A Merci retriever device (Concentric Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA) was successfully used to retrieve most of the dislodged Onyx material and recanalize the vertebrobasilar circulation.

  2. Fusiform Lenticulostriate Artery Aneurysm with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Role for Superselective Angiography in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, P.S.; Morrish, W.F.; Hudon, M.E.; Wong, J.H.; Goyal, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms of the lenticulostriatal perforating arteries are rare and either involve the middle cerebral artery-perforator junction or are located distally in basal ganglia. We describe a rare ruptured fusiform lenticulostriatal perforating artery aneurysm arising from a proximal M2 MCA branch, discerned on superselective microcatheter angiography, presenting solely with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with diffuse SAH and negative CT angiogram. Cerebral angiogram demonstrated a 2 mm fusiform aneurysm presumably arising from the right lateral lenticulostriate perforator but the exact origin of the perforator was unclear. Superselective angiography was required to precisely delineate the aneurysm and its vessel of origin and directly influenced treatment planning (surgical trapping). Superselective microcatheter angiography provides both an option for endovascular therapy as well as more accurate delineation for surgical planning for these rare aneurysms. PMID:20977857

  3. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  4. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  5. Hémangiome fusiforme: une localisation inhabituelle

    PubMed Central

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Baghad, Bouchra; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    L'hémangiome à cellules fusiformes été décrit par Weiss et Enzinger en 1986 et anciennement nommé hémangioendothéliome à cellules fusiformes. Depuis l'avènement des études immunohistochimique il n'est plus considéré en tant qu'angiosarcome de bas grade. C'est une tumeur bénigne vasculaire. Il touche presque exclusivement le derme des extrémités distales. Nous rapportons le premier cas avec localisation au niveau de l'omoplate, du sein, des cuisses et de la mandibule. Selon la littérature, seulement 9 cas localisés au niveau de la tête et le cou ont été rapportés. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de cette entité rare et mal connue qui peut prêter confusion avec les tumeurs malignes. Notre patient avait une localisation au niveau de l'omoplate, du sein, des cuisses et de la mandibule. Une biopsie-exérèse était réalisée. L’évolution a été favorable avec un recul de 6 mois, sans rechute. PMID:27642429

  6. Leo Stent for Endovascular Treatment of Broad-Necked and Fusiform Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, R.; Nowak, S.; Smól, S.; Kociemba, W.; Blok, T.; Zarzecka, A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The advent of intracranial stents has widened the indications for endovascular treatment of broad-necked and fusiform aneurysms. Leo stent is a self-expandable, nitinol, braided stent dedicated to intracranial vessels. The aim of this study is to present our experience in endovascular treatment of broad-necked and fusiform intracranial aneurysms using self-expanding, nitinol Leo stents. Between February 2004 and November 2006, 25 broad-necked and three fusiform aneurysms in 28 patients were treated using Leo stents in our centre. There were 18 patients who experienced acute subarachnoid haemorrhage due to aneurysm rupture, two patients who experienced SAH at least 12 months ago and in eight patients aneurysms were found incidentally. Aneurysms were located as follows: internal carotid artery15, basilar artery5, basilar tip3, posterior inferior cerebral artery2, M1/M2 segment1, A2 segment1 and vertebral artery1. There were no difficulties with stent deployment and delivery. All patients after acute SAH (n=18) underwent stent implantation and coil embolization in one procedure. The remaining patients underwent coil embolization in a staged procedure. Immediate aneurysm occlusion of more than 95% was achieved in all patients who underwent stent placement and coil embolization in one procedure. There were three thromboembolic complications encountered in patients in an acute setting of SAH, preloaded only on acetylsalicylic acid. Use of abciximab led to patency within the stent and parent vessel. However, one of these patients presented rebleeding from the aneurysm during administration of abciximab and died. Application of Leo stents in cases of broadnecked and fusiform intracranial aneurysms is safe and effective with a low complication rate. PMID:20566117

  7. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Arseny A.; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J.; Michel, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine this association, in particular its pathophysiology, clinical precursor signs, time course, and outcome. To this end, in a retrospective multicenter study, we analyzed 20 patients with VBD and SAH in regard to preceding clinical symptoms, presence of vertebrobasilar thrombosis and ischemia, outcome and neuropathological correlates. Median age of the 7 female and 13 male patients was 70 years (interquartile range [IQR] 18.3 years). Fourteen patients (70%) presented with new or acutely worsening posterior fossa signs at a median of 3 days prior to SAH (IQR 2, range 0.5–14). A thrombus within the VBD was detected in 12 patients (60%). Thrombus formation was associated with clinical deterioration (χ2 = 4.38, P = 0.04) and ponto-cerebellar ischemia (χ2 = 8.09, P = 0.005). During follow-up after SAH, 13 patients (65%) died, after a median survival time of 24 hours (IQR 66.2, range 2–264 hours), with a significant association between proven ponto-cerebellar ischemia and case fatality (χ2 = 6.24, P = 0.01). The data establish an association between clinical deterioration in patients with VBD, vertebrobasilar ischemia, and subsequent SAH. Antithrombotic treatment after deterioration appears controversial and SAH outcome is frequently fatal. Our data also indicate a short window of 3 days that may allow for evaluating interventional treatment, preferably within randomized trials. PMID:27399083

  8. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S.; Baigger, João F.; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software. Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed. No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50). This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  9. A MRI study of fusiform gyrus in schizotypal personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Chandlee C; McCarley, Robert W; Voglmaier, Martina M; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A; Seidman, Larry J; Frumin, Melissa; Toner, Sarah; Demeo, Susan; Shenton, Martha E

    2003-11-01

    The fusiform gyrus is important for face and object recognition, is abnormal in schizophrenia, but has not been studied in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Thin-slice MR images showed no differences, either in right, left or total fusiform gyri volumes, between subjects with SPD (N=21) and normal controls (N=19). However, there was a correlation between severity of illusions and magical thinking suffered by the SPD subjects and smaller right fusiform gyrus volumes. This suggests that future studies may be useful in determining the functional competence of this gyrus in SPD.

  10. Hemifield dependence of responses to colour in human fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Relova, José Luis; Prieto, Angel; Peleteiro, Manuel; Romero, Maria C

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the hemifield dependence of visually evoked responses to colour in the human fusiform gyrus we recorded evoked potentials from subdural electrodes in a patient suffering from occipital epilepsy. The responses in the fusiform gyrus show a strong hemifield dependence and discriminate the onset from the offset of the stimulus. Additionally, we found responses to squares made of random dots, whereas no responses were found to squares with a homogeneous bright surface. Our findings further support the idea that the fusiform gyrus is related to colour and pattern perception. However, the hemifield dependence we found may indicate that further processing is required in order to combine information from both visual hemifields.

  11. Vertebrobasilar system computed tomographic angiography in central vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Paşaoğlu, Lale

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of vertigo in the population is 20% to 30% and one-fourth of the cases are related to central causes. The aim of this study was to evaluate computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings of the vertebrobasilar system in central vertigo without stroke. CTA and magnetic resonance images of patients with vertigo were retrospectively evaluated. One hundred twenty-nine patients suspected of having central vertigo according to history, physical examination, and otological and neurological tests without signs of infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The control group included 120 patients with similar vascular disease risk factors but without vertigo. Vertebral and basilar artery diameters, hypoplasias, exit-site variations of vertebral artery, vertebrobasilar tortuosity, and stenosis of ≥50% detected on CTA were recorded for all patients. Independent-samples t test was used in variables with normal distribution, and Mann–Whitney U test in non-normal distribution. The difference of categorical variable distribution according to groups was analyzed with χ2 and/or Fisher exact test. Vertebral artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis were seen more often in the vertigo group (P = 0.000, <0.001). Overall 78 (60.5%) vertigo patients had ≥50% stenosis, 54 (69.2%) had stenosis at V1 segment, 9 (11.5%) at V2 segment, 2 (2.5%) at V3 segment, and 13 (16.6%) at V4 segment. Both vertigo and control groups had similar basilar artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis rates (P = 0.800, >0.05). CTA may be helpful to clarify the association between abnormal CTA findings of vertebral arteries and central vertigo. This article reveals the opportunity to diagnose posterior circulation abnormalities causing central vertigo with a feasible method such as CTA. PMID:28328808

  12. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  13. [Recurrence of a giant fusiform aneurysm after neck clipping: case report].

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Y; Miyake, H; Ito, T; Kumai, J; Kuroda, T; Sugino, T

    1996-04-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old female. On December 20, 1995, she suddenly developed a severe headache with vomiting and was transferred to our hospital. On admission, her conciousness level was 1-2 on the Japan Coma Scale, but there was no neurological deficit except for right oculomotor palsy. Computed tomography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage which had permeated the right lateral ventricle. On cerebral angiography, a giant fusiform aneurysm in the right internal carotid artery was recognized. During the emergency operation, neither neck clipping nor carotid reconstruction was possible because of the tight adhesion of the aneurysm to the peripheral tissue. On account of this, proximal clipping of the carotid artery with external carotid-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with saphenous vein graft was selected. This patient had had an episode of subarachnoid hemorrhage owing to rupture of the right internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm ten years earlier. At that time, the aneurysmal neck was clipped with a slight residual neck and she left the hospital on foot. Five days later, when the aneurysm was found to be completely thrombosed on CT scan, antiplatelet therapy was started. Although low density areas which corresponded to the regions fed by the right anterior choroidal artery were presented, re-rupture did not occur. Follow-up angiography showed that the aneurysm was completely thrombosed and that the right middle cerebral and the anterior cerebral artery blood was circulated via the vein graft. Among recurrent cases of aneurysm after neck clipping, it is unusual for a giant fusiform aneurysm to be recognized. The growth may have been caused by sclerotic change of the arterial wall. Oculomotor palsy may have delayed the detection of the recurrence of the aneurysm. When residual neck is presented on follow-up angiography, the next angiography should be carried out within at least three years. In this case, antiplatelet therapy was effective to

  14. Classification of fusiform neocortical interneurons based on unsupervised clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cauli, Bruno; Porter, James T.; Tsuzuki, Keisuke; Lambolez, Bertrand; Rossier, Jean; Quenet, Brigitte; Audinat, Etienne

    2000-01-01

    A classification of fusiform neocortical interneurons (n = 60) was performed with an unsupervised cluster analysis based on the comparison of multiple electrophysiological and molecular parameters studied by patch-clamp and single-cell multiplex reverse transcription–PCR in rat neocortical acute slices. The multiplex reverse transcription–PCR protocol was designed to detect simultaneously the expression of GAD65, GAD67, calbindin, parvalbumin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SS), cholecystokinin, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, N-methyl-d-aspartate, and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes. Three groups of fusiform interneurons with distinctive features were disclosed by the cluster analysis. The first type of fusiform neuron (n = 12), termed regular spiking nonpyramidal (RSNP)-SS cluster, was characterized by a firing pattern of RSNP cells and by a high occurrence of SS. The second type of fusiform neuron (n = 32), termed RSNP-VIP cluster, predominantly expressed VIP and also showed firing properties of RSNP neurons with accommodation profiles different from those of RSNP-SS cells. Finally, the last type of fusiform neuron (n = 16) contained a majority of irregular spiking-VIPergic neurons. In addition, the analysis of glutamate receptors revealed cell-type-specific expression profiles. This study shows that combinations of multiple independent criteria define distinct neocortical populations of interneurons potentially involved in specific functions. PMID:10823957

  15. Selectivity for the human body in the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Peelen, Marius V; Downing, Paul E

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed human brain regions, notably in the fusiform gyrus, that respond selectively to images of faces as opposed to other kinds of objects. Here we use fMRI to show that the mid-fusiform gyrus responds with nearly the same level of selectivity to images of human bodies without faces, relative to tools and scenes. In a group-average analysis (n = 22), the fusiform activations identified by contrasting faces versus tools and bodies versus tools are very similar. Analyses of within-subjects regions of interest, however, show that the peaks of the two activations occupy close but distinct locations. In a second experiment, we find that the body-selective fusiform region, but not the face-selective region, responds more to stick figure depictions of bodies than to scrambled controls. This result further distinguishes the two foci and confirms that the body-selective response generalizes to abstract image formats. These results challenge accounts of the mid-fusiform gyrus that focus solely on faces and suggest that this region contains multiple distinct category-selective neural representations.

  16. Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebrobasilar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Pyung; Choi, Seok Keun; Rhee, Bong Arm; Lim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is considered as a reversible pathophysiological condition mainly induced by continuous vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone (REZ) at the cerebellopontine angle. As an offending vessel, vertebrobasilar artery tends to compress much more heavily than others. The authors analyzed HFS caused by vertebrobasilar artery and described the relationships between microsurgical findings and clinical courses. Methods Out of 1,798 cases treated with microvascular decompression (MVD) from Jan. 1980 to Dec. 2004, the causative vessels were either vertebral artery or basilar artery in 87 patients. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled in this study. Preoperatively, computed tomography (CT) or brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 3-dimentional short range MR technique was performed and CT was checked immediately or 2-3 days after anesthetic recovery. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, the compression patterns of the vessels at the time of surgery and treatment outcomes. Results There were 47 were male and 32 female patients. HFS developed on the left side in 52 cases and on the right side in 27. The mean age of onset was 52.3 years (range 19-60) and the mean duration of symptoms was 10.7 years. Many patients (39 cases; 49.1%) had past history of hypertension. HFS caused only by the vertebral artery was 8 cases although most of the other cases were caused by vertebral artery (VA) in combination with its branching arteries. Most frequently, the VA and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were the simultaneous causative blood vessels comprising 32 cases (40.5%), and in 27 cases (34.2%) the VA and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) were the offenders. Facial symptoms disappeared in 61 cases (77.2%) immediately after the operation and 68 cases (86.1%) showed good outcome after 6 months. Surgical outcome just after the operation was poor in whom the perforators arose from the offending

  17. Predictors of Acute Vertebrobasilar Vasospasm following Tumor Resection in the Foramen Magnum Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuekang; Qi, Shirong; Liu, Fan; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral vasospasm can occur after skull base tumor removal. Few studies concentrated on the posterior circulation vasospasm after tumor resection in the posterior fossa. We aimed to identify the risk factors associated with postoperative vertebrobasilar vasospasm after tumor resection in the foramen magnum. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data of 62 patients with tumors in the foramen magnum at our institution from January 2010 to January 2015. The demographic data, tumor features, surgical characteristics were collected. Vertebrobasilar vasospasm was evaluated by bedside transcranial Doppler before surgery and on postoperative day 1, 3, 7. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictors of postoperative vasospasm in the posterior circulation. Results Vertebrobasilar vasospasm was detected in 28 (53.8%) of the 62 patients at a mean time of 3.5 days after surgery. There were 5 (8%) patients with severe vasospasm according to the grading criteria. Age, tumor type, tumor size, vertebral artery encasement, and surgical time were significantly related to vasospasm in the univariate analysis. Further multivariate analysis demonstrated that only age and vertebral artery encasement were independent risk factors predicting the occurrence of postoperative vertebrobasilar vasospasm. Conclusions The incidence of acute vertebrobasilar vasospasm is not uncommon after foramen magnum tumor resection. Age and vertebral artery encasement are significantly correlated with postoperative vasospasm. Close monitoring of vasospasm should be given to patients with younger age and the presence of vertebral artery encasement on the preoperative imaging to facilitate early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27682826

  18. Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction aneurysm: diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Erminia; Russo, Antonino; Ulm, Arthur J

    2009-03-01

    Vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) aneurysms are uncommon and are often found in association with basilar artery (BA) fenestration. The complex anatomical environment of the VBJ, and the complicated geometry of the fenestration make clipping of these aneurysms difficult. Therefore, endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is now widely accepted. The authors describe the case of a 43-year-old woman with sickle cell anemia. She presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and depicted multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had a left superior hypophysial artery aneurysm, a right superior cerebellar artery-posterior cerebral artery aneurysm, and a VBJ aneurysm associated with a fenestration of the BA. The VBJ aneurysm was not identified on the initial angiogram and was only revealed after 3D rotational angiography was performed. The 3D reconstruction was critical to the understanding of the complex geometry associated with the fenestrated BA. The VBJ was reconstructed using a combination endovascular technique. The dominant limb of the fenestration was stented and balloon-assisted coiling was performed, followed by sacrifice of the nondominant vertebral artery using coils and the embolic agent Onyx. Postoperative angiography demonstrated successful occlusion of the aneurysm with reconstruction of the VBJ. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a fenestrated VBJ aneurysm treated with the combination of stenting, balloon remodeling, coiling, and vessel sacrifice. Three-dimensional angiography was critical in making the correct diagnosis of the source of the subarachnoid hemorrhage and with operative planning.

  19. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, A.Y. Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E.; Scherbyuk, A.N.; Kondrashin, S.A; Artukchina, E.G.; Kikevitch, V.A.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74

  1. Ruptured eardrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoid swimming or putting your head underneath the water. Your provider may prescribe antibiotics (oral or ear drops) to prevent or treat an infection. Repair of the eardrum might be needed for larger holes or ruptures or if the eardrum does not ...

  2. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  3. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  4. Prosthecobacter fusiformis nov. gen. et sp., the fusiform caulobacter.

    PubMed

    Staley, J T; Bont, J A; Jonge, K

    1976-01-01

    Four strains of heterotrophic, fusiform caulobacters have been isolated from freshwater sources. A single prostheca extends from one pole of mature cells, and cells attach to various substrata by means of a holdfast located at the distal tip of the appendage. Thus, superficially these bacteria bear a strong resemblance to bacteria in the genus Caulobacter. However, unlike Caulobacter these bacteria do not exhibit a dimorphic life cycle of motile, non-stalked daughter cells and immotile, stalked mother cells. Instead both mother and daughter cells are immotile, and at the time of cell separation the daughter cells are essentially identical mirror-image replicas of the mother cell. In addition, the prosthecae of these fusiform caulobacters do not have crossbands, they are somewhat wider than the stalks of Caulobacter and the pseudostalks of Asticcacaulis, and they terminate in a bulbous tip. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base composition ranges from 54.6-60.1, well below the 62-67 range for the genus Caulobacter. Based upon these and other differences a new genus and species, Prosthecobacter fusiformis, is proposed for the fusiform caulobacters.

  5. Cuneus and fusiform cortices thickness is reduced in trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain disorders are presumed to induce changes in brain grey and white matters. Few studies have focused CNS alterations in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods The aim of this study was to explore changes in white matter microstructure in TN subjects using diffusion tensor images (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS); and cortical thickness changes with surface based morphometry. Twenty-four patients with classical TN (37-67 y-o) and 24 healthy controls, matched for age and sex, were included in the study. Results Comparing patients with controls, no diffusivity abnormalities of brain white matter were detected. However, a significant reduction in cortical thickness was observed at the left cuneus and left fusiform cortex in the patients group. The thickness of the fusiform cortex correlated negatively with the carbamazepine dose (p = 0.023). Conclusions Since the cuneus and the fusiform gyrus have been related to the multisensory integration area and cognitive processing, as well as the retrieval of shock perception conveyed by Aδ fibers, our results support the role of these areas in TN pathogenesis. Whether such changes occurs as an epiphenomenon secondary to daily stimulation or represent a structural predisposition to TN in the light of peripheral vascular compression is a matter of future studies. PMID:24661349

  6. Successful Decoding of Famous Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2015-01-01

    What are the neural mechanisms of face recognition? It is believed that the network of face-selective areas, which spans the occipital, temporal, and frontal cortices, is important in face recognition. A number of previous studies indeed reported that face identity could be discriminated based on patterns of multivoxel activity in the fusiform face area and the anterior temporal lobe. However, given the difficulty in localizing the face-selective area in the anterior temporal lobe, its role in face recognition is still unknown. Furthermore, previous studies limited their analysis to occipito-temporal regions without testing identity decoding in more anterior face-selective regions, such as the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In the current high-resolution functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study, we systematically examined the decoding of the identity of famous faces in the temporo-frontal network of face-selective and adjacent non-face-selective regions. A special focus has been put on the face-area in the anterior temporal lobe, which was reliably localized using an optimized scanning protocol. We found that face-identity could be discriminated above chance level only in the fusiform face area. Our results corroborate the role of the fusiform face area in face recognition. Future studies are needed to further explore the role of the more recently discovered anterior face-selective areas in face recognition. PMID:25714434

  7. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and pontine ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Frisullo, Giovanni; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Di Lella, Giuseppe; Zampino, Giuseppe; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a heterogeneous, common, neurocutaneous disorder presenting different complications during a life span, including cerebrovascular dysplasia. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of NF1 associated with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and pontine ischemic stroke. We describe a 57-year-old man with NF1 who presented an acute onset right-sided facial palsy and hemiplegia, dysarthria, and gait imbalance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an acute left paramedian pontine infarct and a hypoplastic right vertebral artery. Brain Computed Tomography Angiography revealed the occurrence of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. Co-occurrence of VBD and NF1 might not be merely casual and it may significantly heighten the mortality rate in this multisystem disorder. We suggest a possible role of VBD in the genesis of our patient's clinical-radiological features and prompt the early detection of asymptomatic arteriopathy in individuals with NF1 in order to ameliorate patients' quality of life and life expectancy.

  8. Successful treatment of a giant pediatric fusiform basilar trunk aneurysm with surpass flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter; Mokin, Maxim; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2015-06-03

    Fusiform aneurysms present a unique challenge to traditional microsurgical and endovascular treatment because of the lack of a discernible neck and the involvement of parent vessel. Flow diversion has increasingly become the treatment of choice for fusiform aneurysms in the anterior circulation, but its results in the posterior circulation are variable. We report successful treatment of a giant fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with the Surpass flow diverter in an adolescent, and discuss the potential advantages of this emerging technology in the treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms.

  9. Successful treatment of a giant pediatric fusiform basilar trunk aneurysm with surpass flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter; Mokin, Maxim; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-06-01

    Fusiform aneurysms present a unique challenge to traditional microsurgical and endovascular treatment because of the lack of a discernible neck and the involvement of parent vessel. Flow diversion has increasingly become the treatment of choice for fusiform aneurysms in the anterior circulation, but its results in the posterior circulation are variable. We report successful treatment of a giant fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with the Surpass flow diverter in an adolescent, and discuss the potential advantages of this emerging technology in the treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms.

  10. The anatomical and functional specialization of the fusiform gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Zilles, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform gyrus (FG) is commonly included in anatomical atlases and is considered a key structure for functionally-specialized computations of high-level vision such as face perception, object recognition, and reading. However, it is not widely known that the FG has a contentious history. In this review, we first provide a historical analysis of the discovery of the FG and why certain features, such as the mid-fusiform sulcus, were discovered and then forgotten. We then discuss how observer-independent methods for identifying cytoarchitectonical boundaries of the cortex revolutionized our understanding of cytoarchitecture and the correspondence between those boundaries and cortical folding patterns of the FG. We further explain that the co-occurrence between cortical folding patterns and cytoarchitectonical boundaries are more common than classically thought and also, are functionally meaningful especially on the FG and probably in high-level visual cortex more generally. We conclude by proposing a series of alternatives for how the anatomical organization of the FG can accommodate seemingly different theoretical aspects of functional processing, such as domain specificity and perceptual expertise. PMID:26119921

  11. Rupture of lenticulostriate artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heck, Olivier; Anxionnat, René; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Ducrocq, Xavier; Richard, Sébastien; Bracard, Serge

    2014-02-01

    The authors report on 3 rare cases of ruptured lenticulostriate artery (LSA) aneurysms that were heralded by deep cerebral hematomas. The hematomas were unilateral in 2 cases and bilateral in 1; in the bilateral case, only a single LSA aneurysm could be identified on the right side of the brain. Because of their small size (≤ 2 mm), fusiform aspect, and deep location within the brain, all of the aneurysms were treated conservatively. There was no hemorrhage recurrence, and follow-up angiography demonstrated spontaneous thrombosis in 2 of the 3 cases. The clinical course was favorable in 2 of the 3 patients. The course in the patient with the bilateral hematoma was marked by an ischemic event after the initial episode, resulting in an aggravation of deficits. The cause of this second event was uncertain. Because our knowledge about the natural history of LSA aneurysms is incomplete, there is no consensus concerning a therapeutic strategy. The authors' experience in 3 reported cases leads them to think that a conservative approach involving close angiographic monitoring may be proposed as first-line treatment. If the monitored aneurysm then persists or grows in size, its occlusion should be considered. Nonetheless, other studies are needed to further strengthen the legitimacy of this strategy.

  12. Mid-fusiform activation during object discrimination reflects the process of differentiating structural descriptions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Steinmetz, Nicholas A; Farley, Alison B; Smith, Charles D; Joseph, Jane E

    2008-09-01

    The present study explored constraints on mid-fusiform activation during object discrimination. In three experiments, participants performed a matching task on simple line configurations, nameable objects, three dimensional (3-D) shapes, and colors. Significant bilateral mid-fusiform activation emerged when participants matched objects and 3-D shapes, as compared to when they matched two-dimensional (2-D) line configurations and colors, indicating that the mid-fusiform is engaged more strongly for processing structural descriptions (e.g., comparing 3-D volumetric shape) than perceptual descriptions (e.g., comparing 2-D or color information). In two of the experiments, the same mid-fusiform regions were also modulated by the degree of structural similarity between stimuli, implicating a role for the mid-fusiform in fine differentiation of similar visual object representations. Importantly, however, this process of fine differentiation occurred at the level of structural, but not perceptual, descriptions. Moreover, mid-fusiform activity was more robust when participants matched shape compared to color information using the identical stimuli, indicating that activity in the mid-fusiform gyrus is not driven by specific stimulus properties, but rather by the process of distinguishing stimuli based on shape information. Taken together, these findings further clarify the nature of object processing in the mid-fusiform gyrus. This region is engaged specifically in structural differentiation, a critical component process of object recognition and categorization.

  13. Differential Development of Selectivity for Faces and Bodies in the Fusiform Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peelen, Marius V.; Glaser, Bronwyn; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Eliez, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Viewing faces or bodies activates category-selective areas of visual cortex, including the fusiform face area (FFA), fusiform body area (FBA), and extrastriate body area (EBA). Here, using fMRI, we investigate the development of these areas, focusing on the right FFA and FBA. Despite the overlap of functionally defined FFA and FBA (54%-75%…

  14. Dynamic Encoding of Face Information in the Human Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Li, Yuanning; Konecky, Roma O.; Pyles, John A.; Walls, Shawn A.; Destefino, Vincent; Wang, Wei; Richardson, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Humans’ ability to rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and classify faces under variable conditions derives from a network of brain regions highly tuned to face information. The fusiform face area (FFA) is thought to be a computational hub for face processing, however temporal dynamics of face information processing in FFA remains unclear. Here we use multivariate pattern classification to decode the temporal dynamics of expression-invariant face information processing using electrodes placed directly upon FFA in humans. Early FFA activity (50-75 ms) contained information regarding whether participants were viewing a face. Activity between 200-500 ms contained expression-invariant information about which of 70 faces participants were viewing along with the individual differences in facial features and their configurations. Long-lasting (500+ ms) broadband gamma frequency activity predicted task performance. These results elucidate the dynamic computational role FFA plays in multiple face processing stages and indicate what information is used in performing these visual analyses. PMID:25482825

  15. Nanostructured fusiform hydroxyapatite particles precipitated from aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Correas, Covadonga; Gerardo, Michael L; Lord, Alexander M; Ward, Michael B; Andreoli, Enrico; Barron, Andrew R

    2017-02-01

    The present work represents a new approach for the isolation of uniform nano particulate hydroxyapatite (HAp). The chemical characterization of a calcium phosphate product obtained from industrial trout farm aquaculture wastewater by two different routes, washing either with a basic aqueous medium (washNaOH) or followed by a further washing with ethanol (washEtOH), is explored. Characterization of the isolated materials includes morphology studies (SEM and TEM), structural (XRD, electron diffraction), compositional (EDX) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained products are a mixture of different compounds, with hydroxyapatite the predominant phase. The morphology is unusually nanometric size with fusiform shaped particles, such characteristics are ordinarily only obtained by synthetic routes. This process of phosphate precipitation represents a unique self-sufficient process to be compared to conventional chemical or biological practices for precipitating phosphate.

  16. Emergent revascularization of acute tandem vertebrobasilar occlusions: Endovascular approaches and technical considerations-Confirming the role of vertebral artery ostium stenosis as a cause of vertebrobasilar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Leker, Ronen R; Gomori, J Moshe; Eichel, Roni; Rajz, Gustavo; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-12-01

    Patients suffering from acute atherothrombotic occlusion of the proximal vertebral artery (VA) and concomitant basilar artery (BA) occlusion present a grim prognosis. We describe our experience in the endovascular recanalization of tandem vertebrobasilar occlusions using endovascular techniques. The BA was accessed through the normal VA (clean-road) or the occluded, thrombotic VA (dirty-road), and stentriever-based thrombectomy was performed using antegrade or reverse revascularization variants. Seven patients underwent successful stentriever-assisted mechanical thrombectomy of the BA and five sustained concomitant VA revascularization. Stroke onset to endovascular intervention initiation (time-to-treatment) ranged from 4.5-13hours (mean 8.6). In two of seven patients, the BA occlusion was approached with a 'clean-road' approach via the contralateral VA; in five of seven patients, a 'dirty-road' approach via the occluded VA was used. Mean time-to-recanalization was 66minutes (range 55-82). There were no perforations, iatrogenic vessel dissections, or other technical complications. Four patients presented mild-to-moderate disability (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0-3) at 3months, one remained with moderate-to-severe disability (mRS 4), and two patients died on days 9 and 23 after their strokes. Follow-up ranged from 6-45months (mean 24months). In selected patients with acute VA-BA occlusion, stentriever-based thrombectomy performed through either the patent or the occluded VA, may be feasible, effective, and safe. Clinical outcomes in these patients seem to equipoise the neurological outcome of patients with successful revascularization for isolated BA occlusion. This unique pair of occlusions confirms the role of VA ostium stenosis as a cause of vertebrobasilar stroke.

  17. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Qing; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ye-Wen; Kang, Qian; Lan, Y I; Wu, Qing

    2016-03-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation.

  18. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN-YAN; CHEN, WEN; ZHANG, QING; LI, HUI; ZHANG, YE-WEN; KANG, QIAN; LAN, YI; WU, QING

    2016-01-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation. PMID:26998036

  19. Clinical research of persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract in the treatment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Guo, S G; Guan, S H; Wang, G M; Liu, G Y; Sun, H; Wang, B J; Xu, F

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to compare the curative effects of persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract in the treatment of headache and dizziness caused by vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Sixty patients were observed, who underwent therapy with persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract based on the treatment of nimodipine and aspirin. After 30 days, 30 patients treated with persimmon leaf extract and 30 patients with ginkgo biloba extract were examined for changes in hemodynamic indexes and symptoms, such as headache and dizziness. The results showed statistically significant differences of 88.3% for the persimmon leaf extract and 73.1% for the ginkgo biloba extract, P < 0.05. Compared to the group of ginkgo biloba extract, the group of persimmon leaf extract had more apparent improvement in the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, hematokrit, and platelet adhesion rate, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Based on these analyses, it can be concluded that persimmon leaf extract is better than ginkgo biloba extract in many aspects, such as cerebral circulation improvement, cerebral vascular expansion, hypercoagulable state lowering and vertebrobasilar insufficiency-induced headache and dizziness relief.

  20. Clinical Results of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Atherosclerotic Stenoses and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuura, M.; Terada, T.; Masuo, O.; Tsumoto, T.; Yamaga, H.; Itakura, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Hyoutani, G.; Hayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Eighteen patients with intracranial vertebrobasilar stenosis and occlusion were treated by PTA or stenting. In 11 of 18 cases, only PTA was performed and in seven of 18 cases, we used stents. The mean stenosis before and after PTA/stenting was 82.8% and 22.3%, respectively. In 11 cases of PTA only, the stenotic rate decreased from 81.8% to 29.6%, while 85.0% of the stenotic rate remarkably reduced to 6.0% in seven cases of stenting. The 30 days morbidity and 30 days mortality rate were 5.5% and 5.5%, respectively. There was only one haemorrhagic complication (cerebellar haemorrhage) in cases of stenting, and no ischemic events during or after the procedures. Restenosis (more than 50% stenosis) occurred in four of 18 cases(22.2%) during mean follow-up period of 12 months. Two patients with VA occlusion before treatment, developed restenosis and reocclusion. Complete total occlusion seems to be a high-risk lesion and strict follow-up is required. In this study, PTA/stenting for intracranial vertebrobasilar artery stenosis or occlusion is an effective treatment, but strict indications may be required because procedure-related 30 days morbidity rate was 5.5% in addition to unclear natural history. PMID:20587244

  1. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  2. Evaluation of fusiform rust-resistant loblolly pine families for the South Carolina sandhills region

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, H.R. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    Loblolly pine trees from various geographic sources are being evaluated for resistance to fusiform rust. Reasons for differences in resistance and the mechanisms of rust infection are also being investigated. (ACR)

  3. Long-Term Experience with Chinese Language Shapes the Fusiform Asymmetry of English Reading

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Chuansheng; Wei, Miao; He, Qinghua; Dong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested differential engagement of the bilateral fusiform gyrus in the processing of Chinese and English. The present study tested the possibility that long-term experience with Chinese language affects the fusiform laterality of English reading by comparing three samples: Chinese speakers, English speakers with Chinese experience, and English speakers without Chinese experience. We found that, when reading words in their respective native language, Chinese and English speakers without Chinese experience differed in functional laterality of the posterior fusiform region (right laterality for Chinese speakers, but left laterality for English speakers). More importantly, compared with English speakers without Chinese experience, English speakers with Chinese experience showed more recruitment of the right posterior fusiform cortex for English words and pseudowords, which is similar to how Chinese speakers processed Chinese. These results suggest that long-term experience with Chinese shapes the fusiform laterality of English reading and have important implications for our understanding of the cross-language influences in terms of neural organization and of the functions of different fusiform subregions in reading. PMID:25598049

  4. Long-term experience with Chinese language shapes the fusiform asymmetry of English reading.

    PubMed

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Chuansheng; Wei, Miao; He, Qinghua; Dong, Qi

    2015-04-15

    Previous studies have suggested differential engagement of the bilateral fusiform gyrus in the processing of Chinese and English. The present study tested the possibility that long-term experience with Chinese language affects the fusiform laterality of English reading by comparing three samples: Chinese speakers, English speakers with Chinese experience, and English speakers without Chinese experience. We found that, when reading words in their respective native language, Chinese and English speakers without Chinese experience differed in functional laterality of the posterior fusiform region (right laterality for Chinese speakers, but left laterality for English speakers). More importantly, compared with English speakers without Chinese experience, English speakers with Chinese experience showed more recruitment of the right posterior fusiform cortex for English words and pseudowords, which is similar to how Chinese speakers processed Chinese. These results suggest that long-term experience with Chinese shapes the fusiform laterality of English reading and have important implications for our understanding of the cross-language influences in terms of neural organization and of the functions of different fusiform subregions in reading.

  5. The role of the posterior fusiform gyrus in reading.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Joseph T; Jamison, Helen L; Gonnerman, Laura M; Matthews, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    Studies of skilled reading [Price, C. J., & Mechelli, A. Reading and reading disturbance. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 15, 231-238, 2005], its acquisition in children [Shaywitz, B. A., Shaywitz, S. E., Pugh, K. R., Mencl, W. E., Fulbright, R. K., Skudlarski, P., et al. Disruption of posterior brain systems for reading in children with developmental dyslexia. Biological Psychiatry, 52, 101-110, 2002; Turkeltaub, P. E., Gareau, L., Flowers, D. L., Zeffiro, T. A., & Eden, G. F. Development of neural mechanisms for reading. Nature Neuroscience, 6, 767-773, 2003], and its impairment in patients with pure alexia [Leff, A. P., Crewes, H., Plant, G. T., Scott, S. K., Kennard, C., & Wise, R. J. The functional anatomy of single word reading in patients with hemianopic and pure alexia. Brain, 124, 510-521, 2001] all highlight the importance of the left posterior fusiform cortex in visual word recognition. We used visual masked priming and functional magnetic resonance imaging to elucidate the specific functional contribution of this region to reading and found that (1) unlike words, repetition of pseudowords ("solst-solst") did not produce a neural priming effect in this region, (2) orthographically related words such as "corner-corn" did produce a neural priming effect, but (3) this orthographic priming effect was reduced when prime-target pairs were semantically related ("teacher-teach"). These findings conflict with the notion of stored visual word forms and instead suggest that this region acts as an interface between visual form information and higher order stimulus properties such as its associated sound and meaning. More importantly, this function is not specific to reading but is also engaged when processing any meaningful visual stimulus.

  6. Tuning face perception with electrical stimulation of the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Keller, Corey J; Davidesco, Ido; Megevand, Pierre; Lado, Fred A; Malach, Rafael; Mehta, Ashesh D

    2017-03-27

    The fusiform gyrus (FG) is an important node in the face processing network, but knowledge of its causal role in face perception is currently limited. Recent work demonstrated that high frequency stimulation applied to the FG distorts the perception of faces in human subjects (Parvizi et al. []: J Neurosci 32:14915-14920). However, the timing of this process in the FG relative to stimulus onset and the spatial extent of FG's role in face perception are unknown. Here, we investigate the causal role of the FG in face perception by applying precise, event-related electrical stimulation (ES) to higher order visual areas including the FG in six human subjects undergoing intracranial monitoring for epilepsy. We compared the effects of single brief (100 μs) electrical pulses to the FG and non-face-selective visual areas on the speed and accuracy of detecting distorted faces. Brief ES applied to face-selective sites did not affect accuracy but significantly increased the reaction time (RT) of detecting face distortions. Importantly, RT was altered only when ES was applied 100ms after visual onset and in face-selective but not place-selective sites. Furthermore, ES applied to face-selective areas decreased the amplitude of visual evoked potentials and high gamma power over this time window. Together, these results suggest that ES of face-selective regions within a critical time window induces a delay in face perception. These findings support a temporally and spatially specific causal role of face-selective areas and signify an important link between electrophysiology and behavior in face perception. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

  8. Microsurgical clipping of a giant vertebrobasilar junction aneurysm under hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Cıkla, Ulas; Uluç, Kutluay; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2015-07-01

    Giant posterior circulation aneurysms pose a significant challenge to neurovascular surgeons. Among various treatment methods that have been applied individually or in combination, clipping under hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) is rarely used. We present a 62-year-old man who initially underwent coil occlusion of the right vertebral artery (VA) for a 2.5 cm giant vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) aneurysm. His neurological condition had declined gradually and the aneurysm grew to 4 cm in size. The patient underwent clip reconstruction of giant VBJ aneurysm under HCA. His postoperative course was prolonged due to his preexisting neurological deficits. His preoperative Modified Rankin Score was 5, and improved postoperatively to 3 at three and six months, and to 2 at one year. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/L53SiLV8eJY.

  9. Posterior circulation ischemia in patients with fetal-type circle of Willis and hypoplastic vertebrobasilar system.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Piergiorgio; Golaszewski, Stefan; Caleri, Francesca; Ladurner, Gunther; Tezzon, Frediano; Zuccoli, Giulio; Nardone, Raffaele

    2011-12-01

    Little attention has been given to the fetal-type posterior circle of Willis (FTP) in the literature; also symptomatic basilar artery (BA) hypoplasia has been rarely reported. We aimed to illustrate that the association of a hypoplastic vertebrobasilar system (VBS) with the FTP may lead to posterior circulation ischemia. Magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography were performed in 88 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke or TIA in the VBS. Thirteen patients were identified with either stroke or TIA in the context of a hypoplastic VBS and a fetal origin of the posterior cerebral arteries. All patients had unilateral or bilateral FTP, hypoplastic BA and at least one hypoplastic vertebral artery. Transcranial color-coded duplex revealed decreased flow velocity and increased pulsatility index along the BA. A hypoplastic VBS may be accompanied by the FTP and its simultaneous occurrence can predispose to ischemic events in the posterior circulation.

  10. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  11. Comparison of open and controlled pollinated pine families for susceptibility to air pollution, acid rain, and fusiform rust. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chevone, B.; Powers, H.R. Jr.

    1982-10-01

    Loblolly pine seedlings were fumigated with SO/sub 2/, ozone, and a combination of SO/sub 2/ and ozone to determine the relative susceptibility of different strains to air pollution and to fusiform rust. There seems to be no relationship between susceptibility to air pollution and to fusiform rust, indicating it should be possible to select strains resistant to both fusiform rust and air pollution. (ACR)

  12. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    within the tendon or systemic disorders such as lupus erythematosus , diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, rheumatologic disease, and local or...factors for patellar tendon rupture include obesity, male gender, age 30-40, activities that increase patellar stress, systemic lupus erythematosus ...patellar tendon rupture is a rare occurrence usually associated with chronic degeneration of tendon fibers, use of steroids, or systemic illness. Our

  13. Embolization of Ruptured Aneurysm Arising From Basilar Artery Fenestration Using Hydrocoils

    PubMed Central

    Chuan Zhi, Duan

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms arising from the basilar artery fenestration are considered among the rare cerebrovascular diseases. Here, we report on a 44-year-old gentleman who presented with the sudden onset of severe headache complicated by several episodes of vomiting and an altered level of consciousness. A subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interpeduncle and ambient cisterns was detected by computed tomography of the head. During left vertebral arteriography, a basilar fenestration with a ruptured aneurysm just above the proximal end of vertebrobasilar junction was identified. The aneurysm was successfully occluded by means of endovascular treatment using Hydrosoft coils. In the 15-month follow-up angiography, 100% occlusion without recurrence and recanalization was observed. Bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar arteries and both channels of the basilar artery fenestration were entirely filled in follow-up angiograms. PMID:26488001

  14. Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

  15. The Left Fusiform Area Is Affected by Written Frequency of Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Zani, Alberto; Adorni, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    The recent neuroimaging literature gives conflicting evidence about whether the left fusiform gyrus (FG) might recognize words as unitary visual objects. The sensitivity of the left FG to word frequency might provide a neural basis for the orthographic input lexicon theorized by reading models [Patterson, K., Marshall, J. C., & Coltheart, M.…

  16. Evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery changes in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daopei; Zhang, Shuling; Zhang, Hongtao; Xu, Yuming; Fu, Shengqi; Yu, Meng; Ji, Peng

    2013-09-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) lesions in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by magnetic resonance angiography. VBA lesions in patients older than 65 years of age with BPPV were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography. Vascular risk factors, blood vessel changes, and vertigo severity were recorded. Age-matched individuals without BPPV were included in the control group. Of 126 patients screened for this study, 104 were included. Relevant comorbidities included diabetes (12 patients), hypertension (23 patients), and dyslipidemia (20 patients). Findings included left or right vertebral artery (VA) stenosis or occlusion (22 patients, 21.2%), VA tortuosity (25 patients, 24.0%), VA dominance (20 patients, 19.2%), basilar artery (BA) stenosis or occlusion (nine patients, 8.6%), and BA tortuosity (12 patients, 11.5%). These abnormal vessels differed between BPPV patients and the control group (all P<0.05). The severity of Vertigo did not differ between the abnormal VA and abnormal BA groups (P>0.05), but did differ between the normal group and the abnormal VA or BA group (P<0.05). Vertigo severity correlated with VA stenosis or occlusion, VA dominance, and unilateral or bilateral VA tortuosity. VBA tortuosity and VA dominance were common in BPPV patients and may contribute toward BPPV.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  18. Vertebrobasilar junction giant aneurysm: Lessons learned from a neurosurgical audit and anatomical investigation.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Russo, Vittorio Maria; Iacopino, Domenico G; Ulm, Arthur John

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) remains a challenging task in the neurosurgical practice and the gold standard therapy is still under debate. In this article, the authors report a detailed postmortem study of a VBJ giant aneurysm (GA) previously endovascularly treated. Although the decision-making process for the vast majority of neurosurgical treatment can nowadays be accurately carried out during the preoperative planning (i.e., with the aid of neuroimaging fusion protocols, neuronavigation platforms, etc.) meant to maximize the anatomical understanding of the lesions and minimize possible intraprocedural challenges, this postmortem study represents the ultimate essence of neurosurgical audit as the laboratory investigations allowed to reevaluate the clinical history of VBJ GA, and reassess the multiple strategies available for its treatment with a straightforward anatomical perspective. Specifically, the lessons learned through this clinical and laboratory work uphold a great educational value regarding the complex management of those lesions, including the possible role of combined skull base surgical approaches.

  19. Mapping and morphometric analysis of synapses and spines on fusiform cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Rony H.; Chen, Guoyou; Velet, Liliya; Manzoor, Nauman F.; Elkin, Rachel; Kidd, Grahame J.; Coughlin, John; Yurosko, Christopher; Bou-Anak, Stephanie; Azadi, Shirin; Gohlsch, Stephanie; Schneider, Harold; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fusiform cells are the main integrative units of the mammalian dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), collecting and processing inputs from auditory and other sources before transmitting information to higher levels of the auditory system. Despite much previous work describing these cells and the sources and pharmacological identity of their synaptic inputs, information on the three-dimensional organization and utltrastructure of synapses on these cells is currently very limited. This information is essential since an understanding of synaptic plasticity and remodeling and pathologies underlying disease states and hearing disorders must begin with knowledge of the normal characteristics of synapses on these cells, particularly those features that determine the strength of their influence on the various compartments of the cell. Here, we employed serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) followed by 3D reconstructions to map and quantitatively characterize synaptic features on DCN fusiform cells. Our results reveal a relative sparseness of synapses on the somata of fusiform cells but a dense distribution of synapses on apical and basal dendrites. Synapses on apical dendrites were smaller and more numerous than on basal dendrites. The vast majority of axosomatic terminals were found to be linked to other terminals connected by the same axon or different branches of the same axon, suggesting a high degree of divergent input to fusiform cells. The size of terminals was correlated with the number of mitochondria and with the number of active zones, which was highly correlated with the number of postsynaptic densities, suggesting that larger terminals exert more powerful influence on the cell than smaller terminals. These size differences suggest that the input to basal dendrites, most likely those from the auditory nerve, provide the most powerful sources of input to fusiform cells, while those to apical dendrites (e.g., parallel fiber) are weaker but more

  20. Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is a local event in the aneurysm wall that naturally demands tools to assess the risk for local wall rupture. Consequently, global parameters like the maximum diameter and its expansion over time can only give very rough risk indications; therefore, they frequently fail to predict individual risk for AAA rupture. In contrast, the Biomechanical Rupture Risk Assessment (BRRA) method investigates the wall’s risk for local rupture by quantitatively integrating many known AAA rupture risk factors like female sex, large relative expansion, intraluminal thrombus-related wall weakening, and high blood pressure. The BRRA method is almost 20 years old and has progressed considerably in recent years, it can now potentially enrich the diameter indication for AAA repair. The present paper reviews the current state of the BRRA method by summarizing its key underlying concepts (i.e., geometry modeling, biomechanical simulation, and result interpretation). Specifically, the validity of the underlying model assumptions is critically disused in relation to the intended simulation objective (i.e., a clinical AAA rupture risk assessment). Next, reported clinical BRRA validation studies are summarized, and their clinical relevance is reviewed. The BRRA method is a generic, biomechanics-based approach that provides several interfaces to incorporate information from different research disciplines. As an example, the final section of this review suggests integrating growth aspects to (potentially) further improve BRRA sensitivity and specificity. Despite the fact that no prospective validation studies are reported, a significant and still growing body of validation evidence suggests integrating the BRRA method into the clinical decision-making process (i.e., enriching diameter-based decision-making in AAA patient treatment). PMID:27757402

  1. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  2. Traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction in a 3-month-old infant: evaluation and treatment strategies. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Orbach, Darren B

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in young infants are extremely rare, with few published reports on the etiology, evaluation, treatment strategies, and follow-up of this condition in this population. The authors report the case of a traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) in a 3-month-old infant caused by nonaccidental trauma. Therapeutic occlusion of the VBJ was contemplated, but coil embolization of the main aneurysm sac proved feasible, and anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents were initiated. The patient made a full neurological recovery, and follow-up studies demonstrated stable aneurysm occlusion. Management and follow-up strategies for this challenging condition are discussed.

  3. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  4. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation.

  5. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor.

  6. Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian Zhao Zhenwei Gao Guodong Deng Jianping; Yu Jia; Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

  7. Vertebro-basilar junction aneurysms: a single centre experience and meta-analysis of endovascular treatments.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-12-01

    Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option.

  8. Vertebro-Basilar Junction Aneurysms: A Single Centre Experience and Meta-Analysis of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option. PMID:25489898

  9. Neuronal fiber pathway abnormalities in autism: An initial MRI diffusion tensor tracking study of hippocampo-fusiform and amygdalo-fusiform pathways

    PubMed Central

    CONTURO, THOMAS E.; WILLIAMS, DIANE L.; SMITH, CHARLES D.; GULTEPE, EREN; AKBUDAK, ERBIL; MINSHEW, NANCY J.

    2012-01-01

    MRI diffusion-tensor tracking (DTT) was performed in 17 high-functioning adolescents/adults with autism and 17 pairwise-matched controls. White matter pathways involved in face processing were examined due to the relevance of face perception to the social symptoms of autism, and due to known behavioral and functional imaging findings in autism. The hippocampo-fusiform (HF) and amygdalo-fusiform (AF) pathways had normal size and shape but abnormal microstructure in the autism group. The right HF had reduced across-fiber diffusivity (D-min) compared with controls, opposite to the whole-brain effect of increased D-min. In contrast, left HF, right AF, and left AF had increased D-min and increased along-fiber diffusivity (D-max), more consistent with the whole-brain effect. There was a general loss of lateralization compared with controls. The right HF D-min was markedly low in the autism subgroup with lower Benton face recognition scores, compared with the lower-Benton control subgroup, and compared with the higher-Benton autism subgroup. Similar behavioral relationships were found for performance IQ. Such results suggest an early functionally-significant pathological process in right HF consistent with small-diameter axons (with correspondingly slower neural transmission) and/or higher packing density. In left AF and HF, changes were interpreted as secondary, possibly reflecting axonal loss and/or decreased myelination. PMID:18954474

  10. Lingual and fusiform gyri in visual processing: a clinico-pathologic study of superior altitudinal hemianopia.

    PubMed Central

    Bogousslavsky, J; Miklossy, J; Deruaz, J P; Assal, G; Regli, F

    1987-01-01

    A macular-sparing superior altitudinal hemianopia with no visuo-psychic disturbance, except impaired visual learning, was associated with bilateral ischaemic necrosis of the lingual gyrus and only partial involvement of the fusiform gyrus on the left side. It is suggested that bilateral destruction of the lingual gyrus alone is not sufficient to affect complex visual processing. The fusiform gyrus probably has a critical role in colour integration, visuo-spatial processing, facial recognition and corresponding visual imagery. Involvement of the occipitotemporal projection system deep to the lingual gyri probably explained visual memory dysfunction, by a visuo-limbic disconnection. Impaired verbal memory may have been due to posterior involvement of the parahippocampal gyrus and underlying white matter, which may have disconnected the intact speech areas from the left medial temporal structures. Images PMID:3585386

  11. The Changes of Flow Characteristics Caused by a Stent in Fusiform Aneurysm Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    human carotid artery. B. Flow Visualization We used a flow visualization method incorporating photochromic dye in order to observe the flow...fields. A photochromic dye shows photochromic behavior by changing its color by the excitation of light of an appropriate wavelength. We used TNSB (1...visualization technique using photochromic dye was applied to the fusiform aneurysm models. The qualitative observation of tracer lines showed

  12. Treatment of a pediatric recurrent fusiform middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with a flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anthony M; Zipfel, Gregory; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2012-11-15

    Pediatric patients with aneurysm often have different localizations and morphologies from adults and recurrences are not uncommon after successful clip reconstruction/obliteration. Treatment of a recurrent pediatric aneurysm after clip ligation is a technical challenge. We present the case of an adolescent with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) fusiform aneurysm which recurred following clip reconstruction and bypass. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular flow diversion.

  13. Treatment of a pediatric recurrent fusiform middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with a flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anthony M; Zipfel, Gregory; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric patients with aneurysm often have different localizations and morphologies from adults and recurrences are not uncommon after successful clip reconstruction/obliteration. Treatment of a recurrent pediatric aneurysm after clip ligation is a technical challenge. We present the case of an adolescent with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) fusiform aneurysm which recurred following clip reconstruction and bypass. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular flow diversion.

  14. Rupture, waves and earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  15. Rupture, waves and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  16. Fusiform rust of southern pines: a major success for forest disease management.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert A

    2003-08-01

    ABSTRACT The effective management of fusiform rust in slash and loblolly pine plantations is a major success story for disease management scientists and practitioners in the southeastern United States. This disease, which reached epidemic proportions by the 1960s, resulted from anthropogenic causes associated with intensive pine culture and greatly inhibited the optimum management of slash and loblolly pine throughout extensive areas of the southern pine region. Successful management of this disease was made possible by the combined resources and personnel of federal and state agencies, universities, and the forest industry. Chief among these personnel were research pathologists, geneticists, and silviculturalists. Following early studies on the biology of the fusiform rust pathosystem, research on epidemiology, host resistance, and pathogen variability slowly but steadily progressed. Testing of pine selections for resistance was facilitated by the establishment of a rust screening center. Fortunately, genetic rust resistance is relatively abundant in both slash and loblolly pines and has become the foundation for the management of the disease. Rust resistant half- and full-sib progeny from resistant parents established in seed orchards are routinely planted, especially in high-rust-hazard areas. Several important lessons in disease management have been learned or remembered during the progress of this research. Perhaps the ecologically fit fusiform rust pathogen will have additional instructions for us in the future, but for now resistance is an effective management strategy.

  17. Functional dissociation of the left and right fusiform gyrus in self-face recognition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yina; Han, Shihui

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that the fusiform gyrus is engaged in face perception, such as the processes of face familiarity and identity. However, the functional role of the fusiform gyrus in face processing related to high-level social cognition remains unclear. The current study assessed the functional role of individually defined fusiform face area (FFA) in the processing of self-face physical properties and self-face identity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to monitor neural responses to rapidly presented face stimuli drawn from morph continua between self-face (Morph 100%) and a gender-matched friend's face (Morph 0%) in a face recognition task. Contrasting Morph 100% versus Morph 60% that differed in self-face physical properties but were both recognized as the self uncovered neural activity sensitive to self-face physical properties in the left FFA. Contrasting Morphs 50% that were recognized as the self versus a friend on different trials revealed neural modulations associated with self-face identity in the right FFA. Moreover, the right FFA activity correlated with the frequency of recognizing Morphs 50% as the self. Our results provide evidence for functional dissociations of the left and right FFAs in the representations of self-face physical properties and self-face identity.

  18. How music alters a kiss: superior temporal gyrus controls fusiform-amygdalar effective connectivity.

    PubMed

    Pehrs, Corinna; Deserno, Lorenz; Bakels, Jan-Hendrik; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Kappelhoff, Hermann; Jacobs, Arthur M; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Koelsch, Stefan; Kuchinke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    While watching movies, the brain integrates the visual information and the musical soundtrack into a coherent percept. Multisensory integration can lead to emotion elicitation on which soundtrack valences may have a modulatory impact. Here, dynamic kissing scenes from romantic comedies were presented to 22 participants (13 females) during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The kissing scenes were either accompanied by happy music, sad music or no music. Evidence from cross-modal studies motivated a predefined three-region network for multisensory integration of emotion, consisting of fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala (AMY) and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). The interactions in this network were investigated using dynamic causal models of effective connectivity. This revealed bilinear modulations by happy and sad music with suppression effects on the connectivity from FG and AMY to aSTG. Non-linear dynamic causal modeling showed a suppressive gating effect of aSTG on fusiform-amygdalar connectivity. In conclusion, fusiform to amygdala coupling strength is modulated via feedback through aSTG as region for multisensory integration of emotional material. This mechanism was emotion-specific and more pronounced for sad music. Therefore, soundtrack valences may modulate emotion elicitation in movies by differentially changing preprocessed visual information to the amygdala.

  19. Incidence of fusiform rust infection on loblolly pine related to tip moth damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, H.R. Jr.; Stone, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) is a common pest over most of the natural range of loblolly pine, causing deformation and growth reduction of seedlings and saplings during the early life of the stand. Fusiform rust (caused by Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme) is a limiting factor in the production of southern pines throughout a broad area of the southeastern United States, extending from South Carolina to Texas. The target areas on the hosts for both pests are young, succulent shoot tissues. Carbofuran, a systematic insecticide, was used to determine the effect of controlling tip moth on seedlings infected by the fusiform rust organism. Beginning with the 2nd year carbofuran was applied over 4 successive years. The insecticide sharply reduced the incidence of tip moth and increased the height of 5-year-old saplings compared with untreated controls. Usually any treatment that stimulates the growth of pines also results in increased rust infection. However, this was not the case here because untreated saplings had significantly more infection. It is not known whether the increased disease incidence on untreated trees was due to the susceptibility and/or total number of secondary shoots initiated in response to tip dieback caused by the tip moth, or if carbofuran itself has some fungicidal effect resulting in lower infection on treated seedlings. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Crossmodal plasticity in the fusiform gyrus of late blind individuals during voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Hölig, Cordula; Föcker, Julia; Best, Anna; Röder, Brigitte; Büchel, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Blind individuals are trained in identifying other people through voices. In congenitally blind adults the anterior fusiform gyrus has been shown to be active during voice recognition. Such crossmodal changes have been associated with a superiority of blind adults in voice perception. The key question of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was whether visual deprivation that occurs in adulthood is followed by similar adaptive changes of the voice identification system. Late blind individuals and matched sighted participants were tested in a priming paradigm, in which two voice stimuli were subsequently presented. The prime (S1) and the target (S2) were either from the same speaker (person-congruent voices) or from two different speakers (person-incongruent voices). Participants had to classify the S2 as either coming from an old or a young person. Only in late blind but not in matched sighted controls, the activation in the anterior fusiform gyrus was modulated by voice identity: late blind volunteers showed an increase of the BOLD signal in response to person-incongruent compared with person-congruent trials. These results suggest that the fusiform gyrus adapts to input of a new modality even in the mature brain and thus demonstrate an adult type of crossmodal plasticity.

  1. Non-invasive brain stimulation targeting the right fusiform gyrus selectively increases working memory for faces.

    PubMed

    Brunyé, Tad T; Moran, Joseph M; Holmes, Amanda; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2017-04-01

    The human extrastriate cortex contains a region critically involved in face detection and memory, the right fusiform gyrus. The present study evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting this anatomical region would selectively influence memory for faces versus non-face objects (houses). Anodal tDCS targeted the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann's Area 37), with the anode at electrode site PO10, and cathode at FP2. Two stimulation conditions were compared in a repeated-measures design: 0.5mA versus 1.5mA intensity; a separate control group received no stimulation. Participants completed a working memory task for face and house stimuli, varying in memory load from 1 to 4 items. Individual differences measures assessed trait-based differences in facial recognition skills. Results showed 1.5mA intensity stimulation (versus 0.5mA and control) increased performance at high memory loads, but only with faces. Lower overall working memory capacity predicted a positive impact of tDCS. Results provide support for the notion of functional specialization of the right fusiform regions for maintaining face (but not non-face object) stimuli in working memory, and further suggest that low intensity electrical stimulation of this region may enhance demanding face working memory performance particularly in those with relatively poor baseline working memory skills.

  2. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  3. Rupture of the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Pai, V S

    1996-01-01

    Rupture of the plantar fascia in athletes engaged in sports that require running and jumping has been reported. However, spontaneous degenerative rupture of the plantar fascia is not well documented in the literature. This paper reports a patient with degenerative rupture of the plantar fascia.

  4. Premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Poma, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children. PMID:8583489

  5. Inactivation of murine norovirus-1 in the edible seaweeds Capsosiphon fulvescens and Hizikia fusiforme using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Young; Kang, Sujin; Ha, Sang-Do

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of gamma radiation (3-10 kGy) upon the inactivation of murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1), a human norovirus (NoV) surrogate. The edible green and brown algae, fulvescens (Capsosiphon fulvescens) and fusiforme (Hizikia fusiforme), respectively, were experimentally contaminated with 5-6 log10 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml MNV-1. The titer of MNV-1 significantly decreased (P < 0.05) as the dose of gamma radiation increased. MNV-1 titer decreased to 1.16-2.46 log10 PFU/ml in fulvescens and 0.37-2.21 log10 PFU/ml in fusiforme following irradiation. However, all Hunters ('L', 'a' and 'b') and sensory qualities (appearance, color, flavor, texture and overall acceptability) were not significantly (P > 0.05) different in both algae following gamma radiation. The Weibull model was used to generate non-linear survival curves and to calculate Gd values for 1, 2, and 3 log10 reductions of MNV-1 in fulvescens (R(2) = 0.992) and fusiforme (R(2) = 0.988). A Gd value of 1 (90% reduction) corresponded to 2.89 and 3.93 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively. A Gd value of 2 (99% reduction) corresponded to 7.75 and 9.02 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively, while a Gd value of 3 (99.9% reduction) in fulvescens and fusiforme corresponded with 13.83 and 14.93 kGy of gamma radiation, respectively. A combination of gamma radiation at medium doses and other treatments could be used to inactivate ≥ 3 log10 PFU/ml NoV in seaweed. The inactivation kinetics due to gamma radiation against NoV in these algae might provide basic information for use in seaweed processing and distribution.

  6. Encoding human sexual chemosensory cues in the orbitofrontal and fusiform cortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Chen, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensory communication of affect and motivation is ubiquitous among animals. In humans, emotional expressions are naturally associated with faces and voices. Whether chemical signals play a role as well has hardly been addressed. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that the right orbitofrontal cortex, right fusiform cortex, and right hypothalamus respond to airborne natural human sexual sweat, indicating that this particular chemosensory compound is encoded holistically in the brain. Our findings provide neural evidence that socioemotional meanings, including the sexual ones, are conveyed in the human sweat. PMID:19118174

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods via ethylene glycol solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Liange; Du Fanglin . E-mail: dufanglin@qust.edu.cn

    2007-08-07

    Fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods were prepared by a simple solvothermal route at 120 deg. C, and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. By controlling the content of ethylene glycol (EG), it was found that ethylene glycol (EG) played an important role in the formation of such SrCO{sub 3} microrods. Finally, effects of other solvents on the products, including 1,2-propanediol and glycerin, were also investigated.

  8. Endovascular Stenting for Restenosis of the Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Artery After Balloon Angioplasty: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyosue, Hiro Okahara, Mika; Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Natsuki; Mori, Hiromu

    2004-09-15

    Percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) has been used in the treatment of critical stenosis of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA). PTA of the intracranial VBA carries the risk of fatal complications such as arterial dissection or acute occlusion as well as postoperative restenosis. The estimated risk of periprocedural complications and restenosis were approximately 20% and 27%. The use of recently developed stents could prevent these problems of PTA. We present two cases of restenosis of the intracranial VBA after PTA which stenoses were successfully retreated with endovascular stenting using flexible coronary stents without any complications. Neither restenosis nor other recurrent symptoms were observed during the 4- and 6-month follow-up period. Reviewing the literature of 33 cases and our 2 cases, the overall complication rates related to stenting and restenosis were 5.6% and 7.8%. Endovascular stenting for the treatment of intracranial VBA can reduce the risk of arterial dissection and restenosis.

  9. [Premonitory sign of myocardial rupture].

    PubMed

    Lauten, A; Dittrich, P

    1975-10-01

    It is reported on 14 cases in which a rupture of the myocardium occurred following a myocardial infarction. The moment of the appearance as well as anamnestic and clinical peculiarities are examined. As the only usable symptom of the rupture the symptomatology of the electromechanic dissociation must be taken into consideration. Finally it is referred to the on principle possible operative consequences of the rupture of the myocardium (oversewing or infarctetomy).

  10. Slow rupture of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliakhandler, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Bursting of soap film is a fast and fascinating process. It turns out that certain polymer films rupture in a somewhat similar fashion, but much slower. The slowness of the process allows one to study the rupture of polymer films with details. The rupture process in Hele-Shaw-like fashion shows remarkable properties, and is a very simple system. It turns out that propagation speed of the rupture is a function of the film thickness, and rheologic properties of the polymer. Experimental results will be compared with theory, together with demonstration of the experiment.

  11. Comparison of Endovascular Treatments of Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysms of the Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery and Vertebral Artery with a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Choi, Kyu Sun; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by rupture of an internal carotid artery (ICA) or vertebral artery (VA) dissecting aneuryesm is rare. Various treatment strategies have been used for ruptured intracranial dissections. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and angiographic characteristics and outcomes of endovascular treatment for ruptured dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial ICA and VA. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with SAH caused by ruptured intracranial ICA and VA dissecting aneurysms from March 2009 to April 2014. The relevant demographic and angiographic data were collected, categorized and analyzed with respect to the outcome. Results Fifteen patients were identified (6 ICAs and 9 VAs). The percentage of patients showing unfavorable initial clinical condition and a history of hypertension was higher in the VA group. The initial aneurysm detection rate and the percentage of fusiform aneurysms were higher in the VA group. In the ICA group, all patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling, and showed favorable outcomes. In the VA group, 2 patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling and 7 with endovascular trapping. Two patients died and 1 patient developed severe disability. Conclusion Clinically, grave initial clinical condition and hypertension were more frequent in the VA group. Angiographically, bleb-like aneurysms were more frequent in the ICA group and fusiform aneurysms were more frequent in the VA group. Endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is feasible and the result is acceptable in most instances. PMID:27651862

  12. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  13. Extraction and Identification of Phlorotannins from the Brown Alga, Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajing; Fu, Xiaoting; Duan, Delin; Liu, Xiaoyong; Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin

    2017-02-21

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene), which are unique compounds from marine brown algae. In our present study, a procedure for extraction and enrichment of phlorotannins from S. fusiforme with highly antioxidant potentials was established. After comparison of different extraction methods, the optimal extraction conditions were established as follows. The freeze-dried seaweed powder was extracted with 30% ethanol-water solvent with a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 at temperature of 25 °C for 30 min. After extraction, the phlorotannins were fractioned by different solvents, among which the ethyl acetate fraction exhibited both the highest total phlorotannin content (88.48 ± 0.30 mg PGE/100 mg extract) and the highest antioxidant activities. The extracts obtained from these locations were further purified and characterized using a modified UHPLC-QQQ-MS method. Compounds with 42 different molecular weights were detected and tentatively identified, among which the fuhalol-type phlorotannins were the dominant compounds, followed by phlorethols and fucophlorethols with diverse degree of polymerization. Eckol-type phlorotannins including some newly discovered carmalol derivatives were detected in Sargassum species for the first time. Our study not only described the complex phlorotannins composition in S. fusiforme, but also highlighted the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds.

  14. Fucosterol, a sterol extracted from Sargassum fusiforme, shows antidepressant and anticonvulsant effects.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xing-Hua; Quan, Ying-Chun; Jiang, Hai-Ying; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Qu, You-Le; Guan, Li-Ping

    2015-12-05

    We previously showed that extracts of Sargassum fusiforme significantly reduce immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, suggesting that these extracts possess antidepressant-like effects. Here, fucosterol extracted from S. fusiforme was evaluated for antidepressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice. Fucosterol (10, 20, 30 and 40mg/kg) significantly shortened immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test for30min after treatment but had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field test. Fucosterol significantly increased serotonin, norepinephrine and the metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in mouse brain, suggesting that the effects of fucosterol may be mediated through these neurotransmitters. As assessed using maximal electroshock, fucosterol (20, 40, 100mg/kg) possessed anticonvulsant activity, whereas rotarod toxicity test results indicated that fucosterol did not induce neurotoxicity at the same dose levels in mice. Thus, fucosterol may be a useful antidepressant adjunct candidate for treating depression in patients with epilepsy. A significant increase in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels was found in the fucosterol 20mg/kg group (P<0.05). Our findings suggested that fucosterol may possess an antidepressant-like effect, which may be mediated by increasing central BDNF levels.

  15. Extraction and Identification of Phlorotannins from the Brown Alga, Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yajing; Fu, Xiaoting; Duan, Delin; Liu, Xiaoyong; Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene), which are unique compounds from marine brown algae. In our present study, a procedure for extraction and enrichment of phlorotannins from S. fusiforme with highly antioxidant potentials was established. After comparison of different extraction methods, the optimal extraction conditions were established as follows. The freeze-dried seaweed powder was extracted with 30% ethanol-water solvent with a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 at temperature of 25 °C for 30 min. After extraction, the phlorotannins were fractioned by different solvents, among which the ethyl acetate fraction exhibited both the highest total phlorotannin content (88.48 ± 0.30 mg PGE/100 mg extract) and the highest antioxidant activities. The extracts obtained from these locations were further purified and characterized using a modified UHPLC-QQQ-MS method. Compounds with 42 different molecular weights were detected and tentatively identified, among which the fuhalol-type phlorotannins were the dominant compounds, followed by phlorethols and fucophlorethols with diverse degree of polymerization. Eckol-type phlorotannins including some newly discovered carmalol derivatives were detected in Sargassum species for the first time. Our study not only described the complex phlorotannins composition in S. fusiforme, but also highlighted the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds. PMID:28230766

  16. One-year-old fear memories rapidly activate human fusiform gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    Fast threat detection is crucial for survival. In line with such evolutionary pressure, threat-signaling fear-conditioned faces have been found to rapidly (<80 ms) activate visual brain regions including the fusiform gyrus on the conditioning day. Whether remotely fear conditioned stimuli (CS) evoke similar early processing enhancements is unknown. Here, 16 participants who underwent a differential face fear-conditioning and extinction procedure on day 1 were presented the initial CS 24 h after conditioning (Recent Recall Test) as well as 9-17 months later (Remote Recall Test) while EEG was recorded. Using a data-driven segmentation procedure of CS evoked event-related potentials, five distinct microstates were identified for both the recent and the remote memory test. To probe intracranial activity, EEG activity within each microstate was localized using low resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis (LORETA). In both the recent (41–55 and 150–191 ms) and remote (45–90 ms) recall tests, fear conditioned faces potentiated rapid activation in proximity of fusiform gyrus, even in participants unaware of the contingencies. These findings suggest that rapid processing enhancements of conditioned faces persist over time. PMID:26416784

  17. The role of the fusiform face area in social cognition: implications for the pathobiology of autism.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Robert T; Grelotti, David J; Klin, Ami; Kleinman, Jamie; Van der Gaag, Christiaan; Marois, René; Skudlarski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    A region in the lateral aspect of the fusiform gyrus (FG) is more engaged by human faces than any other category of image. It has come to be known as the 'fusiform face area' (FFA). The origin and extent of this specialization is currently a topic of great interest and debate. This is of special relevance to autism, because recent studies have shown that the FFA is hypoactive to faces in this disorder. In two linked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of healthy young adults, we show here that the FFA is engaged by a social attribution task (SAT) involving perception of human-like interactions among three simple geometric shapes. The amygdala, temporal pole, medial prefrontal cortex, inferolateral frontal cortex and superior temporal sulci were also significantly engaged. Activation of the FFA to a task without faces challenges the received view that the FFA is restricted in its activities to the perception of faces. We speculate that abstract semantic information associated with faces is encoded in the FG region and retrieved for social computations. From this perspective, the literature on hypoactivation of the FFA in autism may be interpreted as a reflection of a core social cognitive mechanism underlying the disorder. PMID:12639338

  18. Two-stage selection in slash pine produces good gains in fusiform rust resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The best 6 of 21 progeny-tested first-generation slash pine selections were crossed in a half diallel to study inheritance patterns of their superior fusiform rust resistance (5 trees) and height (1 tree). Their six first-test progenies were duplicated and included in the study. These two groups of progenies, along with two commercial check lots, were planted on an Upper Coastal Plain and a Flatwoods site in Georgia. At age 10 yr, the 15 progenies in the half diallel averaged 23% rust-infected compared with 54% for the check lots. First-test progenies averaged 30% infected. For percentage infection, the six parents differed in general combining ability (GCA) (0.01>P>0.001) on both test sites and in specific combining ability (0.05>P>0.01) on one site. GCA variation for height was significant (0.05>P>0.01) on one site. The parent selected for height had the highest breeding value for height at age 10 yr. These results show that resistance to the fusiform rust disease, a serious problem in management of the species, can be improved in slash pine. These 6 parents and their 15 progenies in the half-diallel cross are a good source of rust resistance genes for use in slash pine improvement programs.

  19. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  20. Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Mallah, Fatemeh; Eftekhar, Tahere; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. In most cases, a correct and definite diagnosis can be made only by laparotomy. We report two cases of diffuse peritonitis caused by spontaneous perforated pyometra. The first case is a 78-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of suspected incarcerated hernia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of symptoms of peritonitis. At laparotomy of both cases, 1 liter of pus with the source of uterine was found in the abdominal cavity. The ruptured uterine is also detected. More investigations revealed no malignancy as the reason of the pyometra. PMID:24024054

  1. Decreased GABAB Receptors in the Cingulate Cortex and Fusiform Gyrus in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Terrell T.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder and among its symptoms are disturbances in face and emotional processing. Emerging evidence demonstrates abnormalities in the GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) system in autism, which likely contributes to these deficits. GABAB receptors play an important role in modulating synapses and maintaining the balance of excitation-inhibition in the brain. The density of GABAB receptors in subjects with autism and matched controls was quantified in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, important for socio-emotional and cognitive processing, and the fusiform gyrus, important for identification of faces and facial expressions. Significant reductions in GABAB receptor density were demonstrated in all three regions examined suggesting that alterations in this key inhibitory receptor subtype may contribute to the functional deficits in individuals with autism. Interestingly, the presence of seizure in a subset of autism cases did not have a significant effect on the density of GABAB receptors in any of the three regions. PMID:20557420

  2. Role of fusiform and anterior temporal cortical areas in facial recognition.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Shahin; Tootell, Roger B H

    2012-11-15

    Recent fMRI studies suggest that cortical face processing extends well beyond the fusiform face area (FFA), including unspecified portions of the anterior temporal lobe. However, the exact location of such anterior temporal region(s), and their role during active face recognition, remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that (in addition to FFA) a small bilateral site in the anterior tip of the collateral sulcus ('AT'; the anterior temporal face patch) is selectively activated during recognition of faces but not houses (a non-face object). In contrast to the psychophysical prediction that inverted and contrast reversed faces are processed like other non-face objects, both FFA and AT (but not other visual areas) were also activated during recognition of inverted and contrast reversed faces. However, response accuracy was better correlated to recognition-driven activity in AT, compared to FFA. These data support a segregated, hierarchical model of face recognition processing, extending to the anterior temporal cortex.

  3. Functional asymmetry between the left and right human fusiform gyrus explored through electrical brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Vinitha; Parvizi, Josef

    2016-03-01

    The ventral temporal cortex (VTC) contains several areas with selective responses to words, numbers, faces, and objects as demonstrated by numerous human and primate imaging and electrophysiological studies. Our recent work using electrocorticography (ECoG) confirmed the presence of face-selective neuronal populations in the human fusiform gyrus (FG) in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes in either the left or right hemisphere. Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) disrupted the conscious perception of faces only when it was delivered in the right, but not left, FG. In contrast to our previous findings, here we report both negative and positive EBS effects in right and left FG, respectively. The presence of right hemisphere language dominance in the first, and strong left-handedness and poor language processing performance in the second case, provide indirect clues about the functional architecture of the human VTC in relation to hemispheric asymmetries in language processing and handedness.

  4. Fault branching and rupture directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliss, Sonia; Bhat, Harsha S.; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

    2005-06-01

    Could the directivity of a complex earthquake be inferred from the ruptured fault branches it created? Typically, branches develop in forward orientation, making acute angles relative to the propagation direction. Direct backward branching of the same style as the main rupture (e.g., both right lateral) is disallowed by the stress field at the rupture front. Here we propose another mechanism of backward branching. In that mechanism, rupture stops along one fault strand, radiates stress to a neighboring strand, nucleates there, and develops bilaterally, generating a backward branch. Such makes diagnosing directivity of a past earthquake difficult without detailed knowledge of the branching process. As a field example, in the Landers 1992 earthquake, rupture stopped at the northern end of the Kickapoo fault, jumped onto the Homestead Valley fault, and developed bilaterally there, NNW to continue the main rupture but also SSE for 4 km forming a backward branch. We develop theoretical principles underlying such rupture transitions, partly from elastostatic stress analysis, and then simulate the Landers example numerically using a two-dimensional elastodynamic boundary integral equation formulation incorporating slip-weakening rupture. This reproduces the proposed backward branching mechanism based on realistic if simplified fault geometries, prestress orientation corresponding to the region, standard lab friction values for peak strength, and fracture energies characteristic of the Landers event. We also show that the seismic S ratio controls the jumpable distance and that curving of a fault toward its compressional side, like locally along the southeastern Homestead Valley fault, induces near-tip increase of compressive normal stress that slows rupture propagation.

  5. Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception

    PubMed Central

    Parvizi, Josef; Jacques, Corentin; Foster, Brett L.; Withoft, Nathan; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Weiner, Kevin S.; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2012-01-01

    Face-selective neural responses in the human fusiform gyrus have been widely examined. However, their causal role in human face perception is largely unknown. Here, we used a multimodal approach of electrocorticography (ECoG), high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) to directly investigate the causal role of face-selective neural responses of the fusiform gyrus (FG) in face perception in a patient implanted with subdural electrodes in the right inferior temporal lobe. High-resolution fMRI identified two distinct FG face-selective regions (mFus-faces and pFus-faces). ECoG revealed a striking anatomical and functional correspondence with fMRI data where a pair of face-selective electrodes, positioned one centimeter apart, overlapped mFus-faces and pFus-faces, respectively. Moreover, electrical charge delivered to this pair of electrodes induced a profound face-specific perceptual distortion during viewing of real faces. Specifically, the subject reported a “metamorphosed” appearance of faces of people in the room. Several controls illustrate the specificity of the effect to the perception of faces. EBS of mFus-faces and pFus-faces neither produced a significant deficit in naming pictures of famous faces on the computer, nor did it affect the appearance of nonface objects. Further, the appearance of faces remained unaffected during both sham stimulation and stimulation of a pair of nearby electrodes that were not face-selective. Overall, our findings reveal a striking convergence of fMRI, ECoG, and EBS, which together offer a rare causal link between functional subsets of the human FG network and face perception. PMID:23100414

  6. Developmental deficits in social perception in autism: the role of the amygdala and fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disorder marked by a triad of deficits, including impairments in reciprocal social interaction, delays in early language and communication, and the presence of restrictive, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. In this review, it is argued that the search for the neurobiological bases of the autism spectrum disorders should focus on the social deficits, as they alone are specific to autism and they are likely to be most informative with respect to modeling the pathophysiology of the disorder. Many recent studies have documented the difficulties persons with an autism spectrum disorder have accurately perceiving facial identity and facial expressions. This behavioral literature on face perception abnormalities in autism is reviewed and integrated with the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature in this area, and a heuristic model of the pathophysiology of autism is presented. This model posits an early developmental failure in autism involving the amygdala, with a cascading influence on the development of cortical areas that mediate social perception in the visual domain, specifically the fusiform "face area" of the ventral temporal lobe. Moreover, there are now some provocative data to suggest that visual perceptual areas of the ventral temporal pathway are also involved in important ways in representations of the semantic attributes of people, social knowledge and social cognition. Social perception and social cognition are postulated as normally linked during development such that growth in social perceptual skills during childhood provides important scaffolding for social skill development. It is argued that the development of face perception and social cognitive skills are supported by the amygdala-fusiform system, and that deficits in this network are instrumental in causing autism.

  7. fMRI-adaptation studies of viewpoint tuning in the extrastriate and fusiform body areas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Wiggett, Alison J; Downing, Paul E

    2010-03-01

    People are easily able to perceive the human body across different viewpoints, but the neural mechanisms underpinning this ability are currently unclear. In three experiments, we used functional MRI (fMRI) adaptation to study the view-invariance of representations in two cortical regions that have previously been shown to be sensitive to visual depictions of the human body--the extrastriate and fusiform body areas (EBA and FBA). The BOLD response to sequentially presented pairs of bodies was treated as an index of view invariance. Specifically, we compared trials in which the bodies in each image held identical poses (seen from different views) to trials containing different poses. EBA and FBA adapted to identical views of the same pose, and both showed a progressive rebound from adaptation as a function of the angular difference between views, up to approximately 30 degrees. However, these adaptation effects were eliminated when the body stimuli were followed by a pattern mask. Delaying the mask onset increased the response (but not the adaptation effect) in EBA, leaving FBA unaffected. We interpret these masking effects as evidence that view-dependent fMRI adaptation is driven by later waves of neuronal responses in the regions of interest. Finally, in a whole brain analysis, we identified an anterior region of the left inferior temporal sulcus (l-aITS) that responded linearly to stimulus rotation, but showed no selectivity for bodies. Our results show that body-selective cortical areas exhibit a similar degree of view-invariance as other object selective areas--such as the lateral occipitotemporal area (LO) and posterior fusiform gyrus (pFs).

  8. Fusiform gyrus face selectivity relates to individual differences in facial recognition ability.

    PubMed

    Furl, Nicholas; Garrido, Lúcia; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon; Duchaine, Bradley

    2011-07-01

    Regions of the occipital and temporal lobes, including a region in the fusiform gyrus (FG), have been proposed to constitute a "core" visual representation system for faces, in part because they show face selectivity and face repetition suppression. But recent fMRI studies of developmental prosopagnosics (DPs) raise questions about whether these measures relate to face processing skills. Although DPs manifest deficient face processing, most studies to date have not shown unequivocal reductions of functional responses in the proposed core regions. We scanned 15 DPs and 15 non-DP control participants with fMRI while employing factor analysis to derive behavioral components related to face identification or other processes. Repetition suppression specific to facial identities in FG or to expression in FG and STS did not show compelling relationships with face identification ability. However, we identified robust relationships between face selectivity and face identification ability in FG across our sample for several convergent measures, including voxel-wise statistical parametric mapping, peak face selectivity in individually defined "fusiform face areas" (FFAs), and anatomical extents (cluster sizes) of those FFAs. None of these measures showed associations with behavioral expression or object recognition ability. As a group, DPs had reduced face-selective responses in bilateral FFA when compared with non-DPs. Individual DPs were also more likely than non-DPs to lack expected face-selective activity in core regions. These findings associate individual differences in face processing ability with selectivity in core face processing regions. This confirms that face selectivity can provide a valid marker for neural mechanisms that contribute to face identification ability.

  9. Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis and rupture.

    PubMed

    Ferlic, D C

    1996-08-01

    Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis at the wrist can cause locking, limitation of motion, nerve compression, and rupture of tendons. To prevent and treat these conditions, a flexor tenosynovectomy, combined with nerve decompression and tendon reconstruction as indicated, is necessary. If tendons are ruptured, the flexor pollicis longus and profundus to the index finger are most commonly affected. On the fingers flexor tenosynovitis can also cause locking, decrease in range of motion and rupture tendons. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers should be treated with decompression of the tendons health with preservation of the pulley system.

  10. Fingerspelling, signed language, text and picture processing in deaf native signers: the role of the mid-fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Waters, Dafydd; Campbell, Ruth; Capek, Cheryl M; Woll, Bencie; David, Anthony S; McGuire, Philip K; Brammer, Michael J; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2007-04-15

    In fingerspelling, different hand configurations are used to represent the different letters of the alphabet. Signers use this method of representing written language to fill lexical gaps in a signed language. Using fMRI, we compared cortical networks supporting the perception of fingerspelled, signed, written, and pictorial stimuli in deaf native signers of British Sign Language (BSL). In order to examine the effects of linguistic knowledge, hearing participants who knew neither fingerspelling nor a signed language were also tested. All input forms activated a left fronto-temporal network, including portions of left inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri, in both groups. To examine the extent to which activation in this region was influenced by orthographic structure, two contrasts of orthographic and non-orthographic stimuli were made: one using static stimuli (text vs. pictures), the other using dynamic stimuli (fingerspelling vs. signed language). Greater activation in left and right inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri was found for pictures than text in both deaf and hearing groups. In the fingerspelling vs. signed language contrast, a significant interaction indicated locations within the left and right mid-fusiform gyri. This showed greater activation for fingerspelling than signed language in deaf but not hearing participants. These results are discussed in light of recent proposals that the mid-fusiform gyrus may act as an integration region, mediating between visual input and higher-order stimulus properties.

  11. Elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures: epicondylitis, biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Rineer, Craig A; Ruch, David S

    2009-03-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis are common causes of elbow pain in the general population, with the lateral variety being more common than the medial by a ratio reportedly ranging from 4:1 to 7:1. Initially thought to be an inflammatory condition, epicondylitis has ultimately been shown to result from tendinous microtearing followed by an incomplete reparative response. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatment options have been employed in the treatment of epicondylitis, without the emergence of a single, consistent, universally accepted treatment protocol. Tendon ruptures about the elbow are much less frequent, but result in more significant disability and loss of function. Distal biceps tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males as a result of an event that causes a sudden, eccentric contraction of the biceps. Triceps tendon ruptures are exceedingly rare but usually have a similar etiology with a forceful eccentric contraction of the triceps that causes avulsion of the tendon from the olecranon. The diagnosis of these injuries is not always readily made. Complete ruptures of the biceps or triceps tendons have traditionally been treated surgically with good results. With regard to biceps ruptures, there continues to be debate about the best surgical approach, as well as the best method of fixation of tendon to bone. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review of the broad topics of elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures, but rather is a review of recently published information on the topics that will assist the clinician in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  12. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method.

  13. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing

  14. Rupture work of pendular bridges.

    PubMed

    de Boer, P C T; de Boer, M P

    2008-01-01

    Capillary bridging can generate substantial forces between solid surfaces. Impacted technologies and sciences include micro- and nanomachining, disk drive interfaces, scanning probe microscopy, biology, and granular mechanics. Existing calculations of the rupture work of capillary bridges do not consider the thermodynamics relating to the evaporation that can occur in the case of volatile liquids. Here, we show that the occurrence of evaporation decreases the rupture work by a factor of about 2. The decrease arises from heat taken from the surroundings that is converted into work. The treatment is based on a thermodynamic control-volume analysis of the pendular bridge geometry. We extend the mathematical formulation of Orr et al., solving the meniscus problem exactly for non-wetting surfaces. The extension provides analytical results for conditions at the rupture point and at a possible inflection point and for the rupture work. A simple equation (eq 32) is shown to fit the rupture work for the two cases over a meniscus curvature range of 3 orders of magnitude. Coefficients for the equation are given in tabular form for different contact angle pairs.

  15. The Faces in Radiological Images: Fusiform Face Area Supports Radiological Expertise.

    PubMed

    Bilalić, Merim; Grottenthaler, Thomas; Nägele, Thomas; Lindig, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) has often been used as an example of a brain module that was developed through evolution to serve a specific purpose-face processing. Many believe, however, that FFA is responsible for holistic processing associated with any kind of expertise. The expertise view has been tested with various stimuli, with mixed results. One of the main stumbling blocks in the FFA controversy has been the fact that the stimuli used have been similar to faces. Here, we circumvent the problem by using radiological images, X-rays, which bear no resemblance to faces. We demonstrate that FFA can distinguish between X-rays and other stimuli by employing multivariate pattern analysis. The sensitivity to X-rays was significantly better in experienced radiologists than that in medical students with limited radiological experience. For the radiologists, it was also possible to use the patterns of FFA activations obtained on faces to differentiate X-ray stimuli from other stimuli. The overlap in the FFA activation is not based on visual similarity of faces and X-rays but rather on the processes necessary for expertise with both kinds of stimulus. Our results support the expertise view that FFA's main function is related to holistic processing.

  16. Cortical Thickness in Fusiform Face Area Predicts Face and Object Recognition Performance

    PubMed Central

    McGugin, Rankin W.; Van Gulick, Ana E.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is defined by its selectivity for faces. Several studies have shown that the response of FFA to non-face objects can predict behavioral performance for these objects. However, one possible account is that experts pay more attention to objects in their domain of expertise, driving signals up. Here we show an effect of expertise with non-face objects in FFA that cannot be explained by differential attention to objects of expertise. We explore the relationship between cortical thickness of FFA and face and object recognition using the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Vanderbilt Expertise Test, respectively. We measured cortical thickness in functionally-defined regions in a group of men who evidenced functional expertise effects for cars in FFA. Performance with faces and objects together accounted for approximately 40% of the variance in cortical thickness of several FFA patches. While subjects with a thicker FFA cortex performed better with vehicles, those with a thinner FFA cortex performed better with faces and living objects. The results point to a domain-general role of FFA in object perception and reveal an interesting double dissociation that does not contrast faces and objects, but rather living and non-living objects. PMID:26439272

  17. Dynamic representations of race: processing goals shape race decoding in the fusiform gyri.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Christian; Ratner, Kyle G; Van Bavel, Jay J

    2014-03-01

    People perceive and evaluate others on the basis of social categories, such as race, gender and age. Initial processing of targets in terms of visually salient social categories is often characterized as inevitable. In the current study, we investigated the influence of processing goals on the representation of race in the visual processing stream. Participants were assigned to one of two mixed-race teams and categorized faces according to their group membership or skin color. To assess neural representations of race, we employed multivariate pattern analysis to examined neural activity related to the presentation of Black and White faces. As predicted, patterns of neural activity within the early visual cortex and fusiform gyri (FG) could decode the race of face stimuli above chance and were moderated by processing goals. Race decoding in early visual cortex was above chance in both categorization tasks and below chance in a prefrontal control region. More importantly, race decoding was greater in the FG during the group membership vs skin color categorization task. The results suggest that, ironically, explicit racial categorization can diminish the representation of race in the FG. These findings suggest that representations of race are dynamic, reflecting current processing goals.

  18. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study.

    PubMed

    Engell, Andrew D; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex.

  19. Fusiform cells in the cambium of Kalopanax pictus are exclusively mononucleate.

    PubMed

    Kitin, Peter; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo

    2002-03-01

    While it is generally accepted that most plant cells are mononucleate, it has been argued with some vehemence that fusiform cambial cells can be multinucleate. The controversy has not been resolved since to date, studies by conventional microscopy and transmission electron microscopy have failed to confirm unambiguously whether cambial cells are mononucleate or multinucleate. In this study, semi-thin sections of epoxy-embedded specimens and thick slices of cambial tissues from the hardwood Kalopanax pictus were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Tangential sections of cambium, regardless of the thickness of the section, are likely to contain portions of cells in several adjacent layers of cells and, at the lower resolution of conventional microscopy, several adjacent cells can appear to be a single cell with more than one nucleus. The higher resolution in the third dimension of confocal microscopy allowed clearly adjacent layers of cells in the cambium to be distinguished and the number of nuclei per cell to be determined. In this tree, the cambial cells were mononucleate in all cases.

  20. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Engell, Andrew D.; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex. PMID:25191255

  1. Unsuppressible Repetition Suppression and exemplar-specific Expectation Suppression in the Fusiform Face Area.

    PubMed

    Pajani, Auréliane; Kouider, Sid; Roux, Paul; de Gardelle, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    Recent work casts Repetition Suppression (RS), i.e. the reduced neural response to repeated stimuli, as the consequence of reduced surprise for repeated inputs. This research, along with other studies documenting Expectation Suppression, i.e. reduced responses to expected stimuli, emphasizes the role of expectations and predictive codes in perception. Here, we use fMRI to further characterize the nature of predictive signals in the human brain. Prior to scanning, participants were implicitly exposed to associations within face pairs. Critically, we found that this resulted in exemplar-specific Expectation Suppression in the fusiform face-sensitive area (FFA): individual faces that could be predicted from the associations elicited reduced FFA responses, as compared to unpredictable faces. Thus, predictive signals in the FFA are specific to face exemplars, and not only generic to the category of face stimuli. In addition, we show that under such circumstances, the occurrence of surprising repetitions did not trigger enhanced brain responses, as had been recently hypothesized, but still suppressed responses, suggesting that repetition suppression might be partly 'unsuppressible'. Repetition effects cannot be fully modulated by expectations, which supports the recent view that expectation and repetition effects rest on partially independent mechanisms. Altogether, our study sheds light on the nature of expectation signals along the perceptual system.

  2. The neural code for face orientation in the human fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Fernando M; Cichy, Radoslaw M; Allefeld, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-09-03

    Humans recognize faces and objects with high speed and accuracy regardless of their orientation. Recent studies have proposed that orientation invariance in face recognition involves an intermediate representation where neural responses are similar for mirror-symmetric views. Here, we used fMRI, multivariate pattern analysis, and computational modeling to investigate the neural encoding of faces and vehicles at different rotational angles. Corroborating previous studies, we demonstrate a representation of face orientation in the fusiform face-selective area (FFA). We go beyond these studies by showing that this representation is category-selective and tolerant to retinal translation. Critically, by controlling for low-level confounds, we found the representation of orientation in FFA to be compatible with a linear angle code. Aspects of mirror-symmetric coding cannot be ruled out when FFA mean activity levels are considered as a dimension of coding. Finally, we used a parametric family of computational models, involving a biased sampling of view-tuned neuronal clusters, to compare different face angle encoding models. The best fitting model exhibited a predominance of neuronal clusters tuned to frontal views of faces. In sum, our findings suggest a category-selective and monotonic code of face orientation in the human FFA, in line with primate electrophysiology studies that observed mirror-symmetric tuning of neural responses at higher stages of the visual system, beyond the putative homolog of human FFA.

  3. Repetition suppression to faces in the fusiform face area: A personal and dynamic journey.

    PubMed

    Henson, Richard N

    2016-07-01

    I review a number of fMRI studies that investigate the effects of repeating faces on responses in the fusiform face area (FFA). These studies show that repetition suppression (RS), as well as repetition enhancement (RE), are sensitive to multiple factors, including pre-existing stimulus representations, cognitive task, lag between repetitions and spatial attention. Parallel EEG studies provide additional constraints on the timing of these repetition effects. Together, the results suggest that RS is not a unitary phenomenon, but likely subsumes multiple mechanisms that operate under different conditions. These mechanisms of course need to relate to single-cell data and known physiological mechanisms; but to make further progress, I believe we need dynamical neural network models that relate these mechanisms to the properties of neural populations that are measured by fMRI and EEG data. One example model is sketched, in which RS reflects an acceleration of neural dynamics, owing to reduced prediction error within a recurrent visual processing hierarchy.

  4. Why is the fusiform face area recruited for novel categories of expertise? A neurocomputational investigation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Matthew H; Joyce, Carrie A; Cottrell, Garrison W

    2008-04-02

    What is the role of the Fusiform Face Area (FFA)? Is it specific to face processing, or is it a visual expertise area? The expertise hypothesis is appealing due to a number of studies showing that the FFA is activated by pictures of objects within the subject's domain of expertise (e.g., cars for car experts, birds for birders, etc.), and that activation of the FFA increases as new expertise is acquired in the lab. However, it is incumbent upon the proponents of the expertise hypothesis to explain how it is that an area that is initially specialized for faces becomes recruited for new classes of stimuli. We dub this the "visual expertise mystery." One suggested answer to this mystery is that the FFA is used simply because it is a fine discrimination area, but this account has historically lacked a mechanism describing exactly how the FFA would be recruited for novel domains of expertise. In this study, we show that a neurocomputational model trained to perform subordinate-level discrimination within a visually homogeneous class develops transformations that magnify differences between similar objects, in marked contrast to networks trained to simply categorize the objects. This magnification generalizes to novel classes, leading to faster learning of new discriminations. We suggest this is why the FFA is recruited for new expertise. The model predicts that individual FFA neurons will have highly variable responses to stimuli within expertise domains.

  5. Is this car looking at you? How anthropomorphism predicts fusiform face area activation when seeing cars.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Brick, Timothy R; Müller, Barbara C N; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphism encompasses the attribution of human characteristics to non-living objects. In particular the human tendency to see faces in cars has long been noticed, yet its neural correlates are unknown. We set out to investigate whether the fusiform face area (FFA) is associated with seeing human features in car fronts, or whether, the higher-level theory of mind network (ToM), namely temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) show a link to anthropomorphism. Twenty participants underwent fMRI scanning during a passive car-front viewing task. We extracted brain activity from FFA, TPJ and MPFC. After the fMRI session participants were asked to spontaneously list adjectives that characterize each car front. Five raters judged the degree to which each adjective can be applied as a characteristic of human beings. By means of linear mixed models we found that the implicit tendency to anthropomorphize individual car fronts predicts FFA, but not TPJ or MPFC activity. The results point to an important role of FFA in the phenomenon of ascribing human attributes to non-living objects. Interestingly, brain regions that have been associated with thinking about beliefs and mental states of others (TPJ, MPFC) do not seem to be related to anthropomorphism of car fronts.

  6. Emotional expressions evoke a differential response in the fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Harry, Bronson; Williams, Mark A; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

    2013-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the fusiform face area (FFA), a brain region specialized for face perception, is not involved in processing emotional expressions. This assumption is based on the proposition that the FFA is involved in face identification and only processes features that are invariant across changes due to head movements, speaking and expressing emotions. The present study tested this proposition by examining whether the response in the human FFA varies across emotional expressions with functional magnetic resonance imaging and brain decoding analysis techniques (n = 11). A one vs. all classification analysis showed that most emotional expressions that participants perceived could be reliably predicted from the neural pattern of activity in left and the right FFA, suggesting that the perception of different emotional expressions recruit partially non-overlapping neural mechanisms. In addition, emotional expressions could also be decoded from the pattern of activity in the early visual cortex (EVC), indicating that retinotopic cortex also shows a differential response to emotional expressions. These results cast doubt on the idea that the FFA is involved in expression invariant face processing, and instead indicate that emotional expressions evoke partially de-correlated signals throughout occipital and posterior temporal cortex.

  7. Selective impairment of facial recognition due to a haematoma restricted to the right fusiform and lateral occipital region

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y; Yamamoto, T

    2001-01-01

    A 67 year old right handed Japanese man developed prosopagnosia caused by a haemorrhage. His only deficit was the inability to perceive and discriminate unfamiliar faces, and to recognise familiar faces. He did not show deficits in visual or visuospatial perception of non-facial stimuli, alexia, visual agnosia, or topographical disorientation. Brain MRI showed a haematoma limited to the right fusiform and the lateral occipital region. Single photon emission computed tomography confirmed that there was no decreased blood flow in the opposite left cerebral hemisphere. The present case indicates that a well placed small right fusiform gyrus and the adjacent area can cause isolated impairment of facial recognition. As far as we know, there has been no published case that has demonstrated this exact lesion site, which was indicated by recent functional MRI studies as the most critical area in facial recognition.

 PMID:11459906

  8. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self

  9. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  10. Ih Equalizes Membrane Input Resistance in a Heterogeneous Population of Fusiform Neurons in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Cesar C.; Li, Shuang; Roque, Antonio C.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos; Leão, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    In a neuronal population, several combinations of its ionic conductances are used to attain a specific firing phenotype. Some neurons present heterogeneity in their firing, generally produced by expression of a specific conductance, but how additional conductances vary along in order to homeostatically regulate membrane excitability is less known. Dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons, fusiform neurons, display heterogeneous spontaneous action potential activity and thus represent an appropriate model to study the role of different conductances in establishing firing heterogeneity. Particularly, fusiform neurons are divided into quiet, with no spontaneous firing, or active neurons, presenting spontaneous, regular firing. These modes are determined by the expression levels of an intrinsic membrane conductance, an inwardly rectifying potassium current (IKir). In this work, we tested whether other subthreshold conductances vary homeostatically to maintain membrane excitability constant across the two subtypes. We found that Ih expression covaries specifically with IKir in order to maintain membrane resistance constant. The impact of Ih on membrane resistance is dependent on the level of IKir expression, being much smaller in quiet neurons with bigger IKir, but Ih variations are not relevant for creating the quiet and active phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate that the individual proportion of each conductance, and not their absolute conductance, is relevant for determining the neuronal firing mode. We conclude that in fusiform neurons the variations of their different subthreshold conductances are limited to specific conductances in order to create firing heterogeneity and maintain membrane homeostasis. PMID:27833532

  11. The contribution of the fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus in processing facial attractiveness: neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence.

    PubMed

    Iaria, G; Fox, C J; Waite, C T; Aharon, I; Barton, J J S

    2008-08-13

    Current cognitive models suggest that the processing of dynamic facial attributes, including social signals such as gaze direction and facial expression, involves the superior temporal sulcus, whereas the processing of invariant facial structure such as the individuals' identity involves the fusiform face area. Where facial attractiveness, a social signal that may emerge from invariant facial structure, is processed within this dual-route model of face perception is uncertain. Here, we present two studies. First, we investigated the explicit judgments of facial attractiveness and attractiveness-motivated behavior in patients with acquired prosopagnosia, a deficit in familiar face recognition usually associated with damage to medial occipitotemporal cortex. We found that both abilities were impaired in these patients, with some weak residual ability for attractiveness judgments found only in those patients with unilateral right occipitotemporal or bilateral anterior temporal lesions. Importantly, deficits in attractiveness perception correlated with the severity of the face recognition deficit. Second, we performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in healthy subjects that included an implicit and explicit processing of facial attractiveness. We found increased neural activity when explicitly judging facial attractiveness within a number of cortical regions including the fusiform face area, but not the superior temporal sulcus, indicating a potential contribution of the fusiform face area to this judgment. Thus, converging neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence points to a critical role of the inferior occipitotemporal cortex in the processing of facial attractiveness.

  12. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Davari, Aida; Daneshbod, Khosrow; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin) confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic) rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen. PMID:24795827

  13. The evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery system in neuro-Behçet and Behçet disease using magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Kose, Evren; Kamisli, Suat; Dogan, Metin; Tasolar, Sevgi; Kahraman, Ayşegül; Oztanir, Mustafa Namik; Sener, Serpil

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of the vertebrobasilar artery system in patients with Behçet's and Neuro-Behçet's disease. For this aim; 20 adults with clinically diagnosed Behcet's disease, 20 adults with Neuro-Behçet's disease, and 19 age- and gender-matched controls were examined by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). During MRA, diameters of left vertebral artery (LVA), right vertebral artery (RVA), basilar artery (BA), and proximal segment (P1) of posterior cerebral artery between origin and junction with the posterior communicating artery were measured. In all groups, LVA was dominant than RVA (P < 0.05). The diameters of BA and right P1 of Neuro-Behçet's disease were larger than the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the diameters of left P1 of Neuro-Behçet's disease were larger but not statistically significant. There is no difference between the groups in terms of gender. Behçet's disease can affect vascular structures; therefore vertebrobasilar artery system should be examined in patients with Behçet's and Neuro-Behçet's disease.

  14. Local Discriminability Determines the Strength of Holistic Processing for Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Goffaux, Valerie; Schiltz, Christine; Mur, Marieke; Goebel, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features. This suggests the existence of both interactive and local processing modes, consistent with recent behavioral findings that the strength of interactive feature processing (IFP) engages most strongly when similar features need to be disambiguated. Here we address whether the engagement of the FFA into interactive versus featural representational modes is governed by local feature discriminability. We scanned human participants while they matched target features within face pairs, independently of the context of distracter features. IFP was operationalized as the failure to match the target without being distracted by distracter features. Picture-plane inversion was used to disrupt IFP while preserving input properties. We found that FFA activation was comparably strong, irrespective of whether similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts(i.e., inducing robust IFP) or dissimilar target features were embedded in the same context (i.e., engaging local processing). Second, inversion decreased FFA activation to faces most robustly when similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts, indicating that FFA engages into IFP mainly when features cannot be disambiguated at a local level. Third, by means of Spearman rank correlation tests, we show that the local processing of feature differences in the FFA is supported to a large extent by the Occipital Face Area, the Lateral Occipital Complex, and early visual cortex, suggesting that these regions encode the local aspects of face information. The present findings confirm the co-existence of holistic and featural representations in the FFA. Furthermore, they establish FFA as the main contributor to the featural/holistic representational mode switches determined by local discriminability. PMID:23316180

  15. Processing deficits for familiar and novel faces in patients with left posterior fusiform lesions

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel J.; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Kim, Esther; Tainturier, Marie-Josephe; Beeson, Pelagie M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Woollams, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Pure alexia (PA) arises from damage to the left posterior fusiform gyrus (pFG) and the striking reading disorder that defines this condition has meant that such patients are often cited as evidence for the specialisation of this region to processing of written words. There is, however, an alternative view that suggests this region is devoted to processing of high acuity foveal input, which is particularly salient for complex visual stimuli like letter strings. Previous reports have highlighted disrupted processing of non-linguistic visual stimuli after damage to the left pFG, both for familiar and unfamiliar objects and also for novel faces. This study explored the nature of face processing deficits in patients with left pFG damage. Identification of famous faces was found to be compromised in both expressive and receptive tasks. Discrimination of novel faces was also impaired, particularly for those that varied in terms of second-order spacing information, and this deficit was most apparent for the patients with the more severe reading deficits. Interestingly, discrimination of faces that varied in terms of feature identity was considerably better in these patients and it was performance in this condition that was related to the size of the length effects shown in reading. This finding complements functional imaging studies showing left pFG activation for faces varying only in spacing and frontal activation for faces varying only on features. These results suggest that the sequential part-based processing strategy that promotes the length effect in the reading of these patients also allows them to discriminate between faces on the basis of feature identity, but processing of second-order configural information is most compromised due to their left pFG lesion. This study supports a view in which the left pFG is specialised for processing of high acuity foveal visual information that supports processing of both words and faces. PMID:25837867

  16. Horizontal tuning for faces originates in high-level Fusiform Face Area.

    PubMed

    Goffaux, Valerie; Duecker, Felix; Hausfeld, Lars; Schiltz, Christine; Goebel, Rainer

    2016-01-29

    Recent work indicates that the specialization of face visual perception relies on the privileged processing of horizontal angles of facial information. This suggests that stimulus properties assumed to be fully resolved in primary visual cortex (V1; e.g., orientation) in fact determine human vision until high-level stages of processing. To address this hypothesis, the present fMRI study explored the orientation sensitivity of V1 and high-level face-specialized ventral regions such as the Occipital Face Area (OFA) and Fusiform Face Area (FFA) to different angles of face information. Participants viewed face images filtered to retain information at horizontal, vertical or oblique angles. Filtered images were viewed upright, inverted and (phase-)scrambled. FFA responded most strongly to the horizontal range of upright face information; its activation pattern reliably separated horizontal from oblique ranges, but only when faces were upright. Moreover, activation patterns induced in the right FFA and the OFA by upright and inverted faces could only be separated based on horizontal information. This indicates that the specialized processing of upright face information in the OFA and FFA essentially relies on the encoding of horizontal facial cues. This pattern was not passively inherited from V1, which was found to respond less strongly to horizontal than other orientations likely due to adaptive whitening. Moreover, we found that orientation decoding accuracy in V1 was impaired for stimuli containing no meaningful shape. By showing that primary coding in V1 is influenced by high-order stimulus structure and that high-level processing is tuned to selective ranges of primary information, the present work suggests that primary and high-level levels of the visual system interact in order to modulate the processing of certain ranges of primary information depending on their relevance with respect to the stimulus and task at hand.

  17. Effect of Hijikia fusiforme extracts on degenerative osteoarthritis in vitro and in vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Han Ol; Lee, Minhee; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Ha, Yejin; Jun, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The inhibitory effect of Hijikia fusiforme (HF) extracts on degenerative osteoarthritis was examined in primary cultured rat cartilage cells and a monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis rat model. MATERIALS/METHODS In vitro, cell survival and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was measured after H2O2 (800 µM, 2 hr) treatment in primary chondrocytes. In vivo animal study, osteoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of MIA into knee joints of rats, and then RH500, HFE250 and HFE500 were administered orally once a day for 28 days. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of HFE, nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expression were measured. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of MMPs, collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan, and TIMPs. RESULTS In the in vitro assay, cell survival after H2O2 treatment was increased by HFE extract (20% EtOH). In addition, anabolic factors (genetic expression of collagen type I, II, and aggrecan) were increased by HFE extract (20% EtOH). However, the genetic expression of MMP-3 and 7, known as catabolic factors were significantly inhibited by treatment with HFE extract (20% EtOH). In the in vivo assay, anabolic factors (genetic expression of collagen type I, II, aggrecan, and TIMPs) were increased by oral administration of HFE extract. However, the genetic expression of MMP-3 and 7, known as catabolic factors, and production of NO and PGE2 were significantly inhibited by treatment with oral administration of HFE extract. CONCLUSIONS HFE extract inhibited articular cartilage degeneration through preventing extracellular matrix degradation and chondrocyte injury. PMID:27247722

  18. Mechanics of Multifault Earthquake Ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Oskin, M. E.; Teran, O.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.2 produced the most complex rupture ever documented on the Pacific-North American plate margin, and the network of high- and low-angle faults activated in the event record systematic changes in kinematics with fault orientation. Individual faults have a broad and continuous spectrum of slip sense ranging from endmember dextral strike slip to normal slip, and even faults with thrust sense of dip slip were commonly observed in the aftershock sequence. Patterns of coseismic slip are consistent with three-dimensional constrictional strain and show that integrated transtensional shearing can be accommodated in a single earthquake. Stress inversions of coseismic surface rupture and aftershock focal mechanisms define two coaxial, but permuted stress states. The maximum (σ1) and intermediate (σ2) principal stresses are close in magnitude, but flip orientations due to topography- and density-controlled gradients in lithostatic load along the length of the rupture. Although most large earthquakes throughout the world activate slip on multiple faults, the mechanical conditions of their genesis remain poorly understood. Our work attempts to answer several key questions. 1) Why do complex fault systems exist? They must do something that simple, optimally-oriented fault systems cannot because the two types of faults are commonly located in close proximity. 2) How are faults with diverse orientations and slip senses prepared throughout the interseismic period to fail spontaneously together in a single earthquake? 3) Can a single stress state produce multi-fault failure? 4) Are variations in pore pressure, friction and cohesion required to produce simultaneous rupture? 5) How is the fabric of surface rupture affected by variations in orientation, kinematics, total geologic slip and fault zone architecture?

  19. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  20. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  1. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  2. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  3. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  4. Compression of the medulla oblongata and acute respiratory failure caused by rupture of a thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanahashi, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with an extremely rare case of a ruptured thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in which a local hematoma compressed the medulla oblongata and caused acute respiratory failure. She first presented with dizziness, general fatigue, and nausea 2 months before admission. She was hospitalized for intense general fatigue, nausea, and occipitalgia. Computed tomography and T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous lesion around the right cerebello-medullary cistern. Angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the right AICA. Asphyxia occurred 4 days after admission and the patient underwent an emergency operation. No subarachnoid hematoma was present, but a hematoma around the ruptured portion markedly compressed the medulla oblongata. The medulla oblongata was adequately decompressed after subtotal removal of the aneurysm. The patient's respiratory status and consciousness level recovered after the operation.

  5. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  6. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  7. Hidden diversity and phylogeographic history provide conservation insights for the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme in the Northwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zi-Min; Li, Jing-Jing; Sun, Zhong-Min; Gao, Xu; Yao, Jian-Ting; Choi, Han-Gil; Endo, Hikaru; Duan, De-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the evolutionary processes that have created diversity and the genetic potential of species to adapt to environmental change is an important premise for biodiversity conservation. Herein, we used mitochondrial trnW-L and cox3 and plastid rbcL-S data sets to analyze population genetic variation and phylogeographic history of the brown alga Sargassum fusiforme, whose natural resource has been largely exterminated in the Asia-Northwest Pacific in the past decades. Phylogenetic trees and network analysis consistently revealed three major haplotype groups (A, B, and C) in S. fusiforme, with A and B distributed in the Japan-Pacific coast. Group C consisted of three subgroups (C1, C2, and C3) which were distributed in the Sea of Japan, the Yellow-Bohai Sea, and East China Sea, respectively. Isolation-with-migration (IM a) analysis revealed that the three groups diverged approximately during the mid-Pleistocene (c. 756-1,224 ka). Extended Bayesian skyline plots (EBSP) showed that groups A and B underwent relatively long-term stable population size despite a subsequent rapid demographic expansion, while subgroups C2 and C3 underwent a sudden expansion at c. 260 ka. FST and AMOVA detected low population-level genetic variation and high degrees of divergence between groups. The cryptic diversity and phylogeographic patterns found in S. fusiforme not only are essential to understand how environmental shifts and evolutionary processes shaped diversity and distribution of coastal seaweeds but also provide additional insights for conserving and managing seaweed resources and facilitate predictions of their responses to future climate change and habitat loss.

  8. Ground motion hazard from supershear rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    An idealized rupture, propagating smoothly near a terminal rupture velocity, radiates energy that is focused into a beam. For rupture velocity less than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in a beam of intense fault-normal velocity near the projection of the rupture trace. Although confined to a narrow range of azimuths, this beam diverges and attenuates. For rupture velocity greater than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in Mach waves forming a pair of beams propagating obliquely away from the fault. These beams do not attenuate until diffraction becomes effective at large distance. Events with supershear and sub-Rayleigh rupture velocity are compared in 2D plane-strain calculations with equal stress drop, fracture energy, and rupture length; only static friction is changed to determine the rupture velocity. Peak velocity in the sub-Rayleigh case near the termination of rupture is larger than peak velocity in the Mach wave in the supershear case. The occurrence of supershear rupture propagation reduces the most intense peak ground velocity near the fault, but it increases peak velocity within a beam at greater distances. ?? 2010.

  9. Bioassay-guided extraction of crude fucose-containing sulphated polysaccharides from Sargassum fusiforme with response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhifei; Li, Haihua; Liu, Hongbing; Hu, Shuman; Li, Yueying; Wang, Mengxue; Guan, Huashi

    2016-06-01

    The response surface methodology (RSM) combined with bioassays was employed to optimize the extraction process of crude fucose-containing sulphated polysaccharides (cFCSP) from Sargassum fusiforme. The central composite design (CCD) was used with four variables, five levels, and four responses. The four variables were pH value of hydrochloric acid solution, extraction temperature (°C), ratio of liquid to raw material (mL g-1), and extraction time (h), respectively. Chemical and bioassay indices were used in combination as the response parameters, which included the yield of cFCSP, fucose content, proliferation rate of spleen cells, and lipopolysaccharide-induced proliferation of splenocytes. The experimental data were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis, and examined using the appropriate statistical methods. The best extraction conditions were as follows: the pH value of hydrochloric acid solution was 3.50; the extraction temperature was 100°C; the ratio of liquid to raw material was 15.00 mL g-1 and the extraction time was 2.50 h. The experimental yield was close to the predicted from the model. The extract could promote spleen lymphocyte proliferation, especially the lipopolysaccharide-induced lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, which suggested that its immunomodulatory effect on B lymphocytes. Therefore, cFCSP extracted from S. fusiforme could be utilized as an immunostimulant in functional foods and pharmaceutical industry in future.

  10. The fusiform face area: a cortical region specialized for the perception of faces

    PubMed Central

    Kanwisher, Nancy; Yovel, Galit

    2006-01-01

    Faces are among the most important visual stimuli we perceive, informing us not only about a person's identity, but also about their mood, sex, age and direction of gaze. The ability to extract this information within a fraction of a second of viewing a face is important for normal social interactions and has probably played a critical role in the survival of our primate ancestors. Considerable evidence from behavioural, neuropsychological and neurophysiological investigations supports the hypothesis that humans have specialized cognitive and neural mechanisms dedicated to the perception of faces (the face-specificity hypothesis). Here, we review the literature on a region of the human brain that appears to play a key role in face perception, known as the fusiform face area (FFA). Section 1 outlines the theoretical background for much of this work. The face-specificity hypothesis falls squarely on one side of a longstanding debate in the fields of cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience concerning the extent to which the mind/brain is composed of: (i) special-purpose (‘domain-specific’) mechanisms, each dedicated to processing a specific kind of information (e.g. faces, according to the face-specificity hypothesis), versus (ii) general-purpose (‘domain-general’) mechanisms, each capable of operating on any kind of information. Face perception has long served both as one of the prime candidates of a domain-specific process and as a key target for attack by proponents of domain-general theories of brain and mind. Section 2 briefly reviews the prior literature on face perception from behaviour and neurophysiology. This work supports the face-specificity hypothesis and argues against its domain-general alternatives (the individuation hypothesis, the expertise hypothesis and others). Section 3 outlines the more recent evidence on this debate from brain imaging, focusing particularly on the FFA. We review the evidence that the FFA is selectively engaged in

  11. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  12. Ruptured jejunum following Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Razaboni, R M; Brathwaite, C E; Dwyer, W A

    1986-01-01

    The Heimlich maneuver, over time, has proved to be a useful resuscitative procedure in the management of cases with airway occlusion secondary to foreign body. Medical treatments, however, can have side effects, and this maneuver is no exception. A previously unreported complication is presented, that of jejunal rupture. The proper application of the maneuver minimizes the number of side effects; however, since they do occur, it is suggested that all persons subject to this maneuver be subsequently evaluated by a physician as soon after the incident as is practicable.

  13. Real-time Monitoring of the Lateral Spread Response Resulting from Serial Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Caused by a Fusiform Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Seok Keun; Kim, Johnho

    2015-07-01

    Fusiform aneurysm as a cause of hemifacial spasm (HFS) is an extremely rare condition. A 69-year-old man developed paroxysmal spasm of his left side facial muscles over a period of 5 years. Radiologic images demonstrated a left vertebral artery (VA) fusiform aneurysm compressing the root entry zone of the left facial nerve. The patient underwent serial surgical procedures for the treatment of HFS under intraoperative electromyography monitoring. Lateral spread response (LSR) did not disappear despite 5 minutes of extracranial left VA ligation and remained after cerebrospinal fluid drainage after dura opening. After interposition of the VA through Teflon felt insertion, the LSR finally disappeared. The patient became symptom free immediately after the surgery and continued as such throughout a follow-up period of 1 year. This is the first report involving real-time monitoring of the LSR changes resulting from serial procedures of decompression in an HFS caused by a fusiform aneurysm of the VA.

  14. Acute Pectoralis Major Rupture Captured on Video

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    Pectoralis major (PM) ruptures are uncommon injuries, although they are becoming more frequent. We report a case of a PM rupture in a young male who presented with axillar pain and absence of the anterior axillary fold after he perceived a snap while lifting 200 kg in the bench press. Diagnosis of PM rupture was suspected clinically and confirmed with imaging studies. The patient was treated surgically, reinserting the tendon to the humerus with suture anchors. One-year follow-up showed excellent results. The patient was recording his training on video, so we can observe in detail the most common mechanism of injury of PM rupture. PMID:27595030

  15. Effects of Dietary Fermented Seaweed and Seaweed Fusiforme on Growth Performance, Carcass Parameters and Immunoglobulin Concentration in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. J.; Lee, S. R.; Oh, J-W.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product and seaweed fusiforme (Hizikia fusiformis) by-product supplementation on growth performance and blood profiles including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) in broilers. Fermentation of seaweeds was conducted by Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae. In a 5-wk feeding trial, 750 one-d-old broiler chicks were divided into 5 groups, and were assigned to the control diet or experimental diets including control+0.5% brown seaweed (BS) by-product, control+0.5% seaweed fusiforme (SF) by-product, control+0.5% fermented brown seaweed (FBS) by-product, and control+0.5% fermented seaweed fusiforme (FSF) by-product. As a consequence, body weight gain (BWG) and gain:feed of seaweed by-product groups were clearly higher, when compared to those of control diet group from d 18 to 35 and the entire experimental period (p<0.05). In mortality rate, seaweed by-product groups were significantly lower when compared to control diet group during entire experimental period (p<0.05). However, Feed Intake of experimental diets group was not different from that of the control group during the entire experimental period. Whereas, Feed Intake of fermented seaweed by-product groups was lower than that of non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). Total organ weights, lipids, and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) of all treatment groups were not different from those of control group. However, glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) of all treatment groups was higher than that of control group at d 17 (p<0.05). In case of serum Igs concentration, the concentration of IgA antibody in BS, SF, FSF treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group at d 35 (p<0.01). IgA concentration in FBS supplementation groups was negligibly decreased when compared to the control group. IgM concentration in the serums of all treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group (p<0.05) and in

  16. Spontaneous diaphragm rupture associated with vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Burt, Bryan M; Ali, Syed Osman; Cohen, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery is a rare occurrence, but has high rates of morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a first uncomplicated case of spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery, which was treated successfully with surgery via a thoracotomy.

  17. Uterine rupture. A seat belt hazard.

    PubMed

    van Enk, A; van Zwam, W

    1994-05-01

    A case is described of a uterine rupture resulting from a car accident occurring in a woman who was wearing a seat belt as generally recommended. The rupture was initially not recognised and only became apparent after attempts to induce labor which led to expulsion of the fetus into the abdominal cavity.

  18. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  19. Urgent arterial embolization of ruptured renal angiomyolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    The most undesired complication of renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is bleeding. Because of tumor rupture, the bleeding can spread to the retroperitoneal field and can be severe enough to be life threatening. We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage caused by a ruptured AML that was successfully treated with transarterial embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate. PMID:28352700

  20. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  1. Combined surgical and endovascular management of a giant fusiform PCA aneurysm in a pediatric patient. A case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, S H; Choi, I S; Thomas, K; David, C A

    2013-06-01

    Treatment of intracranial giant aneurysms presents is challenging. In the case of pediatric giant aneurysm, more challenges arise. We describe our experience with a 17-year-old pediatric patient who presented with severe headache. She was diagnosed as having a giant fusiform aneurysm at the right P1-P2-Pcom junction. The aneurysm was treated with superficial temporal artery-posterior cerebral artery bypass and subsequent coil embolization of the aneurysm with parent artery occlusion. The patient had an excellent outcome at one-year follow-up. Our case suggests a combined approach of surgical and endovascular management may yield a better outcome than surgery or endovascular management alone in the treatment of pediatric giant aneurysm.

  2. Receptor architecture of visual areas in the face and word-form recognition region of the posterior fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Caspers, Julian; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Caspers, Svenja; Schleicher, Axel; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Recently, two extrastriate visual areas on the posterior fusiform gyrus, areas FG1 and FG2, were identified based on cytoarchitectonical criteria (Caspers et al. in Brain Struct Funct 218:511-526, 2013a). They are located within the object-related ventral visual stream at the transition between early and higher-order (category-specific) visual areas. FG2 has a topographical position which is best comparable to the face or visual word-form recognition area. However, the precise function of FG2 is presently unknown. Since transmitter receptors are key molecules of neurotransmission, we analysed the regional and laminar distribution of 15 different receptor binding sites by means of quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Significant differences between receptor densities of both areas were found for NMDA, GABAB, M3, nicotinic α4/β2 and 5-HT1A receptors as well as for GABAA associated benzodiazepine binding sites. These results support the cytoarchitectonic segregation of FG1 and FG2 into two distinct cortical areas. In addition, principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses of the multireceptor data of both fusiform areas and 24 visual, auditory, somatosensory and multimodal association areas not only revealed the typical receptor architectonic characteristics of visual areas for FG1 and FG2, but also suggest their putative function as object recognition regions due to the similarity of their receptor fingerprints with those of areas of the ventral visual stream. Furthermore, FG1 and FG2 build a cluster with the multimodal association areas of the inferior parietal lobule. This underlines their hierarchically high position in the visual system of the human cerebral cortex.

  3. Fusiform Gyrus Dysfunction is Associated with Perceptual Processing Efficiency to Emotional Faces in Adolescent Depression: A Model-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Zhang, Shunan; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Weng, Helen; Connolly, Colm G.; Henje Blom, Eva; Han, Laura K. M.; Mobayed, Nisreen O.; Yang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    While the extant literature has focused on major depressive disorder (MDD) as being characterized by abnormalities in processing affective stimuli (e.g., facial expressions), little is known regarding which specific aspects of cognition influence the evaluation of affective stimuli, and what are the underlying neural correlates. To investigate these issues, we assessed 26 adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 37 well-matched healthy controls (HCL) who completed an emotion identification task of dynamically morphing faces during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We analyzed the behavioral data using a sequential sampling model of response time (RT) commonly used to elucidate aspects of cognition in binary perceptual decision making tasks: the Linear Ballistic Accumulator (LBA) model. Using a hierarchical Bayesian estimation method, we obtained group-level and individual-level estimates of LBA parameters on the facial emotion identification task. While the MDD and HCL groups did not differ in mean RT, accuracy, or group-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency (i.e., drift rate parameter of the LBA), the MDD group showed significantly reduced responses in left fusiform gyrus compared to the HCL group during the facial emotion identification task. Furthermore, within the MDD group, fMRI signal in the left fusiform gyrus during affective face processing was significantly associated with greater individual-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency. Our results therefore suggest that affective processing biases in adolescents with MDD are characterized by greater perceptual processing efficiency of affective visual information in sensory brain regions responsible for the early processing of visual information. The theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications of our results are discussed. PMID:26869950

  4. High-resolution imaging of expertise reveals reliable object selectivity in the fusiform face area related to perceptual performance.

    PubMed

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Gatenby, J Christopher; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-10-16

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is a region of human cortex that responds selectively to faces, but whether it supports a more general function relevant for perceptual expertise is debated. Although both faces and objects of expertise engage many brain areas, the FFA remains the focus of the strongest modular claims and the clearest predictions about expertise. Functional MRI studies at standard-resolution (SR-fMRI) have found responses in the FFA for nonface objects of expertise, but high-resolution fMRI (HR-fMRI) in the FFA [Grill-Spector K, et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:1177-1185] and neurophysiology in face patches in the monkey brain [Tsao DY, et al. (2006) Science 311:670-674] reveal no reliable selectivity for objects. It is thus possible that FFA responses to objects with SR-fMRI are a result of spatial blurring of responses from nonface-selective areas, potentially driven by attention to objects of expertise. Using HR-fMRI in two experiments, we provide evidence of reliable responses to cars in the FFA that correlate with behavioral car expertise. Effects of expertise in the FFA for nonface objects cannot be attributed to spatial blurring beyond the scale at which modular claims have been made, and within the lateral fusiform gyrus, they are restricted to a small area (200 mm(2) on the right and 50 mm(2) on the left) centered on the peak of face selectivity. Experience with a category may be sufficient to explain the spatially clustered face selectivity observed in this region.

  5. High-resolution imaging of expertise reveals reliable object selectivity in the fusiform face area related to perceptual performance

    PubMed Central

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is a region of human cortex that responds selectively to faces, but whether it supports a more general function relevant for perceptual expertise is debated. Although both faces and objects of expertise engage many brain areas, the FFA remains the focus of the strongest modular claims and the clearest predictions about expertise. Functional MRI studies at standard-resolution (SR-fMRI) have found responses in the FFA for nonface objects of expertise, but high-resolution fMRI (HR-fMRI) in the FFA [Grill-Spector K, et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:1177–1185] and neurophysiology in face patches in the monkey brain [Tsao DY, et al. (2006) Science 311:670–674] reveal no reliable selectivity for objects. It is thus possible that FFA responses to objects with SR-fMRI are a result of spatial blurring of responses from nonface-selective areas, potentially driven by attention to objects of expertise. Using HR-fMRI in two experiments, we provide evidence of reliable responses to cars in the FFA that correlate with behavioral car expertise. Effects of expertise in the FFA for nonface objects cannot be attributed to spatial blurring beyond the scale at which modular claims have been made, and within the lateral fusiform gyrus, they are restricted to a small area (200 mm2 on the right and 50 mm2 on the left) centered on the peak of face selectivity. Experience with a category may be sufficient to explain the spatially clustered face selectivity observed in this region. PMID:23027970

  6. Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Rossion, Bruno; Brissart, Hélène; Frismand, Solène; Jacques, Corentin; Hossu, Gabriela; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Vespignani, Hervé; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Maillard, Louis

    2015-11-01

    According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general.

  7. Analysis of saccular aneurysms in the Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, Robert F; Zabramski, Joseph M; McDougall, Cameron G; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Hills, Nancy K; Wallace, Robert C; Nakaji, Peter

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE The Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) is a prospective, randomized trial in which treatment with clipping was compared to treatment with coil embolization. Patients were randomized to treatment on presentation with any nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Because all other randomized trials comparing these 2 types of treatments have been limited to saccular aneurysms, the authors analyzed the current BRAT data for this subgroup of lesions. METHODS The primary BRAT analysis included all sources of SAH: nonaneurysmal lesions; saccular, blister, fusiform, and dissecting aneurysms; and SAHs from an aneurysm associated with either an arteriovenous malformation or a fistula. In this post hoc review, the outcomes for the subgroup of patients with saccular aneurysms were further analyzed by type of treatment. The extent of aneurysm obliteration was adjudicated by an independent neuroradiologist not involved in treatment. RESULTS Of the 471 patients enrolled in the BRAT, 362 (77%) had an SAH from a saccular aneurysm. Patients with saccular aneurysms were assigned equally to the clipping and the coiling cohorts (181 each). In each cohort, 3 patients died before treatment and 178 were treated. Of the 178 clip-assigned patients with saccular aneurysms, 1 (1%) was crossed over to coiling, and 64 (36%) of the 178 coil-assigned patients were crossed over to clipping. There was no statistically significant difference in poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale score > 2) between these 2 treatment arms at any recorded time point during 6 years of follow-up. After the initial hospitalization, 1 of 241 (0.4%) clipped saccular aneurysms and 21 of 115 (18%) coiled saccular aneurysms required retreatment (p < 0.001). At the 6-year follow-up, 95% (95/100) of the clipped aneurysms were completely obliterated, compared with 40% (16/40) of the coiled aneurysms (p < 0.001). There was no difference in morbidity between the 2 treatment groups (p = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS In the

  8. Intersonic shear cracks and fault ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosakis, Ares J.

    2002-06-01

    Recent experimental observations of intersonic shear rupture events that occur in a variety of material systems have rekindled interest in the intersonic failure phenomenon. Since the early 1990s, engineers and scientists working in all length scales, from the atomistic, the structural, all the way up to the scale of the earth's deformation processes, have undertaken joint efforts to study this unexplored area of fracture mechanics. The analysis in the present article emphasizes the cooperative and complementary manner in which experimental observations and analytical and numerical developments have proceeded. The article first reviews early contributions to the theoretical literature of dynamic subsonic and intersonic fracture and highlights the significant differences between tensile and shear cracks. The article then uses direct laboratory observations as a framework for discussing the physics of intersonic shear rupture occurring in constitutively homogeneous (isotropic and anisotropic) as well as in inhomogeneous systems, all containing preferable crack paths or faults. Experiments, models, and field evidence at a variety of length scales (from the atomistic, the continuum, and up to the scale of geological ruptures) are used to discuss processes such as (1) shock wave formation, (2) large-scale frictional contact and sliding at the rupture faces, and (3) maximum attainable rupture speeds and rupture speed stability. Particular emphasis is given to geophysical field evidence and to the exploration of the possibility of intersonic fault rupture during shallow crustal earthquake events.

  9. Extraneural rupture of intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Kameron R; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of simple (extraneural) cysts such as popliteal cysts (Baker's cysts) is a well-known occurrence. The purpose of this report is to introduce the similar occurrence of extraneural rupture of peroneal and tibial intraneural cysts in the knee region, describe the associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and identify risk factors. There was MRI evidence of rupture in 20 of 38 intraneural cases reviewed, mainly in the region of the fibular head and popliteal fossa. Ruptured intraneural cysts and simple cysts share these MRI findings: T2 hyperintense fluid within surrounding intermuscular fascial planes and enhancement with intravenous contrast consistent with inflammation. The mean maximal diameter of the ruptured intraneural cysts was statistically significantly smaller than that of the unruptured cysts. The authors believe that extraneural rupture of an intraneural cyst is due to increased intraarticular pressures transmitted within the cyst and/or elevated extrinsic pressure delivered to the cyst, such as by trauma, akin to the etiology of rupture of extraneural ganglion cysts.

  10. Metrics for comparing dynamic earthquake rupture simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes are complex events that involve a myriad of interactions among multiple geologic features and processes. One of the tools that is available to assist with their study is computer simulation, particularly dynamic rupture simulation. A dynamic rupture simulation is a numerical model of the physical processes that occur during an earthquake. Starting with the fault geometry, friction constitutive law, initial stress conditions, and assumptions about the condition and response of the near‐fault rocks, a dynamic earthquake rupture simulation calculates the evolution of fault slip and stress over time as part of the elastodynamic numerical solution (Ⓔ see the simulation description in the electronic supplement to this article). The complexity of the computations in a dynamic rupture simulation make it challenging to verify that the computer code is operating as intended, because there are no exact analytic solutions against which these codes’ results can be directly compared. One approach for checking if dynamic rupture computer codes are working satisfactorily is to compare each code’s results with the results of other dynamic rupture codes running the same earthquake simulation benchmark. To perform such a comparison consistently, it is necessary to have quantitative metrics. In this paper, we present a new method for quantitatively comparing the results of dynamic earthquake rupture computer simulation codes.

  11. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  12. Ruptured urinary bladder in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J; Ward, D S

    1985-06-15

    A yearling Holstein heifer was admitted with abdominal pain and bilateral, ventral abdominal distention. Bladder rupture was diagnosed by abdominocentesis and endoscopy. Correction of metabolic derangements was accomplished by volume diuresis, with maintenance of a urethral catheter before surgical repair of the bladder. The cause of the bladder rupture was believed to be related to adhesions resulting from previous surgery for urachal abscessation. Bladder rupture, which usually occurs in bulls or steers secondary to urolithiasis or in cows after dystocia, also should be considered in prepartum heifers with dehydration, abdominal pain, and abdominal distention.

  13. Plantar fascia rupture: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rolf, C; Guntner, P; Ericsäter, J; Turan, I

    1997-01-01

    Two patients with spontaneous medial plantar fascia rupture due to a definite injury with no prior symptoms, were referred to our institution. Clinically, there was a tender lump in the sole, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis. Nonoperative treatment was sufficient in curing the acute total rupture. Endoscopic release was used on the partially ruptured plantar fascia, but it is probably more optimal in the acute phase. The literature provides no comparative data on operative or nonoperative treatment efficacy for this rare condition.

  14. History of surgery for ruptured disk.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, R V; Hadley, M N

    2001-01-01

    The history of surgery for ruptured disk of the human spine began approximately a century ago. Advances in the understanding of symptoms and signs of root or cord compression, their relationship to the pathology, and the refinement in imaging techniques have contributed to the present surgical management of rupture disk disease. Historical findings relevant to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions of the spine, with relevant pathophysiology, imaging, and surgical treatment, including the evolution of various surgical approaches are discussed. Surgeons and other contributors in the medical field are cited for their respective contributions to the evolution of the present operative approaches for disk ruptures in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal regions.

  15. Gastric rupture after the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Bintz, M; Cogbill, T H

    1996-01-01

    Since 1975, the Heimlich maneuver has been widely applied to relieve upper airway obstruction caused by aspirated material. Life-threatening complications have been documented following this simple procedure. We report two cases of gastric rupture after use of the Heimlich maneuver. Both patients experienced pulmonary and abdominal symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed in each case by the demonstration of free intraperitoneal air on an upright chest roentgenogram. Full-thickness gastric rupture along the lesser curvature of the stomach was repaired in both patients; one patient died. Abdominal pain or persistent abdominal distention despite nasogastric suction after the Heimlich maneuver should prompt evaluation for possible gastric rupture.

  16. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  17. Plantaris rupture: why is it important?

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Yadav, Rohtas

    2013-01-22

    Plantaris muscle is accessory plantar flexor of calf, a vestigial muscle of triceps surae complex. Its importance lies in the fact that its rupture cans mimic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Sometimes when there is rupture of Achilles tendon, intact plantaris can still cause plantar flexion at ankle presenting a confusing picture. We present one such case of plantaris rupture confused by radiology resident with DVT. A 51-year-old man had a feeling as if kicked in back of calf along with a snapping sound and severe pain while playing tennis. On seeing fluid between muscle plane and a hypoechoic structure radiology resident labelled it DVT. MRI suggested ruptured plantaris as fluid and muscle stump were seen between gastronemius and soleus. Patient was treated conservatively with rest, ice compression and elevated leg and showed significant reduction in pain and swelling.

  18. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  19. Cognitive frames in psychology: demarcations and ruptures.

    PubMed

    Yurevich, Andrey V

    2009-06-01

    As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental "ruptures" are identified: the "horizontal" rupture between various schools and trends, the "vertical" rupture between natural science and humanitarian psychology, and the "diagonal" rupture between academic research and applied practice of psychology. These manifestations of the crisis of psychology have recently been compounded by the crisis of its rationalistic foundations. This situation is described in terms of the cognitive systems in psychology which include meta-theories, paradigms, sociodigms and metadigms.

  20. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-06

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach.

  1. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T. Christian

    2015-01-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  2. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  3. A case of traumatic pericardiophrenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Stefani, A; Brandi, L; Ruggiero, C; Lodi, R

    1998-12-01

    An unusual case of traumatic pericardiophrenic rupture is presented. The defect was limited to the central tendon of the diaphragm, with herniation of the stomach into the pericardial sac. A correct preoperative diagnosis was not made because laparotomy was quickly performed for splenic rupture. Successful operative repair of the tear was performed, with interrupted reabsorbable sutures. The case is discussed and the management of patients with these rare lesions is reviewed.

  4. Peridynamic Modeling of Ruptures in Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jesorka, Aldo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the formation of spontaneous ruptures in supported phospholipid double bilayer membranes, using peridynamic modeling. Experiments performed on spreading double bilayers typically show two distinct kinds of ruptures, floral and fractal, which form spontaneously in the distal (upper) bilayer at late stages of double bilayer formation on high energy substrates. It is, however, currently unresolved which factors govern the occurrence of either rupture type. Variations in the distance between the two bilayers, and the occurrence of interconnections (“pinning sites”) are suspected of contributing to the process. Our new simulations indicate that the pinned regions which form, presumably due to Ca2+ ions serving as bridging agent between the distal and the proximal bilayer, act as nucleation sites for the ruptures. Moreover, assuming that the pinning sites cause a non-zero shear modulus, our simulations also show that they change the rupture mode from floral to fractal. At zero shear modulus the pores appear to be circular, subsequently evolving into floral pores. With increasing shear modulus the pore edges start to branch, favoring fractal morphologies. We conclude that the pinning sites may indirectly determine the rupture morphology by contributing to shear stress in the distal membrane. PMID:27829001

  5. 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphism and neuroticism are linked by resting state functional connectivity of amygdala and fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, J D; Walter, M; Varikuti, D; Jensen, J; Plichta, M M; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Schott, B; Wold, A; Mühleisen, T W; Heinz, A; Erk, S; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Witt, S H; Nöthen, M M; Rietschel, M; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Walter, H

    2015-07-01

    The s/s-genotype of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and the personality trait of neuroticism have both been associated with experiences of negative affect, anxiety and mood disorders, as well as an emotional processing bias towards negative facial emotions. On a neural level, this bias can be characterized by altered amygdala and fusiform gyrus (FFG) activity during perception of negative facial expressions. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a multi-center-sample of 178 healthy subjects of European descent, this study investigated the association of 5-HTTLPR (short s- and long l-allele) including the genotype of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs25531 (A/G) within this region polymorphism, and trait neuroticism on resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) between amygdala and the FFG. Moreover, we aimed to identify additional brain regions with associations of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 (combined according to its expression; low: s/s; high: l(A)/l(A); intermediate: s/l(A), s/l(G), l(G)/l(G), l(A)/l(G)) and trait neuroticism to amygdala rs-FC. Separate analyses for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and neuroticism (controlling for age, gender, handedness, and research site) revealed that s/s-homozygotes and individuals high in neuroticism obtained altered amygdala rs-FC in the right occipital face area, which is considered to be a "core component" of the face processing system. Importantly, effects of neuroticism were replicated across three independent research sites. Additionally, associations of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotype and amygdala rs-FC were observed in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, whereas neuroticism was not related to rs-FC in these areas. The presented data implies that 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 variants and neuroticism are linked by resting state functional connectivity of amygdala and fusiform gyrus and suggests that variants of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotype and different levels of neuroticism may partly account for altered processing of

  6. Regulation of brain activity in the fusiform face and parahippocampal place areas in 7-11-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Vuontela, Virve; Jiang, Ping; Tokariev, Maksym; Savolainen, Petri; Ma, Yuanye; Aronen, Eeva T; Fontell, Tuija; Liiri, Tiina; Ahlström, Matti; Salonen, Oili; Carlson, Synnöve

    2013-03-01

    Developmental studies have demonstrated that cognitive processes such as attention, suppression of interference and memory develop throughout childhood and adolescence. However, little is currently known about the development of top-down control mechanisms and their influence on cognitive performance. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate modulation of activity in the ventral visual cortex in healthy 7-11-year-old children and young adults. The participants performed tasks that required attention to either face (Fs task) or scene (Sf task) images while trying to ignore distracting scene or face images, respectively. A face-selective area in the fusiform gyrus (fusiform face area, FFA) and an area responding preferentially to scene images in the parahippocampal gyrus (parahippocampal place area, PPA) were defined using functional localizers. Children responded slower and less accurately in the tasks than adults. In children, the right FFA was less selective to face images and regulation of activity between the Fs and Sf tasks was weaker compared to adults. In the PPA, selectivity to scenes and regulation of activity, there according to the task demands were comparable between children and adults. During the tasks, children activated prefrontal cortical areas including the middle (MFG) and superior (SFG) frontal gyrus more than adults. Functional connectivity between the right FFA and left MFG was stronger in adults than children in the Fs task. Children, on the other hand, had stronger functional connectivity than adults in the Sf task between the right FFA and right PPA and between right MFG and medial SFG. There were no group differences in the functional connectivity between the PPA and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Together the results suggest that, in 7-11-year-old children, the FFA is still immature, whereas the selectivity to scenes and regulation of activity in the PPA is comparable to adults. The results also

  7. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD. PMID:27242479

  8. A Model of Emergent Category-specific Activation in the Posterior Fusiform Gyrus of Sighted and Congenitally Blind Populations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lang; Rogers, Timothy T

    2015-10-01

    Theories about the neural bases of semantic knowledge tend between two poles, one proposing that distinct brain regions are innately dedicated to different conceptual domains and the other suggesting that all concepts are encoded within a single network. Category-sensitive functional activations in the fusiform cortex of the congenitally blind have been taken to support the former view but also raise several puzzles. We use neural network models to assess a hypothesis that spans the two poles: The interesting functional activation patterns reflect the base connectivity of a domain-general semantic network. Both similarities and differences between sighted and congenitally blind groups can emerge through learning in a neural network, but only in architectures adopting real anatomical constraints. Surprisingly, the same constraints suggest a novel account of a quite different phenomenon: the dyspraxia observed in patients with semantic impairments from anterior temporal pathology. From this work, we suggest that the cortical semantic network is wired not to encode knowledge of distinct conceptual domains but to promote learning about both conceptual and affordance structure in the environment.

  9. Neuromagnetic evidence that the right fusiform face area is essential for human face awareness: An intermittent binocular rivalry study.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yuko; Maekawa, Toshihiko; Urakawa, Tomokazu; Hironaga, Naruhito; Ogata, Katsuya; Shigyo, Maki; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2016-08-01

    When and where the awareness of faces is consciously initiated is unclear. We used magnetoencephalography to probe the brain responses associated with face awareness under intermittent pseudo-rivalry (PR) and binocular rivalry (BR) conditions. The stimuli comprised three pictures: a human face, a monkey face and a house. In the PR condition, we detected the M130 component, which has been minimally characterized in previous research. We obtained a clear recording of the M170 component in the fusiform face area (FFA), and found that this component had an earlier response time to faces compared with other objects. The M170 occurred predominantly in the right hemisphere in both conditions. In the BR condition, the amplitude of the M130 significantly increased in the right hemisphere irrespective of the physical characteristics of the visual stimuli. Conversely, we did not detect the M170 when the face image was suppressed in the BR condition, although this component was clearly present when awareness for the face was initiated. We also found a significant difference in the latency of the M170 (human

  10. Neural Decoding Reveals Impaired Face Configural Processing in the Right Fusiform Face Area of Individuals with Developmental Prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiedong; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face configural processing. This finding, together with evidence showing impairments downstream from the right FFA in DP individuals, has led some to argue that perhaps the right FFA is largely intact in DP individuals. Using fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis, here we report the discovery of a neural impairment in the right FFA of DP individuals that may play a critical role in mediating their face-processing deficits. In seven individuals with DP, we discovered that, despite the right FFA's preference for faces and it showing decoding for the different face parts, it exhibited impaired face configural decoding and did not contain distinct neural response patterns for the intact and the scrambled face configurations. This abnormality was not present throughout the ventral visual cortex, as normal neural decoding was found in an adjacent object-processing region. To our knowledge, this is the first direct neural evidence showing impaired face configural processing in the right FFA in individuals with DP. The discovery of this neural impairment provides a new clue to our understanding of the neural basis of DP. PMID:25632131

  11. Neural decoding reveals impaired face configural processing in the right fusiform face area of individuals with developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiedong; Liu, Jia; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-01-28

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face configural processing. This finding, together with evidence showing impairments downstream from the right FFA in DP individuals, has led some to argue that perhaps the right FFA is largely intact in DP individuals. Using fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis, here we report the discovery of a neural impairment in the right FFA of DP individuals that may play a critical role in mediating their face-processing deficits. In seven individuals with DP, we discovered that, despite the right FFA's preference for faces and it showing decoding for the different face parts, it exhibited impaired face configural decoding and did not contain distinct neural response patterns for the intact and the scrambled face configurations. This abnormality was not present throughout the ventral visual cortex, as normal neural decoding was found in an adjacent object-processing region. To our knowledge, this is the first direct neural evidence showing impaired face configural processing in the right FFA in individuals with DP. The discovery of this neural impairment provides a new clue to our understanding of the neural basis of DP.

  12. Preparation and certification of hijiki reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, from the edible marine algae hijiki (Hizikia fusiforme).

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kazumi; Zhu, Yanbei; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Narushima, Izumi; Chiba, Koichi; Hioki, Akiharu

    2012-02-01

    A certified reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, for the determination of trace elements and As(V) in algae was developed from the edible marine hijiki (Hizikia fusiforme) and certified by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Hijiki was collected from the Pacific coast in the Kanto area of Japan, and was washed, dried, powdered, and homogenized. The hijiki powder was placed in 400 bottles (ca. 20 g each). The concentrations of 18 trace elements and As(V) were determined by two to four independent analytical techniques, including (ID)ICP-(HR)MS, ICP-OES, GFAAS, and HPLC-ICP-MS using calibration solutions prepared from the elemental standard solution of Japan calibration service system (JCSS) and the NMIJ CRM As(V) solution, and whose concentrations are certified and SI traceable. The uncertainties of all the measurements and preparation procedures were evaluated. The values of 18 trace elements and As(V) in the CRM were certified with uncertainty (k = 2).

  13. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  14. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition.

  15. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Keen, G.; Bradbrook, R. A.; McGinn, F.

    1969-01-01

    Seven patients who had traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta are reported. Four of these died within a few hours of admission, allowing no opportunity for diagnosis or treatment. However, three survived long enough for elective surgery to be undertaken. A diagnosis of ruptured aorta was missed in one patient (case 2), and the difficulties of diagnosing this condition, even during thoracotomy, are emphasized. The value of serial chest radiography and forward aortography is discussed. Two of these patients underwent successful aortic repair, using left atrio-femoral bypass. Images PMID:5763507

  16. Rupture of the plantar fascia in athletes.

    PubMed

    Leach, R; Jones, R; Silva, T

    1978-06-01

    Symptoms resembling those of plantar fasciitis were seen in six athletes who were thought to have a partial rupture of the plantar fascia. Treatment, which included the use of crutches, anti-inflammatory agents, strapping of the arch, and ice packs, was successful in all but one patient who had a painful mass in the area of the previous rupture. After surgical excision of the painful mass and release of the fascia, he recovered. Five of the six athletes had been previously treated with repeated local injections of steroid.

  17. Modeling rupture segmentations on the Cascadia megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has produced a series of large to great earthquakes, most recently in 1700 AD. Paleoseismological studies of submarine turbidites suggest a significant difference in recurrence interval between Northern (~500 year) and Southern (~200-300 year) Cascadia. Whether future large ruptures are segmented is very important for estimating hazard in Pacific Northwest, but remains enigmatic from the interpretations of current locking maps. Our approach is to develop rupture scenarios of Cascadia earthquakes by performing numerical simulations using the finite element software, PyLith. Based on the USGS plate interface model of Cascadia, we have constructed a realistic three-dimensional subduction fault model that stretches from Northern California to Central Vancouver Island. We have performed a number of dynamic rupture simulations using a set of artificial friction parameters and uniform stress distributions on the fault governed by a slip-weakening friction law. Preliminary results show that ruptures have initiated from the nucleation zone with higher shear stress than the ambient fault and have propagated on the realistic three-dimensional fault surface. The increase of dip angle with depth has little effect on the rupture propagation because that is governed mostly by the fault strength. The along-strike bend of the fault beneath Washington state and Vancouver Island has not impeded the rupture propagation given the uniform fault strength. To estimate the possible rupture segmentation, we have converted a slip-deficit rate model derived from GPS data into stress change distributions on the fault assuming the entire slip deficit would be released in the next great earthquake. We are also constructing another initial stress map derived from tidal and leveling data, which shows a significant difference in the locking depth beneath Central Oregon. The other important variable, the spatial variation of frictional parameters, however, has to be

  18. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  19. Mega-earthquakes rupture flat megathrusts.

    PubMed

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M; Rempel, Alan W; Karlstrom, Leif; Sladen, Anthony; De Barros, Louis

    2016-11-25

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes highlighted gaps in our understanding of mega-earthquake rupture processes and the factors controlling their global distribution: A fast convergence rate and young buoyant lithosphere are not required to produce mega-earthquakes. We calculated the curvature along the major subduction zones of the world, showing that mega-earthquakes preferentially rupture flat (low-curvature) interfaces. A simplified analytic model demonstrates that heterogeneity in shear strength increases with curvature. Shear strength on flat megathrusts is more homogeneous, and hence more likely to be exceeded simultaneously over large areas, than on highly curved faults.

  20. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  1. The fusiform face area responds equivalently to faces and abstract shapes in the left and central visual fields.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Scott D; White, Rachel C

    2013-12-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is widely believed to be specialized for processing faces. Although the FFA is most responsive to faces, this region also consistently responds to non-face items. This suggests that the FFA may be tuned to a feature that is shared by faces and non-face items. Based on the known left visual field face-processing bias along with evidence that the FFA responds to the visual feature of shape, we hypothesized that the FFA may be particularly tuned to shapes presented in the left visual field. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a face localizer run, participants viewed blocks of faces or objects. In a separate run, blocks of intact or scrambled abstract shapes were presented in the left, the central, or the right visual field. Within each of the eleven face-processing regions-of-interest (identified by contrasting faces and objects), the magnitude of activity associated with faces was compared to the magnitude of activity associated with intact shapes. Consistent with previous results, collapsing over shape visual field location, the magnitude of activity associated with faces was greater than the magnitude of activity associated with shapes in the FFA. However, separating by shape visual field location revealed an equivalent magnitude of activity associated with faces and shapes in the FFA when shapes were presented in the left and central visual fields. These findings indicate that the FFA, rather than being specialized for holistic face processing, mediates shape processing in the left and central visual fields.

  2. Electrical Stimulation of the Left and Right Human Fusiform Gyrus Causes Different Effects in Conscious Face Perception

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vinitha; Hermes, Dora; Foster, Brett L.; Weiner, Kevin S.; Jacques, Corentin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies across species have confirmed bilateral face-selective responses in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and prosopagnosia is reported in patients with lesions in the VTC including the fusiform gyrus (FG). As imaging and electrophysiological studies provide correlative evidence, and brain lesions often comprise both white and gray matter structures beyond the FG, we designed the current study to explore the link between face-related electrophysiological responses in the FG and the causal effects of electrical stimulation of the left or right FG in face perception. We used a combination of electrocorticography (ECoG) and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) in 10 human subjects implanted with intracranial electrodes in either the left (5 participants, 30 FG sites) or right (5 participants, 26 FG sites) hemispheres. We identified FG sites with face-selective ECoG responses, and recorded perceptual reports during EBS of these sites. In line with existing literature, face-selective ECoG responses were present in both left and right FG sites. However, when the same sites were stimulated, we observed a striking difference between hemispheres. Only EBS of the right FG caused changes in the conscious perception of faces, whereas EBS of strongly face-selective regions in the left FG produced non-face-related visual changes, such as phosphenes. This study examines the relationship between correlative versus causal nature of ECoG and EBS, respectively, and provides important insight into the differential roles of the right versus left FG in conscious face perception. PMID:25232118

  3. Electrical stimulation of the left and right human fusiform gyrus causes different effects in conscious face perception.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Vinitha; Hermes, Dora; Foster, Brett L; Weiner, Kevin S; Jacques, Corentin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit; Parvizi, Josef

    2014-09-17

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies across species have confirmed bilateral face-selective responses in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and prosopagnosia is reported in patients with lesions in the VTC including the fusiform gyrus (FG). As imaging and electrophysiological studies provide correlative evidence, and brain lesions often comprise both white and gray matter structures beyond the FG, we designed the current study to explore the link between face-related electrophysiological responses in the FG and the causal effects of electrical stimulation of the left or right FG in face perception. We used a combination of electrocorticography (ECoG) and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) in 10 human subjects implanted with intracranial electrodes in either the left (5 participants, 30 FG sites) or right (5 participants, 26 FG sites) hemispheres. We identified FG sites with face-selective ECoG responses, and recorded perceptual reports during EBS of these sites. In line with existing literature, face-selective ECoG responses were present in both left and right FG sites. However, when the same sites were stimulated, we observed a striking difference between hemispheres. Only EBS of the right FG caused changes in the conscious perception of faces, whereas EBS of strongly face-selective regions in the left FG produced non-face-related visual changes, such as phosphenes. This study examines the relationship between correlative versus causal nature of ECoG and EBS, respectively, and provides important insight into the differential roles of the right versus left FG in conscious face perception.

  4. Earthquake Stress Drop in Rupture Patches and Rupture Barriers on Gofar Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, P. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquakes on mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) exhibit the most systematic behaviors known in seismology. On the fast slipping Gofar transform fault on the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mw ~6.0 earthquakes occur every ~5 years and repeatedly rupture the same asperities (fault patches), suggesting that the intervening fault segments (rupture barriers) stop the propagation of the largest earthquakes. In 2008, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle on Gofar transform fault [McGuire et al., 2012]. We determine stress drop for earthquakes recorded during this experiment to investigate how the source properties of moderate sized earthquakes (3.0 < Mw < 5.5) differ between the rupture patch and rupture barrier fault segments. The OBS experiment on Gofar transform fault recorded an extensive foreshock sequence localized within a 10 km rupture barrier, the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershocks that occurred in a ~10 km rupture patch, and an earthquake swarm that was located in a second rupture barrier adjacent to the ridge-transform intersection. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on the OBS accelerometers, we calculate stress drop using the Madariaga [1976] circular crack model, with the corner frequency derived from an empirical Green's function (EGF) method, and seismic moment obtained by fitting an omega-squared source model to the low frequency amplitude of individual event spectra. Results for ~300 earthquakes in the foreshock, aftershock, and swarm zones have a range of stress drops from 0.2 to 50 MPa. Values for the best constrained 10% of earthquakes show a weighted average stress drop in the aftershock zone that is more than twice the weighted average stress drop in the foreshock zone (3.5 MPa and 1.1 MPa, respectively). These variations in earthquake stress drop reflect systematic differences in along strike fault zone properties between rupture patches and rupture barriers on Gofar

  5. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces.

    PubMed

    García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  6. Plantar fascia rupture associated with corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Sellman, J R

    1994-07-01

    A series of 37 patients, all with a presumptive diagnosis of plantar fascia rupture, is presented. All had had prior heel pain diagnosed as plantar fasciitis, and all had been treated with corticosteroid injection into the calcaneal origin of the fascia. One third described a sudden tearing episode in the heel, while the rest had a gradual change in symptoms. Most of the patients had relief of the original heel pain, which had been replaced by a variety of new foot problems, including dorsal and lateral midfoot pain, swelling, foot weakness, metatarsal pain, and metatarsal fracture. In all 37 patients, there was a palpable diminution in the tension of the plantar fascia on the involved side, and footprints often showed a flattening of the involved arch. Magnetic resonance imaging done on one patient showed attenuation of the plantar fascia. From these observations and data, the author concluded that plantar fascia rupture had occurred. Treatment following rupture included supportive shoes, orthoses, and time. The majority had resolution of their new symptoms, but this often took 6 to 12 months to occur. In the remainder, there were persisting symptoms. Corticosteroid injections, although helpful in the treatment of plantar fasciitis, appear to predispose to plantar fascia rupture.

  7. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  8. Musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture and shoulder weakness.

    PubMed

    Lipford, Melissa C; Bond, Jeffrey R; Steinmann, Scott P; Kumar, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    We report a patient with bilateral simultaneous onset of weakness of shoulder lateral rotation due to musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture that occurred after shoulder steroid injections. Disruption of the musculotendinous junction of the infraspinatus is a rare recently described entity. Electromyography is normal, and magnetic resonance image findings are characteristic.

  9. Bond-rupture immunosensors--a review.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Evan R; Yuan, Yong J; Xu, W L; Bronlund, J E

    2008-07-15

    It has long been the goal of researchers to develop fast and reliable point-of-care alternatives to existing lab-based tests. A viable point-of-care biosensor is fast, reliable, simple, cost-effective, and detects low concentrations of the target analyte. The target of biosensors is biological such as bacteria or virus and as such, the antibody-antigen bond derived from the real immune response is used. Biosensor applications include lab-based tests for the purposes of diagnostics, drug discovery, and research. Additional applications include environmental, food, and agricultural monitoring. The main merits of the bond-rupture method are quick, simple, and capable of discriminating between specific and non-specific interactions. The separation of specific and non-specific bonds is important for working in real-life complex serums such as blood. The bond-rupture technique can provide both qualitative results, the detection of a target, and quantitative results, the concentration of target. Bond-rupture achieves this by a label-free method requiring no pre-processing of the analyte. A piezoelectric transducer such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) shakes the bound particles free from the surface. Other transducers such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) are also considered. The rupture of the bonds is detected as electronic noise. This review article links diverse research areas to build a picture of a field still in development.

  10. The effect of Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide extracts on vibriosis resistance and immune activity of the shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuxiong; Zhou, Hongqi; Zhang, Hui

    2006-05-01

    Immunostimulants are valuable for control of shrimp diseases and the immunostimulatory effects of some polysaccharide additives for shrimp have been reported. In this study, the Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide extract (SFPSE) was assessed as a feed additive when supplemented in the diet (0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 2.0%) for juvenile shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, in order to study the effects of SFPSE on vibriosis resistance and immune activity. Shrimp were cultured in the same pond with cages. The body weight, survival, the cumulative mortality after injection with Vibrio harveyi (30 microl V. harveyi suspension at 9.3 x 10(7) CFU ml(-1) per shrimp), the total haemocyte counts (THCs), the protein concentration and the phenoloxidase (PO) activity in supernatant of haemolymph, the lysozyme (LSZ) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in muscle of the shrimp were assayed after 14 days feeding period. The results indicated that shrimp survival under the stress of V. harveyi was affected by the dietary SFPSE. The shrimp treated with 1.0% and 0.5% SFPSE displayed significantly lower cumulative mortalities after being injected with V. harveyi suspension 24 and 30 h later, respectively, compared with that of the control. However, cumulative mortality of 2.0% SFPSE treatment was not significantly different from that of the control. There was no significant difference of cumulative mortality between 0.5% and 1.0% SFPSE treatment groups. The immune activities of the shrimp also were affected by dosage of dietary SFPSE. The THCs of the shrimp rose with increasing SFPSE dosage. The protein concentration and PO activity in supernatant of haemolymph as well as muscular LSZ activity first rose then dropped with increasing SFPSE dosage. The protein concentration in supernatant of haemolymph appeared a maximum of 167.46 mg ml(-1) in 1.0% SFPSE treatment. The PO activity and LSZ activity reached the peaks as 13.20 U and 3.21 U mgprot(-1) in 0.5% SFPSE treatment, respectively. SOD

  11. Epithelioid and fusiform blue nevus of chronically sun-damaged skin, an entity distinct from the epithelioid blue nevus of the Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Yazdan, Pedram; Haghighat, Zahra; Guitart, Joan; Gerami, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Epithelioid blue nevus (EBN) was first described in patients with Carney complex (CNC) and subsequently shown to also occur sporadically. Over 50% of patients with CNC harbor mutations in the gene PRKAR1A, which codes for protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1α (R1α) involved in the signaling pathway regulating melanogenesis and melanocytic proliferation. Immunohistochemical expression of R1α has been shown to be absent in the majority of pigmented epithelioid melanocytomas and all CNC-associated EBNs but present in melanomas and other melanocytic nevi. We have observed several examples of EBN occurring in chronically sun-damaged (CSD) skin with a predominance of epithelioid morphology but also containing a component of fusiform and conventional blue nevus cells, which we have termed epithelioid and fusiform blue nevus of CSD skin. Several of these cases demonstrated notable pleomorphism and nuclear atypia with rare mitotic activity raising concern for the possibility of melanoma; however, the clinical outcomes, detailed histologic review, and molecular results were most consistent with a benign melanocytic neoplasm. We report our clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization experience with this distinct entity of epithelioid and fusiform blue nevus and demonstrate that it is a unique subtype of blue nevus occurring on CSD skin with a higher frequency of an associated conventional blue nevus component compared with EBN and without association with CNC or loss of R1α expression typically found in pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma and CNC-associated EBN. We also postulate that the epithelioid pattern may represent a subclone of the conventional blue nevus component induced by chronic UV damage.

  12. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of −3 to −4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5 mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for

  13. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  14. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Seismic ruptures are akin to opening a zipper—a gap in the crust starts in one location and travels along the fault in a particular direction. When a strained fault ruptures in an earthquake, seismic waves also spread out from the epicenter. In some cases, the waves' passage can trigger the initiation of a new rupture ahead of the initial expanding rupture in locked portions of the fault. If the triggered rupture grows successfully, the overall rupture front can then outpace the passage of the shear waves, secondary seismic waves that travel slowly after the earthquake begins and are responsible for the bulk of violent shaking. These earthquakes display what is known as supershear rupture; only seven such earthquakes have previously been recorded.

  15. [Proximal and distal rupture of the m. biceps brachii].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O; Kieb, M; Grim, C; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the biceps tendon account for a high percentage of tendon ruptures. The aetiology of proximal ruptures of the long head of the biceps tendon is often degenerative and they are frequently associated with lesions of the rotator cuff. The clinical findings are often not specific and long lasting. Distal ruptures of the biceps tendon mostly occur during eccentric contraction of the biceps muscle.Clinical tests, the associated haematoma and a distalisation or proximalisation of the muscle belly in combination with ultrasound or MRI to rule out combined diseases lead to the diagnosis. The possible options include conservative and operative treatment. Tenotomy and tenodesis lead to comparable results in the literature. Therefore, conservative treatment is mostly recommended in proximal ruptures. Operative treatment is preferred in distal ruptures of the biceps tendon in order to achieve an anatomical reconstruction of the muscle function. Chronic ruptures of the distal biceps tendon can be successfully treated with free autografts or allografts.

  16. Blunt Cardiac Rupture: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish Balkrishna

    2016-01-01

    Blunt Cardiac Rupture (BCR) is a life threatening injury. Majority of patients do not reach the hospital and in those who reach the emergency department, timely diagnosis and treatment is a challenge. The case is about a patient with multiple blunt injuries who presented in shock. Cardiac tamponade was suspected on clinical grounds and on evidence of mediastinal widening on radiograph. In the absence of songography, the diagnosis was confirmed by subxiphoid pericardial window. Emergency thoracotomy revealed a right atrial appendage rupture which was surgically corrected. The patient also underwent splenectomy for grade IV splenic injury. Liver injury, pubic diastasis and tibial spine avulsion fracture was managed conservatively. He recovered well. Systematic observance of trauma resuscitation guidelines can help salvage patients with life threatening complex injuries even in the absence of specialized imaging investigations. PMID:28050441

  17. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  18. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  19. Rupture rudimentary horn pregnancy at 31 week

    PubMed Central

    Al Qarni, Abdullah A.; Al-Braikan, Nawal; Al-Hanbali, Moh’d M.; Alharmaly, Abdullah H.

    2017-01-01

    Rudimentary horn could be a rare congenital uterine anomalies result from incomplete fusion of the 2 Müllerian ducts throughout embryo-genesis. Pregnancy in an exceedingly rudimentary horn is rare and typically terminates in rupture throughout the late of first or second trimester of pregnancy. We tend to present a rare case of a gravida within the trimester (31 weeks) presented with complain of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomit for 3 days. On presentation, the patient was pale and irritable. Ultrasound scan showed fetus at (30 weeks) with cardiac activity. Cardiotocography reactive. Incision showed horned uterus with pregnancy in rudimentary left horn that was ruptured. Alive fetus was delivered. The rudimentary left horn was excised. The patient was advised to not get pregnant for 3 years. Within one year, the patient came to hospital in active labor at (37 weeks). This case emphasizes the importance of fine antepartum care to avoid morbidity and mortality. PMID:28133695

  20. Rupture rudimentary horn pregnancy at 31 week.

    PubMed

    Al Qarni, Abdullah A; Al-Braikan, Nawal; Al-Hanbali, Moh'd M; Alharmaly, Abdullah H

    2017-02-01

    Rudimentary horn could be a rare congenital uterine anomalies result from incomplete fusion of the two Müllerian ducts throughout embryo-genesis. Pregnancy in an exceedingly rudimentary horn is rare and typically terminates in rupture throughout the late of first or second trimester of pregnancy. We tend to present a rare case of a gravida within the trimester (31 weeks) presented with complain of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomit for 3 days. On presentation, the patient was pale and irritable. Ultrasound scan showed fetus at (30 weeks) with cardiac activity. Cardiotocography reactive. Incision showed horned uterus with pregnancy in rudimentary left horn that was ruptured. Alive fetus was delivered. The rudimentary left horn was excised. The patient was advised to not get pregnant for 3 years. Within one year, the patient came to hospital in active labor at (37 weeks). This case emphasizes the importance of fine antepartum care to avoid morbidity and mortality.

  1. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Pericallosal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Kim, Hwan Soo; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Lee, Tae Hong; Yun, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aneurysms arising from the pericallosal artery (PA) are uncommon and challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to report our experiences of the endovascular treatment of ruptured PA aneurysms. Methods From September 2003 to December 2013, 30 ruptured PA aneurysms in 30 patients were treated at our institution via an endovascular approach. Procedural data, clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively reviewed. Results Regarding immediate angiographic control, complete occlusion was achieved in 21 (70.0%) patients and near-complete occlusion in 9 (30.0%). Eight procedure-related complications occurred, including intraprocedural rupture and early rebleeding in three each, and thromboembolic event in two. At last follow-up, 18 patients were independent with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-2, and the other 12 were either dependent or had expired (mRS score, 3-6). Adjacent hematoma was found to be associated with an increased risk of poor clinical outcome. Seventeen of 23 surviving patients underwent follow-up conventional angiography (mean, 16.5 months). Results showed stable occlusion in 14 (82.4%), minor recanalization in two (11.8%), and major recanalization, which required recoiling, in one (5.9%). Conclusion Our experiences demonstrate that endovascular treatment for a ruptured PA aneurysms is both feasible and effective. However, periprocedural rebleedings were found to occur far more often (20.0%) than is generally suspected and to be associated with preoperative contrast retention. Analysis showed existing adjacent hematoma is predictive of a poor clinical outcome. PMID:26539261

  3. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  4. Spontaneous rupture of the plantar fascia.

    PubMed

    Ahstrom, J P

    1988-01-01

    In this study, rupture of the plantar fascia was seen in five feet, of which four had had plantar fasciitis. At the time of the injury, which is an acceleration type of motion, there is severe pain in the heel followed by the development of ecchymosis in the sole and toward the heel of the foot. With conservative symptomatic care, the acute symptoms as well as the plantar fasciitis symptoms subside, generally allowing full activity in 3 to 4 weeks.

  5. [Intradural rupture of an intervertebral disk].

    PubMed

    Paini, G P; Baldi, P G; Barra, N; Pasetti, S

    1978-01-01

    Since the first description of ruptured lumbar disc, erosion of a fragment of disc through the dura mater has been mentioned only rarely. The authros report two cases occurred among 1,078 herniated discs surgically treated in their department over a period of 8 years, from January 1st., 1970 through March 31st., 1978. Various factors that might contribute to this relatively rare complication of disc disease are mentioned, and literature on the subject is summarized.

  6. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  7. Myocardial Bridge and Acute Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Leor; Daniels, David; Schwartz, Jonathan; Tanaka, Shige; Yeung, Alan; Tremmel, Jennifer A.; Schnittger, Ingela

    2016-01-01

    A myocardial bridge (MB) is a common anatomic variant, most frequently located in the left anterior descending coronary artery, where a portion of the coronary artery is covered by myocardium. Importantly, MBs are known to result in a proximal atherosclerotic lesion. It has recently been postulated that these lesions predispose patients to acute coronary events, even in cases of otherwise low-risk patients. One such mechanism may involve acute plaque rupture. In this article, we report 2 cases of patients with MBs who presented with acute coronary syndromes despite having low cardiovascular risk. Their presentation was life-risking and both were treated urgently and studied with coronary angiographies and intravascular ultrasound. This latter modality confirmed a rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque proximal to the MB as a likely cause of the acute events. These cases, of unexplained acute coronary syndrome in low-risk patients, raise the question of alternative processes leading to the event and the role MB play as an underlying cause of ruptured plaques. In some cases, an active investigation for this entity may be warranted, due to the prognostic implications of the different therapeutic modalities, should an MB be discovered. PMID:28251167

  8. Ruptured aneurysms of sinuses of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, B. I.; Fraser, R. S.; Rossall, R. E.; Lee, S. J. K.

    1974-01-01

    At least one additional cardiac lesion was present in 18 consecutive patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinuses of Valsalva who were investigated between 1956 and 1973 at the University of Alberta Hospital. Clinical diagnosis was made in 78% (14/18) of the patients. Confirmation at cardiac catheterization, operation or autopsy was obtained in all but one. The main sites of rupture were the right ventricle (seven cases), right atrium (five) and left ventricle (five). Fifty percent (9/18) are alive and well following prompt operative repair, an average of 8.2 years later (range, six months to 15 years). Replacement of the aortic valve was associated with a high mortality (50% early, 13% late, total 63%) which could be explained by the higher operative risk in this group of very ill patients. Eight patients (44.4%) had had bacterial endocarditis prior to presentation and this may have played a significant role in the rupture of the sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4278257

  9. [Splenic artery rupture in pancreatic pseudocyst].

    PubMed

    Ungania, S; Panocchia, N

    2000-01-01

    Hemorrhage is one of the most threatening complication of pancreatic pseudocyst. It results from erosion of adjacent vessels. Splenic, gastroduodenal, pancreaticoduodenal and middle colic vessels are predominantly involved. Hemorrhage may present different feature: intra and/or extraperitoneal collection, gastrointestinal bleeding. The authors report the rupture of splenic artery into pseudocyst, with the formation of pulsating pseudoaneurysm, increasing progressively until the final rupture. For the diagnosis the authors utilized: ultrasounds (US) which showed the cyst but not its nature and content; the CT scan which disclosed haematic contents; finally the US Color Doppler which proved the dynamic feature of hemorrhage. This technique allows to identify the arterious or venous source of bleeding and the possible presence of arteriovenous fistula. Arteriography was not performed due to circumstances, although it would permit bleeding vessel embolization and the control of hemorrhage. This procedure is not ever achievable, and doesn't exclude the possibility of rebleeding. On surgery, since the intraoperative rupture of the pseudoaneurysm occurred with severe hypovolemic shock, only a timely posterior mesogastric mobilization and the medially displacement of spleen-body-tail pancreatic complex, allowed to clamp the mass and the hemostasis. When such lesion are approached, it is mandatory to be prepared to carry on this maneuver: the severity of bleeding cannot allow intracystic ligature of bleeding vessel.

  10. [Premature rupture of fetal membranes and chorioamnionitis].

    PubMed

    Haram, K; Daugaard, H O

    1994-05-10

    The article presents a survey of preterm rupture of the amniotic membranes at term (more than 1 hour prior to uterine contractions) and preterm (< 37 weeks). The diagnosis of rupture can be suspected from the history alone in 90% of the cases, and confirmed by inspection. In doubtful cases the pH in fluid from the posterior fornix of the vagina is determined and microscopy is performed. Amniotic fluid is alkaline. Microscopy of a dried specimen shows "ferning" when amniotic fluid is present (crystallization test). Staining with Nil blue will reveal orange foetal cells in fresh specimens, usually only late in pregnancy (after the 38 week). The crystallization test is useful, however, in all three trimesters. The cause of membrane rupture and of chorioamnionitis may be infection. Chorioamnionitis is a serious clinical condition, but can be subclinical and may occur with intact membranes. It can lead to preterm delivery. It is important that chorioamnionitis be diagnosed (maternal fever, tachycardia, uterine contractions, abdominal pain, foul smelling vaginal discharge and elevated C-reactive protein). The condition is treated with antibiotics and labour must be induced.

  11. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  12. Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space

    SciTech Connect

    Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri Dingil, Guerbuez; Koeroglu, Mert; Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

  13. Effects of Apparent Supersonic Ruptures for Strike-slip Rupture: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic rupture could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear rupture, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state rupture simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic rupture, i.e., the deep rupture is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear rupture could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip ruptures on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.

  14. Rupture Velocities of Intermediate- and Deep-Focus Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The rupture velocities of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) of the earthquakes. As part of a global study of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes, I have used rupture directivity to estimate the rupture vector (speed and orientation) for 422 earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ≥5.7 since 1990. I estimate the rupture velocity relative to the local P-wave velocity (vr/α). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas --- Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Japan-Kurils-Kamchatka --- include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 193 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained rupture vectors, most earthquakes rupture on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the rupture vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and rupture vectors) to Mode III rupture (i.e., perpendicular slip and rupture vectors). For this earthquake population, the mean rupture velocity is 0.43 vr/α ± 0.14 vr/α. The mean earthquake rupture velocities are similar between all subduction zones. Since the local seismic wavespeed is faster in colder subduction zones, absolute rupture velocities are faster in colder subduction zones. Overall, the fastest rupture velocities exceed the local S-wave speed. The supershear ruptures are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the rupture velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III rupture but the P-wave speed for Mode II

  15. Coupling geodynamic earthquake cycles and dynamic ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zelst, Iris; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Heuret, Arnauld

    2016-04-01

    Studying the seismicity in a subduction zone and its effects on tsunamis requires diverse modelling methods that span spatial and temporal scales. Hundreds of years are necessary to build the stresses and strengths on a fault, while consequent earthquake rupture propagation is determined by both these initial fault conditions and the feedback of seismic waves over periods of seconds up to minutes. This dynamic rupture displaces the sea floor, thereby causing tsunamis. The aim of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulations of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project is to study all these aspects and their interactions. Here, we present preliminary results of the first aspects in this modelling chain: the coupling of a seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) code to the dynamic rupture model SeisSol. STM models of earthquake cycles have the advantage of solving multiple earthquake events in a self-consistent manner concerning stress, strength and geometry. However, the drawback of these models is that they often lack in spatial or temporal resolution and do not include wave propagation. In contrast, dynamic rupture models solve for frictional failure coupled to seismic wave propagation. We use the software package SeisSol (www.seissol.org) based on an ADER-DG discretization allowing high-order accuracy in space and time as well as flexible tetrahedral meshing. However, such simulations require assumptions on the initial fault stresses and strengths and its geometry, which are hard to constrain due to the lack of near-field observations and the complexity of coseismic conditions. By adapting the geometry as well as the stress and strength properties of the self-consistently developing non-finite fault zones from the geodynamic models as initial conditions for the dynamic rupture models, the advantages of both methods are exploited and modelling results may be compared. Our results show that a dynamic rupture can be triggered spontaneously and that the propagating rupture is

  16. The Energy Budget of Earthquake Rupture: a View From Spontaneous Rupture Modeling and Finite-Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Guatteri, M.

    2003-12-01

    It is a common and frustrating experience of many dynamic modelers to initiate spontaneous rupture calculations that subsequently abort before rupturing to the desired earthquake size [Nielsen and Olsen, 2000; Oglesby and Day, 2002]. Source parameters in such dynamic source models are strongly correlated, but stress drop is the main factor affecting the distribution of the other dynamic rupture parameters. Additionally, the position of the hypocenter exerts a strong influence on the dynamic properties of the earthquake, and certain hypocenter positions are not plausible as those would not lead to spontaneous rupture propagation. To further investigate this last statement, we analyze the energy budget during earthquake rupture using spontaneous dynamic rupture calculations and finite-source rupture models. In describing the energy budget during earthquake rupture, we follow Favreau and Archuleta [2003]. Each point on the fault contributes to the radiated seismic energy Ers = Eel - Efr - Erx, where Eel denotes the elasto-static energy and Efr the fracture energy. In this study we neglect for simplicity the relaxation work Erx spent during the stopping of the earthquake. A rupture can be characterized by locally negative seismic energy density values, but its integral over the fault plane must be positive. The fundamental condition for rupture growth is therefore that the integral of Ers on the rupture area remains always positive during rupture propagation. Based on a simple energy budget calculation, we focus on identifying those target slip/stress distribution in dynamic rupture modeling that for a given hypocenter location fail to rupture spontaneously. Additionally, we study the energy budget of finite-source rupture models by analyzing the integrated seismic energy for the inferred slip maps using also hypocenter positions other than the network location. These results indicate how rupture was promoted for the true hypocenter while randomized hypocenters may not

  17. Measuring thermal rupture force distributions from an ensemble of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Swan, J W; Shindel, M M; Furst, E M

    2012-11-09

    Rupture, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve rupture, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of rupture forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the rupture event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of rupture forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing rupture forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.

  18. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  19. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Osamu; Ikawa, Fusao; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Yonezawa, Ushio

    2014-01-01

    Summary We evaluated the outcomes of endovascular or surgical treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), and investigated the relations between treatment complications and the development and location of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated 14 patients (12 men, two women; mean age, 56.2 years) with ruptured VADAs between March 1999 and June 2012 at our hospital. Six and eight patients had Hunt and Hess grades 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. Twelve patients underwent internal endovascular trapping, one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion alone, and one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion in the acute stage and occipital artery (OA)-PICA anastomosis and surgical trapping in the chronic stage. The types of VADA based on their location relative to the ipsilateral PICA were distal, PICA-involved, and non-PICA in nine, two, and three patients, respectively. The types of PICA based on their development and location were bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-PICA, ipsilateral AICA-PICA, extradural, and intradural type in one, two, two, and nine patients, respectively. Two patients with high anatomical risk developed medullary infarction, but their midterm outcomes were better than in previous reports. The modified Rankin scale indicated grades 0-2, 3-5, and 6 in eight, three, and three patients, respectively. A good outcome is often obtained in the treatment of ruptured VADA using internal endovascular trapping, except in the PICA-involved type, even with high-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of the PICA-involved type is controversial. The anatomical location and development of PICA may be predicted by complications with postoperative medullary infarction. PMID:24976093

  20. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. PMID:25716033

  1. Source Rupture Process of the 2005 Tarapaca Intermediate Depth Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrat, S.; Favreau, P.; de Chabalier, J.; Bouin, M.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the details of the rupture process of the large (Mw 7.7) intermediate-depth earthquake that occurred on 13 June 2005 in the Tarapaca region of the Northern Chile seismic gap, using different data sets and different methods. The high quality and variety of seismic and geodetic data available for this event provided an unprecedented opportunity to study its source in detail. This earthquake is a slab-pull event with down dip extensional source mechanism. The aftershock distribution, determined from a post-seismic temporary array, indicates a sub-horizontal fault plane lying between the upper and lower planes of the double seismic zone. This earthquake was also recorded by a permanent digital strong-motion network operated by the University of Chile. These records have absolute time and high dynamic range so that they contain direct information about the rupture process. We used a systematic, fully nonlinear inversion method based on the neighbourhood algorithm to invert for the kinematic slip distribution using the accelerometric data set. This low frequency inversion provides a relatively smooth image of the rupture history. The kinematic inversion shows that the earthquake occurred by the rupture of two asperities. Based on the kinematic inversion result, we propose dynamic rupture models in order to quantify the dynamic rupture process. We simulate the dynamic rupture process and the strong ground motion using a 3D finite-difference method. In our simulation, dynamic rupture grows under the simultaneous control of initial stress and rupture resistance by friction. We constrain dynamic rupture parameters of the Tarapaca earthquake by simple trial and error. Large intraplate earthquakes in subduction zone are quite common although very few have been studied in detail. These earthquakes occurred at depth where the mechanism by which they are triggered remains poorly understood. Consequently, the determination of source rupture for intermediate

  2. Alliance ruptures, impasses, and enactments: a relational perspective.

    PubMed

    Safran, Jeremy D; Kraus, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    Alliance ruptures, impasses, and transference-countertransference enactments are inevitable in therapy. A growing body of evidence suggests that repairing ruptures in the alliance is related to positive outcome (Safran, Muran, & Eubanks-Carter, 2011). Our research program has led to the development of training methods to enhance therapists' abilities to detect and work constructively with alliance ruptures and negative therapeutic process (Safran et al., 2014). This article outlines relevant theoretical underpinnings, intervention principles, and empirical findings.

  3. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kekre, A N; Kekre, N; Nath, V; Seshadri, L

    1997-11-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium is extremely rare. The patient usually presents with acute abdominal pain. Awareness on the part of the treating surgeon that bladder rupture is a possibility will lead to an early diagnosis. Immediate exploration, removing urine from the peritoneal cavity or retropubic space, closing the rupture and securing good vesical drainage, results in resumption of vesical function, and thereby decreases the mortality and morbidity.

  4. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a

  5. Seismic rupture propagation beneath potential landslide wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-12-01

    During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic rupture propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic rupture propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary décollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 °C and > 20°C of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic

  6. Effects of Along-strike Fault Heterogeneity on Rupture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.; Yang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Fault zone materials have been suggested to be heterogeneous, such as along-strike variations of low velocity zone and stress conditions. How these fault heterogeneities affect earthquake rupture propagation is important to advance our understanding of earthquake physics, and yet remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the effects of along-strike fault heterogeneity on rupture propagation through numerical modeling on a strike-slip planar fault governed by a linear slip-weakening friction law. We first implement along-strike variations of fault zone materials based on field observations, which have shown the velocities of P and S waves of the low velocity zones can be reduced up to 50% compared to intact rocks. The rupture speed is decreased if the rupture propagates into materials with lower shear modulus and keeps at a stable speed quickly. In contrast, the rupture speed is increased if the rupture propagates into materials with higher shear modulus and accelerates into a steady speed more slowly. If this material boundary is very close to the nucleation zone, it may inhibit the nucleation process. In addition, there is always a perturbation on the rupture speed near the boundary due to the reflected energy. We then investigate the effects of a patch with elevated effective normal stress (barrier) on rupture propagation. Except for the distance d between the barrier and the nucleation zone, its width w, and the additional effective normal stress Δσn, all other parameters are kept constant for all the simulated models. Our results confirm that the barrier may slow down or stop coseismic ruptures, but may also induce supershear ruptures. Moreover, there is a sharp boundary between stopping the rupture and making very strong supershear ruptures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the supershear rupture may emerge in a region that is delineated by two approximate linear boundaries for parameters d and w. The duration of supershear ruptures increases as the

  7. TMI-2 lower head creep rupture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thinnes, G.L.

    1988-08-01

    The TMI-2 accident resulted in approximately 40% of the reactor's core melting and collecting on the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The severity of the accident has raised questions about the margin of safety against rupture of the lower head in this accident since all evidence seems to indicate no major breach of the vessel occurred. Scoping heat transfer analyses of the relocated core debris and lower head have been made based upon assumed core melting scenarios and core material debris formations while in contact with the lower head. This report describes the structural finite element creep rupture analysis of the lower head using a temperature transient judged most likely to challenge the structural capacity of the vessel. This evaluation of vessel response to this transient has provided insight into the creep mechanisms of the vessel wall, a realistic mode of failure, and a means by which margin to failure can be evaluated once examination provides estimated maximum wall temperatures. Suggestions for more extensive research in this area are also provided. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Ruptures of the distal biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Ward, James P; Shreve, Mark C; Youm, Thomas; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur most commonly in middle-aged males and result from eccentric contraction of the biceps tendon. The injury typically presents with pain and a tearing sensation in the antecubital fossa with resultant weakness in flexion and supination strength. Physical exam maneuvers and diagnostic imaging aid in determining the diagnosis. Nonoperative management is reserved for elderly, low demand patients, while operative intervention is generally pursued for younger patients and can consist of nonanatomic repair to the brachialis or anatomic repair to the radial tuberosity. Anatomic repair through a one-incision or two-incision approach is commonplace, while the nonanatomic repairs are rarely performed. No clear advantage exists in operative management with a one-incision versus two-incision techniques. Chronic ruptures present a more difficult situation, and allograft augmentation is often necessary. Common complications after repair include transient nerve palsy, which often resolves, and heterotopic ossification. Despite these possible complications, most studies suggest that better patient outcomes are obtained with operative, anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon.

  9. Rupture of Right Ventricular Free Wall Following Ventricular Septal Rupture in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy with Right Ventricular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Sung, June-Min; Chung, In-Hyun; Lee, Hye Young; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Byun, Young Sup; Kim, Byung Ok; Rhee, Kun Joo

    2017-01-01

    Most patients diagnosed with takotsubo cardiomyopathies are expected to almost completely recover, and their prognosis is excellent. However, complications can occur in the acute phase. We present a case of a woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with right ventricular involvement who developed a rupture of the right ventricular free wall following ventricular septal rupture, as a consequence of an acute increase in right ventricular afterload by left-to-right shunt. Our case report illustrates that takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be life threatening in the acute phase. Ventricular septal rupture in biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy may be a harbinger of cardiac tamponade by right ventricular rupture. PMID:27873520

  10. Rupture of Right Ventricular Free Wall Following Ventricular Septal Rupture in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy with Right Ventricular Involvement.

    PubMed

    Sung, June Min; Hong, Sung Jin; Chung, In Hyun; Lee, Hye Young; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Byun, Young Sup; Kim, Byung Ok; Rhee, Kun Joo

    2017-01-01

    Most patients diagnosed with takotsubo cardiomyopathies are expected to almost completely recover, and their prognosis is excellent. However, complications can occur in the acute phase. We present a case of a woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with right ventricular involvement who developed a rupture of the right ventricular free wall following ventricular septal rupture, as a consequence of an acute increase in right ventricular afterload by left-to-right shunt. Our case report illustrates that takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be life threatening in the acute phase. Ventricular septal rupture in biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy may be a harbinger of cardiac tamponade by right ventricular rupture.

  11. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane diastereoisomers in Sargassum fusiforme and comparison of the extraction efficiency of ultrasonication, microwave-assisted extraction, Soxhlet extraction and pressurised liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Chen, Xiaomei; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Zhenou; Liu, Cuiping; Chen, Fan; Shen, Yan

    2010-11-01

    The concentrations of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) in Sargassum fusiforme, the common Chinese edible seaweed, were investigated by LC-MS/MS. For the recovery of HBCD, the efficiency levels of ultrasonic-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, Soxhlet extraction and pressurised liquid extraction were compared under different conditions. Pressurised liquid extraction and ultrasonic-assisted extraction resulted in complete extraction of HBCD (92.7-102.5% recovery). Microwave-assisted extraction and Soxhlet extraction, on the other hand, offered relatively low extraction recoveries (82.1-90.6%). The instrumental LODs on columns in this study were 1.0, 0.3 and 0.7 ng/g for α-HBCD, β-HBCD and γ-HBCD, respectively. Because of its accuracy, this straightforward method is particularly suitable for routine HBCD analysis.

  12. Segregation of face sensitive areas within the fusiform gyrus using global signal regression? A study on amygdala resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, Johann D; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Veer, Ilya M; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Erk, Susanne; Mohnke, Sebastian; Pöhland, Lydia; Haddad, Leila; Grimm, Oliver; Tost, Heike; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The application of global signal regression (GSR) to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and its usefulness is a widely discussed topic. In this article, we report an observation of segregated distribution of amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) within the fusiform gyrus (FFG) as an effect of GSR in a multi-center-sample of 276 healthy subjects. Specifically, we observed that amygdala rs-FC was distributed within the FFG as distinct anterior versus posterior clusters delineated by positive versus negative rs-FC polarity when GSR was performed. To characterize this effect in more detail, post hoc analyses revealed the following: first, direct overlays of task-functional magnetic resonance imaging derived face sensitive areas and clusters of positive versus negative amygdala rs-FC showed that the positive amygdala rs-FC cluster corresponded best with the fusiform face area, whereas the occipital face area corresponded to the negative amygdala rs-FC cluster. Second, as expected from a hierarchical face perception model, these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters showed differential rs-FC with other regions of the visual stream. Third, dynamic connectivity analyses revealed that these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters also differed in their rs-FC variance across time to the amygdala. Furthermore, subsample analyses of three independent research sites confirmed reliability of the effect of GSR, as revealed by similar patterns of distinct amygdala rs-FC polarity within the FFG. In this article, we discuss the potential of GSR to segregate face sensitive areas within the FFG and furthermore discuss how our results may relate to the functional organization of the face-perception circuit.

  13. Obliteration of a giant fusiform carotid terminus-M1 aneurysm after distal clip application and extracranial-intracranial bypass. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ferroli, P; Ciceri, E; Parati, E; Minati, L; Broggi, G

    2007-06-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms may not be amenable to direct surgical clipping or endovascular coiling because of three critical factors: 1) lack of clear aneurysmal neck; 2) giant size; 3) involvement with critical perforating or branch vessels. Techniques of flow redirection, however, may offer an alternative treatment strategy for these difficult lesions. In this paper, we report on the use of this alternative strategy in the successful treatment of a left giant fusiform carotid terminus-M1 aneurysm in a 16 year-old boy suffering from Ehler-Danlos disease. This patient was admitted to our Institution because his aneurysm was continuing to be increasing in size, despite a previous ligation of his left cervical ICA which was performed at another institution 2 years earlier after the patient had experienced a hemorrhagic stroke. Upon admission, a neurological examination revealed a slight motor aphasia with mild right hemiparesis, remnant of the ancient stroke. Because of its size and the involvement with M1 perforating arteries, a direct aneurysm attack was deemed inadvisable. After an initial ECA-ICA high flow bypass which spontaneously thrombosed, we performed a repeated high flow bypass with the application of a single clip on M1, right distal to the fusiform dilatation. After an uneventful postoperative course, we were unable to observe any new neurological deficits after surgery. A CT scan on postoperative day 1 revealed that the aneurysm had undergone a spontaneous thrombosis which was completely obliterated at the time of a 6-month follow-up angiogram. At that time, the ECA-ICA bypass was found to be patent. In conclusion the alternative of flow alteration strategies can be successfully used in the treatment of aneurysms that cannot be safely trapped or occluded by traditional neurosurgical methods.

  14. Spontaneous gastroduodenal artery aneurysm rupture in acute surgery.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Hsee, Li

    2012-06-29

    Among the rarest of the visceral aneurysms, gastroduodenal artery (GDA) aneurysms often present with spontaneous rupture and are associated with a high mortality rate. Their aetiology is poorly understood. This report describes a case of haemorrhagic shock due to sudden GDA aneurysm rupture in a patient with a significant autoimmune history.

  15. Delayed rupture of renal artery after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Puijlaert, C.B.A.J.; Mali, W.P.; Rosenbusch, G.; van Straalen, A.M.; Klinge, J.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two cases are reported in which rupture of the renal artery occurred many hours after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Delayed rupture can be recognized by the angiographic appearance and by the presence of persistent flank pain. The typical angiographic finding is a poorly defined zone of contrast medium at the site of perforation.

  16. The Resolution of Ruptures in the Therapeutic Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Jeremy D.; Muran, J. Christopher

    1996-01-01

    A rupture in the therapeutic alliance is a deterioration in the quality of the relationship between patient and therapist; it is an interpersonal marker that indicates an opportunity for exploring and understanding the processes that maintain a maladaptive interpersonal schema. Outlines features of a research program on ruptures in the therapeutic…

  17. Comparing two methods of identifying alliance rupture events.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana; Ribeiro, Eugénia; Sousa, Inês; Safran, Jeremy D

    2014-09-01

    This study compared two methods of detecting ruptures in therapy sessions, a procedure based on a self-report measure, the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI), and an observational Rupture Resolution Rating System (3RS). We anticipated that the 3RS would detect more ruptures than the WAI. We examined the longitudinal data of 38 patient-therapist dyads in a cognitive-behavioral therapy condition. The sample included cases that did not complete treatment (dropped cases) as well as good-outcome and poor-outcome cases. At the end of each session, patients completed the WAI self-report questionnaire. Six judges were trained to observe and detect the occurrence of ruptures, and then rated 201 videotaped sessions. Longitudinal statistical models were applied to the data retrieved from the WAI questionnaires completed by patients. We found discrepancies in the ability of the two methods to detect rupture events with the observational 3RS detecting more ruptures than the WAI. Thus, the use of observational systems for the detection of alliance ruptures is crucial for effectively assessing the quality of the therapeutic alliance over the course of treatment. Furthermore, observational systems proven to detect ruptures can be used to improve clinical practice and training of new clinicians.

  18. Spontaneous rupture of a liver hemangioma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Paredes, María Pilar; Martínez Fernández, Josefa; Morales González, Álvaro; Pardo-García, José Luis

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous rupture of a liver hemangioma is a very uncommon disease, but extremely seriousness because it is associated to a 75% of mortality caused by hipovolemic shock. A case of an spontaneous rupture of liver hemangioma, which was previously unknow, is presented.

  19. Diverse rupture processes in the 2015 Peru deep earthquake doublet

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo; Zhan, Zhongwen; Duputel, Zacharie

    2016-01-01

    Earthquakes in deeply subducted oceanic lithosphere can involve either brittle or dissipative ruptures. On 24 November 2015, two deep (606 and 622 km) magnitude 7.5 and 7.6 earthquakes occurred 316 s and 55 km apart. The first event (E1) was a brittle rupture with a sequence of comparable-size subevents extending unilaterally ~50 km southward with a rupture speed of ~4.5 km/s. This earthquake triggered several aftershocks to the north along with the other major event (E2), which had 40% larger seismic moment and the same duration (~20 s), but much smaller rupture area and lower rupture speed than E1, indicating a more dissipative rupture. A minor energy release ~12 s after E1 near the E2 hypocenter, possibly initiated by the S wave from E1, and a clear aftershock ~165 s after E1 also near the E2 hypocenter, suggest that E2 was likely dynamically triggered. Differences in deep earthquake rupture behavior are commonly attributed to variations in thermal state between subduction zones. However, the marked difference in rupture behavior of the nearby Peru doublet events suggests that local variations of stress state and material properties significantly contribute to diverse behavior of deep earthquakes. PMID:27386585

  20. Diverse rupture processes in the 2015 Peru deep earthquake doublet.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo; Zhan, Zhongwen; Duputel, Zacharie

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes in deeply subducted oceanic lithosphere can involve either brittle or dissipative ruptures. On 24 November 2015, two deep (606 and 622 km) magnitude 7.5 and 7.6 earthquakes occurred 316 s and 55 km apart. The first event (E1) was a brittle rupture with a sequence of comparable-size subevents extending unilaterally ~50 km southward with a rupture speed of ~4.5 km/s. This earthquake triggered several aftershocks to the north along with the other major event (E2), which had 40% larger seismic moment and the same duration (~20 s), but much smaller rupture area and lower rupture speed than E1, indicating a more dissipative rupture. A minor energy release ~12 s after E1 near the E2 hypocenter, possibly initiated by the S wave from E1, and a clear aftershock ~165 s after E1 also near the E2 hypocenter, suggest that E2 was likely dynamically triggered. Differences in deep earthquake rupture behavior are commonly attributed to variations in thermal state between subduction zones. However, the marked difference in rupture behavior of the nearby Peru doublet events suggests that local variations of stress state and material properties significantly contribute to diverse behavior of deep earthquakes.

  1. Tibialis posterior tendon rupture: a cause of rheumatoid flat foot.

    PubMed

    Downey, D J; Simkin, P A; Mack, L A; Richardson, M L; Kilcoyne, R F; Hansen, S T

    1988-03-01

    Flat foot, a major cause of foot pain and disability, may result from rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon. We describe 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who developed flat feet secondary to surgically confirmed tendon rupture, and we discuss the anatomy and diagnosis of this condition. In the second patient, we also present the results of tendon imaging with both magnetic resonance and ultrasound.

  2. Tracheal rupture in a cat: diagnosis by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, Jitender; Kuzma, Alan

    2008-06-01

    A cat was presented with a history of worsening generalized subcutaneous emphysema following dental prophylaxis. Tentative diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made. The location and extent of the tear was confirmed with the help of computed tomography. This is the 1st computed tomographic description of tracheal rupture in the veterinary literature.

  3. Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault Rupture Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Most faults have not ruptured once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future rupture length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ≤5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K ruptures ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long ruptures have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault ruptures? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface ruptures worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface ruptures. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip ruptures are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in ruptures that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity

  4. Control of seafloor roughness on earthquake rupture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Susan L.; Schwartz, Susan Y.; Deshon, Heather R.

    2003-05-01

    Earthquake rupture complexity is described for three recent large underthrusting earthquakes along the Costa Rican subduction zone, the 1983 Osa, 1990 Nicoya Gulf, and 1999 Quepos events. These earthquakes occurred in regions characterized by distinctly different morphologic features on the subducting plate. The 1990 and 1999 events occurred along linear projections of subducting seamount chains and had fairly simple earthquake rupture histories. Both events are interpreted as failure of the basal contact of closely spaced isolated seamounts acting as asperities. In contrast, the 1983 event occurred along the subducting Cocos Ridge and had a complex rupture history. Comparison of rupture characteristics of these large underthrusting earthquakes with size and location of subducting features provides evidence that seamounts can be subducted to seismogenic depths and that variations in seafloor bathymetry of the subducting plate strongly influence the earthquake rupture process.

  5. Material contrast does not predict earthquake rupture propagation direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is rupture behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake rupture propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake rupture propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake rupture propagation direction cannot be predicted from the material contrast. In this paper we provide observational evidence from 70 years of earthquakes at Parkfield, CA, and new 3D numerical simulations. Both the observations and the numerical simulations demonstrate that earthquake rupture propagation direction is unlikely to be predictable on the basis of a material contrast. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Incidence of plantar fascia ruptures following corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul; Cashdollar, Michael R; Mendicino, Robert W; Catanzariti, Alan R; Fuge, LaDonna

    2010-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is commonly treated with corticosteroid injections to decrease pain and inflammation. Therapeutic benefits often vary in terms of efficacy and duration. Rupture of the plantar fascia has been reported as a possible complication following corticosteroid injection. A retrospective chart review of 120 patients who received corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis was performed at the authors' institution to determine the incidence of plantar fascia rupture. The plantar fascia rupture was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Various factors were analyzed, including the number of injections, interval between injections, body mass index (BMI), and activity level. Four patients (2.4%) consequently experienced plantar fascia rupture following an average of 2.67 injections. The average BMI of these patients was 38.6 kg/m². The authors conclude that corticosteroid injection therapy appears to be a safe and effective form of nonoperative treatment with minimal complications and a relatively low incident of plantar fascia rupture.

  7. Pneumatic Rupture of Rectosigmoid; a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Farhangi, Bahman; Montazeri, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic rectosigmoid rapture is usually occurred following the inappropriate fun by direct entering a high volume of the air through the pneumatic device to the anus. Such an event was reported for the first time in 1904 by Stone. Diagnosis and treatment of such injuries are often delayed because of some social limitations and preventing the patient form explaining the event. Colon sigmoid rupture and pneumoperitoneum is one of the most dangerous and life treating complications of entering a high volume of the air to the rectum in a short time. There are only a few reports regarding the similar cases. Here, a case of pneumatic rectosigmoid rapture was reported in a 53 year-old male following an inappropriate fun.

  8. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-04-16

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100,000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission.

  9. Behçet's disease with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm following ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Atsushi; Kawashima, Masatou; Matsushima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old Japanese woman with Behçet's disease suffered successive rupture of thoracic aortic and cerebral aneurysms within one year. The patient underwent successful surgical treatment for both aneurysms. Histological examination of the aneurysm walls revealed lymphocyte infiltration into the adventitia with smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in the thickened intima. This is an extremely unusual presentation of Behçet's disease associated with both cerebral and aortic aneurysms.

  10. Uterine rupture in pregnancies following myomectomy: A multicenter case series

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sun; Oh, Soo-Young; Choi, Suk-Joo; Park, Hyun-Soo; Cho, Geum-Joon; Chung, Jin-Hoon; Seo, Yong-Soo; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Chae, Su-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series was to retrospectively examine records of cases with uterine rupture in pregnancies following myomectomy and to describe the clinical features and pregnancy outcomes. Methods This study was conducted as a multicenter case series. The patient databases at 7 tertiary hospitals were queried. Records of patients with a diagnosis of uterine rupture in the pregnancy following myomectomy between January 2012 and December 2014 were retrospectively collected. The uterine rupture cases enrolled in this study were defined as follows: through-and-through uterine rupture or tear of the uterine muscle and serosa, occurrence from 24+0 to 41+6 weeks’ gestation, singleton pregnancy, and previous laparoscopic myomectomy (LSM) or laparotomic myomectomy (LTM) status. Results Fourteen pregnant women experienced uterine rupture during their pregnancy after LSM or LTM. Preterm delivery of less than 34 weeks’ gestation occurred in 5 cases, while intrauterine fetal death occurred in 3, and 3 cases had fetal distress. Of the 14 uterine rupture cases, none occurred during labor. All mothers survived and had no sequelae, unlike the perinatal outcomes, although they were receiving blood transfusion or treatment for uterine artery embolization because of uterine atony or massive hemorrhage. Conclusion In women of childbearing age who are scheduled to undergo LTM or LSM, the potential risk of uterine rupture on subsequent pregnancy should be explained before surgery. Pregnancy in women after myomectomy should be carefully observed, and they should be adequately counseled during this period. PMID:27896247

  11. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  12. Shigella subverts the host recycling compartment to rupture its vacuole.

    PubMed

    Mellouk, Nora; Weiner, Allon; Aulner, Nathalie; Schmitt, Christine; Elbaum, Michael; Shorte, Spencer L; Danckaert, Anne; Enninga, Jost

    2014-10-08

    Shigella enters epithlial cells via internalization into a vacuole. Subsequent vacuolar membrane rupture allows bacterial escape into the cytosol for replication and cell-to-cell spread. Bacterial effectors such as IpgD, a PI(4,5)P2 phosphatase that generates PI(5)P and alters host actin, facilitate this internalization. Here, we identify host proteins involved in Shigella uptake and vacuolar membrane rupture by high-content siRNA screening and subsequently focus on Rab11, a constituent of the recycling compartment. Rab11-positive vesicles are recruited to the invasion site before vacuolar rupture, and Rab11 knockdown dramatically decreases vacuolar membrane rupture. Additionally, Rab11 recruitment is absent and vacuolar rupture is delayed in the ipgD mutant that does not dephosphorylate PI(4,5)P₂ into PI(5)P. Ultrastructural analyses of Rab11-positive vesicles further reveal that ipgD mutant-containing vacuoles become confined in actin structures that likely contribute to delayed vacular rupture. These findings provide insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of vacuole progression and rupture during Shigella invasion.

  13. Minimum Energy Path to Membrane Pore Formation and Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Christina L.; Appelö, Daniel; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2011-04-01

    We combine dynamic self-consistent field theory with the string method to calculate the minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and rupture. In the regime where nucleation can occur on experimentally relevant time scales, the structure of the critical nucleus is between a solvophilic stalk and a locally thinned membrane. Classical nucleation theory fails to capture these molecular details and significantly overestimates the free energy barrier. Our results suggest that thermally nucleated rupture may be an important factor for the low rupture strains observed in lipid membranes.

  14. Rupture of all digital flexors following Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Srinivasan; Basu, Indraneil; Kaba, Rahim; Pabari, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Flexor tendon rupture following a Colles' fracture is a rare complication with only a handful of cases reported since the initial report in 1932. We present a case in which all digital flexor tendons ruptured within 6 months of a Colles' fracture. Previous reported cases have demonstrated rupture of either the radial or ulnar digital flexors but this case is the first in which all the digital flexors have been involved. This case report highlights the clinical implications of this rare occurrence and stresses the importance of accurate reduction and thorough clinical examination following bony injuries to the wrist.

  15. Surviving Right Atrial Rupture From Blunt Thoracic Trauma After Pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Sepehr Seyed; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Nova, George; Marshman, David

    2016-02-01

    Right atrial rupture secondary to blunt trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case report of blunt chest trauma and right atrial rupture in a patient with a background of pericardiectomy that were successfully managed surgically. Right atrial rupture must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with blunt chest trauma. In patients with previous pericardiectomy, this injury may manifest with massive hemothorax, and insertion of a chest drain should be performed with extreme caution. In our experience, urgent exploratory thoracotomy and repair of the defect are the mainstays of acute management.

  16. Acute partial rupture of the common extensor tendon.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, G; Papadopoulou, O

    2010-06-01

    Rupture of the common extensor tendon is the most common acute tendon injury of the elbow. The authors describe a case of a patient with a clinical history of tendinopathy caused by functional overload of the common extensor tendon, treated also with infiltrations of steroids, and subsequent partial rupture of the tendon during sport activity. The diagnosis was made clinically and at ultrasound (US) examination; US follow-up after some time showed the healing of the lesion. This case confirms that injections of steroids may be a contributory cause of tendon rupture, and emphasizes the sensitivity and specificity of US in the study of pathologies of the elbow tendons.

  17. Nuclear envelope rupture drives genome instability in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghee; Quinton, Ryan J.; Ganem, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope, composed of two lipid bilayers and numerous accessory proteins, has evolved to house the genetic material of all eukaryotic cells. In so doing, the nuclear envelope provides a physical barrier between chromosomes and the cytoplasm. Once believed to be highly stable, recent studies demonstrate that the nuclear envelope is prone to rupture. These rupture events expose chromosomal DNA to the cytoplasmic environment and have the capacity to promote DNA damage. Thus nuclear rupture may be an unappreciated mechanism of mutagenesis. PMID:27799497

  18. Bilateral simultaneous infrapatellar tendon ruptures: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J T; Lester, M N

    1994-09-01

    This case study reports on a patient with a diagnosis of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. Bilateral ruptures of the infrapatellar tendons are rare occurrences; approximately 20 cases have been reported in the medical literature. Much of the medical literature concentrates on surgical repair, immediate postoperative follow-up, and final outcome. There is a void in the literature concerning the rehabilitative process of these patients. The subject of this study is a 26-year-old male former collegiate athlete who suffered simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon ruptures while jumping. A rehabilitation model is provided that may assist others treating patients with similar conditions.

  19. [Spontaneous splenic rupture in the second quarter of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Brocas, E; Tenaillon, A

    2002-03-01

    We report the case of a 33 year-old woman at the second quarter of pregnancy, with known brain aneurysm admitted in intensive care unit for sudden coma. The coma was not related to a rupture of the brain aneurysm but to a serious haemorrhagic shock caused by a spontaneous splenic rupture. This case report illustrates the difficulty of this unrecognized diagnosis and reminds us to suspect a spontaneous splenic rupture in front of any pregnant woman with atypic abdominal pain and haemorrhagic shock.

  20. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  1. Design procedure prevents PE pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Grigory, S.C.

    1995-12-01

    A rupture prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy as the measurement of fracture toughness of PE. Present efforts, however, involve replacing Charpy energy with a dynamic toughness measurement obtained from the Small Scale Steady State (S4) test that is required in ISO 4437. The program is being financed by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago. RCP events in PE pipe have been rare primarily because operating pressures are low and pipe diameters are small in most gas distribution systems. However, controlled RCP experiments in the US and other countries clearly demonstrate that as the gas industry moves toward higher line pressures and larger diameters, the likelihood of an RCP event increases. Recognizing this, ISO includes a requirement for RCP in its ISO 4437 standard for pipe greater than 10 inches in diameter or operating pressures greater than 58 psig. The S4 test may be used on all pipe diameters. A full scale test or the S4 test can be used on pipe greater than 10 inches diameter.

  2. Co-existence of a rare dyspnea with pericardial diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Öz, Necdet; Kargı, Ahmet Bülent; Zeybek, Arife

    2015-06-01

    Pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture is a rare condition which occurs after blunt trauma and involves the herniation of abdominal organs into the pericardium. A 77-year-old female patient presenting with complaints of palpitation and difficulty in breathing was admitted to the emergency room. Left lateral thoracotomy revealed the herniation of abdominal organs into the thorax. A pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture and a pericardial rupture were found to co-exist. The diaphragm and the pericardium were repaired primarily. The case is presented here because herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavity through the pericardium is a rare condition.

  3. An unusual case of cardiac tamponade: ruptured subaortic diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Arash; Lee, Ben; Ivascu, Natalia; Webber, Geoffrey; Paul, Subroto

    2010-05-01

    Cardiac diverticula are rare congenital anomalies found as outpouchings from various chambers of the heart. We present a case of a diverticulum arising from the membranous septum with free rupture into the pericardial space and tamponade.

  4. Consequences of a tight squeeze: Nuclear envelope rupture and repair.

    PubMed

    Isermann, Philipp; Lammerding, Jan

    2017-03-13

    Cell migration through tight spaces can induce substantial deformations of the nucleus and cause nuclear envelope (NE) rupture, resulting in uncontrolled exchange of nuclear and cytosolic proteins. These events can cause DNA damage and, in severe cases, nuclear fragmentation, challenging the integrity of the genomic material. Cells overcome NE ruptures during interphase by repairing the NE using components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Paralleling the molecular mechanism employed during NE reformation in late mitosis, ESCRT-III subunits and the associated AAA-ATPase VPS4B are recruited to NE rupture sites and help restore NE integrity. While these findings are common to many cell types, they are particularly relevant in the context of cancer metastasis, where nuclear deformation and rupture could drive genomic instability in invading cells and further promote cancer progression. At the same time, inhibiting NE repair may offer new therapeutic approaches to specifically target invasive cancer cells.

  5. Uroperitoneum attributable to ruptured urachus in a yearling bull.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G M; Zamos, D T; Mueller, P O

    1992-02-15

    Ruptured urachus was found to result in uroperitoneum in a yearling Beefmaster bull. The uroperitoneum was initially believed to be attributable to ruptured bladder secondary to urolithiasis; however, catheter decompression of the bladder through an ischiatic urethrotomy did not resolve the uroperitoneum. The persistent urachus was diagnosed and removed through caudal right flank laparotomy with the bull standing. The urachus was attached to the umbilicus, communicated with the lumen of the bladder, and had a mucosal lining. Ruptured urachus is an unusual cause of uroperitoneum, but can cause clinical signs identical to those of ruptured bladder. Persistent urachus is a congenital abnormality in many species, but may be hereditary in Beefmaster cattle. In addition, the bull in this report developed hyperkalemia, which is considered an unusual finding in cattle with uroperitoneum.

  6. Cocaine Use and Splenic Rupture: A Rare Yet Serious Association

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, Nishrutha; Gnanapandithan, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is frequent in patients visiting the emergency department. The knowledge of the cardiovascular complications of cocaine is excellent among physicians. However the awareness regarding its abdominal complications, the most important of which include gastroduodenal perforation, bowel ischemia and splenic rupture is less adequate. We report a 58-year-old with cocaine use who presents with upper abdominal pain and a rapidly worsening clinical status. He was found to have atraumatic splenic rupture causing a hemoperitoneum that was managed by intervention radiology guided splenic artery embolization. Splenic hemorrhage and rupture need timely recognition, as they are difficult to diagnose clinically and can be potentially fatal. In the encounter of patients with cocaine use who present with chest or upper abdominal pain, clinicians should consider imaging to look for splenic rupture as it is often masked or overlooked due to the complicated clinical picture. PMID:27777711

  7. Spontaneous rupture of thinning liquid films with Plateau borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Anthony; Brush, Lucien; Davis, Stephen

    2009-11-01

    Spontaneous film rupture from van der Waals instability is investigated in 2D. A thin liquid film between adjacent bubbles in a foam has finite length, curved boundaries (Plateau borders), and a drainage flow from capillary suction that causes thinning. A full linear stability analysis of this thinning film shows that rupture occurs once the film has thinned to tens of nanometers. Whereas, in an unbounded, quiescent, flat free film, rupture occurs when the thickness is hundreds of nanometers. Finite length, Plateau borders and flow are all found to contribute to the stabilization. The drainage flow leads to several distinct qualitative features as well. In particular, unstable disturbances are advected by the flow to the edges of the thin film. As a result, the edges of the film close to the Plateau borders are more susceptible to rupture that the center of the film.

  8. Multi-Canister overpack necessity of the rupture disk

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) rupture disk precludes the MCO from pressurization above the design limit during transport from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility and prior to connection of the CVD process piping. Removal of the rupture disk from the MCO design would: (a) result in unacceptable dose consequences in the event a thermal runaway accident occurred; (b) increase residual risk; and (c) remove a degree of specificity from the dose calculations. The potential cost savings of removing the rupture disk from the MCO design is offset by the cost of design modifications, changes to hazard analyses and safety analyses, and changes to existing documentation. Retaining the rupture disk mitigates the consequences of MCO overpressurization, and considering the overall economic impacts to the SNF Project, is the most cost effective approach.

  9. Plantar fascia rupture in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Kato, Kenji; Takao, Shoichiro; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshitsugu; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old male professional soccer player who presented with symptoms of plantar fasciitis. His symptoms occurred with no remarkable triggers and gradually worsened despite conservative treatments including taping, use of insoles, and physical therapy. Local corticosteroid injection was given twice as a further intervention, but his plantar fascia partially ruptured 49 days after the second injection. He was treated conservatively with platelet-rich plasma, and magnetic resonance imaging showed regenerative change of the ruptured fascia. Five months after the rupture, he returned to his original level of training. If professional athletes find it difficult to refrain from athletic activity, as in the present case, the risk of rupture due to corticosteroid injection should not be overlooked.

  10. [Subcapsular hematoma and rupture of the liver graft].

    PubMed

    Görög, Dénes; Fehérvári, Imre; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs; Máthé, Zoltán; Kóbori, László; Járay, Jeno

    2008-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft is uncommon but serious complication of liver transplantation. It may develop spontaneously or following parenchymal injuries or percutaneous transhepatic invasive procedures. This report describes three cases of subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft with different courses among 350 liver transplantations. In the first case, the patient died due to graft rupture caused by a pseudoaneurysm after biopsy. In the second case, a small injury of the donor liver resulted in a deep rupture, which required partial resection of the graft. The patient died in sepsis later. The third patient presented with a large subcapsular haematoma during transplantation, which was successfully treated. The authors' strategies developed intraoperatively for the management of hematomas. These involve opening and removing of the haematoma, haemostasis with Argon coagulation, which resulted in an adherent Glisson's capsule to the parenchyma and covering with collagen fleece coated with fibrinogen and thrombin.

  11. Outcome of ruptured uterus at University Teaching Hospital Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Bakour, S; Nassif, B; Nwosu, E C

    1998-09-01

    A 10-year review of ruptured gravid uterus at the University Teaching Hospital, Aleppo, Syria showed an incidence of one ruptured uterus in 565 deliveries. This is an average figure compared with published studies but is still high compared with developed countries. Sixty-four per cent of the cases of ruptured uterus had no antenatal care. It is no surprise therefore that maternal and fetal mortality was highest amongst the unbooked labouring women. In survivors the morbidity was also higher. Ruptured uterus is therefore a major cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity in Syria. The overall hospital maternal and perinatal mortalities for the period under review were 4.3% and 2.6% respectively. The main risk factor identified is scarring from previous caesarean sections. Other risk factors are discussed.

  12. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered.

  13. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  14. A ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Shang, Shih-Ta; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2010-02-01

    We describe a case of ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis in a previously healthy man. The patient underwent craniotomy with clipping of aneurysm and received antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks and survived.

  15. Dynamic rupture of megathrust earthquakes with branching on splay faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somala, S.; Ampuero, J. P.; Lapusta, N.

    2010-12-01

    The accretionary prism of subduction margins generally contains splay faults that approach the surface at steeper angles than the megathrust interface. Rupture propagating onto splay faults during megathrust earthquakes can increase seafloor uplift significantly and contribute to the potential of tsunami. Another key aspect of tsunamigenic earthquakes is their relatively low radiation efficiency, which could be related to slow rupture at shallow depth due to frictionally stable fault properties. We present here results of numerical simulations of dynamic rupture on megathrust/splay fault systems that address the mechanical plausibility and characteristics of coseismic slip on splay faults. As a case study, we consider a possible earthquake scenario for the Nankai subduction zone. Previous dynamic rupture simulations (Wendt et. al., 2009) considered a splay fault that cuts through the overriding crust and reaches the surface more than 100 km away from the trench. We examine instead a model geometry based on seismic reflection profiling in Nankai, in which a megasplay fault branches off at around 50 km from the trench, cuts through the sedimentary wedge and reaches the seafloor at about 25 km from the trench. We first investigate the 2D dynamics of this splay fault system, governed by slip-weakening friction law. We compare rupture propagation on this faulting model using a finite-element code (PyLith) and a spectral element code (SEM2DPACK). We report on the favorable conditions for splay faults to rupture, the degree of slip partitioning and the effects of arresting rupture at different depths on the plate-boundary. We also show how well our work correlates with previous works on branched fault systems. We then select a small set of 3D simulations that illustrates the main aspects. Finally the effect of velocity-strengthening fault properties at shallow depth is studied in the context of rate-and-state friction, with particular emphasis on the conditions to produce

  16. Complications of plantar fascia rupture associated with corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, J I; Beskin, J L

    1998-02-01

    From 1992 to 1995, 765 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were evaluated by one of the authors. Fifty-one patients were diagnosed with plantar fascia rupture, and 44 of these ruptures were associated with corticosteroid injection. The authors injected 122 of the 765 patients, resulting in 12 of the 44 plantar fascia ruptures. Subjective and objective evaluations were conducted through chart and radiographic review. Thirty-nine of these patients were evaluated at an average 27-month follow-up. Thirty patients (68%) reported a sudden onset of tearing at the heel, and 14 (32%) had a gradual onset of symptoms. In most cases the original heel pain was relieved by rupture. However, these patients subsequently developed new problems including longitudinal arch strain, lateral and dorsal midfoot strain, lateral plantar nerve dysfunction, stress fracture, hammertoe deformity, swelling, and/or antalgia. All patients exhibited diminished tension of the plantar fascia upon examination by the stretch test. Comparison of calcaneal pitch angles in the affected and uninvolved foot showed a statistically significant difference of 3.7 degrees (P = 0.0001). Treatment included NSAIDs, rest or cross-training, stretching, orthotics, and boot-brace immobilization. At an average 27-month follow-up, 50% had good/excellent scores and 50% had fair/poor scores. Recovery time was varied. Ten feet were asymptomatic by 6 months post rupture, four feet by 12 months post rupture, and 26 feet remained symptomatic 1 year post rupture. Our findings demonstrate that plantar fascia rupture after corticosteroid injection may result in long-term sequelae that are difficult to resolve.

  17. Multiple branching rupture of the 2009 Tonga-Samoa earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M.; Ji, Chen; Bassett, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Several source models have been proposed to explain the enigmatic 2009 Tonga-Samoa earthquake. The long-period data require a composite source model and can be fit with a normal-faulting subevent followed by one or more reverse-faulting subevents. The short-period data, in contrast, indicate a more compact rupture pattern around the epicenter. The lack of a unified source model reflects the complexity of the event. We analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of this earthquake with P wave back-projection from globally distributed stations in different frequency bands (low frequency: 0.05-0.2 Hz, high frequency: 0.2-2 Hz) and a multiple moment tensor inversion. The rupture propagation revealed by back-projection exhibits frequency-dependent behavior, with two branches of high-frequency-enriched bilateral rupture around the epicenter and a high-frequency-deficient rupture branch at the subduction interface. A composite source model with one Mw 8.0 normal-faulting earthquake east of the trench axis (seaward) followed by one Mw 8.1 reverse-faulting earthquake along the subduction interface west of the trench axis (landward) can explain the very long period data (200˜500 s). Combined with high-resolution swath bathymetry data, the back-projection images show that the azimuth of rupture branches east of the trench axis were controlled by the geometry of bending-related faults on the Pacific plate and that the rupture branch west of the trench axis may correlate with the along-strike fore-arc segmentation. The rupture along the subduction interface was triggered by the seaward rupture and a partially subducted normal fault may have played a key role in facilitating the triggering. The apparent normal-reverse faulting interactions pose a higher seismic risk to this region than their individual strands at the northernmost corner of the Tonga subduction zone.

  18. First report of splenic rupture following deep enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Pometta, Roberta; Facciotto, Corinna; Mella, Roberto; Bernasconi, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Splenic rupture is a rare complication of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. Herein, we report for the first time a case of splenic rupture following therapeutic retrograde double-balloon enteroscopy, which occurred in an 85-year-old man who was treated for recurrent mid-intestinal bleeding that resulted from ileal angioectasia. This patient promptly underwent an operation and eventually recovered. PMID:27170840

  19. A Tuboovarian Abscess Associated with a Ruptured Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Sheele, Johnathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of a tuboovarian abscess complicated by a ruptured spleen. Our patient was a 27-year-old female with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of urinary symptoms and diarrhea. After being diagnosed with a tuboovarian abscess (TOA), she received antibiotics and was admitted to the gynecology service. Shortly thereafter she developed hemorrhagic shock, necessitating a splenectomy and salpingooophorectomy from a ruptured spleen. PMID:26904315

  20. Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after radio-frequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Jung, S L; Baek, J H; Kim, J-H

    2011-12-01

    Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after RFA is very rare. We experienced 6 cases in 4 institutions. All patients presented with abrupt neck swelling and pain between 9 and 60 days after RFA. Imaging and clinical findings of the ruptured tumors were anterior subcapsular location, mixed composition, large size, and repeated ablations. Conservative treatment was sufficient in 3 cases, whereas surgical management was required in 3.

  1. Rupture of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration

    PubMed Central

    Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    Successful repair and survival after rupture of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where rupture of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre—the patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4469046

  2. Time course of gamma-band oscillation associated with face processing in the inferior occipital gyrus and fusiform gyrus: A combined fMRI and MEG study.

    PubMed

    Uono, Shota; Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2017-04-01

    Debate continues over whether the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) or the fusiform gyrus (FG) represents the first stage of face processing and what role these brain regions play. We investigated this issue by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) in normal adults. Participants passively observed upright and inverted faces and houses. First, we identified the IOG and FG as face-specific regions using fMRI. We applied beamforming source reconstruction and time-frequency analysis to MEG source signals to reveal the time course of gamma-band activations in these regions. The results revealed that the right IOG showed higher gamma-band activation in response to upright faces than to upright houses at 100 ms from the stimulus onset. Subsequently, the right FG showed greater gamma-band response to upright faces versus upright houses at around 170 ms. The gamma-band activation in the right IOG and right FG was larger in response to inverted faces than to upright faces at the later time window. These results suggest that (1) the gamma-band activities occurs rapidly first in the IOG and next in the FG and (2) the gamma-band activity in the right IOG at later time stages is involved in configuration processing for faces. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2067-2079, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Presence of two neuropeptides in the fusiform ganglion and reproductive ducts of Octopus vulgaris: FMRFamide and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Carlo; Paolucci, Marina; Iglesias, Josè; Sanchez, Javier; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2002-02-15

    We have found evidence of FMRFamide-like and cGnRH-I-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the reproductive ducts of both female and male cephalopod Octopus vulgaris. Cell bodies and fibers were immunolocalized in the fusiform ganglion from which the nerves that reach the female and male reproductive ducts arise. FMRFamide-like and cGnRH-I-like immunoreactive nerve endings were present in the oviduct, and in the oviducal gland of the female and in the seminal vesicle of the male. The GnRH-like peptide from the reproductive ducts has been partially characterized by HPLC. The retention time of the Octopus vulgaris GnRH-like peptide was similar to the retention time of cGnRH-I. Based on these observations we suggest that FMRFamide-like and a novel GnRH-like peptide are involved in the control of reproductive ducts of Octopus vulgaris. One possibility is that the peptides affect gamete transport. Another possibility is that they regulate secretory products such as mucus and mucilaginous substances from the oviducal gland and the seminal vesicle. Our data provide further evidence to support the hypothesis of the existence of a central and peripheral peptidergic control of reproduction of Octopus vulgaris.

  4. Goal-Directed Actions Activate the Face-Sensitive Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus and Fusiform Gyrus in the Absence of Human-Like Perceptual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The conditions under which we identify entities as animate agents and the neural mechanisms supporting this ability are central questions in social neuroscience. Prior studies have focused upon 2 perceptual cues for signaling animacy: 1) surface features representing body forms such as faces, torsos, and limbs and 2) motion cues associated with biological forms. Here, we consider a third cue—the goal-directedness of an action. Regions in the social brain network, such as the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and fusiform face area (FFA), are activated by human-like motion and body form perceptual cues signaling animacy. Here, we investigate whether these same brain regions are activated by goal-directed motion even when performed by entities that lack human-like perceptual cues. We observed an interaction effect whereby the presence of either human-like perceptual cues or goal-directed actions was sufficient to activate the right pSTS and FFA. Only stimuli that lacked human-like perceptual cues and goal-directed actions failed to activate the pSTS and FFA at the same level. PMID:21768227

  5. Neural adaptation to thin and fat bodies in the fusiform body area and middle occipital gyrus: an fMRI adaptation study.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Dennis; Rudolf, Anne K; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Untch, Karl-Heinz; Grabhorn, Ralph; Hampel, Harald; Mohr, Harald M

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception can be strongly biased due to exposure to specific stimuli in the environment, often causing neural adaptation and visual aftereffects. In this study, we investigated whether adaptation to certain body shapes biases the perception of the own body shape. Furthermore, we aimed to evoke neural adaptation to certain body shapes. Participants completed a behavioral experiment (n = 14) to rate manipulated pictures of their own bodies after adaptation to demonstratively thin or fat pictures of their own bodies. The same stimuli were used in a second experiment (n = 16) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation. In the behavioral experiment, after adapting to a thin picture of the own body participants also judged a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa, resembling a typical aftereffect. The fusiform body area (FBA) and the right middle occipital gyrus (rMOG) show neural adaptation to specific body shapes while the extrastriate body area (EBA) bilaterally does not. The rMOG cluster is highly selective for bodies and perhaps body parts. The findings of the behavioral experiment support the existence of a perceptual body shape aftereffect, resulting from a specific adaptation to thin and fat pictures of one's own body. The fMRI results imply that body shape adaptation occurs in the FBA and the rMOG. The role of the EBA in body shape processing remains unclear. The results are also discussed in the light of clinical body image disturbances.

  6. Bioassay-guided isolation of an active compound with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity from Sargassum fusiforme by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Gu, Dongyu; Guo, Xinfeng; Li, Haoquan; Wang, Yi; Guo, Hong; Yang, Yi; Tian, Jing

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and efficient method using high-speed counter-current chromatography was established for the bioassay-guided separation of an active compound with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity from Sargassum fusiforme. Under the bioassay guidance, the ethyl acetate extract with the best IC50 value of 0.37 ± 0.07 μg/mL exhibited a potential protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity, which was further separated by high-speed counter-current chromatography. The separation was performed with a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane/methanol/water (5:4:1, v/v). As a result, dibutyl phthalate (19.7 mg) with the purity of 95.3% was obtained from 200 mg of the ethyl acetate extract. Its IC50 was 14.05 ± 0.06 μM, which was further explained by molecular docking. The result of molecular docking showed that dibutyl phthalate enfolded in the catalytic site of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The main force between dibutyl phthalate and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B was the hydrogen bond interaction with Gln266. In addition, hydrogen bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic interaction with the amino acids (Ala217, Ile219, and Gly220) were also responsible for the stable protein-ligand complex.

  7. Stimulus Value Signals in Ventromedial PFC Reflect the Integration of Attribute Value Signals Computed in Fusiform Gyrus and Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Lark; O'Doherty, John P.

    2013-01-01

    We often have to make choices among multiattribute stimuli (e.g., a food that differs on its taste and health). Behavioral data suggest that choices are made by computing the value of the different attributes and then integrating them into an overall stimulus value signal. However, it is not known whether this theory describes the way the brain computes the stimulus value signals, or how the underlying computations might be implemented. We investigated these questions using a human fMRI task in which individuals had to evaluate T-shirts that varied in their visual esthetic (e.g., color) and semantic (e.g., meaning of logo printed in T-shirt) components. We found that activity in the fusiform gyrus, an area associated with the processing of visual features, correlated with the value of the visual esthetic attributes, but not with the value of the semantic attributes. In contrast, activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus, an area associated with the processing of semantic meaning, exhibited the opposite pattern. Furthermore, both areas exhibited functional connectivity with an area of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that reflects the computation of overall stimulus values at the time of decision. The results provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that some attribute values are computed in cortical areas specialized in the processing of such features, and that those attribute-specific values are then passed to the vmPFC to be integrated into an overall stimulus value signal to guide the decision. PMID:23678116

  8. Incidence and outcome of rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Cretnik, Andrej; Frank, Aleksander

    2004-01-01

    We determined the incidence of complete rupture of the Achilles tendon in the Maribor region (273,609 inhabitants) between 1991 and 1996. During this period, 116 ruptures were treated at Maribor Teaching Hospital. The average incidence was 7 ruptures per 100,000 inhabitants, with a peak incidence of almost 9 per 100,000. Most injuries (65%) occurred during sports activities, with soccer as the major cause of rupture. The average age of patients was 37 years with a male-to-female ratio of 18:1. All patients underwent open surgical repair of the ruptured Achilles tendon, with a minimum follow-up of two years. 19.8% of cases developed complications and in 10.4% of these the complications were major. 1.9% of patients sustained a re-rupture. The mean AOFAS score was 96 points. The patients were subjectively very satisfied with their treatment in 88% of cases. Good functional results with a return to the usual pre-injury activities were achieved in 96% of patients.

  9. Dynamic rupture modeling with laboratory-derived constitutive relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-derived state variable friction constitutive relation is used in the numerical simulation of the dynamic growth of an in-plane or mode II shear crack. According to this formulation, originally presented by J.H. Dieterich, frictional resistance varies with the logarithm of the slip rate and with the logarithm of the frictional state variable as identified by A.L. Ruina. Under conditions of steady sliding, the state variable is proportional to (slip rate)-1. Following suddenly introduced increases in slip rate, the rate and state dependencies combine to produce behavior which resembles slip weakening. When rupture nucleation is artificially forced at fixed rupture velocity, rupture models calculated with the state variable friction in a uniformly distributed initial stress field closely resemble earlier rupture models calculated with a slip weakening fault constitutive relation. Model calculations suggest that dynamic rupture following a state variable friction relation is similar to that following a simpler fault slip weakening law. However, when modeling the full cycle of fault motions, rate-dependent frictional responses included in the state variable formulation are important at low slip rates associated with rupture nucleation. -from Author

  10. Stochastic Earthquake Rupture Modeling Using Nonparametric Co-Regionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungbook; Song, Seok Goo

    2016-10-01

    Accurate predictions of the intensity and variability of ground motions are essential in simulation-based seismic hazard assessment. Advanced simulation-based ground motion prediction methods have been proposed to complement the empirical approach, which suffers from the lack of observed ground motion data, especially in the near-source region for large events. It is important to quantify the variability of the earthquake rupture process for future events and to produce a number of rupture scenario models to capture the variability in simulation-based ground motion predictions. In this study, we improved the previously developed stochastic earthquake rupture modeling method by applying the nonparametric co-regionalization, which was proposed in geostatistics, to the correlation models estimated from dynamically derived earthquake rupture models. The nonparametric approach adopted in this study is computationally efficient and, therefore, enables us to simulate numerous rupture scenarios, including large events (M > 7.0). It also gives us an opportunity to check the shape of true input correlation models in stochastic modeling after being deformed for permissibility. We expect that this type of modeling will improve our ability to simulate a wide range of rupture scenario models and thereby predict ground motions and perform seismic hazard assessment more accurately.

  11. A Kinematic Rupture Model Generator Using Irikura's Recipe

    SciTech Connect

    Pitarka, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this project we developed GEN_SRF4 a computer program for generating kinematic rupture models, compatible with the SRF format, using Irikura and Miyake (2011) asperity-­based earthquake rupture model (IM2011, hereafter). IM2011, also known as Irkura’s recipe, has been widely used to model and simulate ground motion from earthquakes in Japan. An essential part of the method is its kinematic rupture generation technique, which is based on a deterministic rupture asperity modeling approach. The source model simplicity and efficiency of IM2011 at reproducing ground motion from earthquakes recorded in Japan makes it attractive to developers and users of the Southern California Earthquake Center Broadband Platform (SCEC BB platform). Besides writing the code the objective of our study was to test the transportability of IM2011 to broadband simulation methods used by the SCEC BB platform. Here we test it using the Graves and Pitarka (2010) method, implemented in the platform. We performed broadband (0.1--10 Hz) ground motion simulations for a M6.7 scenario earthquake using rupture models produced with both GEN_SRF4 and rupture generator of Graves and Pitarka (2016), (GP2016 hereafter). In the simulations we used the same Green’s functions, and same high frequency approach for calculating the low-­frequency and high-­frequency parts of ground motion, respectively.

  12. Fast rupture propagation for large strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun; Mori, Jim; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    Studying rupture speeds of shallow earthquakes is of broad interest because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes, and it is an important parameter that reflects stress levels and energy on a slipping fault. However, resolving rupture speed is difficult in standard waveform inversion methods due to limited near-field observations and the tradeoff between rupture speed and fault size for teleseismic observations. Here we applied back-projection methods to estimate the rupture speeds of 15 Mw ≥ 7.8 dip-slip and 8 Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes for which direct P waves are well recorded in Japan on Hi-net, or in North America on USArray. We found that all strike-slip events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-5.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s.

  13. Fetal immune response following prematurely ruptured membranes.

    PubMed

    Cederqvist, L L; Francis, L C; Zervoudakis, I A; Becker, C G; Litwin, S D

    1976-10-01

    Concentrations of immunoglobulins (Ig)A1, and IgA2, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM have been determined in cord blood, amniotic fluid, and maternal serum in a group of patients with a history of prematurely ruptured membranes (PRM) prior to the onset of labor and in a control group of patients undergoing normal delivery and without a history of infection during pregnancy. IgA and IgD were determined by sensitive hemagglutination-inhibition tests; IgG and IgM, by radial immunodiffusion; IgE, by a radioimmunoassay. There was evidence for an immune response in 10 of 16 cases of PRM: five of 16 had increased IgA but normal IgM; three of 16 had increased IgA and IgM; two of 16 had high IgM and normal IgA in cord blood. In patients with significantly increased levels of either IgA or IgM or both, there was a decreased level of IgD. These changes are most likely the result of the immune response to ascending infection from the maternal genitals. The sensitive testing method employed could demonstrate the presence of IgD in 53 per cent of normal cord blood samples and 72 per cent of amniotic fluid samples obtained at term. IgE was found in all normal cord blood and amniotic fluid samples tested. By concentrating the amniotic fluid up to 180-fold, IgM was demonstrated in all normal samples tested. The potential importance of IgA determinations in cord blood in addition to IgM determination for detection of intrauterine infections is stressed.

  14. Management of infected carotid artery rupture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zeng, Quan; Huang, Jiang-Ju; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Carotid artery rupture (CAR) is a life-threatening complication of head and neck cancer, and infection complicates its management. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with the treatment of infected CAR and to summarize the existing literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients treated in our department from 2000 to 2011 and re-analyzed cases reported in the literature during the same time period. We analyzed etiology, anatomic location, treatment, and rates of recurrent hemorrhage for each case. A total of 46 episodes of infected CAR occurred in the four patients in our own records and 27 patients described in the literature. Twenty-eight patients suffered from various head and neck cancers and underwent surgical resection, and 27 of them subsequently received radiotherapy or radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy (the 28th patient died before radiotherapy due to severe blood loss). The most common site of bleeding was the common carotid artery (33/46, 71.7%). Seventeen cases (17/45, 37.8%) were treated with surgical ligation, 20 (44.4%) with stent placement, and 7 (15.6%) with embolization. Surgical ligation had a lower rate of recurrent bleeding (2/17, 11.8%) than stent placement (12/20, 60.0%) when used for the treatment of infected CAR (P = 0.037, Chi squared test). Our results suggest that surgical ligation is an effective option in the management of infected CAR and may be the best choice to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. The complication rates, however, may be high when the common carotid or the internal carotid arteries are ligated.

  15. [Report on 21 uterine ruptures and the influence of single row uterotomy stitching on rupture prevention (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kleissl, H P; Becker, H; Falkert

    1975-07-01

    Wound closure by 1 row of interupted sutures provides optimal healing conditions. As a result scar tissue formation is cut down. This general surgical principle is valid in stitching an uterotomy as well. Increasing frequency of cesarian section could end up in a rising number of scar ruptures. This drawback for a subsequent pregnancy should be met by the single row technique. It was applied in 1434 women from 1962 to 1974. All of them had lower segment cesarian sections. Only 3 harmless ruptures occurred in this group. The clinical course of 12 scar ruptures after terraced uterotomy closure was less favourable. In 6 cases a pregnant uterus ruptured without previous operation. Clinical results are compared. This backs the technique practised. In 5 patients the ruptured uterus could be repaired in the same way as in cesarian section. Hysterectomy, however, was the usual treatment. The risk of rupture after classical cesarian section is lowered by the technique described. This applies to the surgical treatment of uterus duplex as well.

  16. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  17. Dynamic rupture in a damage-breakage rheology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ilchev, Assen; Mendecki, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    We present a thermodynamically based formulation for modelling dynamic rupture processes in the brittle crust using a continuum damage-breakage rheology. The model combines aspects of a continuum viscoelastic damage framework for brittle solids with a continuum breakage mechanics for granular flow within dynamically generated slip zones. The formulation accounts for the density of distributed cracking and other internal flaws in damaged rocks with a scalar damage parameter, and addresses the grain size distribution of a granular phase in the slip zone with a breakage parameter. A dynamic brittle instability is associated with a critical level of damage in the solid, leading to loss of convexity of the solid strain energy, localization and transition to a granular phase associated with lower energy level. The continuum damage-breakage rheology model treats the localization to a slip zone at the onset of dynamic rupture and post-failure recovery process as phase transitions between solid and granular states. The model generates sub- and supershear rupture velocities and pulse-type ruptures seen also in frictional models, and additional important features such as strong dynamic changes of volumetric strain near the rupture front and diversity of nucleation mechanisms. The propagation of rupture front and slip accumulation at a point are correlated with sharp dynamic dilation followed by a gradual decay to a level associated with the final volumetric change associated with the granular phase transition in the slipping zone. The local brittle failure process associated with the solid-granular transition is expected to produce isotropic radiation in addition to the deviatoric terms. The framework significantly extends the ability to model brittle processes in complex geometrical structures and allows analysing the roles of gouge thickness and other parameters on nucleation, rupture and radiation characteristics.

  18. Downdip landward limit of Cascadia great earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.

    2013-10-01

    paper examines the constraints to the downdip landward limit of rupture for the Cascadia great earthquakes off western North America. This limit is a primary control for ground motion hazard at near-coastal cities. The studies also provide information on the physical controls of subduction thrust rupture globally. The constraints are (1) "locked/transition" zones from geodetic deformation (GPS, repeated leveling, tide gauges); (2) rupture zone from paleoseismic coastal marsh subsidence, "paleogeodesy"; (3) temperature on the thrust for the seismic-aseismic transition; (4) change in thrust seismic reflection character downdip from thin seismic to thick ductile; (5) fore-arc mantle corner aseismic serpentinite and talc overlying the thrust; (6) updip limit of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) slow slip; (7) rupture area associations with shelf-slope basins; (8) depth limit for small events on the thrust; and (9) landward limit of earthquakes on the Nootka transform fault zone. The most reliable constraints for the limit of large rupture displacement, >10 m, are generally just offshore in agreement with thermal control for this hot subduction zone, but well-offshore central Oregon and near the coast of northern Washington. The limit for 1-2 m rupture that can still provide strong shaking is less well estimated 25-50 km farther landward. The fore-arc mantle corner and the updip extent of ETS slow slip are significantly landward from the other constraints. Surprisingly, there is a downdip gap between the best other estimates for the great earthquake rupture zone and the ETS slow slip. In this gap, plate convergence may occur as continuous slow creep.

  19. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  20. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  1. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  2. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.

    1984-01-01

    The creep rupture behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h rupture life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.

  3. Earthquake Rupture Complexity Evidence from Field Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Teran, O.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations provide strong evidence for four intriguing aspects of rupture process complexity for the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah - Indiviso earthquake. First, the southern “fork” of the rupture exhibits two splays just to the northwest of the event epicenter, both with nearly pure right-lateral faulting. Teleseismic source modeling by others indicates normal slip on deep fault surface preceded the shallow strike-slip faulting, and our field observations from the fork area indicate that the earliest phase of strike-slip faulting did not involve a significant normal faulting component. Second, as rupture propagated to the northwest along the Pescadores fault, slip ended abruptly on this fault and transferred across a complex zone to the Borrego fault (although the Pescadores fault continues farther and would have seemed an easier route to follow). This stepover is called the Puerta Accommodation Zone (PAZ) which extends 11 km along-strike within an elevated portion of the Cucapah massif and accommodates a left step (transpressional) that measures less than 2 km across-strike. Though partly obscured by rockfalls in the steep terrain here, only discontinuous faulting of up to one meter reached the ground surface, yet imagery differencing by others indicates several meters of continuous subsurface slip throughout this section. This 11 km region of reduced and discontinuous slip is one of the longest surface rupture jumps ever observed, with lengthy and continuous surface faulting on either side. The SE end of the stepover coincides spatially with the Canon Rojo embayment where the M7.2 1892 surface rupture propagated onto a second fault forming an abrupt corner in its surface trace. Hence, the surface rupture and slip distribution pattern in 2010 appears to have been influenced by stress changes induced by the 1892 event. Thirdly, from the NW end of the transition section, the Borrego fault continues to the NNW with strong east-down slip obliquity. Along

  4. Altered Functional Connectivity of Fusiform Gyrus in Subjects with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Suping; Chong, Tao; Zhang, Yun; Li, Jun; von Deneen, Karen M.; Ren, Junchan; Dong, Minghao; Huang, Liyu

    2015-01-01

    Visual cognition such as face recognition requests a high degree of functional integration between distributed brain areas of a network. It has been reported that the fusiform gyrus (FG) is an important brain area involved in facial cognition; altered connectivity of FG to some other regions may lead to a deficit in visual cognition especially face recognition. However, whether functional connectivity between the FG and other brain areas changes remains unclear in the resting state in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects. Here, we employed a resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine alterations in functional connectivity of left/right FG comparing aMCI patients with age-matched control subjects. Forty-eight aMCI and 38 control subjects from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed. We concentrated on the correlation between low frequency fMRI time courses in the FG and those in all other brain regions. Relative to the control group, we found some discrepant regions in the aMCI group which presented increased or decreased connectivity with the left/right FG including the left precuneus, left lingual gyrus, right thalamus, supramarginal gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left inferior temporal gyrus, and left parahippocampus. More importantly, we also obtained that both left and right FG have increased functional connections with the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC) in aMCI patients. That was not a coincidence and might imply that the MOG and ACC also play a critical role in visual cognition, especially face recognition. These findings in a large part supported our hypothesis and provided a new insight in understanding the important subtype of MCI. PMID:26379534

  5. Hippocampal Amyloid Burden with Downstream Fusiform Gyrus Atrophy Correlate with Face Matching Task Scores in Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Wen-Neng; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Neuronal activity during face matching shows co-activation of the fusiform gyrus (FG) and areas along the ventral visual network. To elucidate the mechanisms related to the facial discrimination deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the study evaluates the relationships between β-amyloid (Aβ) load and gray matter (GM) atrophy within the ventral visual network. Methods: Comprehensive cognitive assessments and GM volumetry using 3-dimentional T1-weighted images and AV-45 positron emission tomography (PET) were studied in 44 patients with AD. We used AV-45 PET to measure regional Aβ to analyze the correlations between the regional neocortical AV-45 retention and atrophy in patients with AD. Results: FG volume was positively correlated with the para-hippocampus (β = 0.565, P < 0.001), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC; β = 0.402, P < 0.001), and hippocampus volumes (β = 0.209, P = 0.044). After carefully confounded all possible factors simultaneously, the hippocampus standardized uptake value (SUV) ratio was independently associated with FG volume (β = −0.151, P = 0.017). Furthermore, volumes of the hippocampus (r = 0.473, P = 0.003), para-hippocampus (r = 0.515, P = 0.001), and FG (r = 0.383, P = 0.018) were associated with Benton’s facial recognition test (BFRT). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study indicated that amyloid burden within the hippocampus might contribute to FG cortical hub GM atrophy. While the face matching task scores were related to the FG, hippocampus, and para-hippocampus volumes, concordant changes of the aforementioned three structures suggested the importance of the three ventral visual network hubs in AD. PMID:27378917

  6. The fusiform face area is not sufficient for face recognition: evidence from a patient with dense prosopagnosia and no occipital face area.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Jennifer K E; Culham, Jody C; Duchaine, Bradley C; Pratesi, Cristiana Cavina; Valyear, Kenneth F; Schindler, Igor; Humphrey, G Keith; Milner, A David; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2006-01-01

    We tested functional activation for faces in patient D.F., who following acquired brain damage has a profound deficit in object recognition based on form (visual form agnosia) and also prosopagnosia that is undocumented to date. Functional imaging demonstrated that like our control observers, D.F. shows significantly more activation when passively viewing face compared to scene images in an area that is consistent with the fusiform face area (FFA) (p < 0.01). Control observers also show occipital face area (OFA) activation; however, whereas D.F.'s lesions appear to overlap the OFA bilaterally. We asked, given that D.F. shows FFA activation for faces, to what extent is she able to recognize faces? D.F. demonstrated a severe impairment in higher level face processing--she could not recognize face identity, gender or emotional expression. In contrast, she performed relatively normally on many face categorization tasks. D.F. can differentiate faces from non-faces given sufficient texture information and processing time, and she can do this is independent of color and illumination information. D.F. can use configural information for categorizing faces when they are presented in an upright but not a sideways orientation and given that she also cannot discriminate half-faces she may rely on a spatially symmetric feature arrangement. Faces appear to be a unique category, which she can classify even when she has no advance knowledge that she will be shown face images. Together, these imaging and behavioral data support the importance of the integrity of a complex network of regions for face identification, including more than just the FFA--in particular the OFA, a region believed to be associated with low-level processing.

  7. Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral Rupture in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the

  8. Creep rupture of a tropical wood polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, L. H. L.; Boey, F. Y. C.

    Wood polymer composite (WPC) specimens were produced by impregnating a tropical wood with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and subsequently polymerised by gamma irradiation. Beam specimens of varying weight percentages of polymer were then subjected to three-point-bend creep rupture test under a constant load condition. Results indicated that the impregnation of MMA and subsequent polymerisation by irradiation to form WPC significantly increased the creep rupture resistance of the wood. Two models, namely, a three element non-linear mechanical model derived from an energy failure criterion and a power law model derived from a damage parameter concept, modelled adequately the creep rupture time of the WPC. The energy criterion model was useful because the equation parameters such as elastic modulus, anelastic modulus and resilience of WPC show a general trend of increase with the amount of polymer impregnated into the wood, and also it could predict the upper stress limit where the specimens rupture immediately on application of load and the lower stress limit where the specimens sustain the load indefinitely. Results indicated that the equation parameters increase significantly in the first 20 or 30% polymer loading in agreement with previous work. An interfacial interaction between the polymer and the wood cell wall was used to account for the behaviour of the increase in the creep rupture resistance.

  9. Prehistoric ruptures of the Gurvan Bulag fault, Gobi Altay, Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Kendrick, K.; Berryman, K.; Bayasgalan, A.; Ritz, J.F.; Spencer, J.Q.

    2002-01-01

    The 1957 Gobi Altay M8.3 earthquake in southern Mongolia was associated with the simultaneous rupture of several faults, including the Gurvan Bulag reverse fault, which is located about 25 km south of the main strike-slip Bogd fault. Our study of paleoseismic excavations across the Gurvan Bulag fault suggests that the penultimate surface rupture occurred after 6.0 ka, most likely between 2.6 and 4.4 ka, and a possible earlier rupture occurred after 7.3 ka. Our interpretation of the stratigraphic relations in one of the exposures suggests that at least five earthquakes have generated surface rupture of the Gurvan Bulag fault since the abandonment of an ancient alluvial fan surface. Luminescence dating of sediment associated with this surface indicates that it formed either 26.6 ?? 2.1 ka or 16.1 ?? 2.0 ka. These data imply that the recurrence intervals for surface faulting on the Gurvan Bulag and Bogd faults are similar, on the order of several thousands of years, but that the penultimate surface ruptures of the two faults did not occur during the same earthquake.

  10. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  11. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  12. Spontaneous Flexor Tendon Rupture Due to Atraumatic Chronic Carpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, B. H.; Cerovac, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is considered to be invariably associated with previous hand/wrist injury or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. Case Description A 54-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of mild ulnar wrist pain and spontaneous left little finger flexion loss in the absence of distant/recent trauma and systemic arthropathy. Surgical exploration confirmed a zone IV left little finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP5) attritional rupture (100%), ring finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP4) attenuation (40%) and a disrupted lunotriquetral ligament and volar-ulnar wrist capsule. Volar subluxation of the narrowed carpal tunnel resulted in flexor tendon attrition against the hamate hook. A side-to-side tendon transfer was performed along with a lunotriquetral ligament repair and temporary Kirschner wire fixation. At 6 months the patient had full active, synchronous flexion of the ring and little fingers and reduced wrist pain. Literature Review Traumatic flexor tendon ruptures have been reported following distal radius/hamate hook fractures, from carpal bone osteophytes, accessory carpal bones and intraosseous ganglia. Attritional ruptures caused by chronic, degenerative carpal pathology are less common. Clinical Relevance This case highlights an unusual cause of flexor tendon rupture due to chronic carpal instability. PMID:25032080

  13. Rupture of the triceps tendon associated with steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Stannard, J P; Bucknell, A L

    1993-01-01

    Rupture of the triceps mechanism is an uncommon injury that has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. It has been proposed that such injuries commonly accompany fractures of the radial head and must be actively evaluated in the presence of such a fracture. We present a unique case of isolated rupture of the triceps tendon in an athlete who was lifting weights. This case was complicated by a history of olecranon bursitis that had been treated with numerous local steroid injections, as well as a history of anabolic steroid abuse. Both systemic steroids and local injections may predispose tendons to rupture. Triceps tendon ruptures may result in uniformly good to excellent results if recognized and treated surgically. This case also serves as a reminder of the risks of treating inflamed tissues with local steroid injections, especially in strength athletes who place high demands on their musculoskeletal structures. Finally, this case documents a second case of triceps mechanism rupture in an athlete who has abused anabolic steroids. A study by Hunter et al. suggests that oral steroid abuse may be associated with detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of connective tissue, demonstrating another negative effect of anabolic steroid use in athletes.

  14. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Bimaterial Fault Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton-Barrett, E. L.; Dedontney, N.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.

    2011-12-01

    Material juxtapositions across mature faults are a common occurrence. Previous work has found that this elastic mismatch results in a rupture that will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement on the more compliant side of the fault, with more off-fault damage in the stiffer material. This result has implications for inferring preferred rupture directions based on observations of damage zone asymmetry. We perform a complete numerical investigation of the role of the stress state on the distribution of plastic deformation and the direction of preferred rupture propagation. We show that there are important factors, in addition to the elastic mismatch, which control the preferred direction of propagation as well as the side of the fault in which damage predominately accumulates. The orientation of the most compressive principal stress is the controlling factor in determining the location of plastic deformation. For different orientations, plastic deformation can accumulate in either the stiffer or the more compliant material. For high angles of most compressive stress, the aforementioned preferred rupture direction prediction holds true. However, the off-fault plastic response can reverse that direction for low angles of most compressive stress so that rupture will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement in the stiffer material. Also, as already established in the case of purely elastic materials, when pre-stress is close to static friction (low seismic S ratio) a transition to supershear may take place in the direction opposite to what was the preferred direction.

  15. Two Cases of Spontaneous Liver Rupture and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, P. J.; Morris, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous liver rupture is uncommon, difficult to diagnose and carries a universally high mortality. It has been well documented to occur as a complication of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy. Similarly, there are 28 cases of ruptured haemangiomata described in the world literature. It is also well described in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension and is said to carry a mortality of 18% for patients treated by packing and drainage of the haematoma and 75% for patients treated with liver resection. Two female patients aged 60 and 61 presented to our accident and emergency department. One had a history of hypertension only and the other a history of a bleeding diathesis from the lupus anticoagulant. Both presented with hypotension and abdominal pain and both were diagnosed by abdominal CT scan. One was treated with hepatic artery ligation and tamponade and the other with liver resection and correction of the coagulopathy. Neither had any evidence of a ruptured haemangioma or tumour at laparotomy or on histological examination, and both are alive and well. The conclusions to be drawn from this review and our own recent experience is that the treatment of choice for ruptured haemangiomata is liver resection and, for rupture during pregnancy, is tamponade with packs and evacuation of the haematoma. Hepatic arteriography and embolisation, if possible, is a useful adjunct. Correction ofany coagulopathy is essential. We can only speculate that the aetiology in our patients was uncontrolled hypertension in one and coagulopathy in the other. PMID:8809590

  16. Spectral Element Simulations of Rupture Dynamics along kinked faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilotte, J.; Festa, G.; Madariaga, R.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulation of earthquake source dynamics provides key elements for ground-motion prediction and insights into the physics of dynamic rupture propagation. Faulting is controlled by non-linear frictional interactions and damage within the fault zone. Important features of the earthquakes dynamics, such as rupture velocity, arrest phase and high-frequency radiation are believed to be strongly influenced by the geometry of the faults (kinks, jogs and forks). Data analysis as well as kinematic inversions have pointed out potential links between super-shear and geometry, as in the case of the Denali and Izmit earthquakes. Finally, recent laboratory experiments of sub- and super-shear rupture propagation along kink interfaces have shed new lights on these phenomena. We present here spectral element simulations of the dynamic rupture propagation along kinked and curved fault interfaces, a problem that has been experimentally investigated by Rousseau and Rosakis (2003). Depending on the state of the initial stress, we numerically analyze the mechanics of the dynamical fault branching for sub- and super-shear rupture propagation. Special interest is devoted to source directivity effects and high frequency generation related to the branching process. Implications for strong motion analysis will be discussed. This work was supported by the SPICE - Research and Training project

  17. Rupture of draining foam films due to random pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zebin; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2007-02-27

    A generalized formalism for the rupture of a draining foam film due to imposed random pressure fluctuations, modeled as a Gaussian white noise, is presented in which the flow inside the film is decomposed into a flow due to film drainage and a flow due to imposed perturbation. The evolution of the amplitude of perturbation is described by a stochastic differential equation. The rupture time distribution is calculated from the sample paths of perturbation amplitude as the time for this amplitude to equal one-half the film thickness and is calculated for different amplitudes of imposed perturbations, film thicknesses, electrostatic interactions, viscosities, and interfacial mobilities. The probability of film rupture is high for thicker films, especially at smaller times, as a result of faster growth of perturbations in a thick film due to a smaller disjoining pressure gradient. Larger viscosity, larger surface viscosity, higher Marangoni number, and smaller imposed pressure fluctuation result in slower growth of perturbation of a draining film, thus leading to larger rupture time. It is shown that a composite rupture time distribution combining short time simulation results with equilibrium distribution is a good approximation.

  18. Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in soccer.

    PubMed

    Rochcongar, P; Laboute, E; Jan, J; Carling, C

    2009-05-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are serious, common and costly injuries. The present 12-year investigation was undertaken to examine the frequency of ACL ruptures and identify the game events that may have contributed to the cause of these injuries in male soccer players across a French district. A retrospective questionnaire was used to record the players' age at the time of injury, laterality, standard of play, playing position and injured side. The characteristics of the injury situations were described in detail to investigate the game events involved in each case. A total of 934 ruptures was reported. Significantly more ruptures were sustained in a non-contact versus a contact situation (p<0.01). Of the total number of lesions, 34.5% occurred during a pivot action. The right knee was affected more than the left knee (p<0.001), irrespective of the dominant side of the player. Certain game events reported in the injury situations were shown to be related to player's age, standard and position. While these results have confirmed observations from previous investigations on ACL ruptures in soccer, the analysis of a considerably larger number of injury cases has brought new findings to the literature as well as recommendations for future research.

  19. Direct visualization of microalgae rupture by ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Harun, Irina; Pouliopoulos, Antonis; Choi, James J.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    Cell rupture induced by ultrasound is central to applications in biotechnology. For instance, cell disruption is required in the production of biofuels from microalgae (unicellular species of algae). Ultrasound-induced cavitation, bubble collapse and jetting are exploited to induce sufficiently large viscous stresses to cause rupture of the cell membranes. It has recently been shown that seeding the flow with bubbles that act as cavitation nuclei significantly reduces the energy cost for cell processing. However, a fundamental understanding of the conditions for rupture of microalgae in the complex flow fields generated by ultrasound-driven bubbles is currently lacking. We perform high-speed video microscopy to visualize the miscroscale details of the interaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , microalgae of about 10 μm in size, with ultrasound-driven microbubbles of 2-200 μm in diameter. We investigate the efficiency of cell rupture depending on ultrasound frequency and pressure amplitude (from 10 kPa up to 1 MPa), and the resulting bubble dynamics regimes. In particular we compare the efficiency of membrane rupture in the acoustic microstreaming flow induced by linear oscillations, with the case of violent bubble collapse and jetting. V.G. acknowledges partial support from the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG), Grant No. 618333.

  20. [Neurologic complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Fàbregas Julià, N; Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Hernández-Palazón, J

    2010-12-01

    The high rates of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage due to spontaneous rupture of an intracranial aneurysm are mainly the result of neurologic complications. Sixty years after cerebral vasospasm was first described, this problem remains unsolved in spite of its highly adverse effect on prognosis after aneurysmatic rupture. Treatment is somewhat empirical, given that uncertainties remain in our understanding of the pathophysiology of this vascular complication, which involves structural and biochemical changes in the endothelium and smooth muscle of vessels. Vasospasm that is refractory to treatment leads to cerebral infarction. Prophylaxis, early diagnosis, and adequate treatment of neurologic complications are key elements in the management of vasospasm if neurologic damage, lengthy hospital stays, and increased use of health care resources are to be avoided. New approaches to early treatment of cerebral lesions and cortical ischemia in cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm rupture should lead to more effective, specific management.

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  2. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel(COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark, R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar® composite overwrapped pressure vessels(COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm(40-in.) diameter Kevlar® COPV was tested to failure(burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  3. Rupture of thin films with resonant substrate patterning.

    PubMed

    Kao, Justin C-T; Golovin, Alexander A; Davis, Stephen H

    2006-11-15

    We study the stability and rupture of thin liquid films on patterned substrates. It is shown that striped patterning on a length scale comparable to that of the spinodal instability leads to a resonance effect and an imperfect bifurcation of equilibrium film shapes. Weakly nonlinear analysis gives predictions for film shapes, stability, growth rates, and rupture times, which are confirmed by numerical solution of the thin-film equation. Film behavior is qualitatively different in the resonant patterning regime, but with sufficiently large domains rupture occurs on a spinodal length scale regardless of patterning. Instabilities transverse to the patterning are examined and shown to behave similarly as disturbances to films on uniform substrates. We explain some previously reported effects in terms of the imperfect bifurcation.

  4. Spontaneous liver rupture as first sign of polyarteritis nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Luque, Irene; Alconchel, Felipe; Ciria, Rubén; Ayllón, M Dolores; Luque, Antonio; Sánchez, Marina; López-Cillero, Pedro; Briceño, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is one of the systemic vasculitis that affects the media wall of arteries of small and medium diameter. Diagnosis proves difficult due to the unspecific symptoms that dominate the clinical profile. Liver involvement is very diverse, ranging from the development of cirrhotic liver disease to acute abdomen presentation that requires surgery because of liver rupture. The management of these patients requires an expert multidisciplinary team. There are several cases in the literature that describe a sudden liver rupture as the first manifestation of a PAN. In this paper we present the case of a 75 years old patient without any previous disease, who is subjected to major hepatic resection for spontaneous liver rupture. PMID:27917267

  5. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic artery aneurysm associated with polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Parent, Brodie A; Cho, Sung W; Buck, David G; Nalesnik, Michael A; Gamblin, T Clark

    2010-12-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a vasculitis, which often involves small and medium sized visceral arteries. This condition may result in multifocal aneurismal formation and end-organ damage. Uncommonly, PAN may present with rupture of hepatic artery aneurysms. Here, we report a rare case of a ruptured intrahepatic aneurysm associated with PAN. A 79-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain had CT scan of the abdomen, which revealed hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Visceral angiogram confirmed pseudo-aneurysm of a right hepatic arterial branch, and this was managed with endovascular coil embolization. The diagnosis of PAN was made and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. We also performed a literature review to define this condition's demographics, clinical presentations, and appropriate management. The review revealed 17 published cases of ruptured PAN-related intrahepatic aneurysms. We conclude that unexplained findings of visceral arterial aneurysms should prompt investigations for vasculitis as the etiology.

  6. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Allograft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Restuccia, Giuseppe; Lippi, Alessandro; Casella, Francesco; Citarelli, Carmine; Sacchetti, Federico; Benifei, Maurizio

    2017-02-07

    In clinical practice, chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. Usually, these lesions are discovered four to six weeks after injuries. More frequently, Achilles tendon ruptures are acute and treated with tendon sutures.1 Many surgical techniques are available to treat chronic lesions such as sutures or V-Y elongation with or without augments.2-3 Our case is about a chronic Achilles tendon rupture discovered two years after injury. Our patient came to our attention with a 6 cm tendon gap. We performed tendon repair with cadaver allograft. After four years of follow-up, our patient has a complete functional recovery and he can normally perform daily and working tasks without pain.

  7. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  8. Space qualification of the ISO cryogenic rupture discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettlinger, E.; Ruediger, H.; Wanner, M.

    1990-03-01

    Space cryostats, like the model to be used in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), require safety components to protect the satellite, the launcher, and the personnel against overpressure in the helium system. The ISO cryostat, which carries 2250 cu dm of liquid helium, will be equipped with a rupture disk as the ultimate safety component in case of loss of the insulation vacuum. Because it will have to operate under conditions of zero gravity and low pressure drop, the rupture disk has to be located directly on the helium tank and may thus release up to 5 kg/s of helium at a differential pressure of 2.6 bar directly into the insulation vacuum space. The selection and design of the rupture disk, as well as the test and qualification philosophy, are described.

  9. Advancements in identifying biomechanical determinants for abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Metaxa, Eleni; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Tavlas, Emmanouil; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos

    2015-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common health problem and currently the need for surgical intervention is determined based on maximum diameter and growth rate criteria. Since these universal variables often fail to predict accurately every abdominal aortic aneurysms evolution, there is a considerable effort in the literature for other markers to be identified towards individualized rupture risk estimations and growth rate predictions. To this effort, biomechanical tools have been extensively used since abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is in fact a material failure of the diseased arterial wall to compensate the stress acting on it. The peak wall stress, the role of the unique geometry of every individual abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as the mechanical properties and the local strength of the degenerated aneurysmal wall, all confer to rupture risk. In this review article, the assessment of these variables through mechanical testing, advanced imaging and computational modeling is reviewed and the clinical perspective is discussed.

  10. A Case of Ruptured Splenic Artery Aneurysm in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth K.; Harvey, Scott A.; Sauvage, Lynnae M.; Bohrer, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm is rare complication of pregnancy that is associated with a significant maternal and fetal mortality. Case. A multiparous female presented in the third trimester with hypotension, tachycardia, and altered mental status. A ruptured splenic artery aneurysm was discovered at the time of laparotomy and cesarean delivery. The patient made a full recovery following resection of the aneurysm. The neonate survived but suffered severe neurologic impairment. Conclusion. The diagnosis of ruptured splenic artery aneurysm should be considered in a pregnant woman presenting with signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Early intervention by a multidisciplinary surgical team is key to preserving the life of the mother and fetus. PMID:25574408

  11. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  12. [Liver rupture in a newborn infant; diagnosis, treatment and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Westerik, A R; Umans-Eckenhausen, M A; Madern, G C; Robben, S G; van den Anker, J N

    1993-11-20

    Between August 1989 and August 1992 four neonates with rupture of the liver were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Sophia Children's Hospital in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Two neonates were born after breech delivery, two after caesarean section because of foetal distress. All four patients had Apgar scores < 5 after 1 minute and of < 8 after 5 minutes and required artificial ventilation for a prolonged period. All infants collapsed within 6 hours after birth. Surgical treatment was not considered because of the poor clinical condition. All patients were treated conservatively. Clinical signs were: rapid onset pallor, hypotension, tachycardia and abdominal distension. Ultrasonography of the abdomen confirmed the clinical diagnosis of rupture of the liver. Despite rapid diagnosis and maximal non-surgical treatment mortality was 75%. Surgical intervention is indicated in neonatal liver rupture with significant intra-abdominal bleeding.

  13. Ruptured Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm after Bacille Calmette-Guerin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Floros, Nikolaos; Meletiadis, Konstantinos; Kusenack, Ulrich; Zirngibl, Hubert; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Dreger, Nici Markus

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of a ruptured mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (MAA) after intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy because of bladder carcinoma. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for follow-up computed tomography 14 months after transurethral resection of a papillary carcinoma of the bladder and intravesical BCG therapy. The CT scan revealed a ruptured MAA aneurysm and the patient underwent an endovascular repair with an aorto-bi-iliac stent graft. A ruptured MAA is a rare but lethal complication after BCG instillation therapy. The standard therapy is the open reconstruction but according to the literature an endovascular therapy in combination with long-term antibiotics should be considered as a bridging or a definite solution.

  14. Dynamic Rupture Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.

    2010-12-01

    In southwest Japan, large devastating earthquakes (Mw>8) occurred along the Nankai subduction zone every 100-200 years (e.g. Ando, 1975, Tectonophys.; Ishibashi, 2004, Ann. Geophys.). Historical records revealed the segmented nature of the 600 km long seismogenic zone, producing Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes to occur separately or jointly at each cycle. The intersegment zone which separates Nankai and Tonankai source areas, near the Kii Peninsula, should have some special physical properties. In this study, we investigate the dynamic linkage of the coseismic slips on the Nankai and Tonankai segments, by modeling the spontaneous rupture propagation on the subduction interface. To conduct a reliable modeling, the parameters’ lateral variations along the place interface are introduced by combining several geophysical observation data sets. First, we use a large-scale 3D geometry for the plate interface, inferred from seismicity; we also integrate the slip deficit distribution (Hashimoto et al., 2009, SSJ meeting) obtained by inversion of GPS data, to constrain the distribution of stress drop on the interface. This distribution is not uniform, and explains the 1st order asperities of the subduction zone: Hyuga, Nankai, Tonankai and Tokai areas appear clearly as loaded regions. In addition, a constitutive friction law is required to link fault slip and stress release. We compiled regional geophysical information relevant to the segmentation, to infer the distribution of the frictional parameters at seismogenic depths. We focused on areas where the rupture is known to have stopped. The barriers seem to be related to upper plate structure (Wells et al. 2003, JGR, Rosenau and Oncken 2009, JGR). Uplifted areas show common characteristics: end of seismogenic segments, underplating in the wedge, and higher density of the upper old wedge (granitic intrusions). Following above review, we introduced 3 barrier regions delimiting 2 asperity regions (Nankai and Tonankai

  15. Surface rupture of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and comparison with other strike-slip ruptures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Dawson, T.E.; Stenner, Heidi D.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Cinti, F.; Montone, Paola; Sherrod, B.; Craw, P.

    2004-01-01

    On 3 November 2002, an M7.9 earthquake produced 340 km of surface rupture on the Denali and two related faults in Alaska. The rupture proceeded from west to east and began with a 40-km-long break on a previously unknown thrust fault. Estimates of surface slip on this thrust are 3-6 m. Next came the principal surface break along ???218 km of the Denali fault. Right-lateral offsets averaged around 5 m and increased eastward to a maximum of nearly 9 m. The fault also ruptured beneath the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, which withstood almost 6 m of lateral offset. Finally, slip turned southeastward onto the Totschunda fault. Right-lateral offsets are up to 3 m, and the surface rupture is about 76 km long. This three-part rupture ranks among the longest strike-slip events of the past two centuries. The earthquake is typical when compared to other large earthquakes on major intracontinental strike-slip faults. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  16. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture.

  17. The hierarchical rupture process of a fault: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xinglin; Kusunose, Kinichiro; Satoh, Takashi; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2003-05-01

    We describe the detailed faulting process of a naturally healed fault containing geometric and mechanical asperities in a granitic porphyry sample, based on data collected with a high-speed acoustic emission (AE) waveform recording system. Asperity failure is examined using the detailed spatio-temporal distribution of AE hypocenters. The initial phase of AE activity is also examined using high dynamic range waveforms. Our experimental results indicate that quasi-static nucleation of the heterogeneous fault is associated with the failure of asperities on the fault plane. The fracturing of an asperity is characterized by a dense spatial clustering of AE events and a changing b-value ( b, hereinafter), which is manifest in three typical stages of failure as follows: (1) foreshocks exhibiting a decrease in b, (2) a period of mainshocks corresponding to a minimum in b, and (3) aftershocks of increasing b. The progressive fracture of several coupled asperities results in short-term precursory fluctuations in both b and AE rate. Furthermore, some AE events possess similar dynamic rupture features to those of earthquakes, having an initial phase associated with the transition from quasi-dynamic to dynamic rupture. We conclude based on these experimental observations that fault rupture has hierarchical characteristics. Quasi-static nucleation of fault rupture represents dynamic fracture of the asperities on the fault plane; likewise, a quasi-static nucleation process characterized by dynamic microfracturing precedes the fracture of an asperity. Since dynamic motions are easier to detect remotely than static deformations, understanding the hierarchical processes underlying fault rupture may thus be helpful for elucidating quasi-static nucleation at larger scales in terms of the dynamic rupture of the asperities at smaller scales. Careful studies of asperity failure in the lab may guide future seismic studies of large asperities on natural faults, potentially making it

  18. Cognitive impairments after surgical repair of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, A.; Anderson, N.; Sampath, P.; Rigamonti, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the frequency and severity of neuropsychological impairments associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and associated with repair of intracerebral aneurysms.
METHODS—Two groups of patients who underwent repair of intracerebral aneurysms were studied: patients with unruptured aneurysms (n=20) and patients with ruptured aneurysms (n=27). All patients were administered a battery of standardised neuropsychological tests about 3 months after surgery. A subset of 12 patients with unruptured aneurysms were administered the battery both before and after elective repair of the aneurysm(s). A subset of six patients with ruptured aneurysms were given the test at both 3 months and 1year after surgery.
RESULTS—As previously reported for patients with ruptured aneurysms, patients with both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms performed, as a group, significantly below published norms on many of the neuropsychological tests after surgery. However, there were significant differences between preoperative and postoperative performance in the unruptured aneurysm group only on a few tests: measures of word fluency, verbal recall, and frontal lobe function. Performance of patients with ruptured aneurysms was significantly below that of patients with unruptured aneurysms only on a few tests of verbal and visual memory. In addition, group differences compared with published norms reflected severely impaired performance by a minority of patients, rather than moderately impaired performance in a majority of patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Although patients who undergo repair of ruptured aneursyms perform, as a group, below published norms on many neuropsychological tests, significant impairments are seen in a minority of patients. Some of the impairments are associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage, whereas others (found in patients who underwent repair of unruptured aneurysms) are due to general effects of neurosurgery and perioperative management

  19. Rapid aneurysm growth and rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm rupture is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with rupture. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to rupture of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-ruptured, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and rupture, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and rupture. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms. PMID:25657862

  20. Rupture of the Pitáycachi Fault in the 1887 Mw 7.5 Sonora, Mexico earthquake (southern Basin-and-Range Province): Rupture kinematics and epicenter inferred from rupture branching patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Max

    2015-01-01

    During the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5 Sonora earthquake (surface rupture end-to-end length: 101.8 km), an array of three north-south striking Basin-and-Range Province faults (from north to south Pitáycachi, Teras, and Otates) slipped sequentially along the western margin of the Sierra Madre Occidental Plateau. This detailed field survey of the 1887 earthquake rupture zone along the Pitáycachi fault includes mapping the rupture scarp and measurements of surface deformation. The surface rupture has an endpoint-to-endpoint length of ≥41.0 km, dips ~70°W, and is characterized by normal left-lateral extension. The maximum surface offset is 487 cm and the mean offset 260 cm. The rupture trace shows a complex pattern of second-order segmentation. However, this segmentation is not expressed in the 1887 along-rupture surface offset profile, which indicates that the secondary segments are linked at depth into a single coherent fault surface. The Pitáycachi surface rupture shows a well-developed bipolar branching pattern suggesting that the rupture originated in its central part, where the polarity of the rupture bifurcations changes. Most likely the rupture first propagated bilaterally along the Pitáycachi fault. The southern rupture front likely jumped across a step over to the Teras fault and from there across a major relay zone to the Otates fault. Branching probably resulted from the lateral propagation of the rupture after breaching the seismogenic part of the crust, given that the much shorter ruptures of the Otates and Teras segments did not develop branches.

  1. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery.

  2. [Diaphragmatic rupture: case report of a rare complication of labor].

    PubMed

    Mutanen, Annika; Sandelin, Henrik; Nieminen, Anu; Huusari, Hannu; Toikkanen, Vesa

    2015-01-01

    A diaphragmatic rupture associated with labor is a rare complication of pregnancy with high fetal and maternal mortality. Due to non-specific symptoms and rareness of the disease the diagnosis can be challenging. We present a case of a healthy 26-year old woman with one previous childbirth who presented upper abdominal pain, tachycardia and dyspnea during labor. Immediately after labor, a left-sided diaphragmatic rupture complicated with ventricle perforation was diagnosed. After prompt diagnosis and immediate surgical care, including thoracotomy and laparotomy, both patient and child experienced a full recovery.

  3. Spontaneous Liver Rupture After Treatment With Drug-Eluting Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C. O.; Wartenberg, M.; Mottok, A.; Steger, U.; Goltz, J. P.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R.

    2012-02-15

    Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a rare and life-threatening complication. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not yet fully known; it is suggested that rupture is preceded by reactive tissue edema and intratumerous bleeding, leading to a rapid expansion of tumour mass with risk of extrahepatic bleeding in the case of subcapsular localisation. This case report discusses a sudden, unexpected lethal complication in a 74 year-old male patient treated with TACE using DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) in a progressive multifocal HCC.

  4. Deflate-gate: Conservative Management of a Large Ruptured Hydrocele.

    PubMed

    Flores, Viktor X; Wallen, Jared J; Martinez, Danny R; Carrion, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    A hydrocele is a common cause of intrascrotal swelling that results when fluid accumulates between the parietal and visceral layers of the tunica vaginalis. Over time, fluid may collect to form a massive hydrocele and result in significant discomfort for the patient. In this case report, we present a rare event of a 28-year-old gentleman with a documented massive hydrocele measuring 14.1 × 8.9 cm who ruptured his hydrocele during sexual intercourse. We expectantly managed the patient's ruptured hydrocele and encountered no complications throughout the course of his recovery.

  5. Deflate-gate: Conservative Management of a Large Ruptured Hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Viktor X.; Wallen, Jared J.; Martinez, Danny R.; Carrion, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    A hydrocele is a common cause of intrascrotal swelling that results when fluid accumulates between the parietal and visceral layers of the tunica vaginalis. Over time, fluid may collect to form a massive hydrocele and result in significant discomfort for the patient. In this case report, we present a rare event of a 28-year-old gentleman with a documented massive hydrocele measuring 14.1 × 8.9 cm who ruptured his hydrocele during sexual intercourse. We expectantly managed the patient's ruptured hydrocele and encountered no complications throughout the course of his recovery. PMID:26793551

  6. [Tracheal rupture as a cause of unanticipated perioperative mortality].

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Cor J; Marsman, Marije; Knape, J T A Hans; van den Tweel, Jan G

    2013-01-01

    Here we report two cases in which healthy young patients died during surgery because ventilation was impossible by a clinical picture of massive subcutaneous emphysema. The probable diagnosis was tracheal rupture. This diagnosis was not confirmed during coroner's autopsy, but there had been no systematic search for a puncture in the trachea or the main bronchial tubes. Immediate recognition of this situation, and implementation of ventilation of one lung by pushing a narrower endobronchial tube beyond the tracheal rupture, is potentially life-saving.

  7. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed.

  8. Rapid Mapping of Surface Rupture from the South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid documentation (<1 day) of co-seismic surface rupture location and slip is essential for scientific and emergency response. We demonstrate how social media (text messaging and Twitter) and the emerging 3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface ruptures from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface rupture. Preliminary observations of surface rupture (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the rupture trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the rupture trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of rupture extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface rupture map to

  9. Spleen rupture due to primary angiosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koutelidakis, Ioannis M; Tsiaousis, Panagiotis Z; Papaziogas, Basilios Th; Patsas, Aristeides G; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 79-year-old female with rupture of the spleen due to primary angiosarcoma is presented. Symptoms were non-specific. Diagnosis was based on histology postoperatively. Primary angiosarcoma of the spleen is a very rare and aggressive neoplasm with a high metastatic rate and almost uniformly fatal. Due to small number of reported cases, there are no guidelines concerning adjuvant or palliative treatment or any beneficial protocols of chemotherapy or radiotherapy up to date. Splenectomy prior to rupture seems to have a positive impact on long-term survival.

  10. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    California?s 35 million people live among some of the most active earthquake faults in the United States. Public safety demands credible assessments of the earthquake hazard to maintain appropriate building codes for safe construction and earthquake insurance for loss protection. Seismic hazard analysis begins with an earthquake rupture forecast?a model of probabilities that earthquakes of specified magnitudes, locations, and faulting types will occur during a specified time interval. This report describes a new earthquake rupture forecast for California developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP 2007).

  11. Early aortic valve cusp rupture in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A

    1992-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp rupture with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp rupture with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1575597

  12. Duodenal rupture secondary to blunt trauma from a football.

    PubMed

    Luther, Alison; Mann, Christopher; Hart, Colin; Khalil, Khalil

    2013-01-04

    Duodenal rupture secondary to blunt trauma is a relatively uncommon event and is usually a result of a road traffic accident. As the duodenum is a retroperitoneal organ, delays in diagnosis can occur, as the patient may present with vague abdominal symptoms and other non-specific signs. Computed tomographic scanning is therefore a useful tool in the diagnosis of this condition. We present a 19-year-old girl who was hit in the abdomen with a football and subsequently had a duodenal rupture.

  13. Traumatic rupture of sternocleidomastoid muscle following an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Wooles, Nicola Rachel; Bell, Philip Robert; Korda, Marian

    2014-11-19

    A 29-year-old man, a known epileptic, presented to an accident and emergency department following a tonic-clonic seizure, suffering a second seizure in the department. Subsequently, he reported neck pain, swelling and stiffness. An otorhinolaryngology neck examination revealed a tender left side with two palpable masses and a reduced range of movement. Ultrasound confirmed a ruptured middle third of the left sternocleidomastoid muscle, which was successfully treated non-surgically with analgaesia and intensive physiotherapy. Uncommonly, sternocleidomastoid muscle rupture has been reported following high-velocity trauma, but to the best of our knowledge this is the first case described in the literature following an epileptic seizure.

  14. Presumed Testicular Rupture During a College Baseball Game

    PubMed Central

    Freehill, Michael T.; Gorbachinsky, Ilya; Lavender, John D.; Davis, Ronald L.; Mannava, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal rupture during athletic competition is considered a rare occurrence; however, blunt trauma to the scrotum is relatively common. Protective athletic cups are strongly recommended for both children and adults engaging in contact sports as they likely limit the amount of serious injury to the scrotal contents. Nonetheless, should the on-field assessment by the athletic trainer, coach, or team physician indicate that the athlete has increased pain, ecchymosis, swelling, and tenderness to palpation after blunt trauma, testicular rupture should be suspected and prompt ultrasound and urologic assessment should be undertaken, as early operative intervention is necessary for testicular preservation. This report reviews testicular trauma during athletic competition. PMID:25984265

  15. Traumatic rupture of the stomach after Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, A C; Lange, J F

    1990-01-01

    Fatal complications following the performance of the Heimlich maneuver have been reported. A 76-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with signs of respiratory distress, abdominal pain and distension one day after airway obstruction and subsequent resuscitation. Despite successful immediate laparotomy and repair of a ruptured stomach, she later succumbed to the sequelae of aspiration of gastric contents and dehiscence of the gastric tear. This is the 4th case of stomach rupture and the 7th reported fatal complication following the Heimlich maneuver. It is recommended that persons who undergo the Heimlich maneuver be examined and observed by a physician, as soon as possible, to rule out complications.

  16. Posterior fossa ruptured dermoid cyst presenting with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    A. Wani, Abrar; Raswan, Uday S.; Malik, Nayil K.; Ramzan, Altaf U.

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare, benign lesions of embryological origin that represent 0.1-0.7% of all intracranial tumors. They are mainly located in the supra tentorial space, especially in the parasellar region. Their location in the posterior fossa remains uncommon. Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is a rare phenomenon. We present a case of dermoid cyst, which had ruptured into ventricular system. Computed Tomography and MRI revealed fat in the fourth ventricle, prepontine cistern, and cerebellomedullary cistern. Hydrocephalus was noted. We performed right ventriculo-peritoneal shunt on which patient improved and he continues to remain asymptomatic one year after. PMID:27744466

  17. Rupturing of renal angiomyolipoma due to physical examination.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Suat; Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Oktay, Mehmet Murat; Yilmaz, Demet Ari

    2012-06-28

    Renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is relatively a rare benign tumour including vascular smooth muscle, and fatty elements; and the majority of renal AML run an asymptomatic, benign course. Potentially life-threatening complication of renal AML is tumour rupturing that can be seen after a low-velocity trauma. Flank pain and haematuria may be considered not important in emergency department if underlying cause is not kept in mind. In present study, the authors aimed to discuss a patient who developed ruptured AML during physical examination.

  18. Intraslab rupture triggering megathrust rupture coseismically in the 17 December 2016 Solomon Islands Mw 7.9 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thorne; Ye, Lingling; Ammon, Charles J.; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2017-02-01

    The 17 December 2016 Solomon Islands earthquake (Mw 7.9) initiated 103 km deep in the subducting Solomon Sea slab near the junction of the Solomon Islands and New Britain trenches. Most aftershocks are located near the Solomon Islands plate boundary megathrust west of Bougainville, where previous large interplate thrust faulting earthquakes occurred in 1995 (Mw 7.7) and 1971 (Mw 8.0). Teleseismic body wave modeling and aftershock relocations indicate that the initial 30 s of the 2016 rupture occurred over depths of 90 to 120 km on an intraslab fault dipping 30° to the southwest, almost perpendicular to the dipping slab interface. The next 50 s of rupture took place at depths of 32 to 47 km in the deeper (Domain C) portion of the overlying megathrust fault dipping 35° to the northeast. High susceptibility to triggering in the region accounts for this compound rupture of two separate fault planes.

  19. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and

  20. Spontaneous Zone III rupture of the flexor tendons of the ulnar three digits in elderly Korean farmers.

    PubMed

    Lee, G J; Kwak, S; Kim, H K; Ha, S H; Lee, H J; Baek, G H

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is a rare condition and the aetiology is not clear. We report 12 elderly Korean farmers with spontaneous flexor tendon ruptures. We found the rupture in the dominant hand in ten patients. A rupture in the little finger was found in all 12 patients (seven with both flexor tendons ruptured and five with only the profundus ruptured), in the ring finger in four patients (the profundus ruptured in all and both flexor tendons in two patients), and in the middle finger a partial rupture of the profundus in one patient. The tendons were ruptured close to the hook of the hamate. Repetitive friction between the flexor tendons and the hamate hook may cause the ruptures. The hamate hook was excised and the ruptured profundus tendons were reconstructed with tendon transfers with quite favourable functional recovery at follow-up of 1 to 2 years. The ruptured superficialis tendons were not reconstructed. Level of Evidence IV.

  1. 46 CFR 54.15-13 - Rupture disks (modifies UG-127).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) provides for the use of rupture disks in series with spring loaded safety or relief valves. (b) For certain... disk in parallel with or in lieu of a spring loaded safety or relief valve. These rupture disks...

  2. 46 CFR 54.15-13 - Rupture disks (modifies UG-127).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) provides for the use of rupture disks in series with spring loaded safety or relief valves. (b) For certain... disk in parallel with or in lieu of a spring loaded safety or relief valve. These rupture disks...

  3. Computer program for generating kinematic earthquake rupture models using Irikura and Miyake's method.

    SciTech Connect

    Pitarka, Arben

    2016-02-10

    GEN_SRF_4 is a computer program for generation kinematic earthquake rupture models for use in ground motion modeling and simulations of earthquakes. The output is an ascii SRF formatted file containing kinematic rupture parameters.

  4. Axial creep-rupture time of boron-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Koichi; Hamada, Jun`ichi

    1995-11-01

    Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-rupture time were investigated. The average creep-rupture time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-rupture time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-rupture time is improved by compositing with matrix material.

  5. Coil Knotting during Endovascular Coil Embolization for Ruptured MCA Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, S.C.; Lyo, I.U.; Shin, S.H.; Park, J.B.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Complications during coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms include thromboembolic events, hemorrhagic complications related to procedural aneurysmal rupture and parent vessel perforation, and coil-related complications. The present report describes a rare coil-related complication involving spontaneous coil knotting. PMID:20557732

  6. Spontaneous ruptured splenic artery aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms are rare. We discuss a case of a 58-year-old gentleman presenting with collapse and shock secondary to spontaneous splenic artery aneurysm rupture. Patient underwent laparotomy and splenectomy then discharged home within a week of presentation. PMID:20181191

  7. Lateral approach to laparoscopic repair of left diaphragmatic ruptures.

    PubMed

    Goudet, P; Cheynel, N; Ferrand, L; Peschaud, F; Steinmetz, J P; Letourneau, B; Isnardon, J P; Noirot, M T; Poli, L; Freysz, M; Cougard, P

    2001-09-01

    Video-assisted repairs of traumatic diaphragmatic ruptures have been described where thoracoscopy or laparoscopy in the supine position were used. This study aims to validate a new lateral laparoscopic approach for left diaphragmatic repairs. Six consecutive patients were operated on for left diaphragmatic rupture using a lateral approach (Gagner's position). A series of 362 consecutive patients presenting with abdominal or thoracic trauma with or without diaphragmatic rupture over a 2-year period were reviewed retrospectively. Contraindications for immediate or delayed lateral laparoscopic approach were studied. The lateral approach provided complete visibility of the subdiaphragmatic space, easy reduction of herniated organs, easy thoracic inspection and cleaning, the use of low peritoneal pressure, full range of instrumental motion, and rapid diaphragmatic repair. No operative mortality or morbidity was noted. Altogether, 14% to 50% of the patients with diaphragmatic ruptures were candidates for immediate lateral laparoscopic repair. Associated spleen injury in 50% of the cases was the main contraindication. The lateral laparoscopic approach provides better exposure of the diaphragm on the left side and facilitates the diaphragmatic repair especially with a large herniation. Immediate repair is possible in selected cases (14-50%). There is no contraindication in case of delayed diagnosis.

  8. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  9. Spontaneous Rupture of Splenic Hemangioma in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Leo, Bruno; Vidal-Medina, Jorge; Cervantes-Ledezma, Jesús; Díaz De León-Rivera, Arid; Díaz-Velasco, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Spleen vascular tumors such as hemangiomas, albeit rare, can present during neonatal period with unexplained circulatory shock. We present a case of a newborn with refractory hypovolemic shock and acute abdomen that underwent emergency splenectomy due to spontaneous rupture of a splenic hemangioma. PMID:27433454

  10. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  11. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  12. Mapping the rupture process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellweg, M.; Boatwright, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the rupture growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent rupture time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate Parkfield earthquakes using smaller events as Green's functions. The first earthquake (M = 4.6) occurred on November 14, 1993, at a depth of 11 km under Middle Mountain, in the assumed preparation zone for the next Parkfield main shock. The second earthquake (M = 4.7) occurred on December 20, 1994, some 6 km to the southeast, at a depth of 9 km on a section of the San Andreas fault with no previous microseismicity and little inferred coseismic slip in the 1966 Parkfield earthquake. The inversion results are strikingly different for the two events. The average stress release in the 1993 event was 50 bars, distributed over a geometrically complex area of 0.9 km2. The average stress release in the 1994 event was only 6 bars, distributed over a roughly elliptical area of 20 km2. The ruptures of both events appear to grow spasmodically into relatively complex shapes: the inversion only constrains the ruptures to grow more slowly than the S wave velocity but does not use smoothness constraints. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  14. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  15. [Pseudomembranous colitis after surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Lozano Sánchez, F; Sánchez Fernández, J; Palacios, E; Fernández, M; Ingelmo Morin, A; Gómez Alonso, A

    1993-01-01

    We present a rare postoperative complication after surgical procedures for rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The disease, a pseudomembranous colitis, was early recognized (by evidence of clostridium difficile after a coprocultive) and satisfactorily treated with vancomycin. From the literature review we found only a similar case but results were absolutely different from our case.

  16. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Yin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results. PMID:27847806

  17. Spontaneous rupture of the uterus associated with pyometra.

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, D. J.; Alderman, B.

    1985-01-01

    A case is reported in which an elderly patient was admitted with signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen. A laparotomy revealed uterine rupture with free pus in the peritoneal cavity and subsequent histology of the uterus showed no evidence of malignancy. PMID:4039437

  18. Ultrasound evaluation of a spontaneous plantar fascia rupture.

    PubMed

    Louwers, Michael J; Sabb, Brian; Pangilinan, Percival H

    2010-11-01

    Plantar fascia rupture is an occasional complication in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis or in patients with plantar fasciitis treated with steroid injection. Very few cases of spontaneous plantar fascia rupture have been reported in the literature (Herrick and Herrick, Am J Sports Med 1983;11:95; Lun et al, Clin J Sports Med 1999;9:48-9; Rolf et al, J Foot Ankle Surg 1997;36:112-4; Saxena and Fullem, Am J Sports Med 2004;32:662-5). Spontaneous medial plantar fascia rupture in a 37-yr-old man with no preceding symptoms or steroid injections was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasound, which revealed severe fasciitis at the calcaneal insertion with partial tearing. After conservative treatment, the patient returned to full activities. We discuss the anatomy, risk factors, examination findings, and treatment for this condition, as well as the unique benefits that ultrasound offers over magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to consider plantar fascia rupture in patients with hindfoot pain and medioplantar ecchymosis, particularly if an injury occurred during acceleration maneuvers. Ultrasound in these cases can be used to diagnose a plantar fascia tear quickly, accurately, and cost-effectively.

  19. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-01-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Preterm Delivery in the Setting of Left Calyceal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Brent; Tabbarah, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the renal collecting system is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. We report a case of nontraumatic left renal calyceal rupture in a pregnancy which ultimately progressed to preterm delivery. A 29-year-old primigravida with a remote history of urolithiasis presented with left flank pain, suprapubic pain, and signs of preterm labor at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient was believed to have urolithiasis, although initial renal ultrasound failed to demonstrate definitive calculi. After a temporary improvement in flank pain with medication, the patient experienced acute worsening of her left flank pain. Urology was consulted and further imaging was obtained. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with bilateral hydronephrosis and rupture of the left renal calyx. Given the patient's worsening pain in the setting of left calyceal rupture, the urology team planned for placement of a left ureteral stent. However, before the patient could receive her stent, she progressed to active labor and delivered a viable female infant vaginally. Following delivery, the patient's flank pain resolved rapidly and spontaneously, so no surgical intervention was performed. A summary of the literature and the details of this specific clinical situation are provided. PMID:26483981

  1. Pulmonary artery rupture in pregnancy complicating patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicholas J; Rollason, Terence P

    1992-01-01

    Fatal haemopericardium in a 27 year old pregnant woman was caused by rupture of a dissecting aneurysm of the pulmonary artery. She had an uncorrected patent ductus arteriosus and severe pulmonary hypertension. The wall of the pulmonary artery showed atherosclerosis and cystic medionecrosis. PMID:1467058

  2. Ruptured aortic valve cusp: a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J H; Menapace, F J; Howell, R R

    1983-07-01

    A case of traumatic rupture of the aortic valve as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver is presented. Conformation was made by comparative echocardiographic studies available from three months before and immediately following the incident. The patient refused surgical intervention and died one month later with severe congestive heart failure despite vigorous medical therapy.

  3. Mechanics of shear rupture applied to earthquake zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanics of shear slippage and rupture in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.

  4. Dissapearance of arachnoid cyst after rupturing into subdural space.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, C; Cetinalp, E; Caner, H; Altinors, N

    2007-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are developmental anomalies usually diagnosed in childhood. The most important complications of arachnoid cysts are subdural haematomas and hygromas and intracystic haemorrhage. In our case we present a 7-year-old boy whose arachnoid cyst ruptured into the subdural space following a mild head injury and disappeared after draining the subdural haematoma by burr-holes.

  5. Mapping the rupture process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Margaret; Boatwright, John

    1999-04-01

    We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the rupture growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent rupture time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate Parkfield earthquakes using smaller events as Green's functions. The first earthquake (M = 4.6) occurred on November 14, 1993, at a depth of 11 km under Middle Mountain, in the assumed preparation zone for the next Parkfield main shock. The second earthquake (M = 4.7) occurred on December 20, 1994, some 6 km to the southeast, at a depth of 9 km on a section of the San Andreas fault with no previous microseismicity and little inferred coseismic slip in the 1966 Parkfield earthquake. The inversion results are strikingly different for the two events. The average stress release in the 1993 event was 50 bars, distributed over a geometrically complex area of 0.9 km2. The average stress release in the 1994 event was only 6 bars, distributed over a roughly elliptical area of 20 km2. The ruptures of both events appear to grow spasmodically into relatively complex shapes: the inversion only constrains the ruptures to grow more slowly than the S wave velocity but does not use smoothness constraints.

  6. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  7. Theory of time-dependent rupture in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is used to develop a theory of earthquake mechanism which includes the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth. The following phenomena are predicted: slow earthquakes, multiple events, delayed multiple events (doublets), postseismic rupture growth and afterslip, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory predicts a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may 'trigger' another.

  8. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture Four Days after an Open Appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gravante, G; Elshaer, M; Humayun, N; Ebdewi, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous splenic rupture is a rare but dangerous event that requires prompt diagnosis and frequently an emergency splenectomy. Previous case reports have described the occurrence in patients with medical conditions, anticoagulant treatments, endoscopic procedures, laparoscopic surgery or no particular predisposing factor. Our report is the first to describe the occurrence of spontaneous spleen rupture following a laparotomy conducted in the lower abdomen. Case History A 62-year-old woman presented with a 10-day history of right iliac fossa pain radiating to the right leg and associated vomiting. Following a routine blood check and computed tomography (CT), she underwent an open appendicectomy through a lower midline laparotomy for an appendicular abscess. Four days later, she experienced haemorrhagic shock and a second CT scan diagnosed a spontaneous splenic rupture that required a prompt splenectomy. Conclusions Our case is the first that describes the spontaneous rupture of the spleen following an open procedure conducted in the lower quadrants. This entity must still be considered as a rare but potential cause for postoperative bleeding when no other obvious sources are identified. PMID:25723677

  9. Intracranial dermoid cyst rupture-related brain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hang; Guo, Zhen-Ni; Luo, Yun; Zhao, Ren; Sun, Ming-Shuo; Yang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Spontaneous rupture of intracranial dermoid cyst is a rare but serious clinical event that can result in cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm and vasculitis are considered as potential mechanisms of dermoid cyst rupture-related cerebral ischemia. However, the hemodynamic mechanisms between cerebral ischemia and dermoid cyst rupture are not well known. Patient concerns: A 55-year-old, right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with sudden receptive aphasia and right-sided hypoalgesia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a ruptured dermoid cyst and watershed infarcts in the left hemisphere. Then brain magnetic resonance angiography disclosed mild stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA), and further high-resolution MRI demonstrated it was caused by an unstable atherosclerosis plaque. Transcranial Doppler of the patient showed a decreasing tendency of peak systolic velocity (PSV) of the left MCA at different time points after the stroke (from 290cm/s at day 6 to 120cm/s at day 30), indicating a transient vasospasm. However, the time course of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) seemed different from the PSV. The patient's dCA reached its lowest point at day 8 and was restored at day 10. The time course of dCA indicated a “called procedure” of a cerebrovascular regulating function to deal with the stimulation in subarachnoid space. Diagnoses: A dermoid cyst rupture-related cerebral infarction was diagnosed in this patient. Interventions: Aspirin (100 mg/d) and atorvastatin (20 mg/d) were given to the patient. A neurosurgical operation was strongly recommended to minimize the risk of further injury of the ruptured dermoid cyst; however, the patient refused the recommended treatment. Outcomes: The neurological deficit of the patient was significantly improved on 30 days follow-up. Lessons: We found that the spread of cyst contents through the subarachnoid and/or ventricular system can induce a vasospasm. Then, dCA was

  10. Kinematic Seismic Rupture Parameters from a Doppler Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Borges, José F.

    2010-05-01

    The radiation emitted from extended seismic sources, mainly when the rupture spreads in preferred directions, presents spectral deviations as a function of the observation location. This aspect, unobserved to point sources, and named as directivity, are manifested by an increase in the frequency and amplitude of seismic waves when the rupture occurs in the direction of the seismic station and a decrease in the frequency and amplitude if it occurs in the opposite direction. The model of directivity that supports the method is a Doppler analysis based on a kinematic source model of rupture and wave propagation through a structural medium with spherical symmetry [1]. A unilateral rupture can be viewed as a sequence of shocks produced along certain paths on the fault. According this model, the seismic record at any point on the Earth's surface contains a signature of the rupture process that originated the recorded waveform. Calculating the rupture direction and velocity by a general Doppler equation, - the goal of this work - using a dataset of common time-delays read from waveforms recorded at different distances around the epicenter, requires the normalization of measures to a standard value of slowness. This normalization involves a non-linear inversion that we solve numerically using an iterative least-squares approach. The evaluation of the performance of this technique was done through a set of synthetic and real applications. We present the application of the method at four real case studies, the following earthquakes: Arequipa, Peru (Mw = 8.4, June 23, 2001); Denali, AK, USA (Mw = 7.8; November 3, 2002); Zemmouri-Boumerdes, Algeria (Mw = 6.8, May 21, 2003); and Sumatra, Indonesia (Mw = 9.3, December 26, 2004). The results obtained from the dataset of the four earthquakes agreed, in general, with the values presented by other authors using different methods and data. [1] Caldeira B., Bezzeghoud M, Borges JF, 2009; DIRDOP: a directivity approach to determining

  11. Improved Data Set for the Frequency of Gaps and Steps in Ground Ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Morelan, A. E., III

    2014-12-01

    Observations of actual ground ruptures from moderate and large earthquakes show a wide range of behaviors, including fault-to-fault jumps, branching topologies, and rupture traces with multi-kilometer gaps between them. Seismic hazard assessments have responded to these observations by including increasingly sophisticated scenarios of possible ruptures in their earthquake rate forecasts. The largest of these to date has been the Uniform California Earthquake Forecast 3 (UCERF3), which explicitly included ruptures with fault-to-fault jumps in its rupture rate estimates. High-level site-specific seismic source characterizations such as for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant have also begun including complicated rupture geometries. Systematic collection of observations from ground rupturing earthquakes provide one way to evaluate these seismic source models. We have expanded an initial collection by Wesnousky (2008) with events post-dating that collection and events for which new information is available. New events increase the strike-slip and normal event set by 50% and reverse events by 35%. New data allow us to revise previous estimates for strike-slip rupture of the probability that a step of 1 km or more in width will arrest rupture. Observationally, 65% of strike-slip ruptures include at least one step of 1 km or greater. The number of steps through which ruptures are observed to rupture through can be modeled by a geometric distribution in which steps are crossed about 59% of the time. Steps are slightly more effective at arresting rupture in normal and reverse faulting cases, being crossed 56% and 50%, respectively. New events were also systematically examined for gaps in the mapped rupture trace. We find gaps of 1 km or more in about half of the ruptures of the new event set. These empirical data will compliment new research into rupture propagation across gaps, exemplified by the 2010 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake, which included a gap measured variously at 7 or

  12. Characteristic ruptures of micro-seismic hydraulic fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, G. F.; Smith-Boughner, L.; Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process that involves the injection of fluids above lithostatic pressures to increase permeability of rocks at depth. During the fracturing process thousands of micro-seismic events are generated as the fracture front propagates outwards from the injection point. Sand or glass beads are frequently injected later in the stage to prop the fractures and maintain flow paths open. Because injection progresses in time and space changing the in situ characteristics the generated seismic events show a combination of seismic signatures between two end members: Coulomb stress transfer on favorably oriented fractures and fluid-induced tensile fractures. In this study we investigate the failure process of ~27,000 micro-seismic fractures induced during a hydraulic fracturing shale completion program. Our goal is to identify spatial and temporal distribution of families of events with similar characteristic rupture behaviors, for different injection phases and relative locations based on either rock formation, depth, source mechanism, fracture plane orientation, stress drop, etc., to classify distinct dynamic failure processes. In our analysis we estimate static and dynamic stress drop, radiated energy, seismic efficiency, moment tensor, fracture plane orientation, slip direction and rupture velocity. On average, the micro-seismic events have low radiated energy, low dynamic stress and low seismic efficiency failing in overshoot mode, with slow rupture velocities consistent with failure on fluid lubricated fractures with decreased friction resistance. Slip is accommodated on fracture planes with orientations dominated by the rock fabric and not always optimally oriented to the regional stress field. Subtle source characteristic differences can be identified: Events occurring in deeper formations tend to have faster rupture velocities and are more efficient in radiating energy. Variations in rupture velocity tend to correlate with variation in depth

  13. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; Gabriel, A.

    2012-12-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  14. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; Pelties, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  15. Spontaneous forniceal rupture: Can it be treated conservatively?

    PubMed Central

    Al-mujalhem, Ahmed Gaber; Aziz, Mohammed Sayed Ahmed; Sultan, Mohammed Farag; Al-maghraby, Ahmed Mohammed; Al-shazly, Mohammed Abdelmonem

    2017-01-01

    Context: Spontaneous forniceal rupture is one of the possible complications of urolithiasis. The mechanism of forniceal rupture is not well explained in the literature. Most of the cases presented with sudden onset of acute renal colic and diagnosed by noncontrast CT (NCCT). Until now there is no solid consensus about the ideal management of such a condition. Aim: To study indications and validity of conservative management of spontaneous caliceal rupture. Settings and Design: This is an observational prospective study. Materials and Methods: All cases diagnosed as spontaneous forniceal rupture in our departments from 2011 to 2015 were enrolled. All cases were diagnosed with NCCT or CT-Urography.. Non complicated patients were primarily managed conservatively. Intervention (DJ stent insertion, nephrostomy tube insertion, or urgent ureteroscopy) was reserved to complicated cases or solitary kidney. Drainage of urinoma was done in cases with sizable urinoma (more than 100 ml3). Results: A total of 40 patients: Twenty eight (70%) patients had normal serum creatinine level at presentation, while 12 (30%) patients had elevated serum creatinine. Twenty three (57.5%) patients were successfully managed conservatively, their mean size of stone was 6.2 ± 2 mm and the hospital stay was 3.1 ± 1.9 days. Eighteen patients (42.5%) underwent interventions. Their stone size was 4.5 ± 2.1 mm and the hospital stay for the interventional group was 4.2 ± 1.8 days. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney test was used for testing difference between means because the data groups are not parametric. Otherwise, simple descriptive statestics were used. Conclusion: Spontaneous forniceal rupture is more likely to occur with smaller distal ureteric stones. Conservative management is a valid option in non-complicated cases. Intervention should be reserved to complicated cases or cases with sizable urinoma. PMID:28216928

  16. Rupture of silicone-gel breast implants: causes, sequelae, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Silverman, B G; Berg, W A

    1997-11-22

    Silicone-gel-filled breast implants have been widely used for breast augmentation and reconstruction after mastectomy. The rate of implant rupture and its sequelae are not known. We review the frequency, causes, sequelae, and detection of implant rupture. Materials testing of removed implants provides evidence that as implants age in vivo, they weaken and may rupture. Sequelae of rupture include migration of gel accompanied by inflammation and silicone granuloma formation. The role of free silicone gel in relation to idiopathic or atypical connective tissue disease is not clear. Magnetic resonance imaging is substantially more sensitive in the detection of rupture than is mammography or ultrasonography.

  17. Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Young, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of shear rupture fronts in laboratory earthquakes is analysed with the corresponding functional networks, constructed over acoustic emission friction-patterns. We show that the mesoscopic characteristics of functional networks carry the characteristic time for each phase of the rupture evolution. The classified rupture fronts in network states–obtained from a saw-cut fault and natural faulted Westerly granite - show a clear separation into three main groups, indicating different states of rupture fronts. With respect to the scaling of local ruptures' durations with the networks' parameters, we show that the gap in the classified fronts could be related to the possibility of a separation between slow and regular fronts.

  18. [Atypical Achilles tendon rupture in Haglund exostosis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Porsch, M; Hackenbroch, M H; König, D P

    1998-01-01

    We report about an unusual case of a rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with Haglund's exostosis and long term achillodynia. Intraoperatively, we found a fresh superficial typically located tendon-rupture and an old deep round shaped rupture which was located directly over the cranial edge of the calcaneous bone spur. We presume that the sharp edge of Haglund's deformity was the cause of the deep tendon rupture, because the location of the round shaped rupture was near the exostosis. The additional superficial rupture, caused by an inadequate trauma, induced operative revision consisting of double layer transosseous suturing. In conclusion early operative resection of Haglund's deformity in cases of repeated irritations of the Achilles tendon should be performed to avoid mechanical damage, including the risk of rupture by the hypomochlion-like effect of the exostosis.

  19. Spontaneous splenic rupture in an acute leukemia patient with splenic tuberculosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Tingting; Zeng, Hui; Zhao, Bing; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaohuan; Han, Wei; Hu, Yanping; Liu, Fengge; Shan, Zhijuan; Gao, Weifeng; Zhou, Hebing

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture, also referred to as atraumatic splenic rupture, is a rare but life-threatening emergency condition. Without timely diagnosis and treatment, the mortality rate of splenic rupture approaches 100%. The etiology of atraumatic splenic rupture varies; it is reportedly associated with neoplasms or splenic infection, but is rarely encountered in patients with both conditions. We herein report the case of a 58-year-old male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by splenic tuberculosis (TB), who presented with spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Pathological examination of the resected spleen revealed multifocal granulomatosis with caseous necrosis. However, with timely diagnosis and surgical intervention, the patient recovered successfully and is currently on consolidation therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous splenic rupture in AML with splenic TB. The relevant literature on spontaneous splenic rupture was also reviewed and the potential etiology and treatment were discussed. PMID:28357096

  20. Diagnosis and management of testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Jin-Rui; Huang, Yu-Meng; Wang, Long; Liu, Long-Fei; Wei, Yong-Bao; Huang, Liang; Zhu, Quan; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Testicular rupture, one of the most common complications in blunt scrotal trauma, is the rupture of tunica albuginea and extrusion of seminiferous tubules. Testicular rupture is more inclined to young men, and injury mechanisms are associated with sports and motor accidents. After history taking and essential physical examination, scrotal ultrasound is the first-line auxiliary examination. MRI is also one of the vital complementary examinations to evaluate testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma. Surgical exploration and repair may be necessary when the diagnosis of testicular rupture is definite or suspicious. Postoperative follow-up is to monitor the relief of local symptoms and changes of testicular functions. This review sums up the literatures about testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma in recent 16 years and also refers some new advantages and perspectives on diagnosis and management of testicular rupture.

  1. Resolution of alliance ruptures: The special case of animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal

    2017-01-01

    Many therapists regard alliance ruptures as one of the greatest challenges therapists face in the therapy room. Alliance ruptures has been previously defined as breakdowns in the process of negotiation of treatment tasks and goals and a deterioration in the affective bond between patient and therapist. Alliance ruptures have been found to predict premature termination of treatment and poor treatment outcomes. But ruptures can also present important opportunities for gaining insight and awareness and for facilitating therapeutic change. A process of rupture resolution may lead to beneficial outcomes and serve as a corrective emotional experience. The article describes unique processes of alliance rupture resolution inherent in animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP). Building on Safran and Muran's model and on clinical examples, the article describes strategies for identifying ruptures in AAP and techniques for repairing them to facilitate a corrective experience in treatment. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  2. A ruptured large aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, S; Hirose, K; Ohyagi, A

    1987-01-01

    A 60 year old man was admitted with acute back pain followed by hoarseness. An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus Botalli was diagnosed and an operation was recommended because of the high risk of complications such as rupture, embolism, or infection. The patient and his family refused surgery, however. The patient died suddenly of a rupture of the aneurysm a year later; necropsy confirmed the diagnosis. Several diagnostic methods were used and enhanced computed tomography gave the best representation of the aneurysm as it was seen at necropsy. This case indicates that enhanced computed tomography is probably the most useful investigation in patients with this type of aneurysm and it confirms the importance of an aneurysmectomy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3566989

  3. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Wu; Li, Yong; Xie, Kai; Dong, Wei; Cao, Xian-Tong; Xiao, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEH) is a rare tumor of vascular endothelial origin. Spontaneous rupture of HEH is a life-threatening complication and is extremely rare. HEH has variable malignant potential, and the clinical diagnosis remains challenging. Here we report a case of HEH with spontaneous rupture. A 44-year-old man presented with constant cutting pains over the right upper abdomen after eating. He had hemoptysis 11 d previously. Diagnostic abdominal puncture demonstrated active bleeding. Chest and abdominal computer tomography scan showed multiple ground-glass nodules over the lungs, multiple low-density intrahepatic nodules and massive hemorrhage. Transcatheter arterial embolization and exploratory laparotomy were performed and subsequent immunohistochemical examination confirmed a diagnosis of HEH. PMID:28104995

  4. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  5. A Ruptured Digital Epidermal Inclusion Cyst: A Sinister Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip; Ragg, Amanda; Vane, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign cutaneous lesions caused by dermal or subdermal implantation and proliferation of epidermal squamous epithelium as a result of trauma or surgery. They are typically located on the scalp, face, trunk, neck, or back; however they can be found anywhere on the body. Lesions are asymptomatic unless complicated by rupture, malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma, or infection at which point they can clinically appear as more sinister pathologies. We present the case of a 45-year-old laborer with a ruptured epidermal inclusion cyst, manifesting clinically and radiographically as a malignancy. Following MRI, definitive surgical management may appear to be a logical progression in management of the patient. This case however is a good example of why meticulously following surgical protocol when evaluating an unknown soft tissue mass is imperative. By following protocol, an alternate diagnosis was made and the patient has since gone on to a make a full recovery without life transforming surgery. PMID:27418992

  6. A Ruptured Digital Epidermal Inclusion Cyst: A Sinister Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bohler, Iain; Fletcher, Phillip; Ragg, Amanda; Vane, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign cutaneous lesions caused by dermal or subdermal implantation and proliferation of epidermal squamous epithelium as a result of trauma or surgery. They are typically located on the scalp, face, trunk, neck, or back; however they can be found anywhere on the body. Lesions are asymptomatic unless complicated by rupture, malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma, or infection at which point they can clinically appear as more sinister pathologies. We present the case of a 45-year-old laborer with a ruptured epidermal inclusion cyst, manifesting clinically and radiographically as a malignancy. Following MRI, definitive surgical management may appear to be a logical progression in management of the patient. This case however is a good example of why meticulously following surgical protocol when evaluating an unknown soft tissue mass is imperative. By following protocol, an alternate diagnosis was made and the patient has since gone on to a make a full recovery without life transforming surgery.

  7. [Rotator cuff ruptures with predominant involvement of the subscapular tendon].

    PubMed

    Nérot, C; Jully, J L; Gérard, Y

    Among the all rotator cuff tears, the subscapularis lesions are quite rare. But a careful analysis leads to recognize them specially in case of antero-medial impingement between the coracoid process and the head of the humerus. This study of 25 observations where the rupture of the subscapularis was the predominant lesion, allows to emphasize some characteristics of them. The patients are often younger than for the other ruptures, a traumatic experience is not rare at the beginning of the history, the pain is usually the first symptom before the functional disability, the alterations of the rotator-interval and of the biceps tendon are very frequent, the arthroscanner is a very good help for the diagnosis and satisfying stitches are possible in case of early diagnoses. Lastly, the prognosis of these limited lesions is quite different than the one of very large cuff tears including the suscapularis tendon.

  8. Unusual clinical presentation of a partial tibialis anterior rupture.

    PubMed

    Jellad, A; Salah, S; Bouaziz, M A; Bouzaouache, H; Ben Salah, Z

    2012-02-01

    Subcutaneous rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare. Diagnosis is usually clear. The essential clinical symptoms are progressively: footdrop gait, loss of ankle flexion strength, ankle foot pain and claw toes. But the occurrence of an asymptomatic time period between the injury and the onset of clinical signs can make the diagnosis more difficult. MRI is the gold standard examination for tendons injuries and associated bone and joints damages. Surgical exploration confirms MRI findings. It constitutes the treatment of choice for tibialis anterior tendon rupture. Surgical or functional techniques used have an impact on the design of the rehabilitation program, essential step in the care management of these injuries. It avoids postoperative tendon adhesions and their functional consequences. We report here a case of a man presenting with footdrop gait as the only clinical symptom.

  9. [Tracheal rupture in a patient with head and thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, E; Egea, A; González, J M; Hinojosa, A; Fernández-Valderrama, A; Gil, E; Benítez, A

    1995-01-01

    A 49-year-old patient presented with cranioencephalic injuries including subdural hematoma and severe mass effect, facial and thoracic injuries with bilateral rib fractures but no parenchymatous lesions or extrapulmonary air. After surgical evacuation of the subdural hematoma, the patient entered the intensive care unit. Twenty-four hours later the patient pulled out the tubes, which were reinserted after signs of respiratory failure appeared. A series of clinical and radiological signs then followed, namely subcutaneous cervicothoracic emphysema, mediastinitis accompanied by hyperinsufflated balloon tamponade (pressures < 28 cmH2O). Tracheal rupture was suspected, but fibrebronchoscopy through the trachea revealed no damage. Surgical exploration 72 hours after admission confirmed high tracheal rupture near the pars membranacea. The damage was sutured, but sepsis with severe respiratory distress and mediastinitis led to death.

  10. [Tracheal rupture after orotracheal intubation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Hayi-Slayman, D; Page, M; Ben Cheikh, A; Christin, F; Ber, C-E; Rimmelé, T

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of an iatrogenic tracheal rupture following an endotracheal intubation. The 78-year-old patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of an acute respiratory failure related to a severe nosocomial pneumonia occurring 21 days after an abdominal aorta surgery. His main antecedent was a cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Immediately after being intubated, a traumatic tracheobronchial rupture was suspected because of the sudden appearance of cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema. A thoracic computed tomography with multiplanar reformations confirmed the diagnosis and the evolution was unfortunately rapidly unfavourable. Risk factors, clinical and radiological aspects, and management of this rare but serious complication of endotracheal intubation will be discussed.

  11. Amniopatch for iatrogenic rupture of the fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Deprest, Jan; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Richter, Jute; DeKoninck, Philip; Van Mieghem, Tim; Van Schoubroeck, Dominique; Devlieger, Roland; De Catte, Luc; Lewi, Liesbeth

    2011-07-01

    With the increased use of invasive fetal procedures, the number of women facing post-procedure membrane rupture is increasing. Here we review the use of platelets and fresh frozen plasma for sealing iatrogenic fetal membrane defects by describing the mechanisms of action of the amniopatch procedure as well as published experience. In cases of iatrogenic preterm pre-labour rupture of the membranes, amniopatch effectively seals the fetal membranes in over two-thirds of cases. There is a risk of 16% of in utero fetal death, which may occur at varying intervals from the procedure and often for unknown reasons. Amniopatch has also been used as a treatment of chorionic membrane separation. In summary, current experience suggests that in cases of early onset but persistent amniotic fluid leakage following an invasive fetal procedure, amniopatch is an option.

  12. Kernohan's phenomenon associated with left ruptured occipital arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, A; Sato, H; Katayama, W; Nakai, K; Tsunoda, T; Kobayashi, E; Nose, T

    2004-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with ipsilateral hemiparesia due to rupture of a left occipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Emergency decompression (the onset-operation interval was 46 minutes,) was carried out and the patient could leave the hospital upon recovery without neurological deficits. In general, Kernohan's phenomenon is caused by the gradual displacement of the cerebral peduncle against the tentorial edge caused by compression by the contralateral mass. This phenomenon is very rare among the cases with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and only three cases including the present one have been reported in the literature. In all cases the onset-operation intervals of were very short. Kernohan's phenomenon associated with a ruptured AVM is a rare condition and emergency decompression is required.

  13. Cyclophilin A in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: A Prognostic Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-09-01

    Cyclophilin A (CyPA), an oxidative stress-induced factor, was found to play an important role in the aneurysm formation. Our working hypothesis was that the plasma level of CyPA in ruptured intracranial aneurysm could predict the neurological outcome. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 36 patients with ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm were recruited in our study. Before coil embolization, we draw blood samples at the orifice of a culprit aneurysm and in the remote peripheral vein for measurements of the CyPA levels. We utilized the modified Rankin scale 30 days after aneurysm rupture as the outcome measure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios of the poor neurological outcome given the presence of high plasma level of CyPA. The aneurysmal and venous CyPA levels were significantly associated with the initial clinical severity (P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively) and 30-day outcome (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels modestly correlated with age and high Fisher grade (ρ = 0.39 and 0.41; P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels strongly correlated with the venous counterpart (ρ = 0.89; P < 0.001). Patients with high levels of aneurysmal CyPA were 15.66 times (95% CI, 1.48-166.24; P = 0.02) more likely to have worse neurological outcome than those with the low levels after adjustment of the age, gender, and the documented confounding factors. High plasma level of CyPA is a significant prognostic biomarker for poor neurological outcome in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  14. Ruptured gastric artery aneurysm: an uncommon manifestation of microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Yoshihiro; Kadota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Shuhei; Arimoto, Akira; Nishioka, Eiko

    2014-09-21

    Gastric artery aneurysm is a rare and lethal condition, and is caused by inflammatory or degenerative vasculopathies. We describe herein the clinical course of a patient with a ruptured gastric artery aneurysm associated with microscopic polyangiitis. Absence of vasculitic changes in the aneurysm resected and negative results of autoantibodies interfered with our diagnostic process. We should have adopted an interventional radiology and initiated steroid therapy promptly to rescue the patient.

  15. Ruptured gastric artery aneurysm: An uncommon manifestation of microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikura, Yoshihiro; Kadota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Shuhei; Arimoto, Akira; Nishioka, Eiko

    2014-01-01

    Gastric artery aneurysm is a rare and lethal condition, and is caused by inflammatory or degenerative vasculopathies. We describe herein the clinical course of a patient with a ruptured gastric artery aneurysm associated with microscopic polyangiitis. Absence of vasculitic changes in the aneurysm resected and negative results of autoantibodies interfered with our diagnostic process. We should have adopted an interventional radiology and initiated steroid therapy promptly to rescue the patient. PMID:25253973

  16. Simulations of glass surfaces structure, water adsorption, and bond rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalini, Stephen H.

    1990-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure of silica glass surfaces formed in a perfect vacuum as well as in the presence of a water vapor show the type, location, and concentration of specific features formed in the surface. A bond rupture mechanism which causes silanol formation far removed from the original reaction site is observed. The 3-membered ring is proposed as a site for H adsorption in the glass.

  17. [Ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma associated with HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; McCormack, Lucas; Perez, Daniel; Clavien, P A

    2006-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is a rare condition related to pregnancy; however, it can cause complications such as a ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma. In most cases, this is managed surgically, but the mortality rate is high, up to 50% of all patients. We present a case with conservative management by percutaneous embolization of the right hepatic artery with a successful outcome and we propose a modern treatment algorithm.

  18. Spontaneous rupture of urinary bladder: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Albino, Giuseppe; Bilardi, Francesco; Gattulli, Domenico; Maggi, Pietro; Corvasce, Antonio; Marucco, Ettore Cirillo

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the bladder is a rare event. The clinical presentation shows the signs and symptoms of peritonitis, but the diagnosis is made at the operating table. This event is burdened with a high mortality rate. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who came to our observation. He was a chronic carrier of urinary catheter, at least 7 times removed traumatically by himself. At the time of admission he showed drastic reduction in urine output, absence of hydronephrosis, normal functioning of the catheter, a tense and widely meteoric abdomen, the presence of air-fluid levels, normal kidneys, absence of free fluid in the abdomen. The CT showed a fluid collection of about 7 cm diameter between the bladder and rectum. The explorative laparotomy found a small fissuration of the posterior wall of the bladder. For his severe conditions, the patient died a few hours after surgery, in intensive care unit. Although it is a rare event, since 1980, 177 cases of spontaneous rupture of the bladder are reported in the literature. Their causes may be essentially divided into two groups: for increase of intravesical pressure; or for weakening of the bladder wall. In most cases, the spontaneous rupture of the bladder takes place in presence of a urothelial neoplasm or after radiation therapy of the pelvic organs. The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the bladder in our case does not relate to a bladder tumor or radiotherapy. It may have been caused by repeated episodes of acute retention of urine with extreme bladder distension up to 3 liters. It is not easy to think of a bladder perforation in patients presenting signs of peritonitis without a history of bladder cancer or pelvic radiotherapy. A CT with intravesical contrast medium could help the diagnostic orientation.

  19. Ruptured bilateral synovial cysts in presumed gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Terho, P; Viikari, J; Mäkelä, P; Toivanen, A

    1977-01-01

    A man with gonococcal urethritis who developed septic arthritis of both knees is described. The arthritis was complicated by rupture of bilateral synovial cysts. A rise in serum gonococcal complement-fixation antibody titer was demonstrated. Complement-fixing gonococcal antibodies with a high titer were observed in this synovial fluid. The patient responded well to antibiotic treatment and there was no permanent damage to his knee joints.

  20. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  1. Earthquake rupture process recreated from a natural fault surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    What exactly happens on the rupture surface as an earthquake nucleates, spreads, and stops? We cannot observe this directly, and models depend on assumptions about physical conditions and geometry at depth. We thus measure a natural fault surface and use its 3D coordinates to construct a replica at 0.1 m resolution to obviate geometry uncertainty. We can recreate stick-slip behavior on the resulting finite element model that depends solely on observed fault geometry. We clamp the fault together and apply steady state tectonic stress until seismic slip initiates and terminates. Our recreated M~1 earthquake initiates at contact points where there are steep surface gradients because infinitesimal lateral displacements reduce clamping stress most efficiently there. Unclamping enables accelerating slip to spread across the surface, but the fault soon jams up because its uneven, anisotropic shape begins to juxtapose new high-relief sticking points. These contacts would ultimately need to be sheared off or strongly deformed before another similar earthquake could occur. Our model shows that an important role is played by fault-wall geometry, though we do not include effects of varying fluid pressure or exotic rheologies on the fault surfaces. We extrapolate our results to large fault systems using observed self-similarity properties, and suggest that larger ruptures might begin and end in a similar way, though the scale of geometrical variation in fault shape that can arrest a rupture necessarily scales with magnitude. In other words, fault segmentation may be a magnitude dependent phenomenon and could vary with each subsequent rupture.

  2. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-12-20

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome.

  3. [Fall during dancing can lead to urinary bladder rupture].

    PubMed

    Winck-Flyvholm, Lili

    2013-12-02

    The definition of dancing is body movements performed to music. It is hard to imagine any festive occasion without music and dancing. It is also a great exercise which helps you to stay in shape. As with any other form of sports, dancing can lead to injury. In this case report it is described how a fall during dancing resulted in urinary bladder rupture. This type of injury under these circumstances has never been described before in the literature.

  4. Choriocarcinoma with Uterine Rupture and Shock: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Pyrbot, Jupirika; Singh, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and a malignant form of gestational trophoblastic disease. Choriocarcinoma is frequently preceded by a complete mole, ectopic pregnancy, nonmolar intrauterine abortion, and uncommonly by a partial mole. It is treated medically with chemotherapeutic drugs usually. However, we managed to save a life with appropriate and timely surgical intervention in a case of choriocarcinoma who presented with uterine rupture, haemoperitoneum, anaemia and hypovolemic shock. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and hysterectomy followed by systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26557535

  5. Gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tung, P H; Law, S; Chu, K M; Law, W L; Wong, J

    2001-01-01

    Choking is a common emergency problem. The Heimlich maneuver is unquestionably effective in relieving airway obstruction. Serious and life-threatening complications may arise, however, if the maneuver is applied incorrectly. Two cases of gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver are reported. Lay public, paramedics and the medical professionals should be educated with the correct technique of Heimlich maneuver and its potential complications. All patients receiving Heimlich maneuver should be examined by an experienced physician.

  6. Pterional or Subfrontal Access for Proximal Vascular Control in Anterior Interhemispheric Approach for Ruptured Pericallosal Artery Aneurysms at Risk of Premature Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaechan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cases of a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm with a high risk of intraoperative premature rupture and technical difficulties for proximal vascular control require a technique for the early and safe establishment of proximal vascular control. Methods A combined pterional or subfrontal approach exposes the bilateral A1 segments or the origin of the ipsilateral A2 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) for proximal vascular control. Proximal control far from the ruptured aneurysm facilitates tentative clipping of the rupture point of the aneurysm without a catastrophic premature rupture. The proximal control is then switched to the pericallosal artery just proximal to the aneurysm and its intermittent clipping facilitates complete aneurysm dissection and neck clipping. Results Three such cases are reported: a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm with a contained leak of the contrast from the proximal side of the aneurysm, a low-lying ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm with irregularities on its proximal wall, and a multilobulated ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm with the parasagittal bridging veins hindering surgical access to the proximal parent artery. In each case, the proposed combined pterional-interhemispheric or subfrontal-interhemispheric approach was successfully performed to establish proximal vascular control far from the ruptured aneurysm and facilitated aneurysm clipping via the interhemispheric approach. Conclusion When using an anterior interhemispheric approach for a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm with a high risk of premature rupture, a pterional or subfrontal approach can be combined to establish early proximal vascular control at the bilateral A1 segments or the origin of the A2 segment. PMID:28264247

  7. Rupture process of the 2013 Okhotsk deep mega earthquake from iterative backprojection and compress sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W.; Yin, J.; Yao, H.

    2013-12-01

    On May 24th 2013 a Mw 8.3 normal faulting earthquake occurred at a depth of approximately 600 km beneath the sea of Okhotsk, Russia. It is a rare mega earthquake that ever occurred at such a great depth. We use the time-domain iterative backprojection (IBP) method [1] and also the frequency-domain compressive sensing (CS) technique[2] to investigate the rupture process and energy radiation of this mega earthquake. We currently use the teleseismic P-wave data from about 350 stations of USArray. IBP is an improved method of the traditional backprojection method, which more accurately locates subevents (energy burst) during earthquake rupture and determines the rupture speeds. The total rupture duration of this earthquake is about 35 s with a nearly N-S rupture direction. We find that the rupture is bilateral in the beginning 15 seconds with slow rupture speeds: about 2.5km/s for the northward rupture and about 2 km/s for the southward rupture. After that, the northward rupture stopped while the rupture towards south continued. The average southward rupture speed between 20-35 s is approximately 5 km/s, lower than the shear wave speed (about 5.5 km/s) at the hypocenter depth. The total rupture length is about 140km, in a nearly N-S direction, with a southward rupture length about 100 km and a northward rupture length about 40 km. We also use the CS method, a sparse source inversion technique, to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation of this mega earthquake. We observe clear along-strike frequency dependence of the spatial and temporal distribution of seismic radiation and rupture process. The results from both methods are generally similar. In the next step, we'll use data from dense arrays in southwest China and also global stations for further analysis in order to more comprehensively study the rupture process of this deep mega earthquake. Reference [1] Yao H, Shearer P M, Gerstoft P. Subevent location and rupture imaging using iterative backprojection for

  8. Investigating Different Aspects of Supershear Rupture Speed to Constraint Earthquake Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, L. A.; Gabriel, A. A.; Mena Carbrera, B.; Baumann, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    Since the paper of Andrews (1976) in which the physical conditions to the occurrence of supershear rupture speed has been described in in-plane (mode II) rupture, several earthquakes, mainly large strike-slip faults, show evidence of this phenomenon. Now it is widely accepted this possibility, and several studies describing this phenomenon has been reported in the specialized literature. Those studies of supershear rupture are mainly described into the framework of classical cracks governed by slip-weakening friction. Numerical simulations of dynamic rupture in a heterogeneous field, as expected it is in nature, suggest that localized super-shear rupture speed in strike-slip fault exist at events of all sizes (Mena et al, BSSA 2011, submitted), as well as in dip-slip faults (see Baumann and Dalguer, AGU2011 this session). Inspired by the pioneer study on supershear cracks of Andrews (1976), we have developed in-plane dynamic rupture models governed by strong velocity weakening, to investigate the development of supershear rupture speed in a diversity of rupture styles: crack-like, pulse-like and combination of both. In addition to the classical supershear crack, we have identified four styles of supershear rupture patterns (Gabriel et al, JGR2011, submitted): 1) Supershear pulse triggered by a primary pulse; 2) supershear crack triggered by a primary pulse; 3) Initially steady state pulse, then very shortly become growing pulse to soon nucleates a bilateral asymmetric rupture crack, that later trigger a supershear rupture at the two new rupture fronts. The two supershear rupture fronts propagating toward the hypocenter suffer a collision at the hypocenter; 4) Growing main rupture pulse followed by a reactivation of a shear crack at the hypocenter, that subsequently triggers a supershear crack. The supershear transition mechanism described by Andrews (1976) operates also for all the listed supershear styles. We aim to characterize all these aspects of supershear

  9. Near-field tsunami edge waves and complex earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of distributed coseismic slip on progressive, near-field edge waves is examined for continental shelf tsunamis. Detailed observations of edge waves are difficult to separate from the other tsunami phases that are observed on tide gauge records. In this study, analytic methods are used to compute tsunami edge waves distributed over a finite number of modes and for uniformly sloping bathymetry. Coseismic displacements from static elastic theory are introduced as initial conditions in calculating the evolution of progressive edge-waves. Both simple crack representations (constant stress drop) and stochastic slip models (heterogeneous stress drop) are tested on a fault with geometry similar to that of the M w = 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake. Crack-like ruptures that are beneath or that span the shoreline result in similar longshore patterns of maximum edge-wave amplitude. Ruptures located farther offshore result in reduced edge-wave excitation, consistent with previous studies. Introduction of stress-drop heterogeneity by way of stochastic slip models results in significantly more variability in longshore edge-wave patterns compared to crack-like ruptures for the same offshore source position. In some cases, regions of high slip that are spatially distinct will yield sub-events, in terms of tsunami generation. Constructive interference of both non-trapped and trapped waves can yield significantly larger tsunamis than those that produced by simple earthquake characterizations.

  10. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel; Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are potentially devastating pathological dilations of arterial walls that affect 2-5% of the population. In our previous CFD study of 119 IAs, we found that ruptured aneurysms were correlated with complex flow pattern and statistically predictable by low wall shear stress and high oscillatory shear index. To understand flow mechanisms that drive the pathophysiology of aneurysm wall leading to either stabilization or growth and rupture, we aim at exploring vortex dynamics of aneurysmal flow and provide insight into the correlation between the previous predictive morphological parameters and wall hemodynamic metrics. We adopt the Q-criterion definition of coherent structures (CS) and analyze the CS dynamics in aneurysmal flows for both ruptured and unruptured IA cases. For the first time, we draw relevant biological conclusions concerning aneurysm flow mechanisms and pathophysiological outcome. In pulsatile simulations, the coherent structures are analyzed in these 119 patient-specific geometries obtained using 3D angiograms. The images were reconstructed and CFD were performed. Upon conclusion of this work, better understanding of flow patterns of unstable aneurysms may lead to improved clinical outcome.

  11. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hernani, Bruno L; Silva, Pedro C; Nishio, Ricardo T; Mateus, Henrique C; Assef, José C; De Campos, Tercio

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen, the pancreatitis was scored as Balthazar C grade, and a suspicious area of necrosis affecting 30% of the pancreas with splenic vein thrombosis was revealed. Seventy-two hours after admission, the patient had significant improvement in symptoms. However, he showed clinical worsening on the sixth day of hospitalization, with increasing abdominal distension and reduced hemoglobin levels. A CT angiography showed a large amount of free fluid in the abdominal cavity, along with a large splenic hematoma and contrast extravasation along the spleen artery. The patient subsequently underwent laparotomy, which showed hemoperitoneum due to rupture of the splenic parenchyma. A splenectomy was then performed, followed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage. PMID:26425272

  12. Predicting the rupture probabilities of molecular bonds in series.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Gregor; Albrecht, Christian H; Gaub, Hermann E

    2007-08-15

    An assembly of two receptor ligand bonds in series will typically break at the weaker complex upon application of an external force. The rupture site depends highly on the binding potentials of both bonds and on the loading rate of the applied force. A model is presented that allows simulations of force-induced rupture of bonds in series at a given force and loading rate based on the natural dissociation rates kR0,S0 and the potential width DeltaxR,S of the reference and sample bonds. The model is especially useful for the analysis of differential force assay experiments. This is illustrated by experiments on molecular force balances consisting of two 30-bp oligonucleotide duplexes where kR0,S0 and DeltaxR,S have been determined for different single nucleotide mismatches. Furthermore, prediction of the rupture site of two bonds in series is demonstrated for DNA duplexes in combination with streptavidin/biotin and anti-digoxigenin/digoxigenin, respectively.

  13. Spontaneous Rupture of Hepatic Metastasis from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Fernandes; Adarsh, Hiremath

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with advanced-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma presented with fatigue and dyspnea. Examination revealed tachycardia (102 b/min) with mild tenderness in right upper quadrant. His hemoglobin (Hb) was 7.9 g/dL (10 days prior to presentation 12.2 g/dL), International normalized ratio (INR), platelet count was normal, and the stool guaiac test was negative. On admission, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed hepatic metastatic lesion with a rupture and hemoperitoneum communicating to the subdiaphragmatic space. This rapid progression of anemia along with presenting symptoms and CT imaging were attributed to diagnosis of spontaneous rupture of liver metastasis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient received blood transfusion and hemoglobin was monitored in successive intervals. His general condition and anemia improved with conservative management and he was discharged in 3 days. Repeated CT after 4 months showed resolving hemoperitoneum and stable hemoglobin levels. The patient deceased 9 months after being diagnosed. A literature search revealed limited data regarding the incidence and management of spontaneous rupture of metastatic lesion secondary to pancreatic adenocarcinoma which has been managed conservatively and thus we are reporting our experience. PMID:27597912

  14. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  15. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion

    PubMed Central

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G.; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. Presentation of case A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Conclusion Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. PMID:26255001

  16. Endovascular Repair of Contained Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Robert; Loosemore, Tom; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute rupture of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.

  17. Rupture of the pectoralis major muscle in a paratrooper.

    PubMed

    Komurcu, Mahmut; Yildiz, Yavuz; Ozdemir, M Taner; Erler, Kaan

    2004-01-01

    Rupture of the pectoralis major muscle is a very rare injury. Excessive contraction of muscle fibers during certain forms of sports, such as weightlifting and bench pressing, is the most common cause. Among the 150 reported cases in the literature, in only 1 case did the injury happen during the landing phase of parachuting. Here we report a case of pectoralis major muscle rupture caused by a different mechanism than published previously. A paratrooper was injured during a tactical jump out of an aircraft after becoming entangled with the risers. The mechanism of injury was excessive traction and malpositioning of his shoulder when the parachute deployed. A three-phase conservative treatment regimen was performed and results were assessed by dynamometry. The patient was satisfied with the treatment and the dynamometric results were good at 9 mo after injury and at the end of a 20-mo follow-up period. We suggest that three-phase rehabilitation can be an effective treatment option for pectoralis major muscle rupture in selected patients. Prevention of this type of altitude injury would be possible by applying the fundamentals of parachuting.

  18. Spontaneous intramural rupture and intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, W F

    1980-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural rupture or intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is a rare cause of acute pain in the chest and upper abdomen. Much less ominous than spontaneous complete rupture from which it must be distinguished, it seldom if ever necessitates operation. Five new cases are described and reviewed together with 15 collected from published reports. The dominant symptom of every case was severe and constant retrosternal or epigastric pain; concomitant dysphagia was mentioned in 11 cases. In seven the pain was preceded by or coincided with vomiting. The condition was related to other stresses in three and appeared to be truly spontaneous in 10. In approximately one-third of cases it started suddenly but more often it began as discomfort worsening rapidly. Fourteen patients vomited blood after experiencing pain but only four were given transfusions. In contradistinction to complete rupture, none had surgical emphysema and plain chest radiographs were unremarkable. All had abnormal gastrografin or barium swallows. Intramural haematomas with or without mucosal tears were seen in the 11 cases in which oesophagoscopy was performed. Fifteen patients made rapid and complete recoveries on conservative management. Of the four who did not respond satisfactorily, one had the oesophagus repaired, two had drainage of the mediastinum after failure to find the false lumen at thoracotomy, and one had only an abdominal exploration. The only death in the whole series occurred after a disastrous emergency exploration and subsequent total oesophagectomy. Images PMID:6973833

  19. The Rupture Behaviour Of Woven Fabrics Containing Kevlar Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, N.; Qu, J.; Darley, M.; Lingard, S.

    2012-07-01

    Woven fabrics containing high performance fibres are frequently used in spacecraft structures and the rupture behaviour of these fabrics heavily influences the performance of its final products. However, the initiation and propagation of a ruptured fracture in the woven fabrics is not clear and the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods varies. Currently there is a lack of knowledge about both the characteristics of tear propagation woven fabrics containing high performance fibres such as Kevlar and the influence of the fabric structural parameters on the rupture behaviour of the fabrics; this knowledge gap creates difficulties for the engineering design and selection of suitable fabric materials to meet specific requirements in each application case involving such woven fabrics. In this paper, the tear propagations in a polyurethane-coated woven fabric containing Kevlar fibres based on two different tear testing standards are examined; the mechanism of tear propagation in woven fabrics and the influences of tear testing design on the interpretation of the results from different tear testing methods are discussed. It is expected that the results will guide both the engineering design of Kevlar woven fabric structures and the evaluation of the fabric performance.

  20. Rupture of thin liquid films sprayed on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoura, M.; Chandra, S.

    2013-02-01

    An experimental study was done to observe the formation of thin films by spraying liquid onto a solid surface and to determine the conditions under which the films would rupture or remain stable. Water, or water mixed with 20-70 % by weight of glycerin, was sprayed for varying lengths of time onto a circular, 165-mm-diameter plate made of either Plexiglas, steel, or Parafilm-M and the motion of the liquid recorded using a high-speed camera. Water films ruptured immediately after the impact near the center of the surface. Then, if the film thickness was greater than a critical value, the water flooded back and the hole closed; otherwise, the hole remained in the water layer. The critical film thickness increases linearly with advancing liquid-solid contact angle. Increasing liquid viscosity by adding glycerin had little effect on critical film thickness, but inhibited spreading of the liquid and suppressed initial rupture of the liquid layer. A surface energy model was used to predict the variation of critical film thickness with surface wettability.

  1. Mantle cell lymphoma presenting with spontaneous splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sakagami, Yukako; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Koba, Yusuke; Shinzato, Isaku; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2016-08-01

    A 48-year-old man was transferred to our emergency room because of sudden-onset epigastric pain and nausea. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed splenomegaly with splenic infarction and intra-abdominal bleeding, suggestive of splenic rupture. An emergent open splenectomy was performed. His spleen was markedly swollen and showed continuous bleeding due to a laceration. On histopathological examination, his spleen was filled with abnormal tumor cells. He was diagnosed as having mantle cell lymphoma based on the findings of immunohistochemical and cytogenetic analyses of the spleen. Mantle cell lymphoma cells were identified in the bone marrow and ileum, and he was determined to be in stageIVA by positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. He was administered rituximab combined with hyper-CVAD/MA chemotherapy (R-hyper-CVAD/MA regimen). After two courses of the R-hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, he achieved complete response, as confirmed by PET-CT. He received four courses in total of the R-hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, followed sequentially by high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT). He is currently alive and free of disease. This is the 10(th) report of a mantle cell lymphoma case with spontaneous splenic rupture. We herein review previous reports and emphasize the importance of awareness of hematological malignancies when encountering a case with spontaneous splenic rupture.

  2. Prelabour Rupture of Membranes: Mode of Delivery and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ibishi, Vlora Ademi; Isjanovska, Rozalinda Dusan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-labour Rupture of Membranes (PROM) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and increased rate of cesarean section delivery. AIM: The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical characteristics, PROM-delivery interval, mode of delivery, and early maternal neonatal outcome among pregnant patients presenting with pre-labour rupture of membranes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This prospective case control study is implemented at the Obstetric and Gynecology Clinic of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The study included 100 pregnant patients presenting with prelabour rupture of membranes of which 63 were primigravida and 37 patients were multigravida. RESULTS: The incidence of cesarean section in this study is 28 % and the most common indications for cesarean delivery were fetal distress, malpresentation, cephalopelvic disproportion, and failed induction. The most common maternal complications in this study are chorioamnionitis, retained placenta and postpartum hemorrhage. Neonatal infectious morbidity was present in 16 % of cases. CONCLUSION: PROM is a significant issue for obstetricians and an important cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and increased rate of cesarean section delivery. PMID:27275227

  3. Telescoping of sheaths-an easy technique to facilitate the removal of a stuck ruptured transluminal angioplasty balloon.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Adrian; Artikov, Shukhrat

    2014-01-01

    Balloon rupture during angioplasty is an uncommon event. The ruptured balloon usually is removed through its introducer sheath without any problems. However, there may be occasions when a ruptured balloon cannot be withdrawn from an access. We describe a simple technique that can be used to extricate a stuck ruptured angioplasty balloon.

  4. Investigation of Earthquake Rupture Dimension Through Seismic Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Meng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source dimension is one of the most fundamental source parameters but remains difficult to be directly constrained. Many of the key questions in earthquake physics such as earthquake self-similarity are subject to heavy debate due to lack of reliable observations of earthquake source size. Taking advantage of the recent developments of large-scale regional seismic arrays (e.g. USArray) and seismic waveform interferometry, we propose to examine earthquake source dimensions through data-mining the waveform coherency as a function of inter-station distances. Systematic analysis of deep earthquakes show that relatively small earthquakes (M~6) are highly coherent across the USArray over inter-station distances >10 wavelengths and up to 4 Hz, indicating a minimal 3D structural effect on the waveform coherency. However, the inter-station coherence of M>7 earthquakes falls off with faster decay rates for larger magnitudes. For the same earthquake, the coherence pattern depends on the orientation of station pairs that can be explained by the directivity effect. We hypothesize that these patterns are governed by a finite source effect. We verified this hypothesis by establishing the analytical solution of inter-station coherency of a 1D rupture embedded in a 2D medium. We derived a multi-variable relationship to systematically measure the earthquake source dimension based on the coherency function. Rupture dimension, determined through back-projection studies, validates our case study for deep earthquakes in the sea of Okhotsk.. The coherency pattern revealed an elongated rupture on sub-horizontal fault plane of 87 km × 26km on the sub-horizontal fault plane of the for 2008 M7.8 earthquake, while a rupture of 10 km × 60 km occurred in the sub- vertical fault plane for of the 2013 M7.3 event. Future studies will explore the interstation coherency as a function of angular separation between stations. Establishment of a 2D coherency pattern may potentially further

  5. Source Fault and Rupture Process of the 2006 Yogyakarta Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Y.; Koketsu, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Yogyakarta earthquake with a moment magnitude of 6.3 occurred in the central part of Java, Indonesia on 26 May 2006 at 22:54 UTC, causing severe damage to the densely populated area of the Yogyakarta region. About 6,000 people were killed, and 50,000 were injured. At first, the Opak River fault, located along the damage area, was thought to be a possible source fault of the event. However, the aftershock distribution suggests that the source fault is located 10 - 20 km east of the Opak River fault (Walter et al., 2007). This new fault was not known at that time, and its geometry and rupture process is little understood even now. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, we performed teleseismic body-wave inversions. We chose the stations at epicentral distances between 30°and 100°. We retrieved 24 vertical components of broadband P-wave seismograms for these stations from the Data Management Center of IRIS. In order to perform an inversion for the rupture process, it is necessary to set up the source fault plane in advance. We first determined the focal mechanism using the inversion method of Kikuchi and Kanamori (1991). For calculating theoretical waveforms, we used near-source and near-receiver structures derived from CRUST 2.0. We obtained two different types of mechanism, that are left-lateral strike-slip faulting and reverse dip-slip faulting. Based on the obtained focal mechanisms and aftershock distribution, a fault plane is set up as follows: strike= 40°,dip= 85°,length =28km, width =20km , depth of rupture initiation point = 10km. We placed 7×5 grid points with a spacing of 4 km. We then inverted the waveforms for a spatio-temporal distribution of slip on this fault plane (Kikuchi and Kanamori,2003). In the inversion result, we obtained a total seismic moment Mo = 3.8×1013 Nm (Mw = 6.3), rupture front velocity = 2.5 km/s, rupture duration = 10 s, maximum slip = 0.34 m. The resultant slip distribution has two asperities (areas of large slip

  6. Kinematic Rupture Process Of Karakocan-Elazig Earthquake, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekler, F. N.; Ozel, N. M.; Tanircan, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    An earthquake (Mw=5.9) hit Elazig in the eastern part of Turkey on March 8, 2010 at 02:32 (GMT). It is located midway between the provincial capital of Elazığ and Bingöl with coordinates reported as 38o48.42N and 40o5.99E by Bogazici University Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). Source characterization and slip history were estimated the main and four moderate size earthquake almost at the same location. The earthquake occurred at one of the tectonically very active East Anatolian Fault zone starts at the Karlıova triple junction, where it meets the North Anatolian fault to the NE. Multi time-window linear waveform inversion technique (MTWIT) was applied to strong ground motion (SGM) data. Theoretical Green's functions between subfaults and stations were calculated by a Discrete Wave Number Method (DWNM) using 1-D velocity structure. Inversion technique used in this study yields a non unique solution. Therefore various rupture models have been tried until both observed and synthetic data were matched. Results show simple patterns in slip distributions. Maximum slip is 0.78 and seismic moment is 1.435E+25 dyne.cm from the kinematic rupture process of the strike slip faulting. In this study, we searched a stable 1-D crustal velocity model with low RMS misfit to construct the theoretical Green's function between each sub-fault and each station among the 4 different models. These are Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM; Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981), International Association of Seismology and the Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASP91) (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991), Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) earthquake location model, explosion model (Gurbuz, 2004). We have collected previous studies Rebollar et al., (2001), Ichinose et al., (1997), Abdel-Fattah (2002), Somerville et al., (1999), Wells and Coppersmith (1994) on source information of moderate size earthquakes occurred worldwide and compared with

  7. Nonuniformity of the constitutive law parameters for shear rupture and quasistatic nucleation to dynamic rupture: a physical model of earthquake generation processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnaka, M

    1996-04-30

    Based on the recent high-resolution laboratory experiments on propagating shear rupture, the constitutive law that governs shear rupture processes is discussed in view of the physical principles and constraints, and a specific constitutive law is proposed for shear rupture. It is demonstrated that nonuniform distributions of the constitutive law parameters on the fault are necessary for creating the nucleation process, which consists of two phases: (i) a stable, quasistatic phase, and (ii) the subsequent accelerating phase. Physical models of the breakdown zone and the nucleation zone are presented for shear rupture in the brittle regime. The constitutive law for shear rupture explicitly includes a scaling parameter Dc that enables one to give a common interpretation to both small scale rupture in the laboratory and large scale rupture as earthquake source in the Earth. Both the breakdown zone size Xc and the nucleation zone size L are prescribed and scaled by Dc, which in turn is prescribed by a characteristic length lambda c representing geometrical irregularities of the fault. The models presented here make it possible to understand the earthquake generation process from nucleation to unstable, dynamic rupture propagation in terms of physics. Since the nucleation process itself is an immediate earthquake precursor, deep understanding of the nucleation process in terms of physics is crucial for the short-term (or immediate) earthquake prediction.

  8. Evidence for surface rupture in 1868 on the Hayward fault in north Oakland and major rupturing in prehistoric earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, J.J.; Williams, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    WGCEP90 estimated the Hayward fault to have a high probability (0.45 in 30 yr) of producing a future M7 Bay Area earthquake. This was based on a generic recurrence time and an unverified segmentation model, because there were few direct observations for the southern fault and none for the northern Hayward fault. To better constrain recurrence and segmentation of the northern Hayward fault, we trenched in north Oakland. Unexpectedly, we observed evidence of surface rupture probably from the M7 1868 earthquake. This extends the limit of that surface rupture 13 km north of the segmentation boundary used in the WGCEP90 model and forces serious re-evaluation of the current two-segment paradigm. Although we found that major prehistoric ruptures have occurred here, we could not radiocarbon date them. However, the last major prehistoric event appears correlative with a recently recognized event 13 km to the north dated AD 1640-1776. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Pathological Analysis of the Ruptured Vascular Wall of Hypoperfusion-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chie; Sawaragi, Ayaka; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2017-04-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease that results in the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and has a high rupture-related mortality rate. However, the mechanism of AAA rupture remains unknown. In our previous study, we established a novel AAA animal model (hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model) with spontaneous AAA rupture. Using the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model, we demonstrated that the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall is associated with AAA rupture. However, pathological analysis of the rupture area has not been performed because it is particularly difficult to identify the rupture point. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining samples from the rupture point and performed a histological analysis of the ruptured area in the vascular wall in the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. Adipocytes were observed along the AAA-ruptured area of the vascular wall. In the areas around the adipocytes, macrophage infiltration and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were significantly increased and collagen-positive areas were significantly decreased, as compared with areas without adipocytes. The AAA diameter was correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall of the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. On the other hand, serum triglyceride levels and serum total cholesterol levels were not correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall. These results suggest that local adipocyte accumulation in the vascular wall, not serum lipids, has an important role in AAA rupture.

  10. Supershear Rupture of 2013 Jan 05, Mw 7.5, Craig, Alaska earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, H.; Lay, T.; Freymueller, J. T.; Ding, K.; Rivera, L. A.; Ruppert, N. A.; Koper, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Supershear rupture, in which a fracture's crack tip expansion velocity exceeds the elastic shear velocity, has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Supershear rupture speeds have been inferred for six intraplate strike-slip earthquakes. In this work, we show evidence of supershear rupture expansion of an interplate earthquake, the 5 January 2013, Mw = 7.5, Craig, Alaska earthquake, which is a bilateral strike-slip event on the Queen Charlotte Fault, offshore of southeastern Alaska. We present direct observations of shear shock-waves in regional seismic stations using an empirical Green's function technique, which is most probably produced by a supershear rupture process. Several inversion and modeling techniques were processed to investigate the rupture ve.ocity using regional seismic and geodetic observations. Both theoretical and empirical Green's functions were used in inversion and modeling, with both indicate a consistent supear-shear rupture velocity of 5.5 to 6 km/s, higher than the crustal and upper-mantle S-wave velocity and approaching the P-wave velocity. Supershear rupture occurred along ~100 km of the northern rupture zone, but not along the shorter southern rupture extension. The direction of supershear rupture may be related to the strong material contrast across the continental-oceanic plate boundary, as predicted theoretically and experimentally.

  11. How Did the Two Faults Rupture during the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Asano, K.; Iwata, T.; Kubo, H.

    2013-12-01

    On April 11, 2011, the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (Mw6.6) occurred in southeast of Fukushima prefecture, northeast Japan. This event is thought to be induced by the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0). Toda and Tsutsumi (2012) found two surface ruptures on the Itozawa and the Yunodake faults. The hypocenter determined by JMA is located west of the Itozawa fault and it is thought the Ynodake fault ruptured after the Itozawa fault did. Previous studies (Hikima, 2012; JMA, 2012; Shiba and Noguchi, 2012) estimated the source rupture process using strong motion data with two fault models (the Itozawa and the Yunodake faults). They used different fault models, rupture starting points of the Yunodake fault, and rupture delays of the Yunodake fault. They got different slip distributions on the Yunodake fault. In this study we firstly estimate the source rupture process using strong motion data and two fault models based on the source fault model inferred from InSAR information by Fukushima et al. (2013). We test 108 combinations of the rupture starting point and rupture delay of the Yunodake fault for the kinematic waveform inversion and get the best set of parameters. Then, we calculate the temporal ΔCFF by the obtained spatio-temporal slip model to know whether the Itozawa fault rupture triggered the Yunodake fault rupture. The inversion method is the multiple time window linear source inversion (Hartzell and Heaton, 1983). We try nine different rupture starting points, in strike direction north, middle and south side and in dip direction shallow, middle and deep side, and twelve cases of the rupture delay, 3.0~8.5s. The synthetic and observed waveforms fitting is best when the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault is north deep side and the rupture delay is 5.0s. The large slip is found in northeastern shallow part on the Itozawa fault and around the rupture starting point and shallow part on the Yunodake fault. They match the surface displacement

  12. Rupture Velocities of Intermediate-Depth and Deep-Focus Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture velocities of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) that generate the earthquakes. I select earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ≥ 5.7 since 1990 in Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka, and Hindu Kush and analyze the rupture directivity of the P waves using teleseismic data from global and regional seismic networks. I assume a constant rupture vector and estimate the rupture velocity relative to the local P-wave speed (vr/α). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 226 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained rupture vectors, most earthquakes rupture on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the rupture vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and rupture vectors) to Mode III rupture (i.e., perpendicular slip and rupture vectors). Estimated rupture velocities span a wide range of values, from zero (for earthquakes with no observable teleseismic directivity) to approaching the local P-wave speed. The range in estimated rupture velocities is similar between all subduction zones and all depths, suggesting that local slab heterogeneity plays a more important role than temperature in determining rupture velocity. The supershear ruptures are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This observation is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the rupture velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III rupture

  13. Systematic Underestimation of Earthquake Magnitudes from Large Intracontinental Reverse Faults: Historical Ruptures Break Across Segment Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Because most large-magnitude earthquakes along reverse faults have such irregular and complicated rupture patterns, reverse-fault segments defined on the basis of geometry alone may not be very useful for estimating sizes of future seismic sources. Most modern large ruptures of historical earthquakes generated by intracontinental reverse faults have involved geometrically complex rupture patterns. Ruptures across surficial discontinuities and complexities such as stepovers and cross-faults are common. Specifically, segment boundaries defined on the basis of discontinuities in surficial fault traces, pronounced changes in the geomorphology along strike, or the intersection of active faults commonly have not proven to be major impediments to rupture. Assuming that the seismic rupture will initiate and terminate at adjacent major geometric irregularities will commonly lead to underestimation of magnitudes of future large earthquakes.

  14. Time-resolved observation of thermally activated rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, Wan; Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-05

    The capillary-condensed liquid bridge is one of the most ubiquitous forms of liquid in nature and contributes significantly to adhesion and friction of biological molecules as well as microscopic objects. Despite its important role in nanoscience and technology, the rupture process of the bridge is not well understood and needs more experimental works. Here, we report real-time observation of rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge in ambient condition. During slow and stepwise stretch of the nanobridge, we measured the activation time for rupture, or the latency time required for the bridge breakup. By statistical analysis of the time-resolved distribution of activation time, we show that rupture is a thermally activated stochastic process and follows the Poisson statistics. In particular, from the Arrhenius law that the rupture rate satisfies, we estimate the position-dependent activation energies for the capillary-bridge rupture.

  15. Nuclear envelope rupture is induced by actin-based nucleus confinement.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Emily M; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-10-10

    Repeated rounds of nuclear envelope (NE) rupture and repair have been observed in laminopathy and cancer cells and result in intermittent loss of nucleus compartmentalization. Currently, the causes of NE rupture are unclear. Here, we show that NE rupture in cancer cells relies on the assembly of contractile actin bundles that interact with the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We found that the loss of actin bundles or the LINC complex did not rescue nuclear lamina defects, a previously identified determinant of nuclear membrane stability, but did decrease the number and size of chromatin hernias. Finally, NE rupture inhibition could be rescued in cells treated with actin-depolymerizing drugs by mechanically constraining nucleus height. These data suggest a model of NE rupture where weak membrane areas, caused by defects in lamina organization, rupture because of an increase in intranuclear pressure from actin-based nucleus confinement.

  16. Total rupture of hydatid cyst of liver in to common bile duct: a case report.

    PubMed

    Robleh, Hassan; Yassine, Fahmi; Driss, Khaiz; Khalid, Elhattabi; Fatima-Zahra, Bensardi; Saad, Berrada; Rachid, Lefriyekh; Abdalaziz, Fadil; Najib, Zerouali Ouariti

    2014-01-01

    Rupture of hydatid liver cyst into biliary tree is frequent complications that involve the common hepatic duct, lobar biliary branches, the small intrahepatic bile ducts,but rarely rupture into common bile duct. The rupture of hydatid cyst is serious life threating event. The authors are reporting a case of total rupture of hydatid cyst of liver into common bile duct. A 50-year-old male patient who presented with acute cholangitis was diagnosed as a case of totally rupture of hydatid cyst on Abdominal CT Scan. Rupture of hydatid cyst of liver into common bile duct and the gallbladder was confirmed on surgery. Treated by cholecystectomy and T-tube drainage of Common bile duct.

  17. Strain Measurement Using FBG on COPV in Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis; Grant, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to perform ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization testing of a Space Transportation System (STS) 40-in. Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV). The 40-in. vessel was of the same design and approximate age as the STS Main Propulsion System (MPS) and Orbiter Maneuvering System (OMS) vessels. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) assembled a team of experts and conducted an assessment that involved a review of national Kevlar COPY data. During the review, the STS COPVs were found to be beyond their original certification of ten years. The team observed that the likelihood of STS COPV Stress rupture, a catastrophic burst before leak failure mode, was greater than previously believed. Consequently, a detailed assessment of remaining stress rupture life became necessary. Prior to STS-114, a certification deviation was written for two flights of OV-103 (Discovery) and OV-104 (Atlantis) per rationale that was based on an extensive review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, COPV data, and revisions to the STS COPV stress levels. In order to obtain flight rationale to extend the certification deviation through the end of the Program, the Orbiter Project Office has directed an interagency COPV team to conduct further testing and analysis to investigate conservatism in the stress rupture model and evaluate material age degradation. Additional analysis of stress rupture life requires understanding the fiber stresses including stress that occurs due to thru-wall composite compression in COPV components. Data must be obtained at both zero gauge pressure (pre-stress) and at the component operating pressure so that this phenomenon can be properly evaluated. The zero gauge pressure stresses are predominantly a result of the autofrettage process used during vessel manufacture. Determining these pre-stresses and the constitutive behavior of the overwrap at pressure will provide necessary information

  18. Small and large earthquakes: evidence for a different rupture beginning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombelli, Simona; Zollo, Aldo; Festa, Gaetano; Picozzi, Matteo

    2014-05-01

    For the real-time magnitude estimate two Early Warning (EW) parameters are usually measured within 3 seconds of P-wave signal. These are the initial peak displacement (Pd) and the average period (τc). The scaling laws between EW parameters and magnitude are robust and effective up to magnitude 6.5-7 but a well known saturation problem for both parameters is evident for larger earthquakes. The saturation is likely due to the source finiteness so that only a few seconds of the P-wave cannot capture the entire rupture process of a large event. Here we propose an evolutionary approach for the magnitude estimate, based on the progressive expansion of the P-wave time window, until the expected arrival of the S-waves. The methodology has already been applied to the 2011, Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake records and showed that a minimum time window of 25-30 seconds is indeed needed to get stable magnitude estimate for a magnitude M ≥ 8.5 earthquake. Here we extend the analysis to a larger data set of Japanese earthquakes with magnitude between 4 and 9, using a high number of records per earthquake and spanning wide distance and azimuth ranges. We analyze the relationship between the time evolution of EW parameters and the earthquake magnitude itself with the purpose to understand the evolution of these parameters during the rupture process and to investigate a possible different scaling for both small and large events. We show that the initial increase of P-wave motion is more rapid for small earthquakes that for larger ones, thus implying a longer and wider nucleation phase for large events. Our results indicate that earthquakes breaking in a region with a large critical slip displacement value have a larger probability to grow into a large size rupture than those originating in a region with a smaller critical displacement value.

  19. [Surgical treatment of rupture of the plantar fascia].

    PubMed

    Christel, P; Rigal, S; Poux, D; Roger, B; Witvoët, J

    1993-01-01

    Among the various lesions of the hindfoot in athletes, plantar fascia ruptures are not well documented and their surgical treatment is not often reported in the literature. The purpose of the current work was to more precisely define therapeutic indications and to evaluate the results of the surgical treatment based on the excision-release of the plantar fascia. Between 1986 and 1991, 19 patients (5 females, 14 males, average age 32 years) were operated on by one surgeon. All patients were either recreational or competitive athletes. The plantar fascia rupture occurred 18 times during sports activity. Surgical treatment was indicated when pain persisted despite a well conducted conservative treatment. In 17 cases, MRI allowed to plan the operative strategy by showing the fascia lesion. The patients were operated after an average of 8 months following the initial injury (6-16 months). One patient was lost for follow-up, 2 had a follow-up below 6 months, thus 16 patients were available for analysis. The clinical outcome was evaluated through persistence of pain, return to sports, and functional activity. With a 16-month average follow-up (6-51 months) it was observed that pain constantly disappeared and that 11 patients over 16 returned to the same level of sports activity after 6 months with a time-stable result. After failure of a well conducted conservative treatment, surgical treatment of plantar fascia rupture must be proposed. Surgical technique is based not only on fascia release but also on the excision of the pathological scar tissue in order to avoid the restoration of the continuity of the fascia with the calcaneus.

  20. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.