Science.gov

Sample records for rural sociology

  1. International Perspectives in Rural Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Howard, Ed.

    Essays which focus on similarities between developed and underdeveloped nations, concentrating on the issues of power and rural social stratification, are contained in this textbook on rural sociology. It is intended for students of rural sociology, including teachers and researchers. In two main parts, the book first deals with rural social…

  2. Bringing Rural Sociology Back In.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, William W.; Gilbert, Jess

    1985-01-01

    Raises questions about current rural sociology from a critical theory perspective. Provides a brief historical analysis of its theoretical and applied roots. Suggests interweaving of research, practice, and advocacy as way to bring rural sociologists back into policy making. (LFL)

  3. Rural Sociology at the Crossroads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krannich, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    A complex array of socio-historical, demographic, and organizational factors have combined in recent years to threaten both the current status of and future prospects for the discipline of rural sociology, and for the Rural Sociological Society (RSS). This paper examines the somewhat problematic recent trajectories of the RSS as a professional…

  4. Rural Sociological Society 1999 Award Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Sociologist, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes Rural Sociological Society 1999 awards: Excellence in Instruction, Jill Belsky, for designing a college program in rural and environmental change, and Lori Cramer, for strengthening interdisciplinary linkages among rural sociology, forestry, and agriculture; Excellence in Extension, Emmett Fiske; Excellence in Research, Sonya Salamon;…

  5. Bringing Rural Sociology Back In: Critical Theory and Rural Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, William W.; Gilbert, Jess

    In recent years, rural sociology has been the subject of sociological inquiries. Many of these have been highly critical, raising questions about the ontological nature of the discipline. This paper extends the tradition, providing a brief historical analysis of rural sociology's roots as both theoretical and applied and critiquing current rural…

  6. Rural Sociology in an International Context. Papers on the State of Rural Sociology in Selected Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugitt, Glenn V., Ed.

    Published in order to further a better understanding of how work in the field of rural sociology is carried on in various places, the six papers describe pedagogical and research activities relating to the sociological concern for rural people in West Africa, Brazil, Iran, the Middle East, Japan, and India. Each paper describes the evolution of…

  7. A Sociology of the Periphery versus a Peripheral Sociology: Rural Sociology and the Dimension of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobao, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Rural sociology is intrinsically concerned with spatial dimensions of social life, but this underlying research tradition and its contributions to general sociology are little recognized. Concern with space, uneven development, and social relationships of peripheral settings have provided substantive boundaries and conceptual meaning to rural…

  8. Rural Sociology in the South: 1972. Proceedings: Rural Sociology Section, Association of Southern Agricultural Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voland, Maurice E., Ed.

    The papers presented in this collection are said to represent the major thrusts of research and other scholarly activities of rural sociologists in the South in 1972. Arranged in the order of their presentation at the Rural Sociology Section of the Southern Agricultural Workers meetings, these papers discuss such topics as youth, social change in…

  9. Rural Sociology in Brazil: Institutional Growth (1965-1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David O.; And Others

    Growth and present status of graduate programs, major research interests, and potential for US-Brazilian collaboration indicate the present state of rural sociology in Brazil. In contrast to US rural sociology's identity crisis of the past decade, the field in Brazil has blossomed. Graduate programs are underway at universities of Rio Grande do…

  10. Climate Change and Rural Sociology: Broadening the Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Riley E.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is the preeminent environmental problem of this time, and Joseph Molnar's call for greater attention to it by rural sociologists is both welcome and timely. The agenda he lays out for rural sociology's engagement with climate change, however, seems rather narrow and restrictive. Examining the potential impacts of climate change,…

  11. Rural Sociology in the South: 1980. Proceedings of the Rural Sociology Section of the Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists (Hot Springs, Arkansas, February 3-6, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frese, Wolfgang, Ed.

    A total of 47 papers representing the broad research and extension interests related to rural areas are included in this volume. The 13 sessions are entitled Rural Structure and Process, Industrialization, Migration, Health and Alcohol, Quality of Life, Occupations and Work, Applied Sociology, Education, Network Analysis, Poverty, Status…

  12. Family Structure among Urban, Rural and Farm Populations: Classic Sociological Theory Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Don E.; Albrecht, Stan L.

    1996-01-01

    Draws on classic sociological theories of Durkheim, Tonnies, and others to suggest that many urban-rural differences found in the past were actually farm-nonfarm differences. Analysis of Current Population Survey data reveals few differences in family structure between urban and rural nonfarm residents, but extensive differences between these and…

  13. The Sociology of Knowledge and Contextual Effects: Reality Construction in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, William W.

    Introducing the concept of phenomenology (concern with consciousness, objects of consciousness, possibilities, and a return to "things") supported by ethnomethodology as a viable approach to rural sociology, this paper presents: (1) a brief review of selected articles discussing the conceptualization of "rural"; (2) certain principles in the…

  14. A Methodological Review of Fifty Years of Research in "Rural Sociology."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, C. Shannon; Miller, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Examines research methods used in empirical research reported in "Rural Sociology" from 1936-1985. Identifies trends including movement away from descriptive analyses of social phenomena toward quantitative models, increased methodological homogeneity, and focus on individuals instead of social structures and processes. Explains implications of…

  15. Social Activity of Rural Local Community as a Sociological Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urgacz, Barbara

    In view of the 1973 changes brought about by the State's attempt to bring its authority closer to society and create new arrangements to satisfy rural needs, Poland's rural communities were analyzed in terms of a typology of social action. Defined as action and the desire to act resulting from membership in the local community, social action was…

  16. Sociological Perspectives on Energy and Rural Development: A Review of Major Frameworks for Research on Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Bruce; Schlegel, Charles

    The principal sociological frameworks used in energy research on developing countries can be appraised in terms of the view of the energy-rural development problem that each framework implies. "Socio-Technical Analysis," which is used most in industrial and organizational sociology and in ecological anthropology, is oriented to the decomposition…

  17. Towards a Rural Sociological Imagination: Ethnography and Schooling in Mobile Modernity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 1959, C. Wright Mills coined the phrase "the sociological imagination" to offer a critical assessment of a discipline he saw descending into a technical or abstract empiricist practice that he feared would ultimately deepen human alienation and oppression. Mills positioned the sociologist as a careful, critical scholar working in the…

  18. Sociological Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Charles; Middleton, Mike

    This monograph examines sociological perspectives and their applications. It is intended to help the college student coming to sociology for the first time to recognize that there are several perspectives within sociology and to disentangle the mass of terms associated with each. The first distinctive sociological perspective came from the work of…

  19. Rural Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jess

    To be scientific, rural sociology must have a distinctive conceptual basis; therefore, defining "rural" has long been a major concern of rural sociologists. Recently faced with similar problems, political economists have revitalized the field of urban sociology by looking beyond the city to the social production of spatial forms under capitalism.…

  20. Sociology Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Janet M.; Doody, Mary J.

    This manual offers alternatives to high school sociology teachers who wish to enhance their teaching by moving beyond the traditional lecture approach. Exercises and applications directly involve the students in several areas of sociological research. The chapters have several exercises and applications in addition to student activity sheets.…

  1. Syringe sociology.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself. PMID:26072683

  2. Syringe sociology.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself.

  3. Rural Policies for the 1990s. Rural Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Cornelia B., Ed.; Christenson, James A., Ed.

    Written by some of the foremost experts on rural America, this book focuses on policy-relevant research on the problems of rural areas. In each chapter, rural policy needs are identified by examining the flow of events and rural sociology of the 1980s. Chapters are: (1) "Critical Times for Rural America: The Challenge for Rural Policy in the…

  4. Radio sociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, George W., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    A work was conducted, using radio telemetry, to locate a migrating, radio-tagged, sharp-shinned hawk. The hawk was monitored through the noise radiation it created. The hawk was found. During this study, it was found that the concentration of population corresponds with areas of increased noise temperature. Through this study, a bigger study was planned. The study would involved the relationship between a place's radiation signature and its other attributes, such as economic type, population, geographic concentration. The method of radio sociology would be used to track the sources of radio noise.

  5. Integrating Sociological Practice into Traditional Sociology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basirico, Laurence A.

    1990-01-01

    Outlines a model of instruction that uses Marvin Olsen's reconceptualization of sociology as "sociological practice" to integrate sociological practice into traditional courses. States that this approach helps students gain a critical perspective and overcome personal and cultural ideological constraints in dealing with real issues related to…

  6. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  7. Agricultural lands preservation: a sociology of survival

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    This is a rural sociological study investigating the viability of agricultural lands use-values and rural communities in the context of the structure of US agriculture. It outlines the theoretical foundation, ideology, and praxis of a sociology of survival. It is undertaken within the framework of environmental sociology, which focuses on the dynamic interpenetration of social and biotic systems. The concepts of carrying capacity, sustained multiple-use yield, and land-use compatibility and their significance are discussed. The phenomenon of phantom carrying capacity is explored, and its ominous portent noted; but the astonishing potential of agricultural lands to produce huge net gains in use values and in real carrying capacity is affirmed. The theory of unlimited resources, substitution, and market-allocation is falsified. Absolute shortages of renewable and nonrenewable resources are documented, and the necessity for population control, conservation, expanded sustained-yield production, and social allocation is established.

  8. Agriculture and Rurality: Beginning the "Final Separation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedland, William H.

    2002-01-01

    When is a farm a farm? When is rural rural? Has the issue of the rural-urban continuum returned? Decades ago rural sociology worked itself into two blind alleys: rural-urban differences and attempts to define the rural-urban fringe. Although these conceptual problems eventually were exhausted, recent developments in California raise the…

  9. Sociology as a Vocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the meaning of practicing sociology, claiming to "commit a social science" still makes sense. Accepts Max Weber's arguments that sociology clarifies human affairs and is oriented to certain virtues. Suggests, however, that sociology is a passion as well as a profession, something Weber recognized but did not elaborate. (NL)

  10. Sociological Factors in Rural Communities That Impact the Entrance and Upward Mobility of Female Administrators and Administrative Aspirants in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Steven J.; And Others

    Research indicates that female teachers who attempt to enter and advance in administrative positions encounter obstacles ranging from sex-role stereotyping to direct prejudice and discrimination. While these obstacles have been researched for a number of years, there has been little focus on the barriers experienced by women in rural districts.…

  11. The Georgia Club at the State Normal School, Athens, Georgia, for the Study of Rural Sociology. Bulletin, 1913, No. 23. Whole Number 533

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, E. C.

    1913-01-01

    In all States of the Union having a large rural population, efforts are made to adjust the work of the country schools to the needs of country life. There is a widespread feeling that the schools must become a more important factor in country life than they have been and contribute more toward the solution of its problems. To that end normal…

  12. The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Educational Reforms and Their Impact on China's Rural Development. East Asia: History, Politics, Sociology, Culture. A Garland Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Dongping

    China's official history maintains that the radical egalitarianism of the Cultural Revolution (1966-76) led to economic disaster. This book challenges that view. Drawing on local interviews and records in rural Jimo County, Shandong Province, this study contends that the Cultural Revolution's political convulsions democratized village political…

  13. The Sociological Imagination -- A Basis for Teaching of Introductory Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1974-01-01

    The problem in teaching introductory sociology is to determine what can be extracted from the sociological tradition and the current crisis in sociology that will help students lead more meaningful lives. The answer lies in kindling the sociological imagination by the development of a sociology curriculum based upon the study of contemporary youth…

  14. Sociology, Intergroup Conflict and Social Action: A Political Sociological Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William C.; Hopkins, Karen

    1973-01-01

    Argues that a value and action-oriented sociology is needed to rectify the imbalances in the discipline of sociology today, and that for our type of society this must be a political sociology. (Author/JM)

  15. Sociology through Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness. One set of assignments uses self-portraiture to highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity. Another uses photography to guide sociological inquiry. Both sets of assignments draw on the Literacy Through Photography methodology,…

  16. Awakening Students' Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Students who experience a transcendent moment as they vicariously walk in the shoes of another person demonstrate the utilization of sociological imagination. Even though the concept of sociological imagination was advanced more than 50 years ago by sociologist C. Wright Mills, there is high value to revisit this concept and for its application to…

  17. Sociology 5 Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Jerry C.

    In order to deal with the problem of increasing failures and dropouts and the negative impact of large numbers of students lacking basic reading and language skills on instructional activities and materials, the Sociology Department at El Camino College made eligibility for English 1A a prerequisite for its Sociology 5 course in fall 1975. This…

  18. How Sociological Leaders Rank Learning Goals for Introductory Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persell, Caroline Hodges

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the American Sociological Association launched a task force to articulate learning goals for an introduction to sociology course and design an advanced high school sociology curriculum that could also be a model for introductory sociology courses in colleges and universities. This research note describes one of several efforts to validate…

  19. Practicing Sociological Imagination through Writing Sociological Autobiography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebede, Alem

    2009-01-01

    Sociological imagination is a quality of mind that cannot be adopted by simply teaching students its discursive assumptions. Rather, it is a disposition, in competition with other forms of sensibility, which can be acquired only when it is practiced. Adhering to this important pedagogical assumption, students were assigned to write their…

  20. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    PubMed

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  1. Data Visualization in Sociology

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kieran; Moody, James

    2014-01-01

    Visualizing data is central to social scientific work. Despite a promising early beginning, sociology has lagged in the use of visual tools. We review the history and current state of visualization in sociology. Using examples throughout, we discuss recent developments in ways of seeing raw data and presenting the results of statistical modeling. We make a general distinction between those methods and tools designed to help explore datasets, and those designed to help present results to others. We argue that recent advances should be seen as part of a broader shift towards easier sharing of the code and data both between researchers and with wider publics, and encourage practitioners and publishers to work toward a higher and more consistent standard for the graphical display of sociological insights. PMID:25342872

  2. "Is Public Sociology Such a Good Idea?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jonathan H.

    2005-01-01

    Michael Burawoy's call for a public sociology disciplined by professional and policy sociology, on the one side, and driven by critical sociology, on the other, exposes the ideological biases of sociology to publics. In so doing, public sociology will thwart non-ideological efforts for sociology to exert influence on broader publics and on…

  3. What Is Critical about Sociology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buechler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is often presented as a generic technique. This article develops an alternative that links critique more closely to the sociological perspective. I suggest three answers to the above question: that the sociological perspective is critical for comprehending complex issues, that all sociology is implicitly critical by virtue of its…

  4. Urban Sociology in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiot, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Divides the history of urban sociology in France into three periods: (1) functionalism, which lasted from 1910 until the 1960s, (2) neo-Marxist socioeconomics lasting from 1968 until 1979, and (3) anthropological approach which is still dominant. Reviews theoretical perspectives and research characteristic of each period. (JDH)

  5. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational Education of Deaf Adults"…

  6. How can we help? From "sociology in" to "sociology of" bioethics.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Sociology and bioethics have an uneasy relationship. Bioethicists find sociology helpful for describing and analyzing ethical issues, but they are less enthusiastic when bioethics becomes the subject of sociological scrutiny. After review of different sociological approaches to bioethical topics -- descriptive, evaluative, and analytical -- I explain how bioethics will benefit by using the tools of sociology to answer its questions ("sociology in bioethics") and by allowing sociology to use bioethics to answer sociological questions ("sociology of bioethics").

  7. Rural Public Transportation: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Linda

    A concept-based introduction to rural public transportation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, sociology, and technology. Rural public transportation involves systems in rural and small urban areas with populations under 50,000…

  8. A Review of the Definition of Rural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosak, Jeanine; Perlman, Baron

    1982-01-01

    A review of 178 sources (articles, books, and other sources from 1971 through 1980, and frequently-cited earlier sources) on rural sociology and rural mental health indicated 4 major categories of definitions of rural: not explicitly stated, verbal (qualitative), homemade quantitative, and external quantitative. Sources were summarized as to…

  9. Piketty's challenge for sociology.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mike

    2014-12-01

    This paper argues that Piketty's book should not simply be seen as that of an economist, but that it contains significant resources for sociologists to draw upon. These are firstly, this approach to social science and his use of visualizations which chime closely with recent claims about the power of description. Secondly I consider his conceptualization of time and history - which in rebutting epochal arguments about the speed of contemporary change allows for a much better appreciation of the 'long durée'; and finally his conceptualization of social classes and privilege through his elaboration of a sociology of accumulation and inheritance. In all these ways, Piketty's work assists in developing an account of elites and wealth which should be highly productive for future sociology.

  10. The idea of philosophical sociology.

    PubMed

    Chernilo, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces the idea of philosophical sociology as an enquiry into the relationships between implicit notions of human nature and explicit conceptualizations of social life within sociology. Philosophical sociology is also an invitation to reflect on the role of the normative in social life by looking at it sociologically and philosophically at the same: normative self-reflection is a fundamental aspect of sociology's scientific tasks because key sociological questions are, in the last instance, also philosophical ones. For the normative to emerge, we need to move away from the reductionism of hedonistic, essentialist or cynical conceptions of human nature and be able to grasp the conceptions of the good life, justice, democracy or freedom whose normative contents depend on more or less articulated conceptions of our shared humanity. The idea of philosophical sociology is then sustained on three main pillars and I use them to structure this article: (1) a revalorization of the relationships between sociology and philosophy; (2) a universalistic principle of humanity that works as a major regulative idea of sociological research, and; (3) an argument on the social (immanent) and pre-social (transcendental) sources of the normative in social life. As invitations to embrace posthuman cyborgs, non-human actants and material cultures proliferate, philosophical sociology offers the reminder that we still have to understand more fully who are the human beings that populate the social world.

  11. 2004 American Sociological Association Presidential address: for public sociology*.

    PubMed

    Burawoy, Michael

    2005-06-01

    Responding to the growing gap between the sociological ethos and the world we study, the challenge of public sociology is to engage multiple publics in multiple ways. These public sociologies should not be left out in the cold, but brought into the framework of our discipline. In this way we make public sociology a visible and legitimate enterprise, and, thereby, invigorate the discipline as a whole. Accordingly, if we map out the division of sociological labor, we discover antagonistic interdependence among four types of knowledge: professional, critical, policy, and public. In the best of all worlds the flourishing of each type of sociology is a condition for the flourishing of all, but they can just as easily assume pathological forms or become victims of exclusion and subordination. This field of power beckons us to explore the relations among the four types of sociology as they vary historically and nationally, and as they provide the template for divergent individual careers. Finally, comparing disciplines points to the umbilical chord that connects sociology to the world of publics, underlining sociology's particular investment in the defense of civil society, itself beleaguered by the encroachment of markets and states.

  12. Toward Publicly Responsive Sociology Curricula: The Role of Introductory Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory sociology casts a wide net with regard to its audience and plays an important role in capturing the public eye as well as helping students to make more informed choices in their lives and communities. I ask six questions that help us as sociologists to think about how introductory sociology can better serve our discipline, our…

  13. Sociology of Modern Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2009-08-01

    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the ``snowball effect'' or ``groupthink''. We might wonder whether cosmology, the study of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other branches of physics or just a dominant ideology.

  14. Teaching Sociology through Student Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepagnier, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    After several years of teaching Sociological Thought--an upper division course that focuses on classical, modern, and contemporary sociological theories--the author came across the idea of student portfolios. As a consequence, the course has undergone far-reaching changes. The content remains relatively intact; however, today the theory course…

  15. Doing Sociology with Video Tape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Brian C.

    This paper describes the production of a videotape which shows how visual sociology can be used to explicate the varying images which are associated with different status groups and which create conflict about the environment. The videotape, Alternative Images of the Mississippi, Images I, shows in a systematic sociological fashion, the range of…

  16. On Understanding a Sociological Classic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert Alun

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes scholarly criticisms of "Elementary Forms of the Religious Life" by Emil Durkheim for the purpose of illustrating various approaches to sociological theory. Durkheim's theory of sacrifice is reinterpreted to serve as the basis for a new approach to the history of sociological theory. (Author/DB)

  17. The Many Faces of Ephraim: In Search of A Functional Typology of Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, William H.

    The literature of social work and rural sociology lacks conceptualization of the term "rural" and treats the term imprecisely. According to a 1960 survey, authors dealing with rural/urban differences do not agree on the attributes of "rural." However, if the rural concept is to be a useful analytical tool and guide to social work practice, its…

  18. A sociological dilemma: Race, segregation and US sociology.

    PubMed

    Bhambra, Gurminder K

    2014-07-01

    US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the 1960s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought - one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This is evident in the rarity with which scholars such as WEB Du Bois, E Franklin Frazier, Oliver Cromwell Cox, or other 'African American Pioneers of Sociology', as Saint-Arnaud calls them, are presented as core sociological voices within histories of the discipline. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts. With regard to the latter, the article focuses in particular on the debates around equality and emancipation and discusses the ways in which our understanding of these concepts could be extended by taking into account the work of African American sociologists and their different interpretations of core themes.

  19. Assimilating sociology: critical reflections on the 'sociology in nursing' debate.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, J

    1997-04-01

    We are witnessing the emergence of a 'new nursing'. In part, this has been associated with the adoption of a 'holistic' model of health and a commitment to a holistic curriculum within nurse education. The role of sociology within the nursing enterprise has been the subject of much debate. This paper seeks to further this debate by arguing that sociology is invaluable to nursing for many reasons but that its value may be undermined as a consequence of being overly constrained within the nursing arena, at the mutual expense of both sociology and the long term interests of nursing itself. This paper will suggest that central to an understanding of how this 'surplus constraint' of sociology occurs in an understanding of the manner in which the holistic model has been adopted in much of nursing and nurse education. The 'indeterminacy' of the holistic model is such that is has empowered a questionable eclecticism, marginalized philosophical controversies within nursing theory, disguised difficult epistemological and ontological conflicts associated with competing claims to truth and facilitated the operation of a form of power whereby sociology has been excluded, at the very moment of its apparent inclusion. This paper goes on to argue that the value of sociology to nursing is dependent upon: firstly, a more systematic and rigorous discussion of its relationship to, and role within, nursing and secondly, a movement away from an implicit 'assimilation' model regarding the incorporation of sociology into nursing towards a more 'multi-cultural' approach. Only under such circumstances may sociology's value to nursing be realized but in a manner that places an importance on maintaining the ontological and epistomological integrity of the sociological tradition. PMID:9104684

  20. Reflections on the Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantinovskii, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the sociology of education, beginning with a discussion on the trajectory of the rise of the sociology of education in Russia. The author examines how the sociology of education in Russia looks compared to the rest of the world. The sociological study of education in Russia and the Soviet Union has…

  1. The Visions and Divisions of Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Craig; Duster, Troy

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines the evolution of sociology as a science in the American university from the 1800s to the present. Topics discussed include social and academic attitudes towards sociology and influences of social movements on the study and teaching of sociology and sociological research.

  2. 95 Years of Teaching High School Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCesare, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A neglected part of the history of teaching sociology is the history of teaching high school sociology. The American Sociological Association's centennial in 2005 affords sociologists an opportunity to reflect on the teaching of sociology--anywhere and everywhere that it happens. In the spirit of contributing to the history of teaching sociology…

  3. Proceedings of the Southwestern Sociological Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Hillquit, Ed.

    This publication is a collection of the 80 papers presented at the 1970 meetings of the Association in Dallas, Texas. The major concerns of the group are indicated by the topic headings of the many sessions: 1) the sociology of work; 2) the sociology of student life: conformity and alienation; 3) sociological theory; 4) the sociology of the…

  4. A Life with the Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitty, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a life with the sociology of education. He begins by describing the "old" and "new" sociologies of education. Then, he discusses the sociology of education policy and the relevance of Basil Bernstein, who remained the dominant presence within the sociology of education in the UK until his death in 2000 and…

  5. A sociological dilemma: Race, segregation and US sociology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the 1960s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought – one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This is evident in the rarity with which scholars such as WEB Du Bois, E Franklin Frazier, Oliver Cromwell Cox, or other ‘African American Pioneers of Sociology’, as Saint-Arnaud calls them, are presented as core sociological voices within histories of the discipline. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts. With regard to the latter, the article focuses in particular on the debates around equality and emancipation and discusses the ways in which our understanding of these concepts could be extended by taking into account the work of African American sociologists and their different interpretations of core themes. PMID:25418995

  6. Teaching sociology to medical students.

    PubMed

    Najman, J M; Isaacs, G; Siskind, M

    1978-11-01

    A recent change in many medical curricula has been the introduction of courses in the behavioural sciences. These courses, while introduced with the intention of emphasizing interpersonal and behavioural skills, have not been shown to lead to any of the changes towards which they are directed. Rather, there is evidence that students find these courses 'waffly' and boring. If the sociology component of these courses is to lead to change, then there is the need for a continuing process of evaluation and modification. In this paper we report upon one medical sociology course, its evaluation, subsequent modification and re-evaluation. Our evidence would suggest that sociology courses can lead to changed attitudes and values, but that such changes are contingent upon the overt application of relevant sociological concepts to the health care field.

  7. Sociological aspects of earthquake prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    Henry Spall talked recently with Denis Mileti who is in the Department of Sociology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. Dr. Mileti is a sociologst involved with research programs that study the socioeconomic impact of earthquake prediction. 

  8. Changing Rural Social Systems: Adaptation and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nan E., Ed.; Wang, Ching-li, Ed.

    This book includes studies of globalization-related social changes in rural areas of the United States and other countries and implications of these studies for sociological theory. Although no chapter focuses exclusively on education, education-related themes include rural school dropouts and intergenerational poverty, the migration of rural…

  9. Revisiting Rurality and Schooling: A Teacher's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Daisy; Saloojee, Sheeren

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an understanding of what it means to be a teacher in a school defined as "rural". From a sociological perspective, we consider the mechanisms and ways of knowing that are adopted by a teacher for understanding not only the external world but for being a certain kind of teacher for a school in a rural setting. Employing data…

  10. Distance as a Hybrid Actor in Rural Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues that the notion of distance ought to be re-conceptualized and promoted to the theoretical foreground of sociological analyses of rural economic action. Using research in rural British Columbia, Canada, I argue that current changes in rural political economy (for instance, the restructuring of industrial resource production, the…

  11. Sociological aspects of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Babuccu, Orhan; Latifoğlu, Osman; Atabay, Kenan; Oral, Nursen; Coşan, Behçet

    2003-01-01

    Although the psychological aspect of the rhinoplasty operation has been a subject of interest for a long time, with the exception of a few studies, sociological factors have been almost totally ignored. In this prospective study the personality characteristics and socioeconomic backgrounds of 216 rhinoplasty patients were evaluated. Between 1994 and 2000, a questionnaire and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) were given preoperatively to 157 females and 59 males. The MMPI was also given to age-matched people as a control. Six months after surgery, patients were called on the telephone and asked to rate their satisfaction. According to questionnaire, a great majority of the rhinoplasty patients were young, unmarried women with high education levels. In the rhinoplasty group, one or more scales of the inventory were not in the normal ranges in 45% of the patients, whereas this proportion in the control group was 28% (p < 0.01). When MMPI results are considered, female patients of this study could be described as egocentric, childish, highly active, impulsive, competitive, reactive, perfectionistic about themselves, talkative, and emotionally superficial. Male patients could be described as rigid, stubborn, over-sensitive, suspicious, perfectionistic, pessimistic, over-reactive, and having somatizations. Tension and anxiety with feelings of inferiority were found to be characteristics of the male patients. The satisfaction rate after six months was reported as 72%. There was no significant correlation between MMPI results and demographic variables, nor satisfaction rate. In conclusion, the rhinoplasty patients in our study are young people at the very beginning of their careers. It could be that their personalities and socioeconomic backgrounds combine to make aesthetic surgery rewarding enough, both socially and personally, to encourage them to follow through.

  12. A Multi-Level Policy Research Paradigm: Implications for Rural and Regional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberts, Paul R.; Sismondo, Sergio

    Effective research on issues of rural development is increasingly important in a time when inequalities among people in rural areas is widening. Criteria of time-cost effectiveness, policy effectiveness for rural development, and contribution to sociology must be balanced by rural social scientists in their research design decisions. When five…

  13. Towards a sociology of disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Stefan; Haas, Steven

    2008-07-01

    We argue for a sociology of health, illness, and disease. Under the influence of Talcott Parsons, the social study of health began as medical sociology and then morphed into sociology of health and illness, focusing largely on the social aspects of health-related topics. Social scientists have been reluctant to tackle disease in its physiological and biological manifestations. The result is an impoverishment of sociological analysis on at least three levels: social scientists have rarely made diseases central to their inquiries; they have been reluctant to include clinical endpoints in their analysis; and they have largely bracketed the normative purpose of health interventions. Consequently, social scientists tend to ignore what often matters most to patients and health care providers, and the social processes social scientists describe remain clinically unanchored. A sociology of disease explores the dialectic between social life and disease; aiming to examine whether and how social life matters for morbidity and mortality and vice versa. Drawing from specific advances in science and technology studies and social epidemiology, we point to ways that sociologists can participate as health researchers. PMID:18564975

  14. Towards a sociology of disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Stefan; Haas, Steven

    2008-07-01

    We argue for a sociology of health, illness, and disease. Under the influence of Talcott Parsons, the social study of health began as medical sociology and then morphed into sociology of health and illness, focusing largely on the social aspects of health-related topics. Social scientists have been reluctant to tackle disease in its physiological and biological manifestations. The result is an impoverishment of sociological analysis on at least three levels: social scientists have rarely made diseases central to their inquiries; they have been reluctant to include clinical endpoints in their analysis; and they have largely bracketed the normative purpose of health interventions. Consequently, social scientists tend to ignore what often matters most to patients and health care providers, and the social processes social scientists describe remain clinically unanchored. A sociology of disease explores the dialectic between social life and disease; aiming to examine whether and how social life matters for morbidity and mortality and vice versa. Drawing from specific advances in science and technology studies and social epidemiology, we point to ways that sociologists can participate as health researchers.

  15. Racism and the sociological imagination.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bob; Virdee, Satnam

    2008-12-01

    Our chief purpose in this article is to argue for a restoration of a strong notion of agency to sociological accounts of social relations, and particularly those concerned with group formation and conflict. We contend that much contemporary sociological writing on this topic continues to rely on the concepts of race and ethnicity as primary explanatory or descriptive devices. This has two important consequences: on the one hand it reproduces the powerful theoretical obfuscation associated with these concepts, whilst on the other it prompts the notion that human agency has only an illusory role as an intentional agent. Drawing on the intellectual resources of a Hegelian-inflected historical materialism and realism, we challenge both claims by arguing for a post-race, post-ethnicity sociology of group formation, one which allows a greater scope for agency in the determination of social life.

  16. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time. PMID:24964518

  17. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  18. Sociology Out to Lunch: Grad Students' Treat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouzard, Gayle Gordon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explores graduate students' sociological perspective, explains barriers encountered in developing that perspective, and describes strategies employed to create a participatory educational environment. Concludes that students' alienation decreased as participation increased in sociological community. (Author/DH)

  19. The Beginnings of Sociology in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vucinich, Alexander

    1973-01-01

    The search for a conceptually integrated study of society during the 1860's did not produce a system of sociological thought. It did provide a basis upon which most of Russian sociology was built during the following decades. (Author)

  20. Should We Talk about the Pain? Personalizing Sociology in the Medical Sociology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C. H.; Sumerau, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the potential of personalizing sociology curriculum, specifically in Medical Sociology courses, to increase student engagement and sociological awareness. Based on our experiences offering separate Medical Sociology courses at a large public research university and a small private teaching university, respectively, we…

  1. Sociology and the Sociology of Higher Education: A Missed Call or a Disconnection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deem, Rosemary

    2004-01-01

    The article explores the relationship between sociology and sociology of education in the United Kingdom (UK), with specific reference to the development of a sociology of higher education. Though the article is mainly concerned with the UK, the broader issues raised, about the status and location of the sociology of education in relation to…

  2. The Corpus Status of Literature in Teaching Sociology: Novels as "Sociological Reconstruction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlin, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Using fiction in teaching sociology involves what Harvey Sacks calls "sociological reconstruction". Numerous comments on teaching sociology provide advice and suggestions on the use of literature and "what counts" as "sociological" literature, including specific titles. This paper goes further: while the use of literature is a routine feature of…

  3. Can sociology help to improve nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Matthews, David

    The first in a five-part series on sociology offers an overview of the debate about the relationship between sociology and nursing. Although sociological education is currently limited within nurse education, there is a long-held argument for its relevance. With a growing emphasis on preventative and public healthcare, sociology may yet prove its usefulness. Subsequent articles cover four of the key social factors affecting health.

  4. Annual Review of Sociology. Volume 7, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ralph H., Ed.; Short, James F., Jr., Ed.

    Fifteen essays describing current research in sociology are included in this publication. Almost all the authors are with departments of sociology in U.S. colleges and universities. The essays fall into ten broad categories: theory and method, social processes, institutions, formal organizations, political and economic sociology, differentiation…

  5. Assessing an Advanced Level Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa A.; Fermin, Baranda J.; Schneider, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the governing council of the American Sociological Association (ASA) appointed Professor Caroline Persell of New York University to launch a task force with the goal of creating an advanced high school sociology curriculum that would also be a model for introductory sociology courses in colleges and universities. The principle goal of the…

  6. The Advent of Forensic Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, John A.

    1970-01-01

    An historical account of the introduction and increasing use of sociological data in court decisions, with respect to laws for the protection of the health, public morals, and safety of citizens. A brief discussion of the social and economic philosophical implications. (JB)

  7. [Psychological theory and implicit sociology.].

    PubMed

    Sévigny, R

    1983-01-01

    This text is based on the hypothesis that every theory on the psychology of personality must inevitably, in one manner or another, have a sociological referent, that is to say, it must refer to a body of knowledge which deals with a diversity of social contexts and their relations to individuals. According to this working hypothesis, such a sociology is implicit. This text then discusses a group of theoretical approaches in an effort to verify this hypothesis. This approach allows the extrication of diverse forms or diverse expressions of this implicit sociology within this context several currents are rapidly explored : psychoanalysis, behaviorism, gestalt, classical theory of needs. The author also comments on the approach, inspired by oriental techniques or philosophies, which employs the notion of myth to deepen self awareness. Finally, from the same perspective, he comments at greater length on the work of Carl Rogers, highlighting the diverse form of implicit sociology. In addition to Carl Rogers, this text refers to Freud, Jung, Adler, Reich, Perls, Goodman, Skinner as well as to Ginette Paris and various analysts of Taoism. In conclusion, the author indicates the significance of his analysis from double viewpoint of psychological theory and practice.

  8. The Dialogic Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecha, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction theories emphasised the idea that schools reproduce relations of oppression. Later, postmodernism has increased the language of impossibility by analysing all educational actions in terms of power relations. Therefore, educational actions in line with any of those sociological approaches cannot act as tools that schools and…

  9. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-10-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve this goal, analytical sociologists demonstrate an unequivocal focus on the mechanism-based explanation grounded in action theory. In this article I attempt a critical appreciation of analytical sociology from the perspective of Mario Bunge's philosophical system, which I characterize as emergentist systemism. I submit that while the principles of analytical sociology and those of Bunge's approach share a lot in common, the latter brings to the fore the ontological status and explanatory importance of supra-individual actors (as concrete systems endowed with emergent causal powers) and macro-social mechanisms (as processes unfolding in and among social systems), and therefore it does not stipulate that every causal explanation of social facts has to include explicit references to individual-level actors and mechanisms. In this sense, Bunge's approach provides a reasonable middle course between the Scylla of sociological reification and the Charybdis of ontological individualism, and thus serves as an antidote to the untenable "strong program of microfoundations" to which some analytical sociologists are committed.

  10. Towards a Sociology of Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, James W.

    One of the more interesting facets of the philosophy of science today is the stress placed on the sociology of knowledge. People have slowly come to realize that knowledge is to a great extent conditioned by the ambience, the social milieu in which it exists. In the present paper, an attempt is made to draw a miniature socio-profile of the field…

  11. A Sociological Perspective on Contextualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sydney Carroll

    1996-01-01

    Reviews key assumptions of two contextualist theories (constructivism and interactionism), examines the theories' claims, and offers suggestions as to how a sociological analysis of human development can remedy some of the major theoretical failings while building on the basic strengths. Also discusses how a critical contextualism might help…

  12. Brazilian Sociology; Trends and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Neuma

    1995-01-01

    Delineates the historical and sociopolitical factors that influenced the educational development of sociology in Brazil. Discusses leading theorists, educational reformers, and the university's role in opposing the military regime. More recent crises have included shrinking academic budgets and declining enrollment. (MJP)

  13. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  14. A Sociology for Our Times?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Olive Banks' study of the sharp contrasts of "parity and prestige" in English secondary education was published when sociological study of education was only beginning in Britain. It fitted neatly into that study's preoccupation with the interactions of social class, educational opportunity and social mobility. This paper is not an updating of her…

  15. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-01-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve…

  16. Sociology. Grades 11 & 12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton Township Schools, NJ.

    This curriculum guide presents both general information on K-12 social studies curriculum development and information specific to designing an 11th and 12th grade sociology curriculum. A foreword and preface describe Hamilton Township's (New Jersey) K-12 social studies program sequence, curriculum and instruction design criteria, and support…

  17. [Psychological theory and implicit sociology.].

    PubMed

    Sévigny, R

    1983-01-01

    This text is based on the hypothesis that every theory on the psychology of personality must inevitably, in one manner or another, have a sociological referent, that is to say, it must refer to a body of knowledge which deals with a diversity of social contexts and their relations to individuals. According to this working hypothesis, such a sociology is implicit. This text then discusses a group of theoretical approaches in an effort to verify this hypothesis. This approach allows the extrication of diverse forms or diverse expressions of this implicit sociology within this context several currents are rapidly explored : psychoanalysis, behaviorism, gestalt, classical theory of needs. The author also comments on the approach, inspired by oriental techniques or philosophies, which employs the notion of myth to deepen self awareness. Finally, from the same perspective, he comments at greater length on the work of Carl Rogers, highlighting the diverse form of implicit sociology. In addition to Carl Rogers, this text refers to Freud, Jung, Adler, Reich, Perls, Goodman, Skinner as well as to Ginette Paris and various analysts of Taoism. In conclusion, the author indicates the significance of his analysis from double viewpoint of psychological theory and practice. PMID:17093766

  18. Sociology: a lost connection in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Snyder, Benjamin H

    2009-11-01

    For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.

  19. Sociology: a view from the diaspora.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard

    2010-12-01

    From the vantage point of criminology, one of sociology's main export subject areas, the present and future of sociology appear a good deal more promising than John Holmwood's essay on the discipline's misfortune would suggest. Sociology remains in high demand by students and faculty hiring remains strong, even in its more critical sub-fields, such as race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and social inequality. Holmwood is correct that sociology is vulnerable to external pressures to demonstrate its relevance to social practice, but those pressures come from left-wing social movements as well as from centres of power. He is also correct that external pressures contribute to internal disagreement, but sociology has been at war with itself since the 1960s, with little evident decline in its academic standing or intellectual vitality. Those of us on the discipline's diaspora, who depend on sociology for both support and light, must remain hopeful about sociology's continued good fortune.

  20. Sociology, medicine and the construction of health-related sociology.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nelson Filice de; Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2009-02-01

    Starting from a paper about closing the gap between sociology and medicine in Brazil and the United Kingdom that was published in 1971, a historical update was made with the aim of reflecting on the new shapes of health-related teaching and research within the social and human sciences, in these two countries. The methodology was qualitative and the study was developed using secondary data. The reflections were developed through the authors' immersion in Brazilian and British realities. It was concluded that the interface between sociology and health has expanded, although persistent old difficulties exist in relation to the structure and focus of the healthcare system, medical school power and medical student culture.

  1. Social facts and the sociological imagination: the contributions of sociology to psychiatric epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Eaton, W W

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship of psychiatry, epidemiology, and sociology. After a section on definitions, seven empirical contributions by sociologists to the field of psychiatric epidemiology are briefly presented to illustrate the notion of the social fact (contributions by Durkheim, Dunham, Hollingshead, Srole and Langner, Kerckhoff and Back, Dohrenwend, and Brown). Four broad sociological theories are reviewed, as illustrations of the sociological imagination (stratification theory, the idea of Verstehen, symbolic interactionism, and the sociology of knowledge). It is concluded that two major contributions of sociology to psychiatric epidemiology are the concepts and data related to the social fact, and the possibilities offered by the sociological imagination.

  2. Medical sociology as a vocation.

    PubMed

    Bosk, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    This article extends Weber's discussion of science as a vocation by applying it to medical sociology. Having used qualitative methods for nearly 40 years to interpret problems of meaning as they arise in the context of health care, I describe how ethnography, in particular, and qualitative inquiry, more generally, may be used as a tool for understanding fundamental questions close to the heart but far from the mind of medical sociology. Such questions overlap with major policy questions such as how do we achieve a higher standard for quality of care and assure the safety of patients. Using my own research, I show how this engagement takes the form of showing how simple narratives of policy change fail to address the complexities of the problems that they are designed to remedy. I also attempt to explain how I balance objectivity with a commitment to creating a more equitable framework for health care. PMID:25413800

  3. Medical sociology as a vocation.

    PubMed

    Bosk, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    This article extends Weber's discussion of science as a vocation by applying it to medical sociology. Having used qualitative methods for nearly 40 years to interpret problems of meaning as they arise in the context of health care, I describe how ethnography, in particular, and qualitative inquiry, more generally, may be used as a tool for understanding fundamental questions close to the heart but far from the mind of medical sociology. Such questions overlap with major policy questions such as how do we achieve a higher standard for quality of care and assure the safety of patients. Using my own research, I show how this engagement takes the form of showing how simple narratives of policy change fail to address the complexities of the problems that they are designed to remedy. I also attempt to explain how I balance objectivity with a commitment to creating a more equitable framework for health care.

  4. Sociological theory and Jungian psychology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    [[disenchantmentCarl JungpsychoanalysissociologyMax Weber ] In this article I seek to relate the psychology of Carl Jung to sociological theory, specifically Weber. I first present an outline of Jungian psychology. I then seek to relate this as psychology to Weber’s interpretivism. I point to basic methodological compatibilities within a Kantian frame, from which emerge central concerns with the factors limiting rationality. These generate the conceptual frameworks for parallel enquiries into the development and fate of rationality in cultural history. Religion is a major theme here: contrasts of eastern and western religion; the rise of prophetic religion and the disenchantment of modernity. Weber’s categories ‘ascetic’ and ‘mystic’ seem applicable to his own and Jung’s approaches and indeed temperaments, while a shared ironic view of rationality leads to similar visions of the disenchanted modern world. I conclude that Jung is sociologically coherent, but in an entirely different sense from Freud: rather than a constellation of family, socialization, ideology, social continuity, there is an analysis of cultural history against a background of adult normal psychology. I conclude that sociology should acknowledge Jung, but not in terms of over-arching theory. Rather Jungian insights might be used to orient new enquiries, and for reflexive analysis of sociology’s methodological debates.

  5. Dementia: sociological and philosophical constructions.

    PubMed

    Davis, Daniel H J

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents a challenge to the biomedical view of dementia as a disease. This view is critiqued from two perspectives: those of sociology and philosophy. Because these domains inform the creation of the medical discourse, their analysis provides an important refinement to the apprehension of the phenomenon of dementia. From the work of Foucault, and in particular his analysis of the historical origins of modern medicine, the sociological construction of dementia is considered. Following this, the philosophical question of Being is discussed, considering particularly the positions of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Lastly aspects of dementia nursing that are damaging to those relatives forced to take on the role of primary carer are isolated, in the context of Kitwood's view that it is possible to maintain personhood at the extremes of this condition. It is suggested that this critique of sociological and philosophical foundations of dementia might offer a way of approaching the dismantling of the self and revise current conceptions of dementia care for the better.

  6. Comparative education and the ?new? sociologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusz, Andrew R.; Parks-Trusz, Sandra L.

    1981-12-01

    The authors examine the impact of the `new' sociologies on comparative education by reviewing five comparative readers published during the past twenty years. While the `new' sociologies have had considerable impact within sociology and the sociology of education, minimal impact is found within comparative education. The authors further show that while critical new sociologies such as Marxism, neo-Marxism, and Critical theory have had some penetration into comparative education, use of the interpretative sociologies such as symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and semiotics has generally been absent. The authors conclude by suggesting that a synthesis of the critical and interpretative modes would prove fruitful for further work in comparative education. The five texts are: Halsey, Floud and Anderson (eds.), Education, Economy and Society (1961); Eckstein and Noah (eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education (1969); Beck, Perspectives on World Education (1970); Karabel and Halsey (eds.), Power and Ideology in Education (1977); and Altbach and Kelly (eds.), Education and Colonialism (1978).

  7. Rural Development Literature 1976-1977: An Updated Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzard, Shirley, Comp.

    More than 100 books and articles on rural development published during 1976-77 are annotated in this selective bibliography. Concentrating on social science literature, the bibliography is interdisciplinary in nature, spanning agricultural economics, anthropology, community development, community health, and rural sociology. Types of works…

  8. Postmodern Rural Geography? A Reply to Murdoch and Pratt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philo, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Responds to an article by Murdoch and Pratt appearing in this journal issue that questions the view that rural research needs to focus on marginalized groups and communities and that calls for a reconstructed sociology of postmodernism. Clarifies the author's views on postmodernism and the concept of "rurality" and his theoretical similarity to…

  9. Rural-Urban Differences in Environmental Concern in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddart-Kennedy, Emily; Beckley, Thomas M.; McFarlane, Bonita L.; Nadeau, Solange

    2009-01-01

    Distinctions between rural and urban populations are well documented in environmental sociology literature. Rural and urban places may exert different influences on participation in environmentally supportive behavior (ESB) as well as on other forms of environmental concern (EC). The influence of these distinct geographies may be due to present…

  10. Teaching sociology to nurses: exploring the debate.

    PubMed

    Williamson, G R

    1999-05-01

    This article reviews literature on the current debate concerning teaching sociology to nurses. The debate is limited because it does not take into account the work of Donald Schön, or Anthony Giddens. The article also discusses theories of adult education which support teaching sociology in nurse education. Sociology is essential for nurses, because it can help to develop an understanding and analysis of the context and substance of nursing practice.

  11. The Fourth Sociology and Music Education: Towards a Sociology of Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    By identifying three main sociologies that characterise broad movements in the field since its inception, this paper provides a background to considerations of music education from the perspective of sociology. A fourth sociology is then proposed that may be useful to interrogate the complexities of the field of 21st century music education. This…

  12. A Sociology "of" or a Sociology "for" Education? The New Zealand Experience of the Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The sociology of education in New Zealand, as in other countries, is affected by the dilemma inherent to the discipline, namely: is it a sociology "of" education or a sociology "for" education? In this article I analyse three factors in which the dilemma is played out: "cultural oppositionism" in the indigenous (kaupapa Maori) approach, critical…

  13. Sociology by Any Other Name: Teaching the Sociological Perspective in Campus Diversity Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Meghan A.; Banks, Kira Hudson

    2012-01-01

    This article suggests that the way in to sociology may not always be through the front door. The authors demonstrate how students in a three-day campus diversity program develop a sociological imagination despite not having a formal affiliation with the sociology department. In particular, students demonstrate a move from color blindness into…

  14. Sociological Ambivalence and Funeral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Louise

    2015-01-01

    This article builds on Hillcoat-Nallétamby and Phillips’ (2011) conceptualization of sociological ambivalence within the relational framework to examine a particular consumption practice, the funeral. We develop understanding of social, cultural and relational issues that arise from the experience associated with funeral-arranging. This is not a voluntary behaviour but one engaged with through force of circumstance and which involves commercial and relational decisions. Drawing on data from 10 interviews from a larger UK study, we focus on ambivalence surrounding choice and its impact on relations, showing how sentiments including love, obligation, regret and revenge evolve and transform past and future relationships. PMID:26236046

  15. Cross-Cultural Teaching of Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPertuis, Lucy

    1986-01-01

    Demonstrates how the typical American sociology course requires American or Western cultural literacy. Uses as an example the teaching of sociology on the Yap Islands in Micronesia. Demonstrates how to overcome the westernized world view limitation by using cross-cultural comparisons and other techniques. (JDH)

  16. Sociology of Education at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Len; Walker, Steve

    1978-01-01

    The authors trace and critique various thrusts operative in British educational sociology since its beginnings in the 1950s: structural functionalism, school-level analysis, the interactionalist "New Directions" approach, and the Neo-Marxist perspective. They also comment on the place of educational sociology in teacher training. (SJL)

  17. Chronic Illness in Adolescents: A Sociological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Tomas J.

    1983-01-01

    Relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility, and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perceptions and rules explicit. (JAC)

  18. Medical Sociology: What's in a Name?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Derek G.; Twaddle, Andrew C.

    1977-01-01

    Traces the development of medical sociology, which deals with sociological perspectives in relation to health care, from trends in Europe and the United States beginning in the early 20th century through the present. Available from: Unipub, Box 433, Murray Hill Station, New York, New York 10016. (AV)

  19. Sociology: A Student's Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiser, Joni, Comp.

    This guide lists selective reference sources which are useful for research in sociology. The guide is arranged by document type: guides, dictionaries, encyclopedias, directories and biographical sources, statistics, book reviews, theses and dissertations, general social science bibliographies, sociology bibliographies, special subject…

  20. Incorporating Sociology into Community Service Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochschild, Thomas R., Jr.; Farley, Matthew; Chee, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Sociologists and instructors who teach about community service share an affinity for understanding and addressing social problems. While many studies have demonstrated the benefits of incorporating community service into sociology courses, we examine the benefits of incorporating sociological content into community service classes. The authors…

  1. One Hundred Years of Sociological Solitude?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.

    2005-01-01

    This Cuban-born author presents a narrative on the social events in the United States that marked his life as he embarked on a career in the field of sociology in the 1960s and 70s. He advocates for sociologists' awareness of social realities and the evolution of sociological studies from a socially-conscious perspective.

  2. Sociology in U.S. High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCesare, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of continuing the push toward understanding the status of sociology in high schools, this research note reports some results from the first national study of high school sociology to be carried out in more than 25 years. It is also only the second national study to ever be conducted. Specifically, the author examines the prevalence…

  3. [Where are we in general sociology ?].

    PubMed

    Brian, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, history and social sciences have experienced a kind of merging, and a vast number of specialized domains have emerged. Yet the durkheim - ian register of "general sociology" seems somehow neglected. Firstly, this article analyzes the reasons for this neglect, and secondly, it indicates how, through a long-term reflexivity, one can formulate a new agenda for general sociology.

  4. Troubled Pastures, Troubled Pictures: French Agriculture and Contemporary Rural Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hervieu, Bertrand; Purseigle, Francois

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to those of other industrialized western European countries, France's agricultural community continued to represent the majority of the national population for a long time and only became one of many minority groups at the end of the twentieth century. It then came under the influence of various trends, sometimes conflicting but…

  5. The Sociology of Art and Art Education: A Relationship Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaChapelle, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent methodological and conceptual changes in sociology of art research are valuable because they provide descriptive material and counter prevalent sociological assumptions. Researchers now see the need for a sociological component in the study of aesthetics and art. An effective sociology of art is of vital concern to art education. (RM)

  6. Revising the Canon: Graduate Training in the Two Sociologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses effects on graduate sociology education of trends emphasizing quantitative methods and the positivist tradition at the expense of social theory and interpretive sociology. Argues that failure to develop sociology's interpretive tradition has allowed the style and intellectual creativity of sociological work to suffer. Urges greater…

  7. Comte Unplugged: Using a "Technology Fast" to Teach Sociological Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoop, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    Sociology majors learn that sociological theory is foundational to our field; it frames the way we look at the world and provides guiding questions for our social inquiry. But sociology instructors know that teaching theory is a challenge. A number of activities have been created to engage students in sociological theory courses. This note…

  8. First Contact: Teaching and Learning in Introductory Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Introduction to Sociology course is usually the first contact that students have with the discipline of sociology. This course can determine whether students take other sociology courses or learn to use sociology in their lives as adults and citizens. "First Contact" identifies important issues facing instructors in introducing students to the…

  9. Sociological Research and Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Gale

    1996-01-01

    Examines four orientations of sociological research: functional analysis, systems theory, symbolic interaction, and critical theory/conflict analysis. Recommends avoiding adherence to one single orientation and suggests constant reevaluation of the frame of reference. (SK)

  10. Psychological Time and Sociology: A Research Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Psychological time is hypothesized as potentially being both an independent and a dependent dimension associated with such sociological and psychological phenomena as social change, environmental design, personal space, esthetics, and color considerations. (Author)

  11. On the nature and sociology of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Mark; Dunn, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Much has been written in the last decade about how we should understand the value of the sociology of bioethics. Increasingly the value of the sociology of bioethics is interpreted by its advocates directly in terms of its relationship to bioethics. It is claimed that the sociology of bioethics (and related disciplinary approaches) should be seen as an important component of work in bioethics. In this paper we wish to examine whether, and how, the sociology of bioethics can be defended as a valid and justified research activity, in the context of debates about the nature of bioethics. We begin by presenting and arguing for an account of bioethics that does justice to the content of the field, the range of questions that belong within this field, and the justificatory standards (and methodological orientations) that can provide convincing answers to these questions. We then consider the role of sociology in bioethics and show how and under what conditions it can contribute to answering questions within bioethics. In the final section, we return to the sociology of bioethics to show that it can make only a limited contribution to the field.

  12. [Sociological aspects of late fatherhood].

    PubMed

    Bessin, M

    2006-09-01

    Starting from a sociological research on late parenthood, the article shows quantitative and qualitative lessons on the subject--in particular concerning the fathers' perspective. Late parenthood has declined over the 20th Century, to increase again since 1980. The further exploitation of the survey EHF 99 shows the processes and the socio-demographic of late fatherhood, over three generations. This phenomenon is tightly related to the multiple descents and family recombinings. We also observe in these configurations major age differences between spouses and late relationship. The social bipolarity of this phenomenon appears clearly as far as late motherhood is concerned, but is less clear concerning fatherhood, since more blue collars and non qualified men are concerned. This difference is due to the important role played by migrants in this phenomenon. A qualitative survey conducted on the basis of biographic interviews has underlined the gendered logics of late family founding. These logics are linked to the discrepancies due to man/woman differences regarding their respective calendar of fertility and to their attitude towards work. The interviews which provide an analysis of the biographical processes of late parenthood are organised according to postponement or renewal logics, in the form of refoundation or repetition. They are linked to self-introspection and to the negotiations at work within a couple.

  13. From measuring the rural to the rural made to measure: social representations in perspective.

    PubMed

    dos Anjos, Flávio Sacco; Caldas, Nádia Velleda

    2014-01-01

    The founding myth of rural sociology established an opposition between countryside and cities, classifying these notions as separate spatial and social realities. In the last two decades, an idyllic and divinized image of the rural has been constructed, especially in countries from the European Union. What reasons have conspired to foster this new appreciation of the rural? Is there a mutually accepted, recurring meaning between the way this new discourse about the rural is created in Europe and in other countries? This study aims to explore some of the contradictions associated with what the authors call the emergence of a rural "made to measure" in a context marked by post-productivism and the increasing weight of post-materialist values, taking social representations of the rural as the focus of the analysis.

  14. Sociological Paradoxes and Graduate Statistics Classes. A Response to "The Sociology of Teaching Graduate Statistics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a response to Timothy Patrick Moran's article "The Sociology of Teaching Graduate Statistics." In his essay, Moran argues that exciting developments in techniques of quantitative analysis are currently coupled with a much less exciting formulaic approach to teaching sociology graduate students about quantitative analysis. The…

  15. Sociology of the Prison Classroom: Marginalized Identities and Sociological Imaginations behind Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrotta, Kylie L.; Thompson, Gretchen H.

    2011-01-01

    The authors use sociology of the college classroom to analyze their experiences as feminists teaching sociology courses in the "unconventional setting" of prison. Reflective writing was used to chronicle experiences in the classes. They apply the concepts of doing gender, interaction order, and emotion work to the prison classroom. Based on their…

  16. "It's Not Rocket Science!": High School Sociology Teachers' Conceptions of Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCesare, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Since academic sociology's birth in this country, sociologists have not been shy about publicly praising and ridiculing the discipline. Though sociologists have been the primary participants in the seemingly endless debates about sociology's proper subject matter, methods, and purpose, there is another group that has also struggled over the past…

  17. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  18. Sociology Dismissing Religion? The Presentation of Religious Change in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherstone, Richard; Sorrell, Katie L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores whether the field of sociology harbors a dismissive attitude towards religion. Specifically it examines whether introductory sociology textbooks present the classic secularization theory over the more recent religious economies explanation of religious change. The classical secularization thesis suggests that religion is…

  19. Rural Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Websites & Tools Maps Funding & Opportunities Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  20. The Poor Little Rich District: The Effects of Suburbanization on a Rural School and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Aimee; Carnes, Marilyn; Eldridge, Anita; Huber, Donna; Lado, Longun Moses; Kotler, Ruth; Turner, Maryalice

    2005-01-01

    Contextualized in relationship to other case studies about rural districts that have experienced population growth and decline as well as in relationship to the small sociological literature on "boom towns," this study considered the dynamics that seem to be interfering with one previously rural and now suburbanizing district's ability to address…

  1. An Evaluation Of Forced Relocation of Population Due to Rural Community Development. Research Bulletin 1073.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Ted L.; Wright, Cathy J.

    To examine sociological response to rural development projects requiring forced population relocation, a study was conducted of a small, rural farming community in central Ohio which had been disrupted as a result of a large scale (approximately 8,100 acres) development project. A sample of 72 subjects was taken from the affected community (37…

  2. [Pierre Bourdieu: sociology as a "symbolic revolution"].

    PubMed

    Suaud, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The article combines two objectives: understand the genesis and development of the sociology of Bourdieu in connection with his social and intellectual positioning. The sociology of Bourdieu is a theory of Action which reconciles the double requirement of objectification and taking account of the practical logic bound by social agents. From the character both objective and subjective of social space, he analyzes how different institutions (firstly School) are doing that mental structures match the objective structures of society. By making acceptable reality and registering it in the body, these instances contribute to reproduce social divisions and participate in the work of domination. Gradually, Bourdieu develops a general theory about Power, which leads to a sociology of State. But he refuses any sociological fatalism. Because he perceived homologies between the sociologist and the artist facing the social order, each in their own way, he devoted two researches to Flaubert and Manet, seized in the same enterprise of aesthetic subversion he described as a 'symbolic revolution'. In many aspects, the sociology of Bourdieu opens ways of looking for an objectification of caregivers and their practices. PMID:24830225

  3. [Pierre Bourdieu: sociology as a "symbolic revolution"].

    PubMed

    Suaud, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The article combines two objectives: understand the genesis and development of the sociology of Bourdieu in connection with his social and intellectual positioning. The sociology of Bourdieu is a theory of Action which reconciles the double requirement of objectification and taking account of the practical logic bound by social agents. From the character both objective and subjective of social space, he analyzes how different institutions (firstly School) are doing that mental structures match the objective structures of society. By making acceptable reality and registering it in the body, these instances contribute to reproduce social divisions and participate in the work of domination. Gradually, Bourdieu develops a general theory about Power, which leads to a sociology of State. But he refuses any sociological fatalism. Because he perceived homologies between the sociologist and the artist facing the social order, each in their own way, he devoted two researches to Flaubert and Manet, seized in the same enterprise of aesthetic subversion he described as a 'symbolic revolution'. In many aspects, the sociology of Bourdieu opens ways of looking for an objectification of caregivers and their practices.

  4. The Assimilation of Sociology into Common Sense: Some Implications for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengston, William F.; Hazzard, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which sociological sensitivities have filtered into common sense before formal instruction and evaluated the introductory sociology course's effect on developing a sociological imagination. Results suggest that the introductory course does not enhance sociological appreciation significantly. (SLM)

  5. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status. PMID:18706741

  6. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status.

  7. Enriching Sociology 100: Using the Novel "Things Fall Apart"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Cheryl J.

    2005-01-01

    The author has been teaching Introduction to Sociology for several years, and each semester new students bring their own perspectives to the study of sociology, making the content fresh and new. In order to help students understand sociological concepts in more experiential ways and to give them a glimpse into a culture that may be different from…

  8. "The Sociology of Childhood" by William A. Corsaro. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvortrup, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Corsaro's work on the shift toward sociological approaches to research on children. Notes that the book fills a need for textbook on the sociology of childhood; documents the need for concern about children's well-being; presents a new analytical framework for the sociological study of children and of childhood; and challenges traditional…

  9. Simulating Secularization: A Pedagogical Strategy for the Sociology of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Instructing students in sociological theory is a foundational part of the discipline, but it can also be a challenge. Readers of "Teaching Sociology" can find a number of activities designed to improve students' understanding of sociological theory in their general theory courses, but there are fewer activities designed to improve…

  10. Teaching Mills in Tokyo: Developing a Sociological Imagination through Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrs, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Here I emphasize the applicability of the sociological imagination to an international audience by sharing my journey of teaching sociology in Japan. I found my own sociological imagination helpful in critically evaluating the literature on Japanese higher education and the construction of the Japanese student as a form of Orientalism. As I…

  11. Toward a Sociology of Being: The Humanistic Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, John F.

    The holistic, synergistic, normative, self-actualization motivated, transpersonal psychology developed by Maslow and others has opened enormous opportunities for a new sociology, a humanistic, transcultural, value-committed sociology. Such a sociology would not have the glorification of science or knowledge for its own sake as its highest goal,…

  12. American Sociology in a Transnational World: Against Parochialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, John

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that, in spite of its cosmopolitan origins, U.S. sociology is regarded widely as parochial in its outlook and concerns. Discusses factors contributing to the intellectual isolationism of U.S. sociological research and pedagogy. Provides suggestions for internationalizing the sociology curriculum. (CFR)

  13. Toward a Buddhist Sociology: Theories, Methods, and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schipper, Janine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores potential links between Buddhism and sociology, highlighting the many commonalities between sociology and Buddhism, with an emphasis on ways that Buddhist thought and practice may contribute to the field of sociology. What could Buddhism offer to our understanding of social institutions, social problems, and to the dynamics…

  14. Rapid Rural Appraisal: A Study of Gullah Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Charles W.; Lucas, David M.

    Principles of rural sociology and interpersonal communication provide the foundation for a study of "Gullah" culture. The Gullahs are a group of African Americans living along the southwestern U.S. coastal territory. Gullah culture began to evolve with the enslavement of African people in the Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia,…

  15. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  16. A Historical Sociology of Sex and Love.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    Describes how a survey of the history of sex, love, and marriage in Western cultures is used in an undergraduate course on the sociology of emotions. Identifies several periods of history particularly suited to this use and describes assignments and course requirements. (AEM)

  17. Sociology and Citizenship: The Concept of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wronski, Stanley P.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on the question of how Americans would look to a visitor from outer space, this article relates culture to citizenship and explains how sociology can help students become better citizens. Learning exercises on several topics are suggested, including deciding on the proper role of guns in American culture and analyzing alternative futures…

  18. The Sociology of the School Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobkin, V. S.; Kalashnikova, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    In presenting the basic data of the article the authors note that the topic itself, the sociology of the school grade, is determined by the overall context of timely and relevant issues that have to do with rating the success of the educational process. In the past few years the array of problems relating to educational evaluation has been studied…

  19. Some Sociological Ideas for Conceptual Change Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smardon, Regina

    2008-01-01

    This review takes a critical position with regards to Treagust and Duit's article, "Conceptual Change: A discussion of theoretical methodological and practical challenges for science education." It is proposed that conceptual change research in science education might benefit from borrowing concepts currently being developed in the sociology of…

  20. Reputation in the Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strathdee, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The present paper raises questions about the use of the concept of reputation in sociological studies of the relationship between higher education and the labour market. Sociologists of education have yet to subject the concept of reputation to sustained critique and evaluation. This situation is unsatisfactory because a number of critical…

  1. Simmel's Influence on American Sociology. II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Donald N.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article constitutes the second part of a discussion of the diffusion of Georg Simmel's thought within the American sociological community first initiated in the January issue of this journal (See SO 504 694). His influence is traced with respect to metropolitan mentality, small groups, interpersonal knowledge, conflict, and exchange. (Author)

  2. Introduction to the Sociology of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penalosa, Fernando

    This volume is a summary of current knowledge concerning the relationship between social behavior and language behavior. It is intended both for graduate and advanced undergraduate students and for interested laypersons who have no extensive knowledge of either sociology or linguistics. The introduction and ten chapters cover the following topics:…

  3. Cultivating a Sociological Perspective Using Nontraditional Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Ursula; DeAngelis, Joseph; Clark-Ibanez, Marisol

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that novels, mysteries and nonfiction books can provide undergraduate students with an accessible and exciting place to explore sociological concepts. Using storytelling as a pedagogical tool, we teach students key theoretical ideas by analyzing the books in their specific sociocultural contexts. First, we put forward three…

  4. The Relevance of Sociology to Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Janet

    1981-01-01

    The author maintains that art is a social product and that, in the teaching of or about the arts, the social setting in which the arts exist must be acknowledged. She discusses British developments in the sociology of art. (Paper presented at the Aesthetic Education Conference, London, September 1980.) (Editor/SJL)

  5. Cross Course Collaboration in Undergraduate Sociology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltermaurer, Eve; Obach, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cross course collaborative research project designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate aspects of sociological study that are typically addressed in a compartmentalized course by course manner. They used this approach on two separate occasions. The first involved collaboration between a…

  6. Travel-Study as Learning in Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Brenda; Prinz, Andrew K.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the objectives, characteristics, and outcomes associated with a joint "sociology-urban studies, travel-study, minicourse program." Describes how students in a four-day, two-credit-hour course travel to cities such as Washington, DC and Toronto to be exposed to different cultures, organizational structures, and social arrangements.…

  7. How Sociology Texts Address Gun Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonso, William R.

    2004-01-01

    William R. Tonso has chosen an issue that he knows something about to examine how sociology textbooks address controversy. Appealing for gun control is fashionable, but it is at odds with a fondness that ordinary Americans have for their firearms--one that is supported by a growing body of research on deterrence to crime. There are two sides to…

  8. The Sociological Study of Suicide: Methodological Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Reviews methodological issues in the sociological study of suicide, distinguishing between micro and macro approaches. Focusing on critical assessment of macro-level methodology, identifies three recurrent problems: (1) measurement issues on four key variables; (2) problems studying effect of mass media suicide stories; and (3) reasons to adopt…

  9. Sociological Research in a Military School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    What is the content of a system of sociological support for the administration of a higher military educational institution, and what problems are involved? From October 2006 to February 2007, instructors in the department of the humanities and the social-economic disciplines at Eisk F. M. Komarov Higher Military Aviation School (EVVAU) carried…

  10. New Biological Sciences, Sociology and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youdell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Since the Human Genome Project mapped the gene sequence, new biological sciences have been generating a raft of new knowledges about the mechanisms and functions of the molecular body. One area of work that has particular potential to speak to sociology of education, is the emerging field of epigenetics. Epigenetics moves away from the mapped…

  11. On the New Approach in Sociological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A roundtable was held in April 2010, by correspondence and with participants in attendance; it was organized by the editorial board of "Sotsiologicheskie issledovaniia" jointly with the faculty of sociology of the Russian State University of the Humanities [RGGU]. The focus of the proceedings was a discussion (taking account of experience in…

  12. The Future, Extraterrestrial Space Humanization and Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDaniel, William E.

    This paper suggests that sociologists should become actively involved with the study of the future as a means for revitalizing the profession of sociology. One aspect of the future that may be most exciting and challenging is the development of human society and culture in extraterrestrial human communities. A unique combination of technological…

  13. Micropolitics and the Sociology of School Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willower, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Schools are examined using a common sociological perspective. Relationships among key groups in school organizations are discussed from a micropolitical frame of reference. School micropolitics are considered in terms of teacher autonomy, order, time, and school administrators and the organization. Implications for future micropolitical research…

  14. Urban Sociology Bibliography, Exchange Bibliography 1336.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, James L.; And Others

    This bibliography on urban sociology cites studies which discuss the structures and processes of urban society from an historical and comparative perspective. Although it includes studies that discuss population growth, decline, size, and density, the prime concern of this bibliography is not with urban demography. After a brief look at some…

  15. Profile of an Engaged Sociology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kathleen; Reed, Laura

    2007-01-01

    In this research note, the authors report on an exploratory study of the profile of an engaged sociology major. The purpose of this note is to assess which factors relate to senior majors' self-perceived, overall engagement in the discipline. Possible factors include demographic variables, attitudes about learning, and academic or study behaviors.…

  16. Sociology in the context of social psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B

    1994-01-01

    The author addresses various aspects of the interface between sociology and social psychiatry, among them the labelling process related to mental deviance, problems related to diagnosis and social ethology. The need for interdisciplinary work is emphasized, not least in the context of prevention. It is underlined that effective preventive measures can precede the full causal elucidation of a disease.

  17. Future Directions in the Sociology of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christian, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The sociology of religion today faces new and remarkable opportunities to contribute interesting and important knowledge and understanding about the role of religion in social, political, economic and cultural life for scholarly and public audiences. But in order to meet and capitalize successfully upon those opportunities, the field at present…

  18. Some Computer-Based Developments in Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, David R.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses several ways in which computers are being used in sociology and how they continue to change this discipline. Areas considered include data collection, data analysis, simulations of social processes based on mathematical models, and problem areas (including standardization concerns, training, and the financing of computing facilities).…

  19. Sociological Research on Employment Patterns of Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marconi, Katherine

    Sociological research on the employment patterns of youth after entry into the labor force is reviewed for possible Naval manpower policy. Current trends regarding job duration and the occupational aspirations of youth may have possible implications for Naval enlistment policies. (NTIS)

  20. Postdiploma Professional Education (A Sociological Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhorukova, N.; Filatov, S.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a sociological study of postdiploma professional education. The authors state, that under the conditions of the mounting dynamics of social and economic processes, the only way that an individual can retain and increase the level of his professional and social competence and, consequently, his ability to compete in the domestic and…

  1. The Sociology of Language and Ethnicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Describes a college sociology course on the relationship of language and ethnicity, whose topics include intergroup communication and miscommunication; representation of ethnicity in cultural texts; and the role of ethnicity in socialization, values, religion, and social institutions. Development of the course, choice of instructional materials,…

  2. Individualized Instruction in Sociology: Myth and Fact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jioia, Joseph

    This study attempts to determine the value of individualized instruction used in three sociology classes at Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois). The classes incorporated a programed learning textbook, measurable behavioral objectives, instructor-student conferences, self-paced learning, and immediate student gratification. A questionnaire…

  3. Regression Analysis and the Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maio, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Regression analysis is an important aspect of most introductory statistics courses in sociology but is often presented in contexts divorced from the central concerns that bring students into the discipline. Consequently, we present five lesson ideas that emerge from a regression analysis of income inequality and mortality in the USA and Canada.

  4. Thirty Five Years of Viewing Sociology as an External Program Reviewer: A Dean's Perspective on How Administrators View Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohm, Charles F.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has served as an external program reviewer for 17 sociology program reviews, gives his perspective on the views that academic administrators have of sociology. On the plus side, administrators view sociology as a discipline that teaches many students; values and incorporates diversity; produces research aimed at ameliorating…

  5. Origins and canons: medicine and the history of sociology.

    PubMed

    Collyer, Fran

    2010-01-01

    Differing accounts are conventionally given of the origins of medical sociology and its parent discipline sociology. These distinct "histories" are justified on the basis that the sociological founders were uninterested in medicine, mortality and disease. This article challenges these "constructions" of the past, proposing the theorization of health not as a "late development of sociology" but an integral part of its formation. Drawing on a selection of key sociological texts, it is argued that evidence of the founders' sustained interest in the infirmities of the individual, of mortality, and in medicine, have been expunged from the historical record through processes of "canonization" and "medicalization."

  6. [Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sherry Freeland, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on rural education focuses on the unique characteristics and problems of rural schools, and discusses how the "top down" and "one size fits all" nature of the last decade of reforms has not taken these into account. To better address the situation of rural and small schools, various strategies are offered that involve distance…

  7. [Present day Marxist sociology and psychoanalysis].

    PubMed

    Biran, S

    1979-01-01

    The main common theme in psychoanalysis and Marxist sociology is the understanding that it is not consciousness that determines being, but being (spiritual, social) that determines consciousness. The different variations of Marxist movements today are in fact distant from Marx's theory of sociology. They have become representatives of utopian socialism, using anarchistic methods to achieve that aim. This development can only be understood as a social neurosis, with the narcistic frustation of the intellectual class as its cause, and grandiose claims, intolerance, dogmatic thinking and destructive behaviour as its symptoms. The only justified criticism of psychoanalysis from the pseudo-Marxist side is based on the imperfection and error in the analytical doctrine of superego. This should be replaced by the idea of conscious, subjective, emotional morality which clearly explains the aggression contained in social structures. PMID:498762

  8. Some sociological ideas for conceptual change research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smardon, Regina

    2008-07-01

    This review takes a critical position with regards to Treagust and Duit's article, Conceptual Change: A discussion of theoretical methodological and practical challenges for science education. It is proposed that conceptual change research in science education might benefit from borrowing concepts currently being developed in the sociology of emotions. It is further suggested that the study of social interaction within evolving emotional cultures is the most promising avenue for developing and extending theories about conceptual change.

  9. The sociology of popular music, interdisciplinarity and aesthetic autonomy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lee

    2011-03-01

    This paper considers the impact of interdisciplinarity upon sociological research, focusing on one particular case: the academic study of popular music. 'Popular music studies' is an area of research characterized by interdisciplinarity and, in keeping with broader intellectual trends, this approach is assumed to offer significant advantages. As such, popular music studies is broadly typical of contemporary intellectual and governmental attitudes regarding the best way to research specific topics. Such interdisciplinarity, however, has potential costs and this paper highlights one of the most significant: an over-emphasis upon shared substantive interests and subsequent undervaluation of shared epistemological understandings. The end result is a form of 'ghettoization' within sociology itself, with residents of any particular ghetto displaying little awareness of developments in neighbouring ghettos. Reporting from one such ghetto, this paper considers some of the ways in which the sociology of popular music has been limited by its positioning within an interdisciplinary environment and suggests two strategies for developing a more fully-realized sociology of popular music. First, based on the assumption that a sociological understanding of popular music shares much in common with a sociological understanding of everything else, this paper calls for increased intradisciplinary research between sociologists of varying specialisms. The second strategy, however, involves a reconceptualization of the disciplinary limits of sociology, as it argues that a sociology of popular music needs to accept musical specificity as part of its remit. Such acceptance has thus far been limited not only by an interdisciplinary context but also by the long-standing sociological scepticism toward the analysis of aesthetic objects. As such, this paper offers an intervention into wider debates concerning the remit of sociological enquiry, and whether it is ever appropriate for sociological

  10. Gender and physics: a sociological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendick, Heather

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I take a sociological approach to understanding the under-representation of gender and physics. I argue that gender is something we do not something that we are. Thus, every aspect of our behaviour, including our engagement (or not) with physics becomes part of our performance of gender. I then use a brief historical analysis and an example from popular culture to show how physics is culturally aligned with masculinity. The impact is that the subject feels more ‘natural’ for men than for women. I end with some of the implications of this for those who want to make physics more accessible to girls and women. (EDITORS NOTE: This paper was given at the Improving Gender Balance (IGB) conference in Cambridge, UK, in March 2015, organised by the Institute of Physics. This conference was for schools and their supporters who were part of the IGB strand of the Stimulating Physics Network, funded by the Department for Education. It aimed to summarise some of the sociological perspectives on girls and physics for the benefit of the teachers attending the conference. We feel that it may be a useful summary for those teachers of physics who are unfamiliar with sociological approaches to gender and the classroom.)

  11. The sociology of medical screening: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Natalie; Eborall, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Medical screening raises fundamental issues for sociological inquiry, but at present a well-developed sociology of medical screening is lacking. This special issue on the sociology of screening brings together an exciting collection of new work that tackles medical screening from a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. In this opening paper, we begin by explaining what we mean by screening, and why we believe screening merits sociological attention. Secondly, we reflect on the sociology of screening to date and provide an introduction for those new to this area. We then provide an overview of the papers in this collection, highlighting links and contrasts between papers. We conclude by reflecting on sociology's potential contribution to wider debates about screening, and propose future research directions.

  12. The state of the art in medical sociology.

    PubMed

    Chaiklin, Harris

    2011-08-01

    This is a review of the state of the art in Medical Sociology. Three approaches are used. One is looking at the work of the pioneers. Another approach involves examining textbooks, books of reading, and handbooks. The third approach is reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. Special attention is given to the way medical sociologists examine issues in psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21814085

  13. Classical sociology and cosmopolitanism: a critical defence of the social.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bryan S

    2006-03-01

    It is frequently argued that classical sociology, if not sociology as a whole, cannot provide any significant insight into globalization, primarily because its assumptions about the nation-state, national cultures and national societies are no longer relevant to a global world. Sociology cannot consequently contribute to a normative debate about cosmopolitanism, which invites us to consider loyalties and identities that reach beyond the nation-state. My argument considers four principal topics. First, I defend the classical legacy by arguing that classical sociology involved the study of 'the social' not national societies. This argument is illustration by reference to Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons. Secondly, Durkheim specifically developed the notion of a cosmopolitan sociology to challenge the nationalist assumptions of his day. Thirdly, I attempt to develop a critical version of Max Weber's verstehende soziologie to consider the conditions for critical recognition theory in sociology as a necessary precondition of cosmopolitanism. Finally, I consider the limitations of some contemporary versions of global sociology in the example of 'flexible citizenship' to provide an empirical case study of the limitations of globalization processes and 'sociology beyond society'. While many institutions have become global, some cannot make this transition. Hence, we should consider the limitations on as well as the opportunities for cosmopolitan sociology. PMID:16507000

  14. The case for a sociology of dying, death, and bereavement.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Neil; Allan, June; Carverhill, Philip A; Cox, Gerry R; Davies, Betty; Doka, Kenneth; Granek, Leeat; Harris, Darcy; Ho, Andy; Klass, Dennis; Small, Neil; Wittkowski, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dying, death, and bereavement do not occur in a social vacuum. How individuals and groups experience these phenomena will be largely influenced by the social context in which they occur. To develop an adequate understanding of dying, death, and bereavement we therefore need to incorporate a sociological perspective into our analysis. This article examines why a sociological perspective is necessary and explores various ways in which sociology can be of practical value in both intellectual and professional contexts. A case study comparing psychological and sociological perspectives is offered by way of illustration.

  15. Towards a global environmental sociology? Legacies, trends and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Lidskog, Rolf; Mol, Arthur PJ; Oosterveer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A current debate on environmental sociology involves how the subdiscipline should conceptualise and investigate the environment and whether it should be prescriptive and deliver policy recommendations. Taking this debate as a point of departure this article discusses the current and future role of sociology in a globalised world. It discusses how environmental sociology in the US and Europe differ in their understandings of sociology’s contribution to the study of the environment. Particular stress is placed on how these two regions differ with respect to their use of the tradition of sociological thought, views on what constitutes the environment and ways of institutionalising environmental sociology as a sociological field. In conclusion, the question is raised of whether current versions of environmental sociology are appropriate for analysing a globalised world environment; or whether environmental sociology’s strong roots in European and US cultures make it less relevant when facing an increasingly globalised world. Finally, the article proposes some new rules for a global environmental sociology and describes some of their possible implications for the sociological study of climate change. PMID:25937642

  16. Classical sociology and cosmopolitanism: a critical defence of the social.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bryan S

    2006-03-01

    It is frequently argued that classical sociology, if not sociology as a whole, cannot provide any significant insight into globalization, primarily because its assumptions about the nation-state, national cultures and national societies are no longer relevant to a global world. Sociology cannot consequently contribute to a normative debate about cosmopolitanism, which invites us to consider loyalties and identities that reach beyond the nation-state. My argument considers four principal topics. First, I defend the classical legacy by arguing that classical sociology involved the study of 'the social' not national societies. This argument is illustration by reference to Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons. Secondly, Durkheim specifically developed the notion of a cosmopolitan sociology to challenge the nationalist assumptions of his day. Thirdly, I attempt to develop a critical version of Max Weber's verstehende soziologie to consider the conditions for critical recognition theory in sociology as a necessary precondition of cosmopolitanism. Finally, I consider the limitations of some contemporary versions of global sociology in the example of 'flexible citizenship' to provide an empirical case study of the limitations of globalization processes and 'sociology beyond society'. While many institutions have become global, some cannot make this transition. Hence, we should consider the limitations on as well as the opportunities for cosmopolitan sociology.

  17. Choices and Chances: The Sociology Role-Playing Game--The Sociological Imagination in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Joseph M.; Elias, Vicky L.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a sociology role-playing game (RPG) used to demonstrate the broad range of social forces, institutions, and structures in a semester-long series of in-class and homework assignments. RPGs and other simulation games have been frequently suggested as a useful teaching methodology because of their unique ability to allow…

  18. Working for Equity in Heterogeneous Classrooms: Sociological Theory in Practice. Sociology of Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G., Ed.; Lotan, Rachel A., Ed.

    Sociological theory and method have been used to develop a theory of complex instruction (CI). CI enables teachers to teach at a high intellectual level while reaching a wide range of students. Teachers work to create equal-status interaction within small groups as students use each other as resources to complete challenging group tasks. The…

  19. Some computer-based developments in sociology.

    PubMed

    Heise, D R; Simmons, R G

    1985-04-26

    Sociological data sets are now being computer analyzed by means of a variety of sophisticated procedures, to produce results that reflect the intricacy of social life. Computers also are being used to conduct simulations of social processes based on mathematical models and to collect the data for analysis. Portable computers allow computing power to be used in field studies, and the relatively low cost of computers is expanding the range of sociologists who use them. While opening up new research opportunities, computers also bring certain problems for social researchers and teachers.

  20. Introduction: why a Sociology of Pandemics?

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Robert; Hoffman, Lily M; Staniland, Karen

    2013-02-01

    Infectious disease has re-emerged as a public health threat in an increasingly globalised era, adding trans-national actors to traditional national and local government actors. This special issue showcases new sociological work in response to this challenge. The contributors have investigated the social construction of new and re-emerging diseases; the development of surveillance systems, public health governance; the impact of scientific/technical modalities on uncertainty and risk, the interplay of infectious disease, public health and national security concerns, and public and media responses. The case studies range broadly across North America, Europe and Asia and define new agendas for medical sociologists and public health policymakers.

  1. Introduction: why a Sociology of Pandemics?

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Robert; Hoffman, Lily M; Staniland, Karen

    2013-02-01

    Infectious disease has re-emerged as a public health threat in an increasingly globalised era, adding trans-national actors to traditional national and local government actors. This special issue showcases new sociological work in response to this challenge. The contributors have investigated the social construction of new and re-emerging diseases; the development of surveillance systems, public health governance; the impact of scientific/technical modalities on uncertainty and risk, the interplay of infectious disease, public health and national security concerns, and public and media responses. The case studies range broadly across North America, Europe and Asia and define new agendas for medical sociologists and public health policymakers. PMID:23278292

  2. The Strength of Strong Ties for Older Rural Adults: Regional Distinctions in the Relationship between Social Interaction and Subjective Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mair, Christine A.; Thivierge-Rikard, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    Classic and contemporary sociological theories suggest that social interaction differs in rural and urban areas. Intimate, informal interactions (strong ties) are theorized to characterize rural areas while urban areas may possess more formal and rationalized interactions (weak ties). Aging and social support literature stresses social interaction…

  3. The Role of Rural Social Science in Theological Education (With Particular Application to the Town and Country Ministry of the Methodist Church).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett Theological Seminary, Evanston, IL.

    The relationship of rural social science to theological education was a primary focus of this study, with particular emphasis given to the thesis that an ability to think in social science terms on the part of a pastor working in a town or country community is positively related to a productive ministry. Members of the Rural Sociological Society…

  4. Adolescent Crime in the Mirror of Sociological Expert Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimova, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of empirical sociological surveys in providing legal support for Russia's social development has a substantive foundation. Sociology and the juridical sciences share a common viewpoint when it comes to the study of social relations, namely the analysis of normative behavior. Social norms and the norms of law differ a great deal,…

  5. Pour une Sociologie des Apprentissages (Toward a Sociology of Learning)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porcher, Louis

    1977-01-01

    A language, a social practice, cannot be taught or learned apart from determining sociological factors. The effect of this sociological understanding on foreign language methodology, particularly the functional approach, and learner-centered education is discussed. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  6. Service-Learning and the Sociological Imagination: Approach and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balazadeh, Nancy

    Undergraduate sociology students at Rust College, Mississippi, an historically black college, have been given the opportunity to connect with the lives of others in institutional settings, thus making a generational connection between the college and a local nursing home. During the 1995-96 academic year, students in three sociology courses…

  7. New Frontiers: "Milieu" and the Sociology of American Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Bethamie

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century changing circumstances have prompted American Jewish educators to develop new educational strategies to address these needs, and these developments are an important aspect of the sociology of American Jewish education. Using the method of historical sociology, I examine the educational configuration at…

  8. Parsons, professions and the sociology of health care.

    PubMed

    Alaszewski, A; Manthorpe, J

    The fourth paper in the sociology series examines the work of the American Talcott Parsons. His work has particular relevance to the sociology of health and illness. The concept of the sick role as a means of understanding the effects of ill health, which he proposed, is critically examined here. PMID:7667129

  9. The Transcultural Transferability of Bourdieu's Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Derek

    2004-01-01

    As early as 1970, M. S. Archer argued that Bourdieu's sociology of education was the product of the particular conditions of the French educational system within which it was formulated. The same argument was subsequently advanced more generally by Richard Jenkins, who insisted that Bourdieu's sociology of culture, particularly the analysis…

  10. Truth and Truthfulness in the Sociology of Educational Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael; Muller, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to reflect on and explore questions of truth and objectivity in the sociology of educational knowledge. It begins by reviewing the problems raised by the social constructivist approaches to knowledge associated with the "new sociology of education" of the I970s. It suggests that they have significant parallels with the…

  11. Sociological Competencies and Business Careers: Toward an Expanded Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldoff, Rachael A.; Litchfield, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    We use a cross-disciplinary approach and multiple sources of data to investigate and outline sources of comparative advantage that undergraduate sociological study provides to students who are preparing for careers in business. We identify and discuss three core competencies that sociology specifically develops in students--structural…

  12. Challenges of Urban Education: Sociological Perspectives for the Next Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClafferty, Karen A., Ed.; Torres, Carlos Alberto, Ed.; Mitchell, Theodore R., Ed.

    The papers in this collection discuss the challenges facing urban education and the sociology of urban education. The more comprehensive perspective presented in this document can contribute to the improvement of city schools and the empowerment of urban students. Following an introduction, "Challenges of the New Sociology of Urban Education"…

  13. Research in Sociology of Education and Socialization. Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallas, Aaron M., Ed.

    This volume is a mixture of research reviews, theoretical syntheses, and empirical analyses addressing issues in the sociology of education. Following an introduction by Aaron M. Pallas, the book is divided into eight chapters: (1) "The Sociology of Education: Its Development in the United States" (Robert Dreeben); (2) "In Comparative Isolation:…

  14. Sport and Society: An Introduction to Sociology of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Hilmi

    A theoretical framework for the study of sport sociology is provided in this text. It is intended for students of sport, arts and humanities, sociology, and social psychology. Sport and social organization are discussed first. Three models of societies and six theories of social organization are presented which form the basis of the eclectic…

  15. Using the Sociological Imagination to Teach about Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nell Trautner, Mary; Borland, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The sociological imagination is a useful tool for teaching about plagiarism and academic integrity, and, in turn, academic integrity is a good case to help students learn about the sociological imagination. ?We present an exercise in which the class discusses reasons for and consequences of dishonest academic behavior and then examines a series of…

  16. Using Student Ethnography to Teach Sociology of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, William T.; Gilbert, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    Engaging students in a course in the Sociology of Religion can be a challenge, particularly when working with student populations in a homogeneous region of the country who have limited experience with religious diversity. We approached the course from a sociological/anthropological perspective, requiring each student to complete an in-depth…

  17. Abstract and engaged critique in sociology: on football hooliganism.

    PubMed

    King, A

    2001-12-01

    This note is a response to a critical review of some of my own work published recently in the British Journal of Sociology but it does not reply to the specific criticisms made in that article. Rather it addresses the question of what constitutes appropriate critique in sociology by developing a distinction between abstract and engaged criticism.

  18. Theoretical Notes on the Sociological Analysis of School Reform Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladwig, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, Ladwig outlined the theoretical and methodological implications of Bourdieu's concept of the social field for sociological analyses of educational policy and school reform. The current analysis extends this work to consider the sociological import of one of the most ubiquitous forms of educational reform found around…

  19. The "Biographical Turn" in University Sociology Teaching: A Bernsteinian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Monica; Abbas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what happens to disciplinary knowledge when it is taught in contemporary UK universities of different status. Here, Basil Bernstein's theories are applied to what sociology lecturers say about teaching, demonstrating that in conditions in which students are less likely to engage with sociological theory, lecturers,…

  20. Disciplinarity in Question: Comparing Knowledge and Knower Codes in Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckett, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to understanding why curriculum design in a discipline with a horizontal knowledge structure is difficult, time-consuming and contested. A previous paper on the same case study in one sociology department reported that students who had completed the general sociology major found it lacking in coherence. To illustrate the…

  1. The Educational Imagination and the Sociology of Education in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the sociology of education is its proliferation under a broad gamut of research themes and topics. Understanding the relationship of education to social reproduction and social change are pivotal to the sociology of education, and have fruitfully informed research in fields such as gender and education, vocational education…

  2. Rural Agrobusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treillon, Roland; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This publication describes the formation and evolution of rural agribusiness (RA) in the southern hemisphere as a precondition for improving the lives of families in rural communities, and focuses on RA endeavors created by development projects in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. After a short introduction, the first section of this study…

  3. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  4. Ageing, status politics and sociological theory.

    PubMed

    Turner, B S

    1989-12-01

    As a feature of social change and as an aspect of social stratification, ageing and age groups have been seriously neglected by sociological theory. This article attempts to conceptualize age groups in a multi-dimensional model of stratification which considers ageing in relation to economic class, political entitlement, or citizenship, and cultural life-styles. This multi-dimensional model provides an analytical basis for rejecting functionalist theories of ageing, which emphasize the positive functions of social disengagement, activity theories, which show that self-esteem in ageing is an effect of continuing social involvement, and Marxist social gerontology, which argues that retirement is determined by labour-market requirements in capitalism. The article concludes by developing a reciprocity-maturation curve of ageing which explains age stigmatization through exchange theory as an effect of declining social reciprocity. Both young and elderly social groups in a period of economic recession are perceived to be socially dependent, and become the targets of 'the politics of resentment'. The processes of social ageing can be located in the core of sociological theory, because they are connected fundamentally to the conditions of social solidarity. PMID:2688794

  5. [State models (utopias) and sociology of medicine].

    PubMed

    Vida, M

    Social science was well developed at the end of the 18th century, but the theory or rather the methodology of sociology became a source of investigation only in the 19th century. The aspects of society were already studied in ancient times, though--since this term was not known--they thought of an omnipotent state as the only structure of human coexistence. Their judgement about the human community--what we call society today--were expressed inside the political science. In our times the investigation of sociology was primarily interested in what a real society should be, in contradiction to the philosophers of the ancient world, the Fathers of the Church in the Middle Ages and the modern natural-lawyers, who were discussing about an ideal constitutional form. They did not describe the veritable society and its occurrences, but showed a model of social conditions to their contemporaries, which had been imagined or contemplated suitable by them. Nowadays it has gradually been accepted in modern medicine that a substantial proportion in the etiology of certain diseases and the conditions of recovery have social origin. As social circumstances are natural elements of human beings, social existence impresses all functions of human body. The practical problems of prevention and therapy of diseases beside social relevances represent a special social aspect for medicine.

  6. Toward an Understanding of "Genetic Sociology" and Its Relationships to Medical Sociology and Medical Genetics in the Educational Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Marcel; Odiet, Jeff A.; Miller, Steven I.; Fredericks, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we have demonstrated that a new subdiscipline in the field of Medical Sociology is urgently needed to integrate, interpret, and synthesize the interrelationships and implications of genetic discoveries, treatments, and prognoses upon societal behavior. That subdiscipline in our view is "Genetic Sociology."We applied the…

  7. Exploring the "Learning Careers" of Irish Undergraduate Sociology Students through the Establishment of an Undergraduate Sociology Student Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Patricia; Power, Martin J.; Barnes, Cliona; Haynes, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a faculty-reviewed student undergraduate journal titled "Socheolas: The Limerick Student Journal of Sociology" was officially launched. The journal, now in its fourth volume, is produced, edited, and managed by a small team from within the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick in Ireland. The objective of this student…

  8. A Longitudinal, Descriptive Study of Sociology Majors: The Development of Engagement, the Sociological Imagination, Identity, and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kathleen; Naseri, Naghme

    2011-01-01

    In this exploratory scholarship of teaching and learning study, we describe the development, over time, of engagement in the discipline, the ability to use the sociological imagination and other learning, an identity as a sociologist, and a sense of being an autonomous learner in a group of sociology majors. We followed 18 students who completed…

  9. Renewing Sociology of Education? Knowledge Spaces, Situated Enactments, and Sociological Practice in a World on the Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Sociology of education is caught in a dilemma. The study of education and society that unfolded through the twentieth century produced educational vocabularies that spoke into education policy and practice about inequality and social justice. Now that sociologically informed educational discourse is marginalised by individualistic…

  10. Tales of sociology and the nursing curriculum: revisiting the debates.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Kay; Law, Kate

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between nursing and sociology has been extensively debated for more than two decades [Cox, C.A., 1979. Who cares? Nursing and sociology: the development of a symbiotic relationship. Journal of Advanced Nursing 4, 237-252; Cooke, H., 1993. Why teach sociology? Nurse Education Today 13, (3) 210-216; Sharpe, K., 1994. Sociology and the nursing curriculum: a note of caution. Journal of Advanced Nursing 20, (2) 391-395; Sharpe, K., 1995. Why indeed should we teach sociology? A response to Hannah Cooke. Nurse Education Today 15, (1) 52-55; Sharpe, K., 1996. Feedback - sociology and the nursing curriculum: a reply to Sam Porter. Journal of Advanced Nursing 23, (7) 1275-1278; Balsamo, D., Martin, S.I., 1995a. Developing the sociology of health in nurse education: towards a more critical curriculum. Part 1. Andragogy and sociology in Project 2000. Nurse Education Today 15, 427-432; Balsamo, D., Martin, S.I., 1995b. Developing the sociology of health in nurse education: towards a more critical curriculum. Part 2. Linking methodology and epistemology. Nurse Education Today 15, 427-432; Porter, S., 1995. Sociology and the nursing curriculum: a defence. Journal of Advanced Nursing 21, (6) 1130-1135; Porter, S., 1996. Why teach sociology? A contribution to the debate. Nurse Education Today, 16, 170-174; Porter, S., 1997. Sociology and the nursing curriculum: a further comment. Journal of Advanced Nursing 26, (1) 214-218; Porter, S., 1998. Social Theory and Nursing Practice. Macmillan, Basingstoke; Corlett, J., 2000. The perceptions of nurse teacher, student nurses and preceptors of the theory-practice gap in nurse education. Nurse Education Today 20, 499-505; Allen, D., 2001. Review article: nursing and sociology: an uneasy marriage?. Sociology of Health and Illness 23, (3) 386-396; Pinikahana, J., 2003. Role of sociology within the nursing enterprise: some reflections on the unfinished debate. Nursing and health Sciences 5, (2) 175-180; Holland, K., 2004

  11. [Adolescents after suicidal attempts. Sociological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    Adolescents are thought to be one of the high risk groups for suicidal behaviours. About 400 persons till 20 years old commit suicide every year, and from 10 to 20 times more suicide attempts. The paper discusses differences in sociological profiles of youngsters after suicidal attempts and those who never had suicidal attempts. There were several factors in the scope of interest as: sociodemo-graphic characteristics, family structure, school problems, relationship with peers, history of abusive behaviours of youngsters and their relatives. Some particular elements of suicidal acts (suicidal thoughts, circumstances, events directly preceding the attempts, motives for suicidal attempts) were also described. The study group was comprised of 100 adolescents recruited from consecutive patients presented to the Clinic of Acute Poisonings of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine between January 2001 and June 2002 due to self-poisoning. The reference group (100 youngsters) was randomly selected from the different types of secondary schools situated in the area of Lodz voivodeship. The data were collected with help of standardized surveys. The results obtained point to some differences between the study group. The groups differ in 24 among 31 analysed variables. The average teenager who attempts suicide is a 17 year old girl, living in a big city with a full family (not necessarily biological) who was faced with relational and school problems, and affected by abusive behaviour. Sociological characteristics of individuals attempting suicide together with precise diagnosis of risk factors and risk groups is the important step toward the effective prevention of suicide behaviour. Suicidal behaviour appears to be a significant public health problem, and suicide prevention itself should be the essential component of each mental health promotion program.

  12. Global Neo-Liberalism, Global Ecological Modernization, and a Swine CAFO in Rural Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenna, Leland L.; Mitev, Georgi V.

    2009-01-01

    Rural and development sociology studies have tended to credit globalization with low-wage, extractive, environmentally destructive outcomes. Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been treated as a local manifestation of the destructive tendencies of globalization. However, recent scholarship on globalization suggests that…

  13. Community Economic Development Strategies in Rural Washington: Toward a Synthesis of Natural and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Jessica A.

    2006-01-01

    Routes to economic development attract considerable attention in community and rural sociology. Social scientists draw increasingly on studies of social capital and environmental surroundings as they examine the factors that facilitate and inhibit economic development. However, few empirical analyses exist that analyze the impact of the…

  14. Agriculture, Communities, and New Social Movements: East European Ruralities in the Process of Restructuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlach, Krzysztof; Lostak, Michal; Mooney, Patrick H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of the new social movements (NSMs) paradigm in the changing context of East European post-communist societies and their agricultural systems and rural communities. Starting with statements formulated in Western sociology in the context of Western democratic societies about NSMs as a protest against modernity, the…

  15. FACTORS RELATING TO OCCUPATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL DECISION-MAKING OF RURAL YOUTH. RESEARCH SUMMARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HORNER, JAMES T.; AND OTHERS

    STUDIES OF SOCIOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC, EDUCATIONAL, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE OCCUPATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL DECISION-MAKING BY RURAL YOUTH WERE REVIEWED. INCLUDED WERE STUDIES OF ASPIRATIONS, MIGRATION AND MOBILITY, SOCIOECONOMIC SCALE, OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE, COST AND BENEFIT OF EDUCATION, EDUCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND…

  16. Peter L. Berger's "Invitation to Sociology:" Twenty-Five Years of RSVPs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiano, Kevin J.

    1990-01-01

    Reconsiders the place of Peter Berger's "Invitation to Sociology," in teaching undergraduate sociology courses. Traces the success and intellectual impact of the work. Describes the image of sociology it presents. Reviews its treatment of human freedom as a sociological issue. Examines its world vision and evaluates its usefulness in teaching. (NL)

  17. Teaching Sociology of Education in Canada: A Comparative Study of the "Two Solitudes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean-Pierre, Johanne

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to the fields of sociology of education and Canadian sociological teaching. English and French Canadian sociology of education course outlines were systematically analysed in order to assess how national context, language and internal divisions influence the undergraduate teaching of sociology of education. The…

  18. Global Interconnectedness and Multiculturalism in Undergraduate Sociology Courses in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to explain a process of inserting global transnational elements into an undergraduate sociology course. After a review of global themes covered in introductory sociology textbooks, the author administered two projects (Global Multiculturalism and Sociology of Wal-Mart) in an undergraduate sociology course. The current study…

  19. Rural Health Information Hub

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am I Rural? Economic ... toolkits like the Services Integration Toolkit in the Rural Community Health Gateway . Finding Statistics & Data Learn how to ...

  20. The sociological image of medicine and the patient.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, U

    1989-01-01

    Jack Elinson raises somewhat rhetorical questions about the value of medical care and medical sociology. Behind them is a serious concern with the type and scope of medicalisation in modern society as well as its sociological criticism. This raises the issue of whether the various theoretical images of medicine and the patient which sociology provides are able to account for the effect of the social environment upon morbidity and mortality as shown, for instance, by the Alameda County Study. Three theoretically distinct approaches are discussed in detail, structural functionalism, symbolic interactionism and conflict theory. These characterise medical sociology over the last 30 years. They elucidate more clearly Elinson's own image of medicine and the patient. But none seems to match his standpoint vis-a-vis the medicalisation of care which refrains from citing psychological forces but emphasises the availability of good medical services.

  1. Conflict Theory and Functionalism: Introductory Sociology Textbooks, 1928-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Evaluates the claim that conflict theory has risen to prominence since 1960 by analyzing theorist citations in 80 textbooks published between 1928-1976. Findings show increasing coverage, but that sociology is increasingly a multiparadigm discipline. (Author/CK)

  2. Resources for Teaching the Sociology of Sex and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kim M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A computer game called "Sex Roles" for use in college level sociology classes is described. A learning activity for teaching about sex roles is presented and three criminology textbooks that treat women are described. (RM)

  3. Astrosociology in the Classroom: Developing a Practical Sociology Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Astrosociology will progress and develop as a viable multidisciplinary field as well as a potential subfield of sociology more thoroughly and more quickly when a modern college and university level course is developed and offered to students interested in this unique sociological approach. The Introduction to Astrosociology course should present modern sociological issues from the perspective of the impact of space exploration, settlement, and commercialization as they apply to the micro and macro levels of influences on the major institutions of society. The intent of this paper is to outline a syllabus that will address the perspectives, concepts, and theories found in most introductory and applied sociology courses, but with an emphasis on the concepts, definitions, and perspectives of Astrosociology. This presentation outlines a basic topic and subject format for the course syllabus and opens for discussion the need to include or exclude material.

  4. [Margot Jefferys: the British voice of medical sociology].

    PubMed

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2011-03-01

    Margot Jefferys (1916-1999) was not only the person who introduced medical sociology into Great Britain, but also the researcher and professor who, during thirty years, exerted the most deep influence on the teaching of health social sciences either in undergraduate or especially graduate studies, since the beginning of her career, in 1953, at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. In addition to create a global panorama concerning the Jefferys' works, this study highlights two texts, which are situated into the field we are researching: the history of health sociology. The first one, published in 1991, discusses the relationships between epidemiology and sociology; and the second, published in 1996, discusses the field of medical sociology. Both texts are a series of considerations regarding the Jefferys' thought and the more recent questions of the field in Great Britain.

  5. How can sociological theory help our understanding of addictions?

    PubMed

    Adrian, Manuella

    2003-08-01

    Those who work in the addiction field usually use the pharmacological or medical model, psychological theories of behavior, or operate within the confines of a criminal justice perspective. Contributions from the field of sociology are limited to use of the methods of sociological investigations, primarily population surveys, which, typically, are used to identify groups at-risk for specific types of drug use. Surveys have identified illicit drug use as, predominantly, a problem of young males, whereas prescription drug use is predominantly a problem of middle-aged and older women in industrialized countries. Experts in addiction have accused sociologists who study addiction of being "atheoretical." Paradoxically, in the sociology field, the most highly cited article is Merton's theory of addiction. This article will examine the contributions of sociological theory to our understanding of addiction, including social definitions of "the problem of addiction" and mechanisms to account for individual drug use within a social context that defines it as problematic.

  6. Health sociology from post-structuralism to the new materialisms.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the impact of post-structuralism and postmodern social theory upon health sociology during the past 20 years. It then addresses the emergence of new materialist perspectives, which to an extent build upon insights of post-structuralist concerning power, but mark a turn away from a textual or linguistic focus to address the range of materialities that affect health, illness and health care. I conclude by assessing the impact of these movements for health sociology.

  7. Sociology's misfortune: disciplines, interdisciplinarity and the impact of audit culture.

    PubMed

    Holmwood, John

    2010-12-01

    This paper is about tendencies to the subversion of sociology as a discipline. It connects external factors of the wider socio-political environment of higher education in the UK, especially those associated with the audit culture and new systems of governance, with the internal organization of the discipline. While the environment is similar for all social science subjects, the paper argues that there are specific consequences for sociology because of characteristics peculiar to the discipline. The paper discusses these consequences in terms of the changing relationship between sociology and the growing interdisciplinary area of applied social studies as a form of 'mode 2 knowledge'. It argues that while sociology 'exports' concepts, methodologies and personnel it lacks the internal disciplinary integrity of other 'exporter' disciplines, such as economics, political science and anthropology. The consequence is an increasingly blurred distinction between sociology as a discipline and the interdisciplinary area of applied social studies with a potential loss of disciplinary identity. The paper concludes with a discussion of how this loss of identity is associated with a reduced ability to reproduce a critical sensibility within sociology and absorption to the constraints of audit culture with its preferred form of mode 2 knowledge.

  8. British sociology and public intellectuals: consumer society and imperial decline.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bryan S

    2006-06-01

    The following is the lecture given for the BJS 2005 Public Sociology Debate given at the London School of Economics and Political Science on ll October 2005. This lecture on the character of British sociology provides a pretext for a more general inquiry into public intellectual life in postwar Britain. The argument put forward falls into several distinctive sections. First, British social science has depended heavily on the migration of intellectuals, especially Jewish intellectuals who were refugees from fascism. Second, intellectual innovation requires massive, disruptive, violent change. Third, British sociology did nevertheless give rise to a distinctive tradition of social criticism in which one can argue there were (typically home-grown) public intellectuals. The main theme of their social criticism was to consider the constraining and divisive impact of social class, race and gender on the enjoyment of expanding social citizenship. Fourth, postwar British sociology came to be dominated by the analysis of an affluent consumer society. Finally, the main failure of British sociology in this postwar period was the absence of any sustained, macro-sociological analysis of the historical decline of Britain as a world power in the twentieth century.

  9. The sociology of subjectivity, and the subjectivity of sociologists: a critique of the sociology of gender in the Australian family.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Allon J

    2004-03-01

    In this era of reflexive sociology it is commonplace that subjectivity is of great sociological concern, and that the comprehension by social researchers of their own subject position is essential. Still, old habits die hard. Focusing on selected texts in the sociology of the Australian family, this paper traces the effects of failing to focus the sociological gaze on subjectivity and its variation across society. Highlighted are some patterns of analytic misconstruction of subjectivity, especially the substitution of measurement for a theory of practice, and the projection by sociologists of their own class-specific subjectivity onto society at large. Ultimately, this misconstruction turns works like those discussed in this paper into a powerful denial of alternative subjectivities, and a reinforcement of the socially dominant perspective.

  10. [Collective violence: neurobiological, psychosocial and sociological condition].

    PubMed

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Bogerts, B

    2013-11-01

    Collective violence, despite its often disastrous consequences has widely been disregarded by psychiatry, as was the case for individual violence. Physical violence is not only an individual, mostly male phenomenon but manifests mainly as collective violence among men in multiple forms. Due to the plentitude of theories and findings on collective violence the present article is limited to a few relevant sociological and neurobiological aspects of collective violence as a group and intergroup phenomenon. A special focus is given to the association of the phylogenetic disposition to group violence and constructions of masculinity, to the potential relevance of mirror neurons for social contagion and to the influence of sociostructural factors for male adolescents joining violence-prone groups. In this context group dynamics such as in-group overevaluation and out-group devaluation are of central importance by stabilizing the male sense of self-worth and legitimizing, normalizing and internalizing violent behavior. Instead of mythologizing, biologizing or banalizing violence, transdisciplinary approaches are necessary to improve violence prevention on different ecological levels being obligated to a culture of nonviolent conflict management.

  11. Sociology and abortion: legacies and strategies.

    PubMed

    Imber, J B

    1979-11-01

    A survey essay sees the sociological view of abortion practice in 1979 appearing as a dense web of philosophical conundrums and at times violent political strategies; with abortion still not typically seen as 1 form of birth control among others. Attention is called to the variety of approaches to abortion in books and articles about its medical, demographic, religious, historical, political, philosophical, psychological, practical, and personal aspects. These include: James C. Mohr's Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of National Policy 1800-1900; Abortion, by Potts, Diggory, and Peel; Abortion in Psychosocial Perspective: Trends in Transnational Research, edited by Davis, Friedman, Van der Tak, and Seville; Linda Francke's The Ambivalence of Abortion; Mary K. Zimmerman's Passage Through Abortion: The Personal and Social Reality of Women's Experiences; Abortion Politics: The Hawaii Experience, by Steinhoff and Diamond; John Connery's Abortion: the Development of the Roman Catholic Perspective; Abortion: New Directions for Policy Studies, by Manier, Liu, and Solomon; and Harry Harris' Prenatal Diagnosis and Selective Abortion.

  12. The growth and prospects of population sociology in China.

    PubMed

    Li, M

    1989-01-01

    Population sociology is an immature science in China. Several issues are important to consider as population sociology develops. 1) Research subjects need to be specified more rigorously. 2) More indepth discussion needs to take place on a system of research. 3) Population sociology needs to be explained in terms of the relationship to socialism and the contribution to population policies. The future of population sociology within population science is secure because the Party's session in 1978 adopted guidelines to promote the development of science and culture, and because it is necessary to the understanding of population problems in the socialist modernization. Population sociology plays a major role with population economics in policy formation. A large number of scholars have invested effort in the dicipline. One of the basic characteristics of population sociology is the ability to view population and social development dynamically. Research covers population problems related to social problems, and vice versa. It is distinct from other sciences, particularly in research scope. It studies the effects of social elements and population development on one another, which delineates the incompatibility between population growth and social development. China's population sociology did not begin until 1978, even though worldwide the discipline was founded early in the century and grew rapidly during World War II. China's population growth is a hindrance to social and economic development, and more indepth studies are needed to analyze the conflicts between population and modern Chinese society and economy, and to assess how best to slow the population growth. There have been 4 basic views on the study of population sociology. The 1st view is that endorsed by Soviet scholars and emphasizes sociolgical principles which affect population growth. This position is population sociology as a brance of sociology rather than as an independent science. The 2nd view pertains

  13. Rural Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon, Ed.; And Others

    Presented are 10 papers resulting from a workshop, involving representatives from 33 state developmental disabilities councils, designed to examine common problems and issues confronting developmentally disabled citizens in rural areas. Entries include the following titles and authors: "Who, What, and Where--Studying Prevalence of Developmental…

  14. Sociological Profile of Astronomers in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias de Ussel, Julio; Trinidad, Antonio; Ruiz, Diego; Battaner, Eduardo; Delgado, Antonio J.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, José M.; Salvador-Solé, Eduard; Torrelles, José M.

    In this paper the main findings are presented of a recent study made by a team of sociologists from the University of Granada on the professional astronomers currently working in Spain. Despite the peculiarities of this group - its youth, twentyfold increase in size over the last 20 years, and extremely high rate of specialization abroad - in comparison with other Spanish professionals, this is the first time that the sociological characteristics of the group have been studied discretely. The most significant results of the study are presented in the following sections. Section 1 gives a brief historical background of the development of Astronomy in Spain. Section 2 analyzes the socio-demographic profile of Spanish Astronomy professionals (sex, age, marital status, etc.). Sections 3-5 are devoted to the college education and study programs followed by Spanish astronomers, focusing on the features and evaluations of the training received, and pre- and postdoctoral study trips made to research centers abroad. The results for the latter clearly show the importance that Spanish astronomers place on having experience abroad. Special attention is paid to scientific papers published as a result of joint research projects carried out with colleagues from centers abroad as a result of these study trips. Section 6 describes the situation of Astronomy professionals within the Spanish job market, the different positions available and the time taken to find a job after graduation. Section 7 examines Astronomy as a discipline in Spain, including the astronomers' own opinions of the social status of the discipline within Spanish society. Particular attention is paid to how Spanish astronomers view the status of Astronomy in Spain in comparison with that of other European countries.

  15. Sociological profile of astronomers in Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ussel, J. I.; Trinidad, A.; Ruíz, D.; Battaner, E.; Delgado, A. J.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Salvador-Solé, E.; Torrelles, J. M.

    In this paper the main findings are presented of a recent study made by a team of sociologists from the University of Granada on the professional astronomers currently working in Spain. Despite the peculiarities of this group - its youth, twentyfold increase in size over the last 20 years, and extremely high rate of specialization abroad - in comparison with other Spanish professionals, this is the first time that the sociological characteristics of the group have been studied discretely. The most significant results of the study are presented in the following sections. Section 1 gives a brief historical background of the development of astronomy in Spain. Section 2 analyzes the socio-demographic profile of Spanish astronomy professionals (sex, age, marital status, etc.). Sections 3-5 are devoted to the college education and study programs followed by Spanish astronomers, focusing on the features and evaluations of the training received, and pre- and postdoctoral study trips made to research centers abroad. The results for the latter clearly show the importance that Spanish astronomers place on having experience abroad. Special attention is paid to scientific papers published as a result of joint research projects carried out with colleagues from centers abroad as a result of these study trips. Section 6 describes the situation of astronomy professionals within the Spanish job market, the different positions available and the time taken to find a job after graduation. Section 7 examines astronomy as a discipline in Spain, including the astronomers' own opinions of the social status of the discipline within Spanish society. Particular attention is paid to how Spanish astronomers view the status of astronomy in Spain in comparison with that of other European countries.

  16. Sociology of Aging in Canada: Issues for the Millennium. [and] Commentary: Sociological Issues for the Millennium. [and] Commentary: Asian Perspectives on Sociological Issues for the Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Penning, Margaret J.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews sociological gerontology in Canada in four areas: (1) inequality, population aging, and the social construction of aging; (2) retirement and income security; (3) health, health care services, and health policy; and (4) family relations and caregiving. Identifies the importance of social structures for individual experience of aging.…

  17. Let's dance: Organization studies, medical sociology and health policy.

    PubMed

    Currie, Graeme; Dingwall, Robert; Kitchener, Martin; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    This Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine investigates the potential for positive inter-disciplinary interaction, a 'generative dance', between organization studies (OS), and two of the journal's traditional disciplinary foundations: health policy and medical sociology. This is both necessary and timely because of the extent to which organizations have become a neglected topic within medical sociology and health policy analysis. We argue there is need for further and more sustained theoretical and conceptual synergy between OS, medical sociology and health policy, which provides, on the one-hand a cutting-edge and thought-provoking basis for the analysis of contemporary health reforms, and on the other hand, enables the development and elaboration of theory. We emphasize that sociologists and policy analysts in healthcare have been leading contributors to our understanding of organizations in modern society, that OS enhances our understanding of medical settings, and that organizations remain one of the most influential actors of our time. As a starting point to discussion, we outline the genealogy of OS and its application to healthcare settings. We then consider how medical sociology and health policy converge or diverge with the concerns of OS in the study of healthcare settings. Following this, we focus upon the material environment, specifically the position of business schools, which frames the generative dance between OS, medical sociology and health policy. This sets the context for introducing the thirteen articles that constitute the Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine. PMID:22218227

  18. Let's dance: Organization studies, medical sociology and health policy.

    PubMed

    Currie, Graeme; Dingwall, Robert; Kitchener, Martin; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    This Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine investigates the potential for positive inter-disciplinary interaction, a 'generative dance', between organization studies (OS), and two of the journal's traditional disciplinary foundations: health policy and medical sociology. This is both necessary and timely because of the extent to which organizations have become a neglected topic within medical sociology and health policy analysis. We argue there is need for further and more sustained theoretical and conceptual synergy between OS, medical sociology and health policy, which provides, on the one-hand a cutting-edge and thought-provoking basis for the analysis of contemporary health reforms, and on the other hand, enables the development and elaboration of theory. We emphasize that sociologists and policy analysts in healthcare have been leading contributors to our understanding of organizations in modern society, that OS enhances our understanding of medical settings, and that organizations remain one of the most influential actors of our time. As a starting point to discussion, we outline the genealogy of OS and its application to healthcare settings. We then consider how medical sociology and health policy converge or diverge with the concerns of OS in the study of healthcare settings. Following this, we focus upon the material environment, specifically the position of business schools, which frames the generative dance between OS, medical sociology and health policy. This sets the context for introducing the thirteen articles that constitute the Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine.

  19. The media of sociology: tight or loose translations?

    PubMed

    Guggenheim, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Sociologists have increasingly come to recognize that the discipline has unduly privileged textual representations, but efforts to incorporate visual and other media are still only in their beginning. This paper develops an analysis of the ways objects of knowledge are translated into other media, in order to understand the visual practices of sociology and to point out unused possibilities. I argue that the discourse on visual sociology, by assuming that photographs are less objective than text, is based on an asymmetric media-determinism and on a misleading notion of objectivity. Instead, I suggest to analyse media with the concept of translations. I introduce several kinds of translations, most centrally the distinction between tight and loose ones. I show that many sciences, such as biology, focus on tight translations, using a variety of media and manipulating both research objects and representations. Sociology, in contrast, uses both tight and loose translations, but uses the latter only for texts. For visuals, sociology restricts itself to what I call 'the documentary': focusing on mechanical recording technologies without manipulating either the object of research or the representation. I conclude by discussing three rare examples of what is largely excluded in sociology: visual loose translations, visual tight translations based on non-mechanical recording technologies, and visual tight translations based on mechanical recording technologies that include the manipulation of both object and representation.

  20. The Influence of Married Couples' Needs on the Stability of Rural and Urban Young Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravchenko, Iu V.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the influence that the needs of married couples have on family stability in Russia shows that there are marked differences in expectations in rural and urban areas. This article describes a sociological survey carried out in the territory of Rostov oblast in the spring of 2011. The basis for the study consisted of cities and rural…

  1. Rural intentions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane J.; Hakes, Jacquie; Bai, Meera; Tolhurst, Helen; Dickinson, James A.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the reasons for family medicine graduates’ career choices. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups and one-on-one interviews. SETTING University of Calgary in Alberta. PARTICIPANTS Seventeen male and female second-year family medicine residents, representing a range of ages and areas of origin, enrolled in the 2004 urban and rural south streams of the family medicine residency program at the University of Calgary. METHOD During the final month of training, 2 focus groups were conducted to determine graduating students’ career choices and the reasons for them. After focus-group data were analyzed, a questionnaire was constructed and subsequently administered to participants during face-to-face or telephone interviews. MAIN FINDINGS Most residents initially planned to do urban locums in order to gain experience. In the long term, they planned to open practices in urban areas for lifestyle and family reasons. Many residents from the rural stream had no long-term plans to establish rural practices. Most residents said they felt prepared for practice, but many indicated that an optional third year of paid training, with an emphasis on emergency medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics, would be desirable. Reasons cited for not practising in rural areas were related to workload, lifestyle issues, family obligations, and perceived lack of medical support in the community. Only 4 female graduates and 1 male graduate intended to practise obstetrics. The main reason residents gave for this was inadequate training in obstetrics during residency. Finances were cited as a secondary reason for many choices, and might in fact be more important than at first apparent. CONCLUSION Despite its intention to recruit family medicine graduates to rural areas and to obstetrics, the University of Calgary residency training program was not successful in recruiting physicians to these areas. The program likely needs to re-examine the effectiveness of

  2. Rural Prairie Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kari

    "Rural Prairie Women" contains the work of two task forces: the Rural Social Work Task Force which looked at the forces active in North Dakota rural areas and the Rural Women Task Force which examined the position of women within those same rural communities. The relationship between the land, small towns, and sparse population is explored, as is…

  3. Rural as Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Craig B.; Howley, Aimee A.

    This essay explains two ways in which "the rural" serves as context. The common way interprets the rural lifeworld as an impediment to certain projects and goals, thus framing "the rural" as a subjugated and diminished reality. The other way is called "the rural circumstance" in order to situate the rural lifeworld as a center of attention, not as…

  4. Teaching in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woofter, Thomas Jackson

    Published in 1917, this book overviews rural schooling during the early 1900s and was written to address the problems of rural teaching and to serve as an introductory guide for rural teachers. Specifically, the book aimed to bring attention to the needs of rural life and the possible contributions of the rural school, to describe effective…

  5. Rural Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Five articles present an overview of trends and issues affecting rural libraries. The areas discussed include the status of rural library services; outreach programs; the role of library cooperation in the support of rural library service; the development of rural information centers; and political marketing of the rural library. (CLB)

  6. Qualitative medical sociology: what are its crowning achievements?

    PubMed Central

    Chard, J A; Lilford, R J; Court, B V

    1997-01-01

    Doctors and epidemiologists seldom read or cite qualitative medical sociology; it is little published in medical journals. A large number of articles bewail this lack and provide arguments explaining and justifying the subject. Any examples used in such articles are selected ad hoc. We made a systematic search for the literature and used citation analysis to select the world's top 100 articles. We analysed this trawl and provide resumés of a selection from the 'classics'. Mental health and the organization of medicine are the themes within medical sociology with highest impact. Much highly cited work consists of historical and theoretical analysis done 'at the desk' rather than observation or interview 'in the field'. Citation rates, even for the most famous works in medical sociology, are a small fraction of those for high impact biomedical research. PMID:9496271

  7. Alvin W. Gouldner and industrial sociology at Columbia University.

    PubMed

    Chriss, J J

    2001-01-01

    Alvin W. Gouldner (1920--1980) was a prolific sociologist of the post-World War II era who spent the early part of his career (the 1950s) in the field of industrial sociology. A case study of Gouldner's early life and career is useful insofar as it intertwines with the development of industrial sociology as a distinct subfield within sociology. Through this analysis we are also better able to understand how and in what ways a burgeoning organizational studies program developed at Columbia University during the 1940s. This analysis of the historical and cultural contexts within which Gouldner came to prominence as an industrial sociologist at Columbia, and the intellectual program that resulted, can also help shed light on more recent trends in organizational studies.

  8. Castells' Catalan routes: nationalism and the sociology of identity.

    PubMed

    MacInnes, John

    2006-12-01

    Castells' analysis of the rise of a global network society and information age is underpinned, paradoxically, by a nationalist vision with organic links in a Gramscian sense to Catalan nationalism. This leads to various weaknesses in his theory, especially an over-emphasis on language and nation at the expense of class. Exploring the specifically Catalan origins of his work, and testing its adequacy there, helps us to understand Castells' broader approach. Discussion of Castells has perhaps overlooked his commitment to nationalism because the sociology of identity sometimes unwittingly adopts what Billig has called a banal nationalist perspective. A stricter distinction between the different meanings of the term identity would help sociology to avoid arguments, such as that of Castells, that risk becoming determinist, teleological or both. The article concludes by asking whether the 'sociological imagination' has been alert enough to its banal nationalist form, facilitated by its intimate relationship with the state, its concern for policy relevance and methods of data gathering.

  9. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations.

  10. Doing Public Sociology in the Field--A Strong Sociological Intervention Project in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Lina

    2007-01-01

    Through the in-depth analysis of the features of Huabei rural industrialization, the unique factory regime in Baigou, Hebei, and the resulting special workers, this paper reveals two dilemmas the migrant workers in Baigou and larger Hubei area face: Because of the interpersonal network of labor market, personalized trade, familial labor process,…

  11. Educational Sociology and Educational Administration: Problems with Paradigms, Epistemology, Research and Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrell, Michael M.; Macpherson, R. J. S.

    1995-01-01

    Traces the different paradigmatic pathways followed by educational sociology and educational administration. Educational sociology has followed ideostructural, interpretive, and psychosocial paradigms, with emergent holistic critical perspectives and sociobiological materialism. Educational administration has had one dominant tradition,…

  12. [For a sociology of intervention in mental health.].

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, J; Sévigny, R

    1988-01-01

    Mental health workers develop a solid understanding of social phenomenon, which gives them direction and on which they are able to base their interventions. This is what the authors call the "implicit sociology" ("sociologie implicite") of workers. The article describes the principal elements of this special knowledge through information gathered from workers in clinical environments, private practice and "alternative" organizations. The authors focus on the idea workers make of health/mental handicaps, of their clientele, of their involvement, of the organizational and societal context of their work, of their "role" in society. Finally, the authors show how a sociological approach can help improve one's understanding of how to deal with mental health.

  13. A sociological approach to counseling homosexual clients and their families.

    PubMed

    Hammersmith, S K

    1987-01-01

    Stigma lies at the root of many problems typically experienced by homosexual clients and their families. Sociological theory and research shed light on the dynamics of stigma and its consequences, both for the stigmatized population and for their heterosexual families and associates. This article summarizes key sociological research on the nature and development of sexual orientation. It considers the dynamics of homophobia and its implications for homosexual youngsters and their families. It offers practical tips for helping clients to understand their own or a family member's homosexual orientation, for coping with stigma, for reconciling issues of religion and morality, and for determining lifestyle. Suggestions for therapist office materials are also included.

  14. Rural Wellness and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Websites & Tools Funding & Opportunities News Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  15. Medicaid and Rural Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Websites & Tools Funding & Opportunities News Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  16. Medicare and Rural Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... in rural areas. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) – CMMI, also known as the CMS Innovation ...

  17. Rural Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Tools Maps Funding & Opportunities News Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  18. National Rural Health Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Equity Conference recap SRHA Leadership Conference Rural Hospital Innovation Summit NRHA HIT webinars & resources Webinars Publications & News ... San Diego, CA May 9-12 Rural Hospital Innovation Summit San Diego, CA May 9 Rural Medical ...

  19. Sociology and the Training of Teachers of the Disadvantaged: A Final Report - Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Raymond S.; And Others

    The potential relevance of sociology in the development of a teacher training program is examined. Investigation of the sociology area is effected through: (1) the deliberations of a Sociology consortium; (2) a condensed version of material abstracted in a literature search; (3) a conceptual mapping of the field accompanied by a brief listing of…

  20. The Many Faces of Sociology: Ambivalence and Conflict in Graduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godino, Victoria J.; Brents, Barbara G.

    1987-01-01

    Addresses how the ambivalence of sociology affects students' understanding of it. Contends that this ambivalence affects the usefulness of sociology as a discipline and sociologists' attitudes towards their profession in addition to creating problems in applying a sociological perspective to everyday life. Concludes that one possible solution is…

  1. "Laughing Matters": The Comedian as Social Observer, Teacher, and Conduit of the Sociological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Shawn Chandler; Hernandez, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    Much of the sociological curriculum often represents society as tragedy. This article explores the incorporation of a society as comedy component in introductory courses at two institutions using the sociological insight and social critique of comedians. A general discussion of parallels between the comedic eye and the sociological imagination is…

  2. The Cartoon Society: Using "The Simpsons" To Teach and Learn Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Stephen J.; Feinberg, Seth L.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the animated television series "The Simpsons" as a tool to reach undergraduate students by using popular culture to teach sociology. Discusses "The Simpsons" and sociology, provides a sample of the sociological themes embedded within the show, and how to use "The Simpsons." Provides information gleaned from students evaluations. (CMK)

  3. The Effect of Data Analysis Modules in the Introductory Sociology Course: Lessons for the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Tracy L.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers an evaluation of the implementation of the American Sociological Association's Integrating Data Analysis Project in a large introductory sociology course. This project was designed following an examination of the curricula of 13 disciplines that revealed that sociology failed to integrate empirical, quantitative literacy…

  4. "Working Lives": The Use of Auto/Biography in the Development of a Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Carol; Stirling, John; Wray, David

    2015-01-01

    This article critically evaluates the attempt of the authors to develop a sociological imagination within first-year undergraduate students studying the discipline of sociology at a British university. Through a sociological analysis of biography and autobiography (of both teachers and students), we attempted to create a quality of mind that would…

  5. Understanding the World of High School Sociology: Views from an Insider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Having been placed in the unique position of teaching high school sociology at the same time when a renewed interest from professional sociological associations led to a revival of scholarly research on the topic, a commitment from professional sociological associations, my insider's view from the high school classroom and from various…

  6. How Do Students' Accounts of Sociology Change over the Course of Their Undergraduate Degrees?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashwin, Paul; Abbas, Andrea; McLean, Monica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine how students' accounts of the discipline of sociology change over the course of their undergraduate degrees. Based on a phenomenographic analysis of 86 interviews with 32 sociology and criminology students over the course of their undergraduate degrees, we constituted five different ways of accounting for sociology.…

  7. The Place of Sociology in the General Education Curriculum of a Career-Oriented College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbach, Russell; Allon, Natalie

    Goals, course content, and teaching processes for sociology courses for non-sociology majors are outlined. Four general goals for teaching sociology in this context are introducing concepts, methods, and theories of the discipline; providing training in conceptualization and reflection; expanding the student's cultural perspective; and enabling…

  8. Sociology of Education: Outlines towards a Diagnosis and Thoughts on Some Major Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeck, Unn-Doris Karlsen

    2012-01-01

    Sociology of education in Norway has traditionally been preoccupied with the classic problems related to education and the reproduction of social inequality. As the general social scientific and political focus on inequality decreased, the sociology of education also became less visible. At the same time, the sociology of youth evolved, and…

  9. Sisyphus Had It Easy: Reflections of Two Decades of Teaching the Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandaneau, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    "The Sociological Imagination" is among the most recognized books in the history of American Sociology. Yet, the sociological imagination as such, a radical form of self-consciousness, is not commonly well understood nor easily acquired. This essay examines the challenges thus faced by instructors who seek to accurately impart what Mills meant by…

  10. The Sociology of Youth: A Reflection on Its Contribution to the Field and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    This article expands on a piece in the inaugural "Sociology of Youth Newsletter," edited by Steven Threadgold (Wyn 2010). The present article provides an opportunity to engage in a more critical exploration of the issues that youth sociology in Australia contributes to the wider field of sociology and to reflect on challenges that it faces in the…

  11. (Re)igniting a Sociological Imagination in Adult Education: The Continuing Relevance of Classical Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that sociology has been a foundational discipline for the field of adult education, but it has been largely implicit, until recently. This article contextualizes classical theories of sociology within contemporary critiques, reviews the historical roots of sociology and then briefly introduces the classical theories…

  12. Information Literacy: The Partnership of Sociology Faculty and Social Science Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caravello, Patti S.; Kain, Edward L.; Kuchi, Triveni; Macicak, Susan; Weiss, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a joint project of the American Library Association and the American Sociological Association. The goal of this collaboration is to guarantee that students of sociology, particularly sociology majors, develop strong information literacy skills during their undergraduate experience. The article talks about national standards…

  13. The Contradictions of Public Sociology: A View from a Graduate Student at Berkeley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noy, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Reflecting on my experiences as a graduate student, I argue that the terminology of public sociology should be dropped. The public sociology rhetoric is at odds with the fundamental professional reality in the discipline. Sociology, as a "hyper-professionalized" endeavor, primarily values abstract, explanatory theories, even if those theories make…

  14. Schools and Society: A Sociological Approach to Education, Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne H., Ed.; Spade, Joan Z., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This third edition, now published by Pine Forge Press, features original readings and article excerpts by leaders in the area of Sociology of Education. With a wide array of theoretical perspectives, a broad range of respected sources, and inclusion of both classic and contemporary studies, this comprehensive, integrated text addresses key issues…

  15. Sociological Theory and Youth Aspiration Research: A Critical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picou, J. Steven; Wells, Richard H.

    Reviewing sociological theories relative to youth aspiration research, the following thesis was presented: "pre-path analysis aspiration research was characterized by a person-centered, middle-range functionalist approach which eventually shifted to a person-centered, functionalist-system approach with the introduction of the path model…

  16. Enhancing Student Compositional Diversity in the Sociology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Katherine A.; Guppy, Neil

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that interaction between diverse students encourages positive learning outcomes. Given this, we examine how to enhance the quantity and quality of student diversity in university classrooms. Drawing on sociological theory linking life experiences with ways of knowing, we investigate how to increase classroom diversity by…

  17. Epidemiological Sociology and the Social Shaping of Population Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Bruce G.

    2008-01-01

    When biomedical knowledge and technology create the capacity for humans to avoid disease and circumvent early death, sociological factors become more, not less important for population health. The transformation of disease causation from cruel fate, accident, and bad luck to circumstances that are under some degree of human control facilitates a…

  18. The Center Does Hold: The Sociological Literacy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a critique and an addition to observations raised by Ballantine et al. in this issue. After reviewing the strengths of Ballantine et al.'s article about the need for a core in sociology, I argue that this debate has gone on long enough and needs to be reframed around areas of agreement. Three major curricular projects (that…

  19. Applying Empirical and Computer Technique in Teaching Undergraduate Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kane, James M.

    1976-01-01

    A 2-semester undergraduate sociology course in empirical techniques and computer analysis is described which permits the student maximum freedom in his choice of a research problem while encouraging him to use both a statistical design and a computer analysis to test his hypotheses. (JT)

  20. Teaching with Engineers and Scientists: What Role for Sociology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolack, Shirley; MacDougall, John

    This paper explores whether or not sociology may be integrated into courses on technology and values at the college level. Sociologists are interested in collaborating with scientists and engineers because many of the most urgent social issues of the late 20th century seem to lie at the interface of social values and technological change. The…

  1. Making Sociology Relevant: The Assignment and Application of Breaching Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafalovich, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Breaching experiments involve the conscious exhibition of "unexpected" behavior, an observation of the types of social reactions such behavioral violations engender, and an analysis of the social structure that makes these social reactions possible. The conscious violation of norms can be highly fruitful for sociology students, providing insights…

  2. Anomie and the "Brain Drain": A Sociological Explanation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadima, Oscar

    The concept of anomie is proposed as one sociological variable that may explain the "brain drain" phenomenon (i.e., the movement of highly qualified personnel from their country of origin to another, most often a more developed, technologically advanced country). It is hypothesized that the higher the level of anomie found among professionally…

  3. Cold Fusion and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinch, Trevor

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the early stages of the cold fusion controversy. Shows how ideas in the sociology of scientific knowledge such as "symmetry,""interpretative flexibility," and "experimenter's regress" are applicable to the controversy. Argues that there is nothing exceptional about the dynamics of the debate, apart from the media attention. (SR)

  4. The Sociology Research Experience Capstone Course at Three Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kathleen; Busher, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the objectives, structures, and outcomes of a one-semester, required sociology research capstone course as taught at three institutions. Pre- and postquestionnaires from students, syllabi from instructors, and a random sample of final research papers were analyzed. Results indicate that the main foci of the course are to…

  5. The "Postmodern" Heresy in Special Education: A Sociological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot

    2004-01-01

    The special education profession has witnessed a recent struggle between researchers who defend a positivistic approach to knowledge and practice and "postmodern" special educators who challenge that approach. In this analysis I utilize a sociological theory of heresy to examine the conflict between postmodern heresy and positivist orthodoxy. I…

  6. Teaching Sociological Theory through Active Learning: The Irrigation Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Mellisa

    2005-01-01

    For students, theory is often one of the most daunting aspects of sociology--it seems abstract, removed from the concrete events of their everyday lives, and therefore intimidating. In an attempt to break down student resistance to theory, instructors are increasingly turning to active learning approaches. Active learning exercises, then, appear…

  7. Learning Communities as Transformative Pedagogy: Centering Diversity in Introductory Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Monica

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses learning communities as pedagogy for introductory sociology courses, which are often plagued by student apathy. Most importantly, it examines the potential for learning communities to incorporate active and collaborative learning techniques as a vehicle to subvert dominant views of diversity, to see diversity as intersecting…

  8. Quantitative Methodology in Sociology: The Last Twenty-five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Karl F.

    1980-01-01

    Argues that recent work in research methods in sociology consists largely of adapting methods developed elsewhere (statistics, demography, economics) for answering relatively simple questions about social change. These questions reflect practical as well as theoretical concerns. Discusses social indicators, social forecasting, cohort, occupational…

  9. Journalistic Observation as a Qualitative Research Method for Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Gene

    A comparison is made between the tools of observation and research used by journalists to study society and the media, and the qualitative and clinical research tools used in the social and psychological sciences. The first part of the paper, a journalistic approach to sociology, traces the notion of the sociologist as a super-reporter using…

  10. Epistemology, Sociology, and Learning and Teaching in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between epistemology, sociology, and learning and teaching in physics based on an examination of literature from research in science studies, history and philosophy of science, and physics pedagogic research. It reveals a mismatch between the positivist epistemological foundation which seems to underpin the…

  11. Man (Embracing Woman): The Generic in Sociological Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Muriel

    Philosophical works and sociological writings from the seventeenth through the twentieth century are analyzed in this paper to learn the degree to which their use of generics (linguistic terms such as "mankind" that are used to refer to all humans) can be said to have actual reference to all adults without consideration of sex. The paper notes…

  12. Musicking in a West Bank Conservatory: Toward a Sociological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frierson-Campbell, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the evolution of a sociological framework to investigate the experience of teaching and learning music in relation to the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music in the occupied Palestinian territories. The primary foundation of the framework is Christopher Small's (1998) theory of musicking, supported by…

  13. Revisiting School Knowledge: Some Sociological Perspectives on New School Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on attempts to understand how the curriculum and pedagogy can help to reduce inequalities in the outcomes of schooling between those from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds. In the 1970s, the author was involved with Michael F.D. Young and others in the development of the so-called "new" sociology of education. Much…

  14. Reading Michael Apple--The Sociological Imagination at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses Michael Apple's contribution to the sociology of education and education policy analysis and the politics of education. It focuses on ways of "reading" Apple as an intellectual and an activist and looks at the trajectory of his work over a long and illustrious career.

  15. Modern Problems: Sociology Units. An Experimental Program for Grade 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Marshall; Fennig, Lois

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 12. SUBJECT MATTER: Sociology; modern problems. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide contains two units, one on the problems of minority groups and the other on social pathology. Sub-sections of unit 2 include crime and criminals, criminal investigation, gun control, U.S. criminal law, criminal procedure,…

  16. Knowledge and the Curriculum in Adult Education: A Sociological Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Peter

    1978-01-01

    The author examines the source and effect of differing valuations of types of knowledge on the adult education curriculum. He explores ideas and developments in the sociology of the curriculum and the relationship between knowledge and the curriculum in general, with application to adult education curricula. (MF)

  17. Coverage and Representations of Sexuality in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Alicia E.; Balaji, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Mirroring increased cultural and disciplinary attention to sexuality, many introductory sociology textbooks have begun to include coverage of the topic. Our study first assesses the extent of textual coverage of sexuality in a sample of 38 introductory textbooks published after 2000. Secondly, we focus on 14 textbooks with a sexuality chapter…

  18. "Computerization" of a Sociology Department: The Experience at Ball State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Jerry G.; Johnson, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Traces the development of university faculty computer literacy and the extensive use of computer capabilities in undergraduate instruction in a sociology department. Computer applications and benefits are described in terms of teaching, administrative work, research productivity, faculty morale, and departmental image within the university.…

  19. Teaching the Sociological Imagination: Learning from the Biggest Loser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how to use popular culture as a method of teaching scientific concepts. Specifically, the reality-television program The Biggest Loser is used as an example for teaching the concept of the sociological imagination by illustrating the disconnect between personal solutions for weight loss and the demands of…

  20. Does the Center Hold? Reflections on a Sociological Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne; Greenwood, Nancy; Howard, Jay R.; Kain, Edward L.; Pike, Diane; Schwartz, Michael; Smith, R. Tyson; Zipp, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Is there a distinct disciplinary core (or foundation of agreed on knowledge) in sociology? Should we define a core in our broad field to build consensus? If so, what should it look like? We address these questions by presenting three viewpoints that lean for and against identifying a core for department curricula, students, and the public face of…

  1. Schools in Community: Implications of a Sociological Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Gail Chase

    The concept of community is receiving much press but little theoretical classification. Sociological theory can provide a deeper theoretical understanding of the concept of community and the role of schools in community, by addressing the underlying factors that alienate schools from communities. This paper uses the classic…

  2. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Undergraduate Sociological Theory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Daphne E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the use of active and collaborative learning strategies in an undergraduate sociological theory course. A semester-long ethnographic project is the foundation for the course; both individual and group participation contribute to the learning process. Assessment findings indicate that students are able, through…

  3. Architecture and health care: a place for sociology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daryl; Nettleton, Sarah; Buse, Christina; Prior, Lindsay; Twigg, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Sociologists of health and illness have tended to overlook the architecture and buildings used in health care. This contrasts with medical geographers who have yielded a body of work on the significance of places and spaces in the experience of health and illness. A review of sociological studies of the role of the built environment in the performance of medical practice uncovers an important vein of work, worthy of further study. Through the historically situated example of hospital architecture, this article seeks to tease out substantive and methodological issues that can inform a distinctive sociology of healthcare architecture. Contemporary healthcare buildings manifest design models developed for hotels, shopping malls and homes. These design features are congruent with neoliberal forms of subjectivity in which patients are constituted as consumers and responsibilised citizens. We conclude that an adequate sociology of healthcare architecture necessitates an appreciation of both the construction and experience of buildings, exploring the briefs and plans of their designers, and observing their everyday uses. Combining approaches and methods from the sociology of health and illness and science and technology studies offers potential for a novel research agenda that takes healthcare buildings as its substantive focus.

  4. 50 Years of C. Wright Mills and "The Sociological Imagination"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Stephen J.; Grauerholz, Liz

    2009-01-01

    The core ideas and lessons of C. Wright Mills are most likely among the first perspectives to which students are exposed in sociology and are a foundation to the discipline. Although perhaps difficult to recall all of the specific details of the encounter, many of these students are likely to remember the first time that they were introduced to C.…

  5. Sociology of Education in China: Reestablishment and New Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Gerry, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a series of articles on the sociology of education in China. The articles address such topics as the establishment and directions of the field in China, the socialization and social aspects of learning in secondary schools, the social influences on achievement scores, adjusting the structure of the educational system, and the social…

  6. The Future of Sociological Research: Measurement Errors and Their Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blalock, H. M.

    The report deals with the relationship between measurement and data analysis procedures in sociological research. The author finds that too many measured variables exist in both theory and measurement assumptions. Since these procedures are interrelated, improvements in either or both areas are necessary. Presented are three sections: (1) specific…

  7. Assessing research in the history of sociology and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Kuklick, H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews recent interpretive trends among historians of anthropology and sociology, examining both introductory texts and scholarly studies. It focuses on works published over the last ten years, and stresses that there has been no resolution of the long-standing conflict between "presentist" and "historicist" approaches to the history of the human sciences.

  8. The "Adventures" of the Sociology Course in Greek Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougioumoutzaki, Foteini

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of the sociology course in Greek secondary education. The aim is to reveal under which circumstances the course has ended up becoming one of the most downgraded courses, and more importantly, how the specific rationale of the course's structure has resulted in the (re)production of a distorted image of…

  9. Role Playing: Uses and Abuses in Teaching Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Jerry

    Teaching sociology through role playing involves students in acting out roles learned in the socialization process. The content of the game is the simulation of an area of social reality, either simple or complex. Participation in this activity presents students with alternative world views, develops problem solving and behavioral skills, and…

  10. Architecture and health care: a place for sociology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daryl; Nettleton, Sarah; Buse, Christina; Prior, Lindsay; Twigg, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Sociologists of health and illness have tended to overlook the architecture and buildings used in health care. This contrasts with medical geographers who have yielded a body of work on the significance of places and spaces in the experience of health and illness. A review of sociological studies of the role of the built environment in the performance of medical practice uncovers an important vein of work, worthy of further study. Through the historically situated example of hospital architecture, this article seeks to tease out substantive and methodological issues that can inform a distinctive sociology of healthcare architecture. Contemporary healthcare buildings manifest design models developed for hotels, shopping malls and homes. These design features are congruent with neoliberal forms of subjectivity in which patients are constituted as consumers and responsibilised citizens. We conclude that an adequate sociology of healthcare architecture necessitates an appreciation of both the construction and experience of buildings, exploring the briefs and plans of their designers, and observing their everyday uses. Combining approaches and methods from the sociology of health and illness and science and technology studies offers potential for a novel research agenda that takes healthcare buildings as its substantive focus. PMID:25929329

  11. Conflict Sociology-A Perspective for Organizational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostetter, David; Deluca, Nicholas

    This paper reports research which utilizes a qualitative approach in order to document and describe the process of complex organizational conflict. Qualitative research methodology and conflict sociology can be relevant to analysis of organizational processes. The qualitative approach is interpreted to include techniques such as observation, event…

  12. Class and Culture: Sources of Confusion in Educational Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This paper reiterates the centrality of economics (relations of production) in Marxist models of class, while avoiding the crude determinism which results from a neglect of cultural aspects of class formation. It explores the confusion in education and educational sociology arising from non-Marxist conceptions of class which place an exaggerated…

  13. Energy justice and foundations for a sustainable sociology of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleman, Hannah Ann

    This dissertation proposes an approach to energy that transcends the focus on energy as a mere technical economic or engineering problem, is connected to sociological theory as a whole, and takes issues of equality and ecology as theoretical starting points. In doing so, the work presented here puts ecological and environmental sociological theory, and the work of environmental justice scholars, feminist ecologists, and energy scholars, in a context in which they may complement one another to broaden the theoretical basis of the current sociology of energy. This theoretical integration provides an approach to energy focused on energy justice. Understanding energy and society in the terms outlined here makes visible energy injustice, or the interface between social inequalities and ecological depredations accumulating as the social and ecological debts of the modern energy regime. Systems ecology is brought into this framework as a means for understanding unequal exchange, energy injustice more generally, and the requirements for long-term social and ecological reproduction in ecological terms. Energy developments in Ecuador and Cuba are used here as case studies in order to further develop the idea of energy justice and the theory of unequal ecological exchange. The point is to broaden the framework of the contemporary critical sociology of energy, putting energy justice at its heart. This dissertation contains previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

  14. The Development of the E-Learning Course "Sociology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela; Magzan, Masa; Maslac, Ilena

    2008-01-01

    The fast development of information and communication technologies (ICT) improves greatly education quality. E-learning is an important education component at Zagreb School of Economics and Management (ZSEM) and, in addition, it is obligatory for all our teachers and students. In this paper, the development process of course "Sociology" shall be…

  15. Sociological Imagination, Stories, and Learning To Be Literate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Describes the "sociological imagination," which suggests an ability to create possible reconstructions of larger social forces which affect peoples' lives, through a story about Muhammad Ali. Discusses the importance of stories and their role in society. Utilizes three more stories to address various issues in relation to literacy learning. (CMK)

  16. Politicizing Sociology through a Bill of Rights Learning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Writers in this journal have presented a number of strategies that sociology teachers can use to facilitate the expression--and serious analysis--of unpopular opinions. This article contributes to this dialog by illustrating the application of a Bill of Rights learning module. In this module, students are expected to create a document that…

  17. Enhancing Study Skills in an Introductory Sociology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeller, Richard A.; Wells, Janis J.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated the effects of the study skills enhancement technique taught at Bowling Green State University Study Skills Laboratory on the test-taking performance of Sociology 101 students. Found that those students who participated in the program four or more hours per week performed better on tests. (SLM)

  18. Teaching Communication Skills in the Context of Introductory Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichs, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the hypotheses that students need to improve communication skills and that an innovative pedagogy is more effective than traditional methods for improving communication skills. Describes the teaching pedagogy and its implementation in an introductory sociology course. Results suggest that this pedagogy is more effective than conventional…

  19. Is a Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the expansion of education systems that now, following international declarations, are expected to offer an "Education for All" to children, young people and adults. Since in these declarations special education and inclusive education are conjoined, sociological questions can be asked as to what sort of social…

  20. The Mouse that Roared? Article Publishing in Undergraduate Sociology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckberg, Douglas; Marx, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores article production by the entire population of US undergraduate sociology departments. The available literature suggests that undergraduate programs publish little, that this is concentrated among relatively few--mainly liberal arts--departments, and that publication rates are increasing. We argue There are reasons to expect…

  1. Viewing Popular Films about Mental Illness through a Sociological Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses an exercise she uses requiring students to view a popular film that portrays a particular mental disorder or a character with a mental disorder. Students analyze the film and write two papers, one about the sociological model of mental illness and a second about possible links between media images and the…

  2. Factors Affecting Performance in an Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwenda, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting students' performances in an Introductory Sociology course over five semesters. Employing simple and ordered logit regression models, the author explains final grades by focusing on individual demographic and educational characteristics that students bring into the classroom. The results show that a student's…

  3. The Sociology of Disability and the Struggle for Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This article charts the emergence of the sociology of disability and examines the areas of contestation. These have involved a series of erasures and absences--the removal of the body from debates on the social model of disability; the disappearance of the Other from educational policies and practices; and the absence of academics from political…

  4. Basil Bernstein's Sociology of Language: Deficit, Difference and Bewitchment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzig, Arnold B.

    Basil Bernstein's research on the sociology of language indicates that he views language as both subjective and objective. Subjectively, it structures an individual's intentions and thought processes; objectively, it preserves and makes public the store of knowledge of human society. The sharing of language is the basic way in which the objective…

  5. Reverse Discrimination in Hiring in Sociology Departments: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Barbara R.

    1973-01-01

    In a questionnaire to sociology department chairmen, 32 percent indicated they had positions to fill in the past two years and felt coerced to practice reverse discrimination; sixteen percent reported they actually did so. Argues this is reason for grave concern. (Author/RJ)

  6. Rural and Rural Farm Population: 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Population Reports, 1989

    1989-01-01

    An estimated 64,798,000 persons, or 25% of the population of the United States, lived in rural areas in 1988. Rural areas include open countryside and places with fewer than 2,500 inhabitants not in the suburbs of large cities. This report presents demographic data on the rural population, pointing out that comparison with 1987 data suggests a…

  7. Reconceptualizing resistance: sociology and the affective dimension of resistance.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Maria

    2013-12-01

    This paper re-examines the sociological study of resistance in light of growing interest in the concept of affect. Recent claims that we are witness to an 'affective turn' and calls for a 'new sociological empiricism' sensitive to affect indicate an emerging paradigm shift in sociology. Yet, mainstream sociological study of resistance tends to have been largely unaffected by this shift. To this end, this paper presents a case for the significance of affect as a lens by which to approach the study of resistance. My claim is not simply that the forms of actions we would normally recognize as resistance have an affective dimension. Rather, it is that the theory of affect broadens 'resistance' beyond the purview of the two dominant modes of analysis in sociology; namely, the study of macropolitical forms, on the one hand, and the micropolitics of everyday resistance on the other. This broadened perspective challenges the persistent assumption that ideological forms of power and resistance are the most pertinent to the contemporary world, suggesting that much power and resistance today is of a more affective nature. In making this argument, it is a Deleuzian reading of affect that is pursued, which opens up to a level of analysis beyond the common understanding of affect as emotion. I argue that an affective approach to resistance would pay attention to those barely perceptible transitions in power and mobilizations of bodily potential that operate below the conscious perceptions and subjective emotions of social actors. These affective transitions constitute a new site at which both power and resistance operate.

  8. Paul Lazarsfeld and Polish sociology: a historical record of contact, perception, and impact.

    PubMed

    Sułek, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper records the Polish aspects of P. F. Lazarsfeld's sociointellectual biography and examines his impact on Polish sociology. The analysis is divided into three chronological parts. In the 1930s, Lazarsfeld's empirical work inspired Polish sociologists in their studies on unemployment. In the late 1950s and 1960s, his model of empirical social research shaped the style of sociological practice in Poland. In the 1990s, some of Lazarsfeld's substantive contributions, mainly in the area of election studies, were taken up in Polish sociology. Lazarsfeld's influence on Polish sociology was conditioned by changes in Polish society and sociology, which is emphasized in this analysis.

  9. "Ghosts of Sociologies Past": Settlement Sociology in the Progressive Era at the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Vicky M.; Williams, Joyce E.

    2012-01-01

    This embedded case study of the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy (CSCP) illustrates the development of disciplinary boundaries during a transitional period of professionalization in the social sciences, particularly for the fields of sociology and social work. Drawing on archival data (e.g., reports, scholarly and autobiographical…

  10. The Sociological Study of Minority Groups as Reflected by Leading Sociological Journals Who Gets Studies and Who Gets Neglected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.; Forsyth, John M.

    1976-01-01

    In view of the small amount of attention given to non-black ethnic groups in the sociological literature, this paper suggests that it is no wonder that so little is known about ethnic-ethnic, ethnic-black, and ethnic-dominant society relations. (Author)

  11. Mapping the field of medical sociology: a comparative analysis of journals.

    PubMed

    Seale, Clive

    2008-07-01

    A comparative keyword analysis of the content of nine leading journals is used to suggest potential new directions for medical sociology. The major British and American journals in sociology and medical sociology tend to publish authors based in their own countries, contrasting with the internationalism of other social science disciplines relevant to health, although Sociology of Health and Illness is an exception to this. Medical sociology journals on both sides of the Atlantic focus on individual experience more than general sociology journals, which focus more on social systems levels of analysis. While journal contents reveal British medical sociology to be relatively atheoretical when compared with British general sociology journals, American medical sociology appears relatively apolitical on the same comparison with American general journals. American journals of sociology publish more quantitative studies than their British equivalents, more studies concerning race and other social divisions in American society, and less work drawing on social constructionist perspectives or that is engaged with social theory. Analysis of health and health care at societal and global levels and a deeper engagement with the political and public issues that concern non-sociologists represents a possible future for a medical sociology that is internationally relevant and outward looking.

  12. Rural-Urban Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Daniel F.; LaGreca, Anthony J.; Mullis, Ronald L.

    This publication combines three papers on rural and urban youth issues. "Key Issues Facing Rural Youth" (Daniel F. Perkins) notes that rural adolescents share the same concerns and exhibit the same problem behaviors as their urban counterparts. But in addition, geographic isolation presents problems unique to rural areas. A framework is proposed…

  13. What Is Rural? Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Many people have definitions for the term rural, but seldom are these rural definitions in agreement. For some, rural is a subjective state of mind. For others, rural is an objective quantitative measure. In this brief report the United States Department of Agriculture presents the following information along with helpful links for the reader: (1)…

  14. Rural Economies and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Dennis

    Both the rural economy and the disability community in rural areas can benefit from a recognition that they are mutually dependent. With the decline of rural America, the economic base underpinning all aspects of disability support systems is weakening. In addition, rural disability services often are compartmentalized along functional lines with…

  15. Adjustments in Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Howard A., Ed.

    This 1937 compilation of articles covers a wide range of problems within the scope of rural public education. The rural education issues discussed fall under the following general headings: (1) professional leadership; (2) rural school supervision; (3) staff training; (4) rural school district organization; (5) physical plants and equipment; and…

  16. Mapping Gender and Migration in Sociological Scholarship: Is It Segregation or Integration?

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Sara R.; Shafer, Steven; Donato, Katharine M.; Garip, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    A review of the sociological research about gender and migration shows the substantial ways in which gender fundamentally organizes the social relations and structures influencing the causes and consequences of migration. Yet, although a significant sociological research has emerged on gender and migration in the last three decades, studies are not evenly distributed across the discipline. In this article, we map the recent intellectual history of gender and migration in the field of sociology and then systematically assess the extent to which studies on engendering migration have appeared in four widely read journals of sociology (American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Demography, and Social Forces). We follow with a discussion of these studies, and in our conclusions, we consider how future gender and migration scholarship in sociology might evolve more equitably. PMID:27478289

  17. [Disciplinary organization of medical sociology--a contribution to the dialogue with social medicine].

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    1996-10-01

    According to Karl Popper scientific disciplines are characterized by a body of observational knowledge, a specific methodology and terminology and a set of more or less successful theories. This article tries to delineate the disciplinary structure of medical sociology in terms of five important areas of knowledge: 1. sociology of health lifestyles (prevention); 2. sociology of patients careers (rehabilitation); 3. sociology of client-professional interaction (diagnosis, therapy); 4. sociological (social epidemiological) studies of causes of health and disease; 5. sociology of health care systems. It is argued that intensified exchange according to these areas between the academic disciplines of medical sociology and social medicine is needed to generate a significant impact on future training and research both in medicine and in public health.

  18. Rural experiences.

    PubMed

    Mazibuko, R; Mckenzie, A; Schneider, H

    1989-01-01

    Primary health care nurses (PHCNs) in South Africa must complete a 1 year training program. After this training, they provide health care in clinics or a hospital outpatient department. Working conditions in the clinics, particularly rural clinics, are less than optimal. There are either not enough buildings and/or existing structures are deteriorating. Further the clinics often lack drugs and supplies. Moreover poorly trained staff work long hours because there are not enough well trained staff. In addition, the PHCNs and their places of employment are often in remote areas where communication and referral systems are poor. This results in gradual deterioration of the PHCNs' skills. To be perceived as clinically competent, PHCNs need to provide quality curative care which, once perceived as competent, will allow them to provide primary health care. Clinic managers must support pHCNs by allowing them time to take part in continued learning activities such as an apprenticeship system or inservice training aided by local physicians. Clients or colleagues tend to see PHCNs either as miniphysicians or as a threat to physicians. Yet, since they operate clinics as well as provide comprehensive care, their skills are not as narrow as those of miniphysicians. Further few physicians wish to provide care in clinics or rural areas. Besides regulations do not allow the territory of physicians to be invaded. On the other hand, some physicians even consult PHCNs which sometimes distances them from other nurses. Thus it is important for PHCNs not to develop an attitude that they are better than nurses. At the same time, health workers need to recognize the skills of PHCNs and promote them. In fact, their value is indeed being recognized as evidenced by the increase in PHCN training schools. Eventually, as their numbers grow, PHCNs will be able to control their future.

  19. Translation Sociology and Social Capital in Rural Development Initiatives. A Case Study from the Italian Alps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnani, Natalia; Struffi, Lauro

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the results of a European "research and demonstration" project promoting multifunctional and sustainable agriculture in Alpine regions through a participatory approach. It focuses in particular on initiatives undertaken by a local farmers group in the Italian Alpine area of Val di Sole, the purpose being to draw attention to…

  20. A Social Report for Carroll County: Social Indicators for Rural Development. Sociology Report 134G.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Chris; And Others

    Since the burden of improving quality of life is often squarely placed on the shoulders of public decision makers, this report (one of the products of Project 2142) provides a basis for assisting county-level decision makers in the planning process. Statistics that "indicate" the social well being or quality of life experienced by people in…

  1. Imagination and society: the role of visual sociology.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Roberto; Del Re, Emanuela C

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the field of Visual Sociology as an approach that makes use of photographs, films, documentaries, videos, to capture and assess aspects of social life and social signals. It overviews some relevant works in the field, it deals with methodological and epistemological issues, by raising the question of the relation between the observer and the observed, and makes reference to some methods of analysis, such as those proposed by the Grounded Theory, and to some connected tools for automatic qualitative analysis, like NVivo. The relevance of visual sociology to the study of social signals lies in the fact that it can validly integrate the information, introducing a multi-modal approach in the analysis of social signals. PMID:22318365

  2. Explaining drug policy: Towards an historical sociology of policy change.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Toby

    2011-11-01

    The goal of seeking to understand the development over time of drug policies is a specific version of the more general intellectual project of finding ways of explaining social change. The latter has been a preoccupation of some of the greatest thinkers within the social sciences of the last 200 years, from Foucault all the way back to the three nineteenth-century pioneers, Marx, Durkheim and Weber. I describe this body of work as 'historical sociology'. In this paper, I outline how a particular approach to historical sociology can be fruitfully drawn upon to understand the development of drug policy, using by way of illustration the example of the analysis of a recent transformation in British drug policy: the rise of the criminal justice agenda. I conclude by arguing that by looking at developments in drug policy in this way, some new insights are opened up. PMID:21733667

  3. Seasonality of suicides: environmental, sociological and biological covariations.

    PubMed

    Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Belugou, J L; Douillet, P; Braccini, T; Darcourt, G

    1987-01-01

    The monthly rates of completed suicides in France from 1978 until 1982 were analyzed. The seasonal variations of environmental (daylight and sunlight durations, mean temperature, geomagnetism), sociological (unemployment, deaths of all causes, birth and conception rates), and biological (melatonin, cortisol and serotonin circannual rhythms) factors were compared to the seasonal patterns of suicides. A clear seasonal variation (with peaks in May and September) in suicidal behavior was detected. These patterns tended to differ as a function of age (bimodal in young, unimodal in old people). The component analysis clearly pointed out that seasonal patterns of suicides may be considered as the sum of two components, unimodal and bimodal. Almost similar covariations were found between the main seasonal (unimodal) component of suicides and environmental (daylight duration and mean monthly temperature) or sociological factors whereas the secondary component was more correlated to variations in environmental factors and, to some extent, to biological parameters. PMID:2960714

  4. Sociology of health textbooks and narratives: historical significance.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2016-03-01

    This article has as its starting point two central ideas: textbooks as a means of production and dissemination of knowledge and narrative as an approach. After a brief review of studies on health/medical sociology textbooks, I analyze a few of these textbooks from the 1900-2012 period, produced in the United States and England. I have selected eleven textbooks which I thought were representative. In addition to a content analysis, the textbooks are located within the process of constitution of the health/medical sociology with brief references to the biographies of the authors. The textbooks analyzed were classified according to the main narrative features: doctor-centered; interdisciplinary; pedagogical; analytical; almost autobiographical; critical; and synthetic-reflective. In the final remarks, some points about the textbooks, limits and possibilities are presented.

  5. G. H. Mead in the history of sociological ideas.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Filipe Carreira

    2006-01-01

    My aim is to discuss the history of the reception of George Herbert Mead's ideas in sociology. After discussing the methodological debate between presentism and historicism, I address the interpretations of those responsible for Mead's inclusion in the sociological canon: Herbert Blumer, Jürgen Habermas, and Hans Joas. In the concluding section, I assess these reconstructions of Mead's thought and suggest an alternative more consistent with my initial methodological remarks. In particular, I advocate a reconstruction of Mead's ideas that apprehends simultaneously its evolution over time and its thematic breadth. Such a historically minded reconstruction can be not only a useful corrective to possible anachronisms incurred by contemporary social theorists, but also a fruitful resource for their theory-building endeavors. Only then can meaningful and enriching dialogue with Mead begin.

  6. Statistical Features of Complex Systems ---Toward Establishing Sociological Physics---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Kuninaka, Hiroto; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2011-07-01

    Complex systems have recently attracted much attention, both in natural sciences and in sociological sciences. Members constituting a complex system evolve through nonlinear interactions among each other. This means that in a complex system the multiplicative experience or, so to speak, the history of each member produces its present characteristics. If attention is paid to any statistical property in any complex system, the lognormal distribution is the most natural and appropriate among the standard or ``normal'' statistics to overview the whole system. In fact, the lognormality emerges rather conspicuously when we examine, as familiar and typical examples of statistical aspects in complex systems, the nursing-care period for the aged, populations of prefectures and municipalities, and our body height and weight. Many other examples are found in nature and society. On the basis of these observations, we discuss the possibility of sociological physics.

  7. Explaining drug policy: Towards an historical sociology of policy change.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Toby

    2011-11-01

    The goal of seeking to understand the development over time of drug policies is a specific version of the more general intellectual project of finding ways of explaining social change. The latter has been a preoccupation of some of the greatest thinkers within the social sciences of the last 200 years, from Foucault all the way back to the three nineteenth-century pioneers, Marx, Durkheim and Weber. I describe this body of work as 'historical sociology'. In this paper, I outline how a particular approach to historical sociology can be fruitfully drawn upon to understand the development of drug policy, using by way of illustration the example of the analysis of a recent transformation in British drug policy: the rise of the criminal justice agenda. I conclude by arguing that by looking at developments in drug policy in this way, some new insights are opened up.

  8. Imagination and society: the role of visual sociology.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Roberto; Del Re, Emanuela C

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the field of Visual Sociology as an approach that makes use of photographs, films, documentaries, videos, to capture and assess aspects of social life and social signals. It overviews some relevant works in the field, it deals with methodological and epistemological issues, by raising the question of the relation between the observer and the observed, and makes reference to some methods of analysis, such as those proposed by the Grounded Theory, and to some connected tools for automatic qualitative analysis, like NVivo. The relevance of visual sociology to the study of social signals lies in the fact that it can validly integrate the information, introducing a multi-modal approach in the analysis of social signals.

  9. Rural women in Africa and technological change: some issues.

    PubMed

    Date-bah, E; Stevens, Y

    1981-01-01

    The attempt is made in this discussion to highlight some of the important sociological and technical issues relating to rural women in Africa and technological change which appear to have been underplayed, misconceived or overlooked in the past. Attention is directed to the rural woman as a member of the family unit, the image of the rural man, rural women as a diversified group, community and national governmental commitment to rural technology innovations, the use of already existing traditional groups and institutions to effect rural technological change, and design specifications and shortcomings of equipment and tools (manufacturing costs, exploitation of locally available energy resources, the simplicity of the devices), and infrastructural and marketing problems. Numberous projects aimed at improving the lot of women in the rural areas have focused only on women, rather than the woman as a member of an extended as well as a nuclear family unit. Consequently, they have failed, for rural women do not exist or operate in isolation. It is difficult to believe the overall image in much of the literature that the husbands of rural women show no sympathy or regard for their wives. In the effort to attract investment to improve upon the position of rural women, reality should not be distorted with this one-sided view. Men should be involved in the technology planned for rural women, and the technological change should be planned and implemented in such a way that it results in an improvement in the relationship between the rural couple and generally between members of the rural family and between males and females in the village. Another problem is overgeneralization, and it must be recognized that considerable differentiation exists between rural women themselves. The importance of community, governmental and political commitment to rural technology innovations in order to ensure their success is neglected in the literature. The government and polictical leadership

  10. [The sociology of migration in Greece since 1960].

    PubMed

    Moussourou, L M

    1984-01-01

    The sociological literature concerning international migration from Greece since 1960 is reviewed. The author suggests that a Marxist approach to the analysis of European migration is likely to be more useful than a country-oriented study: using this approach, migration can be analyzed in the context of the relationship between industrialized countries in the center receiving migrants and nonindustrialized countries on the periphery that send migrants. (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12267759

  11. From bioethics to a sociology of bio-knowledge.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Growing recognition of bioethics' shortcomings, associated in large part with its heavy reliance on abstract principles, or so-called principlism, has led many scholars to propose that the field should be reformed or reconceptualised. Principlism is seen to de-contextualise the process of ethical decision-making, thus restricting bioethics' contributions to debate and policy on new and emergent biotechnologies. This article examines some major critiques of bioethics and argues for an alternative normative approach; namely, a sociology of bio-knowledge focussing on human rights. The article discusses the need for such an approach, including the challenges posed by the recent rise of 'the bio-economy'. It explores some potential alternative bases for a normative sociology of bio-knowledge, before presenting the elements of the proposed human rights-focused approach. This approach, it is argued, will benefit from the insights and concepts offered by various fields of critical scholarship, particularly the emergent sociology of human rights, science and technology studies, Foucaultian scholarship, and feminist bioethics.

  12. Debating DSM-5: diagnosis and the sociology of critique

    PubMed Central

    Pickersgill, Martyn D

    2014-01-01

    The development of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—the DSM-5—has reenergised and driven further forward critical discourse about the place and role of diagnosis in mental health. The DSM-5 has attracted considerable criticism, not least about its role in processes of medicalisation. This paper suggests the need for a sociology of psychiatric critique. Sociological analysis can help map fields of contention, and cast fresh light on the assumptions and nuances of debate around the DSM-5; it underscores the importance of diagnosis to the governance of social and clinical life, as well as the wider discourses critical commentaries connect with and are activated by. More normatively, a sociology of critique can indicate which interests and values are structuring the dialogues being articulated, and just how diverse clinical opinion regarding the DSM can actually be. This has implications for the considerations of health services and policy decision-makers who might look to such debates for guidance. PMID:24327375

  13. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations. PMID:24486781

  14. Sociological correlates of alienation among adolescent suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Wenz, F V

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the relationship between adolescent alienation and a number of sociological factors in a sample adolescent suicide attempts from a northern metropolitan area. First, Dean's alienation scale is employed and the distribution of responses of the adolescent suicide attempts are analyzed. Second a number of sociological variables are examined by means of multiple regression procedures. In the regression analysis, eight variables were found to be statistically significant-in descending order: social contact with peers in the neighborhood, conflict with parents, broken romance, economic status of parents, communication blockage with parents, school performance, stepparents, and broken romance, These variables have been salient in previous research and theorizing about adolescent suicidal behavior. The fact that adolescence, by itself, seems to be a good predictor of whether or not a person will attempt suicide strongly suggests that there is something about the condition of adolescence which underlies this type of behavior. One possibility is that biological maturation is itself the crucial variable. Alternatively, the argument which follows concentrates on a major sociological aspect of adolescence-the adolescent's relative alienation from institutionalized social life. Alienation may be endemic to the period of adolescence.

  15. A sociological approach to ageing, technology and health.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Kelly; Loe, Meika

    2010-02-01

    Abstract This special monograph issue builds on sociology of health and illness scholarship and expands the analytical lens to examine how old people, healthcare professionals, and technology designers create, use, and modify science and technology to negotiate and define health and illness. Far from passive consumers, elders are technogenarians, creatively utilising and adapting technological artefacts such as walking aids and medications to fit their needs. This publication adds theoretical and empirical depth to our understanding of the multiple and overlapping socio-historical contexts surrounding ageing bodies and ageing enterprises, including the biomedicalisation of ageing that includes the rise of anti-ageing or longevity medicine; and the rise of gerontechnology industries and professions -- fields that largely accept the ageing body as a given. This collection sociologically investigates how and where these two trends overlap and diverge in relation to a global context of ageing and ageism, and calls for further scholarship in this area. Combining science and technology studies and sociology of health and illness frameworks together provides an empirical basis from which to analyse technogenarians in action, as well as the stakeholders and institutions involved in the ageing, health, and technology matrix.

  16. Boundary work in the nursing curriculum: the case of sociology.

    PubMed

    Cooke, H

    1993-12-01

    A discussion of the boundaries between nursing and sociology is contained in this paper. The creation of nursing as an academic subject is discussed and compared with the creation of academic geography. The creation of academic subject involves 'boundary work' in which power and legitimacy are conferred on some forms of knowledge and not others. Boundary work enables a discipline to stake out a claim to its legitimate territory and the resources that go with it. In a practice discipline such as nursing, the boundaries between nursing and supporting subjects, such as sociology and physiology, create problems of transfer of learning. This has implications for curriculum design. Bernstein's work on educational transmissions offers useful insights. He suggests a distinction between educational knowledge codes. 'Collection' codes involve strong boundaries between subjects, 'integrated' codes imply weak boundaries. The implications of the move to an integrated code in nursing are discussed. The existence of an integrated code implies a 'strong ideological consensus' within a discipline. In nursing this entails a belief in the 'individualized care' of the patients. This is incompatible with the sociological understanding of nursing.

  17. The Sociology of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and traditional medicine (TM) are important social phenomena. This article reviews the sociological literature on the topic. First, it addresses the question of terminology, arguing that the naming process is a glimpse into the complexities of power and history that characterize the field. Second, focusing on the last 15 years of scholarship, it considers how sociological research on users and practitioners of TM/CAM has developed in that time. Third, it addresses two newer strands of work termed here the ‘big picture’ and the ‘big question’. The big picture includes concepts that offer interpretation of what is happening at a societal level to constrain and enable observed patterns of social practice (pluralism, integration, hybridity and activism). The big question, ‘Does it work?’, is one of epistemology and focuses on two developing fields of critical enquiry – first, social critiques of medical science knowledge production and, second, attempts to explain the nature of interventions, i.e. how they work. Finally, the article examines the role of sociology moving forward. PMID:25177359

  18. Debating DSM-5: diagnosis and the sociology of critique.

    PubMed

    Pickersgill, Martyn D

    2014-08-01

    The development of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-the DSM-5-has reenergised and driven further forward critical discourse about the place and role of diagnosis in mental health. The DSM-5 has attracted considerable criticism, not least about its role in processes of medicalisation. This paper suggests the need for a sociology of psychiatric critique. Sociological analysis can help map fields of contention, and cast fresh light on the assumptions and nuances of debate around the DSM-5; it underscores the importance of diagnosis to the governance of social and clinical life, as well as the wider discourses critical commentaries connect with and are activated by. More normatively, a sociology of critique can indicate which interests and values are structuring the dialogues being articulated, and just how diverse clinical opinion regarding the DSM can actually be. This has implications for the considerations of health services and policy decision-makers who might look to such debates for guidance.

  19. Studying Your Community: Data Book. Sociology Report 128A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goudy, Willis J.

    The product of a needs assessment (via 4,627 mailed questionnaires) in Iowa's rural Region V, this report exemplifies need assessment techniques designed to assist local residents, their leaders, area change agents, and regional groups in making community decisions for rural areas. The survey used to develop this databook requested information re:…

  20. Headed for rural practice.

    PubMed

    Homan, C

    1994-07-01

    Too often, training programs can overlook the needs and ignore the perspectives of their trainees. In this paper, Dr Chris Homan provides a personal view on the issues facing young graduates considering a career in rural practice. Chris is a senior rural trainee based at the Rural Training Unit in Toowoomba, Queensland. He is the trainee representative to the Board of the Faculty of Rural Medicine, as well as the founding Co-Chairperson of the Australian Rural Doctor Trainees Association. This grass roots, sociopolitical association aims to optimise training for rural practice. PMID:8060286

  1. Reflexivity over and above convention: the new orthodoxy in the sociology of personal life, formerly sociology of the family.

    PubMed

    Gilding, Michael

    2010-12-01

    There is a new orthodoxy in the field that was once understood as the sociology of the family, and is increasingly understood as the sociology of 'personal life', 'intimacy', 'relationships' and 'families'. The orthodoxy highlights the open-endedness of intimate relations at the expense of the family as an institution; that is, reflexivity over and above convention. This article argues that the new orthodoxy not only overstates reflexivity at the expense of convention, but abdicates understanding to frameworks grounded in biologistic and economistic understandings of human behaviour. The article makes its point through attention to three areas of research at odds with the new orthodoxy: paternity uncertainty, inheritance and family business. It then proposes that conceptualization of the family as an institutional regime gives due weight to the reflexive reconfiguration of family relationships and practices on the one hand, and their institutional embeddedness on the other.

  2. A child of the empire: British sociology and colonialism, 1940s-1960s.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, George

    2013-01-01

    British sociology was established as an academic discipline between 1945 and 1965, just as the British Empire was gearing up for a new phase of developmental colonialism backed by the social and other sciences. Many parts of the emerging sociological discipline became entangled with colonialism. Key themes and methods in sociology and the staff of sociology departments emerged from this colonial context. Historians have tended to place postwar British sociology in the context of expanding higher education and the welfare state, and have overlooked this colonial constellation. The article reconstructs this forgotten moment of disciplinary founding and explores three of the factors that promoted colonial sociology: the Colonial Social Science Research Council, the so-called Asquith universities, and the social research institutes in the colonies; and the involvement of sociologists from the London School of Economics in training colonial officials.

  3. The sociology of childbirth: an autobiographical journey through four decades of research.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Ann

    2016-06-01

    The sociology of childbirth emerged in the 1970s largely as a result of influences from outside sociology. These included feminism, maternity care activism, the increasing medicalisation of childbirth, and evidence-based health care. This paper uses the author's own sociological 'career' to map a journey through four decades of childbirth research. It demonstrates the importance of social networks and interdisciplinary work, particularly across the medical-social science divide and including cross-cultural perspectives, argues that the study of reproduction has facilitated methodological development within the social sciences, and suggests that childbirth remains on the periphery of mainstream sociological concerns. PMID:26857343

  4. [Theoretical construction in the sociology of health: a reflection on its trajectory].

    PubMed

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2014-04-01

    The scope of this paper is to reflect on the theoretical construction in the constitution of the sociology of health, still called medical sociology in some countries. Two main ideas constitute the basis for this: interdisciplinarity and the degree of articulation in the fields of medicine and sociology. We sought to establish a dialogue with some dimensions - macro/micro, structure/action - that constitute the basis for understanding medicine/health in relation to the social/sociological dimension. The main aspects of these dimensions are initially presented. Straus' two medical sociologies and the theory/application impasses are then addressed, as well as the dilemmas of the sociology of medicine in the 1960s and 1970s. From these analyses the theoretical production before 1970 is placed as a counterpoint. Lastly, the sociology of health is seen in the general context of sociology, which underwent a fragmentation process from 1970 with effects in all subfields of the social sciences. This process involves a rethinking of the theoretical issues in a broadened spectrum of possibilities. The 1980s are highlighted when theoretical issues in the sociology of health are reinvigorated and the issue of interdisciplinarity is once again addressed.

  5. Rural Youths' Images of the Rural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, Johan Fredrik

    2006-01-01

    Following the cultural turn within the social sciences, recent debates on how to conceptualise "the rural" have focused on "rurality" as a phenomenon produced by processes of social construction. This paper presents an empirical account of the outcome of these social construction processes through an analysis of how teenagers in a remote rural…

  6. Rural Education: Learning to Be Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barter, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper draws on research which began in 2006 with students in a graduate course on rural education. Its purpose was to find out what graduate students saw as current issues of rural education, how that compared to the literature, and what they thought supporting agencies such as government and universities needed to be doing to…

  7. ANIMATION RURALE: Education for Rural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Jeanne Marie

    Information gathered via literature review, interview, and personal observation was used to examine the effectiveness of animation rurale programs in Senegal and Niger, French West Africa. Identifiable animation rurale assumptions tested as applicable to Senegal and Niger were: nationwide development programs at the grass roots level can be…

  8. Uninsured Rural Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Coburn, Andrew F.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Loux, Stephenie L.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Although research shows higher uninsured rates among rural versus urban individuals, prior studies are limited because they do not examine coverage across entire rural families. Purpose: This study uses the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to compare rural and urban insurance coverage within families, to inform the design of…

  9. Think Rural Means Isolated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    The benefits of distance education have made converts out of many rural school administrators. Through communication satellites, schools can gain access to the most advanced courses for students and staff while maintaining their rural characteristics and personal touch. Sidebars present a glossary and one rural New York school's experience with…

  10. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  11. Agriculture and Rural Viability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    Agriculture and the rural economic bases in mining, fisheries, forestry, and natural resource extraction are experiencing major social and economic changes. The farm and rural crises of the 1980s are not short-term aberrations, but symptoms of long-term trends that were partially hidden by the relatively good times for agriculture and rural areas…

  12. Reaching Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on programming undertaken to address the health and educational needs of rural families in developing and developed nations. After examining the nature of rural families and rural poverty, the newsletter discusses: (1) the Mon Women's Organization in Thailand; (2) The "Contact With Kids" parent education project in…

  13. Rural volunteer ombudsman programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, E F; Hinds, H N

    1989-12-01

    We examine benefits and difficulties surrounding the effective implementation of a long-term care volunteer ombudsman program in a rural setting. Discussion focuses on the uniqueness of each rural community and potential strategies that can be mixed and matched to meet individual community needs. We consider implications for the development and implementation of ombudsman programs in rural areas.

  14. Critical issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Dick, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years after serious scientific research began in the field of exobiology, and forty years after serious historical research began on the subject of extraterrestrial life, this paper identifies and examines some of the most important issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of what is today known as astrobiology. As in the philosophy of science in general, and in the philosophies of particular sciences, critical issues in the philosophy and sociology of astrobiology are both stimulated and illuminated by history. Among those issues are (1) epistemological issues such as the status of astrobiology as a science, the problematic nature of evidence and inference, and the limits of science; (2) metaphysical/scientific issues, including the question of defining the fundamental concepts of life, mind, intelligence, and culture in a universal context; the role of contingency and necessity in the origin of these fundamental phenomena; and whether or not the universe is in some sense fine-tuned for life and perhaps biocentric; (3) societal issues such as the theological, ethical, and worldview impacts of the discovery of microbial or intelligent life; and the question of whether the search for extraterrestrial life should be pursued at all, and with what precautions; and (4) issues related to the sociology of scientific knowledge, including the diverse attitudes and assumptions of different scientific communities and different cultures to the problem of life beyond Earth, the public "will to believe," and the formation of the discipline of astrobiology. All these overlapping issues are framed by the concept of cosmic evolution-the 13.7 billion year Master Narrative of the Universe-which may result in a physical, biological, or postbiological universe and determine the long-term destiny of humanity. PMID:23078642

  15. Critical issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Dick, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years after serious scientific research began in the field of exobiology, and forty years after serious historical research began on the subject of extraterrestrial life, this paper identifies and examines some of the most important issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of what is today known as astrobiology. As in the philosophy of science in general, and in the philosophies of particular sciences, critical issues in the philosophy and sociology of astrobiology are both stimulated and illuminated by history. Among those issues are (1) epistemological issues such as the status of astrobiology as a science, the problematic nature of evidence and inference, and the limits of science; (2) metaphysical/scientific issues, including the question of defining the fundamental concepts of life, mind, intelligence, and culture in a universal context; the role of contingency and necessity in the origin of these fundamental phenomena; and whether or not the universe is in some sense fine-tuned for life and perhaps biocentric; (3) societal issues such as the theological, ethical, and worldview impacts of the discovery of microbial or intelligent life; and the question of whether the search for extraterrestrial life should be pursued at all, and with what precautions; and (4) issues related to the sociology of scientific knowledge, including the diverse attitudes and assumptions of different scientific communities and different cultures to the problem of life beyond Earth, the public "will to believe," and the formation of the discipline of astrobiology. All these overlapping issues are framed by the concept of cosmic evolution-the 13.7 billion year Master Narrative of the Universe-which may result in a physical, biological, or postbiological universe and determine the long-term destiny of humanity.

  16. [Sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2012-05-27

    The correlation of the sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy is demonstrated in the study. In societies of today, the role of the media is unquestionable in disseminating information relating to health and the environment. According to Paragraph (1) of Article XXI of the Hungarian Constitution of 2011, everyone has the right to a healthy environment. An environmentalist media democracy may forward environmental justice, environmental education, and environmentalist economy, etc. All these are required in order to establish a society where the healthy environment is an objective value.

  17. Health technology assessment: a sociological commentary on reflexive innovation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study provides a sociological commentary on the current debates within health technology assessment (HTA), specifically in response to the approaches taken in France, The Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. It argues that HTA is part of a wider reflexive innovation system that seeks to order current and prospective technologies. The study discusses the socio-political process of HTA priority setting, the rhetorical role of HTA, the localised and contingent use of HTA, and the policy gap between guidelines and practice. It argues for the development of new types of methodologies for assessment and for a stronger social embedding of HTA practice.

  18. The Scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence: a Sociological Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romesberg, Daniel Ray

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, as it has been conducted by scientists over the past century. The following questions are explored: (1) What are the historical patterns of American scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence? From a sociology of science perspective, how can these patterns of interest be explained? (2) Who are the most prominent scientists involved in SETI? What are their academic backgrounds? (3) How has the rather exotic idea of extraterrestrial intelligence managed to penetrate the realm of respectable science?. In order to measure the historical fluctuations of scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence, a frequency distribution of relevant articles published in American scientific journals over the past century has been constructed. The core scholars of the "extraterrestrial" field have been determined via citation analysis, in a selected portion of the scientific literature. An analysis of recent scientific literature on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has revealed a number of tactics of legitimation and de-legitimation used by SETI proponents, as well as opponents. This study has generated the following findings: (1) Historically, there are three factors which tend to stimulate general scientific interest in extraterrestrial intelligence: First, the strong demonstration of the plausibility of extraterrestrial intelligence, or life, especially in a tangible, and therefore studiable location. Scientific laboratories are primary agents of plausibility here. Second, the organized political activity of SETI scientists. Third, the availability of government funding for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, or life. (2) Statistically, the leading scholars of modern SETI are Sagan, Drake and Morrison. The field itself tends to be dominated by astronomers and physicists. (3) Because SETI has no concrete data, and is easily stigmatized as an illegitimate scientific activity

  19. Joining Rural Development Theory and Rural Education Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    Karl N. Stauber proposes three goals for rural development policy: helping the rural middle class survive, reducing concentrated rural poverty, and sustaining and improving the quality of the natural environment. In contrast to other visions, he advises policy that focuses on rural places rather than rural economic sectors such as agriculture,…

  20. The Social Production of Scientific Knowledge. Sociology of the Sciences, Volume I - Yearbook 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsohn, Everett, Ed.; And Others

    This is the first volume of an annual publication that deals with the sociology of the sciences. The aim of the yearbook is to consider sociology from a very broad perspective and to develop a comparative, cross disciplinary understanding of the sciences. It does this by publishing papers from a number of perspectives and approaches on a specific…

  1. Examining the Impact of a Domestic Violence Simulation on the Development of Empathy in Sociology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latshaw, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing empathy toward others is an unspoken goal of many sociology courses, but rarely do instructors measure changes in empathy throughout a semester. To address this gap in the literature, I use a combination of quantitative and qualitative data gathered before and after students from five sociology classes participated in a simulation on…

  2. Teaching for Social Justice: Motivations of Community College Faculty in Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sonia; Blount, Stacye; Dickinson, Charles A.; Better, Alison; Vitullo, Margaret Weigers; Tyler, Deidre; Kisielewski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the reasons for career choice and job satisfaction among community college faculty who teach sociology, in relation to a social justice motivation for teaching. Using closed- and open-ended response data from a 2014 national survey of community college sociology faculty, this study finds that a preponderance of faculty do…

  3. Mastering the Job Market: Using Graduate Training in Sociology for Careers in Applied Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Bettina J.

    The purpose of this booklet is to help graduate sociology majors outline a career-planning strategy, highlighting sociological skills that might be valued assets in the eyes of employers. The first two sections help students assess interests and skills, and research careers via publications and informational interviewing. Next, three major aspects…

  4. Doing a Good Deed or Confounding the Problem? Peer Review and Sociology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Examines how the peer review process influences the writing and publication of sociology textbooks and the teaching of sociology. States that the peer review process may influence the final textbook in five ways: (1) degree of innovation; (2) length; (3) reading level; (4) cloning ancillaries and accessories; and (5) using reviewers as marketing…

  5. Table ronde "linguistique et sociologie du langage" (A Round Table Discussion "Linguistics and Sociology of Language")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdieu, Pierre; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A panel discussion on sociology and language which leads one to think that a relationship between linguistics and sociolinguistics could be effected if linguists would consent to move toward a situation in which linguistics and sociolinguistics would establish a definite bond with sociology. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  6. The Changing Academic Ecology of Sociology: Learning to Live with More Frogs in the Pond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Sociology exists in a dynamic academic environment that influences how students view and evaluate the discipline. This essay explores the changing academic context of sociology through the author's experience as a professor and department chair over a span of four decades. Increased co-curricular programming, changing student goals, and more…

  7. The sociologist and the state. An assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Willem

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides an assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology based on a reading of his posthumously published lectures on the state in Sur l'État. It argues that the state was a foundational element in Bourdieu's rendition of the symbolic order of everyday life. As such, the state becomes equally pivotal in Bourdieu's sociology, the applicability of which rests on the existence of the state, which stabilizes the social fields and their symbolic action that constitute the object of sociology. The state, which Bourdieu considers a 'meta'-ordering principle in social life, ensures that sociology has a well-ordered object of study, vis-à-vis which it can posit itself as 'meta-meta'. The state thus functions as an epistemic guarantee in Bourdieu's sociology. A critical analysis of Bourdieu's sociology of the state offers the chance of a more fundamental overall assessment of Bourdieu's conception of sociology that has relevance for any critical sociological perspective that rests on the assumption of a meta-social entity, such as the state in Bourdieu's work, as a final ordering instance. PMID:25786339

  8. Integrating Data Analysis (IDA): Working with Sociology Departments to Address the Quantitative Literacy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howery, Carla B.; Rodriguez, Havidan

    2006-01-01

    The NSF-funded Integrating Data Analysis (IDA) Project undertaken by the American Sociological Association (ASA) and the Social Science Data Analysis Network sought to close the quantitative literacy gap for sociology majors. Working with twelve departments, the project built on lessons learned from ASA's Minority Opportunities through School…

  9. What Are We Doing This for? Widening Participation, Employability and Doing Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marr, Liz; Leach, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    This article explores some of the consequences of the widening participation agenda for the teaching of sociology, particularly in the new university sector. Recent research within the Department of Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) suggests that we are increasingly facing new demands from students who take a more instrumental…

  10. Some Preliminary Readings for a Sociological Approach to ESL. NAAESC Occasional Papers, Volume 2, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwierzynski, Mirtes

    A sociological approach to English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction allows for convergence of perspectives from the sociology of education and from adult education. ESL programs for immigrants have historically been purposely designed to make newcomers incorporate the values and beliefs of people in power. Sociologists of education working…

  11. The Brief Rise and Early Decline of Radical Sociology at Washington University: 1969-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzkowitz, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the failure of the sociology department of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, to institutionalize radical sociology. Expounds on the dynamics of radical movements and the opposition they create. Describes the faculty conflicts involving questions of theory versus practice, revolution versus reform, and competing…

  12. Basic Bibliography in Political Sociology. Part II. Resource Materials for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Frederick D., Comp.; Dobratz, Betty A., Comp.

    Designed to accompany the course syllabi, this five-section bibliography cites over 1,500 books, textbooks, and journal articles for teaching political sociology at the university level. Section I, on general works, contains two categories of resources: materials on the theory of political sociology and general collections and texts. Section 2…

  13. Integrating Sociological Research into Large Introductory Courses: Learning Content and Increasing Quantitative Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Maxine P.; Czaja, Ronald F.; Brewster, Zachary B.

    2006-01-01

    Sociologists can make meaningful contributions to quantitative literacy by teaching sociological research skills in sociology classes, including introductory courses. We report on the effectiveness of requiring a research module in a large introductory class. The module is designed to teach both basic research skills and to increase awareness of…

  14. Curriculum Materials in Research Methods in Sociology for Law Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Univ., CO. Coll. of Law.

    The main purpose of this project (1966-1969) was to provide law students with a basic understanding of modern sociological inquiry since the importance of sociology to the law has increased with applications ranging from the presentation of evidence in court to the design of programs for legal reform and social change. The general objective here…

  15. An Annotated Guide to Periodical Publications in Sociology and Related Disciplines. Revised Edition, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Kenneth, Ed.

    This annotated guide lists periodicals in the fields of sociology, anthropology, social work and related sciences which are on file as of 1971 in the Lincoln Memorial Library at South Dakota State University. A project of the Intermediate Sociology Class, fall semester, 1971, the guide is intended as a research tool for undergraduate and graduate…

  16. The Coordinated Curriculum: How Institutional Theory Can Be Used to Catalyze Revision of the Sociology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen; McElrath, Kevin; Kain, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    Content analysis of 77 college and university catalogs and department websites assesses conformity with select recommendations for the sociology major. The majority of institutions have programs that fulfill some recommendations examined, but the minority fulfills most of the recommendations. Some sociology programs are much more coordinated than…

  17. The sociologist and the state. An assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Willem

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides an assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's sociology based on a reading of his posthumously published lectures on the state in Sur l'État. It argues that the state was a foundational element in Bourdieu's rendition of the symbolic order of everyday life. As such, the state becomes equally pivotal in Bourdieu's sociology, the applicability of which rests on the existence of the state, which stabilizes the social fields and their symbolic action that constitute the object of sociology. The state, which Bourdieu considers a 'meta'-ordering principle in social life, ensures that sociology has a well-ordered object of study, vis-à-vis which it can posit itself as 'meta-meta'. The state thus functions as an epistemic guarantee in Bourdieu's sociology. A critical analysis of Bourdieu's sociology of the state offers the chance of a more fundamental overall assessment of Bourdieu's conception of sociology that has relevance for any critical sociological perspective that rests on the assumption of a meta-social entity, such as the state in Bourdieu's work, as a final ordering instance.

  18. A National Survey of American Higher Education Capstone Practices in Sociology and Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauhart, Robert C.; Grahe, Jon E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on capstones in sociology and psychology has suggested that there is a typical capstone experience required by three quarters of all four-year colleges and universities in the United States. This article reports results from a national survey that confirm that sociology and psychology capstone courses conform generally to a…

  19. Bridging a gap: the (lack of a) sociology of oral health and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Exley, Catherine

    2009-11-01

    This article provides an historical review of international research related to sociology and oral health and healthcare. I begin by considering the relevance of the mouth and oral health to social interactions and physical health, and outline existing inequalities in oral health and healthcare experiences. The paper examines critically some of the existing published research in the field - considering both what might be described as sociology of oral health and healthcare and sociology in oral healthcare - and demonstrates the dearth of sociological research related to this subject compared to other areas of interest within the field of sociology of health and illness. I conclude by suggesting some ways in which this area could be expanded and developed further. I suggest that sociological analyses of how individuals experience, understand and manage their mouth and oral health, can add to and enhance the broader field of the sociology of health and illness. Further, examining experiences and provision of oral healthcare may provide sociology with a new opportunity to explore the neglected field of private healthcare, but also to engage with health policy makers who seek to address oral healthcare needs.

  20. Toward Teaching a Liberating Sociological Practicality: Challenges for Teaching, Learning and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Marv

    2009-01-01

    Though C. Wright Mills made a pivotal contribution to the discipline by raising sociologists' awareness of the ideological and bureaucratic content of sociological practicality, he may have placed unyielding limits on "the promise" he profoundly proclaimed in the "sociological imagination." By defining types of practicality in such rigidly…

  1. Bathroom Politics: Introducing Students to Sociological Thinking from the Bottom Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edgar Alan

    2003-01-01

    Describes sociological exercises to identify ways to help students and teachers interact in the intellectual process. Notes four sociological themes for the exercise and four practical benefits. Focuses on gender issues, public and private issues, race and ethnicity issues, social class issues, and age related issues. (KDR)

  2. The Sociology Major at Institutions of Higher Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Edward L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article I examine how the sociology major is structured at institutions of higher education in the United States. I use content analysis of college catalogs from 100 institutions to examine the sociology major at top institutions among regional and national universities and liberal arts colleges. I first examine the basic structure of…

  3. A Third Use of Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: A Lens for Studying Teacher Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Daniel Z.; Avery, Leanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, science educators and science education researchers have grown increasingly interested in utilising insights from the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) to inform their work and research. To date, researchers in science education have focused on two applications: results of sociological studies of science have been…

  4. Applying Sociology through Social Marketing: Student Reflections on an Intimate Violence Awareness Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Jodie; Williams, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Introducing students to sensitive social issues like intimate violence in lower level courses can spark their sociological imaginations motivating them to do further research in order to gain reflective knowledge about such topics. In order to promote two course objectives: (1) recognizing and applying sociological concepts and theories, and (2)…

  5. The Study on the Core Concepts of Contemporary Sociology of Education and Its Theoretical Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Min-hui

    2006-01-01

    Within the sphere of contemporary social sciences, the terms "modernity," "post-modernity" and "globalization" have penetrated, as the core concepts, into various fields of social sciences in a logical way. In constituting the concept of "modernity," sociology of education develops the educational theory, as sociological theory does, into a "grand…

  6. Social Realism and the Problem of the Problem of Knowledge in the Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines from a Social Realist perspective a set of issues in the sociology of education regarding the problem of knowledge. It focuses upon the issue of relativism associated with the constructionist approach that since the time of the New Sociology of Education in the 1970s has constituted in different forms the dominant perspective…

  7. Insiders and Outsiders: Exploring Ethnocentricism and Cultural Relativity in Sociology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schopmeyer, Kim D.

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that central goal of sociology is to provide students with sociological perspective or the ability to reflect on their own society from a distance. Argues that ethnocentricism can be affected by an "insider's bias" and an "outsider's bias." Describes the use of Horace Miner's "Body Ritual of the Nacirema" as a classroom activity designed…

  8. The Founding and Development of the Sociology of Youth in This Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubok, Iu. A.; Chuprov, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    Russian and Soviet sociology have always paid considerable attention to the study of youth. Interest in the problems of youth first emerged in Russian sociology at the turn of the twentieth century. It was manifested with special clarity, however, in the 1920s through the 1980s, when the research came to include problems of the daily life and…

  9. Exploring the Benefits of Community-Based Research in a Sociology of Sexualities Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Rebecca; Weinzimmer, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of community-based research (CBR) in the sociology classroom go beyond those associated with traditional service learning. Here, students use their sociological skills to examine and propose solutions to local social problems addressed by community organizations. Through analyzing students' course reflection journals and the results…

  10. Institutional Barriers to Doing Public Sociology: Experiences of Feminists in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Joey; Laube, Heather

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the discipline of sociology has seen an increased discussion of public sociology, but the discussion has focused on whether or not it is a good idea for sociologists to become more engaged with their various publics. A different question motivates this research: What are the institutional arrangements that make doing public…

  11. Sociology of Education: A Critical History and Prospects for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauder, Hugh; Brown, Phillip; Halsey, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the sociology of education from the perspective of its recent history and attempts to assess the current state of the field. The authors argue that cognate disciplines such as economics and social policy have taken over some of the key questions that were once the preserve of sociology of education. This raises the question of…

  12. Another Nibble at the Core: Student Learning in a Thematically-Focused Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jay R.; Novak, Katherine B.; Cline, Krista M. C.; Scott, Marvin B.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and assessing core knowledge has been and continues to be a challenge that vexes the discipline of sociology. With the adoption of a thematic approach to courses in the core curriculum at Butler University, faculty teaching Introductory Sociology were presented with the opportunity and challenge of defining the core knowledge and…

  13. Developing a Critical Lens: Using Photography to Teach Sociology and Create Critical Thinkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisen, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Sociology instructors strive not only to teach their students the essential aspects of sociology but also to help students develop their critical thinking abilities. One way to help students become better critical thinkers is to assign projects that encourage students to critically assess their world by relating the course content to their…

  14. Parental Concerns in 100th Year Anniversary of Sociology Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasapoglu, Aytul

    2016-01-01

    Although sociology education is celebrating its 100th year anniversary in Turkish higher education, the field itself is not known quite well by the society. Familial worries in the context of emotional sociology are very important because families may have when they think of their child's future especially after graduation from university. Primary…

  15. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Teaching Sociology: 1973-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paino, Maria; Blankenship, Chastity; Grauerholz, Liz; Chin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This article updates and extends research by Baker and Chin, who tracked changes in studies published in Teaching Sociology from 1973 to 1983 (Baker) and 1984 to 1999 (Chin). The current study traces manuscripts published in "Teaching Sociology" from 2000 to 2009. We examine both who publishes in the journal and what gets published. In particular,…

  16. Forensic culture as epistemic culture: the sociology of forensic science.

    PubMed

    Cole, Simon A

    2013-03-01

    This paper explores whether we can interpret the notion of 'forensic culture' as something akin to what Knorr-Cetina called an 'epistemic culture'. Can we speak of a 'forensic culture', and, if so, how is it similar to, or different from, other epistemic cultures that exist in what is conventionally called 'science'? This question has important policy implications given the National Academy Science's (NAS) recent identification of 'culture' as one of the problems at the root of what it identified as 'serious deficiencies' in U.S. forensic science and 'scientific culture' as an antidote to those problems. Finding the NAS's characterisation of 'scientific culture' overly general and naïve, this paper offers a preliminary exploration of what might be called a 'forensic culture'. Specifically, the paper explores the way in which few of the empirical findings accumulated by sociologists of science about research science seem to apply to forensic science. Instead, forensic science seems to have developed a distinct culture for which a sociological analysis will require new explanatory tools. Faithful sociological analysis of 'forensic culture' will be a necessary prerequisite for the kind of culture change prescribed by external reformist bodies like the NAS.

  17. Revising laboratory work: sociological perspectives on the science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobér, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study uses sociological perspectives to analyse one of the core practices in science education: schoolchildren's and students' laboratory work. Applying an ethnographic approach to the laboratory work done by pupils at a Swedish compulsory school, data were generated through observations, field notes, interviews, and a questionnaire. The pupils, ages 14 and 15, were observed as they took a 5-week physics unit (specifically, mechanics). The analysis shows that the episodes of laboratory work could be filled with curiosity and exciting challenges; however, another picture emerged when sociological concepts and notions were applied to what is a very common way of working in the classroom. Laboratory work is characterised as a social activity that is expected to be organised as a group activity. This entails groups becoming, to some extent, `safe havens' for the pupils. On the other hand, this way of working in groups required pupils to subject to the groups and the peer effect, sometimes undermining their chances to learn and perform better. In addition, the practice of working in groups when doing laboratory work left some pupils and the teacher blaming themselves, even though the outcome of the learning situation was a result of a complex interplay of social processes. This article suggests a stronger emphasis on the contradictions and consequences of the science subjects, which are strongly influenced by their socio-historical legacy.

  18. Beyond capital? The challenge for sociology in Britain.

    PubMed

    Holmwood, John

    2014-12-01

    This article offers a 'local', British, reading of Piketty's landmark book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, suggesting that the challenge it offers to sociological approaches to inequality is more fundamental than hitherto recognized. The variations in 'national trajectories' exposed by Piketty reveal Britain to be anomalous in terms of standard approaches to the path dependencies embedded in different welfare regimes. Using the recent work of Monica Prasad on 'settler capitalism' in the USA and the tax and debt-finance regime associated with it, the article suggests that colonialism and empire and its postwar unravelling has had deep consequences for British social stratification, albeit largely neglected by British sociologists. Finally, it points to the fact that the form of tax and debt-finance regime that has become reinforced in Britain is at the heart of recent radical reforms to higher education. These are the currently unexplicated conditions of our future practice as sociologists and, therefore, an obstacle to building a critical sociology on the foundations laid out by Piketty. PMID:25516341

  19. A sociological implication of environment in social development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, D Y

    1997-12-01

    This study, which identifies the sociological implication of the environment in social development, was based on the notion that environmental research should recognize that the environment consists of 3 main, interdependent components: the natural environment, the man-made environment, and the social environment. The study first examines these components of environment and their internal mechanisms and, after noting that sociology has failed to explore the interdependence among these components, offers a new notion of ecosystem that modifies and expands the framework offered by Duncan's POET model (increased population creates pressure for technological change, increases urbanization, and creates more pollution). Next, the paper examines the emerging natural and social environmental problems caused by industrialization. The concluding section reviews the development of concepts about the relationship between the environment and social development based on the assumption of limited natural resources. Because it is now understood that it is more appropriate to consider the limit of ecological capacity, it is important to learn to measure social development by the successful achievement of an adaptation or by harmonization with the environment, rather than by material growth. This requires a conceptualization of man as being part of, rather than independent of, nature. New indicators must be developed to measure the degree of social development achieved.

  20. Patriarchy and phantasy: a conception of psychoanalytic sociology.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, J

    1983-01-01

    The nature versus nurture controversy in the history of the social sciences is compared with the heredity versus environment debate in the history of psychoanalysis. Generally, psychoanalysis addresses the question of human thought in contrast to the social disciplines, which examine human behavior. This division of science may be considered the representation of a fundamental dichotomy between internal (latent) and external (manifest) aspects characteristic of human existence. This universal duality is based on the division between the sexes, the union of which reproduces life. This paper attempts to draw attention to the common structure of the mind and society by showing that the same pattern of manifest and latent content exists within each entity. The manifest aspect of existence is reflected in patriarchal social structure and the latent aspect in the structure of unconscious phantasy. These aspects are dialectically interrelated in that patriarchy is the manifest form of phantasy and phantasy the latent form of patriarchal order. This model of the integration of psychoanalysis and sociology is based on the work of Juliet Mitchell, particularly Psychoanalysis and Feminism. Psychoanalytic sociology is defined as a discipline that investigates the relationship between mental life and social organization. PMID:6638225

  1. Inequalities in oral health: the role of sociology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L B; Blake, M; Baker, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper seeks to identify an important point of contact between the literature on inequalities in oral health and the sociology of power. The paper begins by exploring the problem of social inequalities in oral health from the point of view of human freedom. It then goes on to briefly consider why inequalities in oral health matter before providing a brief overview of current approaches to reducing inequalities in oral health. After this the paper briefly introduces the problem of power in sociology before going on to outline why the problem of power matters in the problem of inequalities in oral health. Here the paper discusses how two key principles associated with the social bond have become central to how we think about health related inequalities. These principles are the principle of treating everyone the same (the principle of autonomy) and the related principle of allowing everyone to pursue their own goals (the principle of intimacy). These principles are outlined and subsequently discussed in detail with application to debates about interventions to reduce oral health related inequalities including that of water fluoridation. The paper highlights how the 'Childsmile' programme in Scotland appears to successfully negotiate the tensions inherent in attempting to do something about inequalities in oral health. It then concludes by highlighting some of the tensions that remain in attempting to alleviate oral health related inequalities.

  2. Inequalities in oral health: the role of sociology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L B; Blake, M; Baker, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper seeks to identify an important point of contact between the literature on inequalities in oral health and the sociology of power. The paper begins by exploring the problem of social inequalities in oral health from the point of view of human freedom. It then goes on to briefly consider why inequalities in oral health matter before providing a brief overview of current approaches to reducing inequalities in oral health. After this the paper briefly introduces the problem of power in sociology before going on to outline why the problem of power matters in the problem of inequalities in oral health. Here the paper discusses how two key principles associated with the social bond have become central to how we think about health related inequalities. These principles are the principle of treating everyone the same (the principle of autonomy) and the related principle of allowing everyone to pursue their own goals (the principle of intimacy). These principles are outlined and subsequently discussed in detail with application to debates about interventions to reduce oral health related inequalities including that of water fluoridation. The paper highlights how the 'Childsmile' programme in Scotland appears to successfully negotiate the tensions inherent in attempting to do something about inequalities in oral health. It then concludes by highlighting some of the tensions that remain in attempting to alleviate oral health related inequalities. PMID:27352473

  3. Beyond capital? The challenge for sociology in Britain.

    PubMed

    Holmwood, John

    2014-12-01

    This article offers a 'local', British, reading of Piketty's landmark book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, suggesting that the challenge it offers to sociological approaches to inequality is more fundamental than hitherto recognized. The variations in 'national trajectories' exposed by Piketty reveal Britain to be anomalous in terms of standard approaches to the path dependencies embedded in different welfare regimes. Using the recent work of Monica Prasad on 'settler capitalism' in the USA and the tax and debt-finance regime associated with it, the article suggests that colonialism and empire and its postwar unravelling has had deep consequences for British social stratification, albeit largely neglected by British sociologists. Finally, it points to the fact that the form of tax and debt-finance regime that has become reinforced in Britain is at the heart of recent radical reforms to higher education. These are the currently unexplicated conditions of our future practice as sociologists and, therefore, an obstacle to building a critical sociology on the foundations laid out by Piketty.

  4. A sociological implication of environment in social development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, D Y

    1997-12-01

    This study, which identifies the sociological implication of the environment in social development, was based on the notion that environmental research should recognize that the environment consists of 3 main, interdependent components: the natural environment, the man-made environment, and the social environment. The study first examines these components of environment and their internal mechanisms and, after noting that sociology has failed to explore the interdependence among these components, offers a new notion of ecosystem that modifies and expands the framework offered by Duncan's POET model (increased population creates pressure for technological change, increases urbanization, and creates more pollution). Next, the paper examines the emerging natural and social environmental problems caused by industrialization. The concluding section reviews the development of concepts about the relationship between the environment and social development based on the assumption of limited natural resources. Because it is now understood that it is more appropriate to consider the limit of ecological capacity, it is important to learn to measure social development by the successful achievement of an adaptation or by harmonization with the environment, rather than by material growth. This requires a conceptualization of man as being part of, rather than independent of, nature. New indicators must be developed to measure the degree of social development achieved. PMID:12293790

  5. The emergence of sociology from political economy in the United States: 1890 to 1940.

    PubMed

    Young, Cristobal

    2009-01-01

    Professional sociology in the U.S. began as a field area within economics, but gradually emerged as a separate discipline. Using new data on joint meetings and the separation of departments, I track interdisciplinary relations through three phases: sponsorship (1890-1905), collaboration (1905-1940), and disengagement (post-1940). In the early years, sociology was mostly a branch of economics departments. With the formation of the American Sociological Society, relations with economics began to be more characterized by professionally autonomous collaboration. The 1920s saw a large wave of sociology departments separating from economics. Still, joint annual meetings (including joint presidential addresses) remained the norm until 1940. Paradigmatic conflict between institutional and neoclassical economists was the major force that sustained the economics-sociology collaboration. As institutionalism faded from the scene in the late 1930s, so went interdisciplinary contact.

  6. The development of medical sociology in the post-Soviet society: the case of Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Kaminskas, Raimundas; Peicius, Eimantas

    2007-06-01

    This article explores the historical development of medical sociology and analyses the social problems that have had impacted the changes of health care institutionalization particularly in Lithuania during the Soviet and post-soviet period. Approaching the interaction between sociology and public health sciences, it is intended to apply the concept of medical sociology and its determinants in the context of health care and education systems. By analyzing the case past of medical sociology in Lithuania, we claim that its prospects should be associated with the study of new challenges in the biomedical sciences. In order to improve the importance of medical sociology in developing democracies we should focus on the questions, for instance, to what extent modern biotechnologies should be applied, how to improve the situation with patients' rights, and how to combine the knowledge of social sciences and biomedicine in order to improve the quality of healthcare services and to ensure better functioning of the healthcare system in particular district.

  7. Rural Stress: Myths and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas D.; McIntire, Walter G.

    A comparison between the common myths of "rural existence" and the documented realities of rural living explodes the myth that rural living is generally stress free, shows that life stress in rural settings can have deleterious effects on the function of individual and family, and provides a basis for exploring some implications of rural stress…

  8. Office of Rural Health Policy

    MedlinePlus

    ... focusing on the impact regulations may have on rural communities.   Rural Hospital Programs More information on FORHP Rural ... Grant and Small Rural Hospital Transitions Project (SRHT).   Rural Community Programs More information on FORHP programs focused on ...

  9. Revitalizing sociology: urban life and mental illness between history and the present.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Des; Rose, Nikolas; Singh, Ilina

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a re-thinking of the relationship between sociology and the biological sciences. Tracing lines of connection between the history of sociology and the contemporary landscape of biology, the paper argues for a reconfiguration of this relationship beyond popular rhetorics of 'biologization' or 'medicalization'. At the heart of the paper is a claim that, today, there are some potent new frames for re-imagining the traffic between sociological and biological research - even for 'revitalizing' the sociological enterprise as such. The paper threads this argument through one empirical case: the relationship between urban life and mental illness. In its first section, it shows how this relationship enlivened both early psychiatric epidemiology, and some forms of the new discipline of sociology; it then traces the historical division of these sciences, as the sociological investment in psychiatric questions waned, and 'the social' become marginalized within an increasingly 'biological' psychiatry. In its third section, however, the paper shows how this relationship has lately been revivified, but now by a nuanced epigenetic and neurobiological attention to the links between mental health and urban life. What role can sociology play here? In its final section, the paper shows how this older sociology, with its lively interest in the psychiatric and neurobiological vicissitudes of urban social life, can be our guide in helping to identify intersections between sociological and biological attention. With a new century now underway, the paper concludes by suggesting that the relationship between urban life and mental illness may prove a core testing-ground for a 'revitalized' sociology.

  10. One Starfish at a Time: Using Fundamentals in Sociology to Rethink Impressions about People Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moremen, Robin D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to document how a course in the fundamentals of sociology encouraged students to rethink negative impressions about people with AIDS. Multimethod, active learning processes were utilized to introduce the sociological imagination, critical thinking, and theory and methods in sociology. The intent was to apply basic…

  11. 2015 Hans O. Mauksch Address: How Departments Can Respond to the Changing Popularity of the Sociology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While the popularity of the psychology major and the sociology major were comparable in 1970, sociology witnessed a decline while psychology witnessed expansion. This article considers strategies of expanding the popularity of the sociology major, considering data from a variety of sources. Primary recommendations are to configure programs to…

  12. Taking the Plunge: Open Access at the "Canadian Journal of Sociology." Case Studies in Open Access Publishing. Number Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Presents a personal account of the transfer to open access of the leading Canadian journal of sociology. Background: The Canadian Journal of Sociology had established a strong position, internationally, among sociology journals. However, subscriptions were falling as readers increasingly accessed the resource through libraries and a…

  13. Trends in Funding for Dissertation Field Research: Why Do Political Science and Sociology Students Win so Few Awards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Rina; Teitelbaum, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Despite the size and growth of political science and sociology relative to other disciplines, political science and sociology graduate students have received a declining share of funding for dissertation field research in recent years. Specifically, political science and sociology students are losing out to competitive applicants from…

  14. Defining the public, defining sociology: hybrid science-public relations and boundary-work in early American sociology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I examine how scientific disciplines define their boundaries by defining the publics with whom they engage. The case study is an episode in the development of early American sociology. In response to the dual challenge of credibility set up by the conflict between religious Baconian science and secular positivist science, key actors engaged in specific strategies of boundary-work to create their desired "sociological public"--a hybrid form of science-public relations that appealed to hostile university scientists while excluding a supportive religious audience from participation in the production of scientific knowledge. Using this case, I offer two specific insights. First I illustrate how, in the pursuit of scientific credibility, actors engage in boundary-work to differentiate audiences, not just practitioners. Such defining of publics is constitutive of scientific disciplines in their formative stage. Second, I demonstrate how audience boundaries can be redefined through the capture of existing boundary objects. Specifically, the removal of informational content in key boundary objects creates durable boundaries that are difficult to overcome.

  15. Defining the public, defining sociology: hybrid science-public relations and boundary-work in early American sociology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I examine how scientific disciplines define their boundaries by defining the publics with whom they engage. The case study is an episode in the development of early American sociology. In response to the dual challenge of credibility set up by the conflict between religious Baconian science and secular positivist science, key actors engaged in specific strategies of boundary-work to create their desired "sociological public"--a hybrid form of science-public relations that appealed to hostile university scientists while excluding a supportive religious audience from participation in the production of scientific knowledge. Using this case, I offer two specific insights. First I illustrate how, in the pursuit of scientific credibility, actors engage in boundary-work to differentiate audiences, not just practitioners. Such defining of publics is constitutive of scientific disciplines in their formative stage. Second, I demonstrate how audience boundaries can be redefined through the capture of existing boundary objects. Specifically, the removal of informational content in key boundary objects creates durable boundaries that are difficult to overcome. PMID:19579532

  16. Identifying Sociological Factors for the Success of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Tarter, D.; Coleman, A.

    Astrosociology factors relevant to success of future space exploration may best be identified through studies of sociological circumstances of past successful explorations, such as the Apollo-Lunar Missions. These studies benefit from access to primary records of the past programs. The Archives and Special Collections Division of the Salmon Library at the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) houses large collections of material from the early periods of the space age. The Huntsville campus of the University of Alabama System had its birth in the mid-1950s at the time when the von Braun rocket team was relocated from Texas to Huntsville. The University, the City of Huntsville and the US Government rocket organizations developed in parallel over subsequent years. As a result, the University has a significant space heritage and focus. This is true not only for the engineering and science disciplines, but also for the social sciences. The life of the University spans the period when Huntsville government and industrial organizations were responsible for producing the rocket vehicles to first take mankind to the Moon. That endeavor was surely as significant sociologically as technologically. In the 1980s, Donald E. Tarter, conducted a series of video interviews with some leading members of the original von Braun team. Although the interviews ranged over many engineering subjects, they also recorded personal features of people involved in the Apollo lunar exploration program and the interactions between these people. Such knowledge was of course an objective. These interviews are now in the collections of the UAH Library Archives, along with extensive documentation from the same period. Under sponsorship of the Archives and the NASA-Marshall Retiree Association, the interview series was restarted in 2006 to obtain comparable oral-history interviews with more than fifty US born members of the rocket team from the 1960s. Again these video interviews are rich with

  17. What Is Rural?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Nutrition Marketing and Trade Natural Resources and Environment Plants and Crops Research and Technology Rural Development Visual Arts and Agricultural History Publications Alternative Farming ...

  18. Sociology, history, and philosophy in the Research Quarterly.

    PubMed

    Sage, George H; Dyreson, Mark S; Kretchmar, R Scott

    2005-06-01

    The accounts of our subdiscipline's contributions to The Research Quarterly are similar. Sociology, history, and philosophy operate at some distance from the biological sciences. The research methods used by scholars in each of our domains address distinctive issues related to objectivity and, thus, validity. Our contributions to The Research Quarterly have been modest, numbering about 240 articles, or slightly over 3 per volume. In short, we have enjoyed only a minority presence in The Research Quarterly during its 75 years of existence. Our stories, however, also diverge in important ways. Our research methods are different, and our relationships with our parent disciplines are not the same. In addition, our perceptions of The Research Quarterly as a potential repository for our respective publications vary considerably.

  19. Towards a Sociological Understanding of Robots as Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oost, Ellen; Reed, Darren

    While Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) have, in the past, primarily mediated or facilitated emotional bonding between humans, contemporary robot technologies are increasingly making the bond between human and robots the core issue. Thinking of robots as companions is not only a development that opens up huge potential for new applications, it also raises social and ethical issues. In this paper we will argue that current conceptions of human-robot companionship are primarily rooted in cognitive psychological traditions and provide important, yet limited understanding of the companion relationship. Elaborating on a sociological perspective on the appropriation of new technology, we will argue for a richer understanding of companionship that takes the situatedness (in location, network and time) of the use-context into account.

  20. Understanding Racial/ethnic Disparities in Health: Sociological Contributions*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.; Sternthal, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the contribution of sociologists to the study of racial and ethnic inequalities in health in the U.S. It argues that sociologists have made four principal contributions. First, they have challenged and problematized the biological understanding of race. Second, they have emphasized the primacy of social structure and context as determinants of racial differences in disease. Third, they have contributed to our understanding of the multiple ways in which racism affects health. Finally, sociologists have enhanced our understanding of the ways in which migration history and status can affect health. Sociological insights on racial disparities in health have important implications for the development of effective approaches to improve health and reduce health inequities. PMID:20943580

  1. Do we Need a Sociology of Energy Development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papatheodorou, Photini; Spathopoulos, Fivos

    2016-04-01

    The presentation discusses the need of developing a new area of scientific study, namely the "Sociology of Energy Development". It presents our knowledge gaps, regarding the reaction of societies towards energy projects. The presentation proposes that the first steps will be to study the "ethnography" of the energy companies and acquire a clear understanding of their specific cultures. In particular, the presentation argues for a need to raise meaningful questions about the values and attitudes of energy companies in areas such as environmental awareness; gender; cultural differences and other issues of conflict. It will also propose that a new conceptual framework is developed for the specific analysis of the relationship between society and energy companies, in the fields of public perception and trust. Finally, the presentation will conclude with an exploration of key principles, which may guide the development of new ethical practices in the field of energy.

  2. Non-standard models and the sociology of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, Martín

    2014-05-01

    I review some theoretical ideas in cosmology different from the standard "Big Bang": the quasi-steady state model, the plasma cosmology model, non-cosmological redshifts, alternatives to non-baryonic dark matter and/or dark energy, and others. Cosmologists do not usually work within the framework of alternative cosmologies because they feel that these are not at present as competitive as the standard model. Certainly, they are not so developed, and they are not so developed because cosmologists do not work on them. It is a vicious circle. The fact that most cosmologists do not pay them any attention and only dedicate their research time to the standard model is to a great extent due to a sociological phenomenon (the "snowball effect" or "groupthink"). We might well wonder whether cosmology, our knowledge of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other fields of physics or a predominant ideology.

  3. Sociology, history, and philosophy in the Research Quarterly.

    PubMed

    Sage, George H; Dyreson, Mark S; Kretchmar, R Scott

    2005-06-01

    The accounts of our subdiscipline's contributions to The Research Quarterly are similar. Sociology, history, and philosophy operate at some distance from the biological sciences. The research methods used by scholars in each of our domains address distinctive issues related to objectivity and, thus, validity. Our contributions to The Research Quarterly have been modest, numbering about 240 articles, or slightly over 3 per volume. In short, we have enjoyed only a minority presence in The Research Quarterly during its 75 years of existence. Our stories, however, also diverge in important ways. Our research methods are different, and our relationships with our parent disciplines are not the same. In addition, our perceptions of The Research Quarterly as a potential repository for our respective publications vary considerably. PMID:16122133

  4. Understanding racial-ethnic disparities in health: sociological contributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Sternthal, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the contribution of sociologists to the study of racial and ethnic inequalities in health in the United States. It argues that sociologists have made four principal contributions. First, they have challenged and problematized the biological understanding of race. Second, they have emphasized the primacy of social structure and context as determinants of racial differences in disease. Third, they have contributed to our understanding of the multiple ways in which racism affects health. Finally, sociologists have enhanced our understanding of the ways in which migration history and status can affect health. Sociological insights on racial disparities in health have important implications for the development of effective approaches to improve health and reduce health inequities.

  5. [Associative commitment and cancer. Results of a sociological study].

    PubMed

    Knobé, S

    2009-05-01

    The associative anti-AIDS movement was the subject of many sociological research interesting in the various positioning of associations the ones compared to the others or in the strategies from the involved actors. The struggle against cancer, which however occurs during the interwar period, did not give place to such developments. Thus, although the report of the absence, in France, of a collective and militant mobilization of cancer patients was already established, the forms of the cancer patients involvement were not questioned. How do the cancer patients to get involved within the associative anticancer movement? We will try to answer this question by the analysis of two distinct dimensions from the involvement: the type of association's organization and the type of patients' commitment the in the associative anticancer movement.

  6. [The medical sociological characteristics of the general practitioner activities].

    PubMed

    Nechaev, V S; Koshman, K B

    2008-01-01

    The medical sociological study involving the general practitioners of the primary medical sanitary health care system of the city of Samara was carried out. The respondents provided their opinions related to the prospects of developing health promotion and disease prevention in the primary health care system, the health management problems and the actual procedures of interaction with patients dealing with health promotion by means of primary and secondary prevention. The general practitioners bear the major duty on the implementation of preventive activities targeted to the attached population since they have more potential possibilities to perform a wide list of preventive and informational educational actions immediately on the level of a particular household. The analysis of ten preventive priorities included into the recommendations given to the patients determined that the general practitioners incompletely enable just the measures of primary prevention concerning the diet improvement, the body mass decreasing, the optimal physical activity, the bad habits refusal and show marked preference to secondary prevention.

  7. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional) needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives. PMID:25426799

  8. Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions between sociology and epistemology.

    PubMed

    Kvasz, Ladislav

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to clarify Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions. We propose to discriminate between a scientific revolution, which is a sociological event of a change of attitude of the scientific community with respect to a particular theory, and an epistemic rupture, which is a linguistic fact consisting of a discontinuity in the linguistic framework in which this theory is formulated. We propose a classification of epistemic ruptures into four types. In the paper, each of these types of epistemic ruptures is illustrated by examples from physics. The classification of epistemic ruptures can be used as a basis for a classification of scientific revolutions and thus for a refinement of our view of the progress of science.

  9. Who cares? Nursing and sociology: the development of a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Cox, C A

    1979-05-01

    The paper has three aims: to illustrate ways in which sociology may help nurses to achieve their primary objective: good patient care; to show how nursing can contribute to sociology; and to indicate some conditions for a healthy relationship between the two activities. After a brief discussion of the nature of sociology, intended for non-sociologists, four examples of ways in which sociology may be relevant to nursing are discussed: (i) Implications for nursing of changing patterns of disease, dependency and death; (ii) Social and cultural variations in perceptions of, and responses to, pain and disease; (iii) Organizational analyses, with particular reference to the importance of nurse-patient communication; (iv) Sociological studies of inter-personal relationships, illustrated by a study of student nurse training. Nursing is described as the major caring profession; as such it has inherent interest for sociologists interested in health care. However, its sociological interest is enhanced by the fact that it is permeated by paradoxes. Reference is also made to current debate on the most appropriate model for health care: the traditional medical model places relatively greater emphasis on cure than does nursing, with its relatively greater involvement with care. It is suggested that current patterns of disease and dependency increase the importance of the care model, and that nursing could play a crucial role in such a shift of emphasis. Having shown that sociology can make positive contributions to nursing, attention is drawn to certain dangers. Nursing should thus make sure that the sociology which it welcomes into its domain is academically sound, and not ideology in disguise. It is also suggested that nursing education should encourage more critical thinking, to enliven nurses' appreciation of what sociology has to offer, and to improve their ability to evaluate the quality of health care.

  10. Rural Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helge, Doris, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Exceptional Children has the theme "Rural Special Education." Nine articles deal with this theme as follows: (1) "The State of the Art of Rural Special Education" (by D. Helge), looks at recent improvements, remaining challenges, and current functioning; policy recommendations are offered for national and state…

  11. Rural Libraries in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Brent, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue includes 13 articles that discuss rural library concerns in Illinois. Topics addressed include strengthening library services; rural trends and their impact on libraries; partnerships; Cooperative Extension Service revitalization; financing; economic development; resource sharing in school libraries; and public libraries and user…

  12. Rural Mathematics Educator, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Mathematics Educator, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This document contains the two issues of "Rural Mathematics Educator" published in 2002. This newsletter of the Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics (ACCLAIM) includes articles on rural mathematics education, as well as information and descriptions of professional development opportunities for…

  13. Ad Hoc Rural Regionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamin, Elisabeth M.; Marcucci, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    A new regionalism has been much documented and researched for metropolitan areas; this article documents that there is a new rural regionalism as well. In the United States, these groups appear most likely to emerge in areas that are challenged by outcomes characterizing globalization's effects on the rural condition: namely, exurban or…

  14. Rural Road Warriors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    Presents a profile of bookmobiles in rural areas, based on data from four national surveys conducted by the Center for the Study of Rural Librarianship between 1985 and 1987. Topics covered include equipment and related problems, collections, services, stop locations, and staff. The need for more research on the bookmobile's function is indicated.…

  15. Rural Revitalization through Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Charles

    In recent years, service programs targeted for Georgia's rural communities have decreased proportionately in relation to those intended for the state's rapidly expanding population centers. At the same time, erosion of traditional manufacturing industries and an adverse agricultural economy have decreased the ability of rural communities to…

  16. Unique Rural District Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tod Allen

    2009-01-01

    The politics of rural educational leadership are both intense and concentrated. Rural educational leaders need to be savvy and politically skilled if they are to inspire educational stakeholders and accomplish organizational objectives. The local school system is an organization with a political culture that can be characterized as a competitive…

  17. Rural Development Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David W., Ed.; Reid, J. Norman, Ed.

    This book seeks to provide a basis for reexamining rural development policy by presenting comprehensive and current information on the effectiveness of various rural policy approaches. An introduction that defines development terminology and discusses changing policy needs is followed by 13 chapters that represent the best recent research…

  18. Supporting Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Doris Terry

    2012-01-01

    While city educators and "country" educators might argue whose hardships are greater, rural school leaders unquestionably recognize that their greatest challenge today is building, sustaining, and supporting a teacher corps so that schools can operate at high levels. Inattention to rural teachers' concerns in education reform arenas exacerbates…

  19. HOSPITALS FOR RURAL PEOPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANNY, ELSIE S.; ROGERS, CHARLES E.

    MODERN ADVANCEMENTS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE HAVE PRECIPITATED THE NEED FOR ADEQUATE UP-TO-DATE HOSPITAL FACILITIES REASONABLY CLOSE TO ALL PEOPLE. RURAL COMMUNITIES HAVE UTILIZED FEDERAL AID, STATE AID, ASSISTANCE FROM FOUNDATIONS, CIVIC BONDS, AND VOLUNTEER CONTRIBUTIONS AND DRIVES TO ERECT AND EQUIP HOSPITALS. HOSPITAL CARE FOR RURAL PEOPLE USUALLY…

  20. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  1. Developing Rural Business Incubators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Mark L.; Burnier, DeLysa

    1991-01-01

    Offers background on rural entrepreneurship and incubation in the United States, with particular focus on rural incubators at community colleges and regional incubation systems. Explains how incubators, which provide shared services and business/management assistance for tenant companies, differ from other entrepreneurial development strategies.…

  2. A sociology of migration or "race relations"? A view from Britain.

    PubMed

    Phizacklea, A

    1984-01-01

    Literature on migration in the United Kingdom during the past 20 years is reviewed. The author argues that there is no cohesive sociology of migration that can be identified. Instead, the literature has largely focused on the topic of race relations. Three perspectives on the study of migration are identified: "the political economy of racism, the sociology of ethnic relations and an eclectic body of literature...[defined] as a sociology of migration, though it is dominated by a structuralist perspective." (SUMMARY IN FRE)

  3. [The sociology of gender: an original perspective for a better understanding of suicide in men].

    PubMed

    Roy, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    There is a general consensus that suicide is a social problem. But what exactly is the contribution of sociology to research on suicide? This paper proposes a brief overview of the historical bases of the sociology of suicide and its evolution through the study of deviance and exclusion. On the level of application, the sociology of gender contributed to better understand how some aspects of male socialisation, such as the rigid relations with norms of the male role, may act as suicide risk factors or as a path to recovery.

  4. Rurality Research and Rural Education: Exploratory and Explanatory Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents analysed data from the first year of the Rural Teacher Education Project (RTEP 2007-2009) with a view to illustrating how a generative theory of rurality as education research was developed, and for which ends it might be utilised. The article suggests that data from projects in rural communities, which take the rural as…

  5. Reconnecting Rural America. Report on Rural Intercity Passenger Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stommes, Eileen S.

    This report summarizes the results of three regional symposia held during 1987-88 to gather grassroots information about rural passenger transportation needs across the country. The first section describes the structural transformation of rural America in the 1980s: (1) the rural economy; (2) rural population trends; (3) impact of information…

  6. Critical Policy Sociology: Historiography, Archaeology and Genealogy as Methods of Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Trevor

    2001-01-01

    Examines the essential characteristics of three approaches to conducting critical policy sociology of higher education: Historiography, archaeology, and genealogy. Draws on Australian higher education policy research to illustrate the use of these three methods. (Contains 65 references.) (PKP)

  7. Globalizing the Intelligent Organization: Learning Organizations, Smart Workers, (Not So) Clever Countries and the Sociological Imagination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Stewart

    1999-01-01

    Contrasts exploratory learning with exploitative learning to argue for the importance of both and not just the latter. Discusses a case for organization studies that situates itself within a classical tradition of sociology. (CCM)

  8. Max Weber in the American Journal of Sociology: A case of circulating knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Marlise

    2012-01-01

    By the middle of the 1970s, a Max Weber revival commenced in American sociology. Almost 75 percent of the articles on Weber in the American Journal of Sociology published in the past six decades appeared in the 1970s and 1980s. The Weber revival in American sociology is a phenomenon observed in leading literature. New translations and publications are frequently indicated reasons for the renewed interest in Weber. Without dismissing this factor, it is not an entirely satisfactory explanation. This article accounts for the Weber revival in a new way. Taking the American Journal of Sociology as a case study, I argue that the Weber revival was a case of circulating knowledge. Certain historically set issues led to a reorientation of Weber, which meant that knowledge about Weber was moved, extended, and transformed.

  9. Sociology and American Studies: A Case Study in the Limits of Interdisciplinarity.

    PubMed

    Dubrow, Joshua Kjerulf

    2011-12-01

    American Studies is an academic discipline whose object of study is the United States of America and everything associated with it, and American sociologists largely ignore it. American Studies largely ignores American sociology. What causes this mutual exclusion? An outline of the disciplinary history of American Studies and journal article citation data show that the relationship between sociology and American Studies is weak and asymmetrical; American Studies cites sociology more often, but very little and not by much. I argue that mutual exclusion is due to mutual distrust in methods: sociology sees itself as a science, while American Studies, with roots in history and literature, does not. This article serves as a case study in the limits of interdisciplinarity.

  10. [On the results of sociological survey of feldshers of emergency medical service].

    PubMed

    Poliukova, M V; Iagodkin, V V; Prokop'eva, M I

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the results of sociological survey of feldshers of emergency medical service concerning satisfaction of conditions of professional work. The complex of activities of development of organization of feldsher activities is substantiated.

  11. Rural School Communities in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Jack

    Visits to nine of the smallest rural elementary schools in Colorado were conducted to gain insights into types of communities served by the schools. No one definition of "rural" covered all nine communities, so they were classified into six types: predominantly agricultural, rural industrial, stable recreational, ranching/railraod, rural commuter,…

  12. Workplace Learning in Rural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Robert F.; Brooks, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Many people perceive rural America as being an almost completely agricultural, farming, or ranching economy. In fact, less than 7 percent of rural employment is in agriculture; service industries account for over half, and service and manufacturing together account for more than 66 percent of employment in rural areas. Rural regions take 50…

  13. The Rural School Leadership Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surface, Jeanne L.; Theobald, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The idea that rural schools and communities, indeed, even rural people, are somehow substandard or second-class has deep historical roots. The goal of this essay is to reveal that history so as to render stereotypical conceptions all things rural less powerful and more easily dismissed by rural school professionals. Consequently the focus is on…

  14. Rural Libraries, Volume XIV, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 issues in this volume contain 10 articles on rural libraries and information access in rural America. Topics include telecommunications and distance education in Nebraska, the future of small rural public libraries, federal programs to improve rural access to information, outreach issues for public libraries, and the role of information in…

  15. Changes & Challenges for Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Leslie Asher, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This theme issue of the newsletter SEDLetter contains articles about the challenges facing rural youth, communities, and schools, and the ways that rural schools are meeting those challenges. "When Rural Traditions Really Count" (Ullik Rouk) outlines the rural situation with regard to adolescent substance abuse, youth gangs, teen pregnancy,…

  16. A Perspective on Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Perspective on Rural Education" (Miller); "You Want Them to Learn What?" (Jones); "Rural Education" (Baker, Burns); "Metnet" (Frick); "Rural Education and Training in Egypt" (Swan, Aly); "Mentors, Youth at Risk, and Rural Education Programs" (Wingenbach); "Designing Effective Adult Education Programs: Needs and Objectives" and "Design,…

  17. OPPORTUNITIES FOR RURAL YOUTH IN RURAL AREAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOWLER, LLOYD

    AGRIBUSINESS IS DEFINED AS THE SUM TOTAL OF ALL OPERATIONS INVOLVED IN THE MANUFACTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FARM SUPPLIES, PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE ON THE FARM, AND THE STORAGE, PROCESSING, AND DISTRIBUTION OF FARM COMMODITIES AND ITEMS MADE FROM THEM. WITHIN THESE THREE AREAS ARE SEEN MANY JOB OPPORTUNITIES FOR RURAL AND URBAN YOUTH HAVING COLLEGE…

  18. The Rural Outreach Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Clarence D.

    2000-01-01

    The Rural Outreach Project was designed to increase the diversity of NASA's workforce by: 1) Conducting educational research designed to investigate the most effective strategies for expanding innovative, NASA-sponsored pre-college programs into rural areas; 2) Field-testing identified rural intervention strategies; 3) Implementing expanded NASA educational programs to include 300 rural students who are disabled, female and/or minority; and 4) Disseminating project strategies. The Project was a partnership that included NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, Norfolk State University, Cooperative Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME) and Paul D. Camp Community College. There were four goals and activities identified for this project; 1) Ascertain effective strategies for expanding successful NASA-sponsored urban-based, pre-college programs into rural settings; 2) Field test identified rural intervention strategies; 3) Publish or disseminate two reports, concerning project research and activities at a national conference; 4) Provide educational outreach to 300, previously underserved, rural students who are disabled, female and /or minority.

  19. Health, illness, and healing in an uncertain era: challenges from and for medical sociology.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, B A; Kronenfeld, J J

    1995-01-01

    The current situation in health care organizations, among providers and for people, dramatically challenges the "business as usual" roles of medicine, government, insurance companies, the community, and the university. Health care reform marks the first attempt in a century to consider a reconstruction of the social contract between society and medicine. While sociology stands as one of the earliest social sciences to systematically study the health care arena and create a health-focused subfield, there is a perception, not without support, of a desertion of identity from within, an encroachment by other areas from without, and abandonment by the parent discipline. We argue that these situations in medical arenas and in research fields require serious rethinking. The key lies in understanding how these phenomena are related to each other and to larger social forces, and how they offer opportunities, rather than signal limitations, to medical sociologists. We turn to the theoretical tools of sociology to help unravel the complicated challenges that face both policymakers and researchers. After framing these issues in a sociology of knowledge perspective, we use the case of "utilization theory" to illustrate the connections between society and systems of care (as well as studies of them) and to create a future agenda. We end by raising three basic questions: (1) Why is a sociological perspective critical to the understanding of change and reform in health care? (2) Why is medical sociology critical to the survival of the general sociological enterprise? and (3) Why is general sociology critical to the research agenda in medical sociology? PMID:7560849

  20. Health, illness, and healing in an uncertain era: challenges from and for medical sociology.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, B A; Kronenfeld, J J

    1995-01-01

    The current situation in health care organizations, among providers and for people, dramatically challenges the "business as usual" roles of medicine, government, insurance companies, the community, and the university. Health care reform marks the first attempt in a century to consider a reconstruction of the social contract between society and medicine. While sociology stands as one of the earliest social sciences to systematically study the health care arena and create a health-focused subfield, there is a perception, not without support, of a desertion of identity from within, an encroachment by other areas from without, and abandonment by the parent discipline. We argue that these situations in medical arenas and in research fields require serious rethinking. The key lies in understanding how these phenomena are related to each other and to larger social forces, and how they offer opportunities, rather than signal limitations, to medical sociologists. We turn to the theoretical tools of sociology to help unravel the complicated challenges that face both policymakers and researchers. After framing these issues in a sociology of knowledge perspective, we use the case of "utilization theory" to illustrate the connections between society and systems of care (as well as studies of them) and to create a future agenda. We end by raising three basic questions: (1) Why is a sociological perspective critical to the understanding of change and reform in health care? (2) Why is medical sociology critical to the survival of the general sociological enterprise? and (3) Why is general sociology critical to the research agenda in medical sociology?