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Sample records for russian channels angers

  1. Cultural framework, anger expression, and health status in Russian immigrant women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bagdasarov, Zhanna; Edmondson, Christine B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of anger expression and cultural framework in predicting Russian immigrant women's physical and psychological health status. One hundred Russian immigrant women between the ages of 30 and 65 completed questionnaires assessing anger expression, cultural framework, and health status. All research questions were addressed using hierarchical regression procedures. The results are discussed in terms of implications for understanding immigration experiences of Russian women who migrate from countries that are more collectivistic and less individualistic than the United States.

  2. Association of Normative Beliefs and Anger with Aggression and Antisocial Behavior in Russian Male Juvenile Offenders and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Ruchkin, Vladislav V.

    2004-01-01

    Examined the association of anger experience and two types of normative beliefs with physical aggression and nonaggressive antisocial behavior in 361 juvenile offenders and 206 high school students in Russia. All participants were male and ranged in age from 14 to 18 years. Higher frequency of aggressive acts was significantly associated with…

  3. Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porterfield, Kitty; Carnes, Meg

    2009-01-01

    School leaders are reporting an uptick in anger in their communities these days--often diffuse, unfocused anger--among staff members, parents and neighbors. In the face of threat, the first impulse of education leaders is to toughen up, tighten down and begin broadcasting their messages. Since anxiety and rage come with uncertain times, the…

  4. Anger management in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Anger is not necessarily bad, according to the author. There are times when it is appropriate. At other times it can escalate unpleasantly. The article describes the different stages of anger and the author's advice on the proper response at each stage. He also lists anger reducing and anger enhancing response behaviors to be aware of. PMID:12371249

  5. Anger Management Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Palardy, Nicole R.; McElroy, Heather K.; Phillips, Nancy; Holmes, Khiela J.

    2004-01-01

    Two anger management interventions for aggressive children, Anger Coping and Coping Power, are described in this review article, including conceptual underpinnings, session format and content, and outcome research findings. Important issues and considerations in the implementation of such interventions are also presented. Overall, Anger Coping and…

  6. Anger in Black and White: Race, Alienation, and Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, J. Beth; Kiecolt, K. Jill

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the 1996 General Social Survey and the 1973 Chicago Crowding Study, we test the hypotheses that African Americans feel and express more anger than whites, that sense of control (versus powerlessness) lessens anger and mistrust increases anger, and that these indicators of alienation affect anger differently for African Americans…

  7. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  8. Driving anger in Ukraine: Appraisals, not trait driving anger, predict anger intensity while driving.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A N; Hill, T; Sullman, M J M

    2016-03-01

    Trait driving anger is often, but not always, found to predict both the intensity of anger while driving and subsequent crash-related behaviours. However, a number of studies have not found support for a direct relationship between one's tendency to become angry and anger reported while driving, suggesting that other factors may mediate this relationship. The present self-report study investigated whether, in anger provoking driving situations, the appraisals made by drivers influence the relationship between trait and state anger. A sample of 339 drivers from Ukraine completed the 33-item version of the Driver Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994) and eight questions about their most recent experience of driving anger. A structural equation model found that the intensity of anger experienced was predicted by the negative evaluations of the situation, which was in turn predicted by trait driving anger. However, trait driving anger itself did not predict anger intensity; supporting the hypothesis that evaluations of the driving situation mediate the relationship between trait and state anger. Further, the unique structure of the DAS required to fit the data from the Ukrainian sample, may indicate that the anger inducing situations in Ukraine are different to those of a more developed country. Future research is needed to investigate driving anger in Ukraine in a broader sample and also to confirm the role of the appraisal process in the development of driving anger in both developed and undeveloped countries. PMID:26710267

  9. Driving anger in Ukraine: Appraisals, not trait driving anger, predict anger intensity while driving.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A N; Hill, T; Sullman, M J M

    2016-03-01

    Trait driving anger is often, but not always, found to predict both the intensity of anger while driving and subsequent crash-related behaviours. However, a number of studies have not found support for a direct relationship between one's tendency to become angry and anger reported while driving, suggesting that other factors may mediate this relationship. The present self-report study investigated whether, in anger provoking driving situations, the appraisals made by drivers influence the relationship between trait and state anger. A sample of 339 drivers from Ukraine completed the 33-item version of the Driver Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994) and eight questions about their most recent experience of driving anger. A structural equation model found that the intensity of anger experienced was predicted by the negative evaluations of the situation, which was in turn predicted by trait driving anger. However, trait driving anger itself did not predict anger intensity; supporting the hypothesis that evaluations of the driving situation mediate the relationship between trait and state anger. Further, the unique structure of the DAS required to fit the data from the Ukrainian sample, may indicate that the anger inducing situations in Ukraine are different to those of a more developed country. Future research is needed to investigate driving anger in Ukraine in a broader sample and also to confirm the role of the appraisal process in the development of driving anger in both developed and undeveloped countries.

  10. Driving anger in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sullman, Mark J M; Stephens, Amanda N; Yong, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the types of situations that cause Malaysian drivers to become angry. The 33-item version of the driver anger scale (Deffenbacher et al., 1994) was used to investigate driver anger amongst a sample of 339 drivers. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the fit of the original six-factor model (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and police presence), after removing one item and allowing three error pairs to covary, was satisfactory. Female drivers reported more anger, than males, caused by traffic obstruction and hostile gestures. Age was also negatively related to five (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving and police presence) of the six factors and also to the total DAS score. Furthermore, although they were not directly related to crash involvement, several of the six forms of driving anger were significantly related to the crash-related conditions of: near misses, loss of concentration, having lost control of a vehicle and being ticketed. Overall the pattern of findings made in the present research were broadly similar to those from Western countries, indicating that the DAS is a valid measure of driving anger even among non-European based cultures.

  11. Understanding Clinical Anger and Violence: The Anger Avoidance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Frank L.; Moore, Zella E.

    2008-01-01

    Although anger is a primary emotion and holds clear functional necessities, the presence of anger and its behavioral manifestations of aggression/violence can have serious emotional, health, and social consequences. Despite such consequences, the construct of clinical anger has to date suffered from few theoretical and treatment advancements and…

  12. Sex, Anger and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Robin W.; Lively, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    A social problem that has preoccupied sociologists of gender and mental health is the higher rate of depression found among women. Although a number of hypotheses about this health disparity between men and women have been advanced, none consider the importance of subjectively experienced anger. Drawing on theoretical and empirical insights from…

  13. Anger Camera Firmware

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  14. Imaging phoswich anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sood, R. K.

    1991-08-01

    High angular resolution and low background are the primary requisites for detectors for future astronomy experiments in the low energy gamma-ray region. Scintillation counters are still the only available large area detector for studies in this energy range. Preliminary details of a large area phoswich anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging is described and its background and position characteristics are discussed.

  15. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  16. "Anger Busters" A New Technique for Anger Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajzler, Darko J.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for anger management, developed from a rational-emotive therapy orientation, is described. The technique makes use of humor and referral to "Anger Busters" (based on the film, "Ghost Busters" to defuse angry emotions. Use of the technique with an 8-year-old is described. (DB)

  17. Russian Folktales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Russian folktales suggests a structured approach to introducing the characters, settings, and motifs in an elementary classroom. Highlights include beginner-level texts; connections to Russian culture; writing connections; activities; and an annotated bibliography of 32 titles. (LRW)

  18. Anger Communication in Bicultural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novin, Sheida; Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about bicultural adolescents' emotional competence. The aim of the present study was to examine anger communication by comparing thirty-eight 16-year-old Moroccan-Dutch adolescents with 40 Dutch and 40 Moroccan peers using hypothetical anger-eliciting vignettes. Findings show that although Moroccan and Dutch adolescents were…

  19. Learn to manage your anger

    MedlinePlus

    ... a good way to react most of the time. You have little or no control over the things that cause your anger. But can you learn to control your reaction. Who Needs Anger Management Some people seem to be more prone to ...

  20. The Colors of Anger, Envy, Fear, and Jealously: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupka, Ralph B.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studies to what extent emotion words--anger, envy, fear, and jealousy--reminded samples of Americans, Germans, Mexicans, Poles and Russians, of 12 terms of color. Responses from 661 undergraduates suggest that cross-modal associations originate in universal human experiences and in culture-specific variables, such as language, mythology, and…

  1. The Effects of Anger on Helping Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Bruce S.; Gaertner, Samuel L.

    Subjects were angered or not angered during a bogus experimental task following which their assistance was solicited. Consistent with derivations from Rawling's concept of Anticipatory Guilt, the results indicated that anger facilitated helping only when the lone bystander's anger was directed toward the victim of an emergency. However, anger…

  2. High trait anger Mexican youth: characteristics, parental anger, and counseling needs.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J; Deffenbacher, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    This study compared three groups of Mexican youth: (1) high trait anger adolescents recognizing anger problems (HR); (2) high trait anger youth not reporting anger problems (HNR); and (3) low trait anger adolescents not reporting anger problems (LNR). The HR group was sizable, representing 21% of all students and 72% of high anger youth. Compared to LNR, high anger groups (HR and HNR) experienced more angry feelings, engaged in anger suppression (e.g., holding anger in and harboring grudges) and aggressive anger expression (e.g., urges to aggression, physical aggressive anger expression toward others and toward self and objects), and reported lower internal and external anger control (e.g., relaxing and controlling one's behavior when angry). High anger groups also reported greater trait anger in both parents than LNR, suggesting parent's anger is a risk factor for anger in adolescents. HR and HNR groups, however, did not differ on any variable. Findings for high anger groups supported the intensity, aggression, and reduced positive coping hypotheses of State-Trait Anger Theory. Findings were also discussed in terms of the counseling needs of high anger Mexican youth and State-Trait Theory.

  3. Understanding Children's Anger: Recognizing and Working with Young Children's Anger and Frustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the causes of anger and frustrations of children at different ages. Honig discusses understanding children's anger from ages 0-2 and gives suggestions on how to cope with anger. Miller discusses how children ages 3-4 provoke to anger, and recommends ways to prevent it. Church discusses the cause of anger in 5- and 6-year old…

  4. Anger profiles in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Versella, Mark V; Piccirillo, Marilyn L; Potter, Carrie M; Olino, Thomas M; Heimberg, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) exhibit elevated levels of anger and anger suppression, which are both associated with increased depression, diminished quality of life, and poorer treatment outcomes. However, little is known about how anger experiences differ among individuals with SAD and whether any heterogeneity might relate to negative outcomes. This investigation sought to empirically define anger profiles among 136 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD and to assess their association with distress and impairment. A latent class analysis was conducted utilizing the trait subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 as indicators of class membership. Analysis revealed four distinct anger profiles, with greatest distress and impairment generally demonstrated by individuals with elevated trait anger, a greater tendency to suppress the expression of anger, and diminished ability to adaptively control their anger expression. These results have implications for tailoring more effective interventions for socially anxious individuals.

  5. Anger expression correlates with platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, S R; Schneider, R H; Walton, K G; MacLean, C R; Levitsky, D K; Mandarino, J V; Waziri, R; Wallace, R K

    1997-01-01

    Potential relationships between increased platelet aggregability and such psychological characteristics as hostility and anger were investigated as part of a larger intervention study investigating the potential efficacy of stress-reduction treatments. Participants performed 6-minute mental arithmetic tests under time pressure. Blood was sampled during the first minute of the task and whole blood platelet aggregation was measured in an aggregometer, using collagen and ADP. To assess anger and hostility, the authors used Spielberger's State-Trait Anger and Anger Expression scales together with the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. The authors found positive correlations between collagen-induced platelet aggregation and outwardly expressed anger, as measured by the Anger Expression Scale. The findings suggested that modes of anger expression may be associated with increased platelet aggregation. If confirmed by future studies, this finding could provide a mechanism for the putative connection between anger/hostility and coronary heart disease.

  6. Trait Anger, Anger Expression, and Suicide Attempts among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Stephanie S.; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Franklin, Joseph C.; Mayfield, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between anger, anger expression, and suicidal behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed findings. In a prospective, naturalistic study, we examined how trait anger and anger expression influenced the likelihood of suicide attempts among 180 adolescents followed for up to 13.3 years after…

  7. Anger Assessment in Rural High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jacqueline M.; Puskar, Kathryn R.; Sereika, Susan; Patterson, Kathy; Kaufmann, Judith A.

    2003-01-01

    Anger and aggression in school children are a major concern in American society today. Students with high anger levels and poor cognitive processing skills are at risk for poor relationships, underachievement in school, and health problems. This article describes characteristics of children who are at risk for high anger levels and aggression as…

  8. Primary School Teachers' Restricted and Elaborated Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the cognitive appraisals associated with the emotion of anger based on interviews with teachers. An analysis of these appraisals demonstrated that teachers experienced different forms of anger depending on whether they were relating to other adults or their pupils. Anger in relation to children was based on persistent goal…

  9. Rising Expectations, Black Anger, and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogdell, Roy T.; McLemore, William P.

    1977-01-01

    The societal paradox of abundant opportunities and numerous constraints affects black people's expectations, frustrations, and anger. Specific questions that this paper examines are: What are some possible causes of anger? How have black people reacted to anger-provoking situations? And what are future prospects for black people? (Author/JM)

  10. High and Low Trait Anger, Angry Thoughts, and the Recognition of Anger Problems.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J; Deffenbacher, Jerry L; Hernández Guzmán, Laura; Jurado Cárdenas, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This research had two goals: (1) it tested hypotheses of the State-Trait Model of anger, and (2) it explored characteristics that may distinguish individuals with high trait anger who recognize problems with their anger from those who do not recognize anger problems. Regarding the first goal, findings supported three hypotheses tested. In particular, compared to those low in trait anger, individuals with high trait anger reported: (a) more intense anger (intensity hypothesis), p < .001, effect size (η(2)) = .109; (b) more thoughts involving pejorative labeling/denigration, p < .001, η(2) = .280, thoughts of revenge, p < .001, η(2) = .170, more outward, negative anger expression (anger-out), p < .001, η(2) = .229, and more physically aggressive expression, p < .001, η(2) = .046-.123, (aggression hypothesis); and (c) more anger suppression (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .231, and fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .001, η(2) = .088, and behavioral efforts to control angry feelings (anger control-in), p < .001, η(2) = .116, and behavior (anger control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .260 (reduced positive coping hypothesis). For the second goal we employed two types of individuals, both with high trait anger: those who identified anger as a personal problem and wanted help, and those who did not identify anger as a personal issue. As a result, compared to those who did not report anger problems, those who reported anger problems demonstrated a higher overall propensity to experience anger (i.e., higher trait anger), p < .01, η(2) = .028, greater anger suppression and harboring grudges (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .035, fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .05, η(2) = .015, and attempts to control their angry feelings (anger-control-in), p < .05, η(2) = .016, and behavior (anger-control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .054. Gender was not associated with trait anger or anger problem recognition. Findings were discussed in terms of State-Trait Theory and implications for

  11. High and Low Trait Anger, Angry Thoughts, and the Recognition of Anger Problems.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J; Deffenbacher, Jerry L; Hernández Guzmán, Laura; Jurado Cárdenas, Samuel

    2015-10-30

    This research had two goals: (1) it tested hypotheses of the State-Trait Model of anger, and (2) it explored characteristics that may distinguish individuals with high trait anger who recognize problems with their anger from those who do not recognize anger problems. Regarding the first goal, findings supported three hypotheses tested. In particular, compared to those low in trait anger, individuals with high trait anger reported: (a) more intense anger (intensity hypothesis), p < .001, effect size (η(2)) = .109; (b) more thoughts involving pejorative labeling/denigration, p < .001, η(2) = .280, thoughts of revenge, p < .001, η(2) = .170, more outward, negative anger expression (anger-out), p < .001, η(2) = .229, and more physically aggressive expression, p < .001, η(2) = .046-.123, (aggression hypothesis); and (c) more anger suppression (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .231, and fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .001, η(2) = .088, and behavioral efforts to control angry feelings (anger control-in), p < .001, η(2) = .116, and behavior (anger control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .260 (reduced positive coping hypothesis). For the second goal we employed two types of individuals, both with high trait anger: those who identified anger as a personal problem and wanted help, and those who did not identify anger as a personal issue. As a result, compared to those who did not report anger problems, those who reported anger problems demonstrated a higher overall propensity to experience anger (i.e., higher trait anger), p < .01, η(2) = .028, greater anger suppression and harboring grudges (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .035, fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .05, η(2) = .015, and attempts to control their angry feelings (anger-control-in), p < .05, η(2) = .016, and behavior (anger-control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .054. Gender was not associated with trait anger or anger problem recognition. Findings were discussed in terms of State-Trait Theory and implications for

  12. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid "triggering" model.

    PubMed

    Burns, John W; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-08-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal.

  13. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger.

  14. Standard English and Student Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Janis Butler

    College composition teachers face serious difficulties with student anger in trying to teach writing to poorly prepared students who do not see the need for learning standard English. Most teachers would agree that they are trying to teach writing in a much harsher, less receptive climate produced by powerful social forces over which they have…

  15. Helping Young Children Deal with Anger. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Marian

    Children's anger presents challenges to teachers committed to constructive, ethical, and effective child guidance. This Digest explores what is known about the components of children's anger, factors contributing to understanding and managing anger, and the ways teachers can guide children's expressions of anger. Anger is believed to have three…

  16. Anger and Paranoia in Mentally Disordered Offenders.

    PubMed

    Darch, Kayleigh; Ellett, Lyn; Fox, Simone

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have identified a positive relationship between aggression and paranoia, yet the relationship between the emotion of anger and paranoia in forensic populations has not been examined. Possible confounding variables, such as social desirability and mood, should also be considered. Sixty-six participants who had a violent conviction and mental disorder completed self-report questionnaires that measured anger, paranoid ideation, socially desirable responding, anxiety, and depression. The findings indicated that increased anger was associated with increased paranoia. Partial correlations showed that anger remained significantly associated with paranoia after socially desirable responding, anxiety, depression, gender, and violence history were controlled, suggesting anger and paranoia were not associated due to indirect relationships with these constructs. This could suggest that integrative psychological interventions that consider experiences of both anger and paranoia may be beneficial with forensic populations.

  17. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as manifest in salivary cortisol measures. About 23% of the 360 children (ages 6–10 years, primarily 7–8) showed at least 1 expression of CI anger in situations designed to elicit positive affect. Expression of anger across 2 positive assessments was less common (around 4%). CI anger predicted the hypothesized lower levels of cortisol beyond that attributed to context appropriate anger. Boys' CI anger predicted lower morning cortisol and flatter slopes. Results suggest that this novel approach to studying children's emotion across varying contexts can provide insight into affective style. PMID:19702392

  18. Test Review: Anger Regulation and Expression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavlazoglu, Baki; Erdogan, Niyazi; Paine, Taylor; Jones, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (ARES) which was developed by DiGiuseppe and Tafrate (2011) and published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. The ARES was designed to be a self-report measure of anger expression and regulation in youth aged 10 to 17 years and was intended to be used in screening, individual assessment,…

  19. An Attachment Perspective on Anger among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Chiaki; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Extending John Bowlby's hypothesis that dysfunctional anger is a predictable outcome of insecure attachments to parents, this study investigated the relationship between current parent-adolescent attachment and both the experience and expression of anger. Participants included 776 students (379 boys and 397 girls) in grades 8-12. As predicted…

  20. Closing the Gestalt: On Anger and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karon J.

    1976-01-01

    The author contends it is time to go beyond the approach of Gestalt therapists regarding anger and violence. She feels counselees (and counselors) must realize anger can destroy the possibility of certain relationships. It is not possible to do "your own thing" without taking responsibility for its effect on others. (Author/HMV)

  1. Coping with Anger--Yours, Your Child's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Saf Lerman

    1989-01-01

    Children's feelings of anger, jealousy, and even hatred need to be acknowledged and accepted by parents. This article suggests methods for teaching acceptable ways to express strong feelings. Because parents are role models for children, guidelines are also provided for parents on coping with their own anger. (IAH)

  2. Occupational Status and the Experience of Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Jessica L.; Lizardo, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Current theories in the sociology of emotions posit contradictory expectations regarding the relationship between status and the relative experience of anger, with some predicting a negative relationship and others proposing a positive one. We test the compatibility of these opposing hypotheses by examining the relationship between anger and a key…

  3. Russian roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Following a recent collision, fire, series of computer and power failures, and other mishaps on the Russian space station, Mir, the U.S. Congress held a hearing on September 18 to question the safety of American astronauts staying aboard the aging spacecraft.“There has been sufficient evidence put before this hearing to raise doubts about the safety of continued American long-term presence on the Mir,” said House Science Committee Chairman Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-Wisc.) at the hearing.

  4. Anger

    MedlinePlus

    ... by providing caring assistance and medical advocacy for military personnel and families with deployment-related health concerns. DHCC ... specialists about issues pertaining to the deployment of military personnel. The CDP is a tri-service center funded ...

  5. Anger

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  6. Analysis of anger expression style--continuous anger and personality types of professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Sahan, Hasan; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; Mehtap, Bekir

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliği Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third league in the 2008-2009 football season. The Eysenck personality inventory was modified to Turkish by Bayar in 1983, having been developed by Eysenck and Eysenck in 1975 and the continuous anger-anger style scale (SOTO) was modified to Turkish by Ozer in 1994. The state trait anger scale (STAS) was originally developed by Spielberger in 1983. All these were used on soccer players participating in the study to determine the continuous anger and anger styles in this study. In the interpretation of data, a meaningfulness of p < 0.05, was applied by using regression analysis, the Kruskal Wallis Test, the one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) test and the Tukey test to find the differences among the groups. The SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) programme was used to find the accounted values and to evaluate the data. According to the results of this study, regarding the education level variable, while there was a meaningful difference between the continuous anger sub-dimension and anger control sub-dimension than continuous anger-anger expression styles, no significant difference was found among personality type sub-dimensions (psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, false). In addition, a significant relationship was found between psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, and lie sub-dimensions and the personality type sub-dimensions of professional players' constant anger-anger expression styles.

  7. RORSCHACH SPACE RESPONSES AND ANGER.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Anna Maria; Chiorri, Carlo; Denevi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    In this study, three different subtypes of Space responses to the Rorschach test were hypothesized: S-fusion, S-reversal, and S-integration. The relationship between these subtypes and feelings of anger and aggression was investigated. The Rorschach test, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were administered to 50 university students. Scores on the STAXI-2 were positively associated with S-fusion and negatively associated with S-integration. No significant associations of S subtypes with aggression were found. The findings support the hypothesis that different figure-ground relationships, shown in the subtypes of S responses, indicate different psychological processes. PMID:26107109

  8. Assessment of Mode of Anger Expression in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautin, Robin L.; Overholser, James C.; Goetz, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated internalized and externalized anger in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Results indicated that internalized anger led to depression and feelings of hopelessness and increased chances of suicide attempts. In contrast, externalized anger was related to alcohol-related problems. Thus, different modes of anger expression appear to be…

  9. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  10. An Investigation of Anger Styles in Adolescent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, DeAnna McKinnie

    2006-01-01

    Four-hundred and eight 14 to 19-year-old adolescents in grades 9 through 12 participated in this study. The Adolescent Anger Rating Scale was used to assess differences in expressed anger among participants. Specific styles of anger were measured: reactive, instrumental, and anger control. Results of this study suggest that males demonstrate…

  11. Making Political Anger Possible: A Task for Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The article asks whether political anger has a legitimate place in a democracy, as this is a political system designed to resolve conflicts by peaceful negotiation. It distinguishes personal from social anger and political anger, to focus explicitly on the latter. It argues that both the feeling and expression of political anger are subject to…

  12. Unresolved Anger and Sadness: Identifying Vocal Acoustical Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochman, Daniel; Diamond, Gary M.; Amir, Ofer

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 studies to identify the vocal acoustical correlates of unresolved anger and sadness among women reporting unresolved anger toward an attachment figure. In Study 1, participants (N = 17) were induced to experience and express anger then sadness or sadness then anger. In Study 2, a 2nd group of participants (N = 22) underwent…

  13. Russians as People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wright

    This analysis of the Russian character in various aspects of Soviet society in its daily activities focuses on the cultural rather than the political. Included in the study are sections on: (1) hibernation and awakening; (2) the Russian scene; (3) being a Russian; (4) Russian society--mass and minority; (5) manners, morals, and taste; and (6)…

  14. Relationships among Perceived Stress, Trait Anger, Modes of Anger Expression and Health Status of College Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Williams, Robert L.

    Relationships among perceived stress, trait anger (general propensity to become angry), modes of anger expression, and health status were examined in a sample of 720 college students, using Caplan's conceptualization of stress as the study's framework. Propensity toward anger was assessed by the 10-item form of the Trait Anger Scale (Spielberger…

  15. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Leah; Dingle, Genevieve A.

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger, and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency have yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18–34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 min of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 min silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased) in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier; rather, it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners. PMID:26052277

  16. Forgivingness, anger, and hostility in aggressive driving.

    PubMed

    Kovácsová, Natália; Rošková, Eva; Lajunen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between trait forgivingness, general anger, hostility, driving anger, and self-reported aggressive driving committed by the driver him/herself ("self" scale) and perceiving him/herself as an object of other drivers' aggressive acts ("other" scale). The Slovak version of questionnaires was administrated to a sample of 612 Slovak and Czech drivers. First, the factor structure of the Driver Anger Indicators Scale (DAIS) was investigated. Factor analyses of the self and other parts of the DAIS resulted in two factors, which were named as aggressive warnings and hostile aggression and revenge. Next, the results showed that from all dependent variables (scales of the DAIS), self-reported aggressive warnings (self) on the road were predicted best by chosen person-related factors. The path model for aggressive warnings (self) suggested that trait forgivingness and general anger were fully mediated by driving anger whereas hostility proved to be a unique predictor of aggressive behavior in traffic. Driving anger was found to be the best predictor of perceptions that other drivers behave aggressively. PMID:24211562

  17. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope.

  18. Forgivingness, anger, and hostility in aggressive driving.

    PubMed

    Kovácsová, Natália; Rošková, Eva; Lajunen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between trait forgivingness, general anger, hostility, driving anger, and self-reported aggressive driving committed by the driver him/herself ("self" scale) and perceiving him/herself as an object of other drivers' aggressive acts ("other" scale). The Slovak version of questionnaires was administrated to a sample of 612 Slovak and Czech drivers. First, the factor structure of the Driver Anger Indicators Scale (DAIS) was investigated. Factor analyses of the self and other parts of the DAIS resulted in two factors, which were named as aggressive warnings and hostile aggression and revenge. Next, the results showed that from all dependent variables (scales of the DAIS), self-reported aggressive warnings (self) on the road were predicted best by chosen person-related factors. The path model for aggressive warnings (self) suggested that trait forgivingness and general anger were fully mediated by driving anger whereas hostility proved to be a unique predictor of aggressive behavior in traffic. Driving anger was found to be the best predictor of perceptions that other drivers behave aggressively.

  19. Russian Arctic

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  A Summer View of Russia's Lena Delta and Olenek River     View ... and the thousands of lakes, channels, and rivers of the Lena Delta into a fertile wetland, and when the usual blanket of thick snow had ...

  20. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid “triggering” model

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal. PMID:23624641

  1. Education and the activation, course, and management of anger.

    PubMed

    Schieman, S

    2000-03-01

    Using data from the 1996 General Social Survey, I examine education's association with the activation, course, and management of anger. I argue that education--as a source of stratification (status) and as a personal resource (human capital)--organizes the conditions that influence anger-related processes. In analyses of anger activation, education is associated with lower odds of family-related anger. The well educated have fewer children and more income--factors associated with a lower risk of family anger. Conversely, education is associated with higher odds of work-related anger, but income and personal control account for that association. In analyses of the course of anger, I document a nonlinear association between education and anger duration. Adjustment for the sense of control--which is negatively associated with anger duration--sharpens that parabolic association. Education is positively associated with perceived appropriateness of anger and negatively associated with the display of anger. In both cases, adjustment for control accounts for education's effect. The sense of control also suppresses education's significant positive effect on anger processing. In analyses of anger management, education increases the odds of cognitive flexibility and problem solving, but its effect on communication depends on the sense of control. In sum, education organizes personal and social circumstances that influence anger-related processes.

  2. Experience and expression of anger among Australian prisoners and the relationship between anger and reintegration variables.

    PubMed

    Shinkfield, Alison J; Graffam, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    We examined the experience and expression of anger among a group of Australian prisoners prior to and following prison release, as well as the relationship between anger and several reintegration variables. Participants were 79 adult prisoners (54 male, 25 female) who completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI-2) 1 month prior to release and again at 1 to 4 weeks and 3 to 4 months post-release. A postrelease questionnaire was also administered at the two postrelease points focusing on the quality of life conditions experienced following release. Mean state and trait anger scores were significantly higher at pre-release than post-release. As well, higher levels of anger expression and anger control were reported at pre-release compared with post-release. Higher age was related to lower state anger at post-release, whereas several variables were related to trait anger at post-release. Theoretical implications for reintegration theory are discussed, together with practical applications.

  3. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Examining Player Anger in World of Warcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Jane; Coulson, Mark; Foreman, Nigel

    This questionnaire study of the sources of anger in World of Warcraft applies classical quantitative measurement scale construction to a new problem, generating a host of questionnaire items that could find use in future studies, and identifying four major categories of events that cause negative effect among players. First, 33 players provided examples of in-game scenarios that had made them angry, and their responses were culled to create a 93-item battery rated by hundreds of player respondents in terms of anger intensity and anger frequency. An iterative process of factor analysis and scale reliability assessment led to a 28-item instrument measuring four anger-provoking factors: Raids/Instances, Griefers, Perceived Time Wasting, and Anti-social Players. These anger-causing scenarios were then illustrated by concrete examples from player and researcher experiences in World of Warcraft. One striking finding is that players become angry at other players' negative behavior, regardless of whether that behavior was intended to harm.

  5. Associations among homesickness, anger, anxiety, and depression.

    PubMed

    Verschuur, Margot J; Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth H M; Spinhoven, Philip

    2004-06-01

    The study investigated the association of homesickness with the related concepts of anxiety, depression, and anger. Two conceptualizations of homesickness were used, one considering homesickness as a state, characterized by severe symptoms of a depressive episode, and the other one as a self-reported tendency to experience homesickness in times of separation from the familiar environment. The latter conceptualization can rather be considered as an enduring trait and does not specifically refer to actual feelings of depression. We compared these two conceptualizations of homesickness in a random sample from the Dutch population (n=485) by assessing their uni- and multivariate associations with anger, anxiety, depression, and anxiety-sensitivity. Both conceptualizations of homesickness were associated with anxiety and depression and with the externalization of anger. No association was found between internalization of anger or control over internalized and externalized anger for either conceptualization of homesickness. The pattern of multivariate associations between homesickness and its emotional correlates was similar for both conceptualizations, although homesickness as a state appeared to have a stronger association with depression, whereas the tendency to develop homesickness showed a particularly strong association with anxiety. It is concluded that homesickness can be considered as a mixed emotion of anxiety and depression ("Cothymia"), but that depression is more characteristic of homesickness as a state, whereas anxiety is more important if homesickness is conceptualized as an enduring tendency.

  6. Is cyberbullying related to trait or state anger?

    PubMed

    Lonigro, Antonia; Schneider, Barry H; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Brunner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a powerful emotion shared by victims and bullies in both physical and electronic forms of bullying. However, little is known about the specific roles of trait anger and state anger in involvement in bullying episodes. The purpose of this study was to verify which component of anger, trait or state, is more strongly related to physical and cyberbullying and victimization. Students between the ages 11-19 (N = 716, 392 female, 324 male) completed the state trait anger expression inventory-2 child and adolescent and a measure of victimization and bullying. Results for cyberbullying suggested a major vulnerability among bullies and victims to experience anger as a personality trait as well some links between state anger, cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Moreover, the outward, explosive expression of anger appears to be common among cyber and physical bullies. Implications for intervention programs are discussed.

  7. Is cyberbullying related to trait or state anger?

    PubMed

    Lonigro, Antonia; Schneider, Barry H; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Brunner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a powerful emotion shared by victims and bullies in both physical and electronic forms of bullying. However, little is known about the specific roles of trait anger and state anger in involvement in bullying episodes. The purpose of this study was to verify which component of anger, trait or state, is more strongly related to physical and cyberbullying and victimization. Students between the ages 11-19 (N = 716, 392 female, 324 male) completed the state trait anger expression inventory-2 child and adolescent and a measure of victimization and bullying. Results for cyberbullying suggested a major vulnerability among bullies and victims to experience anger as a personality trait as well some links between state anger, cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Moreover, the outward, explosive expression of anger appears to be common among cyber and physical bullies. Implications for intervention programs are discussed. PMID:25081097

  8. The relationship between negative expressivity, anger, and PTSD symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Meredith; Roley, Michelle E; Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Dranger, Paula; Wang, Li; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-09-30

    More investigation is needed to understand how specific posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters relate to the internal experience of anger and overt negative behaviors in response to anger (negative expressivity). We investigated whether anger mediated relations between PTSD symptom clusters and negative expressivity. Multiple regression revealed lower PTSD intrusion symptoms associated with higher levels of negative expressivity. Anger mediated this relationship. Higher avoidance symptoms related to higher negative expressivity. Clinical implications, limitations, and strengths are discussed. PMID:27343408

  9. Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation (SCBE-30) and Socialization Values (SVQ): Russian Children Ages 3 to 6 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Demianovitsch, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated social competence and problem behaviors among 217 Russian preschoolers. Found anxiety-withdrawal, anger-aggression, and social competence factors similar to those found in American, Canadian, French, and Spanish children. Found a mix of universal and culturally specific features that may be connected to gender stereotypes prevailing in…

  10. Driving Anger and Driving Behavior in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Tracy L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Rosen, Lee A.; Barkley, Russell A.; Rodricks, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether anger in the context of driving is associated with the negative driving outcomes experienced by individuals with ADHD. Method: ADHD adults (n = 56) complete measures of driving anger, driving anger expression, angry thoughts behind the wheel, and aggressive, risky, and crash-related behavior. Results are…

  11. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  12. Treatment of Anger: A Review of the Current Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Carole Lou

    Many psychological and physiological disorders may have some etiology in an unconstructive response to anger. Still others may be exacerbated by repressed or suppressed anger. Anger is often a problem for clients seeking therapy, yet psychologists have little research upon which to develop a viable therapeutic approach. While skills in…

  13. Effects of Trait Anger on Alcohol Consumption and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibsohn, Matthew T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared alcohol consumption and its consequences for high- and low-anger college students. High-anger students exhibited more frequent drinking and intoxication, and experienced severer physical, emotional, and behavioral alcohol-related consequences than low-anger students. Some gender differences were noted. Results are discussed in terms of…

  14. Role of Appraisals in Expressed Anger after Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Diane; Bryant, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Anger is a common problem in trauma-exposed individuals. This study investigated factors that contribute to post-traumatic anger in civilian trauma survivors. Fifty-one trauma-exposed individuals were assessed for expressed anger, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), daily hassles, maladaptive cognitions and blame. PTSD and non-PTSD participants…

  15. Development of the Juvenile Justice Anger Management Treatment for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Naomi E. S.; Serico, Jennifer M.; Riggs Romaine, Christina L.; Zelechoski, Amanda D.; Kalbeitzer, Rachel; Kemp, Kathleen; Lane, Christy

    2013-01-01

    Female juvenile offenders exhibit high levels of anger, relational aggression, and physical aggression, but the population has long been ignored in research and practice. No anger management treatments have been developed specifically for this population, and no established anger management treatments are empirically supported for use with…

  16. Anger and Political Culture: A Time for Outrage!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the role of political anger in democracy. It reviews the work of Stephane Hessel before examining the role and reception of anger in classical and modern thought. The author identifies two main traditions within which the concept of political anger can be located: revolutionary violence of the Marxist tradition and the…

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Conceptualization and Treatment of Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Anger is conceptualized within a broad cognitive-behavioral (CBT) framework emphasizing triggering events; the person's pre-anger state, including temporary conditions and more enduring cognitive and familial/cultural processes; primary and secondary appraisal processes; the anger experience/response (cognitive, emotional, and physiological…

  18. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  19. Browns in Anger: The Overlooked Minority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara-Braud, Jorge

    This speech advocates that Mexican-Americans must undergo a process of radicalization to attempt to transfer anger from deeds to words. This minority is losing faith in speech as a means of redress, but corrective measures should come through dialogue and not collision. Few Mixican Americans designated themselves "browns" a year ago--but it is now…

  20. Women's Feminist Consciousness, Anger, and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Ann R.; Good, Glenn E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to bring together several lines of research and theory on women's feminist consciousness from psychology, sociology, and philosophy. Past literatures had suggested bivariate links between feminist identity development and psychological distress, feminist identity and anger, feminist identity and interpersonal conflict,…

  1. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  2. Anger Expression and Persistence in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Xu, Qinmei; Degnan, Kathryn Amey

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated anger expression during toy removal (TR) in 92 young Chinese children, two to five years of age, and its relations to their persistence in responding to obstacles during two challenging tasks with highly desirable goals [TR and locked box (LB)] and one challenging task with a less desirable goal [impossible perfect circles…

  3. [The impact of mindfulness meditation on anger].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Misa; Yukawa, Shintaro

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the impact of mindfulness meditation on anger. A meditation group (N = 37) attended 5-10 minutes of mindfulness meditation daily for a week. They were assessed with self-report scales measuring three aspects of anger (rumination, arousal, and lengthiness) before, just after, and four weeks after their one-week participation. Their scores were compared to a control group (N = 27), which was assessed at the same intervals as the meditation group. The meditation group was also asked to evaluate their current mood using the Affect Grid before and after each meditation. The results indicated that participants in the meditation group who continued meditation voluntarily after the week of their participation had decreased anger rumination scores just after and four weeks after their participation. Additionally, the pleasant score on the Affect Grid increased after meditation for almost all the participation days. These findings suggest the efficacy of mindfulness meditation on improving the tendency to ruminate about anger episodes in the medium-term to long-term, and also on improving mood in the short-term.

  4. Individual Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, John L.; Dodd, Louise; Rose, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence for the efficacy of programs to reduce inappropriate aggression in people with intellectual disabilities. These have been provided in groups and for individuals in forensic settings. People with intellectual disability and inappropriately expressed anger who were referred to a community psychology service were assigned to…

  5. Treating Anger: The Misunderstood Emotion in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akande, Adebowale

    1997-01-01

    Reviews behavioral and cognitive interventions that are potential models for the treatment of anger and impulsivity in brain injured patients, including a multicomponent treatment approach coupled with cognitive interventions. Proposes strategies to establish a therapeutic relationship with angry, impulsive patients. Examines models for treating…

  6. Teaching kids to cope with anger: peer education.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Kathryn R; Stark, Kirsti H; Northcut, Terri; Williams, Rick; Haley, Tammy

    2011-03-01

    Anger could be an early warning signal of violent behavior. Early peer education health promotion in relation to anger management could help children before uncontrolled anger becomes a problem in adolescence and adulthood. Peer education has been identified as a viable intervention strategy worldwide with various prevention programs for youth. The purpose of this article is to describe an anger management program (Teaching Kids to Cope with Anger, TKC-A 4th-8th graders) co-led by high school peer educators in an urban school district's summer school enhancement program. A program of five modules will be described. This paper discusses the peer educator implementation and recommendations for future implementation.

  7. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  8. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  9. Russian RBMK reactor design information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

  10. Anger in Adolescent Communities: How Angry Are They?

    PubMed

    Pullen, Lisa; Modrcin, Mary Anne; McGuire, Sandra L; Lane, Karen; Kearnely, Melissa; Engle, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Anger is a common factor in two causes of death in adolescence: homicide and suicide. This study looked at the level of anger in non-clinical convenience sample of adolescents (N = 139) between the ages of 12 and 19 years (early: 12 to 14 years, mid: 15 to 16 years, late: 17 to 19 years) from a large Southeastern Baptist church. Participants completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Beck and Children's Depression Inventories, and Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). The level of self-reported anger was low. The difference in anger between the three age groups was not statistically significant. Differences in gender were generally not significant statistically. A strong correlation exists between stress and anger. A minor relationship between parental drinking behaviors, as measured by the CAST, and anger was found. A significant relationship between anger and depression, and frequency of participation in religious activity and decreased anger was established. By increasing the current knowledge of anger in adolescents, it may be possible to gain insight into risk factors or triggers that cause anger. Interventions must be implemented early to prevent juvenile detention and to help adolescents remain in the community. Public policies addressing anger in adolescents are essential. Health care providers must work together to identify adolescents with disorders or feelings of isolation or disconnect and provide treatment based in communities so adolescents can still function and not be isolated. It is relevant that a mentor or someone that can be trusted is provided to build a safe and secure environment. This greater knowledge may aid in assessment and treatment of adolescents with dysfunctional anger.

  11. Anger in Adolescent Communities: How Angry Are They?

    PubMed

    Pullen, Lisa; Modrcin, Mary Anne; McGuire, Sandra L; Lane, Karen; Kearnely, Melissa; Engle, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Anger is a common factor in two causes of death in adolescence: homicide and suicide. This study looked at the level of anger in non-clinical convenience sample of adolescents (N = 139) between the ages of 12 and 19 years (early: 12 to 14 years, mid: 15 to 16 years, late: 17 to 19 years) from a large Southeastern Baptist church. Participants completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Beck and Children's Depression Inventories, and Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). The level of self-reported anger was low. The difference in anger between the three age groups was not statistically significant. Differences in gender were generally not significant statistically. A strong correlation exists between stress and anger. A minor relationship between parental drinking behaviors, as measured by the CAST, and anger was found. A significant relationship between anger and depression, and frequency of participation in religious activity and decreased anger was established. By increasing the current knowledge of anger in adolescents, it may be possible to gain insight into risk factors or triggers that cause anger. Interventions must be implemented early to prevent juvenile detention and to help adolescents remain in the community. Public policies addressing anger in adolescents are essential. Health care providers must work together to identify adolescents with disorders or feelings of isolation or disconnect and provide treatment based in communities so adolescents can still function and not be isolated. It is relevant that a mentor or someone that can be trusted is provided to build a safe and secure environment. This greater knowledge may aid in assessment and treatment of adolescents with dysfunctional anger. PMID:26201172

  12. Status of the Los Alamos Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Nutter, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests of the neutron Anger camera being developed at Los Alamos are presented. This detector uses a unique encoding scheme involving parellel processing of multiple receptive fields. Design goals have not yet been met, but the results are very encouraging and improvements in the test procedures are expected to show that the detector will be ready for use on a small-angle scattering instrument next year. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Russian Language Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serianni, Barbara; Rethwisch, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the result of a language analysis research project focused on the Russian Language. The study included a diverse literature review that included published materials as well as online sources in addition to an interview with a native Russian speaker residing in the United States. Areas of study include the origin and history of the…

  14. Russian Supplementary Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan).

    This manual is designed for the Russian language training of Peace Corps volunteers serving in Turkmenistan, and focuses on daily communication skills needed in that context. It consists of nine topical lessons, each containing several brief dialogues targeting specific language competencies, and exercises. Text is entirely in Russian, except for…

  15. Russian Teaching Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Betsy

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes two Russian teaching contracts, rhetorically comparing purpose and audience, culture, gender, and the role of the individual versus the state. Uses anecdotal episodes as a framework for examining Russian culture and analyzing university teaching contracts, concluding that the contracts are not only brief and factual but also reflect a…

  16. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  17. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  18. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  19. Anger enhances correspondence between implicit and explicit attitudes.

    PubMed

    Huntsinger, Jeffrey R

    2013-04-01

    The goal of the current research was to subject to empirical examination the idea that the experience of anger would narrow the separation between implicit and explicit attitudes. Specifically, the tendency of anger to promote a sense of certainty in one's point of view was predicted to enhance the subjective validity of implicit attitudes, and that this validation of implicit attitudes by anger should increase implicit-explicit attitude correspondence. Consistent with these predictions, across three experiments, anger, as compared with neutral emotion (Experiments 1-3) and sad emotion (Experiments 1-2), was found to increase implicit-explicit attitude correspondence. Appraisals of certainty, but not individual control, mediated the effect of anger on implicit-explicit correspondence (Experiment 3). More generally, these results imply that anger may play an essential, but until now overlooked, role in directing the interplay between spontaneous and deliberative aspects of the self.

  20. Anger in psychological disorders: Prevalence, presentation, etiology and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Johnson, Sheri L

    2016-06-01

    Anger is present as a key criterion in five diagnoses within DSM-5: Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. This review amasses scientific literature demonstrating that within each of these disorders, anger is a central clinical feature that is highly prevalent and predictive of important outcomes. For each disorder, we also discuss the phenomenology and etiology of anger. Although models of anger have been quite distinct across these disorders, few empirical studies have truly tested whether anger stems from different etiological factors across these different conditions. We end with a discussion of transdiagnostic research that draws from cognitive psychology, affective science, and the neuroscience of anger, and that also fits with integrative approaches to treatment. PMID:27188635

  1. Relations between anger and DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Durham, Tory A; Byllesby, Brianna M; Armour, Cherie; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-30

    The present study investigated the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger. Anger co-occurring with PTSD is found to have a severe effect across a wide range of traumatic experiences, making this an important relationship to examine. The present study utilized data regarding dimensions of PTSD symptoms and anger collected from a non-clinical sample of 247 trauma-exposed participants. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine the underlying factor structure of both PTSD and anger by examining anger in the context of three models of PTSD. Results indicate that a five-factor representation of PTSD and one-factor representation of anger fit the data best. Additionally, anger demonstrated a strong relationship with the dysphoric arousal and negative alterations in cognitions and mood (NACM) factors; and dysphoric arousal was differentially related to anger. Clinical implications include potential need to reevaluate PTSD's diagnostic symptom structure and highlight the potential need to target and treat comorbid anger in individuals with PTSD. In regard to research, these results support the heterogeneity of PTSD. PMID:27525831

  2. Social Status and Anger Expression: The Cultural Moderation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Markus, Hazel R.; Coe, Christopher L.; Miyamoto, Yuri; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine B.; Love, Gayle D.; Kawakami, Norito; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with lower social status have been reported to express more anger, but this evidence comes mostly from Western cultures. Here, we used representative samples of American and Japanese adults and tested the hypothesis that the association between social status and anger expression depends on whether anger serves primarily to vent frustration, as in the United States, or to display authority, as in Japan. Consistent with the assumption that lower social standing is associated with greater frustration stemming from life adversities and blocked goals, Americans with lower social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by the extent of frustration. In contrast, consistent with the assumption that higher social standing affords a privilege to display anger, Japanese with higher social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by decision-making authority. As expected, anger expression was predicted by subjective social status among Americans and by objective social status among Japanese. Implications for the dynamic construction of anger and anger expression are discussed. PMID:24098926

  3. Dimensions of driving anger and their relationships with aberrant driving.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between driving anger and aberrant driving behaviours. An internet-based questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of Chinese drivers, with driving anger measured by a 14-item short Driving Anger Scale (DAS) and the aberrant driving behaviours measured by a 23-item Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ). The results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the three-factor model (hostile gesture, arrival-blocking and safety-blocking) of the DAS fitted the driving anger data well. The Exploratory Factor Analysis on DBQ data differentiated four types of aberrant driving, viz. emotional violation, error, deliberate violation and maintaining progress violation. For the anger-aberration relation, it was found that only "arrival-blocking" anger was a significant positive predictor for all four types of aberrant driving behaviours. The "safety-blocking" anger revealed a negative impact on deliberate violations, a finding different from previously established positive anger-aberration relation. These results suggest that drivers with different patterns of driving anger would show different behavioural tendencies and as a result intervention strategies may be differentially effective for drivers of different profiles.

  4. Anger in the trajectory of healing from childhood maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Bannister, Sarah C; Hall, Joanne M

    2012-06-01

    When a girl is abused during childhood, she may not experience anger, only helplessness or numbness. Only later may the emotion of anger surface. Little is known about anger cognitions or behaviors as they occur across the years of the healing trajectory from childhood maltreatment. Data for the present secondary analysis were derived from a large narrative study of women thriving in adulthood despite childhood abuse. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the phenomenon of anger and its role in the recovery process of 6 midlife women. The 6 cases were purposefully selected because their interviews contained rich descriptions of anger experiences. Because each woman was interviewed 3 times over a 6- to 12-month period, 18 transcripts were available for in-depth examination. A typology was constructed, depicting 5 types of anger. Anger ranged from nonproductive, self-castigating behavior to empowering, righteous anger that enabled women to protect themselves from further abuse and to advocate for abused children. Study findings are relevant to extant theories of women's anger and feminist therapies. PMID:22633579

  5. Anger in the Trajectory of Healing from Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Bannister, Sarah C.; Hall, Joanne M.

    2011-01-01

    When a girl is abused during childhood, she may not experience anger, only helplessness or numbness. Only later may the emotion of anger surface. Little is known about anger cognitions or behaviors as they occur across the years of the healing trajectory from childhood maltreatment. Data for the present secondary analysis were derived from a large narrative study of women thriving in adulthood despite childhood abuse. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the phenomenon of anger and its role in the recovery process of 6 midlife women. The 6 cases were purposefully selected because their interviews contained rich descriptions of anger experiences. Because each woman was interviewed 3 times over a 6–12 month period, 18 transcripts were available for in-depth examination. A typology was constructed, depicting 5 types of anger. Anger ranged from nonproductive, self-castigating behavior to empowering, righteous anger that enabled women to protect themselves from further abuse and to advocate for abused children. Study findings are relevant to extant theories of women’s anger and feminist therapies. PMID:22633579

  6. Anger, stress and blood pressure in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kimberly Hall; Rice, Marti; Howell, Carol

    2011-10-01

    Among adults, trait anger, patterns of anger expression, and stress have been associated with blood pressure (BP). Less apparent is the effect of these variables on BP in overweight and obese children. To characterize the relationships between these psychological variables and BP, the authors conducted a secondary analysis of data from 73 overweight and obese 9- to 11-year-old children. Findings indicate a positive correlation between trait anger and systolic BP (SBP). Regression results indicate that the overall model significantly predicted SBP by explaining 15.4% of the variance and that trait anger was a significant predictor of SBP.

  7. Research on Russian National Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Na, Zhuo

    2008-01-01

    The special geographical location Russia lies in creates the unique character of the Russian nation. Based on the dual nature of the Russian national character, the Russian geographical environment and the analysis of its social structure, this text tries to explore the reasons of the dual nature of Russian national character.

  8. The Relation between Anger Coping Strategies, Anger Mood and Somatic Complaints in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miers, Anne C.; Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Cowan, Richard; Linden, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to explain the experience of somatic complaints among children and adolescents suggest that they may in part result from the influence of particular strategies for coping with anger on the longevity of negative emotions. To explore these relationships British (n = 393) and Dutch (n = 99) children completed a modified version of the…

  9. "Turning Anger into Knowledge": Exploring Anger and Advocacy with Women Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorney, Judith

    2000-01-01

    In exploring the connections among gender, schooling, and knowledge, this paper considers the relationships between, and the effects of silencing or expressing anger, in women and their work as educators. Data come from two action research projects: Women Teaching Girls retreats and the Exploring Gender and Knowledge. Each consisted of a series of…

  10. Quantum Russian roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; da Silva, Ladário

    2013-01-01

    We quantize the gamble known as Russian roulette and we study it in two versions for two- and three-persons when: (i) players use a fully loaded quantum gun; (ii) the quantum gun has only one quantum bullet.

  11. Russian Education: Historical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the evaluation of Russian educational concepts through six historical periods; stresses the significance of social, philosophical, political, and psychological factors that have affected Soviet educational policies used to instill Communist values. (JD)

  12. Russian Contract Procurement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2010-03-29

    This contract supports the enhancement of physical protection or nuclear material control and accounting systems at institutes or enterprises of the newly independent states under the material protection control and accounting (MPC&A) program. The contract is entered into pursuant to the MPC&A Program, a gratuitous technical assistance program, in accordance with the bilateral Agreements between the Russian Federation and the United States of America concerning the Safe and Secure Transportation, Storage and Destruction of Weapons and the Prevention of Weapons Proliferation of June 1992, as extended and amended by Protocol signed of June 1999, Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation regarding Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Materials Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of October 1999 and the Russian Federation law of May 1999 on the taxation exemption of gratuitous technical assistance with Russian Federation under registration No.DOE001000.

  13. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  14. Don't look back in anger: neural correlates of reappraisal, analytical rumination, and angry rumination during recall of an anger-inducing autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Fabiansson, Emma C; Denson, Thomas F; Moulds, Michelle L; Grisham, Jessica R; Schira, Mark M

    2012-02-01

    Despite the enormous costs associated with unrestrained anger, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying anger regulation. Behavioral evidence supports the effectiveness of reappraisal in reducing anger, and demonstrates that rumination typically maintains or augments anger. To further understand the effects of different anger regulation strategies, during functional magnetic resonance imaging 21 healthy male and female undergraduates recalled an anger-inducing autobiographical memory. They then engaged in three counterbalanced anger regulation strategies: reappraisal, analytical rumination, and angry rumination. Reappraisal produced the least self-reported anger followed by analytical rumination and angry rumination. Rumination was associated with increased functional connectivity of the inferior frontal gyrus with the amygdala and thalamus. Understanding how neural regions interact during anger regulation has important implications for reducing anger and violence.

  15. Attitudes toward Anger Management Scale: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, David J.; Dahlen, Eric R.; Madson, Michael B.; Bullock-Yowell, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and preliminary validation of the Attitudes Toward Anger Management Scale (ATAMS), a self-report measure of attitudes toward anger management services. Undergraduate volunteers ("N" = 415) completed an initial version of the instrument. Principal components analysis yielded a two-factor solution.…

  16. Anger in Australian Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Peter; Mergler, Amanda; Furlong, Michael; Caltabiano, Nerina

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study examined the cultural differences in the dimensions of self-reported anger in Indigenous and non-Indigenous (Caucasian) students aged 10-13 years in Far North Queensland, Australia. The Multidimensional School Anger Inventory-Revised (MSAI-R) (Boman, Curtis, Furlong, & Smith, 2006) was used to measure affective,…

  17. The Social Antecedents of Anger Proneness in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, R. Jay; Russell, David; Glover, Regan; Hutto, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Anger has been shown to be an important factor in occupational maladjustment, family conflict, physical and sexual assault, criminal behavior, and substance abuse. It has also been linked with such adverse health outcomes as hypertension, heart disease, and cancer. Focusing on anger proneness, conceptualized as a relatively enduring propensity to…

  18. Longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change of anger and cynicism.

    PubMed

    Hakulinen, Christian; Jokela, Markus; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Merjonen, Päivi; Raitakari, Olli T; Hintsanen, Mirka

    2014-06-01

    Anger and hostility are key concepts in behavioral medicine, but little is known about their stability over life course. A sample of 3,074 individuals from six age groups (aged 15-30 at the baseline) were selected from a population-based study to examine longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change in anger and cynicism from early to middle adulthood over 15 years. Cynicism, a facet of hostility, and anger were measured 4 times in 1992, 1997, 2001 and 2007. Final longitudinal measurement invariance models achieved partial strict measurement invariance, indicating good measurement consistency over time. Rank-order stability of anger and cynicism was found to be moderate. Mean levels of anger and cynicism decreased over time, but in anger the decline was faster among women. The variance of anger and cynicism also increased over time, but in cynicism the rate of change was higher among men. Altogether, anger and cynicism show measurement invariance and moderate stability from early adulthood to middle adulthood.

  19. From Unresolved Anger to Sadness: Identifying Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochman, Daniel; Diamond, Gary M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to identify physiological correlates of unresolved anger and sadness, and the shift between these emotions, in a context similar to that of emotion-focused, experiential psychotherapy. Twenty-seven university students reporting unresolved anger toward an attachment figure were induced to experience and express unresolved…

  20. Response Styles in the Assessment of Anger Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollwitzer, Mario; Eid, Michael; Jurgensen, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    This study demonstrates how mixture distribution item response models can be used to detect different response styles in the clinical assessment of anger expression. Analyses of 3 subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory in a clinical sample of 4,497 patients revealed that there are different response styles that manifest themselves…

  1. Women, Anger, and Aggression: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eatough, Virginia; Smith, Jonathan A.; Shaw, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    This study reports a qualitative phenomenological investigation of anger and anger-related aggression in the context of the lives of individual women. Semistructured interviews with five women are analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. This inductive approach aims to capture the richness and complexity of the lived experience of…

  2. Infants' and Mothers' Vagal Reactivity in Response to Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ginger A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Exposure to anger in the family is a risk factor for disruptive behavior disorders characterized by ineffective vagal regulation. Effects of anger on developing vagal regulation may be due to direct exposure or to effects on parents' regulation of emotion as parents support infants' regulation. Little is known about the impact of anger…

  3. The Application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Problem Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to familiarize clinicians with the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for problem anger by describing the application of ACT to a case of a 45-year-old man struggling with anger. ACT is an approach and set of intervention technologies that support acceptance and mindfulness processes linked with commitment and…

  4. The Politics and Regulation of Anger in Urban China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Negative emotions such as anger, and community responses to their expression are culturally and politically conditioned, including by dominant medical discourse on anger's somatic and psychic effects. In this article I examine local genres of anger expression in Beijing, China, particularly among marginalized workers, and address culturally specific responses to them. Through majie (rant), xiangpi ren (silenced rage), and nande hutu (muddledness as a more difficult kind of smartness), workers strategically employ anger to seek redress for injustices and legitimate their moral indignation while challenging official psychotherapeutic interventions. Those who seek to regulate anger, mostly psychosocial workers acting as arm's-length agents of the state, use mixed methods that draw on Western psychotherapy and indigenous psychological resources to frame, medicalize or appease workers' anger in the name of health and social stability. I demonstrate how the two processes--anger expression and responses to it--create tensions and result in an ambiguous and multivalent social terrain which Chinese subjects must negotiate and which the state attempts to govern. I argue that the ambivalence and multi-valence of anger expressions and state-sponsored reactions to them render this emotion both subversive vis-à-vis power and subject to manipulations that maintain social order.

  5. Mad Kids: How To Help Your Child Manage Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beekman, Susan; Holmes, Jeanne

    2002-01-01

    Children move through the same anger cycle as adults and need similar coping strategies and problem solving skills. This paper presents pre-anger approaches, discussing what to do before the "boil-over" occurs, when the boiling point is reached, and after the boil-over. A sidebar presents a list of questions and activities parents can use with…

  6. Toward disentangling sources of individual differences in appraisal and anger.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, Peter; Van Mechelen, Iven; Rijmen, Frank

    2008-07-01

    A theoretical framework is presented to explain individual differences in situation-specific emotional experience in terms of three different sources of variance: (a) individual differences in how one appraises one's circumstances, (b) individual differences in how appraisals are related to the experience of emotion, and (c) individual differences independent from situation and appraisal. The relative contribution and nature of these sources was examined empirically for the experience of anger based on data from two directed imagery studies (total N=1,192). Consistent results across the two studies demonstrated that variability in anger experience primarily stems from variability in how a situation is appraised and to a smaller extent from individual differences in the relations between the appraisals and anger and individual differences independent of appraisal. The findings further identified frustration as the central appraisal involved in anger. Implications for emotion theories and anger management programs are discussed.

  7. An Investigation of Anger and Anger Expression in Terms of Coping with Stress and Interpersonal Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Coskun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anger and anger expression styles with respect to coping with stress and interpersonal problem-solving. The participants were 468 (258 female and 210 male, between 17-30 years old) university students. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and multiple hierarchical regression analysis were…

  8. An Investigation of Violent and Nonviolent Adolescents' Family Functioning, Problems Concerning Family Members, Anger and Anger Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Rasit; Gucray, Songul Sonay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to (a) investigate the families of violent and nonviolent adolescents in terms of family functioning, trait anger and anger expression, and (b) compare incidence of psychological problems, alcohol usage and delinquent behaviors. The sample consisted of families of both violent (n = 54) and nonviolent adolescents (n =…

  9. Adolescent Russian roulette deaths.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kim A

    2010-03-01

    Adolescence, between the ages of 10 and 19 years, is a unique period both physically and emotionally. During this time of life, individuals are known to experiment and engage in risky behavior, sometimes with unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We also see suicide emerge as a manner of death in this age group. The most common method is gunshot wound and sometimes in the form of Russian roulette. Few studies have looked at deaths by Russian roulette, the victims, and scenarios. In particular, no study examines the adolescent victim of Russian roulette. To better understand and classify this entity, adolescent Russian roulette autopsy cases over a 20-year period were examined looking at the victims, scenarios, autopsy findings, cause and manner of death, and the weapons. All victims were males, ages 13 to 19 years, with a Black-to-White ratio of 1:1. No victim had a previous psychiatric history. Toxicology was positive for alcohol and/or marijuana in 50% of the victims. Friends were present when the victim shot himself which occurred in the home the majority of the time. In all but 1 case, premeditation of the game was involved as the victim provided the weapon for the roulette. The cause of death was gunshot wound to the head (6 to the right side, 1 to the mouth, 1 to the forehead), and the manner of death was suicide in 6 cases and accident in 2 cases. A review of the literature discusses the adolescent victim, suicide, and Russian roulette.

  10. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  11. Development of neutron Anger-camera detector based on flatpanel PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Katsuya; Satoh, Setsuo; Sakai, Kenji; Shinohara, Takenao; Ikeda, Kazuaki; Mishima, Kenji; Yamada, Satoru; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.

    2006-11-01

    A neutron scintillating detector and its data taking system have been developed for neutron scattering measurement. A 64-channel flatpanel photomultiplier is used for the Anger-camera method. The detection efficiency of γ-ray background is very low in the use of the ZnS/ 6LiF scintillator. The spatial resolution is less than 1 mm. The effective area of this detector is around 25 cm 2, and it is easy to expand it to a larger area with small dead space using the multi-photomultiplier tubes system. The fast DAQ system has 10-bit 100 MHz flash ADCs, FPGA chips and USB2.0 device.

  12. The therapeutic release of anger: Helen Watkins's silent abreaction and subsequent elaborations of the anger rock.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Sarah Y

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes Helen Watkins's (1980) silent abreaction technique for releasing anger and the subsequent elaborations it has inspired. Discussion of Watkins's seminal article incorporates her verbatim account of the technique, 2 clinical applications, and her encouragement of further adaptations. Other scholars' subsequent contributions include an adaptation for dissociative identity disorder, brief treatment of constant pain syndrome, and inpatient treatment of a suicidally depressed, dissociative survivor of sexual abuse. Commonalities and distinctions among Watkins's work and these modifications are discussed. New case material from the author's practice illustrate further elaborations, with emphasis on the role of releasing anger in the resolution of dissociative defenses and internal fragmentation in dissociative clients. To enhance the clinical utility of this paper, verbatim passages are included for all case illustrations in H. H. Watkins (1980), the 3 published elaborations, and the new case material.

  13. Anger and selective attention to reward and punishment in children.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Jin, Xinyi; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Xiang; Shui, Rende; Shen, Mowei

    2013-07-01

    Anger is a negative emotion associated with approach motivation and may influence children's attention preference. Three experiments examined the effect of anger on the attentional biases accompanying reward versus punishment cues in Chinese 5- and 6-year-olds. Experiment 1 tested children who were prone to report angry feelings in an unfair game. Experiment 2 measured children who were rated by parents and teachers for temperamental anger. Experiment 3 explored children who reported angry feelings in a frustrating attention task with rigged and noncontingent feedback after controlling for temperament anger. Results suggested that both the angry and anger-prone children were faster to engage attention toward the reward cues than toward the punishment cues in the three experiments. Furthermore, the angry children in the frustrating attention task (and those with poor attention focusing by parental report) were slower in disengaging attention away from the reward versus punishment cues (especially after negative feedback). Results support the approach motivation of anger, which can facilitate children's attention toward the appetitive approach-related information. The findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive and maladaptive function of anger.

  14. Clinicians' diagnosis of a case with anger problems.

    PubMed

    Lachmund, Edna; DiGiuseppe, Raymond; Fuller, J Ryan

    2005-07-01

    Psychiatrists and psychologists responded to case vignettes to assess the prevalence, severity, and diagnostic confidence clinicians had concerning treating anger disordered clients compared with clients with generalized anxiety disorder. Five hundred and forty-two clinicians (a response rate of 30%) assessed one of two matched case histories by mail. One described generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and the other a case of anger disorder (AD). Cases were identical except for thoughts and affect relevant to the disorders. Both male and female versions were used. More than 95% of the participants viewed the cases they received as pathological. The disorders were rated as equally common. The clinicians reported treating equal numbers of patients with similar anger or anxiety symptoms in the past year. Although the case histories were alike in length and detail, AD participants rated their case as less complete and had lower confidence in their diagnoses. The diagnostic consensus was high for GAD clinicians, but low for AD. Forty-three percent of participants selected an Axis II diagnosis for AD, compared with 3% for GAD. Clinicians appeared to encounter patients with chronic anger about as frequently as they see GAD, but they displayed diagnostic confusion and bias toward personality disorder diagnoses when presented with the anger symptoms. The findings support the development of a diagnostic category for primary anger. The wide dispersion of diagnoses for anger underscores the need for focused differential assessment.

  15. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  16. Children's Self-Reports about Anger Regulation: Direct and Indirect Links to Social Preference and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, Karen F.; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Assessed direct relations between three aspects of self-reported anger regulation and peer-rated social preference and aggression as well as indirect relations between these constructs as mediated by observed anger expression. Interviewed 274 second-graders following anger-arousing games. Found that anger regulation was only indirectly related to…

  17. The Effects of Cognitive--Behavioral Therapy on Trait Anger and Paranoid Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio; Jozefowicz-Simbeni, Debra M. Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates a cognitive-behavioral anger treatment approach to reduce anger and paranoid ideation on men (n = 32) in treatment for anger problems and compares levels of paranoid ideation with a sample of men ( n = 27) who sought mental health treatment for non-anger issues. Method: A pre- and posttest design is used to evaluate…

  18. Racial Identity Status Profiles and Expressions of Anger in Black Americans: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert T.; Pieterse, Alex L.; Smith, Sidney, III

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between Black adult racial identity status profiles and anger expression was examined. Two profiles, Undifferentiated and Immersion-Emersion, emerged. A comparison of modes of anger expression revealed that the Immersion-Emersion dominant profile was associated with higher scores on Anger-Out and lower scores on Anger-Control.…

  19. Anger Problem Profiles among Partner Violent Men: Differences in Clinical Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christopher M.; Taft, Casey T.; Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    Cluster analysis of 139 partner violent men's self-reports on the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory identified profiles reflecting pathological anger (PA), low anger control (LAC), and normal anger (NA). The PA group self-reported higher pretreatment partner abuse, interpersonal dysfunction, distress, and substance abuse and had lower…

  20. Studying Russian and Soviet History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Abraham, Ed.

    These essays were written to assist teachers in the task of making Russian history intelligible to young U.S. students. In "An Approach to Russian History," Edward Keenan proposes that students need to gain a better understanding of how Russians perceive themselves and their history. In "Pre-Petrine Russia," Andrzej S. Kaminski focuses on the…

  1. Soviet Standardization of Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Morton

    1961-01-01

    After a brief history of influences on the standardization of Russian since the Revolution, the descriptive and normalizing role of specific reference works of grammar, phonetics, vocabulary, and morphology is discussed. Concluding remarks point out a problem caused by a lack of coordination of standardization efforts and the mounting demands for…

  2. Russian Resource Materials Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Viveca

    This guide provides the teacher of Russian with helpful background material and activities on the geography of the Soviet Union and the history of Russia as well as its customs, traditions, literary selections, songs, foods, and festivals. In addition to these topics, the introductory chapter outlines a philosophy for teaching and learning Russian…

  3. Three Early Russian Bibliographers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cholden, Marianna Tax

    1974-01-01

    Introduces three early Russian contributors to bibliography: Novikov, Sopikov, and Anastasevich, who worked at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries. Their lives and main bibliographic works are viewed in the contexts of Russia in their time and Western European bibliography. (JB)

  4. English Loanwords in Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Morton

    1959-01-01

    This introductory survey describes the English contribution to the vocabulary of modern Russian. The author presents an analysis of English loanwords based on the etymologies of Vasmer and Lexin, by subject classification (amusements, clothing, economics, food, nautical terminology, and technology). Separate commentary on sporting terms, where…

  5. Effect of regulating anger and sadness on decision-making.

    PubMed

    Szasz, Paul Lucian; Hofmann, Stefan G; Heilman, Renata M; Curtiss, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of reappraisal, acceptance, and rumination for regulating anger and sadness on decision-making. Participants (N = 165) were asked to recall two autobiographical events in which they felt intense anger and sadness, respectively. Participants were then instructed to reappraise, accept, ruminate, or not use any strategies to regulate their feelings of anger and sadness. Following this manipulation, risk aversion, and decision-making strategies were measured using a computer-based measure of risk-taking and a simulated real-life decision-making task. Participants who were instructed to reappraise their emotions showed the least anger and sadness, the most adaptive decision-making strategies, but the least risk aversion as compared to the participants in the other conditions. These findings suggest that emotion regulation strategies of negative affective states have an immediate effect on decision-making and risk-taking behaviors. PMID:27438753

  6. Effect of regulating anger and sadness on decision-making.

    PubMed

    Szasz, Paul Lucian; Hofmann, Stefan G; Heilman, Renata M; Curtiss, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of reappraisal, acceptance, and rumination for regulating anger and sadness on decision-making. Participants (N = 165) were asked to recall two autobiographical events in which they felt intense anger and sadness, respectively. Participants were then instructed to reappraise, accept, ruminate, or not use any strategies to regulate their feelings of anger and sadness. Following this manipulation, risk aversion, and decision-making strategies were measured using a computer-based measure of risk-taking and a simulated real-life decision-making task. Participants who were instructed to reappraise their emotions showed the least anger and sadness, the most adaptive decision-making strategies, but the least risk aversion as compared to the participants in the other conditions. These findings suggest that emotion regulation strategies of negative affective states have an immediate effect on decision-making and risk-taking behaviors.

  7. Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to A Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to a Heart Attack? But researchers suggest that artery-clogging plaque has ... physical exertion may be triggers for a first heart attack in some people, new research suggests. In the ...

  8. Psychometric Examination of an Arabic Version of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Motohiro; Bouanene, Ines; El-Mhamdi, Sana; Soltani, Mohamed; Bongard, Stephan; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of an Arabic version of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Methods: This study took place between April 2005 and August 2014. Adults in Yemen (n = 334) and Tunisia (n = 200) were recruited from university campuses and a smoking cessation clinic, respectively. The STAXI was translated into Arabic using back-translation methods. An explanatory principal component analysis was conducted to explore the factor structure of the anger expression scale, utilising parallel analyses to determine the number of retained factors. Results: Good internal consistency of the trait anger scale was observed among the Yemeni (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76) and Tunisian (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86) samples. The parallel analysis suggested a three-factor solution for the anger expression scale (anger in, anger out and anger control), in accordance with the original STAXI. The internal consistency of anger in, anger out and anger control factors ranged between 0.51–0.79 in the Yemeni sample and 0.66–0.81 in the Tunisian sample. Overall, items loaded on the anger control factor included all items proposed by the original authors and this factor had higher reliability than the other two factors in both samples. Conclusion: The results of the current study provide initial support for the use of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the STAXI in Arabic-speaking countries. PMID:27606112

  9. Psychometric Examination of an Arabic Version of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Motohiro; Bouanene, Ines; El-Mhamdi, Sana; Soltani, Mohamed; Bongard, Stephan; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of an Arabic version of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Methods: This study took place between April 2005 and August 2014. Adults in Yemen (n = 334) and Tunisia (n = 200) were recruited from university campuses and a smoking cessation clinic, respectively. The STAXI was translated into Arabic using back-translation methods. An explanatory principal component analysis was conducted to explore the factor structure of the anger expression scale, utilising parallel analyses to determine the number of retained factors. Results: Good internal consistency of the trait anger scale was observed among the Yemeni (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76) and Tunisian (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86) samples. The parallel analysis suggested a three-factor solution for the anger expression scale (anger in, anger out and anger control), in accordance with the original STAXI. The internal consistency of anger in, anger out and anger control factors ranged between 0.51–0.79 in the Yemeni sample and 0.66–0.81 in the Tunisian sample. Overall, items loaded on the anger control factor included all items proposed by the original authors and this factor had higher reliability than the other two factors in both samples. Conclusion: The results of the current study provide initial support for the use of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the STAXI in Arabic-speaking countries.

  10. Anger management training: the effects of a structured programme on the self-reported anger experience of forensic inpatients with learning disability.

    PubMed

    Burns, M; Bird, D; Leach, C; Higgins, K

    2003-10-01

    Within the current political climate, there is an increasing burden on mental health professionals to achieve accuracy in risk assessment and prediction. The accurate assessment and treatment of anger can make a valuable contribution towards alleviating this burden as part of a comprehensive treatment package. This study describes an anger management training programme provided to a group of three forensic inpatients with learning disability. An ABA single case study design was used, with anger levels assessed at weekly intervals before, during and after the programme. The results suggested that anger management training is useful with this client group, with established tools, such as the Novaco Anger Scale, the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory and the Modified Overt Aggression Scale, allowing the impact of the programme on anger levels to be evaluated. There is an indication that maintenance treatment is required to prevent anger levels increasing to pretest levels following treatment.

  11. Interpersonal Conflict: Effects of Variations in Manner of Expressing Anger and Justification for Anger upon Perceptions of Appropriateness, Competence, and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sereno, Kenneth K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how an expression of anger affects the receiver's perceptions of anger in a close interpersonal relationship. Reports that findings contradicted conventional wisdom and research findings on assertive communication. (MM)

  12. Anger and globalization among young people in India.

    PubMed

    Suchday, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges faced by youth in developing countries. Using India as an example of a fast-globalizing country, this article highlights the experience and challenges faced by adolescents and emerging adults as they search for their interpersonal and professional identities. The difficulties of defining identity in the context of rapid globalization where people are exposed to diverse cultural forces that may conflict with each other are particularly salient when dealing with anger. Anger frequently results from thwarted wants and needs. In globalizing developing economies, young people often face inequitable access and opportunities that may be cause for distress-anger and depression. However, the skills to deal with anger are frequently culturally determined and may not be effective in situations where multiple cultural rules are operational. For example, India being a collectivist culture traditionally encourages the suppression of anger. However, situations and rules of conduct in a global economic order require the assertive expression of anger and the confrontation of conflict. Research that is methodologically and culturally appropriate is needed in exploring these issues and ameliorating distress associated with inequity, conflicts, and challenges.

  13. Development of the Juvenile Justice Anger Management Treatment for Girls

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Naomi E. S.; Serico, Jennifer M.; Riggs Romaine, Christina L.; Zelechoski, Amanda D.; Kalbeitzer, Rachel; Kemp, Kathleen; Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Female juvenile offenders exhibit high levels of anger, relational aggression, and physical aggression, but the population has long been ignored in research and practice. No anger management treatments have been developed specifically for this population, and no established anger management treatments are empirically supported for use with delinquent girls. Thus, to alleviate anger and reduce the frequency and severity of aggressive behaviors in this underserved population, we developed the gender-specific, Juvenile Justice Anger Management (JJAM) Treatment for Girls. This cognitive-behavioral intervention was adapted from the Coping Power Program (Lochman & Wells, 2002), a school-based anger management treatment for younger children that has established efficacy and effectiveness findings with its target populations. This paper describes how the content of JJAM was developed to meet the unique needs of adolescent girls in residential juvenile justice placements. It also traces the process of developing a manualized treatment and the steps taken to enhance efficacy and clinical utility. An overview of the treatment, a session-by-session outline, an example session activity, and an example homework assignment are provided. A randomized controlled trial is currently being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the JJAM Treatment for Girls. PMID:27642247

  14. Anger and Postcombat Mental Health: Validation of a Brief Anger Measure with U.S. Soldiers Postdeployed from Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novaco, Raymond W.; Swanson, Rob D.; Gonzalez, Oscar I.; Gahm, Gregory A.; Reger, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of anger in the psychological adjustment of current war veterans, particularly in conjunction with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), warrants greater research focus than it has received. The present study concerns a brief anger measure, Dimensions of Anger Reactions (DAR), intended for use in large sample studies…

  15. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  16. Context-inappropriate anger, emotion knowledge deficits, and negative social experiences in preschool.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 40% of children showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger. PMID:26376288

  17. Context-Inappropriate Anger, Emotion Knowledge Deficits, and Negative Social Experiences in Preschool

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Robin L.; Miller, Alison L.; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined contextually-inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n=134). Approximately one-quarter of children (23%) showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 2/5 of children (40%) showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger. PMID:26376288

  18. Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: moderation by life stress.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Rebecca J; Buss, Kristin A; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2014-10-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors.

  19. Context-inappropriate anger, emotion knowledge deficits, and negative social experiences in preschool.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 40% of children showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger.

  20. Effectiveness of negative-thought-reduction, meditation and placebo training treatment in reducing anger.

    PubMed

    Dua, J K; Swinden, M L

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine highly angry subjects who obtained high scores on Spielberger's Trait component of State-Trait Anger Scale went through a thought-listing procedure to determine their negative self-statements in response to high, medium, and low anger-arousing situations. It was found that subjects made more negative self-statements in response to a high anger-arousing situation compared to the medium and low anger-arousing situations. The subjects were divided into four groups. Subjects in one group were trained to reduce their negative thoughts, subjects in a second group were trained to meditate, subjects in the third group were asked to imagine the high anger-arousing situations (placebo procedure), and subjects in the fourth group were given no treatment. It was found that the subjects in the Negative-thought-reduction, Meditation and Placebo groups showed improvement in trait anger, anger aroused through high-anger situations, anger scores across a wide variety of situations, unconstructive coping, and anger measured through physiological symptoms. The gains made through intervention were maintained at a 6-week follow-up. The No-treatment Group showed no significant change in anger scores across a wide variety of situations, unconstructive coping, and physiological symptom scores but showed a small but significant improvement in trait anger and in anger aroused by high-anger situations.

  1. Binge eating & childhood emotional abuse: The mediating role of anger.

    PubMed

    Feinson, Marjorie C; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies reveal that childhood emotional abuse (CEA) is the trauma most clearly associated with adult eating pathology. Yet, relatively little is understood about psychological mechanisms linking these distal experiences. Anger's mediational role in the relationship between CEA and adult binge eating (BE) is explored in a community-based sample of 498 adult women (mean age 44). Detailed telephone interviews assess BE (7 items), CEA (single item), and unresolved anger (single item) along with self-criticism (modified Rosenberg self-esteem scale), depression and anxiety symptoms (BSI sub-scales). Statistical analyses include Pearson correlations, Baron and Kenny's steps for mediation, and Preacher and Hayes bootstrapping method to test proposed multiple mediators simultaneously. Findings reveal significantly more respondents (n = 476 with complete data) with serious BE behaviors report a history of CEA compared to women with considerable and/or minimal BE (53% vs 37%, p = 0.002 respectively). Significant correlations are found among all study variables. Mediation analyses focus on anger together with self-criticism, depression and anxiety. Findings reveal anger and self-criticism fully mediate the CEA-BE relationship. In contrast, depression and anxiety symptoms are not significant mediators in a model that includes anger and self-criticism. Although additional research is warranted to more fully understand complex causal processes, in the interim, treatment interventions should be broadened to include assessments of anger among adult women with BE behaviors, especially those with histories of childhood abuse. Additionally, prevention strategies that incorporate learning how to express anger directly and positively may be particularly effective in reducing various disordered eating behaviors among women and girls. PMID:27208594

  2. Russian electrometallurgy: Achievements, problems, prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utochkin, Yu. I.; Semin, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in the Russian metallurgy, in particular, electric furnace steelmaking, having occurred in the recent years are analyzed. The main increase in the steelmaking output is due to putting into operation of new electric furnaces in new miniworks and enterprises equipped earlier with open-hearth furnaces. Reaching the rated capacity of a furnace in Russia substantially lags behind foreign enterprises. Only 30-35% of the Russian market of corrosion-resistant steel are provided by Russian metal.

  3. Anger toward God: social-cognitive predictors, prevalence, and links with adjustment to bereavement and cancer.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Park, Crystal L; Smyth, Joshua M; Carey, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Many people see themselves as being in a relationship with God and see this bond as comforting. Yet, perceived relationships with God also carry the potential for experiencing anger toward God, as shown here in studies with the U.S. population (Study 1), undergraduates (Studies 2 and 3), bereaved individuals (Study 4), and cancer survivors (Study 5). These studies addressed 3 fundamental issues regarding anger toward God: perceptions and attributions that predict anger toward God, its prevalence, and its associations with adjustment. Social-cognitive predictors of anger toward God paralleled predictors of interpersonal anger and included holding God responsible for severe harm, attributions of cruelty, difficulty finding meaning, and seeing oneself as a victim. Anger toward God was frequently reported in response to negative events, although positive feelings predominated. Anger and positive feelings toward God showed moderate negative associations. Religiosity and age correlated negatively with anger toward God. Reports of anger toward God were slightly lower among Protestants and African Americans in comparison with other groups (Study 1). Some atheists and agnostics reported anger involving God, particularly on measures emphasizing past experiences (Study 2) and images of a hypothetical God (Study 3). Anger toward God was associated with poorer adjustment to bereavement (Study 4) and cancer (Study 5), particularly when anger remained unresolved over a 1-year period (Study 5). Taken together, these studies suggest that anger toward God is an important dimension of religious and spiritual experience, one that is measurable, widespread, and related to adjustment across various contexts and populations.

  4. Influence of apologies and trait hostility on recovery from anger.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeremy C; Linden, Wolfgang; Habra, Martine E

    2006-08-01

    While there is growing evidence that quick recovery from stress is health-protective, relatively little is known about what factors affect recovery rates. We tested whether recovery from anger can be diffused with apologies. 184 participants performed a stress task involving verbal harassment and apologies. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: non-harassed control, good apology, pseudo-apology, or no apology. Measures of blood pressure and heart rate were taken at baseline, task and recovery periods. Participants scoring high in trait hostility displayed faster systolic blood pressure recovery when they received a genuine apology, but recovered more slowly when they received a pseudo-apology or no apology. Apologies did not influence subjective anger ratings. It was concluded that apologies may accelerate cardiovascular anger recovery among those with hostile personality predispositions.

  5. Anger expression styles in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: associations with anxiety, paranoia, emotion recognition, and trauma history.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Jamie M; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-12-01

    Heightened levels of anger and dysregulated expression of anger have been associated with poorer outcomes and treatment response for persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Less is known, however, about the psychological processes that determine the extent to which anger is expressed in a more versus less adaptive manner. To explore this issue, this study gathered reports of anger expression style in 88 persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder using the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Second Edition. The authors additionally assessed anxiety, suspiciousness, emotion recognition, self-esteem, and cumulative trauma history. Correlations and multiple regression analyses showed that outward anger control, that is, the suppression of anger, was predicted by lower levels of suspiciousness, poorer emotion recognition, and reduced anxiety. Participants who endorsed greater anxiety and had experienced more traumatic events reported a heightened tendency to express anger both inwardly and outwardly.

  6. The effects of collective anger and fear on policy support in response to terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeshin

    2016-01-01

    Both correlational and experimental studies examined how perceived emotional responses of the majority of Americans to 9/11 affect individuals' support for government counter-terrorism policies (i.e., military intervention, anti-immigration, restricting civil liberties). Study 1 found associations between perceived collective emotions (i.e., anger, fear) and individuals' own corresponding emotions and those between perceived collective anger and counter-terrorism policy support. Individuals' own anger mediated the associations of collective anger with policy support. Using experimental manipulations, Study 2 showed that collective anger had a significant effect on individuals' own anger and one significant and two marginal effects on counter-terrorism policy support. Individuals' own anger mediated one of the marginal effects of collective anger on policy support. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of terrorist threat.

  7. [The effects of self-anger on rumination and on mental health].

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Yuina

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of self-anger on rumination and mental health (depression and anxiety). In study 1, a scale to measure self-anger was developed by the review of previous studies and survey interviews. Exploratory factor analysis identified one factor of self-anger. The reliability and validity of the scale were confirmed by internal consistency measures and correlations with other anger-related scales. In study 2, which used the self-anger scale developed in study 1, undergraduate and graduate students completed a set of scales to measure self-anger, rumination, depression, anxiety, and five-factor personality traits. The results of mediation analysis indicated that self-anger effects depression and anxiety directly or through mediating rumination excluding the effect of sex and neuroticism. Finally, the possibility that self-anger management leads to the reduction of rumination and improvement of mental health was discussed.

  8. Anger and parent-to-child aggression in mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Mammen, O K; Pilkonis, P A; Kolko, D J

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between anger and parent-to-child aggression (PTCA) was examined in mothers presenting for treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, because parental anger may have adverse effects on children and anger may decrease with treatment. Anger's role as mediator and moderator of the effects of the following predictors on PTCA was assessed: depression, anxiety, and ecologic variables that can induce or buffer against stress (partner verbal aggression, satisfaction with and perceived availability of social support, socioeconomic status, and number of children). Anger was found to mediate the effects of depression, partner verbal aggression, satisfaction with social support, and number of children on PTCA. Anger also had significant effects on PTCA after controlling for these variables. The other predictors did not have effects on PTCA, and anger did not moderate their effects. If replicated, these findings suggest the importance of examining whether treatment to reduce parental anger will reduce PTCA.

  9. Expression of Anger in Depressed Adolescents: The Role of the Family Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anger is considered to be abnormal in depression, yet its role is only poorly understood. In the present study we sought to clarify this role by examining the moderating influence of the family environment on overall levels of anger expression and anger reactivity in depressed and non-depressed adolescents during conflictual…

  10. Anger-Control Group Counseling for Women Recovering from Alcohol or Drug Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Two experimental conditions, a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger-control treatment incorporating empowerment strategies and a relapse-prevention treatment without the anger-control component, were compared to assess their impact on levels of trait anger and attributional styles of women recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Participants…

  11. Rumination on Anger and Sadness in Adolescence: Fueling of Fury and Deepening of Despair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Maya; Moretti, Marlene M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N = 121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of…

  12. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  13. A Comparison of Anger in Offenders and Non-Offenders Who Have Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll, Matthew; Beail, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy to treat anger in offenders with intellectual disabilities. The aim is to lower anger levels; the rationale is that this will reduce recidivism. However, the hypothesis that anger levels amongst offenders are higher than non-offenders has not been tested.…

  14. Anger, Hostility, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Trauma-Exposed Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Ulrich; Wieland, Elias

    2006-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes the available data on the strength of association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and between hostility and PTSD, covering 39 studies with trauma-exposed adults. Effect sizes did not differ for anger and hostility, which could therefore be combined; effect sizes for anger expression variables…

  15. Display Rules for Anger and Aggression in School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Two studies examined the development of display rules for anger and the relationship between the use of display rules for anger and aggressiveness as rated by school peers. Findings indicate that the phenomenon of display rules for anger is complex and depends on the way display rules are defined and the age and gender of the subjects. (GLR)

  16. Anger, Hostility, and Aggression: Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention Strategies for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael J., Ed.; Smith, Douglas C., Ed.

    This book is designed to give those who work with youth the information they need on recent anger-related research. It presents practical information about critical assessment, prevention, and intervention by emphasizing the affective, attitudinal, and behavioral aspects of anger. Chapters include: (1) "Correlates of Anger, Hostility, and…

  17. Anger in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parent's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Betty P. V.; Stephenson, Jennifer; Carter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Anger related behaviours such as aggression are known to be an area of difficulty for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A national internet forum for parents of children with ASD was selected out of other similar forums from six English speaking countries. Information about the angry episodes of 121 children with ASD as described by…

  18. Assessment of anger terms in Hebrew: a gender comparison.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Orly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Appraisal of anger terms is based on past experience recollections, social norms, and gender roles. The objectives of this study were to find combinations of emotional components presented by a new composite variable that will exhibit differences between genders and differentiate between anger terms in Hebrew. The sample was comprised of forty students, Hebrew native speakers who participated in a web based study. Participants were asked to rate eight anger terms in Hebrew on a number of features that comprised five emotional components: subjective feelings states body reactions, expressions, action tendencies, and cognitive evaluations. A two-factor between-subjects multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted. A simplified multivariate composite, defined as subjective experience minus regulation, explained 10% of the gender difference. Another simplified composite, which combines the additive effect of the subjective experience and the actions that accompany this emotional state, explained 14% of difference between the anger terms. The findings are discussed with respect to appraisal theory and social constructivist conceptualization.

  19. Addressing Anger Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman initiated counselling services at a community agency to address her explosive anger that was a remnant of childhood physical and emotional abuse. Sensorimotor psychotherapy was used to help this client learn how to monitor and regulate her sensorimotor processes. In conjunction with this approach, Cognitive behavioural therapy was…

  20. Social Support and Anger Expression among Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loper, Ann Booker; Gildea, Jennifer Whitney

    2004-01-01

    Incarcerated women at a maximum security state facility (N= 216) completed a questionnaire concerning their perceived social support within the prison, structured activities, and perceived support from prison surrogate families. A series of regression analyses evaluated the relationship between social support measures and anger, as measured by the…

  1. Assessment of anger terms in Hebrew: a gender comparison.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Orly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Appraisal of anger terms is based on past experience recollections, social norms, and gender roles. The objectives of this study were to find combinations of emotional components presented by a new composite variable that will exhibit differences between genders and differentiate between anger terms in Hebrew. The sample was comprised of forty students, Hebrew native speakers who participated in a web based study. Participants were asked to rate eight anger terms in Hebrew on a number of features that comprised five emotional components: subjective feelings states body reactions, expressions, action tendencies, and cognitive evaluations. A two-factor between-subjects multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted. A simplified multivariate composite, defined as subjective experience minus regulation, explained 10% of the gender difference. Another simplified composite, which combines the additive effect of the subjective experience and the actions that accompany this emotional state, explained 14% of difference between the anger terms. The findings are discussed with respect to appraisal theory and social constructivist conceptualization. PMID:25590344

  2. A Comprehensive Treatment Program for a Case of Disturbed Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiuseppe, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Santanello (2011) presented the case of a man with long-term anger problems who does not meet the criteria for any "DSM-IV-TR" diagnosis for treatment recommendations by several authors. This paper presents a comprehensive treatment package applied to this case. Of crucial importance is the building of a therapeutic alliance. In addition to…

  3. New Attacks on Animal Researchers Provoke Anger and Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on firebomb attacks at the homes of two animal researchers which have provoked anger and unease. The firebomb attacks, which set the home of a neuroscientist at the University of California at Santa Cruz aflame and destroyed a car parked in the driveway of another university researcher's home, have left researchers and…

  4. Some Anger Metaphors in Spanish and English. A Contrastive Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soriano, Cristina

    2003-01-01

    In spite of being very similar, the metaphorical models of anger in English and Spanish exhibit some differences too. These have been analyzed along a number of parameters: existence of the mapping in the language, degree of conceptual elaboration, degree of linguistic conventionalization and degree of linguistic exploitation. A number of examples…

  5. Anger Management and Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamelin, Jeffery; Travis, Robert; Sturmey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review of anger management in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). We identified 2 studies that used randomized controlled trials and 6 that used pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group designs. The mean between-group effect size was 1.52 for randomized controlled trials and 0.89 for the other…

  6. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Reduction of Persistent Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorenstein, Ethan E.; Tager, Felice A.; Shapiro, Peter A.; Monk, Catherine; Sloan, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    Although persistent anger is not represented in "DSM-IV" as a psychiatric disorder, it is nevertheless a significant clinical problem. Based on our experience with both research and clinic patients from a diverse urban population, and drawing on methods utilized by others, we have refined and elaborated several treatment strategies that appear…

  7. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly assigned into either a booster…

  8. Evaluation of an Anger Therapy Intervention for Incarcerated Adult Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoy, Steven D.; Hoyt, William T.

    2004-01-01

    An anger therapy intervention was developed for incarcerated adult males. The therapy was an extension of cognitive-behavioral approaches, incorporating principles and practices drawn from Buddhist psychology. Adult males from a Midwestern low-security prison were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (n= 16) or a waiting list control…

  9. Anger after Childbirth: An Overlooked Reaction to Postpartum Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Lobel, Marci; DeLuca, Robyn Stein

    2002-01-01

    Other than postpartum depression, little is known about women's emotional responses to childbirth and subsequent stressors. Anger was explored on the basis of theory and evidence that it is a likely emotional response in this context. During their third trimester of pregnancy and approximately six weeks after delivery, 163 participants completed…

  10. Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees’ Behavior during Organizational Change

    PubMed Central

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior—mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident’s negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  11. Effects of habitual anger on employees' behavior during organizational change.

    PubMed

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-12-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees' habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior-mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident's negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  12. Anger in Middle School: The Solving Problems Together Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri L.; Owens, Rachel B.

    2009-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), with a small group of adolescent African American boys struggling with anger management. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  13. Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions Applied to Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Oetting, Eugene R.; DiGiuseppe, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    This article applies the Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions (PESI) in counseling psychology to anger management with adults. The review suggests that there is empirical support for cognitive-behavioral interventions generally and for four specific interventions (relaxation, cognitive, behavioral skill enhancement, and combinations…

  14. Clinical Correlates of Hwa-Byung and a Proposal for a New Anger Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

  15. Anger, PTSD, and the Nuclear Family: A Study of Cambodian Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Devon; Rasmussen, Andrew; Nou, Leakhena; Pollack, Mark; Mary-Jo, Good

    2009-01-01

    This study profiles the family-directed anger of traumatized Cambodian refugees, all survivors of the Pol Pot genocide (1975-1979), who were patients at a psychiatric clinic in Lowell, MA, USA. We focus on the nuclear family (NF) unit, the NF unit defined as the patient's “significant other” (i.e. spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend) and children. Survey data were collected from a convenience sample of 143 Cambodian refugee patients from October 2006 to August 2007. The study revealed that 48% (68/143) of the patients had anger directed toward a NF member in the last month, with anger directed toward children being particularly common (64 of the 143 patients, or 49% [64/131] of the patients with children). NF-type anger was severe, for example, almost always resulting in somatic arousal (e.g., causing palpitations in 91% [62/68] of the anger episodes) and often in trauma recall and fears of bodily dysfunction. Responses to open-ended questions revealed the causes of anger toward a significant other and children, the content of anger-associated trauma recall, and what patients did to gain relief from anger. A type of cultural gap, namely, a linguistic gap (i.e., the parent's lack of English language skills and the child's lack of Khmer language skills) seemingly played a role in generating conflict and anger. NF-type anger was associated with PTSD presence. The effect of anger on PTSD severity resulted in part from anger-associated trauma recall and fears of bodily dysfunction, with 54% of the variance in PTSD severity explained by that regression model. The study: 1) suggests that among traumatized refugees, family-related anger is a major clinical concern; 2) illustrates how family-related anger may be profiled and investigated in trauma-exposed populations; and 3) gives insights into how family-related anger is generated in such populations. PMID:19748169

  16. Anger Arousal and Behavioral Anger Regulation in Everyday Life among Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Relationships to Patient Pain and Function

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Gerhart, James I.; Bruehl, Stephen; Peterson, Kristina M.; Smith, David A.; Porter, Laura S.; Schuster, Erik; Kinner, Ellen; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Marie Fras, Anne; Keefe, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the degree to which patient anger arousal and behavioral anger regulation (expression, inhibition) occurring in the course of daily life was related to patient pain and function as rated by patients and their spouses. Method Married couples (N = 105) (one spouse with chronic low back pain) completed electronic daily diaries, with assessments 5 times/day for 14 days. Patients completed items on their own state anger, behavioral anger expression and inhibition, and pain-related factors. Spouses completed items on their observations of patient pain-related factors. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test concurrent and lagged relationships. Results Patient-reported increases in state anger were related to their reports of concurrent increases in pain and pain interference and to spouse reports of patient pain and pain behavior. Patient-reported increases in behavioral anger expression were related to lagged increases in pain intensity and interference and decreases in function. Most of these relationships remained significant with state anger controlled. Patient-reported increases in behavioral anger inhibition were related to concurrent increases in pain interference and decreases in function, which also remained significant with state anger controlled. Patient-reported increases in state anger were related to lagged increases in spouse reports of patient pain intensity and pain behaviors. Conclusions Results indicate that in patients with chronic pain, anger arousal and both behavioral anger expression and inhibition in everyday life are related to elevated pain intensity and decreased function as reported by patients. Spouse ratings show some degree of concordance with patient reports. PMID:25110843

  17. Russian Orthography and Learning to Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerek, Eugenia; Niemi, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    The unique structure of Russian orthography may influence the organization and acquisition of reading skills in Russian. The present review examines phonemic-graphemic correspondences in Russian orthography and discusses its grain-size units and possible difficulties for beginning readers and writers. Russian orthography is governed by a…

  18. An evidence-based solution for minimizing stress and anger in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2007-12-01

    Manifestations of stress and anger are becoming more evident in society. Anger, an emotion associated with stress, often affects other aspects of everyday life, including the workplace and the educational setting. Stress and irrational anger in nursing students presents a potential teaching-learning problem that requires innovative evidence-based solutions. In this article, anger in nursing students is discussed, and background information on the topic is provided. Common sources and manifestations of anger in nursing students are presented, and one evidence-based solution--mindfulness-based-stress reduction--is discussed.

  19. Others' Anger Makes People Work Harder Not Smarter: The Effect of Observing Anger and Sarcasm on Creative and Analytic Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron-Spektor, Ella; Efrat-Treister, Dorit; Rafaeli, Anat; Schwarz-Cohen, Orit

    2011-01-01

    The authors examine whether and how observing anger influences thinking processes and problem-solving ability. In 3 studies, the authors show that participants who listened to an angry customer were more successful in solving analytic problems, but less successful in solving creative problems compared with participants who listened to an…

  20. Daily associations among anger experience and intimate partner aggression within aggressive and nonaggressive community couples.

    PubMed

    Crane, Cory A; Testa, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Anger is an empirically established precipitant to aggressive responding toward intimate partners. The current investigation examined the effects of anger, as experienced by both partners, as well as gender and previous aggression, on in vivo intimate-partner aggression (IPA) using a prospective daily diary methodology. Participants (N = 118 couples) individually provided 56 consecutive, daily reports of affective experience and partner aggression. Multilevel models were estimated using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) framework to analyze the daily associations between anger and partner-aggression perpetration among participating men and women, as moderated by aggression history. Results revealed that both actor and partner anger were generally associated with subsequently reported daily conflict. Further, increases in daily partner anger were associated with corresponding increases in partner aggression among both women who reported high levels of anger and men, regardless of their own anger experience. Increases in actor anger were associated with increases in daily partner aggression only among previously aggressive women. Previously aggressive men and women consistently reported greater perpetration than their nonaggressive counterparts on days of high levels of actors' anger experiences. Results emphasize the importance of both actor and partner factors in partner aggression and suggest that female anger may be a stronger predictor of both female-to-male and male-to-female partner aggression than male anger, when measured at the daily level.

  1. Prevalence and Correlates of Anger in the Community: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Mayumi; Picazo, Julia; Olfson, Mark; Hasin, Deborah S.; Liu, Shang-Min; Bernardi, Silvia; Blanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the prevalence and correlates of anger in the community. Methods We used data derived from a large national sample of the United States population which included more than 34,000 adults ages 18 years and older. We defined inappropriate, intense, or poorly controlled anger by means of self-report of: 1) anger that was triggered by small things or that was difficult to control; 2) frequent temper outbursts or anger that lead to loss of control; or 3) hitting people or throwing objects in anger. Results The overall prevalence of inappropriate, intense, or poorly controlled anger in the U.S. population was 7.8%. Anger was especially common among men and younger adults, and was associated with decreased psychosocial functioning. Significant and positive associations were evident between anger and parental factors, childhood, and adulthood adverse events. There were strong associations between anger and bipolar disorder, drug dependence, psychotic disorder, borderline, and schizotypal personality disorders. There was a dose-response relationship between anger and a broad range of psychopathology. Conclusions A rationale exists for developing screening tools and early intervention strategies, especially for young adults, to identify and help reduce anger. PMID:25831968

  2. An analysis of anger in adolescent girls who practice the martial arts.

    PubMed

    Lotfian, Sara; Ziaee, Vahid; Amini, Homayoun; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali

    2011-01-01

    The effect of martial arts on adolescents' behavior, especially aggression, is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess and compare anger ratings among adolescent girl athletes of different martial arts. 291 female adolescents between the ages of 11 and 19 were assessed according to the Adolescent Anger Rating Scale designed by DM Burney. In the case group, the martial arts practiced were either judo (n = 70) or karate (n = 66), while the control group was composed of swimmers (n = 59) and nonathletes (n = 96). Total anger scores showed statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.001) decreasing from girls who practiced judo to nonathletes, karate, and swimmers. Instrumental and reactive anger subscales also showed significant differences between the groups, but this difference was not found for anger control. As a conclusion, the anger rate did not differ between judoka and nonathletes, but that both of these groups received higher scores in total anger than karateka and swimmers.

  3. Peeking into the black box: mechanisms of action for anger management treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Morland, Leslie A; Frueh, B Christopher; Greene, Carolyn J; Rosen, Craig S

    2014-10-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of action for anger symptom reductions, specifically, the roles of anger regulation skills and therapeutic alliance on changes in anger symptoms, following group anger management treatment (AMT) among combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were drawn from a published randomized controlled trial of AMT conducted with a racially diverse group of 109 veterans with PTSD and anger symptoms residing in Hawaii. Results of latent growth curve models indicated that gains in calming skills predicted significantly larger reductions in anger symptoms at post-treatment, while the development of cognitive coping and behavioral control skills did not predict greater symptom reductions. Therapeutic alliance had indirect effects on all outcomes mostly via arousal calming skills. Results suggest that generalized symptom reduction may be mediated by development of skills in calming physiological arousal. In addition, arousal reduction skills appeared to enhance one's ability to employ other anger regulation skills.

  4. Indigenous Adoption of Novaco's Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Naz, Sumara; Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco's model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that individuals in the treatment group significantly (p < .01) scored lower on the NAI and ASR (at post-assessment) as compared to the control group. Therefore, the indigenous model of anger management was shown to be more effective than general counseling for anger management.

  5. Young Chinese Children's Anger and Distress: Emotion Category and Intensity Identified by the Time Course of Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Qiu, Peihua; Park, Ka Young; Xu, Qinmei; Potegal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical cluster analysis of the time course of the videotaped reactions of 75 Chinese 2-4-year olds to mothers' toy-removal identified Distress, Low Anger, and High Anger behavior clusters. Anger often begins at low intensity; some children then escalate. The face-validity of Low and High Anger-cluster classifications was supported in…

  6. Profiles of Anger Control in Second-Grade Children: Examination of Self-Report, Observational, and Physiological Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marissa; Hubbard, Julie A.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine anger control in 257 second-grade children (approximately 8 years of age). Anger was induced through losing a game and prize to a confederate who cheated. Three components of anger control were assessed: self-report of awareness of anger, observed intensity of angry facial…

  7. The Beliefs, Attitudes and Views of University Students about Anger and the Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Oriented Anger Control and Anxiety Management Programs on Their Anger Management Skill Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karahan, T. Fikret; Yalçin, B. Murat; Erbas, Melda M.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed as a qualitative focus group using a randomized controlled trail with a mixed methodology. The study has dual aims. First we searched the beliefs, attitudes and views of 176 university students on how to deal with anger using eight focus discussion groups. The anxiety and anger levels of these students were investigated…

  8. Extension Russian: A Few Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Irene J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents observations on the teaching of Russian in an evening extension course and four teaching techniques which involve variety in lesson planning, flexibility in presentation, a relaxed atmosphere and encouragement. (LG)

  9. Inside the Russian Soyuz Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA: Behind the Scenes, take a tour inside the Russian Soyuz, the vehicle which takes the expedition crews back and forth to the International Space Station. Astronaut Mike Finc...

  10. Clearing the Air: A Qualitative Investigation of Genetic Counselors' Experiences of Counselor-Focused Patient Anger.

    PubMed

    Schema, Lynn; McLaughlin, Michaela; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-10-01

    Patient anger is challenging for healthcare professionals to manage, particularly when it is directed at them. This study comprises the first in-depth investigation of genetic counselors' experiences with patient anger. Using a brief survey and interview methods, this study explored prevalence and context of patient anger directed at the genetic counselor, how genetic counselors manage patient anger directed at them, and possible thematic differences due to genetic counseling experience. Individuals enrolled in the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) listserv were invited to participate in a study of their experiences with patient anger directed at them. A majority of survey respondents (95.7 %, 243/254) reported experiencing patient anger directed at them, and 19.4 % reported having feared for their safety because of patient anger. Twenty-two survey respondents were purposively selected to participate in individual interviews. Inductive and cross case analysis yielded prevalent themes concerning patient triggers for anger, including bad news, logistical mishaps, and perceived counselor characteristics. Interview results further suggest unaddressed patient anger negatively affected patient and counselor emotional well-being and hindered genetic counseling goals. Prevalent challenges included genetic counselor attempts to accurately recognize, understand, and effectively manage patient anger without taking it personally. Commonly recommended strategies for addressing anger were empathy (i.e., understanding origins of patient anger), anticipating and acknowledging anger, maintaining personal, professional and legal protection, and debriefing with colleagues. Themes were quite similar across counselor experience levels. The findings underscore the importance of training and continuing education regarding patient anger. Additional findings, practice implications, and research recommendations are presented. PMID:25651823

  11. Varieties of Anger and the Inverse Link between Education and Inflammation: Toward an Integrative Framework

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine multiple aspects of anger experience and expression (frequency, outward expression, suppression, control) as moderators of the association of social inequality as measured by educational status with inflammation and coagulation markers. Methods Following survey assessments via telephone and mail, MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) respondents (N = 1,054) participated in an overnight clinic visit, where they completed anger questionnaires and provided a fasting blood sample to measure IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Results Educational status was linked to higher anger-control among men (B = .14, p = .001). Significant inverse correlations emerged between education and IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen (r's ≥ -.09, p's < .004) and between anger-control and IL-6 and CRP (r's = -.07, p's <. 03). Controlling for demographic and health status covariates, anger-in predicted lower fibrinogen (p = .031). Interactions between education and anger measures were significant for education and trait anger as related to fibrinogen (p = .023), education and anger-out as related to IL-6 (p = 0.05) and fibrinogen (p = .05). As predicted, the inverse relationships between education and IL-6 and fibrinogen were stronger among individuals reporting high anger. Anger-control also moderated the association of education with IL-6 in women (p = .026), such that the link between education and IL-6 was attenuated among women with high anger-control. Conclusion Varieties of anger moderated educational gradients in inflammation: The inverse relationships between education and inflammation markers were strongest among individuals with high anger, and were attenuated among those with high anger control. PMID:23766379

  12. Clearing the Air: A Qualitative Investigation of Genetic Counselors' Experiences of Counselor-Focused Patient Anger.

    PubMed

    Schema, Lynn; McLaughlin, Michaela; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-10-01

    Patient anger is challenging for healthcare professionals to manage, particularly when it is directed at them. This study comprises the first in-depth investigation of genetic counselors' experiences with patient anger. Using a brief survey and interview methods, this study explored prevalence and context of patient anger directed at the genetic counselor, how genetic counselors manage patient anger directed at them, and possible thematic differences due to genetic counseling experience. Individuals enrolled in the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) listserv were invited to participate in a study of their experiences with patient anger directed at them. A majority of survey respondents (95.7 %, 243/254) reported experiencing patient anger directed at them, and 19.4 % reported having feared for their safety because of patient anger. Twenty-two survey respondents were purposively selected to participate in individual interviews. Inductive and cross case analysis yielded prevalent themes concerning patient triggers for anger, including bad news, logistical mishaps, and perceived counselor characteristics. Interview results further suggest unaddressed patient anger negatively affected patient and counselor emotional well-being and hindered genetic counseling goals. Prevalent challenges included genetic counselor attempts to accurately recognize, understand, and effectively manage patient anger without taking it personally. Commonly recommended strategies for addressing anger were empathy (i.e., understanding origins of patient anger), anticipating and acknowledging anger, maintaining personal, professional and legal protection, and debriefing with colleagues. Themes were quite similar across counselor experience levels. The findings underscore the importance of training and continuing education regarding patient anger. Additional findings, practice implications, and research recommendations are presented.

  13. Anger Feelings and Anger Expression as a Mediator of the Effects of Witnessing Family Violence on Anxiety and Depression in Japanese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Toshinori; Hasui, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    The effects of anger feelings (rated by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) and witnessing family violence on anxiety and depression (rated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were examined in 457 junior high school students. Anxiety and depression scores were correlated with frequencies of witnessing family violence. In a…

  14. Population heterogeneity of trait anger and differential associations of trait anger facets with borderline personality features, neuroticism, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Lubke, Gitta H; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; de Moor, Marleen H M; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-15

    Anger is an emotion consisting of feelings of variable intensity ranging from mild irritation to intense fury. High levels of trait anger are associated with a range of psychiatric, interpersonal, and health problems. The objectives of this study were to explore heterogeneity of anger as measured by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS), and to assess the association of the different anger facets with a selection of psychiatric disorders covering externalizing and internalizing problems, personality disorders, and substance use. Factor mixture models differentiated between a high and low scoring class (28% vs. 72%), and between three factors (anger-temperament, anger-reaction, and immediacy of an anger response). Whereas all psychiatric scales correlated significantly with the STAS total score, regressing the three STAS factors on psychiatric behaviors model showed a more detailed pattern. Only borderline affect instability and depression were significantly associated with all three factors in both classes whereas other problem behaviors were associated only with 1 or 2 of the factors. Alcohol problems were associated with immediacy only in the high scoring class, indicating a non-linear relation in the total sample. Taking into account these more specific associations is likely to be beneficial when investigating differential treatment strategies.

  15. Population heterogeneity of trait anger and differential associations of trait anger facets with borderline personality features, neuroticism, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Lubke, Gitta H; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; de Moor, Marleen H M; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-15

    Anger is an emotion consisting of feelings of variable intensity ranging from mild irritation to intense fury. High levels of trait anger are associated with a range of psychiatric, interpersonal, and health problems. The objectives of this study were to explore heterogeneity of anger as measured by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS), and to assess the association of the different anger facets with a selection of psychiatric disorders covering externalizing and internalizing problems, personality disorders, and substance use. Factor mixture models differentiated between a high and low scoring class (28% vs. 72%), and between three factors (anger-temperament, anger-reaction, and immediacy of an anger response). Whereas all psychiatric scales correlated significantly with the STAS total score, regressing the three STAS factors on psychiatric behaviors model showed a more detailed pattern. Only borderline affect instability and depression were significantly associated with all three factors in both classes whereas other problem behaviors were associated only with 1 or 2 of the factors. Alcohol problems were associated with immediacy only in the high scoring class, indicating a non-linear relation in the total sample. Taking into account these more specific associations is likely to be beneficial when investigating differential treatment strategies. PMID:26454404

  16. Educational Status, Anger, and Inflammation in the MIDUS National Sample: Does Race Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Lewis, Tené T.; Coe, Christopher L.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Racial differences in anger frequency and expression styles have been found. Further, African Americans receive fewer health benefits from higher education than Whites. Purpose To investigate racial differences in how anger moderates the association between education and inflammation. Methods Midlife in the U.S. (MIDUS) participants (N = 1,200; 43.0% male; 18.5% African American) provided education and anger data via survey assessments. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen were determined from a fasting blood sample following an overnight clinic visit. Results African Americans reported higher anger-out, IL-6, and fibrinogen and lower anger-control than Whites. Anger-out predicted higher IL-6 and fibrinogen among African Americans with higher education, whereas trait anger and anger-out predicted lower fibrinogen among Whites with higher education. Anger-out marginally predicted higher IL-6 in less educated Whites. Conclusions Findings underscore racial differences in the benefits and consequences of educational attainment, and how social inequities and anger are manifest in inflammatory physiology. PMID:25715901

  17. Anger in brain and body: the neural and physiological perturbation of decision-making by emotion.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Sarah N; Zorab, Emma; Navaratnam, Nakulan; Engels, Miriam; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Minati, Ludovico; Dowell, Nicholas G; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F; Critchley, Hugo D

    2016-01-01

    Emotion and cognition are dynamically coupled to bodily arousal: the induction of anger, even unconsciously, can reprioritise neural and physiological resources toward action states that bias cognitive processes. Here we examine behavioural, neural and bodily effects of covert anger processing and its influence on cognition, indexed by lexical decision-making. While recording beat-to-beat blood pressure, the words ANGER or RELAX were presented subliminally just prior to rapid word/non-word reaction-time judgements of letter-strings. Subliminal ANGER primes delayed the time taken to reach rapid lexical decisions, relative to RELAX primes. However, individuals with high trait anger were speeded up by subliminal anger primes. ANGER primes increased systolic blood pressure and the magnitude of this increase predicted reaction time prolongation. Within the brain, ANGER trials evoked an enhancement of activity within dorsal pons and an attenuation of activity within visual occipitotemporal and attentional parietal cortices. Activity within periaqueductal grey matter, occipital and parietal regions increased linearly with evoked blood pressure changes, indicating neural substrates through which covert anger impairs semantic decisions, putatively through its expression as visceral arousal. The behavioural and physiological impact of anger states compromises the efficiency of cognitive processing through action-ready changes in autonomic response that skew regional neural activity. PMID:26253525

  18. The place and role of (moral) anger in organizational behavior studies

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this article is to conceptually delineate moral anger from other related constructs. Drawing upon social functional accounts of anger, we contend that distilling the finer nuances of morally motivated anger and its expression can increase the precision with which we examine prosocial forms of anger (e.g., redressing injustice), in general, and moral anger, in particular. Without this differentiation, we assert that (i) moral anger remains theoretically elusive, (ii) that this thwarts our ability to methodologically capture the unique variance moral anger can explain in important work outcomes, and that (iii) this can promote ill‐informed organizational policies and practice. We offer a four‐factor definition of moral anger and demonstrate the utility of this characterization as a distinct construct with application for workplace phenomena such as, but not limited to, whistle‐blowing. Next, we outline a future research agenda, including how to operationalize the construct and address issues of construct, discriminant, and convergent validity. Finally, we argue for greater appreciation of anger's prosocial functions and concomitant understanding that many anger displays can be justified and lack harmful intent. If allowed and addressed with interest and concern, these emotional displays can lead to improved organizational practice. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Organizational Behavior Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27773966

  19. Emotion Knowledge and Attentional Differences in Preschoolers Showing Context-Inappropriate Anger.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Lang, Nichole J

    2016-08-01

    Some children show anger inappropriate for the situation based on the predominant incentives, which is called context-inappropriate anger. Children need to attend to and interpret situational incentives for appropriate emotional responses. We examined associations of context-inappropriate anger with emotion recognition and attention problems in 43 preschoolers (42% male; M age = 55.1 months, SD = 4.1). Parents rated context-inappropriate anger across situations. Teachers rated attention problems using the Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher Report Form. Emotion recognition was ability to recognize emotional faces using the Emotion Matching Test. Anger perception bias was indicated by anger to non-anger situations using an adapted Affect Knowledge Test. 28% of children showed context-inappropriate anger, which correlated with lower emotion recognition (β = -.28) and higher attention problems (β = .36). Higher attention problems correlated with more anger perception bias (β = .32). This cross-sectional, correlational study provides preliminary findings that children with context-inappropriate anger showed more attention problems, which suggests that both "problems" tend to covary and associate with deficits or biases in emotion knowledge. PMID:27417387

  20. Effect of anger and trait forgiveness on cardiovascular risk in young adult females.

    PubMed

    May, Ross W; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Hawkins, Kirsten A; Batchelor, Wayne B; Fincham, Frank D

    2014-07-01

    High trait anger is linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. A potential antidote to the cardiotoxic influence of anger is trait forgiveness (TF), as it has shown associations with improved blood pressure (BP) and cardiovagal tone regulation in cardiac patients. However, it has yet to be determined if anger and forgiveness independently predict cardiovascular parameters. Trait anger (State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2) and TF (Tendency to Forgive Scale) were evaluated in 308 (M = 21.11years ± SD = 2.52) healthy female volunteers allocated to 3 related, yet distinct, studies. Hierarchical multiple regressions tested the incremental contribution of TF after accounting for anger. Study 1 assessed autonomic modulation through beat-to-beat BP and spectral analysis to examine sympathovagal balance and baroreflex functioning. Study 2 used tonometry and pulse wave analysis for aortic hemodynamics. Study 3 assessed 24-hour ambulatory BP and ambulatory arterial stiffness index. Hierarchical models demonstrated that anger was significantly associated with increased sympathovagal tone, increased hemodynamic indices, high ambulatory BPs, and attenuated BP variability and baroreflex. In contrast, TF was associated with more favorable hemodynamic effects (i.e., decreased ventricular work and myocardial oxygen consumption). In conclusion, these results demonstrate divergent cardiovascular effects of anger and forgiveness, such that anger is associated with a more cardiotoxic autonomic and hemodynamic profile, whereas TF is associated with a more cardioprotective profile. These findings suggest that interventions aimed at decreasing anger while increasing forgiveness may be clinically relevant.

  1. Anger in brain and body: the neural and physiological perturbation of decision-making by emotion.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Sarah N; Zorab, Emma; Navaratnam, Nakulan; Engels, Miriam; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Minati, Ludovico; Dowell, Nicholas G; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F; Critchley, Hugo D

    2016-01-01

    Emotion and cognition are dynamically coupled to bodily arousal: the induction of anger, even unconsciously, can reprioritise neural and physiological resources toward action states that bias cognitive processes. Here we examine behavioural, neural and bodily effects of covert anger processing and its influence on cognition, indexed by lexical decision-making. While recording beat-to-beat blood pressure, the words ANGER or RELAX were presented subliminally just prior to rapid word/non-word reaction-time judgements of letter-strings. Subliminal ANGER primes delayed the time taken to reach rapid lexical decisions, relative to RELAX primes. However, individuals with high trait anger were speeded up by subliminal anger primes. ANGER primes increased systolic blood pressure and the magnitude of this increase predicted reaction time prolongation. Within the brain, ANGER trials evoked an enhancement of activity within dorsal pons and an attenuation of activity within visual occipitotemporal and attentional parietal cortices. Activity within periaqueductal grey matter, occipital and parietal regions increased linearly with evoked blood pressure changes, indicating neural substrates through which covert anger impairs semantic decisions, putatively through its expression as visceral arousal. The behavioural and physiological impact of anger states compromises the efficiency of cognitive processing through action-ready changes in autonomic response that skew regional neural activity.

  2. The effect of an anger management program for family members of patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Son, Ju-Young; Choi, Yun-Jung

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to test the structured anger management nursing program for the family members of patients with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Families with the AUDs suffer from the dysfunctional family dynamic caused by the patients' deteriorative disease processes of alcohol dependence. Family members of AUDs feel bitter and angry about the uncontrolled behaviors and relapses of the patients in spite of great effort for a long time. This chronic anger threatens the optimal function of the family as well as obstructs the family to help the patients who are suffering from AUDs. Sixty three subjects were participated who were referred from community mental health centers, alcohol consultation centers, and an alcohol hospital in Korea. Pre-post scores of the Korean Anger Expression Inventory were used to test the program. An anger management program was developed and implemented to promote anger expression and anger management for the family members of the patients with AUDs. The total anger expression score of the experimental group was significantly more reduced as compared with that of the control group. Subjects in the experimental group reported after the program that they felt more comfortable and their life was changed in a better way. The anger management program was effective to promote anger expression and anger management for family members of AUDs. Nurses need to include family members in their nursing process as well as to care of patients with AUDs to maximize nursing outcome and patient satisfaction.

  3. The mediating role of anger in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Wang, Xin; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2015-03-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chemtob, 2002); possibly in the form of impulsive actions consistent with impulsivity's association with anger (Milligan & Waller, 2001; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). This could be 1 of the explanations for the relationship between PTSD and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, & Amir, 2001; Ledgerwood & Petry, 2006). The present study assessed the mediating role of anger between PTSD (overall scores and subscales of arousal and negative alterations in mood/cognitions) and impulsivity, using gender as a covariate of impulsivity. The PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), Dimensions of Anger Reaction scale-5, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 244 undergraduate students with a trauma history. Results based on 1000 bootstrapped samples indicated significant direct effects of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on anger, of anger on impulsivity, and of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on impulsivity. Further, anger significantly mediated the relationship between PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) and impulsivity, consistent with the hypothesized models. Results suggest that impulsivity aims at coping with distressing anger, possibly explaining the presence of substance usage, and other impulsive behaviors in people with PTSD. Further, anger probably serves as a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion coupled with PTSD symptoms. PMID:25793689

  4. A thick Anger camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. R.; Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The NaI(Tl) Anger camera is a natural candidate for a position sensitive detector in imaging of astrophysical gamma-ray sources. Here laboratory measurements are presented of the response of a relatively thick (5.1 cm) NaI(Tl) Anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging in the 50 keV to 2 MeV energy range. A position resolution of 10.5 mm FWHM at 122 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 662 keV. The energy resolution was 7 percent FWHM at 662 keV. The ability of the detector to resolve the depth of the gamma-ray interaction and the use of this depth resolution to reduce back-incident and internal background is discussed.

  5. A thick anger camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.R.; Finger, M.; Prince, T.A.

    1985-02-01

    The NaI(T1) Anger camera is a natural candidate for a position sensitive detector in imaging of astrophysical ..gamma..-ray sources. Here we present laboratory measurements of the response of a relatively thick (5.1 cm) NaI(T1) Anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging in the 50 keV to 2 MeV energy range. We obtained a position resolution of 10.5 mm FWHM at 122 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 662 keV. The energy resolution was 7% FWHM at 662 keV. We discuss the ability of the detector to resolve the depth of the ..gamma..-ray interaction and the use of this depth resolution to reduce back-incident and internal background.

  6. Differential effects of trait anger on optimism and risk behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pietruska, Karin; Armony, Jorge L

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that angry people exhibit optimistic risk estimates about future events and, consequently, are biased towards making risk-seeking choices. The goal of this study was to directly test the hypothesised effect of trait anger on optimism and risk-taking behaviour. One hundred healthy volunteers completed questionnaires about personality traits, optimism and risk behaviour. In addition their risk tendency was assessed with the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), which provides an online measure of risk behaviour. Our results partly confirmed the relation between trait anger and outcome expectations of future life events, but suggest that this optimism does not necessarily translate into actual risk-seeking behaviour. PMID:22780446

  7. A dance in anger: physician responses to changes in practice.

    PubMed

    Klint, R B

    1999-01-01

    Although "managed care" means different things to different people, it has become an icon for health care change and is commonly cited as the principle cause for the physician's lament. Successful leaders are finding ways to address the signs, symptoms, and causes of the physician grief reaction to the tumultuous marketplace changes affecting how they view themselves as professionals and how they practice medicine. Health care CEOs continue to place the search for solutions, physician-hospital integration, and the alignment of system and physician incentives as their number one strategic priority. This article reviews common sources of anger and identifies potential solutions. Strategies for dealing with the anger include: (1) recognizing the issues, causes, signs, and symptoms; (2) restoring balance and power; (3) developing new economic partnerships; (4) managing the organizational culture; and (5) educating one another and developing leadership.

  8. Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members.

    PubMed

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52-2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62-2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender.

  9. Secure Base Priming Diminishes Conflict-Based Anger and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Tamara; Bartholomew, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a visual representation of a secure base (i.e. a secure base prime) on attenuating experimentally produced anger and anxiety. Specifically, we examined the assuaging of negative emotions through exposure to an image of a mother-infant embrace or a heterosexual couple embracing. Subjects seated at a computer terminal rated their affect (Pre Affect) using the Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) then listened to two sets of intense two person conflicts. After the first conflict exposure they rated affect again (Post 1 AAC). Following the second exposure they saw a blank screen (control condition), pictures of everyday objects (distraction condition) or a photo of two people embracing (Secure Base Prime condition). They then reported emotions using the Post 2 AAC. Compared to either control or distraction subjects, Secure Base Prime (SBP) subjects reported significantly less anger and anxiety. These results were then replicated using an internet sample with control, SBP and two new controls: Smiling Man (to control for expression of positive affect) and Cold Mother (an unsmiling mother with infant). The SBP amelioration of anger and anxiety was replicated with the internet sample. No control groups produced this effect, which was generated only by a combination of positive affect in a physically embracing dyad. The results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and research on spreading activation. PMID:27606897

  10. Reward sensitivity and anger in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Duek, Or; Osher, Yamima; Belmaker, Robert H; Bersudsky, Yuly; Kofman, Ora

    2014-01-30

    According to the hypersensitive behavioral approach system (BAS) model of bipolar disorder (BP), hypersensitivity of the BAS is a trait that should be present even in the euthymic state. This would be expected to result in increased anger and reward sensitivity, both of which are related to the approach system. This study examined these predictions through the use of tasks that assess different aspects of the BAS: reward sensitivity, anger and impulsivity. These characteristics were assessed using the probabilistic classification task (PCT), ultimatum game (UG) and single key impulsivity paradigm (SKIP), respectively. Participants were euthymic adult bipolar disorder patients (BP; N=40) and healthy controls (HC; N=41). In the UG, all participants showed the standard pattern of rejecting overtly unfair offers and accepting clearly fair offers; however, BPs rejected more of the moderately unfair offers than did HCs. BP and HC participants did not differ on their ability to learn, but did show different patterns of learning from reward and punishment. Learning for reward and punishment were negatively correlated in the BP group, suggesting that individuals could learn well either from reward or punishment, but not both. No correlation was found between these forms of learning in the HC group. BP patients show signs of their disorder even in the euthymic state, as seen by the dysbalance between reward and punishment learning and their residual anger in the UG.

  11. Secure Base Priming Diminishes Conflict-Based Anger and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Donald G; Lane, René A; Koren, Tamara; Bartholomew, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a visual representation of a secure base (i.e. a secure base prime) on attenuating experimentally produced anger and anxiety. Specifically, we examined the assuaging of negative emotions through exposure to an image of a mother-infant embrace or a heterosexual couple embracing. Subjects seated at a computer terminal rated their affect (Pre Affect) using the Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) then listened to two sets of intense two person conflicts. After the first conflict exposure they rated affect again (Post 1 AAC). Following the second exposure they saw a blank screen (control condition), pictures of everyday objects (distraction condition) or a photo of two people embracing (Secure Base Prime condition). They then reported emotions using the Post 2 AAC. Compared to either control or distraction subjects, Secure Base Prime (SBP) subjects reported significantly less anger and anxiety. These results were then replicated using an internet sample with control, SBP and two new controls: Smiling Man (to control for expression of positive affect) and Cold Mother (an unsmiling mother with infant). The SBP amelioration of anger and anxiety was replicated with the internet sample. No control groups produced this effect, which was generated only by a combination of positive affect in a physically embracing dyad. The results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and research on spreading activation. PMID:27606897

  12. Reward sensitivity and anger in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Duek, Or; Osher, Yamima; Belmaker, Robert H; Bersudsky, Yuly; Kofman, Ora

    2014-01-30

    According to the hypersensitive behavioral approach system (BAS) model of bipolar disorder (BP), hypersensitivity of the BAS is a trait that should be present even in the euthymic state. This would be expected to result in increased anger and reward sensitivity, both of which are related to the approach system. This study examined these predictions through the use of tasks that assess different aspects of the BAS: reward sensitivity, anger and impulsivity. These characteristics were assessed using the probabilistic classification task (PCT), ultimatum game (UG) and single key impulsivity paradigm (SKIP), respectively. Participants were euthymic adult bipolar disorder patients (BP; N=40) and healthy controls (HC; N=41). In the UG, all participants showed the standard pattern of rejecting overtly unfair offers and accepting clearly fair offers; however, BPs rejected more of the moderately unfair offers than did HCs. BP and HC participants did not differ on their ability to learn, but did show different patterns of learning from reward and punishment. Learning for reward and punishment were negatively correlated in the BP group, suggesting that individuals could learn well either from reward or punishment, but not both. No correlation was found between these forms of learning in the HC group. BP patients show signs of their disorder even in the euthymic state, as seen by the dysbalance between reward and punishment learning and their residual anger in the UG. PMID:24230992

  13. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure.

    PubMed

    Rohlf, Helena L; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  14. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure

    PubMed Central

    Rohlf, Helena L.; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6–10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  15. Young Children’s Adjustment as a Function of Maltreatment, Shame, and Anger

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David S.; Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; Lewis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Maltreated children are at increased risk for behavior problems. This study examines a model in which shame mediates the potential relation between maltreatment and anger, and anger mediates the potential relation between shame and behavior problems. Participants were 177 children (ages 3 to 7 years) and their mothers, 90 of whom had histories of perpetrating neglect and/or physical abuse. Physical abuse, but not neglect, was related to increased shame during an evaluative task; shame was related to increased anger; and anger to teacher ratings of total behavior problems and externalizing problems. Age moderated the relation between physical abuse and adjustment, as abuse was related to more total problems only among the younger children. Anger was a significant mediator of shame and both behavior problems and externalizing problems. Shame, anger, age, and type of maltreatment appear to be important factors in explaining variance in behavioral adjustment following a history of maltreatment. PMID:16204734

  16. A Prospective Study of Trait Anger and PTSD Symptoms in Police

    PubMed Central

    Meffert, Susan M.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Henn-Haase, Clare; McCaslin, Shannon; Inslicht, Sabra; Chemtob, Claude; Neylan, Thomas; Marmar, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown whether anger is a risk factor for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, arises as a consequence of PTSD, or both. Two hypotheses were tested in 180 police recruits: Greater trait anger during training will predict greater PTSD symptoms at one year; greater PTSD symptoms at one year will predict greater state anger at one year. Both hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that trait anger is a risk factor for PTSD symptoms, but that PTSD symptoms are also associated with an increase of state anger. Increased anger is important not only because of the impact it has on individual distress and physical health, but also because of its potential public health impact. PMID:18720397

  17. Anger expression and natural killer cell activity in family caregivers participating in a physical activity trial.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, S; King, A C; Vitaliano, P P; Brassington, G S

    2000-07-01

    Associations between psychological functioning and natural killer cell activity (NKA) were examined in 23 older (62.2 ± 7.5 years) family caregivers randomized to a moderate intensity four-month exercise program or to a wait-list control condition. At baseline, although NKA was related to anger-control (r = -.42; trend p < .06) and anger-out (r = .50; p < .03), it was not related to depression, anxiety, perceived stress, or caregiver burden. After controlling for baseline NKA, changes in anger-control explained 14 percent of the variance in NKA four months later. Decreases in anger-control predicted increases in NKA. Group assignment (exercise vs control) was unrelated to changes in NKA over the four-month period; however, the study was not powered to detect this effect. These results are consistent with reported relationships of anger expression with other physiological measures, and extend the importance of anger expression to immune functioning in older family caregivers.

  18. Vengeance is self-focused: Comparing vengeful to anger-driven responses.

    PubMed

    Elshout, Maartje; Nelissen, Rob M A; van Beest, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Prior definitions and empirical research do not distinguish responses to transgressions driven by feelings of revenge from responses to transgressions driven by feelings of anger. We used autobiographical recalls to examine differences between vengeful and anger-driven responses. Our findings revealed that vengeful responses are not the same as anger-driven responses. Compared to anger-driven responses, vengeful responses resulted more from offences that induce a self-threat, which elicited more intense negative self-conscious emotions and more rumination. Moreover, compared to anger-driven responses, vengeful responses consisted more of behaviours that induced a self-threat to the other person, were motivated more by intrapersonal goals, were more delayed, elicited more positive emotions and resulted in less relationship restoration. Together, these findings suggest that more so than anger-driven responses, vengeance is self-focused.

  19. Adult attachment orientations and anger expression in romantic relationships: a dyadic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nisenbaum, Max G; Lopez, Frederick G

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how the gender and adult attachment orientations of romantic relationship partners contribute to each participant's experience and expression of anger in their relationship. Specifically, we collected data from both members of a heterosexual relationship to examine how a person's adult attachment orientation influences their own, and their partner's, anger-related behavior. In addition, we examined whether one partner's responses to another's anger predicted the other's anger-related response tendencies. Furthermore, we explored the contribution of participants' sex to their own and their partners' anger-related behavior. Hypotheses were tested using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), a data analytic strategy that takes into account the nonindependence of dyadic data. Results yielded partial support for theory-based predictions about the influence of adult attachment orientations on anger-related reactions and accommodation behavior. The implications of these findings for counseling practice and future research are discussed.

  20. Vengeance is self-focused: Comparing vengeful to anger-driven responses.

    PubMed

    Elshout, Maartje; Nelissen, Rob M A; van Beest, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Prior definitions and empirical research do not distinguish responses to transgressions driven by feelings of revenge from responses to transgressions driven by feelings of anger. We used autobiographical recalls to examine differences between vengeful and anger-driven responses. Our findings revealed that vengeful responses are not the same as anger-driven responses. Compared to anger-driven responses, vengeful responses resulted more from offences that induce a self-threat, which elicited more intense negative self-conscious emotions and more rumination. Moreover, compared to anger-driven responses, vengeful responses consisted more of behaviours that induced a self-threat to the other person, were motivated more by intrapersonal goals, were more delayed, elicited more positive emotions and resulted in less relationship restoration. Together, these findings suggest that more so than anger-driven responses, vengeance is self-focused. PMID:25379742

  1. Maternal Depression and Trait Anger as Risk Factors for Escalated Physical Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Nicole L.; Knutson, John F.

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesized anger-mediated relation between maternal depression and escalation of physical discipline, 122 economically disadvantaged mothers were assessed for current and lifetime diagnoses of depression using the Current Depressive Episode, Past Depression, and Dysthymia sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and a measure of current depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory–Second Edition (BDI-II). Escalation of physical discipline was assessed using a video analog parenting task; maternal anger not specific to discipline was assessed using the Spielberger Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Reports of anger were associated with the diagnosis of depression and depressive symptoms. Bootstrap analyses of indirect effects indicated that the link between depression and escalated discipline was mediated by anger. Parallel analyses based on BDI-II scores identified a marginally significant indirect effect of depression on discipline. Findings suggest that anger and irritability are central to the putative link between depression and harsh discipline. PMID:18174347

  2. Russian Prime Minister Calls the Station Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin called the International Space Station from the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia, on Jan. 11, 2011. Putin also offered his condolences to ISS ...

  3. The mu opioid receptor A118G gene polymorphism moderates effects of trait anger-out on acute pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W

    2008-10-15

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested that the effects of anger-out on postoperative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotypexphenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-outxA118G interactions were observed (p's<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p's<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-outxA118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotypexphenotype interactions involving trait anger-out.

  4. The Mu Opioid Receptor A118G Gene Polymorphism Moderates Effects of Trait Anger-Out on Acute Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested the effects of anger-out on post-operative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotype X phenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-out X A118G interactions were observed (p’s<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p’s<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-out X A118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotype X phenotype interactions involving trait anger-out. PMID:18579306

  5. Russian Soyuz in Launch Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle is shown in the vertical position for its launch from Baikonur, carrying the first resident crew to the International Space Station. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960s until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  6. Anger management style and endogenous opioid function: is gender a moderator?

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; al'Absi, Mustafa; France, Christopher R; France, Janis; Harju, Angie; Burns, John W; Chung, Ok Y

    2007-06-01

    This study explored possible gender moderation of previously reported associations between elevated trait anger-out and reduced endogenous opioid analgesia. One hundred forty-five healthy participants underwent acute electrocutaneous pain stimulation after placebo and oral opioid blockade in separate sessions. Blockade effects were derived reflecting changes in pain responses induced by opioid blockade. Hierarchical regressions revealed that elevated anger-out was associated with smaller pain threshold blockade effects (less opioid analgesia) in females, with opposite findings in males (interaction p < .001). Similar marginally significant interactions were noted for blockade effects derived for nociceptive flexion reflex threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings (p < .10). Anger-in was also associated negatively with pain threshold blockade effects in females but not males (interaction p < .05). Across genders, elevated anger-in was related to smaller pain tolerance blockade effects (p < .01). Overlap with negative affect did not account for these opioid effects. The anger-in/opioid association was partially due to overlap with anger-out, but the converse was not true. These findings provide additional evidence of an association between trait anger-out and endogenous opioid analgesia, but further suggest that gender may moderate these effects. In contrast to past work, anger-in was related to reduced opioid analgesia, although overlap with anger-out may contribute to this finding. PMID:17410417

  7. Symmetrical and asymmetrical outcomes of leader anger expression: A qualitative study of army personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lindebaum, Dirk; Jordan, Peter J; Morris, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the utility of anger at work, suggesting that anger can have positive outcomes. Using the Dual Threshold Model, we assess the positive and negative consequences of anger expressions at work and focus on the conditions under which expressions of anger crossing the impropriety threshold are perceived as productive or counterproductive by observers or targets of that anger. To explore this phenomenon, we conducted a phenomenological study (n = 20) to probe the lived experiences of followers (as observers and targets) associated with anger expressions by military leaders. The nature of task (e.g. the display rules prescribed for combat situations) emerged as one condition under which the crossing of the impropriety threshold leads to positive outcomes of anger expressions. Our data reveal tensions between emotional display rules and emotional display norms in the military, thereby fostering paradoxical attitudes toward anger expression and its consequences among followers. Within this paradoxical space, anger expressions have both positive (asymmetrical) and negative (symmetrical) consequences. We place our findings in the context of the Dual Threshold Model, discuss the practical implications of our research and offer avenues for future studies. PMID:26900171

  8. Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: Moderation by life stress

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors. PMID:25151247

  9. Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Krause, Steven J; Broer, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings suggest the utility of distinguishing between anger toward God and behaviors suggesting assertiveness toward God. PMID:27216030

  10. Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Krause, Steven J; Broer, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings suggest the utility of distinguishing between anger toward God and behaviors suggesting assertiveness toward God.

  11. Anger, spiritual meaning and support from the religious community in dementia caregiving.

    PubMed

    Márquez-González, María; López, Javier; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Losada, Andrés

    2012-03-01

    This study explores the relationships between spiritual meaning and social support from the religious community and problem behaviors, anger and depression in 128 dementia caregivers. The results suggest a mediating role of anger in the relationship between the appraisal of problem behaviors and depression. Support from the religious community is directly and negatively associated with anger, but the relationship between spiritual meaning and anger is mediated by caregivers' appraisals of problem behaviors, suggesting that spiritual beliefs might help caregivers to find meaning in caregiving experiences and thus appraise care recipients' behavioral problems as less stressful.

  12. The expression and regulation of anger in toddlers: relations to maternal behavior and mental representations.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth; Dollberg, Daphna; Nadam, Roni

    2011-04-01

    Anger is an intense and adaptive approach emotion that undergoes significant development during the toddler years. We assessed the expression of anger and the strategies toddlers use to regulate it in relation to maternal behavior and mental representations. Seventy-four toddlers were observed in three anger-eliciting paradigms: toy removal (TR), still-face (SF), and delayed gratification (DG). Anger expression and three clusters of regulatory behaviors were micro-coded: putative regulatory behaviors, attention manipulation, and play behaviors. Maternal relational style was coded for sensitivity and intrusiveness, and mental representations of the mother-child relationship were assessed for joy and anger. Children expressed the most anger during the TR, less during the SF, and minimally during the DG. Use of putative regulatory behaviors was highest during the SF, whereas during the TR children employed newly acquired skills, such as focused attention and substitutive play, in the service of anger regulation. Anger expression and regulation were differentially related to the negative and positive components in the mother's behavior and representations, and maternal intrusiveness moderated the relations between angry representations and the degree of child anger during the SF. Results are consistent with dynamic models of emotions and accord with perspectives that emphasize the role of sensitive parenting in facilitating emotion regulation. PMID:21388688

  13. The effects of respiratory sinus arrhythmia on anger reactivity and persistence in major depression.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Alissa J; Shumake, Jason; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-10-01

    The experience of anger during a depressive episode has recently been identified as a poor prognostic indicator of illness course. Given the clinical implications of anger in major depressive disorder (MDD), understanding the mechanisms involved in anger reactivity and persistence is critical for improved intervention. Biological processes involved in emotion regulation during stress, such as respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), may play a role in maintaining negative moods. Clinically depressed (MDD; n = 49) and nondepressed (non-MDD; n = 50) individuals were challenged with a stressful computer task shown to increase anger, while RSA (high frequency range 0.15-0.4 Hz) was collected. RSA predicted future anger, but was unrelated to current anger. That is, across participants, low baseline RSA predicted anger reactivity during the task, and in depressed individuals, those with low RSA during the task had a greater likelihood of anger persistence during a recovery period. These results suggest that low RSA may be a psychophysiological process involved in anger regulation in depression. Low RSA may contribute to sustained illness course by diminishing the repair of angry moods. PMID:27401801

  14. Does anger mediate between personality and eating symptoms in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Siccardi, Sara; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marech, Lucrezia; Barosio, Marta; Fassino, Secondo

    2012-12-30

    The goals of the study were to explore anger correlation with bulimic symptoms and to test the mediation power of anger between personality and eating psychopathology. A total of 242 bulimia nervosa (BN) outpatients and 121 healthy controls were recruited. Assessment was performed using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 (STAXI-2); Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2); Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ); Binge Eating Scale (BES); and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Mediation was tested on the whole BN group, on controls and on two BN subgroups based on a previous history of anorexia nervosa. Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness extensively relate to anger and psychopathology in bulimic group. Bulimic symptoms are related to Trait Reactive Anger. Trait Anger and Anger Expression fully mediate Cooperativeness effects on binge eating and Impulsiveness in the BN subjects. Anger Expression-In partially mediates between Harm Avoidance and Social Insecurity/Interpersonal Distrust in BN subjects. The comparison with controls and the analysis of subgroups underlines that these patterns are specific for BN. Anger mediation between Cooperativeness, and binge eating and impulsive behaviours confirm the relevance of relational dynamics in the expression of these core eating symptoms. Relational skills may represent a relevant target for the treatment of BN.

  15. Violence associated with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder: The importance of anger.

    PubMed

    Novaco, Raymond W; Chemtob, Claude M

    2015-09-01

    The importance of anger with regard to violence among veterans with combat-related PTSD has received little attention. We previously proposed that in PTSD the activation of threat-related cognitive networks strongly potentiates anger in a positive feedback loop and that inhibitory controls on aggression can be overridden when PTSD and anger activation are conjoined. We predicted that violence would be intensified when combat-related PTSD was conjoined with anger. We used the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS) public use data set, selecting the male combat theater veterans, which entailed 1,200 from the main survey (Study 1) and 259 from the clinical interview component (Study 2). Anger indices were constructed from NVVRS variables. PTSD was assessed by continuous symptom scores and by clinical diagnostic measures. Conjoined anger and PTSD was associated with greatly increased violence. PTSD was not associated with violence in the absence of anger. This result was obtained using alternative measures of PTSD and of anger in both the main survey and the clinical interview component. These findings call for reconceptualizing the association of PTSD and violence. Concerted attention should be given to anger as a risk factor for violence in the assessment and treatment of combat-related PTSD, and as an important portal of entry for treatment. PMID:26147447

  16. Processing of Contrastiveness by Heritage Russian Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekerina, Irina A.; Trueswell, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments in the Visual World paradigm compared how monolingual Russian (Experiment 1) and heritage Russian-English bilingual (Experiment 2) listeners process contrastiveness online in Russian. Materials were color adjective-noun phrases embedded into the split-constituent construction Krasnuju polozite zvezdovku..."Red put…

  17. Teaching Russian Culture: Concepts of Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianne

    Russian culture is very much influenced by its huge land area, peculiar topography, and harsh climate. To understand Russian culture one must know how Russians perceive nature. This paper discusses how this concept may be conveyed to U.S. middle school students through poetry. Poems about nature can provide students an opportunity to understand…

  18. Russian Loanword Adaptation in Persian; Optimal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambuziya, Aliye Kord Zafaranlu; Hashemi, Eftekhar Sadat

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed some of the phonological rules of Russian loanword adaptation in Persian, on the view of Optimal Theory (OT) (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). It is the first study of phonological process on Russian loanwords adaptation in Persian. By gathering about 50 current Russian loanwords, we selected some of them to analyze. We…

  19. Social and Racial Correlates of Russian Roulette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven; Wasserman, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The epidemiology of a neglected form of suicidal behavior, Russian roulette, is addressed. Also tested is an explanation of racial differences based on the opportunity theory of deviant behavior related to the availability of revolvers, necessary weapons with which to play Russian roulette. Data refer to 15 cases of Russian roulette found through…

  20. Russian roulette with a knife.

    PubMed

    Frazer, M; Rosenberg, S

    1983-01-01

    The following case report describes an accidental stabbing that occurred on Halloween. The unwitting victim, while preparing for a holiday charade, stabbed himself with an ornamental dagger. By placing himself in a potentially hazardous situation, the victim's behavior entailed risk taking. The psychological implications of such risk taking are complex, and may be compared to such behaviors as russian roulette, gambling, and parasuicide.

  1. Atlanta Public Schools Russian Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Billie Davis; And Others

    This guide for teachers of Russian outlines course objectives and general educational goals. Contents include information on: (1) philosophy and long-range goals, (2) student recruitment, (3) program counseling, (4) English in the classroom, (5) grammar, (6) articulation, (7) independent study, (8) grouping for student-centered work, (9) reading…

  2. Identity Options in Russian Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shardakova, Marya; Pavlenko, Aneta

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a new analytical approach to the study of identity options offered in foreign and second language textbooks. This approach, grounded in poststructuralist theory and critical discourse analysis, is applied to 2 popular beginning Russian textbooks. Two sets of identity options are examined in the study: imagined learners…

  3. Russian program of planetary missions.

    PubMed

    Galeev, A A

    1996-01-01

    In the area of Solar System Exploration most of recently proposed mission oriented to the studies of Mars. Except MARS-96 and possibly MARS SAMPLE RETURN missions other Mars missions use Molnija class launchers. All Russian missions heavily involve international partners.

  4. Launch of Russian reactor postponed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-05

    Astronomers and weapons scientists seemed heated on a collision course a few months ago over the military's plans to send a Russian nuclear reactor into space. But an agreement reached in late January has prevented a pile-up, at least for 6 months. The astronomers, led by Donald Lamb of the University of Chicago, were objecting to plans by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) to launch Topaz 2, an experimental Russian nuclear reactor, arguing that rogue particles from it might ruin sensitive gamma ray experiments. The reactor is designed to propel itself in space with a jet of xenon ions. One worry was that leaking gamma rays and positrons, which can travel in the earth's magnetic field and pop up in the darndest places, might cause false signals in gamma ray monitors (Science, 18 December 1992, p. 1878). The worry has abated now that SDI officials will postpone choosing a rocket and mission altitutde for Topaz 2 for 6 months, while experts study how its emissions at various altitudes might affect instruments aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory and other satellites. In effect, the SDIO has agreed to an environmental impact study for space, following an unusual meeting organized by former Russian space official Roald Sagdeev at the University of Maryland on 19 January. There the Russian designers of Topaz 2, its new owners at the SDIO, and critics in the astronomy community achieved common ground: that more study was needed.

  5. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders.

  6. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  7. The Relationship between Anger Expression and Its Indices and Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Farnam, Alireza; Attaran, Rana; Farhang, Sara; Safarnavadeh, Maryam; Gholizadeh, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Depression, stress and anxiety are psychological factors that their influence on the expression of lichen planus by affecting the immune system's function has been confirmed. There is a probable relationship between anger and OLP expression. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association of "anger" and OLP. In this descriptive study 95 subjects were included in 3 groups. A: patients with oral lichen planus, B: positive control, C: negative control. Anger and its indices were assessed by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) questionnaire, and pain was measured via the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The collected data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 18 software. The lichen planus and positive control groups bore higher total anger index (AX index) values compared with the negative control. Comparing anger expression-in (AXI) among the lichen planus and negative control groups revealed higher grades in lichen planus group. Evaluating the pain severity index (VAS) data and anger indices in lichen planus group, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test revealed a significant correlation between TAngR (reactional anger traits) and pain severity. The findings of this study indicated that there was a significant correlation between anger control and suppression of lichen planus development. On the other hand, the patients with more severe pain mostly expressed their anger physically. Based on the findings, we can make the claim that anger suppression and its control-in (gathering tension) may play a role in the development of lichen planus as a known psychosomatic disorders. PMID:27231675

  8. Russians Work on Aft Portion of Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this photograph, Russians are working on the aft portion of the United States-funded, Russian-built Functional Cargo Bay (FGB) also known as Zarya (Russian for sunrise). Built at Khrunichev, the FGB began pre-launch testing shortly after this photo was taken. Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, Zarya was the first element of the International Space Station (ISS) followed by the U.S. Unity Node. The aft docking mechanism, Pirs, on the far right with ventilation ducting rurning through it, will be docked with the third Station element, the Russian Service Module, or Zvezda.

  9. Russian perspectives: The past shapes the present

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, R.P.

    1994-11-01

    This document contains an outline of a speech given to a group of professionals at Pacific Northwest Laboratory which was intended to give an unbiased view of Soviet perceptions. Topics discussed include: The new mission of US and Soviet labs and institutions to develop products and dedicate research to post cold war threat, historical prospectives of Russia, Russian military roles and missions, ideology of Russian politics, evils of capitalism, Russian civil war, communism, world war II, Russian losses during the war, the cold war, reasons why America should care what happens in Russia, the internal threat against a market-based economy, the US should help, and the Russian people and their attitudes.

  10. Interpersonal rejection as a determinant of anger and aggression.

    PubMed

    Leary, Mark R; Twenge, Jean M; Quinlivan, Erin

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on the relationship between interpersonal rejection and aggression. Four bodies of research are summarized: laboratory experiments that manipulate rejection, rejection among adults in everyday life, rejection in childhood, and individual differences that may moderate the relationship. The theoretical mechanisms behind the effect are then explored. Possible explanations for why rejection leads to anger and aggression include: rejection as a source of pain, rejection as a source of frustration, rejection as a threat to self-esteem, mood improvement following aggression, aggression as social influence, aggression as a means of reestablishing control, retribution, disinhibition, and loss of self-control. PMID:16768650

  11. Women, Anger Expression, Relational and Health Consequences: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Kristin L.

    Women's anger expression style has been the focus of several recent studies and has been demonstrated to have deleterious effects on emotional and physical health. The purpose of this study was to review the empirical literature for women's anger expression style and related health and relational consequences. The study reviewed emotion induction,…

  12. Relationship of Anger, Stress, and Coping with School Connectedness in Fourth-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Marti; Kang, Duck-Hee; Weaver, Michael; Howell, Carol C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: High trait anger and stress, ineffective patterns of anger expression, and coping are risk factors for the development of disease and negative social behaviors in children and adults. School connectedness may be protective against negative consequences in adolescents, but less is known about this in school-aged children. The purposes…

  13. The Predictors of Indonesian Senior High School Students' Anger at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernawati, Lucia; Rahayu, Esti; Soejowinoto, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the correlation between senior high school students' anger at school and the quality relationship of parents-adolescents, peer pressure, narcissistic personality, and school climate. The instruments used were student anger at school inventory, scale of adolescent and family attachment, peer pressure inventory,…

  14. Anger and Sadness Perception in Clinically Referred Preschoolers: Emotion Processes and Externalizing Behavior Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah E.; Boekamp, John R.; McConville, David W.; Wheeler, Elizabeth E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined emotion perception processes in preschool aged children presenting with clinically significant emotional and behavior problems, with emphasis on sadness perception accuracy (i.e., the ability to correctly identify sadness from expressive and situational cues) and anger perception bias (i.e., the tendency to perceive anger in…

  15. Age Regression in the Treatment of Anger in a Prison Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisel, Harry E.

    1988-01-01

    Incorporated hypnotherapy with age regression into cognitive therapeutic approach with prisoners having history of anger. Technique involved age regression to establish first significant event causing current anger, catharsis of feelings for original event, and reorientation of event while under hypnosis. Results indicated decrease in acting-out…

  16. Anger Dysregulation, Depressive Symptoms, and Health in Married Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Carrère, Sybil; Mittmann, Angela; Woodin, Erica; Tabares, Amber; Yoshimoto, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Background Anger problems (anger dysregulation) and depressive symptoms have been linked to risk for all causes of mortality, but less is known about the association between anger dysregulation and depressive symptoms within the context of gender differences and health outcomes. Objectives The association between anger dysregulation, depressive symptoms, and self-reports of health in married adults was evaluated using an emotion-regulation model. Method Fifty-two married couples completed a series of procedures that included an interview assessing their ability to regulate anger, a questionnaire reporting depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and self-reports indicating health. Results Results provided support for hypothesized links between the variables, but they varied by gender: (a) greater anger dysregulation in the wives, but not the husbands, was predictive of depressive symptoms; (b) anger dysregulation was predictive of the husbands’ self-reports of health but was not predictive of the wives’ self-reports of health; (c) depressive symptoms were not significantly associated with self-reports of health for either married women or men. Discussion These results suggest that anger dysregulation may play different roles in the depressive symptoms and self-reports of health for married women and men. PMID:15897794

  17. Assessment and Intervention for Adolescents with Anger and Aggression Difficulties in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feindler, Eva L.; Engel, Emily C.

    2011-01-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of anger management programs have proliferated over the past decade. The programs aim to moderate the intensity, frequency, and severity of anger expression, and facilitate alternative nonaggressive responses to conflict and frustration. Cognitive-behavioral theory highlights cognitive processes such…

  18. Relationship of racial stressors to blood pressure responses and anger expression in black college students.

    PubMed

    Armstead, C A; Lawler, K A; Gorden, G; Cross, J; Gibbons, J

    1989-01-01

    The physiological effects of racism, as a stressor, were examined as they related to blood pressure (BP) and anger experiences in Black college students. Current research has failed to consider the stressful effects of racism as a factor contributing to the higher incidence of essential hypertension among Blacks. Twenty-seven Black college students viewed three excerpts showing racist situations involving Blacks; anger-provoking, nonracist situations; and neutral situations. After each scene, BP was taken, and a mood checklist was administered. The Framingham Anger Scale and the Anger Expression Scale were administered. Analyses revealed that BP significantly increased during the presentation of racist stimuli but not of anger-provoking or neutral stimuli. Self-reports of state anger, as measured by the mood checklist, were significant for both the anger-provoking and racist stimuli. BP scores were significantly correlated to the two trait anger measures. Exposure to racist stimuli was associated with BP increases among Blacks. Such cumulative exposure to racism may have important implications for the etiology of essential hypertension.

  19. Dynamic Changes in Anger, Externalizing and Internalizing Problems: Attention and Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jungmeen; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low levels of dispositional anger and a good attention span are critical to healthy social emotional development, with attention control reflecting effective cognitive self-regulation of negative emotions such as anger. Using a longitudinal design, we examined attention span as a moderator of reciprocal links between changes in anger…

  20. The Experience of Anger and Sadness in Everyday Problems Impacts Age Differences in Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard-Fields, Fredda; Coats, Abby Heckman

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined regulation of the discrete emotions anger and sadness in adolescents through older adults in the context of describing everyday problem situations. The results support previous work; in comparison to younger age groups, older adults reported that they experienced less anger and reported that they used more passive and fewer…

  1. The Relationship of Computer Games and Reported Anger in Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirok, Mukaddes; Ozdamli, Fezile; Hursen, Cigdem; Ozcinar, Zehra; Kutguner, Muge; Uzunboylu, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Playing computer games is a routine activity for most young people today. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of time spent playing computer games, the violence of the game, and self-reported anger of students in North Cyprus. Four hundred participants between the ages of 15-18 completed the State-Trait Anger and the Anger…

  2. Application of a Flexible, Clinically Driven Approach for Anger Reduction in the Case of Mr. P

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassinove, Howard; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2011-01-01

    We treat maladaptive anger in adults with a program based on traditional behavior therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. To these, we add client-centered motivational interviewing techniques. With the goal of modifying maladaptive stimulus-response relationships, our specific aim is to reduce anger reactivity to aversive triggers. Thus, in daily…

  3. Anger Expression in Swiss Adolescents: Establishing Measurement Invariance across Gender in the AX Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimprich, Daniel; Mascherek, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined measurement invariance in the three anger expression subscales of the STAXI (Spielberger, 1988) with respect to gender. In a sample of 576 male and 531 female students, strict measurement invariance was found. For all three anger expression factors, no differences in variances or factor correlations were found. A large…

  4. Does Comorbid Anger Exacerbate the Rejection of Children with Depression by their School Peers?

    PubMed

    Martinez, Yuri Arsenio Sanz; Schneider, Barry H; Zambrana, Aaron; Batista, Grethel Selva; Soca, Zayda Sanchez

    2015-08-01

    Depression in childhood and adolescence is often accompanied with social rejection by peers, which accentuates the course of that emotion. Despite the documented association between anger and depression, little is known about the impact of the interaction of both emotions on peer relations. The main objective of this study is to explore the interpersonal implications of depression with comorbid anger in a pediatric sample. The sample consisted of 466 participants; the mean age was 11.45 (SD = 1.55). There were 231 females (49.6 %) and 235 males (50.4 %). ANOVAs revealed significant differences between boys and girls in depression, aggression, anger experience/explosive anger and internalized responses to anger. There were no significant differences between the correlations computed with the data from boys and girls for the hypothesized associations among anger, aggression, depression, and peer acceptance/rejection. Both Anger-Out and Depression were significantly associated with perceived unpopularity. Additionally, the interaction of Anger-Out and Depression added significantly to the prediction of perceived unpopularity.

  5. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  6. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  7. Let Me Go: The Influences of Crawling Experience and Temperament on the Development of Anger Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pemberton Roben, Caroline K.; Bass, Anneliese J.; Moore, Ginger A.; Murray-Kolb, Laura; Tan, Patricia Z.; Gilmore, Rick O.; Buss, Kristin A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Teti, Laureen O.

    2012-01-01

    Infants' emerging ability to move independently by crawling is associated with changes in multiple domains, including an increase in expressions of anger in situations that block infants' goals, but it is unknown whether increased anger is specifically because of experience with being able to move autonomously or simply related to age. To examine…

  8. "Can You Hear Me Now, Ms. Monster?": Anger, "Thumos," and First-Year Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecker, Diann

    2007-01-01

    There are not many English words for "anger." There's "wrath" and "ire," although no one uses "ire" anymore and hardly anyone "wrath." There's "frustration," "resentment," and "indignation," but they don't have the emotional intensity of "anger," a word that…

  9. Depression, Self-Esteem, and Anger in Emerging Adulthood: Seven-Year Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Nancy L.; Barker, Erin T.; Krahn, Harvey J.

    2006-01-01

    This study used a school-based community sample (N = 920) to examine trajectories of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and expressed anger in the critical years of emerging adulthood (ages 18-25). Using data from 5 waves, the authors discovered that multilevel models indicated that, on average, depressive symptoms and expressed anger declined,…

  10. Anger and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Crime Victims: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Ulrich; Cahill, Shawn P.; Foa, Edna B.; Maercker, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Among trauma-exposed individuals, severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms is strongly correlated with anger. The authors used 2 longitudinal data sets with 282 and 218 crime victims, respectively, to investigate the temporal sequence of anger and PTSD symptoms following the assault. Cross-lagged regression analyses indicated that…

  11. A Study of Anger and the Elementary Student. Research Brief #25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyer, Robin; Wise, Stephanie

    A survey was developed to study anger in elementary school students drawing on the experience of school counselors and teachers. The final survey was distributed to elementary school counselors, school administrators, and teachers to use with children referred for anger control issues. In 7 elementary schools, 1 female and 36 male students in…

  12. Learning To Manage Anger: Discussion Leader's Manual for the RETHINK Workout for Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Mental Health Initiatives, Washington, DC.

    Although anger is a universal emotion, many normal people have great difficulty expressing this feeling. It is associated with physical as well as emotional manifestations, and has serious, destructive social ramifications. Several cognitive skills have been identified in the constructive use of anger: focus strategies, cognitive restructuring,…

  13. Psychometric Characteristics of the Persian Version of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aryadoust, Vahid; Akbarzadeh, Sanaz; Akbarzedeh, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The Multidimensional School Anger Inventory-Revised (MSAI-R) is a measurement tool to evaluate high school students' anger. Its psychometric features have been tested in the USA, Australia, Japan, Guatemala, and Italy. This study investigates the factor structure and psychometric quality of the Persian version of the MSAI-R using data from an…

  14. Sex Differences in the Relationship of Anger and Depression: An Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jody L.; Gray, Elizabeth A.; Fuqua, Dale R.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory scales revealed that women scored significantly higher than men on depression, whereas there were no significant differences on any of the six anger scales. These findings support further research on functional affective differences between men…

  15. Cognitive Regulation and Skills Training in the Management of Anger: A Stress Inoculation Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novaco, Raymond W.

    Experimental interest in anger arousal has typically been incidental or secondary to the study of aggresssion. Novaco developed a cognitive behavior therapy approach to chronic anger problems. Clinical techniques have followed the work of Meichenbaum (1974, 1975) in the development of an approach called "stress inoculation" that has been applied…

  16. The Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Effects of Anger on Negotiation Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Meina

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of negotiators' anger on their own and their counterparts' use of negotiation strategies and whether such effects were moderated by national culture. Participants (N= 130) were 66 sojourning Chinese and 64 Americans who performed an intracultural negotiation simulation. Findings indicated that (a) anger caused…

  17. Developing Anger and Aggression Control in Youth in Recreation and Park Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Recreation and park personnel can be influential in beginning a concerted and systematic effort to develop anger- and aggression-management programs for youth. The article outlines examples of anger- and aggression-control program content, typical training procedures, possible program sessions, and organizational implementation. (SM)

  18. The Child Who Seems Angry: Helping Children Manage Anger and Frustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    2005-01-01

    It is hard for many people to accept anger as part of a young child's range of feelings. Teachers work so hard to make children happy, and feel frustrated, even resentful, when they do not respond with 100 percent happiness all the time. Teachers know in their minds that anger is a normal emotion and that they, too, sometimes feel angry. However,…

  19. Anger and Approach Motivation in Infancy: Relations to Early Childhood Inhibitory Control and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Degnan, Kathryn Amey; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Henderson, Heather A.; Hane, Amie Ashley; Xu, Qinmei; Fox, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    The relations among infant anger reactivity, approach behavior, and frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, and their relations to inhibitory control and behavior problems in early childhood were examined within the context of a longitudinal study of temperament. Two hundred nine infants' anger expressions to arm restraint were observed at 4…

  20. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Anger Experience and Expression among Partner Assaultive Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    The author investigated the acute effects of alcohol intoxication on anger experience and expression among 46 maritally violent (MV) and 56 maritally nonviolent (NV) men randomly assigned to receive alcohol, placebo, or no alcohol. Participants completed an anger-arousing articulated thoughts in simulated situations (ATSS) paradigm and imagined…

  1. A Composite Case Study of an Individual with Anger as a Presenting Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santanello, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a composite case study of a 45-year-old Caucasian male with anger as a presenting problem. Mr. P is technically self-referred but admits that he ultimately decided to seek treatment at his girlfriend's insistence. He reports experiencing frequent, intense anger episodes, usually occasioned by minor inconveniences. These anger…

  2. Context-Inappropriate Anger, Emotion Knowledge Deficits, and Negative Social Experiences in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Miller, Alison L.; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI…

  3. Conciliatory gestures promote forgiveness and reduce anger in humans.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Michael E; Pedersen, Eric J; Tabak, Benjamin A; Carter, Evan C

    2014-07-29

    Conflict is an inevitable component of social life, and natural selection has exerted strong effects on many organisms to facilitate victory in conflict and to deter conspecifics from imposing harms upon them. Like many species, humans likely possess cognitive systems whose function is to motivate revenge as a means of deterring individuals who have harmed them from harming them again in the future. However, many social relationships often retain value even after conflicts have occurred between interactants, so natural selection has very likely also endowed humans with cognitive systems whose function is to motivate reconciliation with transgressors whom they perceive as valuable and nonthreatening, notwithstanding their harmful prior actions. In a longitudinal study with 337 participants who had recently been harmed by a relationship partner, we found that conciliatory gestures (e.g., apologies, offers of compensation) were associated with increases in victims' perceptions of their transgressors' relationship value and reductions in perceptions of their transgressors' exploitation risk. In addition, conciliatory gestures appeared to accelerate forgiveness and reduce reactive anger via their intermediate effects on relationship value and exploitation risk. These results strongly suggest that conciliatory gestures facilitate forgiveness and reduce anger by modifying victims' perceptions of their transgressors' value as relationship partners and likelihood of recidivism. PMID:25024227

  4. Anger and shame as determinants of perceived competence.

    PubMed

    Hareli, Shlomo; Berkovitch, Nathan; Livnat, Liat; David, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Emotions are complex signals conveying a multitude of "messages" concomitantly. This idea is examined within the context of competence inferences drawn from the emotional expressions of another individual. In two studies, participants assuming the role of patients took part in a simulated medical consultation. They encountered a physician who had either a high or a standard professional status, and who responded with anger, shame, or emotional neutrality when asked to clarify the advice he dispensed. While a display of anger did not affect perceived competence, shame made the physician appear less competent. Three types of signals conveyed by the emotions were responsible for these effects: the physician's decisiveness and control over the situation, and the extent to which he felt professionally devalued by the patient's request, mediated the effects of the emotions on perceived competence. A priori information about the physician's professional status had little effect on the perception of competence. The research exemplifies the richness of information contained in emotions, and the complex way in which it allows observers to construe an impression of the expresser. PMID:23767876

  5. Conciliatory gestures promote forgiveness and reduce anger in humans.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Michael E; Pedersen, Eric J; Tabak, Benjamin A; Carter, Evan C

    2014-07-29

    Conflict is an inevitable component of social life, and natural selection has exerted strong effects on many organisms to facilitate victory in conflict and to deter conspecifics from imposing harms upon them. Like many species, humans likely possess cognitive systems whose function is to motivate revenge as a means of deterring individuals who have harmed them from harming them again in the future. However, many social relationships often retain value even after conflicts have occurred between interactants, so natural selection has very likely also endowed humans with cognitive systems whose function is to motivate reconciliation with transgressors whom they perceive as valuable and nonthreatening, notwithstanding their harmful prior actions. In a longitudinal study with 337 participants who had recently been harmed by a relationship partner, we found that conciliatory gestures (e.g., apologies, offers of compensation) were associated with increases in victims' perceptions of their transgressors' relationship value and reductions in perceptions of their transgressors' exploitation risk. In addition, conciliatory gestures appeared to accelerate forgiveness and reduce reactive anger via their intermediate effects on relationship value and exploitation risk. These results strongly suggest that conciliatory gestures facilitate forgiveness and reduce anger by modifying victims' perceptions of their transgressors' value as relationship partners and likelihood of recidivism.

  6. Conciliatory gestures promote forgiveness and reduce anger in humans

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Michael E.; Pedersen, Eric J.; Tabak, Benjamin A.; Carter, Evan C.

    2014-01-01

    Conflict is an inevitable component of social life, and natural selection has exerted strong effects on many organisms to facilitate victory in conflict and to deter conspecifics from imposing harms upon them. Like many species, humans likely possess cognitive systems whose function is to motivate revenge as a means of deterring individuals who have harmed them from harming them again in the future. However, many social relationships often retain value even after conflicts have occurred between interactants, so natural selection has very likely also endowed humans with cognitive systems whose function is to motivate reconciliation with transgressors whom they perceive as valuable and nonthreatening, notwithstanding their harmful prior actions. In a longitudinal study with 337 participants who had recently been harmed by a relationship partner, we found that conciliatory gestures (e.g., apologies, offers of compensation) were associated with increases in victims’ perceptions of their transgressors’ relationship value and reductions in perceptions of their transgressors’ exploitation risk. In addition, conciliatory gestures appeared to accelerate forgiveness and reduce reactive anger via their intermediate effects on relationship value and exploitation risk. These results strongly suggest that conciliatory gestures facilitate forgiveness and reduce anger by modifying victims’ perceptions of their transgressors’ value as relationship partners and likelihood of recidivism. PMID:25024227

  7. Dispositional anger and the resolution of the approach-avoidance conflict.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Boyd, Ryan L; Persich, Michelle R

    2016-09-01

    The approach-avoidance conflict is one in which approaching reward brings increased threat while avoiding threat means forgoing reward. This conflict can be uniquely informative because it will be resolved in different ways depending on whether approach (toward) or avoidance (away from) is the stronger motive. Two studies (total N = 191) created a computerized version of this conflict and used the test to examine questions of motivational direction in anger. In Study 1, noise blast provocations increased the frequency of approach behaviors at high levels of trait anger, but decreased their frequency at low levels. In Study 2, a simpler version of the conflict test was used to predict anger in daily life. As hypothesized, greater approach frequencies in the test predicted greater anger reactivity to daily provocations and frustrations. The discussion focuses on the utility of the approach-avoidance conflict test and on questions of motivational direction in anger. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27078742

  8. The roles of marriage and anger dysregulation in biobehavioral stress responses.

    PubMed

    Carrère, Sybil; Yoshimoto, Dan; Mittmann, Angela; Woodin, Erica M; Tabares, Amber; Ullman, Jodie; Swanson, Catherine; Hawkins, Melissa

    2005-07-01

    Physiological and behavioral correlates of anger dysregulation in adults were evaluated in the context of marital stress. Fifty-four married couples participated in a series of laboratory procedures that included electrocardiogram measures during a 15-min marital conflict interaction and an interview assessing their inability to regulate anger (anger dysregulation). Results from the multivariate regression analyses indicated that the nature of the couple's relationship, rather than individual levels of anger dysregulation, predicted lower parasympathetic cardiac activity (indexed by high-frequency heart period variability) and shorter cardiac interbeat intervals. Anger dysregulation, rather than the dyadic relationship, was predictive of greater displays of angry behavior during the marital conflict interaction. The importance of contextual factors in stress processes, such as stress due to marriage, are discussed in light of research linking poor marital quality to greater health risks for women than for men. PMID:15920001

  9. Hope, anger, and depression as mediators for forgiveness and social behavior in Turkish children.

    PubMed

    Taysi, Ebru; Curun, Ferzan; Orcan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of hope, anger, and depression in the associations between forgiveness and social behavior, in fourth grade students in Turkey. The 352 fourth grade primary school students were involved in the study. The average age was 9.98 and 56.3% were boys. The Enright Forgiveness Inventory for Children (EFI-C), the Beck Anger Inventory for Youth (BANI-Y), the Children Hope Scale (CHS), the Social Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) were used. Results showed that depression mediates the relationship between anger and antisocial behavior and between hope and antisocial behavior. Anger mediates the relationship between hope and depression and between hope and antisocial behavior. Forgiveness was related to anger and hope directly. Implications of this study for child counseling were discussed. PMID:25901636

  10. Hope, anger, and depression as mediators for forgiveness and social behavior in Turkish children.

    PubMed

    Taysi, Ebru; Curun, Ferzan; Orcan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of hope, anger, and depression in the associations between forgiveness and social behavior, in fourth grade students in Turkey. The 352 fourth grade primary school students were involved in the study. The average age was 9.98 and 56.3% were boys. The Enright Forgiveness Inventory for Children (EFI-C), the Beck Anger Inventory for Youth (BANI-Y), the Children Hope Scale (CHS), the Social Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) were used. Results showed that depression mediates the relationship between anger and antisocial behavior and between hope and antisocial behavior. Anger mediates the relationship between hope and depression and between hope and antisocial behavior. Forgiveness was related to anger and hope directly. Implications of this study for child counseling were discussed.

  11. Anger and health in dementia caregivers: exploring the mediation effect of optimism.

    PubMed

    López, J; Romero-Moreno, R; Márquez-González, M; Losada, A

    2015-04-01

    Although previous studies indicate a negative association between caregivers' anger and health, the potential mechanisms linking this relationship are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to explore the potential mediating role of optimism in the relationship between anger and caregivers' physical health. Dementia caregivers (n = 108) were interviewed and filled out instruments assessing their anger (reaction), optimism and health (vitality). A mediational model was tested to determine whether optimism partially mediated the relationship between anger and vitality. Angry reaction was negatively associated with optimism and vitality; optimism was positively associated with vitality. Finally, the relationship between angry reaction and vitality decreased when optimism was entered simultaneously. A non-parametric bootstrap approach confirmed that optimism significantly mediated some of the relationship between angry reaction and vitality. These findings suggest that low optimism may help explain the association between caregivers' anger and reduced sense of vitality. The results provide a specific target for intervention with caregivers.

  12. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  13. Association between burnout and anger in oncology versus ophthalmology health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, M R A; Bruno, A; Carroccio, C; Cedro, C; La Torre, D; Di Rosa, A E; Zoccali, R; Aragona, M; La Torre, F; Mattei, A; Angelone, A M; Di Orio, F

    2006-10-01

    The prevalence of burnout in oncology staff was compared with that of the ophthalmology staff, who normally present a low prevalence of burnout as described in this literature. The correlation of burnout with the emotion of anger was also investigated. Thirty-six subjects working in an oncology department and 32 working in an ophthalmology department were examined using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. The oncology group showed higher mean scores on the MBI Emotive Exhaustion and Depersonalization scales with respect to ophthalmology staff. Correlation analysis showed that increasing burnout was associated with higher anger expressed towards the environment and loss of anger control. Anger, as a response to frustration, appears to be a feature constantly associated with the clinical expression of burnout and it should not be underestimated in theoretical and preventive contexts.

  14. Anger Expression and Life Stress Among Blacks: Their Role in Physical Health

    PubMed Central

    Broman, Clifford L.; Johnson, Ernest H.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between anger expression and life stress in a nationally representative sample of black adults. Recent research of mostly white subjects has shown that anger-hostility, one of the components of the Type A behavioral pattern, is an important predictor of health problems. The findings of the present inquiry indicate that anger-hostility is an important predictor of life stress, and that people with higher levels of anger conflict are more likely to experience negative life events. Moreover, negative life events and anger are shown to be independent predictors of health problems among blacks. The implications of these results for future studies of the health of black Americans are discussed. PMID:3249337

  15. The effect of anger rumination in the relationship between borderline personality disorder symptoms and precursors.

    PubMed

    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E; Geiger, Paul J; Baer, Ruth A

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has identified an invalidating childhood environment and a biological predisposition for affective instability to be two precursors for the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). In addition, rumination, particularly in response to anger, is significantly associated with symptom severity and dysregulated behavior in BPD. This study examined whether a significant relationship between childhood precursors and current BPD symptom severity could be accounted for by the tendency to engage in anger rumination in a sample of undergraduate students (N = 342), including many with high BPD features. Results showed a significant indirect effect of anger rumination in the relationship between self-reported childhood emotional vulnerability (but not invalidating childhood environment) and BPD symptom severity. This finding suggests that anger rumination could be a risk factor for BPD. These results suggest the importance of continued research on the role of anger rumination in the development and exacerbation of BPD symptoms.

  16. Fight fire with fire: the effect of perceived anger on punitive intuitions.

    PubMed

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    The human ability to "mind-read" is fundamental in social interaction (e.g., contributing to the experience of empathy). The present research tests the hypothesis that perceiving anger in others on the basis of facial cues is sufficient to elicit very rapid punitive responses toward crime. The results suggest that individuals are faster to harshly punish criminals who appear to be angry, and that this effect emerges early in the decision-making process. Black criminals receive quicker punitive responses, but the effect of ethnicity is weakened at high levels of perceived anger. The results are discussed in terms of associative processes linking anger to punishment, the human ability to simulate and experience others' emotional responses, and the role of anger in eliciting hostile aggression. The findings also have important policy implications, as they suggest that drumming up anger toward crime could engender punitive intuitions.

  17. Fight fire with fire: the effect of perceived anger on punitive intuitions.

    PubMed

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    The human ability to "mind-read" is fundamental in social interaction (e.g., contributing to the experience of empathy). The present research tests the hypothesis that perceiving anger in others on the basis of facial cues is sufficient to elicit very rapid punitive responses toward crime. The results suggest that individuals are faster to harshly punish criminals who appear to be angry, and that this effect emerges early in the decision-making process. Black criminals receive quicker punitive responses, but the effect of ethnicity is weakened at high levels of perceived anger. The results are discussed in terms of associative processes linking anger to punishment, the human ability to simulate and experience others' emotional responses, and the role of anger in eliciting hostile aggression. The findings also have important policy implications, as they suggest that drumming up anger toward crime could engender punitive intuitions. PMID:24219396

  18. Anger Management for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Clients: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Manual [and] Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Patrick M.; Shopshire, Michael S.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Campbell, Torri A.

    This manual and workbook set focuses on anger management. The manual was designed for use by qualified substance abuse and mental health clinicians who work with substance abuse and mental health clients with concurrent anger programs. The manual describes a 12-week cognitive behavioral anger management group treatment. Each of the 12 90-minute…

  19. Anger Emotional Stress Influences VEGF/VEGFR2 and Its Induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiao, Mingqi; Wu, Jibiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We discuss the influence of anger emotional stress upon VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Methods. We created a rat model of induced anger (anger-out and anger-in) emotional response using social isolation and resident-intruder paradigms and assessed changes in hippocampus' VEGF content, neuroplasticity, and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Results. The resident-intruder method successfully generated anger-out and anger-in models that differed significantly in composite aggression score, aggression incubation, open field behavior, sucrose preference, and weight gain. Anger emotional stress decreased synaptic connections and VEGFR2 expression. Anger emotional stress led to abnormal expression of VEGF/VEGFR2 mRNA and protein and disorderly expression of key factors in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Fluoxetine administration ameliorated behavioral abnormalities and damage to hippocampal neurons caused by anger emotional stress, as well as abnormal expression of some proteins in VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Conclusion. This research provides a detailed classification of anger emotion and verifies its influence upon VEGF and the VEGF-induced signaling pathway, thus providing circumstantial evidence of mechanisms by which anger emotion damages neurogenesis. As VEGFR2 can promote neurogenesis and vasculogenesis in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, these results suggest that anger emotional stress can result in decreased neurogenesis. PMID:27057362

  20. Different Factors Influence Self-Reports and Third-Party Reports of Anger by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, John; Willner, Paul; Shead, Jennifer; Jahoda, Andrew; Gillespie, David; Townson, Julia; Lammie, Claire; Woodgate, Christopher; Stenfert Kroese, Biza; Felce, David; MacMahon, Pamela; Rose, Nikki; Stimpson, Aimee; Nuttall, Jacqueline; Hood, Kerenza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities display high levels of anger, and cognitive-behavioural anger management interventions are used routinely. However, for these methods to be used optimally, a better understanding is needed of different forms of anger assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of a…

  1. An Examination of the Factorial Invariance and Refinement of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory for Five Pacific Rim Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael J.; You, Sukkyung; Smith, Douglas C.; Gonzalez, Victoria; Boman, Peter; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki; Terasaka, Akiko; Merino, Cesar; Grazioso, María del Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory (MSAI) was examined with adolescents from 5 Pacific Rim countries (N = 3,181 adolescents; age, M = 14.8 years; 52% females). Confirmatory factor analyses examined configural invariance for the MSAI's anger experience, hostility, destructive expression, and anger coping subscales. The…

  2. The Relationship of Negative Self-Schemas and Insecure Partner Attachment Styles with Anger Experience and Expression among Male Batterers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Michael; Roring, Steven; Winterowd, Carrie; Porras, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore how negative self-schemas and partner attachments were related to the experience and expression of anger (i.e., trait anger, inward and outward expression of anger) in a sample of male batterers (n = 40) who participated in court-mandated group services. They completed the Experience in Close Relationships…

  3. Anger Emotional Stress Influences VEGF/VEGFR2 and Its Induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiao, Mingqi; Wu, Jibiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We discuss the influence of anger emotional stress upon VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Methods. We created a rat model of induced anger (anger-out and anger-in) emotional response using social isolation and resident-intruder paradigms and assessed changes in hippocampus' VEGF content, neuroplasticity, and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Results. The resident-intruder method successfully generated anger-out and anger-in models that differed significantly in composite aggression score, aggression incubation, open field behavior, sucrose preference, and weight gain. Anger emotional stress decreased synaptic connections and VEGFR2 expression. Anger emotional stress led to abnormal expression of VEGF/VEGFR2 mRNA and protein and disorderly expression of key factors in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Fluoxetine administration ameliorated behavioral abnormalities and damage to hippocampal neurons caused by anger emotional stress, as well as abnormal expression of some proteins in VEGF/VEGFR2 and its induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. Conclusion. This research provides a detailed classification of anger emotion and verifies its influence upon VEGF and the VEGF-induced signaling pathway, thus providing circumstantial evidence of mechanisms by which anger emotion damages neurogenesis. As VEGFR2 can promote neurogenesis and vasculogenesis in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, these results suggest that anger emotional stress can result in decreased neurogenesis. PMID:27057362

  4. The Relationship of Spiritual Beliefs and Involvement with the Experience of Anger and Stress in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterowd, Carrie; Harrist, Steve; Thomason, Nancy; Worth, Sheri; Carlozzi, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of spiritual beliefs and involvement with anger and stress in college students. The spirituality scales were positively related to perceived stress and most of the anger subscales. When stress was controlled, the spirituality subscales still contributed significantly to anger.

  5. Endogenous Opioids May Buffer Effects of Anger Arousal on Sensitivity to Subsequent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Magid, Edward; Chont, Melissa; Goodlad, James K.; Gilliam, Wesley; Matsuura, Justin; Somar, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that anger and pain are related, yet it is not clear by what mechanisms anger may influence pain. We have proposed that effects of anger states and traits on pain sensitivity are partly opioid-mediated. In this study, we tested the extent to which analgesic effects of acute anger arousal on subsequent pain sensitivity were opioid-mediated by subjecting healthy participants to anger-induction and pain either under opioid blockade (oral naltrexone) or placebo. Participants were 160 healthy individuals. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects opioid blockade design was used, with participants assigned randomly to one of two Drug conditions (placebo or naltrexone), and to one of two Task Orders (anger-induction followed by pain or vice versa). Results of ANOVAs showed significant Drug Condition × Task Order interactions for sensory pain ratings (MPQ-Sensory) and angry and nervous affect during pain-induction, such that participants who underwent anger-induction prior to pain while under opioid blockade (naltrexone) reported more pain, and anger and nervousness than those who underwent the tasks in the same order, but did so on placebo. Results suggest that for people with intact opioid systems, acute anger arousal may trigger endogenous opioid release that reduces subsequent responsiveness to pain. Conversely, impaired endogenous opioid function, such as that found among some chronic pain patients, may leave certain people without optimal buffering from the otherwise hyperalgesic affects of anger arousal, and so may lead to greater pain and suffering following upsetting or angry events. PMID:19682793

  6. The Modernization of Russian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippov, V. M.

    2005-01-01

    These days many people are trying to assess what has been done in the past few years. The country is looking into the future and trying to map out the most optimal paths of its development. In this article, the author examines the main paths of development in the field of Russian Education. It is necessary to keep in mind the multi-plane character…

  7. Russian Arctic battles pipeline leak

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.

    1995-05-12

    An estimated 100,000 barrels of oil have leaked from a corroded pipeline in northern Russia`s Komi Republic since last August. The oil threatens salmon fisheries and marshlands used for grazing cattle and raindeer. This article discusses the spill in relation to other large spills and the possible ecological damage. Russian authorities, first reluctant to come to grips with the spill, are changing their attitudes, a position essential to gaining access to threatened regions for important monitoring studies.

  8. Trait anger expressiveness and pain-induced beta-endorphin release: support for the opioid dysfunction hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W; Diedrich, Laura

    2007-08-01

    The anger management styles of anger-in (inhibition) and anger-out (direct expression) are positively associated with pain responsiveness. Opioid blockade studies suggest that hyperalgesic effects of trait anger-out, but not those of trait anger-in, are mediated in part by opioid analgesic system dysfunction. The current study tested the opioid dysfunction hypothesis of anger-out using an alternative index of opioid function: pain-induced changes in plasma endogenous opioids. Plasma beta-endorphin (BE) was assessed at rest and again following exposure to three laboratory acute pain tasks (finger pressure, ischemic, and thermal) in 14 healthy controls and 13 chronic low back pain (LBP) subjects. As expected, acute pain ratings correlated positively with measures of anger-in (both groups) and anger-out (LBP group; p's<.05). Greater pain-induced increases in BE were associated with significantly lower pain ratings in both groups (p's<.05). Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that greater anger-out significantly predicted smaller pain-induced BE increases (p<.05). Subject type did not moderate this association (p>.10). Anger-in did not display significant main or interaction effects on pain-induced BE changes (p's>.10). The significant association between anger-out and BE release partially mediated the hyperalgesic effects of anger-out on pain unpleasantness, and was not attenuated by statistical control of general negative affect. This suggests unique associations with expressive anger regulation. Elevated trait anger-out therefore appears to be associated with opioid analgesic system dysfunction, whether it is indexed by responses to opioid blockade or by examining circulating endogenous opioid levels. Possible "statextrait" interactions on these anger-related opioid system differences are discussed. PMID:17197088

  9. The Moderating Effect of State Anger on Treatment Outcome in Female Adolescents With PTSD.

    PubMed

    Kaczkurkin, Antonia N; Asnaani, Anu; Zhong, Jody; Foa, Edna B

    2016-08-01

    Trauma experienced in childhood and adolescence negatively affects the development of adaptive regulation of emotions and is associated with greater symptoms of anger. Prior research has suggested that high levels of anger may impede the outcome of treatment in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study investigated whether high levels of anger resulted in poorer treatment outcomes in adolescent girls with PTSD. Participants included 61 female adolescent survivors of sexual abuse or assault who were randomized to either prolonged exposure for adolescents (PE-A) or client-centered therapy (CCT) for traumatized children for 8-14 weekly sessions. Participants were followed for 12 months posttreatment. High levels of state anger at baseline were associated with less improvement in PTSD symptoms in the CCT group than the PE-A group (d = 0.62). The moderating effects of state anger on improvement in PTSD symptoms was significant with emotion regulation difficulties, which may underlie anger symptoms (d = 0.58) in the model. The results of this study suggessted that high state anger was less of an impediment to treatment of PTSD for those receiving PE-A than those receiving less differentiated approaches such as CCT. PMID:27459380

  10. Validation of the Novaco Anger Scale-Provocation Inventory (Danish) With Nonclinical, Clinical, and Offender Samples.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum; Novaco, Raymond W; Heinola-Nielsen, Vivian; Hougaard, Helle

    2016-10-01

    Anger has high prevalence in clinical and forensic settings, and it is associated with aggressive behavior and ward atmosphere on psychiatric units. Dysregulated anger is a clinical problem in Danish mental health care systems, but no anger assessment instruments have been validated in Danish. Because the Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI) has been extensively validated with different clinical populations and lends itself to clinical case formulation, it was selected for translation and evaluation in the present multistudy project. Psychometric properties of the NAS-PI were investigated with samples of 477 nonclinical, 250 clinical, 167 male prisoner, and 64 male forensic participants. Anger prevalence and its relationship with other anger measures, anxiety/depression, and aggression were examined. NAS-PI was found to have high reliability, concurrent validity, and discriminant validity, and its scores discriminated the samples. High scores in the offender group demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining self-report assessments of anger with this population. Retrospective and prospective validity of the NAS were tested with the forensic patient sample regarding physically aggressive behavior in hospital. Regression analyses showed that higher scores on NAS increase the risk of having acted aggressively in the past and of acting aggressively in the future.

  11. Modeling anger and aggressive driving behavior in a dynamic choice-latent variable model.

    PubMed

    Danaf, Mazen; Abou-Zeid, Maya; Kaysi, Isam

    2015-02-01

    This paper develops a hybrid choice-latent variable model combined with a Hidden Markov model in order to analyze the causes of aggressive driving and forecast its manifestations accordingly. The model is grounded in the state-trait anger theory; it treats trait driving anger as a latent variable that is expressed as a function of individual characteristics, or as an agent effect, and state anger as a dynamic latent variable that evolves over time and affects driving behavior, and that is expressed as a function of trait anger, frustrating events, and contextual variables (e.g., geometric roadway features, flow conditions, etc.). This model may be used in order to test measures aimed at reducing aggressive driving behavior and improving road safety, and can be incorporated into micro-simulation packages to represent aggressive driving. The paper also presents an application of this model to data obtained from a driving simulator experiment performed at the American University of Beirut. The results derived from this application indicate that state anger at a specific time period is significantly affected by the occurrence of frustrating events, trait anger, and the anger experienced at the previous time period. The proposed model exhibited a better goodness of fit compared to a similar simple joint model where driving behavior and decisions are expressed as a function of the experienced events explicitly and not the dynamic latent variable.

  12. The Moderating Effect of State Anger on Treatment Outcome in Female Adolescents With PTSD.

    PubMed

    Kaczkurkin, Antonia N; Asnaani, Anu; Zhong, Jody; Foa, Edna B

    2016-08-01

    Trauma experienced in childhood and adolescence negatively affects the development of adaptive regulation of emotions and is associated with greater symptoms of anger. Prior research has suggested that high levels of anger may impede the outcome of treatment in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study investigated whether high levels of anger resulted in poorer treatment outcomes in adolescent girls with PTSD. Participants included 61 female adolescent survivors of sexual abuse or assault who were randomized to either prolonged exposure for adolescents (PE-A) or client-centered therapy (CCT) for traumatized children for 8-14 weekly sessions. Participants were followed for 12 months posttreatment. High levels of state anger at baseline were associated with less improvement in PTSD symptoms in the CCT group than the PE-A group (d = 0.62). The moderating effects of state anger on improvement in PTSD symptoms was significant with emotion regulation difficulties, which may underlie anger symptoms (d = 0.58) in the model. The results of this study suggessted that high state anger was less of an impediment to treatment of PTSD for those receiving PE-A than those receiving less differentiated approaches such as CCT.

  13. ISS Update: Russian Spacesuits and Spacewalks

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Marc Ciupitu, EVA Flight and Increment Manager, about the Russian Orlan spacesuits that cosmonauts wear during spacewalks. Marc also discusses wha...

  14. SPECIFIC EFFECTS OF ANGER RUMINATION ON PARTICULAR EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS (.).

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinfang; Yang, Yin; Qian, Mingyi; Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene

    2015-12-01

    The effects of two types of rumination on different kinds of executive functions were investigated. Fifty-nine participants (M age = 22.8 yr., SD = 2.5) were assigned to one of three conditions and instructed either to: (1) ruminate in a self-distanced way, (2) ruminate in a self-immersed way, or (3) think about the layout of their campus following anger induction. Afterward, the participants were directed to finish tasks designed to assess three kinds of executive functions: shifting, inhibition, and updating. Results showed that self-immersed rumination impaired shifting ability the most, while participants engaged in self-distanced rumination showed the worst performance on the inhibition task. No significant difference was found in the updating task. These results suggest that rumination influenced particular executive functions in different ways. PMID:26595287

  15. Anger superiority effect for change detection and change blindness.

    PubMed

    Lyyra, Pessi; Hietanen, Jari K; Astikainen, Piia

    2014-11-01

    In visual search, an angry face in a crowd "pops out" unlike a happy or a neutral face. This "anger superiority effect" conflicts with views of visual perception holding that complex stimulus contents cannot be detected without focused top-down attention. Implicit visual processing of threatening changes was studied by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) using facial stimuli using the change blindness paradigm, in which conscious change detection is eliminated by presenting a blank screen before the changes. Already before their conscious detection, angry faces modulated relatively early emotion sensitive ERPs when appearing among happy and neutral faces, but happy faces only among neutral, not angry faces. Conscious change detection was more efficient for angry than happy faces regardless of background. These findings indicate that the brain can implicitly extract complex emotional information from facial stimuli, and the biological relevance of threatening contents can speed up their break up into visual consciousness.

  16. Eliminating spatial distortions in Anger-type gamma cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Michael; Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef-Andreas

    2012-12-01

    A procedure to quantify and correct the spatial distortions inherent to Anger-type gamma cameras is presented. It consists in imaging a pattern of regularly spaced holes, assigning to each pair of lattice indices the actual position on the detector and generating a look-up matrix describing the inverse mapping. This allows one to correct the position of the distinct events either during or after the measurement with minimal computational effort. The corrected spectrum is indistinguishable from a spectrum taken with an ideal detector in a statistical sense. The effect of the increased resolution on measurements of angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation is demonstrated. The presented scheme is applicable for all types of area detectors.

  17. A fast parallel encoding scheme for the Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1984-02-01

    In an Anger camera, only seven photomultipliers generally receive any significant signal from any one event; more distant tubes contribute only noise and background. The basic unit for two-dimensional position determination is thus a ''receptive field'' of seven photomultipliers. In the new encoding scheme, position determination is performed in two steps: first, the PM with the largest signal is identified, giving the coarse position. Then linear combinations of that signal and its six neighbors are used to interpolate within that receptive field. Since the analog sums are used only for interpolation, less precision is needed and faster electronics can be used. Speed is also increased by forming the linear combinations of all possible fields in parallel; this is done in a circuit called the ''brain''. Total time to digitize the position of an event is 400 ns; the precision is 1/26 of the photomultiplier spacing.

  18. Anger Is More Influential than Joy: Sentiment Correlation in Weibo

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rui; Zhao, Jichang; Chen, Yan; Xu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the tremendous growth of the online social media. In China, Weibo, a Twitter-like service, has attracted more than 500 million users in less than five years. Connected by online social ties, different users might share similar affective states. We find that the correlation of anger among users is significantly higher than that of joy. While the correlation of sadness is surprisingly low. Moreover, there is a stronger sentiment correlation between a pair of users if they share more interactions. And users with larger number of friends possess more significant sentiment correlation with their neighborhoods. Our findings could provide insights for modeling sentiment influence and propagation in online social networks. PMID:25333778

  19. Mental health services responding to men and their anger.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Don; Harmon, Karen

    2004-12-01

    Due to their propensity for acting out with antisocial behaviours, angry men are often regarded as having antisocial personality disorder with little hope for treatment success. Whilst not denying the difficulties in working with angry men, this paper looks to challenge some of the received wisdom in this area. Antisocial personality disorder is compared with borderline personality disorder and the many similarities, including the association with childhood trauma, course of illness, symptoms and rates of occurrence, are discussed. Differences between the two groups may be associated with the internalization or externalization of anger. Some issues related to bias in diagnosis are raised, as is the universal hopelessness implied in the literature related to treatment of antisocial personality disorder. Some issues related to engaging traditional men are discussed. In this paper the term 'traditional men' is used to describe men who value stoicism, self-reliance, strength, work, status and aggression highly whilst denying any vulnerability and exhibiting restricted emotionality. There is a need to reframe the diagnosis in order to recognize the associated behaviours as being an adult manifestation of complex childhood trauma. Further, there is a need for treatment directed towards altering ongoing patterns of retraumatization which characterize the lives of these men. A case study is included to demonstrate a number of the issues involved in working with angry men. These include issues of connection, boundaries, safety and utilization of the general practitioner in setting up a containing structure. The case study is used to illustrate that when issues of connection and anger containment are positively addressed, good therapeutic outcomes are possible.

  20. Explosive anger as a response to human rights violations in post-conflict Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Silove, Derrick; Brooks, Robert; Bateman Steel, Catherine Robina; Steel, Zachary; Hewage, Kalhari; Rodger, James; Soosay, Ian

    2009-09-01

    Over several decades, clinicians have documented a pattern of explosive anger amongst survivors of gross human rights violations. Yet there is a dearth of epidemiological research investigating explosive anger in post-conflict countries. In the present study undertaken in Timor-Leste between March and November 2004, we identified an indigenous descriptor for explosive anger, including this index in the East Timor Mental Health Epidemiological Needs Study, a small area total population survey of 1544 adults living in an urban and a rural area. Other measures included indices of past trauma events, post-traumatic stress and general psychological distress, and socio-demographic variables. We found that 38% of the population reached the defined threshold of one attack of explosive anger a month (average=1 episode every 2-3 days). Only a minority of persons with explosive anger reached threshold scores for post-traumatic stress and general psychological distress. High levels of trauma exposure represented the strongest predictor of explosive anger. Latent class analysis identified three sub-groups with explosive anger: young trauma-affected adults living in the capital city who were unemployed; an older group, predominantly men, who had experienced extensive violence, including combat, assault and torture; and a less well characterized group of women. The findings offer support for a sequential model of explosive anger in which experiences of past persecution are compounded by frustrations in the post-conflict environment. The data provide a foundation for exploring further the role of trauma-induced anger in the cycles of violence that are prevalent in post-conflict countries.

  1. Aggression in US soldiers post-deployment: Associations with combat exposure and PTSD and the moderating role of trait anger.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Joshua E; Quartana, Phillip J; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Kok, Brian C; Riviere, Lyndon A

    2015-01-01

    Anger and aggression are among the most common issues reported by returning service members from combat deployments. However, the pathways between combat exposure and anger and aggression have not been comprehensively characterized. The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between trait anger, combat exposure, post-deployment PTSD, and aggression. U.S. Army soldiers (N = 2,420) were administered anonymous surveys assessing combat exposure, current PTSD symptoms and aggression, as well as trait anger items 3 months after returning from deployment to Afghanistan. PTSD symptom levels were related to aggression at higher levels of trait anger, but not evident among soldiers who had lower levels of trait anger. The pathway from combat exposure to PTSD, and then to aggression, was conditional upon levels of trait anger, such that the pathway was most evident at high levels of trait anger. This was the first study to our knowledge that concurrently modeled unconditional and conditional direct and indirect associations between combat exposure, PTSD, trait anger, and aggression. The findings can be helpful clinically and for developing screening protocols for combat exposed Soldiers. The results of this study suggest the importance of assessing and managing anger and aggression in soldiers returning from combat deployment. Anger is one of the most common complaints of returning soldiers and can have debilitating effects across all domains of functioning. It is imperative that future research efforts are directed toward understanding this phenomenon and developing and validating effective treatments for it.

  2. The relationship of negative self-schemas and insecure partner attachment styles with anger experience and expression among male batterers.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael; Roring, Steven; Winterowd, Carrie; Porras, Claudia

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore how negative self-schemas and partner attachments were related to the experience and expression of anger (i.e., trait anger, inward and outward expression of anger) in a sample of male batterers (n = 40) who participated in court-mandated group services. They completed the Experience in Close Relationships (ECR), the Young Schema Questionnaire-2 (YSQ-2), the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and a demographic sheet. Male batterers who experienced pervasive anger (i.e., trait anger) tended to experience negative self-schemas associated with the Impaired Limits domain (respecting the rights of others, insufficient self-control, entitlement). Male batterers who tended to suppress their anger tended to feel avoidantly attached to their romantic partner and endorsed negative self-schemas associated with the Disconnection and Rejection domain (abandonment, emotional deprivation, defectiveness/shame). Implications for clinical practice with male offenders and future research are discussed.

  3. Powerlessness, anger, and stress in African American women: implications for physical and emotional health.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shirley A; González-Prendes, A Antonio

    2009-01-01

    African American women find themselves at a high risk of experiencing feelings of powerlessness associated with socioeconomic disparities rooted in a history of racism and sexism. The authors present a conceptual model that discusses powerlessness as a significant variable that contributes to the experience of anger and stress in African American women, and consequently to the adverse health consequences of such anger and stress. The authors review the current literature as well as census and health statistics to discern critical historical, social, and cognitive aspects of powerlessness and anger in African American women. Implications for practitioners are addressed.

  4. A gender-specific analysis of adolescent dietary caffeine, alcohol consumption, anger, and violent behavior.

    PubMed

    James, Jack E; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported dietary caffeine and alcohol consumption were examined in relation to anger and violent behavior in Icelandic tenth-graders. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to investigate direct and indirect effects of measured and latent variables in the population sample of 3,670, controlling for parental financial standing, family structure, ADHD, and peer delinquency. Gender differences were observed that have not been reported previously, especially in relation to anger as a possible mediator of violent behavior against a background of caffeine and alcohol consumption. Study findings suggest the need to take account of caffeine consumption in relation to adolescent anger and violence.

  5. Anger, anxiety, and depression in early adolescents from intact and divorced families.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Noreen E; Yarcheski, Adela; Yarcheski, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    This study examined differences in anger, anxiety, and depression between early adolescents from divorced families and early adolescents from intact families. To control for extraneous variables, 24 early adolescents from divorced families were matched with 24 early adolescents from intact families according to gender, age, race, and grade in school. All responded to measures of state anger, state anxiety, and depression. Using the t test, one of the three hypotheses was supported. Statistically significant differences were found in state anger, but not in state anxiety or depression, between the two groups. Implications for nursing are addressed.

  6. The new Russian law on psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, D

    1994-01-01

    On July 2, 1992, President Boris Yeltsin signed into effect a law that has the potential for advancing human rights of psychiatric clients in the Russian Federation. The author provides a comparative analysis of the U.S. and Russian psychiatric laws, demonstrating a striking similarity of the laws in terms of substance and scope.

  7. Russian Media Education Researches: 1950-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzed the development of Russian media education researches from 1950 to 2010 years. The list of theses of the Russian authors on the subject of Media Education is about 180 titles since 1950. Nearly 70 of them have been defended for the recent 10 years. From 1950 till 1959 six theses were defended, from 1960 till 1969--15; from…

  8. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  9. Aspects of the Teaching of Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Robert L.

    The process of learning Russian should be no more difficult than the process of learning other languages although it may take somewhat longer. The phonetic system should not present major difficulties with respect to individual sounds, but intonation may be difficult because Russian pitch patterns represent different intentions and emotions than…

  10. Russian Literature: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    An annotated bibliography of general and specialized reference works for Russian and Soviet literature is intended for both students and researchers. English language and Russian language sources in the McGill University (Canada) libraries are included. Subject headings include guides (to the literature and to archival resources), encyclopedias,…

  11. Syllabus for Use in Russian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernonok, Jevgenij

    This syllabus outlines a two semester course to accompany the basic textbook: THE EPIC OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE by Marc Slonim. An introduction to the guide gives a brief summary of the history of Russian literature and objectives of the course are stated, defining concepts and understandings to be developed. In addition, teaching techniques are…

  12. Syllabus for Use in Imperial Russian History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husum, Carol

    This syllabus is an outline of a one semester course in Imperial Russia designed to emphasize the relationship between Russia's past and her present. Course content begins with the founding of the first Russian state and continues to the fall of the Romanovs in 1917. In addition, some topics are suggested for investigation of Russian history in…

  13. The Russian Culture Course: Some Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Gilbert F.

    1981-01-01

    Presents statistical data from a survey of Russian culture courses taught at institutions that offer Russian language instruction. Includes data on total number, length, and language of instruction, which, while substantiating the widespread assumption of a culture course explosion, point to the large proportion of courses that are taught in…

  14. Lexical Inferencing in Reading L2 Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes how intermediate-level first language English readers of Russian as a second language deploy lexical inferencing and other strategies when reading informational texts. Fifth-semester students of Russian performed think-alouds while reading two texts; one written for the general adult reader, and the other meant for school-age…

  15. Anger and the ABC model underlying Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Daniel J; Smith, Phillip N

    2004-06-01

    The ABC model underlying Ellis's Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy predicts that people who think more irrationally should display greater trait anger than do people who think less irrationally. This study tested this prediction regarding the ABC model. 186 college students were administered the Survey of Personal Beliefs and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-Second Edition to measure irrational thinking and trait anger, respectively. Students who scored higher on Overall Irrational Thinking and Low Frustration Tolerance scored significantly higher on Trait Anger than did those who scored lower on Overall Irrational Thinking and Low Frustration Tolerance. This indicates support for the ABC model, especially Ellis's construct of irrational beliefs which is central to the model.

  16. Mindfulness training for reducing anger, anxiety, and depression in fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Amutio, Alberto; Franco, Clemente; Pérez-Fuentes, María de Carmen; Gázquez, José J.; Mercader, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disabling syndrome. Results obtained with different therapies are very limited to date. The goal of this study was to verify whether the application of a mindfulness-based training program was effective in modifying anger, anxiety, and depression levels in a group of women diagnosed with fibromyalgia. This study is an experimental trial that employed a waiting list control group. Measures were taken at three different times: pretest, posttest, and follow-up. The statistical analyses revealed a significant reduction of anger (trait) levels, internal expression of anger, state anxiety, and depression in the experimental group as compared to the control group, as well as a significant increase in internal control of anger. It can be concluded that the mindfulness-based treatment was effective after 7 weeks. These results were maintained 3 months after the end of the intervention. PMID:25628591

  17. Assessing the Impact of Anger State on the Three Attentional Networks with the ANT-I.

    PubMed

    Techer, Franck; Jallais, Christophe; Fort, Alexandra; Corson, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a negative and highly aroused emotion. Previous research has revealed that a high level of arousal can induce the participant in a physical preparation and self-awareness. The aim of this research was to study the influence of anger on the attentional network using the Attention Network Test-Interactions (ANT-I). This test has been developed in order to assess 3 attentional networks: alerting, orienting, and executive control. Here, participants were induced in anger using the autobiographic recall procedure or in a neutral mood before the realization of the ANT-I. As expected, the results showed a better alerting score for the angry group. The possible origin of this alerting gain related to the high level of arousal is discussed. The results obtained should enlighten the interaction between emotion and the functioning of the attentional system. They also may be relevant for applied fields related to anger.

  18. Expressing anger in conflict: when it helps and when it hurts.

    PubMed

    Van Kleef, Gerben A; Côté, Stéphane

    2007-11-01

    Do expressions of anger in conflict elicit competition or cooperation? To reconcile inconsistent results obtained in previous research, the authors developed and tested a dual-process model that proposes that power and the appropriateness of the expressions of anger jointly determine whether an individual facing an angry antagonist competes by demanding value or cooperates by conceding value. In a scenario study and a computer-mediated negotiation simulation, (a) participants with lower power claimed less value from an angry adversary than from a nonemotional one, regardless of the appropriateness of the expressions of anger, and (b) participants with higher power demanded more value when the adversary's expressions of anger were inappropriate than when they were appropriate or when the adversary was nonemotional. The theoretical and practical implications of the model and findings are discussed.

  19. What motivates hate crimes based on sexual orientation? Mediating effects of anger on antigay aggression.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Dominic J; Peterson, John L

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of anger in response to gay men within three theoretical models of antigay aggression. Participants were 135 exclusively heterosexual men who completed a structured interview designed to assess sexual prejudice, anger in response to a vignette depicting a nonerotic male-male intimate relationship (i.e. partners saying "I love you", holding hands, kissing), and past perpetration of antigay aggression. Among identified antigay assailants, motivations for one earlier assault (i.e. sexual prejudice, peer dynamics, thrill seeking) were also assessed. Results indicated that anger fully mediated the relationship between sexual prejudice and antigay aggression, partially mediated the effect of peer dynamics on antigay aggression, and did not account for the relationship between thrill seeking and antigay aggression. These findings indicate that anger in response to gay men facilitates antigay aggression among some, but not all, antigay perpetrators.

  20. Associative and spontaneous appraisal processes independently contribute to anger elicitation in daily life.

    PubMed

    Wilkowski, Benjamin M; Robinson, Michael D

    2010-04-01

    There has been a great deal of debate concerning the antecedents of anger, with appraisal theorists emphasizing the role of hostile interpretations and cognitive neo-associationistic theorists emphasizing the role of more basic associative processes. Recently, theorists have sought to reconcile these views by acknowledging the role of both associative and inferential processes, and the current investigation drew upon recent social-cognitive research to test this compromise. Individual differences in hostile inferences and associations were assessed in an implicit cognitive paradigm, and relevant outcomes were assessed in a daily diary protocol. Implicit hostile inferences predicted both anger and aggression in daily life, and such relationships were mediated by propensities toward hostile interpretations in daily life. Hostile associations also predicted anger in daily life, but this relationship proved to be independent of daily hostile interpretations. Results therefore support a model that acknowledges the role of both associative and appraisal processes in anger elicitation.

  1. Trait anxiety, but not trait anger, predisposes obese individuals to emotional eating

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kristin L.; Appelhans, Bradley M.; Whited, Matthew C.; Oleski, Jessica; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined whether trait anxiety and trait anger are associated with vulnerability to emotional eating, particularly among obese individuals. Lean (n=37) and obese (n=24) participants engaged in a laboratory study where they completed measures of trait anxiety and trait anger at screening and then completed 3 counterbalanced experimental sessions involving different mood inductions (neutral, anxiety, anger). Following each mood induction, participants were provided with snack foods in a sham taste test. Models predicting snack intake revealed a significant trait anxiety × body mass index group interaction, such that high trait anxiety was positively associated with food intake for obese individuals, but not their lean counterparts. Contrary to the hypothesis, trait anger was not associated with food intake for obese or lean participants. Results suggest that trait anxiety may be a risk factor for emotional eating among obese individuals. PMID:20959131

  2. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  3. Social and racial correlates of Russian roulette.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven; Wasserman, Ira

    2008-08-01

    The epidemiology of a neglected form of suicidal behavior, Russian roulette, is addressed. Also tested is an explanation of racial differences based on the opportunity theory of deviant behavior related to the availability of revolvers, necessary weapons with which to play Russian roulette. Data refer to 15 cases of Russian roulette found through a search of the medical examiner's suicide files (N = 1,412) and 75 matched controls who suicided by a gunshot to the head. The results support an opportunity perspective: 80% of the Russian roulette victims were African American compared to 30.7% of the controls. Further, among the controls, Blacks were three times more likely than Whites to use revolvers in suicides, a pattern indicating Blacks' greater access to revolvers. Russian roulette victims were entirely male, significantly younger, and less apt to be married than the control group.

  4. The Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.; Baker, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    The United States and Russia discovered a mutual interest in fuel cell development during a series of workshops designed to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian nuclear weapon scientists and engineers to aid them in converting their skill to peaceful applications. The proposal for a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium was initiated at the third workshop held in Livermore, CA, in May 1994. Representatives from U.S. fuel cell industries, U.S. research institutes, Russian institutes and ministries, and U.S. national laboratories attended, including those from GAZPROM, the Russian natural gas company. GASPROM needs to provide power for telemetry, cathodic corrosion protection of gas lines, and gas line pumping power in remote areas, and estimates that it needs approximately seventy thousand 1.5 to 15 KW plants to do so. Since the workshop, several direct working relationships have developed between the Russian Nuclear Weapon Institutes and the U.S. fuel cell industry.

  5. Depressive Mood, Anger, and Daily Cortisol of Caregivers on High- and Low-Stress Days

    PubMed Central

    Zarit, Steven H.; Kim, Kyungmin; Almeida, David M.; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines the association of daily cortisol with depressive mood and anger. Method. Depressive mood, anger and 2 markers of cortisol, area under the curve (AUC), and cortisol awakening response (CAR) were examined for caregivers (N = 164) of individuals with dementia (IWDs) across 8 days, some of which IWDs attended an adult day service (ADS) program. Caregivers were primarily female (86.7%) with a mean age of 61.99. First, multilevel models were run with CAR and AUC each as separate covariates of anger and depressive mood. A second set of models examined contextual factors of caregivers (i.e., care-related stressors and amount of ADS use) were added to the models for anger and depressive mood (Model 2). Results. On days where caregivers had AUCs below their average they expressed higher anger scores. However in Model 2, anger was associated with more care-related stressors, but not ADS use or daily cortisol. Caregivers who on average had smaller CARs were more likely to be depressed. In Model 2, depressed mood was associated with more care-related stressors and a low average CAR. Discussion. We found that hypocortisol patterns, reflective of chronic stress experienced by caregivers, are associated with negative mood. PMID:24924160

  6. Prediction of toddlers' expressive language from maternal sensitivity and toddlers' anger expressions: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Nozadi, Sara S; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eisenberg, Nancy; Bolnick, Rebecca; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D; Smith, Cynthia L; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne; Sallquist, Julie

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence for the importance of individual differences in expressive language during toddlerhood in predicting later literacy skills, few researchers have examined individual and contextual factors related to language abilities across the toddler years. Furthermore, a gap remains in the literature about the extent to which the relations of negative emotions and parenting to language skills may differ for girls and boys. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the associations among maternal sensitivity, children's observed anger reactivity, and expressive language when children were 18 (T1; n = 247) and 30 (T2; n = 216) months. At each age, mothers reported on their toddlers' expressive language, and mothers' sensitive parenting behavior was observed during an unstructured free-play task. Toddlers' anger expressions were observed during an emotion-eliciting task. Using path modeling, results showed few relations at T1. At T2, maternal sensitivity was negatively related to anger, and in turn, anger was associated with lower language skills. However, moderation analyses showed that these findings were significant for boys but not for girls. In addition, T1 maternal sensitivity and anger positively predicted expressive language longitudinally for both sexes. Findings suggest that the relations between maternal sensitivity, anger reactivity and expressive language may vary depending on the child's developmental stage and sex.

  7. Peer victimization and subsequent disruptive behavior in school: The protective functions of anger regulation coping

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Övgü; Lepore, Stephen J.; Kliewer, Wendy; Jaggi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Peer victimization is linked to adjustment problems in youth, including aggressive behavior, yet not all victimized youth are aggressive. The present study investigated whether youth’s anger regulation coping might attenuate the positive association between peer victimization and subsequent aggressive behavior. Longitudinal data from 485 7th-grade students (55% female, mean age = 12.84 years) and their teachers were collected in the fall and six months later. Teacher ratings of youth aggressive behavior at follow-up were the primary outcome, with statistical adjustments for baseline aggressive behavior and demographics. Results from multilevel models showed significant interactive effects of baseline anger regulation and peer victimization on residualized teacher-rated aggressive behaviors that were consistent with the hypothesis that anger regulation played a protective role: under high levels of peer victimization, youth with higher levels of anger regulation displayed lower levels of aggressive behavior than their counterparts with lower levels of anger regulation. These findings suggest that targeting and improving students’ ability to regulate their anger may be protective in the face of peer victimization and reduce subsequent aggressive behavior. PMID:25309013

  8. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  9. Self-Construals, Anger Regulation, and Life Satisfaction in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Ayano; Kim, Min-Sun; Oshio, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported evidence that indicates differences between Western and East Asian cultures in anger regulation and its psychological consequences. However, many of these studies have focused on a specific anger regulation strategy and its relation with a psychological consequence. Here, we developed an integrated model that can comprehensively examine three different anger regulation strategies (anger suppression, expression, and control), independent and interdependent self-construals as the psychological antecedent, and life satisfaction as the psychological consequence. We estimated the model using large samples of American and Japanese adults to examine the associations between the two self-construals, three anger regulation strategies, and life satisfaction. We compared the difference in the patterns of relationships among the key constructs between the American and Japanese samples. The results confirmed previously suggested cultural differences while also discovering new culturally different paths. The results generally suggest that individual-level self-construals matter more when anger is a culturally condoned emotion (vs. condemned). The implications and limitations of the integrated model are discussed. PMID:27303332

  10. Distinctive effects of fear and sadness induction on anger and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Jun; Ren, Jun; Fan, Jin; Luo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has reported that the successful implementation of cognitive regulation of emotion depends on higher-level cognitive functions, such as top-down control, which may be impaired in stressful situations. This calls for “cognition free” self-regulatory strategies that do not require top-down control. In contrast to the cognitive regulation of emotion that emphasizes the role of cognition, traditional Chinese philosophy and medicine views the relationship among different types of emotions as promoting or counteracting each other without the involvement of cognition, which provides an insightful perspective for developing “cognition free” regulatory strategies. In this study, we examined two hypotheses regarding the modulation of anger and aggressive behavior: sadness counteracts anger and aggressive behavior, whereas fear promotes anger and aggressive behavior. Participants were first provoked by reading extremely negative feedback on their viewpoints (Study 1) and by watching anger-inducing movie clips (Study 2). Then, these angry participants were assigned to three equivalent groups and viewed sad, fear-inducing, or neutral materials to evoke the corresponding emotions. The results showed that participants displayed a lower level of aggressive behavior when sadness was later induced and a higher level of anger when fear was later induced. These results provide evidence that supports the hypothesis of mutual promotion and counteraction relationships among these types of emotions and imply a “cognition free” approach to regulating anger and aggressive behavior. PMID:26124725

  11. Predictors of suicidal ideation in a community sample: roles of anger, self-esteem, and depression.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jin-Mahn; Park, Jong-Il; Oh, Keun-Young; Lee, Keon-Hak; Kim, Myung Sig; Yoon, Myeong-Sook; Ko, Sung-Hee; Cho, Hye-Chung; Chung, Young-Chul

    2014-04-30

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationships of anger, self-esteem, and depression with suicidal ideation. A survey was conducted in a wide range of community areas across Jeollabuk-do Province, Korea. A total of 2964 subjects (mean age=44.4yr) participated in this study. Hierarchical regression was used to investigate predictors of suicidal ideation in terms of their sociodemographic characteristics, depression, self-esteem, and anger. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that anger and self-esteem were significantly associated with suicidal ideation regardless of age and after controlling for depression. Moderation analysis showed that the impact of anger on suicidal ideation was significantly greater among females than males in adolescents, but not in other age groups. Additionally, there were some differences in sociodemographic predictors of suicidal ideation among age groups. Predictors included gender and family harmony in adolescents, marital status and family harmony in middle-aged individuals, and economic status and family harmony in elderly individuals. Our results revealed that anger and self-esteem play important roles in suicidal ideation beyond the effect of depression. Development and implementation of preventive strategies, including management of anger and self-esteem, could possibly reduce suicidal ideation and subsequent suicide attempts.

  12. Plains cottonwood's last stand: can it survive invasion of Russian olive onto the Milk River, Montana floodplain?

    PubMed

    Pearce, C M; Smith, D G

    2001-11-01

    Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) was introduced in 1950 onto one site on the Milk River floodplain, northern Montana, 10 km downstream from the Canada/United States border. To analyze dispersal of Russian olive from the point source between 1950 and 1999, we compared distribution, numbers, size structure, and mortality of Russian olive and plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides Marsh:) on an unregulated reach of the Milk River floodplain in southeastern Alberta and north-central Montana. Within 50 years, Russian olive in this reach has moved upriver into Alberta and downriver to the Fresno Reservoir. It is now present on 69 of the 74 meander lobes sampled, comprising 34%, 62%, and 61% of all Russian olive and plains cottonwood seedlings, saplings, and trees, respectively. On some meander lobes, Russian olive has colonized similar elevations on the floodplain as plains cottonwood and is oriented in rows paralleling the river channel, suggesting that recruitment may be related to river processes. Breakup ice had killed 400 Russian olive saplings and trees and damaged >1000 others on 30 of the meander lobes in 1996. Nevertheless, Russian olive now outnumbers cottonwood on many sites on the Milk River floodplain because its seeds can be dispersed by wildlife (particularly birds) and probably by flood water and ice rafts; seeds are viable for up to 3 years and germination can take place on bare and well-vegetated soils; and saplings and trees are less palatable to livestock and beaver than plains cottonwood. Without control, Russian olive could be locally dominant on the Milk River floodplain in all age classes within 10 years and replace plains cottonwood within this century.

  13. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Renata; Blume, Christine; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Wielek, Tomasz; Heib, Dominik P J; Schabus, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject's own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry) names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry) target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients.

  14. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody

    PubMed Central

    del Giudice, Renata; Blume, Christine; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Wielek, Tomasz; Heib, Dominik P. J.; Schabus, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject’s own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry) names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry) target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients. PMID:27442445

  15. Small prototype of Anger camera with submillimeter position resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorini, Carlo; Perotti, Francesco

    2005-04-01

    In this work we present a small prototype of Anger camera based on a monolithic array of silicon drift detectors (SDDs) used as photodetectors for a single CsI(Tl) scintillator crystal. This prototype, having a total sensitive area of about 1 cm{sup 2}, has been realized in order to evaluate the performances attainable in {gamma}-ray imaging by using a SDD array instead of the more conventionally employed photomultiplier tubes. An intrinsic resolution better than 200 {mu}m has been measured with this camera. This result was achieved thanks to the extremely low electronics noise presented by the SDD units, fully exploited by the integration of the front-end junction field effect transistor directly on the detector chip. The main features of the detector as well as the results of its extended experimental characterization with 60 and 122 keV gamma rays are presented and discussed in the article. The present device has many potential applications in the field of medical imaging, in which outstanding position resolutions are essential.

  16. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Renata; Blume, Christine; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Wielek, Tomasz; Heib, Dominik P J; Schabus, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject's own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry) names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry) target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients. PMID:27442445

  17. Russian Virtual Observatory: data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O.; Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Bakanas, E.; Kilpio, E.; Kniazev, A.; Kovaleva, D.; Mironov, A.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Ryabchikova, T.; Rykhlova, L.; Sachkov, M.; Sazonov, S.; Zhukov, A.

    The purpose of this review is to analyze main directions of creation and functioning of major data sources developed by Russian astronomers or with their participation and to compare them with the worldwide trends in these fields. We discuss astronomical space missions of the past, present, and future (Astron, INTEGRAL, WSO-UV, Spectrum Roentgen Gamma, Lyra-B), high-quality photometric atlases and catalogues, and spectroscopic data sources, primarily VALD and the global VAMDC framework for the maintenance and distribution of atomic and molecular data. We describe collection, analysis, and dissemination of astronomical data on minor bodies of the Solar System and on variable stars. Also described is the project joining data for all observational types of binary and multiple stars, Binary star DataBase (BDB).

  18. The relationship between anger, childhood maltreatment, and emotion regulation difficulties in intimate partner and non-intimate partner violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Frank L; Moore, Zella E; Dettore, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Violence is a significant public health problem, which has been linked to the primary emotion of anger. While several theoretical models have attempted to understand the relationship between anger and violence, empirical evidence to support these models and the psychological treatments that follow from them have been lacking. A newer model for understanding the relationship between anger and violence emphasizes the dual diatheses of childhood maltreatment and difficulties in emotion regulation as central to understanding the anger-violence relationship. Investigating the relationship between childhood maltreatment and anger experience and expression among 88 violent offenders referred for intimate partner or non-intimate partner violent offenses, results herein confirm that substantial childhood maltreatment is found among violent offenders, with differing patterns of abuse noted across groups. Furthermore, mediational analyses indicate that difficulties in emotion regulation mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and various aspects of anger experience and expression among both types of offenders.

  19. Violence on the Russian & American Media Screen and Youth Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of the Russian and American experience regarding media violence, standards for rating Russian media programs, and a course of study on media violence for students will have a significant impact upon Russian society, will raise Russian societal and governmental attention to the infringement of the Rights of the Child on the Russian…

  20. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  1. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  2. Alcohol-Adapted Anger Management Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Innovative Therapy for Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Walitzer, Kimberly S; Deffenbacher, Jerry L; Shyhalla, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    A randomized controlled trial for an innovative alcohol-adapted anger management treatment (AM) for outpatient alcohol dependent individuals scoring moderate or above on anger is described. AM treatment outcomes were compared to those of an empirically-supported intervention, Alcoholics Anonymous Facilitation treatment (AAF). Clients in AM, relative to clients in AAF, were hypothesized to have greater improvement in anger and anger-related cognitions and lesser AA involvement during the 6-month follow-up. Anger-related variables were hypothesized to be stronger predictors of improved alcohol outcomes in the AM treatment condition and AA involvement was hypothesized to be a stronger predictor of alcohol outcomes in the AAF treatment group. Seventy-six alcohol dependent men and women were randomly assigned to treatment condition and followed for 6 months after treatment end. Both AM and AAF treatments were followed by significant reductions in heavy drinking days, alcohol consequences, anger, and maladaptive anger-related thoughts and increases in abstinence and self-confidence regarding not drinking to anger-related triggers. Treatment with AAF was associated with greater AA involvement relative to treatment with AM. Changes in anger and AA involvement were predictive of posttreatment alcohol outcomes for both treatments. Change in trait anger was a stronger predictor of posttreatment alcohol consequences for AM than for AAF clients; during-treatment AA meeting attendance was a stronger predictor of posttreatment heavy drinking and alcohol consequences for AAF than for AM clients. Anger-related constructs and drinking triggers should be foci in treatment of alcohol dependence for anger-involved clients.

  3. Not all anger is created equal: the impact of the expresser's culture on the social effects of anger in negotiations.

    PubMed

    Adam, Hajo; Shirako, Aiwa

    2013-09-01

    The influence of culture on the social effects of emotions in negotiations has recently gained the attention of researchers, but to date this research has focused exclusively on the cultural background of the perceiver of the emotion expression. The current research offers the first investigation of how the cultural background of the expresser influences negotiation outcomes. On the basis of the stereotype that East Asians are emotionally inexpressive and European Americans are emotionally expressive, we predicted that anger will have a stronger signaling value when East Asians rather than European American negotiators express it. Specifically, we predicted that angry East Asian negotiators will be perceived as tougher and more threatening and therefore elicit great cooperation from counterparts compared with angry European American negotiators. Results from 4 negotiation studies supported our predictions. In Study 1, angry East Asian negotiators elicited greater cooperation than angry European American and Hispanic negotiators. In Study 2, angry East Asian negotiators elicited greater cooperation than angry European American ones, but emotionally neutral East Asian and European American negotiators elicited the same level of cooperation. Study 3 showed that this effect holds for both East Asian and European American perceivers and that it is mediated by angry East Asian negotiators being perceived as tougher and more threatening than angry European American negotiators. Finally, Study 4 demonstrated that the effect emerges only when negotiators hold the stereotype of East Asians being emotionally inexpressive and European Americans being emotionally expressive. We discuss implications for our understanding of culture, emotions, and negotiations.

  4. Factors Associated with Anger among Male Adolescents in Western Iran: An Application of Social Cognitive Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zavareh, Mohammad Sadegh Abedzadeh; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Hidarnia, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anger can be defined a natural emotional response that is gradually formed to protect us in dealing with threats, damages, assaults, and failures; while hatred is a change of attitude which is built following the persistence of anger towards a subject or an individual. One of the main reasons of adolescents’ reference to the counseling centers is their anger accompanied by violence. Objective: This study aims to determine the social cognitive factors associated with anger among a population of adolescents in the west of Iran based on the social cognitive theory. Methodology: Samples were selected based on multi-stage cluster sampling. Method including the first and the second-grade male high school students from Ilam town (N=360). The Spielberger’s anger questionnaire (STAXI 2) and a self-designed questionnaire based on Bandura’s social cognitive theory were employed as the data collection instruments in the present study. Results: Of the selected population, 200 students were the first-grade and 160 students were the second-grade students. 135 students were the first child of the family, 150 students were the second or the third birth, and 75 students were the fifth or above in their families. Descriptive tests and correlation analysis were used to conduct the statistical analysis. Although there was a significant and inverse relationship between all the components of the theory and anger, the strongest relationship was seen in self-efficacy (-0.585) and the weakest relationship was seen in modeling (-0.297). Discussion and Conclusion: If was concluded that helping people to know their abilities and have a better personal judgment in this case, can influence their anger control. In addition, the process of stress management can effectively increase an individual’s emotional coping. PMID:26153165

  5. The Role of Anger/Hostility in Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Secondary Analysis From the ADAPT-A Study.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lauren B; Fava, Maurizio; Doros, Gheorghe D; Alpert, Jonathan E; Henry, Michael; Huz, Ilana; Freeman, Marlene P

    2015-10-01

    Major depressive disorder is often accompanied by elevated levels of anger, hostility, and irritability, which may contribute to worse outcomes. The present study is a secondary analysis examining the role of anger/hostility in the treatment response to low-dose aripiprazole added to antidepressant therapy in 225 patients with major depressive disorder and inadequate response to antidepressant treatment. Repeated-measures model demonstrated no drug-placebo difference in treatment response across levels of anger/hostility. However, within-group analyses showed significantly lower placebo response rates in patients with high anger/hostility and a trend for lower drug response rates in patients with high anger/hostility. Pooled response rates across phases and treatments revealed a lower response rate among patients with high anger/hostility. Depressed patients with high anger/hostility demonstrate greater illness severity and lower depressive treatment response rates than patients with low anger/hostility, suggesting that patients with high anger/hostility may have poorer outcomes in response to adjunctive treatment.

  6. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  7. Russian Roulette: From Sputnik to Global Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Problems in the educational system involving poor verbal and mathematics skills of students are discussed. The "back to basics" movement is advocated. The Russian instructional program at the University of Virginia is described. (SW)

  8. Russian Fires and Pakistani Floods Linked

    NASA Video Gallery

    Beginning in mid-July and stretching through mid-August, a persistent Omega-shaped blocking high over western Russian and Kazakhstan produced abnormally warm temperatures (indicated by the yellow a...

  9. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  10. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder. PMID:26437231

  11. Social Information Processing in Anger Expression and Partner Violence in Returning U.S. Veterans.

    PubMed

    Taft, Casey T; Weatherill, Robin P; Scott, Jillian Panuzio; Thomas, Sarah A; Kang, Han K; Eckhardt, Christopher I

    2015-08-01

    We examined social information processing factors that could represent pathways through which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms relate to anger expression and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration in returning U.S. veterans. The sample included 92 male Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans, primarily Caucasian (77.4%), with smaller numbers of African American, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaskan Native, and other minority participants (9.7%, 2.2%, 2.2%, 3.2%, and 5.3% respectively). The average age was 40.37 (SD = 9.63) years. Data were collected through self-report questionnaires (PTSD Checklist, State-Trait Anger Expression Scale, Revised Conflict Tactics Scales) and the Articulated Thoughts in Simulated Situations experimental protocol. Laboratory-based assessment of cognitive biases and hostile attributions were tested as mediators of associations between PTSD symptoms and anger expression and IPV. Among the PTSD symptom clusters, hyperarousal symptoms were most strongly associated with anger expression (r = .50) and IPV perpetration (r = .27). Cognitive biases mediated associations between PTSD total scores and 3 of 4 PTSD cluster scores as well as anger expression. Hostile attribution biases were also associated with IPV perpetration (r = .23). We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding social information processing mechanisms for the relationship between PTSD symptoms and aggression.

  12. Exploring the Relationships of Perceived Discrimination, Anger, and Aggression among North American Indigenous Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Sittner Hartshorn, Kelley J.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research has documented associations between discrimination, anger and delinquency, but the exact nature of these associations remains unclear. Specifically, do aggressive behaviors emerge over time as a consequence of perceived discrimination and anger? Or do adolescents who engage in aggressive behavior perceive that they are being discriminated against and become angry? We use autoregressive cross-lagged path analysis on a sample of 692 Indigenous adolescents (mean age=12 years) from the Northern Midwest and Canada to answer these research questions. Results showed that the direction of effects went only one way; both perceived discrimination and anger were significantly associated with subsequent aggression. Moreover, early discrimination and anger each had indirect effects on aggressive behavior three years later, and anger partially mediated the association between discrimination and aggression. Perceived discrimination is but one of many strains related to their unequal social position that these Indigenous youth experience, and have important implications for the proliferation of disparities in later life. PMID:22905334

  13. The interplay of trait anger, childhood physical abuse, and alcohol consumption in predicting intimate partner aggression.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Rosalita C; Watkins, Laura E; DiLillo, David

    2015-04-01

    The current study examined three well-established risk factors for intimate partner aggression (IPA) within Finkel and Eckhardt's I(3) model, including two impellance factors-trait anger and childhood physical abuse history-and the disinhibiting factor of alcohol consumption. Participants were 236 male and female college students in a committed heterosexual dating relationship who completed a battery of self-report measures assessing childhood physical abuse, trait anger, alcohol consumption, and IPA perpetration. Results revealed a significant three-way interaction showing that as the disinhibition factor alcohol consumption increased, the interaction of the two impelling factors, trait anger and childhood physical abuse, became increasingly more positive. Individuals who had high levels of childhood physical abuse and alcohol consumption were at greater risk of IPA perpetration when trait anger was high. Consistent with the I(3) model, these findings suggest that trait anger and a history of childhood physical abuse may increase tendencies to aggress against one's partner, whereas alcohol consumption may reduce individuals' abilities to manage these aggressive tendencies. The importance of interplay among these risk factors in elevating IPA risk is discussed, as are the implications for clinicians working with male and female IPA perpetrators.

  14. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder.

  15. Anger, problematic alcohol use, and intimate partner violence victimisation and perpetration

    PubMed Central

    Sprunger, Joel G.; Eckhardt, Christopher I.; Parrott, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anger and problematic alcohol use have been established as individual risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) victimisation and perpetration, but it is unknown how these factors convey risk for IPV perpetration for men and women within the context of mutually violent relationships. Hypotheses Anger and problematic alcohol use were hypothesised to mediate the association between IPV victimisation and perpetration for men and women, with direct and indirect influences from partner variables. Methods Heterosexual couples (N = 215) at high-risk for IPV completed questionnaires indexing trait anger, problematic alcohol use and extent of past-year IPV perpetration and victimisation. An actor-partner interdependence modelling (APIM) framework was used to evaluate these cross-sectional data for two hypothesised models and one parsimonious alternative. Results The best-fitting model indicated that IPV victimisation showed the strongest direct effect on physical IPV perpetration for both men and women. For women, but not men, the indirect effect of IPV victimisation on physical IPV perpetration through anger approached significance. For men, but not women, the victimisation–perpetration indirect effect through problematic drinking approached significance. Implications for clinical practice The results suggest that anger and problem drinking patterns play different yet important roles for men and women in mutually violent relationships. PMID:26482016

  16. Social Information Processing in Anger Expression and Partner Violence in Returning U.S. Veterans.

    PubMed

    Taft, Casey T; Weatherill, Robin P; Scott, Jillian Panuzio; Thomas, Sarah A; Kang, Han K; Eckhardt, Christopher I

    2015-08-01

    We examined social information processing factors that could represent pathways through which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms relate to anger expression and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration in returning U.S. veterans. The sample included 92 male Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans, primarily Caucasian (77.4%), with smaller numbers of African American, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaskan Native, and other minority participants (9.7%, 2.2%, 2.2%, 3.2%, and 5.3% respectively). The average age was 40.37 (SD = 9.63) years. Data were collected through self-report questionnaires (PTSD Checklist, State-Trait Anger Expression Scale, Revised Conflict Tactics Scales) and the Articulated Thoughts in Simulated Situations experimental protocol. Laboratory-based assessment of cognitive biases and hostile attributions were tested as mediators of associations between PTSD symptoms and anger expression and IPV. Among the PTSD symptom clusters, hyperarousal symptoms were most strongly associated with anger expression (r = .50) and IPV perpetration (r = .27). Cognitive biases mediated associations between PTSD total scores and 3 of 4 PTSD cluster scores as well as anger expression. Hostile attribution biases were also associated with IPV perpetration (r = .23). We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding social information processing mechanisms for the relationship between PTSD symptoms and aggression. PMID:26201304

  17. Differential effects of expressive anger regulation on chronic pain intensity in CRPS and non-CRPS limb pain patients.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Yung; Burns, John W

    2003-08-01

    Research has shown that the anger management styles of both anger-in (suppression of anger) and anger-out (direct verbal or physical expression of anger) may be associated with elevated chronic pain intensity. Only the effects of anger-out appear to be mediated by increased physiological stress responsiveness. Given the catecholamine-sensitive nature of pain mechanisms in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), it was hypothesized that anger-out, but not anger-in, would demonstrate a stronger relationship with chronic pain intensity in CRPS patients than in non-CRPS chronic pain patients. Thirty-four chronic pain patients meeting IASP criteria for CRPS and 50 non-CRPS (predominantely myofascial) limb pain patients completed the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ), the Anger Expression Inventory (AEI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Analyses revealed no diagnostic group differences in mean scores on the anger-in (AIS) and anger-out (AOS) subscales of the AEI, or on the BDI (values of P>0.10). Results of general linear model analyses revealed significant AOS x diagnostic group interactions on both the sensory (MPQ-S) and affective (MPQ-A) subscales of the MPQ (values of P<0.05). In both cases, higher AOS scores were associated with more intense chronic pain in the CRPS group, but with less intense pain in the non-CRPS limb pain group. Inclusion of BDI scores as a covariate did not substantially alter the AOS x diagnostic group interactions, indicating that these AOS interactions were not due solely to overlap with negative affect. Although higher AIS scores were associated with elevated MPQ-A pain intensity as a main effect (P<0.05), no significant AIS x diagnostic group interactions were detected (values of P>0.10). The AIS main effect on MPQ-A ratings was accounted for entirely by overlap with negative affect. Results are consistent with a greater negative impact of anger-out on chronic pain intensity in conditions reflecting catecholamine

  18. Anger induced by interferon-alpha is moderated by ratio of arachidonic acid to omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E.; Sears, Barry; McNamara, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anger worsens in some patients during interferon-alpha (IFN-α) therapy. Elevated anger has also been associated with lower long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acid levels. We examined whether fatty acids could influence vulnerability to anger during IFN-α exposure. Methods Plasma arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were determined prior to IFN-α therapy by mass spectroscopy. Repeated-measure analyses examined the relationship between AA/EPA+DHA and the subsequent development of labile anger and irritability in 82 subjects who prospectively completed the Anger, Irritability, and Assault Questionnaire (AIAQ) during the first eight weeks of IFN-α therapy. Results Prior to IFN-α therapy, AA/EPA+DHA did not correlate with either labile anger or irritability. Pre-treatment AA/EPA+DHA did correlate with the subsequent maximal increase in labile anger during IFN-α therapy (r=0.33; p=0.005). Over time, labile anger increased more in subjects with above median AA/EPA+DHA ratios (p<0.05). Of the 17 subjects ultimately requiring psychiatric intervention for anger, 14/17 had above-median AA/EPA+DHA ratios (p=0.009). There was also an interaction with the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) promoter polymorphism (A-308G), such that only those with both elevated AA/EPA+DHA and the A allele had increased labile anger (p=0.001). In an additional 18 subjects, we conversely observed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment was associated with increased irritability during IFN-α therapy. Conclusion LCn-3 fatty acid status may influence anger development during exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines, and may interact with genetic risk for increased brain TNF-α. LCn-3 supplements may be one strategy for minimizing this adverse side effect of IFN-α. PMID:24182638

  19. Risk Assessment Update: Russian Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana; Hyde, James; Bjorkman, Michael; Hoffman, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BUMPER-II version 1.95j source code was provided to RSC-E- and Khrunichev at January 2012 MMOD TIM in Moscow. MEMCxP and ORDEM 3.0 environments implemented as external data files. NASA provided a sample ORDEM 3.0 g."key" & "daf" environment file set for demonstration and benchmarking BUMPER -II v1.95j installation at the Jan-12 TIM. ORDEM 3.0 has been completed and is currently in beta testing. NASA will provide a preliminary set of ORDEM 3.0 ".key" & ".daf" environment files for the years 2012 through 2028. Bumper output files produced using the new ORDEM 3.0 data files are intended for internal use only, not for requirements verification. Output files will contain these words ORDEM FILE DESCRIPTION = PRELIMINARY VERSION: not for production. The projectile density term in many BUMPER-II ballistic limit equations will need to be updated. Cube demo scripts and output files delivered at the Jan-12 TIM have been updated for the new ORDEM 3.0 data files. Risk assessment results based on ORDEM 3.0 and MEM will be presented for the Russian Segment (RS) of ISS.

  20. Russian Docking Module is lowered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-built Docking Module (DM) is lowered for installation into the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis while the spaceplane is in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles. The white structures attached to the module's sides are solar panels that will be attached to the Mir after the conclusion of the STS-74 mission.

  1. Reading L2 Russian: The Challenges of the Russian-English Dictionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examines when and how students use Russian-English dictionaries while reading informational texts in Russian and what success they have with word lookup. The study uses introspective verbal protocols (i.e., think-alouds) to follow how readers construct meaning from two texts while reading them for a limited time first…

  2. Russian Advanced Course: A Short History of the Development of Russian Language and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this volume is to acquaint the student with the historical development of the Russian language and literature. Samples of the original works with English translations and lists of recommended readings are provided. Contents include a review of Russian literature by century, samples of the short story "Samizdat," and major…

  3. Aggression, anger and hostility: Evaluation of moral disengagement as a mediational process.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Garay, Fernando; Carrasco, Miguel A; Amor, Pedro J

    2016-04-01

    This study examines how the mechanisms underlying moral disengagement serve as a mediator between anger and hostility and physical and verbal aggression. The study was carried out on 424 participants (61.1% females), aged 15 to 25 years, assessing the direct and indirect effects of the distinct variables using a hierarchical multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling. The findings suggest that anger and hostility contribute independently and positively to physical and verbal aggression. Moreover, the relationships between anger, hostility, and aggression appear to be mediated by moral disengagement. Indeed, this process of mediation was invariant across sexes, and it tended to be stronger for physical--as opposed to verbal--aggression. PMID:26778197

  4. Why individuals protest the perceived transgressions of their country: the role of anger, shame, and guilt.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Aarti; Schmader, Toni; Lickel, Brian

    2007-04-01

    The present research examined emotions as predictors of opposition to policies and actions of one's country that are perceived to be illegitimate. Two studies investigated the political implications of American (Study 1) and British (Study 2) citizens' anger, guilt, and shame responses to perceived harm caused by their countries' occupation of Iraq. In both studies, a manipulation of pervasive threat to the country's image increased participants' shame but not guilt. The emotions predicted political action intentions to advocate distinct opposition strategies. Shame predicted action intentions to advocate withdrawal from Iraq. Anger predicted action intentions to advocate compensation to Iraq, confrontation of agents responsible, and withdrawal from Iraq. Anger directed at different targets (ingroup, ingroup representative, and outgroup representative) predicted action intentions to support distinct strategies (Study 2). Guilt did not independently predict any political action intentions. Implications for the study of political action and emotions in intergroup contexts are discussed. PMID:17400836

  5. The Unique and Shared Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Fear, Anger, and Sadness in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Sierra; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which subordinate dimensions of negative emotionality were genetically and environmentally distinct in a sample of 1316 twins (51% female, 85.8% Caucasian, primarily middle class, mean age = 7.87 years, SD = .93), recruited from Wisconsin hospital birth records between 1989 and 2004. Cholesky, independent pathway, and common pathway models were fitted for mother-report, father-report, and in-home observation of temperament. Although findings support the use of negative emotionality, there were heritable aspects of anger and fear not explained by a common genetic factor, and shared environmental influences common to anger and sadness but not fear. Observed fear was independent from observed anger and sadness. Distinctions support specificity in measurement when considering implications for child development. PMID:26182850

  6. Anger, hostility, internalizing negative emotions, and intimate partner violence perpetration: A meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Birkley, Erica L; Eckhardt, Christopher I

    2015-04-01

    Prior reviews have identified elevated trait anger as a risk factor for intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. Given that 10 years have passed since the last comprehensive review of this literature, we provide an updated meta-analytic review examining associations among anger, hostility, internalizing negative emotions, and IPV for male and female perpetrators. One hundred and five effect sizes from 64 independent samples (61 studies) were included for analysis. IPV perpetration was moderately associated with the constructs of anger, hostility, and internalizing negative emotions. This association appeared stronger for those who perpetrated moderate to severe IPV compared to those who perpetrated low to moderate IPV, and did not vary across perpetrator sex, measurement method, relationship type, or perpetrator population. Implications and limitations of findings were reviewed in the context of theoretical models of IPV, and future directions for empirical and clinical endeavors were proposed.

  7. Exploring the psychological underpinnings of the moral mandate effect: motivated reasoning, group differentiation, or anger?

    PubMed

    Mullen, Elizabeth; Skitka, Linda J

    2006-04-01

    When people have strong moral convictions about outcomes, their judgments of both outcome and procedural fairness become driven more by whether outcomes support or oppose their moral mandates than by whether procedures are proper or improper (the moral mandate effect). Two studies tested 3 explanations for the moral mandate effect. In particular, people with moral mandates may (a) have a greater motivation to seek out procedural flaws when outcomes fail to support their moral point of view (the motivated reasoning hypothesis), (b) be influenced by in-group distributive biases as a result of identifying with parties that share rather than oppose their moral point of view (the group differentiation hypothesis), or (c) react with anger when outcomes are inconsistent with their moral point of view, which, in turn, colors perceptions of both outcomes and procedures (the anger hypothesis). Results support the anger hypothesis.

  8. Anger, Hostility, Internalizing Negative Emotions, and Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Birkley, Erica; Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Prior reviews have identified elevated trait anger as a risk factor for intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. Given that 10 years have passed since the last comprehensive review of this literature, we provide an updated meta-analytic review examining associations among anger, hostility, internalizing negative emotions, and IPV for male and female perpetrators. One hundred and five effect sizes from 64 independent samples (61 studies) were included for analysis. IPV perpetration was moderately associated with the constructs of anger, hostility, and internalizing negative emotions. This association appeared stronger for those who perpetrated moderate to severe IPV compared to those who perpetrated low to moderate IPV, and did not vary across perpetrator sex, measurement method, relationship type, or perpetrator population. Implications and limitations of findings were reviewed in the context of theoretical models of IPV, and future directions for empirical and clinical endeavors were proposed. PMID:25752947

  9. Exploring factors related to the anger superiority effect in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    May, T; Cornish, K; Rinehart, N J

    2016-07-01

    Despite face and emotion recognition deficits, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) appear to experience the anger superiority effect, where an angry face in a crowd is detected faster than a neutral face. This study extended past research to examine the impacts of ecologically valid photographic stimuli, gender and anxiety symptoms on the anger superiority effect in children with and without ASD. Participants were 81, 7-12year old children, 42 with ASD matched on age, gender and perceptual IQ to 39 typically developing (TYP) children. The photographic stimuli did not impact on task performance in ASD with both groups exhibiting the anger superiority effect. There were no gender differences and no associations with anxiety. Age was associated with the effect in the TYP but not ASD group. These findings confirm a robust effect of speeded detection of threat in ASD which does not appear to be confounded by gender or anxiety, but may have different underlying age-associated mechanisms.

  10. Aggression, anger and hostility: Evaluation of moral disengagement as a mediational process.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Garay, Fernando; Carrasco, Miguel A; Amor, Pedro J

    2016-04-01

    This study examines how the mechanisms underlying moral disengagement serve as a mediator between anger and hostility and physical and verbal aggression. The study was carried out on 424 participants (61.1% females), aged 15 to 25 years, assessing the direct and indirect effects of the distinct variables using a hierarchical multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling. The findings suggest that anger and hostility contribute independently and positively to physical and verbal aggression. Moreover, the relationships between anger, hostility, and aggression appear to be mediated by moral disengagement. Indeed, this process of mediation was invariant across sexes, and it tended to be stronger for physical--as opposed to verbal--aggression.

  11. Task difficulty moderates implicit fear and anger effects on effort-related cardiac response.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Mathieu; Silvestrini, Nicolas; Gendolla, Guido H E

    2016-03-01

    Based on the implicit-affect-primes-effort (IAPE) model (Gendolla, 2012, 2015), the present experiment tested whether objective task difficulty moderates the previously found impact of fear and anger primes on effort-related cardiac response during an arithmetic task. We expected that fear primes would lead to stronger cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) reactivity than anger primes in an easy task, but that anger primes would lead to a stronger PEP response than fear primes in a difficult task. Results corroborated these predictions. Moreover, there was no evidence that the affect primes induced conscious feelings that could explain the observed cardiac reactivity, suggesting that the primes had the intended implicit effect on effort mobilization. The findings contribute to the accumulating evidence in support of the IAPE model, showing that objective task difficulty is a moderator of implicit affect's influence on effort-related cardiac response.

  12. How does cognitive control reduce anger and aggression? The role of conflict monitoring and forgiveness processes.

    PubMed

    Wilkowski, Benjamin M; Robinson, Michael D; Troop-Gordon, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    It is well-established that superior cognitive control abilities are associated with lower levels of anger and aggression. However, the precise emotion regulation operations underlying this relationship have been underspecified and underexplored in previous research. Drawing on neuropsychological models of cognitive control, the authors propose that limited capacity resources can be recruited within a hostile situation to promote a process of forgiveness. The results of 2 studies supported this proposal. Across studies, individual differences in hostility-primed cognitive control were assessed implicitly. In Study 1, hostility-primed cognitive control predicted less aggressive behavior in response to a laboratory provocation. Moreover, forgiveness mediated these effects. In Study 2, hostility-primed cognitive control predicted forgiveness of provocations in participants' daily lives and subsequent reductions in anger. In sum, the results contribute to a systematic understanding of how cognitive control leads to lower levels of anger and aggression.

  13. Associations of Anger and Fear to Later Self-Regulation and Problem Behavior Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Nozadi, Sara S.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The mediating and moderating roles of self-regulation in the associations of dispositional anger and fear to later conduct and anxiety symptoms were tested. Mothers and teachers rated children’s anger and fear at 54 months (N = 191), and mothers reported on children’s symptoms of anxiety and conduct disorders at 72 and 84 months (Ns = 169 and 144). Children’s self-regulatory ability was assessed using the Tower of Hanoi task at 72 months. Children’s self-regulation mediated the association between early dispositional fear and 84-month mother-reported anxiety disorder symptoms above and beyond the effects of earlier generalized anxiety symptoms. Children’s anger directly predicted relatively high mother-reported conduct and anxiety disorder symptoms. Findings are discussed in terms of the importance of considering self-regulation as potential mechanism relating early childhood dispositional reactivity to later psychopathology symptoms. PMID:26089582

  14. Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Anger, Mood, and Vulnerability to Substance Use among Inpatient Substance-Dependent Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wei-Fen; Mack, David; Enright, Robert D.; Krahn, Dean; Baskin, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    Anger and related emotions have been identified as triggers in substance use. Forgiveness therapy (FT) targets anger, anxiety, and depression as foci of treatment. Fourteen patients with substance dependence from a local residential treatment facility were randomly assigned to and completed either 12 approximately twice-weekly sessions of…

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Short Anger Management Group for Special Education Teachers in Greece: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Tsiligiannis, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a psychoeducational group for Greek special education teachers, all but one of whom reported experiencing anger in class. An anger management program was designed, which included a short, four-session package to be given within two weeks. The results of a pretest-posttest comparison revealed reductions in…

  16. Lesson Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum within an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Emily L.; Carlson, John S.; Guthrie, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Four fourth-grade boys participated in an anger management group using "Seeing Red: An Anger Management and Peacemaking Curriculum for Kids" facilitated by a school psychology intern and her supervisor (J. Simmonds, 2003). The group met for 30 min weekly for a total of 14 sessions. Lessons consisted of practicing skills and strategies related to…

  17. The Relationship between the Recognition of Facial Expressions and Self-Reported Anger in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, Kate A.; Rose, John

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study aims to examine the relationship between how individuals with intellectual disabilities report their own levels of anger, and the ability of those individuals to recognize emotions. It was hypothesized that increased expression of anger would be linked to lower ability to recognize facial emotional expressions and increased…

  18. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  19. Effect of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention on Responses to Anger by Middle School Students with Chronic Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, T. Rowand; Smith, Stephen W.; Miller, M. David

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two middle school students with emotional/behavioral disorders placed in an alternative school were exposed to a cognitive-behavioral intervention which decreased the inappropriate external responses to anger and increased anger control as measured by student self-reports and teacher behavioral checklists. No effect was found for internal…

  20. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, R. A.; Donahue, C.; Visscher, T.; Montcalm, C.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and performance of a 157 mm×157 mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of <1.2 mm with distortion <0.5 mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1 mm3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low values of the refinement parameter Rw(F).

  1. Design and performance of a large area neutron sensitive anger camera

    DOE PAGES

    Visscher, Theodore; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Donahue, Jr., Cornelius; Riedel, Richard A.

    2015-05-21

    We describe the design and performance of a 157mm x 157mm two dimensional neutron detector. The detector uses the Anger principle to determine the position of neutrons. We have verified FWHM resolution of < 1.2mm with distortion < 0.5mm on over 50 installed Anger Cameras. The performance of the detector is limited by the light yield of the scintillator, and it is estimated that the resolution of the current detector could be doubled with a brighter scintillator. Data collected from small (<1mm3) single crystal reference samples at the single crystal instrument TOPAZ provide results with low Rw(F) values

  2. Getting mad but ending up sad: the mental health consequences for African Americans using anger to cope with racism.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Chavella T

    2011-01-01

    Anger is a common reaction to stressful life events. However, little is known about anger’s use and efficacy as a coping strategy for racism. Is anger a coping strategy for racism that improves mental health? Or does anger operate in an opposing way, deteriorating mental health? The analyses for this research focused on a probability sample of African Americans who reported experiences of acute (n = 246) or chronic (n = 120) racial discrimination in a survey interview. General linear model results revealed that using anger to cope with racial discrimination negatively affected the general well-being and psychological distress of African Americans. These findings raise concerns about the effectiveness (or lack therefore of) of anger as a common coping mechanism for racism, given the deleterious effects it may have on African Americans’ mental health.

  3. Chinese children's effortful control and dispositional anger/frustration: relations to parenting styles and children's social functioning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Wang, Yun; Reiser, Mark

    2004-05-01

    Relations among authoritative and authoritarian parenting styles, children's effortful control and dispositional anger/frustration, and children's social functioning were examined for 425 first and second graders (7-10 years old) in Beijing, China. Parents reported on parenting styles; parents and teachers rated children's effortful control, anger/frustration, externalizing problems, and socially appropriate behaviors: and peers rated aggression and leadership/sociability. High effortful control and low dispositional anger/frustration uniquely predicted Chinese children's high social functioning, and the relation of anger/frustration to social functioning was moderated by effortful control. Authoritarian parenting was associated with children's low effortful control and high dispositional anger/frustration, which (especially effortful control) mediated the negative relation between authoritarian parenting and children's social functioning. Effortful control weakly mediated the positive relation of authoritative parenting to social functioning.

  4. The Role of Anger Rumination and Autism Spectrum Disorder-Linked Perseveration in the Experience of Aggression in the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Fritz, Matthew S.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    This study (a) examined the role of anger rumination as a mediator of the relation between social anxiety and the experience of anger, hostility, and aggression, in the general population, and (b) evaluated the degree to which the presence of autism spectrum disorder characteristics moderates the indirect influence of anger rumination. We then…

  5. The Influence of Sex, Gender, Self-Discrepancies, and Self-Awareness on Anger and Verbal Aggressiveness among U.S. College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Terry A.; Smith, Brian A.; Donzella, Bonny

    2001-01-01

    Presents a study examining individual differences, such as sex, gender, self-discrepancies, and self awareness. Determined how the differences affect anger and verbal aggressiveness among a sample of U.S. college students (n=445). Reports that repressing anger is explained by masculinity and public self-awareness; while expressing anger is caused…

  6. US/Russian affirmation process of the Russian fissile material container design

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.E.; Nunley, S.M.; Chalfant, G.

    1998-05-10

    The US government agreed to provide the Russian Federation with containers to support the dismantlement of Russian nuclear weapons as part of the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction program. In February 1996, the ``affirmation`` of the Russian Fissile Material container design was completed. The ``affirmation`` process allowed a joint program between the Russian and US governments to proceed without the exchange of sensitive weapons specific information. The Russian Fissile Material container program is an integral part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction program wherein the US government provides assistance to the states of the Former Soviet Union for dismantlement of their nuclear stockpile. The Cooperative Threat Reduction program is managed by the US Defense Special Weapons Agency. Sandia National Laboratories was selected as the design agency and technical point of contact for the Russian Federation. The Department of Energy, which certifies containers for weapons shipments in the US, provided an independent assessment of the Sandia designed container to assure that it met the requirements of the August 31, 1993 AT-4OOR Container Requirements [Sandia National Laboratories, 1993] document which was agreed to by representatives of the US and Russian Federation. The ``affirmation`` process was undertaken in lieu of a certification process. This process was a formal review by the US Department of Energy of Sandia`s design and testing of the Russian Fissile Material container. The affirmation was intended to provide the Russian Federation with assurance that the container met the negotiated requirements including specific sections of IAEA Safety Series 6 [IAEA, 1985]. The process stopped short of a certification process that would have required weapons specific design information.

  7. Using SuperPILOT for Creating the Russian Characters Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamantova-Abbas, Vera

    1986-01-01

    Examines the possibility of creating the Russian character set using a "programerless" authoring language, SuperPILOT, which allows a teacher or a learner to produce and use the Russian alphabet with no programing skills. (Author/CB)

  8. Kurs po Stilistike Russkogo Jazyka (A Course on Russian Stylistics)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukanovich, E. P.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines basic goals, techniques, and materials for a college level course in Russian language stylistics. The use of literature readings, composition writing, stylistics levels of both spoken and written language, and synonym equivalence are discussed. (Text is in Russian.) (DH)

  9. Russian Soyuz Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle, which carried the first resident crew to the International Space Station, moves toward the launch pad at the Baikonur complex in Kazakhstan. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960' until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction for African-American Men through Health Empowerment and Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Torrance; Braithwaite, Harold; Johnson, Larry; Harris, Catrell; Katkowsky, Steven; Troutman, Adewale

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine impact of CVD risk reduction intervention for African-American men in the Atlanta Empowerment Zone (AEZ) designed to target anger management. Design: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test was employed as a non-parametric alternative to the t-test for independent samples. This test was employed because the data used in this analysis…

  11. Racial Discrimination-Induced Anger and Alcohol Use among Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Francis; Miller, Aletha R.; Foster, Kenneth; Watkins, C. Edward, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored whether a relationship exists between anger among Black adolescents that has been provoked by racial discrimination, and alcohol consumption. Participants consisted of 134 Black adolescents from 14 to 18 years of age, residing in northeast Texas. All participants were administered a questionnaire measuring whether and the…

  12. In search of the emotional face: anger versus happiness superiority in visual search.

    PubMed

    Savage, Ruth A; Lipp, Ottmar V; Craig, Belinda M; Becker, Stefanie I; Horstmann, Gernot

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has provided inconsistent results regarding visual search for emotional faces, yielding evidence for either anger superiority (i.e., more efficient search for angry faces) or happiness superiority effects (i.e., more efficient search for happy faces), suggesting that these results do not reflect on emotional expression, but on emotion (un-)related low-level perceptual features. The present study investigated possible factors mediating anger/happiness superiority effects; specifically search strategy (fixed vs. variable target search; Experiment 1), stimulus choice (Nimstim database vs. Ekman & Friesen database; Experiments 1 and 2), and emotional intensity (Experiment 3 and 3a). Angry faces were found faster than happy faces regardless of search strategy using faces from the Nimstim database (Experiment 1). By contrast, a happiness superiority effect was evident in Experiment 2 when using faces from the Ekman and Friesen database. Experiment 3 employed angry, happy, and exuberant expressions (Nimstim database) and yielded anger and happiness superiority effects, respectively, highlighting the importance of the choice of stimulus materials. Ratings of the stimulus materials collected in Experiment 3a indicate that differences in perceived emotional intensity, pleasantness, or arousal do not account for differences in search efficiency. Across three studies, the current investigation indicates that prior reports of anger or happiness superiority effects in visual search are likely to reflect on low-level visual features associated with the stimulus materials used, rather than on emotion.

  13. He drove forward with a yell: anger in medicine and Homer.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, A; Marshall, R; Levine, D

    2014-06-01

    We use Homer and Sun Tzu as a background to better understand and reformulate confrontation, anger and violence in medicine, contrasting an unproductive 'love of war' with a productive 'art of war' or 'art of strategy'. At first glance, it is a paradox that the healing art is not pacific, but riddled with militaristic language and practices. On closer inspection, we find good reasons for this cultural paradox yet regret its presence. Drawing on insights from Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey, we argue for better understanding of confrontation, anger, bullying, intimidation and violence in medicine in order to change the culture. For example, equating medicine with war is not a given condition of medicine but a convenient metaphor with historical origins and a historical trajectory. Other, non-martial metaphors, such as medicine as collaboration, may be more appropriate in an age of team-based care. Taking lessons from Homer, we suggest three key ways in which cold-hearted confrontation and anger in medicine can be transformed into productive, warm-hearted engagement: the transformation of angry impulse into (1) reflection, (2) moral courage and (3) empathy. Thinking with Homer can offer an aesthetically and morally charged alternative to the current body of literature on topics, such as anger in doctors, and how this may be 'managed', without recourse to an instrumental economy where emotions are viewed as commodities, and emotional responses can be 'trained' through communication skills courses. PMID:24194554

  14. The Relations among Observational, Physiological, and Self-Report Measures of Children's Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Julie A.; Parker, Elizabeth H.; Ramsden, Sally R.; Flanagan, Kelly D.; Relyea, Nicole; Dearing, Karen F.; Smithmyer, Catherine M.; Simons, Robert F.; Hyde, Christopher T.

    2004-01-01

    Our first goal was to examine the relations among observational, physiological, and self-report measures of children's anger. Our second goal was to investigate whether these relations varied by reactive or proactive aggression. Children (272 second-grade boys and girls) participated in a procedure in which they lost a game and prize to a…

  15. "I Am Not Angry in the Kindergarten!" Interruptive Anger as Democratic Participation in Norwegian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindheim, Liv Torunn

    2014-01-01

    This article calls into question the idyllic picture of Norwegian kindergartens where harmonious and joyful interaction is the preferred and normal way to participate. If taking children's right to democratic participation and freedom of expression seriously, anger can also be seen as a legitimate way of participating. Conflicts of interest,…

  16. Creating an art therapy anger management protocol for male inmates through a collaborative relationship.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Mary J; Tuomisto, Laura; Bouyea, Elizabeth; Gussak, David E; Aufderheide, Dean

    2012-10-01

    A training partnership was established with the Florida Department of Corrections in 2003, and over the ensuing years, art therapy graduate student interns from Florida State University's Graduate Art Therapy Program have been placed in local prisons at different times. Recently, the art therapy interns worked closely with the supervising psychologist in one prison to alleviate and redirect aggression by integrating cognitive-behavioral techniques with art therapy directives. The art therapy interns and the psychologist developed a curriculum using a combination of workbook exercises and art tasks to develop and increase the participants' anger management skills, the Art Therapy Anger Management Protocol. This article provides an overview of art therapy in prison, the cognitive-behavioral approach to anger management with prison inmates, and how art therapy was used to support this approach. Examples of completed art tasks designed to correspond with the workbook curriculum are presented. Overall, this article presents the successful collaboration between the psychologist and art therapists and demonstrates how they facilitated improvement in the participants' anger management skills through this program. PMID:21862527

  17. Scaffolding Young Children's Prosocial Responsiveness: Preschoolers' Responses to Adult Sadness, Anger, and Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; And Others

    Two studies investigated children's responsiveness to an adult's negative emotions (anger, sadness, and pain). The studies also evaluated effects of adult scaffolding (labeling and explaining negative emotions, and requesting help). In the first study, subjects were 55 preschool children between the ages of 33 and 56 months. During individual play…

  18. The Influence of Mother-Child Emotion Regulation Strategies on Children's Expression of Anger and Sadness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Silk, Jennifer S.; Morris, Michael D. S.; Steinberg, Laurence; Aucoin, Katherine J.; Keyes, Angela W.

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 153 children from preschool through second grade, relations between the use of emotion regulation strategy and children's expression of anger and sadness were coded during an observational task in which children were intentionally disappointed in the presence of the mother. Multilevel modeling was used to examine strategy use and…

  19. Maternal Socialization of Children's Anger, Sadness, and Physical Pain in Two Communities in Gujarat, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raval, Vaishali Vidhatri; Martini, Tanya Susan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recognition of cultural influences in child socialization, little is known about socialization of emotion in children from different cultures. This study examined (a) Gujarati Indian mothers' reports concerning their beliefs, affective and behavioral responses to their children's displays of anger, sadness, and physical pain, and (b)…

  20. Examining Anger as a Predictor of Drug Use among Multiethnic Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Mahadeo, Madhuvanti; Bryant, Kylie; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anger, a component of negative affect, has previously been associated with increased drug use primarily among white high school-aged students. However, few studies have examined these associations over time, and fewer have examined them among younger adolescents and students of color. Affective factors may play a greater role in drug…

  1. Doing Anger Differently: two controlled trials of percussion group psychotherapy for adolescent reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of 'Doing Anger Differently' (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1, but also followed up controls at 6 months. In study 1 (N = 54) the treatment resulted in lowered trait anger (Cohen's d = -1.3), aggression-reports (d = -1.0) and depression (d = -0.6), and increased self-esteem (d = 0.6), all maintained at six months. In study 2 (N = 65), aggression-reports fell to one fifth of pre-treatment levels at nine months follow-up (d = -1.2), with lowered trait anger (d = -0.4) and anger expression (d = -0.3) post-treatment.

  2. Seeing Red: Anger Increases How Much Republican Identification Predicts Partisan Attitudes and Perceived Polarization.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaela; Van Boven, Leaf; Park, Bernadette; Pizzi, William T

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of incidental anger on perceived and actual polarization between Democrats and Republicans in the context of two national tragedies, Hurricane Katrina (Study 1) and the mass shooting that targeted Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Arizona (Study 2). We hypothesized that because of its relevance to intergroup conflict, incidental anger exacerbates the political polarization effects of issue partisanship (the correlation between partisan identification and partisan attitudes), and, separately, the correlation between conservative partisan identification and perceived polarization between Democrats and Republicans. We further hypothesized that these effects would be strongest for Republican identification because Republican leaders were targets of public criticism in both tragedies and because conservative (Republican) ideology tends to be more sensitive to threat. In the studies, participants first completed an emotion induction procedure by recalling autobiographical events that made them angry (Studies 1 & 2), sad (Studies 1 & 2), or that involved recalling emotionally neutral events (Study 2). Participants later reported their attitudes regarding the two tragedies, their perceptions of the typical Democrat's and Republican's attitudes on those issues, and their identification with the Democratic and Republican parties. Compared with incidental sadness (Studies 1 and 2) and a neutral condition (Study 2), incidental anger exacerbated the associations between Republican identification and partisan attitudes, and, separately between Republican identification and perceived polarization between the attitudes of Democrats and Republicans. We discuss implications for anger's influence on political attitude formation and perceptions of group differences in political attitudes. PMID:26407321

  3. He drove forward with a yell: anger in medicine and Homer.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, A; Marshall, R; Levine, D

    2014-06-01

    We use Homer and Sun Tzu as a background to better understand and reformulate confrontation, anger and violence in medicine, contrasting an unproductive 'love of war' with a productive 'art of war' or 'art of strategy'. At first glance, it is a paradox that the healing art is not pacific, but riddled with militaristic language and practices. On closer inspection, we find good reasons for this cultural paradox yet regret its presence. Drawing on insights from Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey, we argue for better understanding of confrontation, anger, bullying, intimidation and violence in medicine in order to change the culture. For example, equating medicine with war is not a given condition of medicine but a convenient metaphor with historical origins and a historical trajectory. Other, non-martial metaphors, such as medicine as collaboration, may be more appropriate in an age of team-based care. Taking lessons from Homer, we suggest three key ways in which cold-hearted confrontation and anger in medicine can be transformed into productive, warm-hearted engagement: the transformation of angry impulse into (1) reflection, (2) moral courage and (3) empathy. Thinking with Homer can offer an aesthetically and morally charged alternative to the current body of literature on topics, such as anger in doctors, and how this may be 'managed', without recourse to an instrumental economy where emotions are viewed as commodities, and emotional responses can be 'trained' through communication skills courses.

  4. The Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (1994 Version) in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI, 1994 version) in Dutch violent forensic psychiatric patients and secondary vocational students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the subscale structure of the NAS was carried out, reliability was investigated, and relations were calculated between…

  5. Anger and Children's Socioemotional Development: Can Parenting Elicit a Positive Side to a Negative Emotion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razza, Rachel A.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of anger in infancy and its interaction with maternal warmth in predicting children's socioemotional development. Participants included a demographically diverse sample of 316 mothers and children from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) study. Infants were followed across 3 waves of data…

  6. Anger Expression Styles of Hearing Impaired Individuals Doing Sport and Those Not Doing Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the anger expression styles between the sportive hearing impaired individuals and the sedentary hearing impaired individuals. In the sportive hearing impaired group, there were 170 participants: 62 females and 108 males doing basketball, volleyball and football teams as licensed sportsmen in various clubs…

  7. State narcissism and aggression: The mediating roles of anger and hostile attributional bias.

    PubMed

    Li, Caina; Sun, Ying; Ho, Man Yee; You, Jin; Shaver, Phillip R; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-07-01

    Prior research has documented a relationship between narcissism and aggression but has focused only on dispositional narcissism without considering situational factors that may increase narcissism temporarily. This study explored the possibility that an increase in state narcissism would foster aggressive responding by increasing anger and hostile attributional bias following unexpected provocation among 162 college students from China. We created a guided-imagination manipulation to heighten narcissism and investigated its effects on anger, aroused hostile attribution bias, and aggressive responses following a provocation with a 2 (narcissism/neutral manipulation) × 2 (unexpected provocation/positive evaluation condition) between-subjects design. We found that the manipulation did increase self-reported state narcissism. The increase in state narcissism in turn heightened aggression, and this relation was mediated by increased anger. Regardless of the level of state narcissism, individuals were more aggressive after being provoked and this effect of provocation was mediated by hostile attributional bias. The findings indicate that narcissism can be temporarily heightened in a nonclinical sample of individuals, and that the effect of state narcissism on aggression is mediated by anger. Differences between state and trait narcissism and possible influences of culture are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:333-345, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Posttraumatic Anger, Recalled Peritraumatic Emotions, and PTSD in Victims of Violent Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunst, M. J. J.; Winkel, F. W.; Bogaerts, S.

    2011-01-01

    A mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design was employed to explore the association between posttraumatic anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; symptoms) in victims of civilian violence. It was speculated that this relationship is mainly due to concurrent recalled peritraumatic emotions. Such emotions may be interpreted to result from…

  9. Interpersonal Rejection Sensitivity in Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors: Mediator of Depressive Symptoms and Anger Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterek, Jane A.; Harb, Gerlinde C.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Marx, Brian P.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated whether interpersonal rejection sensitivity serves a mediating role between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and three long-term psychological correlates of CSA in adult female survivors: depressive symptoms, anger suppression, and attenuated emotional expression. Interpersonal rejection sensitivity has been shown to be a risk…

  10. Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Emotional Intelligence and Anger Expression Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin Baltaci, Hulya; Demir, Kamile

    2012-01-01

    In this study in which the pre-service classroom teachers' emotional intelligence and the ways of their anger expression styles were examined, correlational survey model was used. In total 342 students, 189 of whom were females and 153 of whom were males, constituted the participants of the research. The students are the first year and the senior…

  11. Anger among Allies: Audre Lorde's 1981 Keynote Admonishing the National Women's Studies Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lester C.

    2011-01-01

    This essay argues that Audre Lorde's 1981 keynote speech, "The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism," has much to contribute to communication scholars' understanding of human biases and rhetorical artistry. The significance of Lorde's subject is one reason for devoting critical attention to her speech, because, in contemporary public life in…

  12. Factor Structure of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5: Relationships Among Symptom Clusters, Anger, and Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Armour, Cherie; Contractor, Ateka; Shea, Tracie; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Scarce data are available regarding the dimensional structure of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and how factors relate to external constructs. We evaluated six competing models of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, including Anhedonia, Externalizing Behaviors, and Hybrid models, using confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 412 trauma-exposed college students. We then examined whether PTSD symptom clusters were differentially related to measures of anger and impulsivity using Wald chi-square tests. The seven-factor Hybrid model was deemed optimal compared with the alternatives. All symptom clusters were associated with anger; the strongest association was between externalizing behaviors and anger (r = 0.54). All symptom clusters, except re-experiencing and avoidance, were associated with impulsivity, with the strongest association between externalizing behaviors and impulsivity (r = 0.49). A seven-factor Hybrid model provides superior fit to DSM-5 PTSD symptom data, with the externalizing behaviors factor being most strongly related to anger and impulsivity.

  13. Effect of anger management education on mental health and aggression of prisoner women

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Elaheh; Mazaheri, Maryam Amidi; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: “Uncontrolled anger” threats the compatible and health of people as serious risk. The effects of weaknesses and shortcomings in the management of anger, from personal distress and destruction interpersonal relationships beyond and linked to the public health problems, lack of compromises, and aggressive behavior adverse outcomes. This study investigates the effects of anger management education on mental health and aggression of prisoner women in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: The single-group quasi-experimental (pretest, posttest) by prisoner women in the central prison of Isfahan was done. Multi-stage random sampling method was used. Initially, 165 women were selected randomly and completed the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire-28, and among these, those with scores >78 (the cut point) in aggression scale was selected and among them 70 were randomly selected. In the next step, interventions in four 90 min training sessions were conducted. Posttest was performed within 1-month after the intervention. Data were analyzed using SPSS-20 software. Results: Data analysis showed that anger management training was effective in reducing aggression (P < 0.001) and also had a positive effect on mental health (P < 0.001). Conclusion: According to the importance of aggression in consistency and individual and collective health and according to findings, presented educational programs on anger management is essential for female prisoners. PMID:27512697

  14. Denial of Anger/Denial of Self: Dealing with the Dilemmas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Ellen D.

    1998-01-01

    This essay explores the relationship between denial of anger and denial of self in light of two aspects of Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration--the levels of emotional development and the psychic overexcitabilities. It suggests that issues for gifted children are exacerbated by their emotional intensity and offers strategies to help…

  15. Creating an art therapy anger management protocol for male inmates through a collaborative relationship.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Mary J; Tuomisto, Laura; Bouyea, Elizabeth; Gussak, David E; Aufderheide, Dean

    2012-10-01

    A training partnership was established with the Florida Department of Corrections in 2003, and over the ensuing years, art therapy graduate student interns from Florida State University's Graduate Art Therapy Program have been placed in local prisons at different times. Recently, the art therapy interns worked closely with the supervising psychologist in one prison to alleviate and redirect aggression by integrating cognitive-behavioral techniques with art therapy directives. The art therapy interns and the psychologist developed a curriculum using a combination of workbook exercises and art tasks to develop and increase the participants' anger management skills, the Art Therapy Anger Management Protocol. This article provides an overview of art therapy in prison, the cognitive-behavioral approach to anger management with prison inmates, and how art therapy was used to support this approach. Examples of completed art tasks designed to correspond with the workbook curriculum are presented. Overall, this article presents the successful collaboration between the psychologist and art therapists and demonstrates how they facilitated improvement in the participants' anger management skills through this program.

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Men and Anger: Three Single Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of men with anger problems presents significant challenges for practitioners. This article discusses a cognitive-behavioral, individual therapy, approach within the framework of three single case studies involving men. Treatment challenges and methodology are presented. Key treatment issues included: establishing a therapeutic…

  17. The Role of Depressed Mood and Anger in the Relationship between Family Conflict and Delinquent Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigfusdottir, Inga-Dora; Farkas, George; Silver, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on R. Agnew's (Foundation for a general strain theory of crime and delinquency. Criminology 30: 47-87, 1992) general strain theory, this paper examines whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of family conflict on delinquency. We examine data on 7,758 students, 14-16 years old, attending the compulsory 9th and 10th grades of…

  18. Forgiveness and PTSD among veterans: the mediating role of anger and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Karaırmak, Özlem; Güloğlu, Berna

    2014-11-30

    Man-made traumatic events such as combat and terrorism may cause individuals to develop various forms of psychopathology, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. Veterans who engage in combat experienced negative emotions such as anger, hostility and aggression. Forgiveness may buffer these feelings and prevent the development of psychiatric problems, in that it is a way of decreasing negative feelings and increasing positive feelings. The aim of the current study was to examine the mediating role of anger and negative affect on the relationship between forgiveness and both PTSD and depression co-morbid to PTSD among Turkish veterans who were exposed to combat experience because of terrorist attacks during their compulsory military service. Two hundred and forty-seven injured veterans participated in this study. Veterans were assessed using the Traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist (TSSC), Heartland Forgiveness Scale (HFS), State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). A path analysis supported the hypothesized model that both anger and negative affect fully mediated the relationship between forgiveness and both PTSD and depression co-morbid to PTSD.

  19. A Service for Emotion Management: Turkish Version of the Adolescent Anger Rating Scale (AARS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, A. Esra; Sevincler-Togan, Seyhan

    2009-01-01

    An individual's activities are closely related with his/her communication abilities. One's awareness of his feelings and needs and to what extend he can control such feelings are the key factors which effect communication abilities. Webster (1996) defines anger as, "a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed…

  20. Indirect effects of smoking motives on adolescent anger dysregulation and smoking.

    PubMed

    Mischel, Emily R; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; Knapp, Ashley A; Bilsky, Sarah A; Ham, Lindsay; Lewis, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of disease and death in the United States, and smoking typically begins in adolescence. It is therefore important to understand factors that relate to increased risk for cigarette smoking during this stage of development. Adolescence is a period when emotion regulatory capacities are still emerging and a common affective state to be regulated is anger, which adult research has linked to nicotine use. Drawing from work suggesting that negative affect reduction motives are one of the most common reasons for cigarette smoking, the current study was designed to evaluate the indirect effects of negative affect reduction motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and nicotine use within a sample of 119 treatment-seeking adolescents enrolled in group-based residential therapy. Results were generally consistent with hypotheses, suggesting significant indirect effects of negative affect reduction smoking motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and smoking outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of negative affect reduction motives for cigarette use in the context of anger regulation among youths. PMID:25128636

  1. Violent and nonviolent girls: contrasting perceptions of anger experiences, school, and relationships.

    PubMed

    Smith, H; Thomas, S P

    2000-01-01

    Arrests of American girls for assault and weapons charges are rapidly increasing, at rates exceeding those for boys. Yet research on girls' violence is scant. We surveyed a national sample of 213 girls (ages 9-19) via personal interview or an Internet questionnaire, regarding anger precipitants and behaviors, interpersonal relationships, and experiences of discipline at home and school. Girls were categorized as violent (n = 54) if they had been suspended or expelled from school for fighting or bringing a weapon, or charged with a violent offense by the juvenile justice system. The remaining girls (n = 159) were categorized as nonviolent. The anger of violent girls tended to be intense and generalized, while the anger of nonviolent girls was precipitated by specific situations of injustice. Correlates of feeling angry enough to hit or hurt someone were loneliness, unfair treatment by adults, not liked by classmates, and somatic anger symptoms. Violent girls were significantly more likely to dislike school and perceive school discipline as unfair. Both groups of girls held negative views of television violence and curfews. Although girls with well-established patterns of aggression need psychotherapy, school-based interventions such as emotional literacy and violence prevention programs may also be helpful. Mental health nurses are well prepared to serve in a consultative role to schools, assisting in the development and delivery of violence prevention programming. PMID:11261077

  2. Indirect effects of smoking motives on adolescent anger dysregulation and smoking.

    PubMed

    Mischel, Emily R; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; Knapp, Ashley A; Bilsky, Sarah A; Ham, Lindsay; Lewis, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of disease and death in the United States, and smoking typically begins in adolescence. It is therefore important to understand factors that relate to increased risk for cigarette smoking during this stage of development. Adolescence is a period when emotion regulatory capacities are still emerging and a common affective state to be regulated is anger, which adult research has linked to nicotine use. Drawing from work suggesting that negative affect reduction motives are one of the most common reasons for cigarette smoking, the current study was designed to evaluate the indirect effects of negative affect reduction motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and nicotine use within a sample of 119 treatment-seeking adolescents enrolled in group-based residential therapy. Results were generally consistent with hypotheses, suggesting significant indirect effects of negative affect reduction smoking motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and smoking outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of negative affect reduction motives for cigarette use in the context of anger regulation among youths.

  3. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants' anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies.

  4. A school-based anger management program for developmentally and emotionally disabled high school students.

    PubMed

    Kellner, M H; Tutin, J

    1995-01-01

    Using Novaco's cognitive-behavioral conceptualization of anger, several practitioners developed cognitive-behavioral approaches for effectively intervening with aggressive youth. However, little attention has been paid to using these approaches with young people whose cognitive, emotional, and behavioral limitations appear to preclude them from benefiting from these interventions. A group program at a special school has demonstrated that older adolescents and young adults with diagnoses such as pervasive developmental delay, mental retardation, and autism can benefit from such a model if it is modified to meet their special learning needs. Through the use of daily logs, group reinforcement, role playing, skill building and relaxation techniques, normalizing anger, and providing liaison to classrooms, multiply handicapped students were able to learn the physiology, triggers, and consequences of anger as well as to develop coping strategies for managing their anger, while reducing aggressive acting out. Most of these students will enter protective work and residential settings in the future, and possessing these skills will facilitate their successful placement and increase the likelihood that some will succeed in entering some aspect of the adult mainstream. PMID:8588518

  5. Anger Management groups for adolescents: a mixed-methods study of efficacy and treatment preferences.

    PubMed

    Down, Richard; Willner, Paul; Watts, Louise; Griffiths, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of, and adolescents' preferences for, a Cognitive Behavioural (CBT) and Personal Development (PD) Anger Management (AM) group. The CBT group aimed to help adolescents develop skills to manage predominantly reactive aggression. The PD group aimed to enhance motivation to develop less aggressive identities with less use of proactive aggression. Eighteen adolescents were randomly allocated to a 10-session CBT or PD AM Group; seven additional adolescents formed a control group. They completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires to assess anger expression and control, use of AM coping skills (also completed by carers) and self-image. Participants were also interviewed pre- and post-intervention; transcripts were subjected to Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements in anger coping and self-esteem, relative to the control group. Participants' age was significantly correlated with self-image and anger control outcomes in the CBT group. Qualitative analysis identified factors associated with improved outcomes, particularly regarding participants' age, motivation and readiness to change, engagement in the therapeutic process, group dynamics and emotional expressiveness. Our ability to interpret data clinically was enhanced by the use of a mixed quantitative-qualitative methodology. The results help us to better match interventions to clients. PMID:20223794

  6. Helping Schoolchildren Cope with Anger: A Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jim; Lochman, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This guide presents information and clinical tools to implement the Anger Coping Program, an empirically supported intervention for students in grades 3-6. Practitioners are taken step by step through setting up treatment groups, teaching vital skills for reducing aggression and disruptive behavior, and building strong partnerships with teachers…

  7. Frontal Cortical Asymmetry May Partially Mediate the Influence of Social Power on Anger Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies. PMID:26869972

  8. A Multicomponent Treatment Package To Increase Anger Control in Teacher-Referred Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Heather A.; Fee, Virginia E.; Holloway, Keli S.; Giesen, J. Martin

    2003-01-01

    Investigates a treatment package for anger control in boys ages 7 to 10 using a control group outcome design. The treatment package included modeling, rehearsal with self-talk problem-solving, daily report cards and a praise phase. At post-test treatment participants were significantly higher than controls on the Aggression Control factor of the…

  9. Anger/Frustration, Task Persistence, and Conduct Problems in Childhood: A Behavioral Genetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.; Thompson, Lee A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Individual differences in conduct problems arise in part from proneness to anger/frustration and poor self-regulation of behavior. However, the genetic and environmental etiology of these connections is not known. Method: Using a twin design, we examined genetic and environmental covariation underlying the well-documented correlations…

  10. Seeing Red: Anger Increases How Much Republican Identification Predicts Partisan Attitudes and Perceived Polarization.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaela; Van Boven, Leaf; Park, Bernadette; Pizzi, William T

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of incidental anger on perceived and actual polarization between Democrats and Republicans in the context of two national tragedies, Hurricane Katrina (Study 1) and the mass shooting that targeted Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Arizona (Study 2). We hypothesized that because of its relevance to intergroup conflict, incidental anger exacerbates the political polarization effects of issue partisanship (the correlation between partisan identification and partisan attitudes), and, separately, the correlation between conservative partisan identification and perceived polarization between Democrats and Republicans. We further hypothesized that these effects would be strongest for Republican identification because Republican leaders were targets of public criticism in both tragedies and because conservative (Republican) ideology tends to be more sensitive to threat. In the studies, participants first completed an emotion induction procedure by recalling autobiographical events that made them angry (Studies 1 & 2), sad (Studies 1 & 2), or that involved recalling emotionally neutral events (Study 2). Participants later reported their attitudes regarding the two tragedies, their perceptions of the typical Democrat's and Republican's attitudes on those issues, and their identification with the Democratic and Republican parties. Compared with incidental sadness (Studies 1 and 2) and a neutral condition (Study 2), incidental anger exacerbated the associations between Republican identification and partisan attitudes, and, separately between Republican identification and perceived polarization between the attitudes of Democrats and Republicans. We discuss implications for anger's influence on political attitude formation and perceptions of group differences in political attitudes.

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Gifted Students' Coping with Anger and Decision Making Skills Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Evren; Deniz, Mehmet Engin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the scale concerning gifted children's' skills for making decisions and coping with anger and to examine the validity and reliability of the scale. A total of 324 students, which 151 were female and 173 were male, studying in 3 different Science and Arts Center's (BILSEM) in Istanbul during 2014-2015…

  12. Doing Anger Differently: Two Controlled Trials of Percussion Group Psychotherapy for Adolescent Reactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of "Doing Anger Differently" (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1,…

  13. The Effects of Anger Management on Children's Social and Emotional Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candelaria, Ashley M.; Fedewa, Alicia L.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of violent behaviors and bullying in schools continues to be a recognized problem among students and school personnel. The concern caused by these behaviors have led many schools to implement anger management and other impulse control based programs for at-risk students in an effort to prevent many of these incidences. This study…

  14. How the Use of Computer Types and Frequency Affects Adolescences towards Anger and Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagci, Emete; Caglar, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to research the relationship between use of computer types and frequency and anger and aggression in adolescents. The study was conducted among years 9, 10 and 11 students (secondary level) in 2008-2009 academic year. The general research tool for this study used was "Relationship research" model. The focal schools of this…

  15. Doing Anger Differently: two controlled trials of percussion group psychotherapy for adolescent reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of 'Doing Anger Differently' (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1, but also followed up controls at 6 months. In study 1 (N = 54) the treatment resulted in lowered trait anger (Cohen's d = -1.3), aggression-reports (d = -1.0) and depression (d = -0.6), and increased self-esteem (d = 0.6), all maintained at six months. In study 2 (N = 65), aggression-reports fell to one fifth of pre-treatment levels at nine months follow-up (d = -1.2), with lowered trait anger (d = -0.4) and anger expression (d = -0.3) post-treatment. PMID:22245455

  16. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  17. Respect-Based Control and Anger as Determinants of Children's Socio-Emotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awong, Tsasha; Grusec, Joan E.; Sorenson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Shortly after the birth of their infants, teenage working-class mothers were assessed on attitudes toward the need for deference to family authority (respect-based control) and anger. Their children's internalizing and externalizing problems and self-esteem were assessed approximately 12 years later. High respect-based control was linked to higher…

  18. Anticipated Coping with Interpersonal Stressors: Links with the Emotional Reactions of Sadness, Anger, and Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Skinner, Ellen A.; Morris, Helen; Thomas, Rae

    2013-01-01

    The same stressor can evoke different emotions across individuals, and emotions can prompt certain coping responses. Responding to four videotaped interpersonal stressors, adolescents ("N" = 230, the average values of "X"[subscript age] = 10 years) reported their sadness, fear "and" anger, and 12 coping strategies.…

  19. Examination of Anxiety Levels and Anger Expression Manners of Undergraduate Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Tamer; Türkçapar, Ünal

    2016-01-01

    This research was done for the determination of how their anxiety levels' and anger expressions' get shaped according to some variances. For this reason there were 76 female 125 male totally 201 sportsmen, who participated to the table tennis championship between universities in 2016 and ages differ from 18 to 28, were included the research group.…

  20. Anger and Irritability Symptoms among Youth with ODD: Cross-Informant versus Source-Exclusive Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2012-01-01

    We examined differences in co-occurring psychological symptoms and background characteristics among clinically referred youth with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) with and without anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) according to either parent or teacher (source-exclusive) and both informants (cross-informant), youth with noncompliant symptoms…

  1. Teachers' Language: L1 Attrition in Russian-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isurin, Ludmila

    2007-01-01

    The present study reports on the evidence of first language (L1) attrition in a population that may appear to be the most resistant to L1 changes. Russian monolinguals (n=3) and Russian-English bilinguals (n=10) participated in the study. The bilinguals were graduate students teaching Russian as a foreign language at a U.S. university. The data…

  2. Assessing grooming behavior of Russian honey bees toward Varroa destructor.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The grooming behavior of Russian bees was compared to Italian bees. Overall, Russian bees had significantly lower numbers of mites than the Italian bees with a mean of 1,937 ± 366 and 5,088 ± 733 mites, respectively. This low mite population in the Russian colonies was probably due to the increased ...

  3. Russian Civic Education and Social Studies Education at Purdue University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lynn R.; Rapoport, Anatoli

    2005-01-01

    There are three distinct Russian civic education programs at Purdue University (the Civics Mosaic program, the Training of Professors for Civic Education program, and the Russian Maymester program). The programs are loosely joined together by a civic education purpose, but remain distinct in the nature of their participants--Russian and American…

  4. Neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions.

    PubMed

    Gilam, Gadi; Lin, Tamar; Raz, Gal; Azrielant, Shir; Fruchter, Eyal; Ariely, Dan; Hendler, Talma

    2015-10-15

    In managing our way through interpersonal conflict, anger might be crucial in determining whether the dispute escalates to aggressive behaviors or resolves cooperatively. The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a social decision-making paradigm that provides a framework for studying interpersonal conflict over division of monetary resources. Unfair monetary UG-offers elicit anger and while accepting them engages regulatory processes, rejecting them is regarded as an aggressive retribution. Ventro-medial prefrontal-cortex (vmPFC) activity has been shown to relate to idiosyncratic tendencies in accepting unfair offers possibly through its role in emotion regulation. Nevertheless, standard UG paradigms lack fundamental aspects of real-life social interactions in which one reacts to other people in a response contingent fashion. To uncover the neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions, we incorporated on-line verbal negotiations with an obnoxious partner in a repeated-UG during fMRI scanning. We hypothesized that vmPFC activity will differentiate between individuals with high or low monetary gains accumulated throughout the game and reflect a divergence in the associated emotional experience. We found that as individuals gained more money, they reported less anger but also more positive feelings and had slower sympathetic response. In addition, high-gain individuals had increased vmPFC activity, but also decreased brainstem activity, which possibly reflected the locus coeruleus. During the more angering unfair offers, these individuals had increased dorsal-posterior Insula (dpI) activity which functionally coupled to the medial-thalamus (mT). Finally, both vmPFC activity and dpI-mT connectivity contributed to increased gain, possibly by modulating the ongoing subjective emotional experience. These ecologically valid findings point towards a neural mechanism that might nurture pro-social interactions by

  5. Developmental changes in anger expression and attention focus: Learning to wait

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Pamela M.; Tan, Patricia Z.; Hall, Sarah E.; Zhang, Yiyun; Crnic, Keith A.; Blair, Clancy B.; Li, Runze

    2011-01-01

    Being able to wait is an essential part of self-regulation. The present study examined the developmental course of changes in the latency to and duration of target waiting behaviors by following 65 boys and 55 girls from rural and semi-rural economically strained homes from ages 18 to 48 months. Age-related changes in latency to and duration of children’s anger expressions and attention focus (e.g., self-initiated distraction) during an eight minute wait for a gift were found. On average, at 18 and 24 months of age, children were quick to react angrily and slower to shift attention away from the desired object than they were at later ages. Over time, children were quicker to distract themselves. By 36 months, distractions occurred before children expressed anger, and anger expressions were briefer. At 48 months, children typically made a quick bid to mother about demands of waiting before distracting themselves; on average, they did not appear angry until the latter half of the wait. Unexpectedly, children bid to their mothers as much at age 48 months as they had at 18 months; however bids became less angry as children got older. Developmental changes in distraction and bidding predicted age-related changes in the latency to anger. Findings are discussed in terms of the neurocognitive control of attention around age 30 months, the limitations of children’s self-regulatory efforts at age 48 months, and the importance of fostering children’s ability to forestall, as well as modulate, anger. PMID:21639619

  6. Evaluation of the dimensions of anger reactions-5 (DAR-5) scale in combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Forbes, David; Alkemade, Nathan; Hopcraft, Dale; Hawthorne, Graeme; O'Halloran, Paul; Elhai, Jon D; McHugh, Tony; Bates, Glen; Novaco, Raymond W; Bryant, Richard; Lewis, Virginia

    2014-12-01

    After a traumatic event many people experience problems with anger which not only results in significant distress, but can also impede recovery. As such, there is value to include the assessment of anger in routine post-trauma screening procedures. The Dimensions of Anger Reactions-5 (DAR-5), as a concise measure of anger, was designed to meet such a need, its brevity minimizing the burden on client and practitioner. This study examined the psychometric properties of the DAR-5 with a sample of 163 male veterans diagnosed with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. The DAR-5 demonstrated internal reliability (α=.86), along with convergent, concurrent and discriminant validity against a variety of established measures (e.g., HADS, PCL, STAXI). Support for the clinical cut-point score of 12 suggested by Forbes et al. (2014, Utility of the dimensions of anger reactions-5 (DAR-5) scale as a brief anger measure. Depression and Anxiety, 31, 166-173) was observed. The results support considering the DAR-5 as a preferred screening and assessment measure of problematic anger.

  7. High Immunoglobulin A Levels Mediate the Association Between High Anger Expression and Low Somatic Symptoms in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, A; Lila, M; Vitoria-Estruch, S; Moya-Albiol, L

    2016-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that anger expression may be associated with increased salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels, which is associated with decreased somatic symptoms, and therefore anger expression may be associated with reduced somatic symptoms in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators. This study tested the potential mediating effect of sIgA levels on the relationship between anger expression and respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms in IPV perpetrators and non-violent controls. The sample consisted of IPV perpetrators (n = 19) and controls (n = 21). Saliva samples were collected for assessing sIgA levels. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 was used to assess anger expression and the Revised version of the Somatic Symptoms Scale developed by Sandín and Chorot to measure somatic symptoms. High anger expression was associated with low levels of respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms in IPV perpetrators mediated through high sIgA levels but the same was not true for non-violent controls. This finding supports the hypothesis that for IPV perpetrators, anger expression may be physiologically and psychologically rewarding. Future research examining other immunological parameters is needed to further test this hypothesis. Such effort may illuminate why some IPV perpetrators continue to use violence against their partners.

  8. Prevalence and correlates of explosive anger among pregnant and post-partum women in post-conflict Timor-Leste

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Susan; Tam, Natalino; Mohsin, Mohammed; Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Tol, Wietse

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about explosive anger as a response pattern among pregnant and post-partum women in conflict-affected societies. Aims To investigate the prevalence and correlates of explosive anger among this population in Timor-Leste. Method We assessed traumatic events, intimate partner violence, an index of adversity, explosive anger, psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder among 427 women (257 in the second trimester of pregnancy, 170 who were 3–6 months post-partum) residing in two districts of Timor-Leste (response >99%). Results Two-fifths (43.6%) had explosive anger. Levels of functional impairment were related to frequency of explosive anger episodes. Explosive anger was associated with age (>35 years), being married, low levels of education, being employed, traumatic event count, ongoing adversity and intimate partner violence. Conclusions A combination of social programmes and novel psychological therapies may assist in reducing severe anger among pregnant and post-partum women in conflict-affected countries such as Timor-Leste. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703721

  9. One angry woman: Anger expression increases influence for men, but decreases influence for women, during group deliberation.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Jessica M; Peter-Hagene, Liana C

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether expressing anger increases social influence for men, but diminishes social influence for women, during group deliberation. In a deception paradigm, participants believed they were engaged in a computer-mediated mock jury deliberation about a murder case. In actuality, the interaction was scripted. The script included 5 other mock jurors who provided verdicts and comments in support of the verdicts; 4 agreed with the participant and 1 was a "holdout" dissenter. Holdouts expressed their opinions with no emotion, anger, or fear and had either male or female names. Holdouts exerted no influence on participants' opinions when they expressed no emotion or fear. Participants' confidence in their own verdict dropped significantly, however, after male holdouts expressed anger. Yet, anger expression undermined female holdouts: Participants became significantly more confident in their original verdicts after female holdouts expressed anger-even though they were expressing the exact same opinion and emotion as the male holdouts. Mediation analyses revealed that participants drew different inferences from male versus female anger, which created a gender gap in influence during group deliberation. The current study has implications for group decisions in general, and jury deliberations in particular, by suggesting that expressing anger might lead men to gain influence, but women to lose influence over others (even when making identical arguments). These diverging consequences might result in women potentially having less influence on societally important decisions than men, such as jury verdicts.

  10. Child anger proneness moderates associations between child-mother attachment security and child behavior with mothers at 33 months.

    PubMed

    McElwain, Nancy L; Holland, Ashley S; Engle, Jennifer M; Wong, Maria S

    2012-02-01

    Child-mother attachment security, assessed via a modified Strange Situation procedure (Cassidy & Marvin, with the MacArthur Attachment Working Group, 1992), and parent-reported child proneness to anger were examined as correlates of observed child behavior toward mothers during a series of interactive tasks (N = 120, 60 girls). Controlling for maternal sensitivity and child gender and expressive language ability, greater attachment security, and lower levels of anger proneness were related to more child responsiveness to maternal requests and suggestions during play and snack sessions. As hypothesized, anger proneness also moderated several security-behavior associations. Greater attachment security was related to (a) more committed compliance during clean-up and snack-delay tasks for children high on anger proneness, (b) more self-assertiveness during play and snack for children moderate or high on anger proneness, and (c) more help-seeking during play and snack for children moderate or low on anger proneness. Findings further our understanding of the behavioral correlates of child-mother attachment security assessed during late toddlerhood via the Cassidy-Marvin system and underscore child anger proneness as a moderator of attachment-related differences in child behavior during this developmental period. PMID:22182337

  11. Impaired recognition of facial expressions of anger in Parkinson's disease patients acutely withdrawn from dopamine replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Andrew D; Goerendt, Ines K; Brooks, David J

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that acute dopaminergic blockade in healthy volunteers results in a transient disruption of the recognition of facial expressions of anger, whilst leaving intact the recognition of other facial expressions (including fear and disgust) and facial identity processing. Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by cell loss in dopaminergic neuronal populations, and hence we predicted that PD would be associated with impaired anger recognition. We reasoned that treatment with dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) could mask any deficit present in PD, and therefore studied facial expression recognition in a group of PD patients transiently withdrawn from DRT. Seventeen PD patients were compared to 21 age- and IQ-matched controls on the Ekman 60 task, which required the forced-choice labelling of 10 exemplars of each of six facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, sadness, happiness, surprise). In line with our predictions, PD patients showed a selective impairment in the recognition of facial expressions of anger. This deficit was not related to the PD patients' performance on the Benton unfamiliar-face matching task, which was normal, nor was the deficit related to overall disease severity, or to depression symptoms. However, as predicted by simulation theories, impaired anger recognition in PD was related to reduced levels of the anger-linked temperament trait, exploratory excitability. The results extend our previous findings of a role for dopamine in the processing of facial expressions of anger, and demonstrate the power of adopting a phylogenetic, comparative perspective on emotions. PMID:16780901

  12. Russian Higher Education: Who Can Afford It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gounko, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The article explores the issue of access and equity in the Russian higher education system by examining recent government initiatives. While recently introduced measures such as the Unified State Examination and student loan project are designed to aid students and expand participation, they alone cannot ensure equitable access to higher education…

  13. The Impact of Globalization on Russian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinagatullin Birsk, Ilghiz M.

    2003-01-01

    The notion of globalization, which Andrutchenko (2001) defines as a "consequence of the development of human civilization," and the way it is related to the issues of education are being discussed widely today among Russian educational and scientific circles, education policymakers, scholars, educators, as well as school and university students.…

  14. Ethnicity and Culture in Russian Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dmitriyev, G. D.

    This paper presents a brief overview of education in the Soviet Union during the Marxist era and states that one result of the Communist system collapse in 1991 was that it became imperative to democratize Russian society and schooling. The paper notes the need to reevaluate the legacy of "international upbringing" along the line of true humanism,…

  15. Decomposition of Prefixed Words in Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanina, Nina

    2011-01-01

    I examined the nature of morphological decomposition in a series of masked-priming experiments with Russian prefixed nouns. In Experiments 1A and 1B, I tested 3 types of prime-target pairs in which the prime was a morphologically simple word, and a facilitation was found when the prime and the target were truly morphologically related (e.g.,…

  16. On the Reform of Russian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mironov, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    The "modernization" of Russian education is linked to the functioning of the entire social system of Russia, and reforms are proving difficult and contradictory. The use of the Unified State Examination in Russia, plus participation in the Bologna process, is causing concern about the ability of education to meet the needs of the…

  17. N-person quantum Russian roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraçkiewicz, Piotr; Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.

    2014-05-01

    We generalize the concept of quantum Russian roulette introduced in Schmidt and da Silva (2013). Our model coincides with the previous one in the case of the game with two players and gives the suitable quantum description for any finite number of players. As an example, we provide a detailed study of the three and four-person case.

  18. A Hierarchy of Russian Writing Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengramt, Sandra F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines the implications of the ACTFL Provisional Proficiency Guidelines for the writing curriculum. Argues that the functions identified in the guidelines should be practices in writing as well as in speech. Discusses error correction techniques and presents examples of writing assignments in Russian that elicit advanced-level functions. (SED)

  19. Word Order in Russian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmelman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the results of an investigation of word order in Russian Sign Language (RSL) are presented. A small corpus of narratives based on comic strips by nine native signers was analyzed and a picture-description experiment (based on Volterra et al. 1984) was conducted with six native signers. The results are the following: the most frequent…

  20. The New Generation Russian VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Andrey; Ipatov, Alexander; Smolentsev, Sergey; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Fedotov, Leonid; Surkis, Igor; Ivanov, Dmitrij; Gayazov, Iskander

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a new project of the Russian VLBI Network dedicated for Universal Time determinations in quasi on-line mode. The basic principles of the network design and location of antennas are explained. Variants of constructing receiving devices, digital data acquisition system, and phase calibration system are specially considered. The frequency ranges and expected values of noise temperature are given.