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Sample records for russian reactor pressure

  1. Microstructural investigations on Russian reactor pressure vessel steels by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, A.; Boehmert, J.; Strunz, P.; Dewhurst, C.; Mathon, M.-H.

    The effect of radiation embrittlement has a high safety significance for Russian VVER reactor pressure vessel steels. Heats of base and weld metals of the as-received state, irradiated state and post-irradiation annealed state were investigated using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to obtain insight about the microstructural features caused by fast neutron irradiation. The SANS intensities increase in the momentum transfer range between 0.8 and 3 nm-1 for all the material compositions in the irradiated state. The size distribution function of the irradiation-induced defect clusters has a pronounced maximum at 1 nm in radius. Their content varies between 0.1 and 0.7 vol.% dependent on material composition and increases with the neutron fluence. The comparison of nuclear and magnetic scattering indicates that the defects differ in their composition. Thermal annealing reduces the volume fraction of irradiation defect clusters.

  2. Exploratory Study of Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chernobaeva, A.A., Kryukov, A.M., Nikolaev, Y.A., Korolev, Y.N. , Sokolov, M.A., Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The working group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible), and test two materials of the other; so far, only charpy impact and tensile specimens have been included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ornl) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 AND VVER-1000 RPVS, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation,annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) program weld 73w. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. the ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 X 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV).

  3. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-06-16

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at {approximately}290 C and annealing treatments were conducted

  4. Retrofit Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, W.

    1993-04-01

    A likely source for enriched uranium for production of a gun-type bomb might be a research reactor. A state or terrorist organization would find the technical process for separating uranium from the reactor fuel plates is simple and well-published. An unguarded research reactor could be found in the former Soviet Union. Russia and the former republics have seen an increasing number of terrorist incidents, including hijackings and bombings. Recognizing the danger, Russia and the U.S. have explored means of safeguarding former Soviet weapons materials. This article describes some of the plans to reduce the risk of nuclear materials being obtained for illicit weapons production.

  5. Launch of Russian reactor postponed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-05

    Astronomers and weapons scientists seemed heated on a collision course a few months ago over the military's plans to send a Russian nuclear reactor into space. But an agreement reached in late January has prevented a pile-up, at least for 6 months. The astronomers, led by Donald Lamb of the University of Chicago, were objecting to plans by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) to launch Topaz 2, an experimental Russian nuclear reactor, arguing that rogue particles from it might ruin sensitive gamma ray experiments. The reactor is designed to propel itself in space with a jet of xenon ions. One worry was that leaking gamma rays and positrons, which can travel in the earth's magnetic field and pop up in the darndest places, might cause false signals in gamma ray monitors (Science, 18 December 1992, p. 1878). The worry has abated now that SDI officials will postpone choosing a rocket and mission altitutde for Topaz 2 for 6 months, while experts study how its emissions at various altitudes might affect instruments aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory and other satellites. In effect, the SDIO has agreed to an environmental impact study for space, following an unusual meeting organized by former Russian space official Roald Sagdeev at the University of Maryland on 19 January. There the Russian designers of Topaz 2, its new owners at the SDIO, and critics in the astronomy community achieved common ground: that more study was needed.

  6. Russian RBMK reactor design information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

  7. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, G.F.; Schmidt, G.L.; Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-08-01

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

  8. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  9. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  10. Russian Missile Technology and Nuclear Reactor Transfers to Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-29

    Kraftwerk Union (KWU) to build two large pressurized water reactors ( PWRs ) at Bushehr, near Kharg Island. At one point 10,000 workers were reported at...Russian- designed PWR on the site instead. Why Is Oil-Rich Iran Building Nuclear Power Plants? At the time the Shah’s government first started a nuclear...focused primarily on the power plant itself. It is not expected that Iran would divert weapons material from the Bushehr PWR . If Iran has a program to

  11. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

    1994-10-04

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

  12. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  13. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  14. Evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel steels by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, V.; Hein, H.; Sojak, S.; Simeg Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Sabelová, V.; Pavúk, M.; Hinca, R.; Stacho, M.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of commercially used German and Russian reactor pressure vessel steels from the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) point of view, having in mind knowledge obtained also from other techniques from the last decades. The second generation of Russian RPV steels seems to be fully comparable with German steels and their quality allows prolongation of NPP operating lifetime over projected 40 years. The embrittlement of CrMoV steels is relatively low due to effect of higher temperature which implies partial in situ annealing of primary microstructural point defects and therefore delays the degradation processes caused by neutron irradiation.

  15. Windowless High-Pressure Solar Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Obscuration by reaction products eliminated. Chemical reactor heated by Sunlight employs rocket technology to maintain internal pressure. Instead of keeping chamber tightly closed, pressure maintained by momentum balance between incoming and outgoing materials. Windowless solar reactor admits concentrated Sunlight through exhaust aperture. Pressure in reactor maintained dynamically.

  16. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  17. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  18. A comparative risk assessment for the Russian V213 power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.D.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Honey, J.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1996-04-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment methodology is applied to generate an evaluation of the relative likelihood of safe recovery following selected pressurized water reactor (PWR) design basis accidents for a Russian V213 nuclear power reactor. US-designed PWRs similar to the V213 are used for reference and comparison. This V213 risk assessment is based on comparison analyses of the following aspects: accident progression event tree success paths for typical PWR accident initiating events, safety aspects in reactor design, and perceived performance of reactor safety systems. The four initiating events considered here are: loss of offsite power with station blackout, large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), medium-break LOCA, and small-break LOCA. The success probabilities for the V213 reaching a non-core-damage state after the onset of the selected initiating events are calculated for two scenarios: (a) using actual component reliability data from US PWRs and (b) assuming common component reliability data. US PWR component reliability data are used based of the unavailability of such data for the V213 at the time of the analyses. While the use of US PWR data in this risk assessment of the V213 does strongly infer V213 comparability to US plants, the risk assessment using common component reliability does not have such a stringent limitation and is thus a separate scoping assessment of the V213 engineered safety systems. The results of the analyses suggest that the V213 has certain design features that significantly improve the reactor`s safety margin for the selected initiating events and that the V213 design has a relative risk of core damage for selected initiating events that is at least comparable to US PWRs. It is important to realize that these analyses are of a scoping nature and may be significantly influenced by important risk factors such as V213 operator training, quality control, and maintenance procedures.

  19. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  20. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP

    DOEpatents

    Puechl, K.H.

    1963-09-24

    A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

  1. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J.; Bocharov, A.

    1993-09-30

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  2. Utilizing a Russian Space Nuclear Reactor for a United States Space Mission: Systems Integration Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Edward; Schaefer, Edward; Polansky, Gary; Lacy, Jeff; Bocharov, Anatoly

    1994-07-01

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a U.S. spacecraft. One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons learned regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  3. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a US space mission: Systems integration issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J.; Bocharov, A.

    1993-09-01

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft. One component is the Topaz 2 Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz 2 reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz 2 was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz 2, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons learned regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  4. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  5. Pressurized water reactor flow skirt apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kielb, John F.; Schwirian, Richard E.; Lee, Naugab E.; Forsyth, David R.

    2016-04-05

    A pressurized water reactor vessel having a flow skirt formed from a perforated cylinder structure supported in the lower reactor vessel head at the outlet of the downcomer annulus, that channels the coolant flow through flow holes in the wall of the cylinder structure. The flow skirt is supported at a plurality of circumferentially spaced locations on the lower reactor vessel head that are not equally spaced or vertically aligned with the core barrel attachment points, and the flow skirt employs a unique arrangement of hole patterns that assure a substantially balanced pressure and flow of the coolant over the entire underside of the lower core support plate.

  6. Lithium Ceramic Blankets for Russian Fusion Reactors and Influence of Breeding Operation Mode on Parameters of Reactor Tritium Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapyshev, Victor K.; Chernetsov, Mikhail Yu.; Zhevotov, Sergej I.; Kersnovskij, Alexandr Yu.; Kolbasov, Boris N.; Kovalenko, Victor G.; Paltusov, Nikolaj P.; Sernyaev, Georgeij A.; Sterebkov, Juri S.; Zyryanov, Alexej P.

    2005-07-15

    Russian controlled fusion program supposes development of a DEMO reactor design and participation in ITER Project. A solid breeder blanket of DEMO contains a ceramic lithium orthosilicate breeder and a beryllium multiplier. Test modules of the blanket are developed within the scope of ITER activities. Experimental models of module tritium breeding zones (TBZ), materials and fabrication technology of the TBZ, tritium reactor systems to analyse and process gas released from lithium ceramics are being developed. Two models of tritium breeding and neutron multiplying elements of the TBZ have been designed, manufactured and tested in IVV-2M nuclear reactor. Initial results of the in-pile experiments and outcome of lithium ceramics irradiation in a water-graphite nuclear reactor are considered to be a data base for development of the test modules and initial requirements for DEMO tritium system design. Influence of the tritium release parameters and hydrogen concentration in a purge gas on parameters of reactor system are discussed.

  7. Excerpt from {open_quotes}Summary of Near-Term Options for Russian Plutonium-Production Reactors{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    The Russian Federation desires to stop producing weapons-grade plutonium. During the last several years, ten graphite-moderated, water-cooled, production reactors have been shut down. However, complete cessation of weapons-grade plutonium production is impeded by the fact that the last three operating Russian plutonium-production reactors supply electrical energy and district heat as well as produce plutonium. These reactors are major suppliers of heat in the Tomsk and Krasnoyarsk regions of Siberia.

  8. Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

    2008-07-01

    On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

  9. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  10. 98. ARAIII. ML1 reactor pressure vessel is lowered into reactor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. ARA-III. ML-1 reactor pressure vessel is lowered into reactor pit by hoist. July 13, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4049. Photographer: Lowin. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Pressure vessel calculations for VVER-440 reactors.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G; Hegyi, Gy; Keresztúri, A; Maráczy, Cs; Temesvári, E; Vértes, P; Zsolnay, E

    2005-01-01

    For the determination of the fast neutron load of the reactor pressure vessel a mixed calculational procedure was developed. The procedure was applied to the Unit II of Paks NPP, Hungary. The neutron source on the outer surfaces of the reactor was determined by a core design code, and the neutron transport calculations outside the core were performed by the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The reaction rate in the activation detectors at surveillance positions and at the cavity were calculated and compared with measurements. In most cases, fairly good agreement was found.

  12. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  13. In-reactor performance of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, D. K.; Coleman, C. E.; Griffiths, M.; Bickel, G. A.; Theaker, J. R.; Muir, I.; Bahurmuz, A. A.; Lawrence, S. St.; Resta Levi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The pressure tubes in CANDU reactors have been operating for times up to about 25 years. The in-reactor performance of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes has been evaluated by sampling and periodic inspection. This paper describes the behaviour and discusses the factors controlling the behaviour of these components in currently operating CANDU reactors. The mechanical properties (such as ultimate tensile strength, UTS, and fracture toughness), and delayed-hydride-cracking properties (crack growth rate Vc, and threshold stress intensity factor, KIH) change with irradiation; the former reach a limiting value at a fluence of <1 × 10 25 n m -2, while Vc and KIH reach a steady-state condition after a fluence of about 3 × 10 25 n m -2 and 3 × 10 24 n m -2, respectively. At saturation the UTS is raised by about 200 MPa, toughness is reduced to about 40% of its initial value, Vc increases by about a factor of ten while KIH is only slightly reduced. The role of microstructure and trace elements in these behaviours is described. Pressure tubes exhibit elongation and diametral expansion. The deformation behaviour is a function of operating conditions and material properties that vary from tube-to-tube and as a function of axial location. Semi-empirical predictive models have been developed to describe the deformation response of average tubes as a function of operating conditions. For corrosion and, more importantly deuterium pickup, semi-empirical predictive models have also been developed to represent the behaviour of an average tube. The effect of material variability on corrosion behaviour is less well defined compared with other properties. Improvements in manufacturing have increased fracture resistance by minimising trace elements, especially H and Cl, and reduced variability by tightening controls on forming parameters, especially hot-working temperatures.

  14. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  15. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lipinski, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  16. Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y.; Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V.

    2008-07-15

    One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

  17. Reactor pressure vessel annealing -- Effective mitigation method

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.

    1996-09-01

    Reactor pressure vessels of old generation were mostly manufactured from materials with high content of impurities which results in high increase in irradiation embrittlement values. Standard mitigation methods for decrease this damage--application of low-leakage core or dummy elements insertion--are inefficient if applied during the reactor operation. Thermal annealing of reactor pressure vessels has been shown as a very effective method for restoration of initial material properties in a high extent. Even though annealing process is not fully understood from the microstructural changes point of view, results from the testing were so promising that many annealing of WWER RPVs were performed. Nevertheless, some problems still remains, connected mainly with monitoring of the extent of annealing restoration as well as with re-embrittlement rate after such a properties restoration. Experience with WWER-440 RPVs is discussed, mainly because of the austenitic cladding existence. Cladding does not allow to take templates from the inner RPV surface and it is damaged during operation, as well. At the same time, no monitoring of cladding behavior during operation was planned within surveillance programs. Problems connected with material behavior monitoring after annealing as well as during further operation (re-embrittlement rate) are discussed together with the assessment of inaccuracies and possible solutions.

  18. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  19. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  20. Structure and creep of Russian reactor steels with a BCC structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Kochetkova, T. N.; Kataeva, N. V.; Kozlov, K. A.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Vil'danova, N. F.; Ageev, V. S.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M. V.; Nikitina, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The structural phase transformations have been revealed and the characteristics of the creep and long-term strength at 650, 670, and 700°C and 60-140 MPa have been determined in six Russian reactor steels with a bcc structure after quenching and high-temperature tempering. Creep tests were carried out using specially designed longitudinal and transverse microsamples, which were fabricated from the shells of the fuel elements used in the BN-600 fast neutron reactor. It has been found that the creep rate of the reactor bcc steels is determined by the stability of the lath martensitic and ferritic structures in relation to the diffusion processes of recovery and recrystallization. The highest-temperature oxide-free steel contains the maximum amount of the refractory elements and carbides. The steel strengthened by the thermally stable Y-Ti nanooxides has a record high-temperature strength. The creep rate at 700°C and 100 MPa in the samples of this steel is lower by an order of magnitude and the time to fracture is 100 times greater than that in the oxide-free reactor steels.

  1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

    2003-02-26

    Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

  2. Cover for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, H.

    1980-03-11

    A pressure vessel, containment or burst shield for a nuclear reactor has a substantially circular cover surmounting the cylindrical part (Shell) of the vessel and is preferably comprised of a plurality of circular or polylateral segments arranged concentrically and stressed inwardly by annular prestressing means. At least the outer polylateral segments and preferably all of the circular segments are provided on the upper surface with upwardly open circular grooves receiving the prestressing arrangement. The latter can comprise an outwardly open channel-shaped (U-section) supporting member receiving the stressing cables and means for transferring the radial stress of the annular stressing arrangement to the ring segment. The latter means may be wedges inserted between the support and a wall of the groove after the stressing arrangement has been placed under stress, E.G. By hydraulic means for spreading the annular stressing arrangement.

  3. THERMAL ANNEALING OF REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Server, W. L.; Nanstad, Randy K

    2015-01-01

    Some of the current fleet of nuclear power plants is poised to reach their end of life and will require an operating life time extension. Therefore, the main structural components, including the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be subject to higher neutron exposures than originally planned. These longer operating times raise serious concerns regarding our ability to manage the reliability of RPV steels at such high doses. Thermal annealing is the only option that can, to some degree, recover irradiated beltline region transition temperature shift and recover upper shelf energy properties lost during radiation exposure and extend RPV service life. This paper reviews the experience accumulated internationally with development and implementation of thermal annealing to RPV and potential perspectives for carrying out thermal annealing on US nuclear power plant RPVs.

  4. Surveillance of WWER-440C reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Pav, T.

    1993-12-01

    In Czechoslovakia there are six units of Water-Water Power Reactor (WWER)-440 C type reactors (pressurized water reactor [PWR] type) incorporated with pressure vessel surveillance specimens. These sets of specimens are kept for carrying out static tensile testing, impact notch toughness testing, and static fracture toughness testing, and are supplemented by necessary sets of neutron flux monitors. Results of mechanical testing of these specimens evaluated after one to five years of reactor operation are summarized and discussed with respect to the effect of individual heats and welding joints, radiation embrittlement laws, and lead factor and pressure vessel lifetime assessment.

  5. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallows surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on a shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  6. Magnetic hysteresis properties of neutron-irradiated VVER440-type nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Gillemot, F.; Horváth, Á.; Székely, R.; Horváth, M.

    2012-11-01

    The development of non-destructive evaluation methods for irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels has a key role for safe and long-term operation of nuclear power plants. In this study, we have investigated the effect of neutron irradiation on base and weld metals of Russian VVER440-type reactor pressure vessel steels by measurements of magnetic minor hysteresis loops. A minor-loop coefficient, which is obtained from a scaling power-law relation of minor-loop parameters and is a sensitive indicator of internal stress, is found to change with neutron fluence for both metals. While the coefficient for base metal exhibits a local maximum at low fluence and a subsequent slow decrease, that for weld metal monotonically decreases with fluence. The observed results are explained by competing mechanisms of nanoscale defect formation and recovery, among which the latter process plays a dominant role for magnetic property changes in weld metal due to its ferritic microstructure.

  7. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  8. Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.M.

    1996-06-18

    A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Super-atmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gasification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor. 2 figs.

  9. Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani M.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Superatmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gassification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor.

  10. Development of a New Transportation/Storage Cask System for Use by the DOE Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Tyacke; Frantisek Svitak; Jiri Rychecky; Miroslav Picek; Alexey Smirnov; Sergey Komarov; Edward Bradley; Alexander Dudchenko; Konstantin Golubkin

    2007-10-01

    The United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been working together on a program called the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program. The purpose of this program is to return Soviet or Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel, currently stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia. To accommodate transport of the HEU spent nuclear fuel (SNF), a new large-capacity transport/storage cask system was specially designed for handling and operations under the unique conditions at these research reactor facilities. This new cask system is named the ŠKODA VPVR/M cask. The design, licensing, testing, and delivery of this new cask system result from a significant international cooperative effort by several countries and involved numerous private and governmental organizations. This paper contains the following sections: 1) Introduction; 2) VPVR/M Cask Description; 3) Ancillary Equipment, 4) Cask Licensing; 5) Cask Demonstration and Operations; 6) IAEA Procurement, Quality Assurance Inspections, Fabrication, and Delivery; and, 7) Conclusions.

  11. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  12. The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A.

    1997-08-01

    During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.

  13. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  14. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Norman R

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  15. Fatigue behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.Y.; Chen, C.Y.; Chien, K.F.; Kuo, R.C.; Liaw, P.K.; Huang, J.G.

    1999-07-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests have been conducted on reactor pressure vessel steels, SA533-B1, with four levels of sulfur contents at room temperature. The applied stress versus fatigue life cycle (S-N) curves were developed at load ratios, R, of 0.2 and 0.8. At a load ratio of 0.2, the fatigue limit for SA533-B1 steels with sulfur contents less than 0.015 wt % is around 650 MPa, which is slightly higher than that with sulfur contents higher than 0.027 wt %. At a load ratio of 0.8, there were no fatigue indications on the fracture surface. In some fatigue-tested specimens, specifically those with higher sulfur content levels, fatigue cracks were observed to initiate around the inclusions. A digital video camera was used to record the entire fatigue process, and the results demonstrated that the crack initiation period dominated more than 80% of the total fatigue life. The fatigue-tested specimen surface had been thoroughly examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Apparent distinctions were observed between the neighborhood of the crack initiation site and the rest of the specimen surface. A great number of precipitates were found distributed along the sub-grain boundary using transmission electron microscopy. There is no or little change of the morphology of precipitates before and after fatigue tests. The mis-orientation between two neighboring sub-grains ranges from 1 to 5{degree}. The effects of the applied maximum stress, precipitate distribution, and fatigue cycle on the mis-orientation of the sub-grain boundary will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Russia and the West After the Ukrainian Crisis: European Vulnerabilities to Russian Pressures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    lever - age would be to sell its own assets in the European Union. Indeed, this threat is not wholly without merit. In October 2014, a draft law was...earlier, the large ethnic Russian and Russophone minorities in Estonia and Latvia provide a lever that Russia could use to attempt to exert pressure on

  17. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes.

  18. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

  19. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

  20. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  1. SCW Pressure-Channel Nuclear Reactor Some Design Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioro, Igor L.; Khan, Mosin; Hopps, Victory; Jacobs, Chris; Patkunam, Ruban; Gopaul, Sandeep; Bakan, Kurtulus

    Concepts of nuclear reactors cooled with water at supercritical pressures were studied as early as the 1950s and 1960s in the USA and Russia. After a 30-year break, the idea of developing nuclear reactors cooled with SuperCritical Water (SCW) became attractive again as the ultimate development path for water cooling. The main objectives of using SCW in nuclear reactors are: 1) to increase the thermal efficiency of modern Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from 30-35% to about 45-48%, and 2) to decrease capital and operational costs and hence decrease electrical energy costs (˜1000 US/kW or even less). SCW NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to modern NPPs (pressure about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625°C), and a simplified flow circuit, in which steam generators, steam dryers, steam separators, etc., can be eliminated. Also, higher SCW temperatures allow direct thermo-chemical production of hydrogen at low cost, due to increased reaction rates. Pressure-tube or pressure-channel SCW nuclear reactor concepts are being developed in Canada and Russia for some time. Some design features of the Canadian concept related to fuel channels are discussed in this paper. The main conclusion is that the development of SCW pressure-tube nuclear reactors is feasible and significant benefits can be expected over other thermal-energy systems.

  2. Pressurized hydrogenotrophic denitrification reactor for small water systems.

    PubMed

    Epsztein, Razi; Beliavski, Michael; Tarre, Sheldon; Green, Michal

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of hydrogenotrophic denitrification is limited due to safety concerns, poor H2 utilization and low solubility of H2 gas with the resulting low transfer rate. The current paper presents the main research work conducted on a pressurized hydrogenotrophic reactor for denitrification that was recently developed. The reactor is based on a new concept suggesting that a gas-liquid equilibrium is achieved in the closed headspace of denitrifying reactor, further produced N2 gas is carried out by the effluent and gas purging is not required. The feasibility of the proposed reactor was shown for two effluent concentrations of 10 and 1 mg NO3(-)-N/L. Hydrogen gas utilization efficiencies of 92.8% and 96.9% were measured for the two effluent concentrations, respectively. Reactor modeling predicted high denitrification rates above 4 g NO3(-)-N/(Lreactor·d) at reasonable operational conditions. Hydrogen utilization efficiency was improved up to almost 100% by combining the pressurized reactor with a following open-to-atmosphere polishing unit. Also, the potential of the reactor to remove ClO4(-) was shown.

  3. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijaksono, Umar Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  4. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  5. Apparatus for introducing solid fuels into a pressure gasification reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Grimminger, A.; Strecker, J.; Wenning, P.; Wiedmann, W.

    1981-03-10

    Apparatus for introducing solid fuels into a pressure gasification reactor comprising at least one conveyor worm turnable in a housing for conveying finely divided fuel, optionally mixed with a binder, and compacting the fuel into a gas-tight plug which is discharged through a discharge opening leading to the pressure gasification reactor. The discharge opening is provided with a closure member and the housing has an outlet opening also provided with a closure member near the discharge opening. The outlet opening is open to the ambient atmosphere. The closure members of the discharge opening and the outlet opening are alternatively actuatable such that when one is open the other is closed.

  6. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  7. An evolution of understanding of reactor pressure vessel steel embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the lifetime contributions of Prof. G. Robert Odette to our understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor pressure vessel steel embrittlement. These contributions span the entire range of phenomena that contribute to embrittlement, from the production and evolution of fine scale features by radiation damage processes, to the effects of this damage microstructure on mechanical properties. They include the development and application of unique and novel experimental tools (from Seebeck Coefficient to Small Angle Neutron Scattering to confocal microscopy and fracture reconstruction), the design and implementation of large multi-variable experimental matrices, the application of multiscale modeling to understand the underlying mechanisms of defect evolution and property change, and the development of predictive methodologies employed to govern reactor operations. The ideas and discoveries have provided guidance worldwide to improving the safety of operating nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  8. An Inexpensive Sampleable Reactor for High-Pressure Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumate, R. E.; Riley, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how to modify the commercially available and inexpensive Griffin-Worden (Kontes) glass pressure reactors to permit sampling of homogeneous reactions, without changing the relative concentration of species present. All required parts necessary for the modification are commercially available. (JN)

  9. LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head being installed in vault. Refueling port extension (right) and control rod nozzles (center). Camera facing northwest. Photographer: Comiskey. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-241 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Current status of high conversion pressurized water reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Umeoka, T.; Kono, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Ogino, M.; Iwai, S.; Hishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary design studies on high conversion pressurized water reactors (HCPWRs) have been completed, and plant design studies are currently being performed to improve the feasibility of HCPWRs. The present status of the feasibility studies is covered, and the related validation tests to be conducted in the coming years are reviewed.

  11. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  12. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.

    1995-07-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed.

  13. 78 FR 56752 - Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors... and operate integral pressurized water reactors (iPWR). This guidance applies to environmental reviews...

  14. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow M.; Todosow M.; Raitses, G. Galperin, A.

    2009-07-12

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  15. Process and apparatus for adding and removing particles from pressurized reactors

    DOEpatents

    Milligan, John D.

    1983-01-01

    A method for adding and removing fine particles from a pressurized reactor is provided, which comprises connecting the reactor to a container, sealing the container from the reactor, filling the container with particles and a liquid material compatible with the reactants, pressurizing the container to substantially the reactor pressure, removing the seal between the reactor and the container, permitting particles to fall into or out of the reactor, and resealing the container from the reactor. An apparatus for adding and removing particles is also disclosed.

  16. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  17. PWR (pressurized water reactor) pressurizer transient response: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model.

  18. Modifications of water chemistry for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    For commercial pressurized water reactors, the evolution of the water chemistry for both the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and the balance of plant (BOP) systems has been in concert with or responsive to the changes in specified materials and operating experience. Much of the early reactor coolant chemistry was identified within a program to develop the use of boric acid as a water soluble neutron absorber for chemical shim. Boric acid was selected as the absorber. The BOP steam and feedwater cycle chemistry was largely a translation from conventional low-pressure boiler water chemistry with specific changes to account for new materials in major components. Today's chemistry for the reactor and BOP systems has undergone significant changes since circa 1950. With advances in the design duty of the plant components and with a much better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion of component materials, the water chemistry practices and methods of control are more successfully aimed at plant reliability than ever before. This paper presents a review of several important advances in water chemistry, as applied to both the RCS and the BOP and the basis for their adoption.

  19. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  20. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S.

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  1. Thermally activated deformation of irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmert, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-03-01

    Temperature and strain rate change tensile tests were performed on two VVER 1000-type reactor pressure vessel welds with different contents of nickel in unirradiated and irradiated conditions in order to determine the activation parameters of the contribution of the thermally activated deformation. There are no differences of the activation parameters in the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions as well as for the two different materials. This shows that irradiation hardening preferentially results from a friction hardening mechanism by long-range obstacles.

  2. Reactor physics and safety aspects of various design options of a Russian light water reactor with rock-like fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, A. V.; Komissarov, O. V.; Kozmenkov, Ya. K.; Matveev, Yu. V.; Orekhov, Yu. I.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Sharapov, V. N.

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents results of analytical studies on weapons grade plutonium incineration in VVER (640) medium size light water reactors using a special composition of rock-like fuel (ROX-fuel) to assure spent fuel long-term storage without its reprocessing. The main goal is to achieve high degree of plutonium incineration in once-through cycle. In this paper we considered two fuel compositions. In both compositions weapons grade plutonium is used as fissile material. Spinel (MgAl 2O 4) is used as the 'preserving' material assuring safe storage of the spent fuel. Besides an inert matrix, the option of rock-like fuel with thorium dioxide was studied. One of principal problems in the realization of the proposed approach is the substantial change of properties of the light water reactor core when passing to the use of the ROX-fuel, in particular: (i) due to the absence of 238U the Doppler effect playing a crucial role in reactor's self-regulation and limiting the consequences of reactivity accidents, decreases significantly, (ii) no fuel breeding on one hand, and the quest to attain the maximum plutonium burnup on the other hand, would result in a drastical change of the fuel assembly power during the lifetime and, as a consequence, the rise in irregularity of the power density of fuel assemblies, (iii) both the control rods worth and dissolved boron worth decrease in view of neutron spectrum hardening brought on by the larger absorption cross-section of plutonium as compared to uranium, (iv) βeff is markedly reduced. All these distinctive features are potentially detrimental to the reactor nuclear safety. The principal objective of this work is that to identify a variant of the fuel composition and the reactor layout, which would permit neutralize the negative effect of the above-mentioned distinctive features.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  4. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R&D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993).

  5. A model for simulating autoclave-reactor pressure histories

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small heated-batch reactors, frequently referred to as autoclave reactors, are often used in developing information for a proposed new chemical/physical processing step. These systems often entail considerable pressure buildup during the course of operation. This report describes a model formulated to simulate well mixed autoclave reactors. The model solves a system of differential and algebraic equations which describe vapor/liquid equilibrium and chemical reactions in the reactor during a heating and cooling cycle. The model allows any number of chemical species to be defined. Phase equilibrium considerations are limited to systems with one liquid and one vapor phase, although some provisions for dealing with a second pure water liquid phase are considered. Equilibrium constraints are formulated using fugacity and activity coefficients. A new version of the general purpose differential-algebraic system solver DASSL, called DASPK, has been used to solve the system of equations. This solver has been found to work well in test problems. Selected results from a number of example problems are described. The example systems are water/nitrogen; crude oil/water; hexane/toluene; hexane/heptadecane; water/carbon dioxide; and a biomass system.

  6. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  7. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-11-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber`s, Hardrath-Ohman`s as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared.

  8. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  9. Neurocontrol of Pressurized Water Reactors in Load-Follow Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Shen Chihming

    2000-12-15

    The neurocontrol technique was applied to control a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in load-follow operations. Generalized learning or direct inverse control architecture was adopted in which the neural network was trained off-line to learn the inverse model of the PWR. Two neural network controllers were designed: One provided control rod position, which controlled the axial power distribution, and the other provided the change in boron concentration, which adjusted core total power. An additional feedback controller was designed so that power tracking capability was improved. The time duration between control actions was 15 min; thus, the xenon effect is limited and can be neglected. Therefore, the xenon concentration was not considered as a controller input variable, which simplified controller design. Center target strategy and minimum boron strategy were used to operate the reactor, and the simulation results demonstrated the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller.

  10. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  11. VERA Core Simulator methodology for pressurized water reactor cycle depletion

    DOE PAGES

    Kochunas, Brendan; Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; ...

    2017-01-12

    This paper describes the methodology developed and implemented in the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) to perform high-fidelity, pressurized water reactor (PWR), multicycle, core physics calculations. Depletion of the core with pin-resolved power and nuclide detail is a significant advance in the state of the art for reactor analysis, providing the level of detail necessary to address the problems of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Reactor Simulation Hub, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS has three main components: the neutronics solver MPACT, the thermal-hydraulic (T-H) solver COBRA-TF (CTF), and the nuclidemore » transmutation solver ORIGEN. This paper focuses on MPACT and provides an overview of the resonance self-shielding methods, macroscopic-cross-section calculation, two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2-D/1-D) transport, nuclide depletion, T-H feedback, and other supporting methods representing a minimal set of the capabilities needed to simulate high-fidelity models of a commercial nuclear reactor. Results are presented from the simulation of a model of the first cycle of Watts Bar Unit 1. The simulation is within 16 parts per million boron (ppmB) reactivity for all state points compared to cycle measurements, with an average reactivity bias of <5 ppmB for the entire cycle. Comparisons to cycle 1 flux map data are also provided, and the average 2-D root-mean-square (rms) error during cycle 1 is 1.07%. To demonstrate the multicycle capability, a state point at beginning of cycle (BOC) 2 was also simulated and compared to plant data. The comparison of the cycle 2 BOC state has a reactivity difference of +3 ppmB from measurement, and the 2-D rms of the comparison in the flux maps is 1.77%. Lastly, these results provide confidence in VERA-CS’s capability to perform high-fidelity calculations for practical PWR reactor problems.« less

  12. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I.; Bhatt, S.

    1994-03-01

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed.

  13. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  14. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL ISSUES FOR THE LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Odette, George Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Plan is a collaborative program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the private sector directed at extending the life of the present generation of nuclear power plants to enable operation to at least 80 years. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the primary components requiring significant research to enable such long-term operation. There are significant issues that need to be addressed to reduce the uncertainties in regulatory application, such as, 1) high neutron fluence/long irradiation times, and flux effects, 2) material variability, 3) high-nickel materials, 4)specimen size effects and the fracture toughness master curve, etc. The first issue is the highest priority to obtain the data and mechanistic understanding to enable accurate, reliable embrittlement predictions at high fluences. This paper discusses the major issues associated with long-time operation of existing RPVs and the LWRSP plans to address those issues.

  15. Low pressure stagnation flow reactor with a flow barrier

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A flow barrier disposed at the periphery of a workpiece for achieving uniform reaction across the surface of the workpiece, such as a semiconductor wafer, in a stagnation flow reactor operating under the conditions of a low pressure or low flow rate. The flow barrier is preferably in the shape of annulus and can include within the annular structure passages or flow channels for directing a secondary flow of gas substantially at the surface of a semiconductor workpiece. The flow barrier can be constructed of any material which is chemically inert to reactive gases flowing over the surface of the semiconductor workpiece.

  16. Structural Integrity of Water Reactor Pressure Boundary Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tests of reference steels of the NRC light water reactor, pressure vessel irradiation dosimetry program. SECURITY CLAS5IICATION 0PHiS PA6GMbn" Dfat ...multiple specimen R- curve approach; NRL emphasis was on the SSC procedure as it is being developed for hot- cell testing of irradiated materials. MULTIPLE...a second autoclave, capable of testing 50 or 100 mm (2T or 4T) thick CT or WOL specimens, was installed in a hot cell and a test was started on 2T-CT

  17. High pressure, high-temperature vessel, especially for nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterbacher, P.; Schoning, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1980-09-23

    A pressure vessel susceptible to high temperatures, especially for containment of a nuclear-reactor core, is constituted of a cylindrical shell from a cast material such as cast steel, cast iron or concrete, and is prestressed by vertical cables which extend parallel to generatrices of the shell. Peripheral (Circumferential) prestressing cables are provided around the shell which can be externally insulated. The peripheral tensioning cables are exposed externally of the insulation material and bear upon the shell of the vessel with heatresistant elements of high compressive strength which extend through the external insulation.

  18. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  19. Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

  20. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS OF CANDIDATE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR DESIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Cliff B. Davis; George Hayner; Kevan Weaver

    2006-10-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code. Because PEBBED-THERMIX has not been extensively validated, confirmatory calculations were also performed with RELAP5-3D for the pebble-bed design. During normal operation, the predicted axial profiles in reactor vessel temperature were similar with both codes and the predicted maximum values were within 2 °C. The trends of the calculated vessel temperatures were similar during the depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The maximum value predicted with RELAP5-3D during the depressurized conduction cooldown accident was about 40 °C higher than that predicted with PEBBED. This agreement is considered reasonable based on the expected uncertainty in either calculation. The differences between the PEBBED and RELAP5-3D calculations were not large enough to affect conclusions concerning comparisons between calculated and allowed maximum temperatures during normal operation and the depressurized conduction cooldown accident.

  1. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  2. Fuzzy power control algorithm for a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hah, Y.J. ); Lee, B.W. )

    1994-05-01

    A fuzzy power control algorithm is presented for automatic reactor power control in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Automatic power shape control is complicated by the use of control rods with a conventional proportional-integral-differential controller because it is highly coupled with reactivity compensation. Thus, manual shape controls are usually employed even for the limited capability needed for load-following operations including frequency control. In an attempt to achieve automatic power shape control without any design modifications to the core, a fuzzy power control algorithm is proposed. For the fuzzy control, the rule base is formulated based on a multiple-input multiple-output system. The minimum operation rule and the center of area method are implemented for the development of the fuzzy algorithm. The fuzzy power control algorithm has been applied to Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3. The simulation results show that the fuzzy control can be adapted as a practical control strategy for automatic reactor power control of PWRs during the load-following operations.

  3. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  4. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  5. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  6. Flux effect analysis in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Blagoeva, D.; Debarberis, L.

    2013-11-01

    The results of long term research programme concerning the determination of irradiation embrittlement dependence on fast neutron flux for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels before and after annealing are presented in this paper. The study of flux effect was carried out on commercial WWER-440 steels which differ significantly in phosphorous (0.013-0.036 wt%) and copper (0.08-0.20 wt%) contents. All specimens were irradiated in surveillance channel positions under similar conditions at high ˜4 × 1012 сm-2 s-1 and low ˜6 × 1011 сm-2 s-1 fluxes (E > 0.5 MeV) at a temperature of 270 °С. The radiation embrittlement was evaluated by transition temperature shift on the basis of Charpy specimens test results. In case of low flux, the measured Tk shifts could be 25-50 °C bigger than the Tk shifts obtained from high flux data. A significant flux effect is observed in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels with higher copper content (>0.13 wt%).

  7. Improvement of Algorithms for Pressure Maintenance Systems in Drum-Separators of RBMK-1000 Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksakov, A. N. Yankovskiy, K. I.; Dunaev, V. I.; Kushbasov, A. N.

    2015-05-15

    The main tasks and challenges for pressure regulation in the drum-separators of RBMK-1000 reactors are described. New approaches to constructing algorithms for pressure control in drum-separators by electro-hydraulic turbine control systems are discussed. Results are provided from tests of the operation of modernized pressure regulators during fast transients with reductions in reactor power.

  8. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  9. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-02-20

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  10. Estimation of absolute sound pressure in a small-sized sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinji; Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    A small-sized sonochemical reactor in which the absolute value of the sound pressure amplitude can be estimated from the vibration velocity of the transducer was investigated. The sound pressure distribution in the reactor and the relationship between the vibration velocity and the sound pressure amplitude were derived through Helmholtz wave equation. The reactor consists of a bolt-clamped Langevin transducer and a rectangular cell with a tungsten reflector. A 3λ/4-standing-wave-field was generated in the reactor to simplify the sound pressure distribution. The sound pressure distribution was measured from the optical refractive index change of water using a laser interferometer. The experimental and theoretical results showed a good agreement in the absolute value of the sound pressure amplitude, and it was confirmed that the sound pressure in the sonochemical reactor can be estimated from the input current of the vibrator. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. MOCKUP AND PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. MOCK-UP AND PRESSURE TEST AREAS. ISSUE ROOM, LAUNDRY, STORAGE. IDO MTR-635-IDO-5-A, 6/1953. INL INDEX NO. 531-0635-00-396-110588, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  13. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... thermal annealing or to operate the nuclear power reactor following the annealing must be identified. The... licensee shall so confirm in writing to the Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The...

  14. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, S.; Uţă, O.; Pârvan, M.; Ohâi, D.

    2009-03-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  15. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  16. Pressurized water reactor fuel crud and corrosion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, Jeff; Hussey, Dennis; Kendrick, Brian; McGurk, John; Secker, Jeff; Short, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Pressurized water reactors circulate high-temperature water that slowly corrodes Inconel and stainless steel system surfaces, and the nickel/iron based corrosion products deposit in regions of the fuel where sub-cooled nucleate boiling occurs. The deposited corrosion products, called `crud', can have an adverse impact on fuel performance. Boron can concentrate within the crud in the boiling regions of the fuel leading to a phenomenon known as axial offset anomaly (AOA). In rare cases, fuel clad integrity can be compromised because of crud-induced localized corrosion (CILC) of the zirconium-based alloy. Westinghouse and the Electric Power Research Institute have committed to understanding the crud transport process and develop a risk assessment software tool called boron-induced offset anomaly (BOA) to avoid AOA and CILC. This paper reviews the history of the BOA model development and new efforts to develop a micro-scale model called MAMBA for use in the Consortium for Advanced Light Water Reactor Simulation (CASL) program.

  17. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Supercritical Pressure Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Schulenberg, T.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Souyri, A.

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of the European project HPLWR, joined by European research institutions, industrial partners and the University of Tokyo, thermal-hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactors has been carried out. A thorough literature survey on heat transfer of supercritical fluids indicates a large deficiency in the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient and the onset of heat transfer deterioration under the reactor condition. A CFD code for analysing the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of supercritical fluids was developed. Numerical results show that the heat transfer coefficient, including the heat transfer deterioration region, can be well predicted using this CFD code, at least for circular tube geometries. Such a CFD code is well suitable for understanding the heat transfer mechanism. Based on the numerical results, a new heat transfer correlation has been proposed. For the thermal-hydraulic design of an HPLWR fuel assembly, the subchannel analysis code STAR-SC has been developed with a high numerical efficiency and a high applicability to different kinds of fuel assembly configurations. The results show clearly that design of a HPLWR fuel assembly is a highly challenging task. At the same time, sub-channel analysis provides some important guidelines for the design of a HPLWR fuel assembly. (authors)

  18. Detecting pin diversion from pressurized water reactors spent fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ham, Young S.; Sitaraman, Shivakumar

    2017-01-10

    Detecting diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) by determining possible diversion including the steps of providing a detector cluster containing gamma ray and neutron detectors, inserting the detector cluster containing the gamma ray and neutron detectors into the spent fuel assembly through the guide tube holes in the spent fuel assembly, measuring gamma ray and neutron radiation responses of the gamma ray and neutron detectors in the guide tube holes, processing the gamma ray and neutron radiation responses at the guide tube locations by normalizing them to the maximum value among each set of responses and taking the ratio of the gamma ray and neutron responses at the guide tube locations and normalizing the ratios to the maximum value among them and producing three signatures, gamma, neutron, and gamma-neutron ratio, based on these normalized values, and producing an output that consists of these signatures that can indicate possible diversion of the pins from the spent fuel assembly.

  19. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  20. Design of Recycle Pressurized Water Reactor with Heavy Water Moderation

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, Koki; Uchita, Masato

    2004-03-15

    This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is very low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.

  1. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  2. Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Yoshiei; Hori, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Keiji; Mishima, Kaichiro; Sugiyama, Shigekazu

    1995-12-01

    The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

  3. Young's modulus anisotropy in reactor pressure vessel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Mertens, M.; Scibetta, M.

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study it was shown that the anisotropy of Young's modulus in the stainless steel cladding of a reactor pressure vessel could be attributed to the solidification texture of the cladding. Further it was found that annealing the samples to remove the delta phase caused a modulus change but only in some directions. Since the texture was only estimated from X-ray diffraction patterns the moduli, calculated for some principal directions, differed considerably from the measured ones. In the present study, executed on a practically identical cladding, the texture was determined by actual texture measurements. It was found to be close to a fibre texture with <0 0 1> perpendicular to the cladding plane and the values calculated from it agreed much better with the experimental ones. The annealing effect found in the previous study was shown to be due to surface recrystallization induced by milling damage.

  4. Transient Temperature and Pressure in the Reactor Room During a Core Meltdown Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A.

    2001-07-17

    The purpose of this numerical model is to determine the optimum ventilation exhaust flow rate for the reactor room. The influence of steam produced in the reactor vessel, on the reactor room pressures, is included in the model. A parametric study of the affect of various steam mass flow rates is included in this document. The affect of steam on the conditions in the reactor room is significant at modest flow rates.

  5. An Interactive Code for a Pressurized Water Reactor Incorporating Temperature and Xenon Feedback.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    feedback effects , as well as an automatic reactor protection and average reactor coolant temperature control system. The thermal response of the model plant ...of a pressurized water reactor power plant . The reactivity feedback effects of Xenon-135 poisoning and moderator temperature are incorporated into the...developed, using the applicable plant parameters from Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The point reactor kinetics equations for one delayed neutron

  6. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  7. Reactor physics behavior of transuranic-bearing TRISO-particle fuel in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M. A.; Sen, R. S.; Ougouag, A. M.; Youinou, G.; Boer, B.

    2012-07-01

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) - only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is retained. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  8. Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

    2012-04-01

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

  9. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  10. Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S.

    2006-07-01

    Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe

  11. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  12. Application of the failure assessment diagram to the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits for a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, K.K.; Bloom, J.M.; Pavinich, W.A.; Slager, H.W.

    1984-06-01

    The failure assessment diagram approach, an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics procedure based on the J-integral concept, was used in the evaluation of pressure-temperature (P-T) limits for the beltline region of the vessel of a pressurized water reactor. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the application of an alternate fracture mechanics method for the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits, as allowed by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulation Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Appendix G. The evaluation of P-T limits for the beltline region of a pressurized water reactor vessel was based on the following assumptions: ASME Pressure Vessel and Piping Code, Section III, Appendix G reference flaw End-of-life fluence level in the beltline region Longitudinal flaw in the beltline weld J-resistance material toughness curves obtained from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program Other material properties obtained from the Babcock and Wilcox Integrated Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program The maximum allowable pressure levels were calculated at 33 time points along the given bulk coolant temperature history representing the normal operation of a pressurized water reactor. The results of the calculations showed that adequate margins of safety on operating pressure for the critical weld in the beltline of the pressurized water reactor vessel are assured.

  13. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  14. U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Science and Technology: A Case Study of the TOPAZ Space-Based Nuclear Reactor International Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Richard S.

    2014-08-01

    The TOPAZ International Program (TIP) was the final name given to a series of projects to purchase and test the TOPAZ-II, a space-based nuclear reactor of a type that had been further developed in the Soviet Union than in the United States. In the changing political situation associated with the break-up of the Soviet Union it became possible for the United States to not just purchase the system, but also to employ Russian scientists, engineers and testing facilities to verify its reliability. The lessons learned from the TIP illuminate some of the institutional and cultural challenges to U.S. - Russian cooperation in technology research which remain true today.

  15. ARD remediation with limestone in a CO2 pressurized reactor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Friedrich, Andrew E.; Vinci, Brian J.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated a new process for remediation of acid rock drainage (ARD). The process treats ARD with intermittently fluidized beds of granular limestone maintained within a continuous flow reactor pressurized with CO2. Tests were performed over a thirty day period at the Toby Creek mine drainage treatment plant, Elk County, Pennsylvania in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Equipment performance was established at operating pressures of 0, 34, 82, and 117 kPa using an ARD flow of 227 L/min. The ARD had the following characteristics: pH, 3.1; temperature, 10 °C; dissolved oxygen, 6.4 mg/L; acidity, 260 mg/L; total iron, 21 mg/L; aluminum, 22 mg/L; manganese, 7.5 mg/L; and conductivity, 1400 μS/cm. In all cases tested, processed ARD was net alkaline with mean pH and alkalinities of 6.7 and 59 mg/L at a CO2 pressure of 0 kPa, 6.6 and 158 mg/L at 34 kPa, 7.4 and 240 mg/L at 82 kPa, and 7.4 and 290 mg/L at 117 kPa. Processed ARD alkalinities were correlated to the settled bed depth (p<0.001) and CO2 pressure (p<0.001). Iron, aluminum, and manganese removal efficiencies of 96%, 99%, and 5%, respectively, were achieved with filtration following treatment. No indications of metal hydroxide precipitation or armoring of the limestone were observed. The surplus alkalinity established at 82 kPa was successful in treating an equivalent of 1136 L/min (five-fold dilution) of the combined three ARD streams entering the Toby Creek Plant. This side-stream capability provides savings in treatment unit scale as well as flexibility in treatment effect. The capability of the system to handle higher influent acidity was tested by elevating the acidity to 5000 mg/L with sulfuric acid. Net alkaline effluent was produced, indicating applicability of the process to highly acidic ARD.

  16. Dual shell reactor vessel: A pressure-balanced system for high pressure and temperature reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.; Deverman, G.S.

    1995-03-01

    The main purpose of this work was to demonstrate the Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) as a safe and economical reactor for the hydrothermal water oxidation of hazardous wastes. Experimental tests proved that the pressure balancing piston and the leak detection concept designed for this project will work. The DSPBV was sized to process 10 gal/hr of hazardous waste at up to 399{degree}C (750{degree}F) and 5000 psia (34.5 MPa) with a residence time of 10 min. The first prototype reactor is a certified ASME pressure vessel. It was purchased by Innotek Corporation (licensee) and shipped to Pacific Northwest Laboratory for testing. Supporting equipment and instrumentation were, to a large extent, transported here from Battelle Columbus Division. A special air feed system and liquid pump were purchased to complete the package. The entire integrated demonstration system was assembled at PNL. During the activities conducted for this report, the leak detector design was tested on bench top equipment. Response to low levels of water in oil was considered adequate to ensure safety of the pressure vessel. Shakedown tests with water only were completed to prove the system could operate at 350{degree}C at pressures up to 3300 psia. Two demonstration tests with industrial waste streams were conducted, which showed that the DSPBV could be used for hydrothermal oxidation. In the first test with a metal plating waste, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and cyanide concentrations were reduced over 90%. In the second test with a munitions waste, the organics were reduced over 90% using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the oxidant.

  17. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, S.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-12-31

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is i good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between he observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  19. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Improved pressurized water reactor radial reflector modeling in nodal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.Z. )

    1991-10-01

    A one-dimensional method based on a combination of the nodal equivalence theory and response matrix homogenization methods was previously described for determining environment-insensitive equivalent few-group diffusion theory parameters for homogenized radial reflector nodes of a pressurized water reactor. This reflector model, called the NGET-RM model, yields equivalent nodal parameters that do not account for the two-dimensional structure of the baffle at core corners; this can lead to significant errors in computed two-dimensional core power distributions. A semi-empirical correction procedure is proposed for reducing the two-dimensional effects associated with this particular one-dimensional reflector model. Numerical two-group experiments are performed for a given reflector configuration (and soluble boron concentration) to determine optimal values of the two empirical factors defined by this model. In this paper it is shown that the resultant factors are rather insensitive to core configuration or core conditions and that their application yields improved two-group NGET-RM reflector parameters with which accurate nodal power distributions can be obtained. The results are also compared with those obtained with another one-dimensional environment-insensitive model that has an extra degree of freedom utilized here to reduce two-dimensional effects. Some practical aspects related to the application of the proposed correction procedure are briefly discussed.

  1. Miniaturized Charpy test for reactor pressure vessel embrittlement characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, M.P. Sr.

    1999-10-01

    Modifications were made to a conventional Charpy machine to accommodate the miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) specimens which were fabricated from an archived reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Over 100 dynamic MCVN tests were performed and compared to the results from conventional Charpy V-Notch (CVN) tests to demonstrate the efficacy of the miniature specimen test. The optimized sidegrooved MCVN specimens exhibit transitional fracture behavior over essentially the same temperature range as the CVN specimens which indicates that the stress fields in the MCVN specimens reasonably simulate those of the CVN specimens and this fact has been observed in finite element calculations. This result demonstrates a significant breakthrough since it is now possible to measure the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) using miniature specimens with only small correction factors, and for some materials as in the present study, without the need for any correction factor at all. This development simplifies data interpretation and will facilitate future regulatory acceptance. The non-sidegrooved specimens yield energy-temperature data which is significantly shifted downward in temperature (non-conservative) as a result of the loss of constraint which accompanies size reduction.

  2. Measurement and Analysis of Structural Integrity of Reactor Core Support Structure in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Saleem A.; Haroon, Muhammad; Rashid, Atif; Kazmi, Zafar

    2017-02-01

    Extensive calculation and measurements of flow-induced vibrations (FIV) of reactor internals were made in a PWR plant to assess the structural integrity of reactor core support structure against coolant flow. The work was done to meet the requirements of the Fukushima Response Action Plan (FRAP) for enhancement of reactor safety, and the regulatory guide RG-1.20. For the core surveillance measurements the Reactor Internals Vibration Monitoring System (IVMS) has been developed based on detailed neutron noise analysis of the flux signals from the four ex-core neutron detectors. The natural frequencies, displacement and mode shapes of the reactor core barrel (CB) motion were determined with the help of IVMS. The random pressure fluctuations in reactor coolant flow due to turbulence force have been identified as the predominant cause of beam-mode deflection of CB. The dynamic FIV calculations were also made to supplement the core surveillance measurements. The calculational package employed the computational fluid dynamics, mode shape analysis, calculation of power spectral densities of flow & pressure fields and the structural response to random flow excitation forces. The dynamic loads and stiffness of the Hold-Down Spring that keeps the core structure in position against upward coolant thrust were also determined by noise measurements. Also, the boron concentration in primary coolant at any time of the core cycle has been determined with the IVMS.

  3. SAFT inspections for developing empirical database of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Pardini, Allan F.

    1998-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a methodology for estimating the size and density distribution of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This involves the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reactor pressure vessel materials and the destructive validation of the flaws found. NDE has been performed on reactor pressure vessel material made by Babcock & Wilcox and Combustion Engineering. A metallographic analysis is being performed to validate the flaw density and size distributions estimated from the 2500 indications of fabrication flaws that were detected and characterized in the very sensitive SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) inspection data from the Pressure Vessel Research User Facility (PVRUF) vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Research plans are also described for expanding the work to include other reactor pressure vessel materials.

  4. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Carl E.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  5. Test calculations of the neutron flux on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, K.D.; Belousov, S.I.; Antonov, S.Y.; Zaritsky, S.M.; Brodkin, E.B.

    1994-12-31

    A three dimensional test for calculation of the neutron fluence onto the VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is presented. The test is based on the commercial VVER-1000 reactor design data. The flux results obtained by different authors are in good agreement.

  6. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  7. Suboptimal projective control of a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Saif, M. )

    1989-12-01

    The time- and oxide field-dependencies of interface trap (N{sub it}) formation in MOSFETs have been studied following pulsed ionizing radiation. Results are compared with the two-stage model for Nit formation involving slow drift of radiation-induced H{sup +} ions in the SiO{sub 2}. Detailed data on the gate oxide field dependence during each individual stage are presented and discussed. A model is developed for the production of H{sup +} throughout the oxide. Calculations based on this model correctly predict the complete time dependent N{sub it} formation is at a maximum near zero first stage gate bias. This unexpected behavior apparently arises from the oxide field dependence of the H{sup +} production during the first stage. A suboptimal output feedback approach for control of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant is presented. Optimal state feedback linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory with pole placement capability is extended to obtain a suboptimal projective controller for such cases where the entire state vector is inaccessible for measurement and feedback purposes. The appealing feature of the proposed approach is that it is possible to select the weighting matrices in the quadratic cost functional such that the resulting control law would nearly minimize the cost, and at the same time can assign a subspectrum of the closed-loop system to preassigned desired locations. Additionally, the design algorithm is computationally attractive, since regardless of the dimension of the PWR model the approach mainly involves low-order matrix computations.

  8. High-performance simulations for atmospheric pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav

    Plasma-assisted processing and deposition of materials is an important component of modern industrial applications, with plasma reactors sharing 30% to 40% of manufacturing steps in microelectronics production. Development of new flexible electronics increases demands for efficient high-throughput deposition methods and roll-to-roll processing of materials. The current work represents an attempt of practical design and numerical modeling of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The system utilizes plasma at standard pressure and temperature to activate a chemical precursor for protective coatings. A specially designed linear plasma head, that consists of two parallel plates with electrodes placed in the parallel arrangement, is used to resolve clogging issues of currently available commercial plasma heads, as well as to increase the flow-rate of the processed chemicals and to enhance the uniformity of the deposition. A test system is build and discussed in this work. In order to improve operating conditions of the setup and quality of the deposited material, we perform numerical modeling of the plasma system. The theoretical and numerical models presented in this work comprehensively describe plasma generation, recombination, and advection in a channel of arbitrary geometry. Number density of plasma species, their energy content, electric field, and rate parameters are accurately calculated and analyzed in this work. Some interesting engineering outcomes are discussed with a connection to the proposed setup. The numerical model is implemented with the help of high-performance parallel technique and evaluated at a cluster for parallel calculations. A typical performance increase, calculation speed-up, parallel fraction of the code and overall efficiency of the parallel implementation are discussed in details.

  9. Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture Analysis Capabilities in Grizzly

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Chakraborty, Pritam; Hoffman, William

    2015-03-01

    Efforts have been underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Development in prior years has resulted a capability to calculate -integrals. For this application, these are used to calculate stress intensity factors for cracks to be used in deterministic linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) assessments of fracture in degraded RPVs. The -integral can only be used to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws because it can only be used to obtain the stress intensity factor for pure Mode I loading. Off-axis flaws will be subjected to mixed-mode loading. For this reason, work has continued to expand the set of fracture mechanics capabilities to permit it to evaluate off-axis flaws. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture mechanics capabilities for RPVs: • Interaction Integral and -stress: To obtain mixed-mode stress intensity factors, a capability to evaluate interaction integrals for 2D or 3D flaws has been developed. A -stress evaluation capability has been developed to evaluate the constraint at crack tips in 2D or 3D. Initial verification testing of these capabilities is documented here. • Benchmarking for axis-aligned flaws: Grizzly’s capabilities to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws have been benchmarked against calculations for the same conditions in FAVOR. • Off-axis flaw demonstration: The newly-developed interaction integral capabilities are demon- strated in an application to calculate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for off-axis flaws. • Other code enhancements: Other enhancements to the thermomechanics capabilities that relate to the solution of the engineering RPV fracture problem are documented here.

  10. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  11. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  12. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from -90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  13. Ceramic membrane reactor with two reactant gases at different pressures

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Mieville, Rodney L.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic membrane reactor for syngas production having a reaction chamber, an inlet in the reactor for natural gas intake, a plurality of oxygen permeating ceramic slabs inside the reaction chamber with each slab having a plurality of passages paralleling the gas flow for transporting air through the reaction chamber, a manifold affixed to one end of the reaction chamber for intake of air connected to the slabs, a second manifold affixed to the reactor for removing the oxygen depleted air, and an outlet in the reaction chamber for removing syngas.

  14. General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1996-07-01

    The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

  15. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  16. Design and construction of a cascading pressure reactor prototype for solar-thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermanoski, Ivan; Grobbel, Johannes; Singh, Abhishek; Lapp, Justin; Brendelberger, Stefan; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Whaley, Josh; McDaniel, Anthony; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work regarding the efficiency maximization for solar thermochemical fuel production in two step cycles has led to the design of a new type of reactor—the cascading pressure reactor—in which the thermal reduction step of the cycle is completed in multiple stages, at successively lower pressures. This approach enables lower thermal reduction pressures than in single-staged reactors, and decreases required pump work, leading to increased solar to fuel efficiencies. Here we report on the design and construction of a prototype cascading pressure reactor and testing of some of the key components. We especially focus on the technical challenges particular to the design, and their solutions.

  17. A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

  18. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  19. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Development of a pressurizer level compensator for use on N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bussell, J.H.

    1985-07-01

    The instrument described in this report has been developed to compensate the measured water level in the N Reactor pressurizer for temperature effects. N Reactor is a pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR). The instrument is defined as a pressurizer level compensator (PLC). A pressurizer is used in a PWR to control the primary coolant pressure and provide a surge volume for primary coolant expansion and contraction. A means of compensating for water and steam density is required because of the wide range of pressure and temperature that result from different steady state and transient reactor power levels. The uncompensated level is determined by measurement of differential pressure between the top of the level measurement zone and the bottom of the level measurement zone. Temperature of the water in the pressurizer is the parameter that is used to determine the proper level compensation since water and steam density are primarily functions of temperature in this case. The PLC uses a microprocessor to calculate the compensated level from temperature and differential pressure measurements. This report includes a description of the design, development, and implementation of software and hardware that are in the PLC. 9 refs., 51 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-04-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called ';Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, …) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program.

  2. Safety system augmentation at Russian Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerbo, J. A.; Satpute, S. N.; Donkin, J. Y.; Reister, R. A.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the design and procurement of a Class 1E DC power supply system to upgrade plant safety at the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Kola NPP is located above the Arctic circle at Polyanie Zprie, Murmansk, Russia. Kola NPP consists of four units. Units 1 and 2 have VVER-440/230 type reactors: Units 3 and 4 have VVER-440/213 type reactors. The VVER 440 reactor design is similar to the pressurized water reactor design used in the US. This project provided redundant Class 1E DC station batteries and DC switchboards for Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2. The new DC power supply system was designed and procured in compliance with current nuclear design practices and requirements. Technical issues that needed to be addressed included reconciling the requirements in both US and Russian codes and satisfying the requirements of the Russian nuclear regulatory authority. Close interface with ATOMENERGOPROEKT (AEP), the Russian design organization, KOLA NPP plant personnel, and GOSATOMNASZOR (GAN), the Russian Version of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was necessary to develop a design that would assure compliance with current Russian design requirements. Hence, this project was expected to serve as an example for plant upgrades at other similar VVER-440 nuclear plants. In addition to technical issues, the project needed to address language barriers and the logistics of shipping equipment to a remote section of the Former Soviet Union.

  3. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-1: Pressurized Water Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is the PWR…

  4. Pressure separation and gas flows in a prototype vacuum-pumped solar-thermochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermanoski, Ivan; Orozco, Adrian; Grobbel, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    A detailed design of pressure separation by packed columns of particles, in a solar-thermochemical reactor prototype, is presented. Results show that the concept is sound and robust under a multitude operational conditions. Straightforward control approaches, such as pumping speed and pressure adjustments, can be implemented to cover a wide range of contingencies.

  5. Pressure Vessel and Internals of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, C.V.; Padovani, E.; Cammi, A.; Collado, J.M.; Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral light water cooled, low-to-medium power reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors. Its integrated layout features a pressure vessel containing all the main primary circuit components: the internals and the biological shield, here described together with the pressure vessel, plus the steam generators, the pressurizer, and the main coolant pumps described in companion papers. For this reason the pressure vessel is a crucial component of the plant, which deserves the most demanding design effort. The wide inner annulus around the core is exploited to insert steel plates, in order to improve the inner shielding capability up to the elimination of the external biological shielding and to simplify decommissioning activities by having all the irradiated components inside the vessel. (authors)

  6. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was

  7. Pressure-Letdown Machine for a Coal Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.; Mabe, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Pumps operating in reverse generate power. Conceptual pressure-letdown machine for coal-liquefaction system extracts energy from expansion of product fluid. Mud pumps, originally intended for use in oil drilling, operated in reverse so their motors act as generators. Several pumps operated in alternating phase to obtain multiple stages of letdown from inlet pressure to outlet pressure. About 75 percent of work generates inlet pressure recoverable as electrical energy.

  8. Influence of temperature gradients on partial pressures in a low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterlaken, T. G. M.; Leusink, G. J.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Radelaar, S.; Kuijlaars, K. J.; Kleijn, C. R.; van den Akker, H. E. A.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements and calculations of the influence of temperature gradients on the partial pressures of the gas species in a cold-wall chemical-vapor-deposition reactor are presented. The experiments were performed at low pressures (300-500 Pa total pressure) and gas mixtures consisting of hydrogen, nitrogen, and tetrafluoromethane. The partial pressures were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The Soret effect (or thermal diffusion) has a large influence on the partial pressures of heavy gases in the vicinity of the heated wafer. In some cases a decrease in partial pressure of 20% compared to the inlet partial pressures was observed. Numerical calculations were performed to predict the behavior of the gas mixture. For mixtures under investigation the gas temperatures as well as the changes in partial pressures due to the Soret effect were predicted correctly.

  9. Retrospective Dosimetry of Vver 440 Reactor Pressure Vessel at the 3RD Unit of Dukovany Npp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Sus, F.; Klupak, V.; Rataj, J.; Hogel, J.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) residual lifetime of the Czech VVER-440 is currently monitored under Surveillance Specimens Programs (SSP) focused on reactor pressure vessel materials. Neutron fluence in the samples and its distribution in the RPV are determined by a combination of calculation results and the experimental data coming from the reactor dosimetry measurements both in the specimen containers and in the reactor cavity. The direct experimental assessment of the neutron flux density incident onto RPV and neutron fluence for the entire period of nuclear power plant unit operation can be based on the evaluation of the samples taken from the inner RPV cladding. The Retrospective Dosimetry was also used at Dukovany NPP at its 3rd unit after the 18th cycle. The paper describes methodology, experimental setup for sample extraction, measurement of activities, and the determination of the neutron flux and fluence averaged over the samples.

  10. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs.

  11. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  12. Ab initio simulation of radiation damage in nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Daniel; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Using Kinetic Monte Carlo we developed a code to study point defect hopping in BCC metallic alloys using energetics and attempt frequencies calculated using VASP, an electronic structure software package. Our code provides a way of simulating the effects of neutron radiation on potential reactor materials. Specifically we will compare the Molybdenum-Chromium alloy system to steel alloys for use in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  13. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher

  14. Retrofittable Modifications to Pressurized Water Reactors for Improved Resource Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency under BOA AC9NX707 (Task Order 80-02), as part of the Agency's continuing program on improved fuel utilization in light water reactors. The objective of the study was to investigate improvements in fuel management and design of water reactors (PWRs) that could potentially increase the utilization of natural uranium resources in a once-through fuel cycle (i.e., without using spent fuel reprocessing and recycle). For the present study, potential improvements were limited to retrofittable concepts, i.e., those which could be modifications to the reactor system or balance of plant. The potential improvements considered were not necessarily restricted to those which might be economical under current uranium ore prices or to those which might be acceptable to the nuclear industry at the present time. A six-month fuel cycle, for example, although technically possible, would be neither economical nor accept able to the industry at the present time. Although all potential improvements are not necessarily compatible with each other, the target objective was to seek a composite system of compatible improvements that, if possible, could increase uranium resource utilization by 30% or more. Economic factors, risks involved in the introduction, and potential licensing concerns are also addressed in the report.

  15. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  16. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cyrus M; Nanstad, Randy K; Clayton, Dwight A; Matlack, Katie; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Light, Glenn

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  17. Non-invasive liquid level and density gauge for nuclear power reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.; Jester, W.A.; Kenney, E.S.; Mc Master, I.B.; Schultz, M.A.

    1987-01-27

    A method is described of non-invasively determining the liquid coolant level and density in a nuclear power reactor pressure vessel comprising the steps: positioning at least three neutron detector fission chambers externally of the reactor pressure vessel at multiple spaced positions along the side of the fuel core. One of the neutron detectors is positioned at the side near the bottom of the fuel core. The multiple spaced positions along the side remove any ambiguity as to whether the liquid level is decreasing or increasing: shielding the neutron detector fission chamber from thermal neutrons to avoid the noise associated therewith, and eliminating the effects of gamma radiation from the detected signals; monitoring the detected neutron level signals to determine to coolant liquid level and density in the nuclear power reactor pressure vessel.

  18. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  19. Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Plasma-chemical reactor based on a low-pressure pulsed arc discharge for synthesis of nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Lepeshev, A. A.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    A reactor for producing nanopowders in the plasma of a low-pressure arc discharge has been developed. As a plasma source, a pulsed cold-cathode arc evaporator has been applied. The design and operating principle of the reactor have been described. Experimental data on how the movement of a gaseous mixture in the reactor influences the properties of nanopowders have been presented.

  1. In-Reactor Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 Under Low Water Vapor Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330° and 370°C). Data from these tests will be used to support fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex- reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  2. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 ºC). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  3. Prediction of radiation induced hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castin, N.; Malerba, L.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use an artificial neural network approach to obtain predictions of neutron irradiation induced hardening, more precisely of the change in the yield stress, for reactor pressure vessel steels of pressurized water nuclear reactors. Different training algorithms are proposed and compared, with the goal of identifying the best procedure to follow depending on the needs of the user. The numerical importance of some input variables is also studied. Very accurate numerical regressions are obtained, by taking only four input variables into account: neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, and chemical composition (Cu and Ni content). Accurate extrapolations in term of neutron fluence are obtained.

  4. PALS combined with Charpy-V tests at WWER reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, V.; Kryukov, A.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Sojak, S.; Sabelová, V.; Hinca, R.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents results from our long-term studies of irradiated, commercially used WWER reactor pressure vessel steels. Results from Charpy-V tests and positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques are compared and discussed in details, having in mind actual state of art and other microstructural studies in this area. The optimal region for annealing of irradiation induced defects was analyzed. It was shown that WWER steel with low impurity contents has good radiation stability and operation these reactor pressure vessels could be extended beyond a design lifetime.

  5. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  6. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  7. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  8. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Atwood; V. N. Shah; W. J. Galyean

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  9. Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S.; Park, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

  10. Elevated temperature mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, H. E.; Rittenhouse, P. L.

    1990-04-01

    A testing program is in progress to define the tensile and creep properties of SA533 Grade B Class 1 steel at temperatures from 371 to 538 °C. The overall objective is to provide the data necessary to obtain ASME Code approval for use of this material for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) vessel during short-term temperature excursions above 371 °C. Testing and evaluation involve three heats of base metal, two submerged arc welds, and a shielded metal arc weld. The creep strengths of the base metal heats and the weldments were found to be equivalent; the weld metal itself is slightly stronger. The data obtained indicate that stress to produce 1% strain will likely be the controlling factor in setting the allowable stresses for design.

  11. Gamma dose rate estimation and operation management suggestions for decommissioning the reactor pressure vessel of HTR-PM

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Fang; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Wenqian Li; Feng Xie; Jiejuan Tong

    2013-07-01

    China is now designing and constructing a high temperature gas cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM). In order to investigate the future decommissioning approach and evaluate possible radiation dose, gamma dose rate near the reactor pressure vessel was calculated for different cooling durations using QAD-CGA program. The source term of this calculation was provided by KORIGEN program. Based on the calculated results, the spatial distribution and temporal changes of gamma dose rate near reactor pressure vessel was systematically analyzed. A suggestion on planning decommissioning operation of reactor pressure vessel of HTRPM was given based on calculated dose rate and the Chinese Standard GB18871-2002. (authors)

  12. The Information Fusion Embrittlement Models for U.S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domain model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The

  13. Optimization of Pressurized Oxy-Combustion with Flameless Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malavasi, Massimo; Landegger, Gregory

    2014-06-30

    Pressurized OxyECombustion is one of the most promising technologies for utility-scale power generation plants. Benefits include the ability to burn low rank coal and capture CO2. By increasing the flue gas pressure during this process, greater efficiencies are derived from increased quantity and quality of thermal energy recovery. UPA with modeling support from MIT and testing and data verification by Georgia Tech’s Research Center designed and built a 100 kW system capable of demonstrating pressurized oxyEcombustion using a flameless combustor. Wyoming PRB coal was run at 15 and 32 bar. Additional tests were not completed but sampled data demonstrated the viability of the technology over a broader range of operating pressures, Modeling results illustrated a flat efficiency curve over 20 bar, with optimum efficiency achieved at 29 bar. This resulted in a 33% (HHV) efficiency, a 5 points increase in efficiency versus atmospheric oxy-combustion, and a competitive cost of electricity plus greater CO2 avoidance costs then prior study’s presented. UPA’s operation of the bench-scale system provided evidence that key performance targets were achieved: flue gas sampled at the combustor outlet had non-detectable residual fly ashes, and low levels of SO3 and heavy-metal. These results correspond to prior pressurized oxy-combustion testing completed by IteaEEnel.

  14. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  15. Apparatus and process to eliminate diffusional limitations in a membrane biological reactor by pressure cycling

    DOEpatents

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1989-08-29

    An improved multilayer continuous biological membrane reactor and a process to eliminate diffusional limitations in membrane reactors in achieved by causing a convective flux of nutrient to move into and out of an immobilized biocatalyst cell layer. In a pressure cycled mode, by increasing and decreasing the pressure in the respective layers, the differential pressure between the gaseous layer and the nutrient layer is alternately changed from positive to negative. The intermittent change in pressure differential accelerates the transfer of nutrient from the nutrient layers to the biocatalyst cell layer, the transfer of product from the cell layer to the nutrient layer and the transfer of byproduct gas from the cell layer to the gaseous layer. Such intermittent cycling substantially eliminates mass transfer gradients in diffusion inhibited systems and greatly increases product yield and throughput in both inhibited and noninhibited systems.

  16. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  17. Reactor Pressure Vessel Temperature Analysis for Prismatic and Pebble-Bed VHTR Designs

    SciTech Connect

    H. D. Gougar; C. B. Davis

    2006-04-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code.

  18. Numerical simulation of hydrogen diffusion in the pressure vessel wall of a WWER-440 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toribio, J.; Vergara, D.; Lorenzo, M.

    2017-07-01

    Materials forming the wall of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (NRPV) can undergo in-service failure due to the presence of hydrogen, which enhances the fracture process known as hydrogen embrittlement (HE). A common way of avoiding this damage phenomenon is using a cladding material at the vessel wall side exposed to the hydrogenating source. This layer acts as a barrier for hydrogen diffusion and, hence, it protects the base material. In this paper, a numerical model of hydrogen diffusion assisted by stress and strain is used to analyse the hydrogen distribution, and hence the HE, in the pressure vessel wall of a real widely spread WWER-440 reactor considering two thickness for the cladding layer. Results show how the hydrogen accumulation is delayed as the thickness of the cladding layer increases, thus delaying the HE phenomenon affecting the structural integrity of the reactor.

  19. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  20. Dosimetry assessments for the reactor pressure vessel and core barrel in UK PWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, D.A.; Allen, D.A.; Huggon, A.P.; Picton, D.J.; Robinson, A.T.; Steadman, R.J.; Seren, T.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.

    2011-07-01

    Specimens for the Sizewell B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inservice steels surveillance program are irradiated inside eight capsules located within the reactor pressure vessel and loaded prior to commissioning. The periodic removal of these capsules and testing of their contents provides material properties data at intervals during the lifetime of the plant. Neutron activation measurements and radiation transport calculations play an essential role in assessing the neutron exposure of the specimens and RPV. Following the most recent withdrawal, seven capsules have now been removed covering nine cycles of reactor operation. This paper summarizes the dosimetry results of the Sizewell B surveillance program obtained to date. In addition to an overview of the calculational methodology it includes a review of the measurements. Finally, it describes an extension of the methodology to provide dosimetry recommendations for the core barrel and briefly discusses the results that were obtained. (authors)

  1. Characteristics of Spent Fuel from Plutonium Disposition Reactors, Vol. 1: The Combustion Engineering System 80+ Pressurized-Water-Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses a simulation study of the burnup of mixed-oxide fuel in a Combustion Engineering System 80+ Pressurized-Water Reactor. The mixed oxide was composed of uranium and plutonium oxides where the plutonium was of weapons-grade composition. The study was part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program that considered the possibility of fueling commercial reactors with weapons plutonium. The isotopic composition of the spent fuel is estimated at various times following discharge. Actinides and all significant fission products are considered. The activities, decay-heat values, and gamma-ray fluxes associated with the spent fuel are also discussed. It is clear from the analysis that following discharge the plutonium is no longer of weapons-grade composition. The characteristics of the mixed-oxide fuel at various times following discharge indicate its behavior under long-term storage. As a counterpoint to the mixed-oxide fuel case, the situation with a similar reactor fueled with uranium oxide alone is analyzed. The comparisons serve to emphasize the significance of the plutonium as part of the fuel. For the mixed-oxide case, the burnup was 42,200 MWd/MTHM; in the pure-uranium case, it was 47,800 MWd/MTHM.

  2. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  3. Pressure-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition: micro capillary versus autoclave reactor performance.

    PubMed

    Borukhova, Svetlana; Seeger, Andreas D; Noël, Timothy; Wang, Qi; Busch, Markus; Hessel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Pressure effects on regioselectivity and yield of cycloaddition reactions have been shown to exist. Nevertheless, high pressure synthetic applications with subsequent benefits in the production of natural products are limited by the general availability of the equipment. In addition, the virtues and limitations of microflow equipment under standard conditions are well established. Herein, we apply novel-process-window (NPWs) principles, such as intensification of intrinsic kinetics of a reaction using high temperature, pressure, and concentration, on azide-alkyne cycloaddition towards synthesis of Rufinamide precursor. We applied three main activation methods (i.e., uncatalyzed batch, uncatalyzed flow, and catalyzed flow) on uncatalyzed and catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. We compare the performance of two reactors, a specialized autoclave batch reactor for high-pressure operation up to 1800 bar and a capillary flow reactor (up to 400 bar). A differentiated and comprehensive picture is given for the two reactors and the three methods of activation. Reaction speedup and consequent increases in space-time yields is achieved, while the process window for favorable operation to selectively produce Rufinamide precursor in good yields is widened. The best conditions thus determined are applied to several azide-alkyne cycloadditions to widen the scope of the presented methodology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beach, N J; Knapp, S M M; Landis, C R

    2015-10-01

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from -90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  5. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  6. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems.

  7. Stochastic model to monitor mechanical vibrations in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using neutron flux and core-exit temperature signals in PWRs for estimating core coolant flow velocity has been demonstrated using normal operational data from both the LOFT reactor and a commerical PWR. The LOFT analysis further showed that the core coolant velocity can be accurately monitored for various flow rates using the linear phase-frequency relationship in the frequency range 0.1 to 2 Hz. The development of the technique for monitoring core coolant velocity in PWRs provides a valuable alternative for flow measurement. Theoretical studies of core heat transfer in PWRs showed that the fluctuating heat sources have a dominating effect on the core-exit temperature compared to fluctuations of the coolant flow rate and core inlet coolant temperature. In the present analysis a detailed distributed parameter model of a PWR core was developed with the purpose of studying the following aspects of core coolant flow rate measurement: the mechanisms causing linear phase relationship between neutron flux and coolant temperature signals due to various perturbation sources; the effect of axial flux shape on the phase slope (or estimated transit delay time); and the relationship between transit delay time and effective distance of temperature noise propagation to maintain the flow velocity invariant.

  8. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  9. Evaluation of waste pyrolysis characteristics in a pressurized fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Ono, A; Kurita, M; Nagashima, T; Horio, M

    2001-01-01

    To obtain the distribution of fuel components to gas, tar and char in a pressurized fluidized bed waste pyrolyzer, experiments were conducted with a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. Waste samples were fed batchwise from the top of the reactor into the fluidized bed of silica sand and pyrolyzed by nitrogen/nitrogen-O2 gas and the effects of pressure, particle size, heating rate and oxygen addition were investigated. In the case of rubber, the char yield tended to increase a little and the tar yield decrease over the pressure of 304-709 kPa. In comparison with the thermogravimetry data it was clearly demonstrated that the char yield from fluidized bed pyrolysis is much lower. A small amount of oxygen addition decreased both tar and char yields but its further increase did not affect them very much.

  10. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission HSST and HSSI Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report discusses development on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on reactor pressure vessel steel have shown that local brittle zones do not significantly degrade the material fracture toughness, constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased fracture toughness, and biaxial loading reduces but does not eliminate the shallow-flaw fracture toughness elevation. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch versus temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement and the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  11. Nondestructive characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels: A feasibility study. Technical note (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    Radiation damage to the walls of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) causes the steel to become more brittle and less able to withstand the thermal stresses of start-up and shut-down procedures. Current methods of monitoring the degree of embrittlement are based on measurements of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of surveillance specimens subjected to severe radiation damage inside the reactor itself. In order to improve on this conservative approach and extend the useful life of vessels that have been in service for many years, NIST undertook a feasibility study to investigate nondestructive techniques for inferring the DBTT of the pressure vessel wall itself. The approach used was based on the hypothesis that the changes in microstructure that accompany embrittlement could be detected by accurate measurements of the physical properties of the steel in the pressure vessel wall.

  12. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy.

  13. The role of gamma rays and freely-migrating defects in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E.

    1996-09-01

    Gamma ray effects are often neglected when evaluating reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement. However, recent analyses indicate that in newer style light water reactors, gamma damage can be a substantial fraction of the total displacement damage experienced by the (RPV); ignoring this damage will lead to errors in embrittlement predictions. Furthermore, gamma rays may be more efficient than fast neutrons at producing freely-migrating defects and as such can impact certain embrittlement mechanisms more effectively than fast neutrons. Consideration of these gamma effects are therefore essential for a more complete understanding of radiation embrittlement.

  14. Dosimetry analyses of the Ringhals 3 and 4 reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, J.A.; Fero, A.H.; Rouden, J.; Green, E.L.

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive series of neutron dosimetry measurements consisting of surveillance capsules, reactor pressure vessel cladding samples, and ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been analyzed and compared to the results of three-dimensional, cycle-specific neutron transport calculations for the Ringhals Unit 3 and Unit 4 reactors in Sweden. The comparisons show excellent agreement between calculations and measurements. The measurements also demonstrate that it is possible to perform retrospective dosimetry measurements using the {sup 93}Nb (n,n') {sup 93m}Nb reaction on samples of 18-8 austenitic stainless steel with only trace amounts of elemental niobium. (authors)

  15. The first critical experiment with a LEU Russian fuel IRT-4M at the training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Frybort, Jan

    2008-07-15

    A critical experiment is a standard part of training of students at the Training Reactor VR-1 operated within the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering at the Czech Technical University in Prague. In autumn 2005 the HEU fuel IRT-3M with enrichment 36 % {sup 235}U was replaced by the LEU fuel IRT-4M with enrichment 19.7 % {sup 235}U. The fuel replacement at the VR-1 Reactor is a part of an international program RERTR. This Paper presents basic information about preparation for the fuel replacement and approaching of the first critical state with the new zone configuration C1 which replaced B1 core with the old IRT-3M fuel. The whole process was carried out according to the Czech law and the relevant international recommendations. The experience with the VR-1 operation confirms the assumption that the C1 core configuration will be suitable from the point of view of the reactivity balance for the long term safe operation of the Training Reactor VR-1. (author)

  16. A new scanning tunneling microscope reactor used for high-pressure and high-temperature catalysis studies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Feng; Tang, David; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2008-08-01

    We present the design and performance of a homebuilt high-pressure and high-temperature reactor equipped with a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for catalytic studies. In this design, the STM body, sample, and tip are placed in a small high pressure reactor ( approximately 19 cm(3)) located within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber. A sealable port on the wall of the reactor separates the high pressure environment in the reactor from the vacuum environment of the STM chamber and permits sample transfer and tip change in UHV. A combination of a sample transfer arm, wobble stick, and sample load-lock system allows fast transfer of samples and tips between the preparation chamber, high pressure reactor, and ambient environment. This STM reactor can work as a batch or flowing reactor at a pressure range of 10(-13) to several bars and a temperature range of 300-700 K. Experiments performed on two samples both in vacuum and in high pressure conditions demonstrate the capability of in situ investigations of heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry at atomic resolution at a wide pressure range from UHV to a pressure higher than 1 atm.

  17. A new scanning tunneling microscope reactor used for high-pressure and high-temperature catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feng; Tang, David; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-08-01

    We present the design and performance of a homebuilt high-pressure and high-temperature reactor equipped with a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for catalytic studies. In this design, the STM body, sample, and tip are placed in a small high pressure reactor (˜19 cm3) located within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber. A sealable port on the wall of the reactor separates the high pressure environment in the reactor from the vacuum environment of the STM chamber and permits sample transfer and tip change in UHV. A combination of a sample transfer arm, wobble stick, and sample load-lock system allows fast transfer of samples and tips between the preparation chamber, high pressure reactor, and ambient environment. This STM reactor can work as a batch or flowing reactor at a pressure range of 10-13 to several bars and a temperature range of 300-700 K. Experiments performed on two samples both in vacuum and in high pressure conditions demonstrate the capability of in situ investigations of heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry at atomic resolution at a wide pressure range from UHV to a pressure higher than 1 atm.

  18. Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  19. Design strategies for optically-accessible, high-temperature, high-pressure reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  20. Safety system augmentation at Russian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Scerbo, J.A.; Satpute, S.N.; Donkin, J.Y.; Reister, R.A. |

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and procurement of a Class IE DC power supply system to upgrade plant safety at the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Kola NPP is located above the Arctic circle at Polyarnie Zorie, Murmansk, Russia. Kola NPP consists of four units. Units 1 and 2 have VVER-440/230 type reactors: Units 3 and 4 have VVER-440/213 type reactors. The VVER-440 reactor design is similar to the pressurized water reactor design used in the US. This project provided redundant, Class 1E DC station batteries and DC switchboards for Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2. The new DC power supply system was designed and procured in compliance with current nuclear design practices and requirements. Technical issues that needed to be addressed included reconciling the requirements in both US and Russian codes and satisfying the requirements of the Russian nuclear regulatory authority. Close interface with ATOMENERGOPROEKT (AEP), the Russian design organization, KOLA NPP plant personnel, and GOSATOMNADZOR (GAN), the Russian version of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was necessary to develop a design that would assure compliance with current Russian design requirements. Hence, this project was expected to serve as an example for plant upgrades at other similar VVER-440 nuclear plants. In addition to technical issues, the project needed to address language barriers and the logistics of shipping equipment to a remote section of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). This project was executed by Burns and Roe under the sponsorship of the US DOE as part of the International Safety Program (INSP). The INSP is a comprehensive effort, in cooperation with partners in other countries, to improve nuclear safety worldwide. A major element within the INSP is the improvement of the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors.

  1. Acquisition of Raman Spectrometer and High Temperature and Pressure Reactor for Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Based Hybrid Nanoparticles from Waste Wood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-27

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have purchased four instruments using this grant, including a custom built high temperature pressure reactor from Parr... pressure hydrothermal reactor (RC-Ni100, MTI corporation). These tools were fully installed and operational. We have also synthesized carbon materials...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Acquisition of Raman Spectrometer and High Temperature & Pressure Reactor for Synthesis and

  2. The Effect of Operating Temperature on De-pressurized Conduction Cooldown for a High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Brian E.; Woaye-Hune, Antony; Simoneau, Jan-Patrice; Gabeloteau, Thierry; Lefort, Frederic; Haque, Hamidul; Lommers, Lewis

    2004-07-01

    Passive decay heat removal through conduction and radiation (i.e., conduction cooldown) is a key feature of the high temperature reactor (HTR) designs currently being developed. Several evaluations of conduction cooldown performance have been performed previously for current HTR designs with core outlet temperatures of around 850 degrees Celsius. However, additional work is required to assess the impact of adopting alternate operating conditions, such as those of the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept (e.g., 1000 degrees Celsius outlet temperature). This study examines the effect of reactor operating temperature on de-pressurized conduction cooldown results. Numerical simulations of a de-pressurized conduction cooldown event for a prismatic block HTR are performed using STAR-CD{sup R}, a commercially available computational-fluid dynamics/ heat-transfer code. In parallel, calculations are performed using THERMIX, a code used in the German HTR program. These calculations first are performed for a design based on the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) configuration with an outlet temperature of 850 degrees Celsius. The calculations then are extended to VHTR operating conditions to assess the thermal consequences of higher outlet temperatures, and potentially lower inlet temperatures, on the fuel and reactor vessel. Increasing the outlet temperature to VHTR conditions (approximately 1000 degrees Celsius) results in a relatively small increase in the peak fuel temperature. A more significant effect results from changing the inlet temperature, since this change affects a much larger volume of graphite in the reactor. In all cases, changes in the operating temperature primarily influence only the early phases of the transient. The long-term behavior-governed by the quasi-steady-state balance of the decay heat power, the geometry, and the heat transport properties of the system-is less sensitive to such changes. Therefore, the significance

  3. Laser anemometry measurements of natural circulation flow in a scale model PWR reactor system. [Pressurized Water Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, J. R.; Schneider, S. J.; Stewart, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The natural circulation of a single phase fluid in a scale model of a pressurized water reactor system during a postulated grade core accident is analyzed. The fluids utilized were water and SF6. The design of the reactor model and the similitude requirements are described. Four LDA tests were conducted: water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with and without the participation of simulated steam generators; water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with the participation of simulated steam generators and with cold upflow of 12 lbm/min from the lower plenum; and SF6 with 0.9 kW of heat in the simulated core and without the participation of the simulated steam generators. For the water tests, the velocity of the water in the center of the core increases with vertical height and continues to increase in the upper plenum. For SF6, it is observed that the velocities are an order of magnitude higher than those of water; however, the velocity patterns are similar.

  4. Comparison of Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel and Surveillance Specimens for Various Core Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukanov, V. N.; Diemokhin, V. L.; Grytsenko, O. V.; Vasylieva, O. G.; Pugach, S. M.

    2009-08-01

    The comparative analysis of irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens and pressure vessel of VVER-1000 reactor has been carried out for various configurations of the core. It is proved the fluences onto specimens and a pressure vessel don't correlate with each other but only the spectral indexes do. It is revealed that in the case of the specimen reconstitution technique application the data on the assembly orientation to the reactor core is sufficient to complete four representative groups from the samples of any container assembly. It is shown that the standard surveillance program of VVER-1000 allows obtaining reliable information on the reactor pressure vessel state.

  5. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel (nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)). This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected.

  6. Effect of long-term thermal aging on magnetic property in reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Sato, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Klingensmith, D.; Odette, G. R.; Kikuchi, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Effect of long-term thermal aging at 290 and 500 °C on magnetic hysteresis property in reactor pressure vessel steels and simple model alloys have been investigated for times up to 8800 h. While Vickers hardness is insensitive to thermal aging at both temperatures, coercivity generally exhibits a slight decrease after aging at 290 °C. In particular, at a higher temperature of 500 °C a steady increase of coercivity was observed for reactor pressure vessel steels, whereas coercivity for simple model alloys exhibits an abrupt drop just after aging and the decrease was 20-30% of that before aging. The results were interpreted by the thermally-assisted formation of Cu-rich precipitates and recovery, but the latter has the dominant effect for simple model alloys because of their ferritic microstructure. The possible effect of relaxation of lattice strain created by dissolved interstitial atoms during neutron irradiation is proposed.

  7. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Steele, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracture mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.

  8. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  9. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  10. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a closure head penetration in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    ALLOY 600 has been used typically for penetrations through the closure head in pressurized water reactors because of its thermal compatibility with carbon steel, superior resistance to chloride attack and higher strength than the austenitic stainless steels. Recent plant operating experience with this alloy has indicated that this material may be susceptible to degradation. One of the major parameters relating to degradation of the head penetrations are the operational temperatures and stress levels in the penetration.

  11. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  12. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. In-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr 2.5Nb pressure tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Over forty years of in-reactor testing and over thirty years of operating experience in power reactors have provided a broad understanding of the in-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, and an extensive data-base upon which to base models for managing the life of existing reactors and for designing new ones. The effects of the major operating variables and many of the metallurgical variables are broadly understood. The deformation is often considered to comprise three components: thermal creep, irradiation growth and irradiation creep. Of the three, irradiation growth is best understood - it is thought to be driven by the diffusional anisotropy difference (DAD). It is still not clear whether the enhancement of creep by irradiation is due to climb-plus-glide (CPG), stress-induced preferred absorption (SIPA) or elasto-diffusion (ED). The least understood area is the transition between thermal creep and irradiation where the fast neutron flux may either suppress or enhance the creep rate. The three components are generally treated as additive in the models, although it is recognized that this is only a crude approximation of reality. There are still significant gaps in our knowledge besides the thermal- to irradiation-creep transition, for example, the effect of Mo which is produced from Nb by transmutation in the thermal neutron flux is not known, and on-going work is required in a number of areas. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the in-reactor deformation of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, and highlights areas for further research.

  14. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  15. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  16. Influence of fluence rate on radiation-induced mechanical property changes in reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L. )

    1990-03-01

    This report describes a set of experiments undertaken using a 2 MW test reactor, the UBR, to qualify the significance of fluence rate to the extent of embrittlement produced in reactor pressure vessel steels at their service temperature. The test materials included two reference plates (A 302-B, A 533-B steel) and two submerged arc weld deposits (Linde 80, Linde 0091 welding fluxes). Charpy-V (C{sub v}), tension and 0.5T-CT compact specimens were employed for notch ductility, strength and fracture toughness (J-R curve) determinations, respectively. Target fluence rates were 8 {times} 10{sup 10}, 6 {times} 10{sup 11} and 9 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} {minus}s{sup {minus}1}. Specimen fluences ranged from 0.5 to 3.8 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The data describe a fluence-rate effect which may extend to power reactor surveillance as well as test reactor facilities now in use. The dependence of embrittlement sensitivity on fluence rate appears to differ for plate and weld deposit materials. Relatively good agreement in fluence-rate effects definition was observed among the three test methods. 52 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. ); Lambert, H.E. )

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

  18. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  19. Russian Translatology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porozinskaya, Galina

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Russian translatology after 1950. Introduces in chronological order some of the most important Russian works and discusses their main points. Deals with Russian approaches to key problems in translation such as equivalence, pragmatic relations, audience orientation, and problems of cultural transfer. (SR)

  20. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  1. Hydrolases in supercritical CO2 and their use in a high-pressure membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Knez, Z; Habulin, M; Primozic, M

    2003-03-01

    The thermal stability and activity of enzymes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO(2)) and near-critical propane were studied at a pressure of 300 bar in the temperature range 20-90 degrees C. Proteinase from Carica papaya was incubated in microaqueous SC CO(2) at atmospheric pressure in a nonaqueous system. Lipase stability in an aqueous medium at atmospheric pressure and in SC CO(2) as well as near-critical propane at 100 bar and 40 degrees C was studied. In order to investigate the impact of solvent on lipases, these were chosen from different sources: Pseudomonas fluorescences, Rhizpous javanicus, Rhizopus niveus and porcine pancreas. On the basis of our previous study on lipase activities in dense gases, a high-pressure continuous flat-shape membrane reactor was designed. The hydrolysis of sunflower oil in SC CO(2) was performed as a model reaction in this reactor. The reaction was catalyzed by the lipase preparation Lipolase 100T and was performed at 50 degrees C and 200 bar.

  2. Isothermal and thermal-mechanical fatigue of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Balazs; Trampus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The fatigue life of the structural materials 15Ch2MFA (CrMoV-alloyed ferritic steel) and 08Ch18N10T (CrNi-alloyed austenitic steel) of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel under completely reserved total strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests were investigated. An advanced test facility was developed for GLEEBLE-3800 physical simulator which was able to perform thermomechanical fatigue experiments under in-service conditions of VVER nuclear reactors. The low cycle fatigue results were evaluated with the plastic strain based Coffin-Manson law, and plastic strain energy based model as well. It was shown that both methods are able to predict the fatigue life of reactor pressure vessel steels accurately. Interrupted fatigue tests were also carried out to investigate the kinetic of the fatigue evolution of the materials. On these samples microstructural evaluation by TEM was performed. The investigated low cycle fatigue behavior can provide reference for remaining life assessment and lifetime extension analysis.

  3. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    SciTech Connect

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  4. A plutonium-fueled high-moderated pressurized water reactor for the next century

    SciTech Connect

    Barbrault, P.

    1996-02-01

    Within the framework of French reprocessing policy, for several years, Electricite de France has been studying a high-moderating-ratio (HMR) pressurized water reactor that could accept 100% mixed-oxide (MOX) reloads. Total plutonium content is 9% to ensure a discharge burnup of 60,000 MWd/tonne. A high-moderating ratio (2.5 instead of 2.0) is obtained by replacing 36 fuel rods by water holes. This solution combines the advantages of high moderation (better efficiency of soluble boron, control rods, etc.) and technological continuity. The core should contain 241 fuel assemblies for a total thermal output of 4,250 MW(thermal). The fuel management is easy, but core control requires the use of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide for the control rods and {sup 10}B-enriched soluble boric acid for the primary system, thereby ensuring satisfactory core behavior under accident conditions such as control rod ejection and unexpected valve opening on the secondary side. The advantages of this 100% MOX core compared with a 50% MOX core are discussed. This concept is fully compatible with the future European pressurized reactor (EPR). This 100% MOX HMR reactor could be the plutonium version of the EPR.

  5. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  6. Re-evaluation of the dosimetry for reactor pressure-vessel surveillance capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, R.L.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Oberg, D.L.

    1982-03-01

    Revised fluences and displacements per atom (dpa) and their uncertainties were determined after re-evaluating the neutron dosimeters from forty-one pressurized water reactor (PWR) surveillance capsules. The goals of this HEDL Reactor Dosimetry Center work are (1) to apply and test new ASTM recommended physics-dosimetry analysis methods and data being developed for LWR power plant surveillance and (2) to provide improved neutron exposure values for reactor pressure vessel steel metallurgical data bases; particularly for the changes in nil ductility transition temperature (..delta..NDTT) and upper shelf energy. Uncertainties in the FERRET-SAND adjustment Code derived neutron exposure values range from 10 to 34%. The ratio of the new to the old exposure values for fluence greater than 1 MeV varied from a low of 0.79 to a high of 2.11, with an average value of 1.30. The fission reactions for /sup 238/U and /sup 237/Np were found to be instrumental in producing low uncertainties in the exposure values (10 to 15%) whereas with their absence the uncertainty increased to 25 to 34%. Corrections for fissile impurity atoms in the /sup 238/U dosimeters were found to be as high as 29% in some cases. Other sources of corrections such as surveillance capsule perturbations and photo fission reactions have been considered.

  7. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in the throttle of the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarunichev, V. A.; Orlova, E. E.; Lemekhov, Yu. V.; Shpanskii, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    This work in devoted to numerical calculation of turbulent flow in a labyrinth-type throttle. A system of such throttles is installed at the inlet to the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber and serves for setting up the required pressure difference and coolant flow rate. MBIR is a multipurpose fourthgeneration fast-neutron research reactor intended for investigating new kinds of nuclear fuel, structural materials, and coolants. The aim of this work is to develop a verified procedure for carrying out 3D calculation of the throttle using CFD modeling techniques. The investigations on determining the throttle hydraulic friction coefficient were carried out in the range of Reynolds numbers Re = 52000-136000. The reactor coolant (liquid sodium) was modeled by tap water. The calculations were carried out using high-Reynolds-number turbulence models with the near-wall functions k-ɛ and RNG k-ɛ, where k is the turbulent pulsation kinetic energy and ɛ is the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate. The obtained results have shown that the calculated value of hydraulic friction coefficient differs from its experimental value by no more than 10%. The developed procedure can be applied in determining the hydraulic friction coefficient of a modified labyrinth throttle design. The use of such calculation will make it possible to predict an experiment with the preset accuracy.

  8. On-line Analysis of Catalytic Reaction Products Using a High-Pressure Tandem Micro-reactor GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Kim, Young-Min; Hosaka, Akihiko; Watanabe, Chuichi; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime; Kim, Seungdo; Park, Young-Kwon; Wang, Kaige; Freeman, Robert R

    2017-01-01

    When a GC/MS system is coupled with a pressurized reactor, the separation efficiency and the retention time are directly affected by the reactor pressure. To keep the GC column flow rate constant irrespective of the reaction pressure, a restrictor capillary tube and an open split interface are attached between the GC injection port and the head of a GC separation column. The capability of the attached modules is demonstrated for the on-line GC/MS analysis of catalytic reaction products of a bio-oil model sample (guaiacol), produced under a pressure of 1 to 3 MPa.

  9. Neutron fluence determination for VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel aging surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, K.D.; Apostolov, T.G.; Belousov, S.I.; Antonov, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The neutron flux and fluence determination on Bulgarian VVER-440/230 (Units No. 1--4 of Kozloduy NPP) Reactor Pressure Vessels is discussed. In these reactors weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. The choice of the neutron transport calculational parameters is substantiated. The inconsistency of 3D neutron flux values obtained by the 3D code TORT and by the synthesis method of DOT 2D results in the point of most severe irradiation embrittlement is within 3% limits range. Radiochemical analysis of the templets sampled out from the Unit No. 2 vessel after 16 cycles of exploitation, before and after the annealing, was carried out. The calculated and experimental values of the neutron fluence on the Unit 2 RPV are compared.

  10. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    DOE PAGES

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; ...

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code calledmore » NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.« less

  11. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.

  12. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Gou, P.F.; Chu, C.L.; Oliver, R.P.

    1999-07-27

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block. 6 figs.

  13. Assemblies and methods for mitigating effects of reactor pressure vessel expansion

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Gou, Perng-Fei; Chu, Cherk Lam; Oliver, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Support assemblies for allowing RPV radial expansion while simultaneously limiting horizontal, vertical, and azimuthal movement of the RPV within a nuclear reactor are described. In one embodiment, the support assembly includes a support block and a guide block. The support block includes a first portion and a second portion, and the first portion is rigidly coupled to the RPV adjacent the first portion. The guide block is rigidly coupled to a reactor pressure vessel support structure and includes a channel sized to receive the second portion of the support block. The second portion of the support block is positioned in the guide block channel to movably couple the guide block to the support block.

  14. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  15. Automated Microdosing System for Integration With a Miniaturized High-pressure Reactor System.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Norbert; Hawali, Ihsan; Thurow, Kerstin

    2005-01-01

    We present a new automated dosing system developed by the Institute for Automation of the University of Rostock, Germany. The new system is designed for the dosing of chemical liquids in the range of 50 muL-2.5 mL. It is integrated into a miniaturized reactor system to be used in the field of combinatorial synthesis. The reactor system can be pressurized up to 150 bar and tempered up to 200(;)C. A wide range of liquids with different physical properties can be handled with the new dosing system. A detailed description of the new dosing system in terms of function and operation as well as the relevant features and potential benefits is provided.

  16. Positron annihilation study of Fe-ion irradiated reactor pressure vessel model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Li, Z. C.; Schut, H.; Sekimura, N.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of reactor pressure vessel steels under irradiation, which results from the hardening and embrittlement caused by a high number density of nanometer scale damage, is of increasingly crucial concern for safe nuclear power plant operation and possible reactor lifetime prolongation. In this paper, the radiation damage in model alloys with increasing chemical complexity (Fe, Fe-Cu, Fe-Cu-Si, Fe-Cu-Ni and Fe-Cu-Ni-Mn) has been studied by Positron Annihilation Doppler Broadening spectroscopy after 1.5 MeV Fe-ion implantation at room temperature or high temperature (290 oC). It is found that the room temperature irradiation generally leads to the formation of vacancy-type defects in the Fe matrix. The high temperature irradiation exhibits an additional annealing effect for the radiation damage. Besides the Cu-rich clusters observed by the positron probe, the results show formation of vacancy-Mn complexes for implantation at low temperatures.

  17. Radial pressure profiles in a cold‐flow gas‐solid vortex reactor

    PubMed Central

    Pantzali, Maria N.; Kovacevic, Jelena Z.; Marin, Guy B.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    A unique normalized radial pressure profile characterizes the bed of a gas‐solid vortex reactor over a range of particle densities and sizes, solid capacities, and gas flow rates: 950–1240 kg/m3, 1–2 mm, 2 kg to maximum solids capacity, and 0.4–0.8 Nm3/s (corresponding to gas injection velocities of 55–110 m/s), respectively. The combined momentum conservation equations of both gas and solid phases predict this pressure profile when accounting for the corresponding measured particle velocities. The pressure profiles for a given type of particles and a given solids loading but for different gas injection velocities merge into a single curve when normalizing the pressures with the pressure value downstream of the bed. The normalized—with respect to the overall pressure drop—pressure profiles for different gas injection velocities in particle‐free flow merge in a unique profile. © 2015 The Authors AIChE Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 61: 4114–4125, 2015 PMID:27667827

  18. Reactor vessel dosimetry benchmarks for commercial VVER-440 plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, S.M.; Gurevich, M.I.; Osmera, B.

    1997-12-01

    The reactor pressure vessel dosimetry benchmarks were created on the basis of the VVER-440 mockup experiments carried out on the LR-0 experimental reactor by the Nuclear Research Institute in the Czech Republic, Skoda Nuclear Machinery in the Czech Republic, and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute in Russia from 1984 through 1990. Several VVER-440 mockups with standard and low leakage cores have been investigated.

  19. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  20. Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Reactor Vessel cooperative research and development agreement with Innotek, Inc., Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.; Deverman, G.S.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER) has provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. This document details a cooperative research and development agreement for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The Technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R&D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER.

  1. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  2. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-Pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  3. Advanced Computational Modeling of Vapor Deposition in a High-pressure Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; McCall, Sonya D.; Cardelino, Carlos A.; Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In search of novel approaches to produce new materials for electro-optic technologies, advances have been achieved in the development of computer models for vapor deposition reactors in space. Numerical simulations are invaluable tools for costly and difficult processes, such as those experiments designed for high pressures and microgravity conditions. Indium nitride is a candidate compound for high-speed laser and photo diodes for optical communication system, as well as for semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. But InN and other nitride compounds exhibit large thermal decomposition at its optimum growth temperature. In addition, epitaxy at lower temperatures and subatmospheric pressures incorporates indium droplets into the InN films. However, surface stabilization data indicate that InN could be grown at 900 K in high nitrogen pressures, and microgravity could provide laminar flow conditions. Numerical models for chemical vapor deposition have been developed, coupling complex chemical kinetics with fluid dynamic properties.

  4. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout Caused by External Flooding Using the RISMC Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis; Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the application of a RISMC detailed demonstration case study for an emergent issue using the RAVEN and RELAP-7 tools. This case study looks at the impact of a couple of challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a power uprate, (2) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (3) and earthquake induces station-blackout, and (4) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  6. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature ({minus}60{degree}C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Regulatory Activities Related to Circumferential Cracking of Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Penetration Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, Allen L. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    The recent discoveries of cracked and leaking Alloy 600 vessel head penetration (VHP) nozzles, including control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) and thermocouple nozzles, at four pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have raised concerns about the structural integrity of VHP nozzles throughout the PWR industry. Nozzle cracking at Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 1 in November 2000 and Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 in February 2001 was limited to axial cracking, an occurrence deemed to be of limited safety concern in the NRC staff's generic safety evaluation on the cracking of VHP nozzles dated November 19, 1993. However, the discovery of circumferential cracking at Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 in February 2001 and Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 2 in April 2001 particularly the large circumferential cracking identified in two CRDM nozzles at ONS3 has raised concerns about the potential safety implications and prevalence of cracking in VHP nozzles in PWRs. In response to the circumferential cracking identified at the Oconee units, the NRC issued Bulletin 2001-01, 'Circumferential Cracking of Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Penetration Nozzles', on August 3, 2001. This bulletin requests information from licensees related to the structural integrity of the reactor pressure VHP nozzles for their facilities, including the extent of VHP nozzle leakage and cracking that has been found to date, the inspections and repairs that have been undertaken to satisfy applicable regulatory requirements, future plans to inspect VHP nozzles, and a description of how future inspection plans will ensure compliance with applicable regulatory requirements. This paper summarizes the staff's review and assessment of licensee responses to NRC Bulletin 2001-01. (author)

  8. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

  9. Atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) and ZnO at atmospheric pressure in a flow tube reactor.

    PubMed

    Jur, Jesse S; Parsons, Gregory N

    2011-02-01

    Improving nanoscale thin film deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) to permit operation at ambient pressure is important for high-throughput roll-to-roll processing of emerging flexible substrates, including polymer sheets and textiles. We present and investigate a novel reactor design for inorganic materials growth by ALD at atmospheric pressure. The reactor uses a custom "pressure boost" approach for delivery of low vapor pressure ALD precursors that controls precursor dose independent of reactor pressure. Analysis of continuum gas flow in the reactor shows key relations among reactor pressure, inert gas flow rate, and species diffusion that define conditions needed to efficiently remove product and adsorbed reactive species from the substrate surface during the inert gas purge cycle. Experimental results, including in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) characterization and film thickness measurements for deposition of ZnO and Al(2)O(3) are presented and analyzed as a function of pressure and gas flow rates at 100 °C. At atmospheric pressure and high gas flow, ZnO deposition can proceed at the same mass uptake and growth rate as observed during more typical low pressure ALD. However, under the same high pressure and flow conditions the mass uptake and growth rate for Al(2)O(3) is a factor of ∼1.5-2 larger than at low pressure. Under these conditions, Al(2)O(3) growth at atmospheric pressure in a "flow-through" geometry on complex high surface area textile materials is sufficiently uniform to yield functional uniform coatings.

  10. Calculation of Internal Pressures in the Fuel Tube of a Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B. M.; Allen, G.

    1952-01-01

    General procedures for computing internal pressures in fuel tubes of nuclear reactors are described and the effects on the pressure of varying neutron flux, fissioning material, and operating temperatures are discussed. A general proof is given that during pile operation each fission product is monotonically increasing and therefore a maximum amount of all elements is present at the time of shit down. The post-shutdown build-up of elements that are held in check during pile operation because of their inordinately high capture cross sections is calculated quantitatively. An account of chemical interactions between the many fission-product elements and the resulting effect on the total pressure completes the discussion. The general methods are illustrated by calculations applied to a system consisting of 90 percent enriched U235 in the form of UO2 packed into a hollow metal cylinder or "pin", operating at a flux of 8 x 10(exp 14) at 2000 F. Calculations of the pressure inside a pin are made with and without a sodium metal heat-transfer additive. The bulk of the pressure is shown to depend on the four elements, xenon, krypton, rubidium, and cesium; the amount of free oxygen, however, was also significant. For a shutdown time of 10(exp 6) seconds, the pressure was about 100 atmospheres.

  11. Development of an improved-contact liquid-level probe for pressurized reactor vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, P. V., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    Electrical-conductivity-based probes for liquid level sensing show promise for pressurized water reactor environments, but have exhibited frequent bond failures at the ceramic/metal interfaces. A program to characterize and improve the interface behavior was completed successfully, and provided data for optimizing fabrication parameters, as well as general information on glass-to-metal bonding in a superalloy/silicate-glass system. The materials studied were Inconel X-750 and a barium silicate glass containing minor amounts of TiO2, CeO2, As2O3, Bi2O3, and Al2O3.

  12. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  13. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Falahi, A.; Haennine, M.; Porkholm, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  14. European pressurized water reactor (EPR) - an advanced LWR to fit the needs of European utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Teichel, H.; Pouget-Abadie, X.

    1997-12-01

    The European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is a project for the development of an advanced PWR pursued by Electricite de France and the major German utilities (RWEE, PreussenElektra, BAG et. al.) together with SIEMENS, Framatome and their common subsidiary NPI. In this project, the experience gained through the design, the erection, the commissioning and the operation of the existing PWR in France and Germany are combined and the existing technical solutions were carefully checked before adopted for the EPR. The deep involvement of the future operators since the beginning of the project guarantees an optimized operational behaviour and easy maintainability. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Advanced Concepts for Pressure-Channel Reactors: Modularity, Performance and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Romney B.; Pioro, Igor L.; Kuran, Sermet

    Based on an analysis of the development of advanced concepts for pressure-tube reactor technology, we adapt and adopt the pressure-tube reactor advantage of modularity, so that the subdivided core has the potential for optimization of the core, safety, fuel cycle and thermal performance independently, while retaining passive safety features. In addition, by adopting supercritical water-cooling, the logical developments from existing supercritical turbine technology and “steam” systems can be utilized. Supercritical and ultra-supercritical boilers and turbines have been operating for some time in coal-fired power plants. Using coolant outlet temperatures of about 625°C achieves operating plant thermal efficiencies in the order of 45-48%, using a direct turbine cycle. In addition, by using reheat channels, the plant has the potential to produce low-cost process heat, in amounts that are customer and market dependent. The use of reheat systems further increases the overall thermal efficiency to 55% and beyond. With the flexibility of a range of plant sizes suitable for both small (400 MWe) and large (1400 MWe) electric grids, and the ability for co-generation of electric power, process heat, and hydrogen, the concept is competitive. The choice of core power, reheat channel number and exit temperature are all set by customer and materials requirements. The pressure channel is a key technology that is needed to make use of supercritical water (SCW) in CANDU®1 reactors feasible. By optimizing the fuel bundle and fuel channel, convection and conduction assure heat removal using passive-moderator cooling. Potential for severe core damage can be almost eliminated, even without the necessity of activating the emergency-cooling systems. The small size of containment structure lends itself to a small footprint, impacts economics and building techniques. Design features related to Canadian concepts are discussed in this paper. The main conclusion is that development of

  16. Magnetic non-destructive evaluation of hardening of cold rolled reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejiao; Qiang, Wenjiang; Shu, Guogang

    2017-08-01

    Non-destructive test (NDT) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel is urgently required due to the life extension program of nuclear power plant. Here magnetic NDT of cold rolled RPV steel is studied. The strength, hardness and coercivity increase with the increasing deformation, and a good linear correlation between the increment of coercivity, hardness and yield strength is found, which may be helpful to develop magnetic NDT of degradation of RPV steel. It is also found that besides dislocation density, the distribution of dislocations may affect coercivity as well.

  17. Modeling of boron control during power transients in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, P.; Distexhe, E.

    1986-02-01

    Accurate control instructions in a reactor control aid computer are included in order to realize the boron makeup throughput, which is required to obtain the boron concentration in the primary coolant loop, predicted by a neutronic code. A modeling of the transfer function between the makeup and the primary loop is proposed. The chemical and volumetric control system, the pressurizer, and the primary loop are modeled as instantaneous diffusion cells. The pipes are modeled as time lag lines. The model provides the unstationary boron distributions in the different elements of the setup. A numerical code is developed to calculate the time evolutions of the makeup throughput during power transients.

  18. The development of the fast-running simulation pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Terashita, N.; Ogino, T. . Central Research Lab.)

    1989-06-01

    This article discusses a pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1) has been developed to apply to an operator support system or an advanced training simulator. The simulation code must produce reasonably accurate results as well as fun in a fast mode for realizing functions such as anomaly detection, estimation of unobservable plant internal states, and prediction of plant state trends. The NUPAC-1 code adopts fast computing methods, i.e., the table fitting method of the state variables, time-step control, and calculation control of heat transfer coefficients, in order to attain accuracy and fast-running capability.

  19. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite - moderated boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling channels in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  1. A microfluidic reactor for rapid, low-pressure proteolysis with on-chip electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Rob, Tamanna; Wilson, Derek J

    2010-02-01

    A microfluidic reactor that enables rapid digestion of proteins prior to on-line analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is introduced. The device incorporates a wide (1.5 cm), shallow (10 microm) reactor 'well' that is functionalized with pepsin-agarose, a design that facilitates low-pressure operation and high clogging resistance. Electrospray ionization is carried out directly from a short metal capillary integrated into the chip outlet. Fabrication, involving laser ablation of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), is exceedingly straightforward and inexpensive. High sequence coverage spectra of myoglobin (Mb), ubiquitin (Ub) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) digests were obtained after <4 s of residence time in the reactor. Stress testing showed little loss of performance over approximately 2 h continuous use at high flow rates (30 microL/min). The device provides a convenient platform for a range of applications in proteomics and structural biology, i.e. to enable high-throughput workflows or to limit back-exchange in spatially resolved hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  3. Improved reliability of residual heat removal capability in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Fitzpatrick, R.; Yoon, Won Hyo

    1987-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in supporting Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) effort towards the resolution of Generic Issue 99 ''Reactor Coolant System (RCS)/Residual Heat Removal (RHR) Suction Line Interlocks on Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs).'' Operational experience of US PWRs indicates that numerous loss of RHR events have occurred during plant shutdown. Of particular significance is the loss of RHR suction due to the inadvertent closure of the RHR suction/isolation valves or an excess lowering of the water level in the reactor vessel. In the absence of prompt mitigative action by the operator, the core may become uncovered. Various design/operational changes have been proposed. The objective of this paper is to estimate the improvement in the RHR reliability and the risk reduction potential provided by those proposed RHR design/operational changes. The benefits of those changes are expressed in terms of the reduction in the frequency of loss-of-cooling events and the frequency of core damage.

  4. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Messina, L.; Becquart, C. S.; Olsson, P.; Malerba, L.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a "grey-alloy" approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  5. Back corona enhanced organic film deposition inside an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Xie, Shuzheng; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    A grounded screen with short needle-like protrusions has been designed to generate back corona in an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) reactor. The grounded screen with protrusions is placed downstream at a variable gap length from an array of needles that is energized with 60 Hz high voltage. The excitation voltage is in the range 0--10 kV RMS and the feed gas mixture consists of argon and acetylene. A Lecroy 9350AL 500 MHz digital oscilloscope is used to monitor the reactor voltage and current using a resistive voltage divider and a current viewing resistor, respectively. The current signal contains many positive and negative current pulses associated with corona discharge. Analysis of the current signal shows asymmetry between positive and negative corona discharge currents. Photographs show substantial back corona generated near the tips of the protrusions situated at the grounded screen. The back corona activates via bond scission acetylene radicals that are transported downstream to form a plasma-polymerized film on a substrate positioned downstream from the grounded screen. The oscillograms will be used to generate corona mode maps that show the nature of the corona discharge as a function of gap spacing, applied voltage and many other reactor parameters.

  6. Assembly-level calculations for transuranics recycling in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.C.; Du, J. )

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we present fuel depletion calculations evaluating the feasibility and efficiency of transmuting transuranics (TRUs) from spent nuclear fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In contrast to previous studies, which focused on plutonium recycling, we consider recycling all TRUS, including neptunium, americium, and curium isotopes. Single-assembly and (2 x 2) color-set calculations have been performed with the CASMO assembly-level collision probability code to model equilibrium PWR configurations. There has been renewed interest in the separation and transmutation of TRUs for reducing the long-term radioactivity in spent-fuel repositories. With low capture-to-fission ratios for TRUs in a fast spectrum, liquid-metal reactors (LMRS) are often considered favorable for transmutation of TRUS. The TRU fission cross sections are, however, larger in a thermal spectrum, which offers the potential for thermal transmutors to operate with a smaller TRU inventory, resulting in a higher fractional depletion rate and a higher TRU inventory reduction (TIR) factor. The TIR factor is defined as the ratio of the TRU inventory, without the TRU transmutor, to the inventory that would accumulate with TRU reprocessing and recycling. We present a preliminary study on how standard PWR designs could realize these potential advantages of thermal spectrum reactors.

  7. On the thermal stability of late blooming phases in reactor pressure vessel steels: An atomistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Hou, M.; Van Neck, D.; Malerba, L.

    2013-11-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is the lifetime limiting factor of reactor pressure vessels in existing nuclear light water reactors. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. In view of improving the predictive capability of existing models it is necessary to understand better the mechanisms leading to the formation of these defects, amongst which the so-called "late blooming phases". In this work we study the stability of the latter by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Monte Carlo simulations based on a here developed quaternary FeCuNiMn interatomic potential. The potential is based on extensive DFT and experimental data. The reference DFT data on solute-solute interaction reveal that, while Mn-Ni pairs and triplets are unstable, larger clusters are kept together by attractive binding energy. The NiMnCu synergy is found to increase the temperature range of stability of solute atom precipitates in Fe significantly as compared to binary FeNi and FeMn alloys. This allows for thermodynamically stable phases close to reactor temperature, the range of stability being, however, very sensitive to composition.

  8. 2-D pressurized water reactor whole core benchmark problem development and MOCUM program verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oredeko, Ayoola Emmanuel

    The need to solve larger-scale and highly heterogeneous reactor problems is urgent nowadays; different computational codes are being developed to meet this demand. Method of characteristics unstructured meshing (MOCUM) is a transport theory code based on the method of characteristic as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor. The objective of this research was to use the MOCUM program to solve the whole core, highly heterogeneous pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem, to determine its efficiency in solving complicated benchmarks, the large scale full-core PWR benchmark problem presented in this work was modeled for high heterogeneity at the core and assembly level, and depicts a realistic reactor design. The design of the core is a 15x15 assembly arrangement and each assembly is based on the C5G7 assembly design, i.e, 17x17 fuel pins. The problem was simplified for faster computation time by using the 1/4 symmetry of the core. MATLAB is used for the visualization of the neutron flux for each group, and the fission rate. MOCUM result shows good agreement with monte carlo N-particles (MCNP6) solution with a -0.025% difference in eigenvalue (keff). The pin and assembly power calculated with MOCUM, shows good agreement with that of MCNP6; the maximum relative difference for pin and assembly power was -2.53% and -1.79% respectively. The power profiles from these two computational codes were compared and used to validate the MOCUM solutions.

  9. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  11. Neutron spectra at different High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel surveillance locations

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.; Kam, F.B.

    1993-12-01

    This project addresses the potential problem of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports. Surveillance specimens irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron flux levels (about 1.5E + 8 cm{sup {minus}2}.s{sup {minus}1}) and low temperatures (about 50{degrees}C) showed embrittlement more rapidly than expected. Commercial power reactors have similar flux levels and temperatures at the level vessel support structures. The purposes of this work are to provide the neutron fluence spectra data that are needed to evaluate previously measured mechanical property changes in the HFIR, to explain the discrepancies in neutron flux levels between the nickel dosimeters and two other dosimeters, neptunium and beryllium, and to address any questions or peculiarities of the HFIR reactor environment. The current work consists of neutron and gamma transport calculations, dosimetry measurements, and least-squares logarithmic adjustment to obtain the best estimates for the neutron spectra and the related neutron exposure parameters. The results indicate that the fission rates in neptunium-237 (Np-237) and uranium-238 (U-238) and the helium production rates in beryllium-9 (Be-9) are dominated by photo-induced reactions. The displacements per atom rate for iron (dpa/s) from gamma rays is five times higher than the dpa/s from neutrons. The neutron fluxes in key 7, position 5 do not show any significant gradient in the surveillance capsule, but key 4 and key 2 showed differences in magnitude as well as in the shape of the spectrum. The stainless steel monitor in the V-notch of the Charpy specimens of the surveillance capsules is adequate to determine the neutron flux above 1.0 MeV at the desired V-notch location. Simultaneous adjustment of neutron and gamma fluxes with the measurements has been demonstrated and should avoid future problems with photo-induced reactions.

  12. Development and verification of two-phase pressure drop correlations for RBMK-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvinys, Evaldas

    The available two-phase frictional pressure drop correlations are reviewed and compared, extending their applicability range to include the thermal-hydraulic conditions prevailing in RBMK reactor fuel channels. It is shown that the Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Service (HTFS) pressure drop correlation used in RELAP5 MOD 3.2.1.2 code has shortcomings. From the list of alternative correlations the Osmachkin and Friedel correlations are selected. The behavior of the above two correlations is explained and the shortcomings of the Osmachkin correlation are noted. In order to improve the Osmachkin correlation, a new concept of the free flow fraction is introduced. It is shown that using the free flow fraction one can predict the quality at which the homogeneous equilibrium model case pressure drop is approached. A computational algorithm for two-phase pressure drop multiplier is developed using the transition criteria based on the free flow fraction and also on the Friedel and Osmachkin two-phase pressure drop relations. This algorithm is implemented into the RELAP5 code. The performance of the updated code version is verified using the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant data base of operation parameters. The comparison reveals that the "updated" code version shows a better agreement with data. The performance of the updated and standard code versions is also investigated by modeling a group distribution header guillotine rupture in the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. Although the calculated results show differences, the deviation between the two code versions is within the engineering uncertainty range.

  13. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-15

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  14. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-01

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  15. Detection of small-sized near-surface under-clad cracks for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.; Crawford, S.L.; Doctor, S.R.; Posakony, G.J.

    1983-02-01

    The analysis of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) shows it is necessary for nondestructive evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting evaluation to demonstrate high probability of detecting cracks 0.250 inches deep and deeper at the clad/base metal interface. Ultrasonic techniques developed and used in Europe are evaluated in this paper for their applicability to US reactor pressure vessels for detecting cracks of interest for PTS. Flaw detectability experiments were carried out by testing the inspection technique's ability to detect artificial flaws under several types of clad, including some Manual Metal Arc (MMA) clad. Both ground and unground clad surfaces were evaluated. Crack sizing tests of the inspection technique were made using a crack tip diffraction technique.

  16. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Williams, Paul; Hoffman, William; Alfonsi, Andrea; Dickson, Terry; Bass, B. Richard; Klasky, Hilda

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  17. Irradiation and annealing behavior of 15Kh2MFA reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, K.; Bergmann, U.; Bergner, F.; Hampe, E.; Leonhardt, W.D.; Schuetzler, H.; Viehrig, H.

    1993-12-01

    This work deals with the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels used in the pressurized water reactors (PWR) of former Soviet type WWER-440. The materials under investigation were a forging (base metal 15Kh2MFA) and the corresponding weld. Charpy 5-notch specimens and tensile test specimens were irradiated in the PWR WWER-2 Rheinsberg at about 270 C up to the two neutron fluence levels of 4 {times} 10{sup 18} and 5 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Post irradiation annealing heat treatments were performed, among others a 475 C/152 h treatment of technical interest. A set of experimental data is given regarding the influence of sampling depth (through-thickness position within the forging), neutron irradiation, and annealing on the properties derived from instrumented Charpy impact testing, tensile and hardness tests. The ferrite content varies through the thickness of the forging. The variation of the mechanical properties can be explained qualitatively with the varying ferrite content. The surface layer of the forging is more sensitive to neutron irradiation than material from the 1/4-T position. To evaluate the effect of annealing heat treatment, the kinetics of the recovery process for the hardness has been investigated. The recovery coefficients for different mechanical properties and parameters have been compared. The annealing behavior is too complex to predict the effect of a large-scale annealing of an RPV on the basis of single hardness measurements.

  18. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  19. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-18

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  20. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  1. Simplified failure sequence evaluation of reactor pressure vessel head corroding in-core instrumentation assembly

    SciTech Connect

    McVicker, J.P.; Conner, J.T.; Hasrouni, P.N.; Reizman, A.

    1995-11-01

    In-Core Instrumentation (ICI) assemblies located on a Reactor Pressure Vessel Head have a history of boric acid leakage. The acid tends to corrode the nuts and studs which fasten the flanges of the assembly, thereby compromising the assembly`s structural integrity. This paper provides a simplified practical approach in determining the likelihood of an undetected progressing assembly stud deterioration, which would lead to a catastrophic loss of reactor coolant. The structural behavior of the In-Core Instrumentation flanged assembly is modeled using an elastic composite section assumption, with the studs transmitting tension and the pressure sealing gasket experiencing compression. Using the above technique, one can calculate the flange relative deflection and the consequential coolant loss flow rate, as well as the stress in any stud. A solved real life example develops the expected failure sequence and discusses the exigency of leak detection for safe shutdown. In the particular case of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) it is concluded that leak detection occurs before catastrophic failure of the ICI flange assembly.

  2. Assessment of Radiation Embrittlement in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzar, Davor

    2010-10-01

    The radiation-enhanced formation of small (1-2 nm) copper-rich precipitates (CRPs) is critical for the occurrence of embrittlement in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. Small CRPs are coherent with the bcc matrix, which causes local matrix strain and interaction with the dislocation strain fields, thus impeding dislocation mobility. As CRPs grow, there is a critical size at which a phase transformation occurs, whereby the CRPs are no longer coherent with the matrix, and the strain is relieved. Diffraction-line-broadening analysis (DLBA) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to characterize the precipitate formation in surrogate ferritic reactor-pressure vessel steels. The materials were aged for different times at elevated temperature to produce a series of specimens with different degrees of copper precipitation. SANS measurements showed that the precipitate size distribution broadens and shifts toward larger sizes as a function of ageing time. Mechanical hardness showed an increase with ageing time, followed by a decrease, which can be associated with the reduction in the number density as well as the loss of coherency at larger sizes. Inhomogeneous strain correlated with mechanical hardness.

  3. European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) SAR ATWS Accident Analyses by using 3D Code Internal Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Gagner, Renata; Lafitte, Helene; Dormeau, Pascal; Stoudt, Roger H.

    2004-07-01

    Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) accident analyses make part of the Safety Analysis Report of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), covering Risk Reduction Category A (Core Melt Prevention) events. This paper deals with three of the most penalizing RRC-A sequences of ATWS caused by mechanical blockage of the control/shutdown rods, regarding their consequences on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) and core integrity. A new 3D code internal coupling calculation method has been introduced. (authors)

  4. Reactor moderator, pressure vessel, and heat rejection system of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyke, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-megawatt open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 196,600 newtons (44,200 lb) and a specific impulse of 4400 seconds. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel, and waste heat rejection system) were considered conceptually and were sized.

  5. Assessment of the advantages of a residual heat removal system inside the reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, G.M.

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of research on diversified means for removing residual heat from pressurized water reactors, the CEA is studying a passive system called RRP (Refroidissement du Reacteur au Primaire, or primary circuit cooling system). This system consists of integrated heat-exchangers and a layout of the internal structures so as to obtain convection from the primary circuit inside the vessel, whatever the state of the loops. This system is operational for all primary circuit temperatures and pressures, as well as for a wide range of conditions: such as independent from the state of the loops, low volume of water in the primary circuit, compatibility with either a passive or an active operation mode, and compatibility with any other decay heat removal systems. This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the RRP system in the event of a small primary circuit break in a totally passive operation mode without the intervention of any another system. The results of this evaluation show the potential interest of such a system: a clear increase of the time-delay for the implementation of a low pressure safety injection system and no need for the use of a high pressure safety injection system.

  6. Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

  7. Chooz A, First Pressurized Water Reactor to be Dismantled in France - 13445

    SciTech Connect

    Boucau, Joseph; Mirabella, C.; Nilsson, Lennart; Kreitman, Paul J.; Obert, Estelle

    2013-07-01

    Nine commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down in France to date, of which the Chooz A plant underwent an extensive decommissioning and dismantling program. Chooz Nuclear Power Station is located in the municipality of Chooz, Ardennes region, in the northeast part of France. Chooz B1 and B2 are 1,500 megawatt electric (MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) currently in operation. Chooz A, a 305 MWe PWR implanted in two caves within a hill, began operations in 1967 and closed in 1991, and will now become the first PWR in France to be fully dismantled. EDF CIDEN (Engineering Center for Dismantling and Environment) has awarded Westinghouse a contract for the dismantling of its Chooz A reactor vessel (RV). The project began in January 2010. Westinghouse is leading the project in a consortium with Nuvia France. The project scope includes overall project management, conditioning of the reactor vessel (RV) head, RV and RV internals segmentation, reactor nozzle cutting for lifting the RV out of the pit and seal it afterwards, dismantling of the RV thermal insulation, ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) forecast to ensure acceptable doses for the personnel, complementary vacuum cleaner to catch the chips during the segmentation work, needs and facilities, waste characterization and packaging, civil work modifications, licensing documentation. The RV and RV internals will be segmented based on the mechanical cutting technology that Westinghouse applied successfully for more than 13 years. The segmentation activities cover the cutting and packaging plan, tooling design and qualification, personnel training and site implementation. Since Chooz A is located inside two caves, the project will involve waste transportation from the reactor cave through long galleries to the waste buffer area. The project will end after the entire dismantling work is completed, and the waste storage is outside the caves and ready to be shipped either to the ANDRA (French

  8. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 1-Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized- water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence in SCALE-4. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code sequence was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE-4 criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for analysis of each critical configuration. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the

  9. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    PubMed

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  10. Estimate of LOCA-FI plenum pressure uncertainty for a five-ring RELAP5 production reactor model

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code (RELAP5) is used to perform best-estimate analyses of certain postulated Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) in SRS production reactors. Currently, the most limiting DBA in terms of reactor power level is an instantaneous double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A six-loop RELAP5 K Reactor model is used to analyze the reactor system behavior dozing the Flow Instability (FI) phase of the LOCA, which comprises only the first 5 seconds following the DEGB. The RELAP5 K Reactor model includes tank and plenum nodalizations having five radial rings and six azimuthal sectors. The reactor system analysis provides time-dependent plenum and tank bottom pressures for use as boundary conditions in the FLOWTRAN code, which models a single fuel assembly in detail. RELAP5 also performs the system analysis for the latter phase of the LOCA, denoted the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) phase. Results from the RELAP analysis are used to provide boundary conditions to the FLOWTRAN-TF code, which is an advanced two-phase version of FLOWTRAN. The RELAP5 K Reactor model has been tested for LOCA-FI and Loss-of-Pumping Accident analyses and the results compared with equivalent analyses performed with the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code (TRAC). An equivalent RELAP5 six-loop, five-ring, six-sector L Reactor model has been benchmarked against qualified single-phase system data from the 1989 L-Area In-Reactor Test Program. The RELAP5 K and L Reactor models have also been subjected to an independent Quality Assurance verification.

  11. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  12. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  13. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  14. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGES

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; ...

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  15. On the Analysis of Clustering in an Irradiated Low Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Weld.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Kristina; Stiller, Krystyna; Efsing, Pål; Thuvander, Mattias

    2017-03-21

    Radiation induced clustering affects the mechanical properties, that is the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT), of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of nuclear power plants. The combination of low Cu and high Ni used in some RPV welds is known to further enhance the DBTT shift during long time operation. In this study, RPV weld samples containing 0.04 at% Cu and 1.6 at% Ni were irradiated to 2.0 and 6.4×1023 n/m2 in the Halden test reactor. Atom probe tomography (APT) was applied to study clustering of Ni, Mn, Si, and Cu. As the clusters are in the nanometer-range, APT is a very suitable technique for this type of study. From APT analyses information about size distribution, number density, and composition of the clusters can be obtained. However, the quantification of these attributes is not trivial. The maximum separation method (MSM) has been used to characterize the clusters and a detailed study about the influence of the choice of MSM cluster parameters, primarily on the cluster number density, has been undertaken.

  16. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  17. JRQ and JPA irradiated and annealed reactor pressure vessel steels studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, Vladimír; Gokhman, Oleksandr; Pecko, Stanislav; Sojak, Stanislav; Bergner, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The paper is focused on a comprehensive study of JRQ and JPA reactor pressure vessel steels from the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) point of view. Based on our more than 20 years' experience with characterization of irradiated reactor steels, we confirmed that defects after irradiation start to grow and/or merge into bigger clusters. Experimental results shown that JPA steel is more sensitive to the creation of irradiation-induced defects than JRQ steel. It is most probably due to high copper content (0.29 wt.% in JPA) and copper precipitation has a major impact on neutron-induced defect creation at the beginning of the irradiation. Based on current PALS results, no large vacancy clusters were formed during irradiation, which could cause dangerous embrittlement concerning operation safety of nuclear power plant. The combined PALS, small angle neutron scattering and atomic probe tomography studies support the model for JRQ and JPA steels describing the structure of irradiation-induced clusters as agglomerations of vacancy clusters (consisting of 2-6 vacancies each) and are separated from each other by a distribution of atoms.

  18. Photofission Analysis for Fissile Dosimeters Dedicated to Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Faucher, Margaux; Thiollay, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Fissile dosimeters are commonly used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance programs. In this paper, the photofission contribution is analyzed for in-vessel 237Np and 238U fissile dosimeters in French PWR. The aim is to reassess this contribution using recent tools (the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code) and latest nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII nuclear libraries). To be as exhaustive as possible, this study is carried out for different configurations of fissile dosimeters, irradiated inside different kinds of PWR: 900 MWe, 1300 MWe, and 1450 MWe. Calculation of photofission rate in dosimeters does not present a major problem using the TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo code and the coupled neutron-photon simulation mode. However, preliminary studies were necessary to identify the origin of photons responsible of photofissions in dosimeters in relation to the photofission threshold reaction (around 5 MeV). It appears that the main contribution of high enough energy photons generating photofissions is the neutron inelastic scattering in stainless steel reactor structures. By contrast, 137Cs activity calculation is not an easy task since photofission yield data are known with high uncertainty.

  19. Boric acid corrosion of light water reactor pressure vessel head materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Chopra, O. K.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Cullen, Jr.; W. H.; Energy Technology; USNRC

    2005-01-01

    This work presents experimental data on electrochemical potential and corrosion rates for the materials found in the reactor pressure vessel head and control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles in boric acid solutions of varying concentrations at temperatures of 95-316 C. Tests were conducted in (a) high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions with a range of boric acid concentrations, (b) high-temperature (150-316 C)H-B-Osolutions at ambient pressure, in wet and dry conditions, and (c) low-temperature (95 C) saturated, aqueous, boric acid solutions. These correspond to the following situations: (a) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus plugged, (b) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus open, and (c) significant cooling due to high leakage and nozzle/head annulus open. The results showed significant corrosion only for the low-alloy steel and no corrosion for Alloy 600 or 308 stainless steel cladding. Also, corrosion rates were significant in saturated boric acid solutions, and no material loss was observed in H-B-O solution in the absence of moisture. The results are compared with the existing corrosion/wastage data in the literature.

  20. Thermal-Mechanical Stress Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel with/without a Preexisting Crack under Grid Load Following Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; ...

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress-strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. The stress-strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress-strain state estimatedmore » assuming simplified transients.« less

  1. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; ...

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress-strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. In conclusion, the stress-strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress-strainmore » state estimated assuming simplified transients.« less

  2. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we present thermal-mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal-mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress-strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. In conclusion, the stress-strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress-strain state estimated assuming simplified transients.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

  4. Development of a shallow-flaw fracture assessment methodology for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Pennell, W.E.

    1996-06-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing postulated shallow flaws. Cleavage fracture in shallow-flaw cruciform beam specimens tested under biaxial loading at temperatures in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain-controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture. A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that includes both the properties of the inner-surface stainless-steel cladding and a biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness correlation gave a reduction in probability of cleavage initiation of more than two orders of magnitude from an ASME-based reference case.

  5. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  6. Prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Chistyakov, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new method has been proposed for prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The method is based on the test results for materials in two conditions, namely, aged at temperatures of temper embrittlement and annealed after irradiation. The prediction is based on the McLean's equation and the dependencies describing thermally activated and radiation-enhanced phosphorus diffusion. Experimental studies have been carried out for estimation of thermal ageing of the WWER-1000 RPV 2Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel. The ductile to brittle transition temperature shift ΔTk due to phosphorus segregation has been estimated on the basis of experimental data processed by the proposed method for the time t = 5 × 105 h (more than 60 years of operation) for the base and weld metals of the WWER-1000 RPV.

  7. Atom probe tomography of reactor pressure vessel steels: an analysis of data integrity.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J M; Burke, M G; Gault, B; Saxey, D Wf; Styman, P; Wilford, K B; Williams, T J

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the importance of optimising experimental conditions for the analysis of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels using atom probe tomography is explored. The quality of the resultant atom probe data is assessed in terms of detection efficiency, noise levels and mass resolution. It is demonstrated that artefacts can exist even when experimental conditions have been optimised. In particular, it is shown that surface diffusion of some minority species, including P and Si, to major poles prior to field evaporation can be an issue. The effects were most noticeable during laser pulsing. The impact of surface migration on the characterisation of dislocations and grain boundaries is assessed. The importance of selecting appropriate regions of the reconstructed data for subsequent re-analysis is emphasised.

  8. On flux effects in a low alloy steel from a Swedish reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boåsen, Magnus; Efsing, Pål; Ehrnstén, Ulla

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the presence of Unstable Matrix Defects in irradiated pressure vessel steel from weldments of the Swedish PWR Ringhals 4 (R4). Hardness tests have been performed on low flux (surveillance material) and high flux (Halden reactor) irradiated material samples in combination with heat treatments at temperatures of 330, 360 and 390 °C in order to reveal eventual recovery of any hardening features induced by irradiation. The experiments carried out in this study could not reveal any hardness recovery related to Unstable Matrix Defects at relevant temperatures. However, a difference in hardness recovery was found between the low and the high flux samples at heat treatments at higher temperatures than expected for the annihilation of Unstable Matrix Defects-the observed recovery is here attributed to differences of the solute clusters formed by the high and low flux irradiations.

  9. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-09-15

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

  10. Advanced ultrasonic inspection system for the ID-inspection of reactor pressure vessels of BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, E.; Wuestenberg, H.; Tagliamonte, M.; Dalichow, M.

    1994-12-31

    A newly-developed, modular ultrasonic examination system has been developed by Siemens for the ID inspection of BWR RPV`S. It is based on the phased-array technique with hybrid probes using the latest in manipulator and control equipment technology to allow the often hard-to-access weld areas of older reactor pressure vessels in US BWR plants to be examined within a very short time and with minimal radiation exposure of the examination personnel. New NRC stipulations requiring almost complete ultrasonic examination of all RPV welds can be fully satisfied using this system for the ID inspection of all longitudinal and circumferential welds above the jet pump baffle plate.

  11. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuan, C.C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, C.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning.

  12. Pressurized water reactor core parameter prediction using an artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Gon; Chang, Soon Heung; Lee, Byung Ho )

    1993-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, the fuel reloading problem has significant meaning in terms of both safety and economics. The local power peaking factor must be kept lower than a predetermined value during a cycle, and the effective multiplication factor must be maximized to extract the maximum energy. If these core parameters could be obtained in a very short time, the optimal fuel reloading patterns would be found more effectively and quickly. A very fast core parameter prediction system is developed using the back propagation neural network. This system predicts the core parameters several hundred times as fast as the reference numerical code, within an error of a few percent. The effects of the variation of the training rate coefficients, the momentum, and the hidden layer units are also discussed.

  13. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Itoh, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased.

  14. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Thermal Plasma Reactor at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Lukasz; Kolacinski, Zbigniew; Wiak, Slawomir; Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Pietrzak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to the synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in reactors operating at atmospheric pressure is presented. Based on the literature and our own research results, the most effective methods of CNT synthesis are investigated. Then, careful selection of reagents for the synthesis process is shown. Thanks to the performed calculations, an optimum composition of gases and the temperature for successful CNT synthesis in the CVD (chemical vapor deposition) process can be chosen. The results, having practical significance, may lead to an improvement of nanomaterials synthesis technology. The study can be used to produce CNTs for electrical and electronic equipment (i.e., supercapacitors or cooling radiators). There is also a possibility of using them in medicine for cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:28336880

  15. Atomic and dislocation dynamics simulations of plastic deformation in reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnet, Ghiath; Domain, Christophe; Queyreau, Sylvain; Naamane, Sanae; Devincre, Benoit

    2009-11-01

    The collective behavior of dislocations in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel involves dislocation properties on different phenomenological scales. In the multiscale approach, adopted in this work, we use atomic simulations to provide input data for larger scale simulations. We show in this paper how first-principles calculations can be used to describe the Peierls potential of screw dislocations, allowing for the validation of the empirical interatomic potential used in molecular dynamics simulations. The latter are used to compute the velocity of dislocations as a function of the applied stress and the temperature. The mobility laws obtained in this way are employed in dislocation dynamics simulations in order to predict properties of plastic flow, namely dislocation-dislocation interactions and dislocation interactions with carbides at low and high temperature.

  16. Magnetic properties of a highly neutron-irradiated nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Gillemot, F.; Horváth, Á.; Székely, R.

    2012-02-01

    We report results of minor B- H loop measurements on a highly neutron-irradiated A533B-type reactor pressure vessel steel. A minor-loop coefficient, which is a sensitive indicator of internal stress, changes with neutron fluence, but depends on relative orientation to the rolling direction in the low fluence regime. At a higher fluence of ˜10 × 10 23 m -2, on the other hand, an anomalous increase of the coefficient was detected irrespective of the orientation. The results were interpreted as due to competing irradiation mechanisms of the formation of Cu-rich precipitates, recovery process, and the formation of late-blooming Mn-Ni-Si-rich clusters.

  17. Marine transportation and burial of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank package

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) project for dismantling the Shippingport atomic power station. One of the more significant and challenging technical aspects of the project, which is being managed for DOE by General Electric-Nuclear Energy, is the marine transport of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated neutron shield tank (NST) to the government-owned Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Planning of the transport activity, barge transportation operations, and Hanford transportation operations, are discussed. This work will be the first use of barge transportation in the United States of a radioactive RPV package from a decommissioned land-based nuclear power plant. This extensive transportation operation has been accomplished in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  18. Thorium-based mixed oxide fuel in a pressurized water reactor: A feasibility analysis with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Lucas Powelson

    This dissertation investigates techniques for spent fuel monitoring, and assesses the feasibility of using a thorium-based mixed oxide fuel in a conventional pressurized water reactor for plutonium disposition. Both non-paralyzing and paralyzing dead-time calculations were performed for the Portable Spectroscopic Fast Neutron Probe (N-Probe), which can be used for spent fuel interrogation. Also, a Canberra 3He neutron detector's dead-time was estimated using a combination of subcritical assembly measurements and MCNP simulations. Next, a multitude of fission products were identified as candidates for burnup and spent fuel analysis of irradiated mixed oxide fuel. The best isotopes for these applications were identified by investigating half-life, photon energy, fission yield, branching ratios, production modes, thermal neutron absorption cross section and fuel matrix diffusivity. 132I and 97Nb were identified as good candidates for MOX fuel on-line burnup analysis. In the second, and most important, part of this work, the feasibility of utilizing ThMOX fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) was first examined under steady-state, beginning of life conditions. Using a three-dimensional MCNP model of a Westinghouse-type 17x17 PWR, several fuel compositions and configurations of a one-third ThMOX core were compared to a 100% UO2 core. A blanket-type arrangement of 5.5 wt% PuO2 was determined to be the best candidate for further analysis. Next, the safety of the ThMOX configuration was evaluated through three cycles of burnup at several using the following metrics: axial and radial nuclear hot channel factors, moderator and fuel temperature coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, and shutdown margin. Additionally, the performance of the ThMOX configuration was assessed by tracking cycle length, plutonium destroyed, and fission product poison concentration.

  19. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-07-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  20. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 2-Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations reported herein is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of three reactor critical configurations for the Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3. This unit and cycle were chosen because of the relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) the unit had a significantly long downtime of 2.7 years during the middle of cycle (MOC) 3, and (2) the core consisted entirely of burned fuel at the MOC restart. The first benchmark critical calculation was the MOC restart at hot, full-power (HFP) critical conditions. The

  1. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  2. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  3. 77 FR 26050 - Burnup Credit in the Criticality Safety Analyses of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... criticality safety analyses of pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in transportation packages... Doc No: 2012-10618] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0100] Burnup Credit in the Criticality... the Criticality Safety Analyses of PWR Spent Fuel in Transportation and Storage Casks.'' This...

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel 12X18H9T after neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of BR-10 fast reactor at very low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Konobeev, Yury V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shulepin, S. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2006-12-01

    Results are presented for void swelling, microstructure andmechanical properties of Russian 12X18H9T (0.12C-18Cr-9Ni-Ti) austenitic stainless steel irradiated as a pressure vessel structure material of the BR-10 fast reactor at ~350C to only 0.64 dpa, produced by many years of exposure at the very low displacement rate of only 1.9x10-9 dpa/s. In agreement with a number of other recent studies it appears that lower dpa rates have a pronounced effect on the microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. In general, loweer dpa rates lead to the onset of swelling at much lower doses compared to comparable irradiations conducted at higher dpa rates.

  5. Lewis Research Center's coal-fired, pressurized, fluidized-bed reactor test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobak, J. A.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1981-10-01

    A 200-kilowatt-thermal, pressurized, fluidized-bed (PFB) reactor, research test facility was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a NASA-funded project to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot-gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that might have applications in stationary-power-plant turbogenerators. Some of the techniques and components developed for this PFB system are described. One of the more important items was the development of a two-in-one, gas-solids separator that removed 95+ percent of the solids in 1600 F to 1900 F gases. Another was a coal and sorbent feed and mixing system for injecting the fuel into the pressurized combustor. Also important were the controls and data-acquisition systems that enabled one person to operate the entire facility. The solid, liquid, and gas sub-systems all had problems that were solved over the 2-year operating time of the facility, which culminated in a 400-hour, hot-gas, turbine test.

  6. Ethanolamine properties and use for feedwater pH control: A pressurized water reactor case study

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, D.L.; Polidoroff, C.T.; Cortese, S.; Cushner, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Ethanolamine (ETA) as a feedwater pH control additive has been recently used to minimize corrosion of secondary water components in the nuclear power industry pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The use of ETA is compared with ammonia. Relative volatility effects on various parts of the system are analyzed and chemistry changes are presented. Materials of construction and the use of existing plant equipment for ETA service are discussed. Properties of ETA as well as safety, storage and handling issues are compared with ammonia. Health d aquatic toxicity are reviewed. warnings, safety, handling guidelines, biodegradability an Diablo Canyon Power Plant used ammonia for pH control from 1985 until a change over to ETA in 1993/1994. Full flow condensate polishers that are required to protect the plant from saltwater cooling incursions limit the amount of pH additive. Iron levels in the secondary water systems are compared before and after changing to ETA and replacement of corrosion-susceptible piping. Iron reduction benefits are assessed along with other effects on the feedwater nozzles, low pressure turbine, polisher resin capacity and polisher regeneration system.

  7. Lewis Research Center's coal-fired, pressurized, fluidized-bed reactor test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobak, J. A.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 200-kilowatt-thermal, pressurized, fluidized-bed (PFB) reactor, research test facility was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a NASA-funded project to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot-gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that might have applications in stationary-power-plant turbogenerators. Some of the techniques and components developed for this PFB system are described. One of the more important items was the development of a two-in-one, gas-solids separator that removed 95+ percent of the solids in 1600 F to 1900 F gases. Another was a coal and sorbent feed and mixing system for injecting the fuel into the pressurized combustor. Also important were the controls and data-acquisition systems that enabled one person to operate the entire facility. The solid, liquid, and gas sub-systems all had problems that were solved over the 2-year operating time of the facility, which culminated in a 400-hour, hot-gas, turbine test.

  8. Simulation study of nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-02-15

    A self-consistent combination of plasma fluid model, nanoparticle heating model, and surface deposition model is used to investigate the coating of nanosize particles by amorphous carbon layers in a low pressure plasma reactor. The numerical results show that, owing to the net heat release in the surface reactions, the particle temperature increases and its equilibrium value remains always 50 K above the background gas temperature. The deposition rate decreases with increasing of the particle temperature and the corresponding time scale is of the order of 10 ms. The deposition rate is also strongly affected by the change in plasma parameters. When the electron temperature is increased, the deposition rate first increases due to the enhanced ion and radical generation, shows a maximum and then declines as the particle temperature rises above the gas temperature. An enhancement in the background gas pressure and/or temperature leads to a reduction in the deposition rate, which can be explained in terms of the enhanced etching by atomic hydrogen and particle heating by the background gas.

  9. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trung Q.; Zhu, Xinli; Lobban, Lance L.; Mallinson, Richard G.

    2011-07-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C2Hx side products. H2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C2Hx products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H2 only.

  10. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  11. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. )

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  12. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1998-08-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  13. Investigation of the DSMC Approach for Ion/neutral Species in Modeling Low Pressure Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Hao; Li, Z.; Levin, D.; Gochberg, L.

    2011-05-20

    Low pressure plasma reactors are important tools for ionized metal physical vapor deposition (IMPVD), a semiconductor plasma processing technology that is increasingly being applied to deposit Cu seed layers on semiconductor surfaces of trenches and vias with the high aspect ratio (e.g., >5:1). A large fraction of ionized atoms produced by the IMPVD process leads to an anisotropic deposition flux towards the substrate, a feature which is critical for attaining a void-free and uniform fill. Modeling such devices is challenging due to their high plasma density, reactive environment, but low gas pressure. A modular code developed by the Computational Optical and Discharge Physics Group, the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), has been successfully applied to the numerical investigations of IMPVD by modeling a hollow cathode magnetron (HCM) device. However, as the development of semiconductor devices progresses towards the lower pressure regime (e.g., <5 mTorr), the breakdown of the continuum assumption limits the application of the fluid model in HPEM and suggests the incorporation of the kinetic method, such as the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), in the plasma simulation.The DSMC method, which solves the Boltzmann equation of transport, has been successfully applied in modeling micro-fluidic flows in MEMS devices with low Reynolds numbers, a feature shared with the HCM. Modeling of the basic physical and chemical processes for ion/neutral species in plasma have been developed and implemented in DSMC, which include ion particle motion due to the Lorentz force, electron impact reactions, charge exchange reactions, and charge recombination at the surface. The heating of neutrals due to collisions with ions and the heating of ions due to the electrostatic field will be shown to be captured by the DSMC simulations. In this work, DSMC calculations were coupled with the modules from HPEM so that the plasma can be self-consistently solved. Differences in the Ar

  14. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft interim staff guidance; Request for public... Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001; telephone: 301-415-4029..., Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  15. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Boron Dilution Transients in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hertlein, Roland J.; Umminger, Klaus; Kliem, Soeren; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Hoehne, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-15

    Within the pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety analyses, attention has increasingly focused in recent years on boron dilution events that could potentially lead to reactivity transients. Mixing of the low-boron water with the ambient coolant of higher boron content provides an important mitigation mechanism before the low-boron water enters the core.Experimental support is needed to validate the computational tools to be applied to analyze the mixing of the low-boron water. Experiments were performed in the three test facilities - the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), the Primaerkreislauf (PKL), and the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) - in Germany.The relevant PKL and UPTF tests were focused on small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) scenarios with reflux-condenser mode and restart of natural circulation. The two test facilities represent a typical western-type PWR and are/were operated by Siemens/KWU now Framatome ANP in Germany. While the restart of natural circulation was investigated in the PKL system test facility (volume 1:145, height 1:1), the UPTF experiments dealt with the mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the cold legs, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) downcomer, and the lower plenum (all these components were full-scale models).The results from the PKL test facility demonstrate that in case of a postulated SBLOCA with reflux condensation phase, natural circulation does not start up simultaneously in all loops. This means that slugs of condensate, which might have accumulated in the pump seal during reflux-condenser mode of operation, would reach the RPV at different points in time. The UPTF tests showed an almost ideal mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the RPV downcomer.The ROCOM test facility has been built in a linear scale of 1:5 for the investigation of coolant mixing phenomena in a wide range of flow conditions in the RPV of the German KONVOI-type PWR. The test results presented are

  16. Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessments with the Grizzly Aging Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Hoffman, William; Chakraborty, Pritam

    2015-08-01

    Grizzly is a simulation tool being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of the US Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program to provide improved safety assessments of systems, components, and structures in nuclear power plants subjected to age-related degradation. Its goal is to provide an improved scientific basis for decisions surrounding license renewal, which would permit operation of commercial nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE framework, which enables multiphysics simulations in a parallel computing environment. It will address a wide variety of aging issues in nuclear power plant systems, components, and structures, modelling both the aging processes and the ability of age-degraded components to perform safely. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen as the initial application for Grizzly. Grizzly solves tightly coupled equations of heat conduction and solid mechanics to simulate the global response of the RPV to accident conditions, and uses submodels to represent regions with pre-existing flaws. Domain integrals are used to calculate stress intensity factors on those flaws. A physically based empirical model is used to evaluate material embrittlement, and is used to evaluate whether crack growth would occur. Grizzly can represent the RPV in 2D or 3D, allowing it to evaluate effects that require higher dimensionality models to capture. Work is underway to use lower length scale models of material evolution to inform engineering models of embrittlement. This paper demonstrates an application of Grizzly to RPV failure assessment, and summarizes on-going work.

  17. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

  18. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  19. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  20. Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chodak, III, Paul

    1996-05-01

    This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO2 assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the 239Pu and ≥90% {sub total}Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products.

  1. Core damage severity evaluation for pressurized water reactors by artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironidis, Anastasios Pantelis

    1998-12-01

    During the course of nuclear power evolution, accidents have occurred. However, in the western world, none of them had a severe impact on the public because of the design features of nuclear plants. In nuclear reactors, barriers constitute physical obstacles to uncontrolled fission product releases. These barriers are an important factor in safety analysis. During an accident, reactor safety systems become actuated to prevent the barriers from been breached. In addition, operators are required to take specified actions, meticulously depicted in emergency response procedures. In an accident, on-the-spot knowledge regarding the condition of the core is necessary. In order to make the right decisions toward mitigating the accident severity and its consequences, we need to know the status of the core [1, 3]. However, power plant instrumentation that can provide a direct indication of the status of the core during the time when core damage is a potential outcome, does not exist. Moreover, the information from instruments may have large uncertainty of various types. Thus, a very strong potential for misinterpreting incoming information exists. This research endeavor addresses the problem of evaluating the core damage severity of a Pressurized Water Reactor during a transient or an accident. An expert system has been constructed, that incorporates knowledge and reasoning of human experts. The expert system's inference engine receives incoming plant data that originate in the plethora of core-related instruments. Its knowledge base relies on several massive, multivariate fuzzy logic rule-sets, coupled with several artificial neural networks. These mathematical models have encoded information that defines possible core states, based on correlations of parameter values. The inference process classifies the core as intact, or as experiencing clad damage and/or core melting. If the system detects a form of core damage, a quantification procedure will provide a numerical

  2. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Comparison of microstructural features of radiation embrittlement of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Erak, D. Yu.; Lavrenchuk, O. V.

    2002-02-01

    Comparative microstructural studies of both surveillance specimens and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 light water reactor systems have been carried out, following irradiation to different fast neutron fluences and of the heat treatment for extended periods at the operating temperatures. It is shown that there are several microstructural features in the radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 steels compared to VVER-440 RPV steels that can cause changes in the contributions of different radiation embrittlement mechanisms for VVER-1000 steel.

  5. In situ observation of UF5 nanoparticle growth in a low-pressure mixed-flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, Y.; Hirasawa, M.; Seto, T.; Okuyama, K.; Takeuchi, K.

    A mixed-flow reactor for the generation of UF5 nanoparticles equipped with an in situ size-monitoring system, a LPDMA (low-pressure differential mobility analyzer), was developed to experimentally investigate the nanoparticle growth mechanism. The concentration of photoproduced UF5 molecules was controlled by changing three factors: (I) the concentration of the feed UF6 gas, (II) the laser pulse energy of the irradiation, and (III) the repetition rate of the laser pulses. The dependence of the volumetric average diameter of the photoproduced particles on the UF5 nascent concentration in all three cases was found to be very similar. The result strongly suggests that the reactor functions as a mixed-flow reactor under a complete mixing condition. The particle size measured by the LPDMA was found to be in the range of 6 to 11 nm, and it was approximately proportional to the power 0.3 of the initial concentration of photoproduced UF5 molecules.

  6. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Pressurized Water Reactor Standard Core Loading Benchmark Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzu Alpan, F.; Kulesza, Joel A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper compares contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a pressurized water reactor calculational benchmark problem with a standard out-in core loading. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library for the calculations. In this paper, a Westinghouse three-dimensional discrete ordinates code with parallel processing, the RAPTOR-M3G code was used. A variety of cross section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE-93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the broad-group ALPAN-VII.0 cross-section library developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculation-to-calculation reaction rates using the BUGLE-93 cross-section library at the thermal shield, pressure vessel, and cavity capsules, for eleven dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 5% was observed, with the exception of 65Cu(n,2n) in the pressure vessel capsule that had a 90% relative difference with respect to the reference results. It is thought that the 65Cu(n,2n) reaction rate reported in the reference for the pressure vessel capsule is not correct. In considering the libraries developed after BUGLE-93, a maximum relative difference of 12% was observed in reaction rates, with respect to the reference results, for 237Np(n,f) in the cavity capsule using BUGLE-B7.

  7. SURROGATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOR RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, William M.; Riley, Matthew E.; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    2016-07-01

    In nuclear light water reactors (LWRs), the reactor coolant, core and shroud are contained within a massive, thick walled steel vessel known as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Given the tremendous size of these structures, RPVs typically contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced in the manufacturing process. After many years of operation, irradiation-induced embrittlement makes these vessels increasingly susceptible to fracture initiation at the locations of the pre-existing flaws. Because of the uncertainty in the loading conditions, flaw characteristics and material properties, probabilistic methods are widely accepted and used in assessing RPV integrity. The Fracture Analysis of Vessels – Oak Ridge (FAVOR) computer program developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used for this purpose. This program can be used in order to perform deterministic and probabilistic risk-informed analyses of the structural integrity of an RPV subjected to a range of thermal-hydraulic events. FAVOR uses a one-dimensional representation of the global response of the RPV, which is appropriate for the beltline region, which experiences the most embrittlement, and employs an influence coefficient technique to rapidly compute stress intensity factors for axis-aligned surface-breaking flaws. The Grizzly code is currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to be used as a general multiphysics simulation tool to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled RPVs. Grizzly can be used to model the thermo-mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local 3D models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in

  8. Evolution of Design Methodologies for Next Generation of Reactor Pressure Vessels and Extensive Role of Thermal-Hydraulic Numerical Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bellet, Serge; Goreaud, Nicolas; Nicaise, Norbert

    2005-11-15

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the first pressurized water reactors was mainly based on an experimental approach, with a large series of tests on the main equipment [control rod guide tubes, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) plenums, etc.] to check performance.Development of computational fluid dynamics codes and computers now allows for complex simulations of hydraulics phenomena. Provided adequate qualification, these numerical tools are an efficient means to determine hydraulics in the given design and to perform sensitivities for optimization of new designs. Experiments always play their role, first for qualification and then for validation at the last stage of the design. The design of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR), jointly developed by Framatome ANP, Electricite de France (EDF), and the German utilities, is based on both hydraulics calculations and experiments handled in a complementary approach.This paper describes the collective effort launched by Framatome ANP and EDF on hydraulics calculations for the RPV of the EPR. It concerns three-dimensional calculations of RPV inlets, including the cold legs, the RPV downcomer and lower plenum, and the RPV upper plenum up to and including the hot legs. It covers normal operating conditions but also accidental conditions such as pressurized thermal shock in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. Those hydraulics studies have provided much useful information for the mechanical design of RPV internals.

  9. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Hoffman, William; Sen, Sonat; Rabiti, Cristian; Dickson, Terry; Bass, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  10. Study of the Neutron Flux and Dpa Attenuation in the Reactor Pressure-Vessel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1999-06-01

    The study of the neutron flux and dpa attenuation in the reactor pressure vessel (PV) wall presented in this work was performed with state-of-the art methods currently used to determine PV fluxes, the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, and the iron displacement cross sections derived from ENDF/B-VI data. The calculations showed that the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, extrapolation formula predicts slower--and therefore conservative--attenuation of the neutron flux (E > 1MeV) in the PV wall. More importantly, the calculations gave slower attenuation of the dpa rate in the PV wall than the attenuation predicted by the formula. The slower dpa rate attenuation was observed for all the cases considered, which included two different PWRs, and several configurations obtained by varying the PV wall thickness and thermal shield thickness. For example, for a PV wall thickness of {approximately}24 cm, the calculated ratio of the dpa rate at 1/4 and 3/4 of the PV wall thickness to the dpa value on the inner PV surface is {approximately}14% and 19% higher, respectively, than predicted by the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, formula.

  11. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Ware; C. Hsu; C. L. Atwood; M. B. Sattison; R. S. Hartley; V. N. Shah

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  12. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  13. Generic risk insights for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Fresco, A. ); Chung, J. )

    1990-11-01

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering (CE) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and apply the insights gained to Westinghouse and Ce plants have not been subjected to a PRA. The available PRAs (five Westinghouse plants and one CE plant) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plant. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eleven sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human errors that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training maintenance, design review, and inspections.

  14. Control of alkaline stress corrosion cracking in pressurized-water reactor steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Park, I.G. . Div. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Outer-diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubings in steam generators of the Kori-1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR) caused an unscheduled outage in 1994. Failure analysis and remedy development studies were undertaken to avoid a recurrence. Destructive examination of a removed tube indicated axial intergranular cracks developed at the top of sludge caused by a boiling crevice geometry. A high ODSCC propagation rate was attributed to high local pH and increased corrosion potential resulting from oxidized copper presumably formed during the maintenance outage and plant heatup. Remedial measures included: (1) crevice neutralization by crevice flushing with boric acid (H[sub 3]BO[sub 3]) and molar ratio control using ammonium chloride (NH[sub 4]Cl), (2) corrosion potential reduction by hydrazine (H[sub 2]NNH[sub 2]) soaking and suppression of oxygen below 20 ppb to avoid copper oxide formation, (3) titanium dioxide (TiO[sub 2]) inhibitor soaking, and (4) temperature reduction of 5 C. Since application of the remedy program, no significant ODSCC has been observed, which clearly demonstrates the benefit of departing from an oxidizing alkaline environment. In addition, the TiO[sub 2] inhibitor appeared to have a positive effect, warranting further examination.

  15. Pressure Loss Predictions of the Reactor Simulator Subsystem at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of the Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is being conducted at NASA GRC. The TDU consists of three subsystems: the Reactor Simulator (RxSim), the Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), and the Heat Exchanger Manifold (HXM). An Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) is used to drive the working fluid. A preliminary version of the TDU system (which excludes the PCU for now), is referred to as the RxSim subsystem and was used to conduct flow tests in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6). In parallel, a computational model of the RxSim subsystem was created based on the CAD model and was used to predict loop pressure losses over a range of mass flows. This was done to assess the ability of the pump to meet the design intent mass flow demand. Measured data indicates that the pump can produce 2.333 kg/sec of flow, which is enough to supply the RxSim subsystem with a nominal flow of 1.75 kg/sec. Computational predictions indicated that the pump could provide 2.157 kg/sec (using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model), and 2.223 kg/sec (using the k-? turbulence model). The computational error of the predictions for the available mass flow is -0.176 kg/sec (with the S-A turbulence model) and -0.110 kg/sec (with the k-epsilon turbulence model) when compared to measured data.

  16. Irradiation effects on magnetic properties in neutron and proton irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.G.; Hong, J.H.; Kim, I.S.; Kim, H.C.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of neutron and proton dose on the magnetic properties of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated. The coercivity and maximum induction increased in two stages with respect to neutron dose, being nearly constant up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa, followed by a rapid increase up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa. The coercivity and maximum induction in the proton irradiated specimens also showed a two stage variation with respect to proton dose, namely a rapid increase up to a dose of 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa, then a decrease up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The Barkhausen noise (BN) amplitude in neutron irradiated specimens also varied in two stages in a reverse manner, the transition at the same dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa. The BN amplitude in proton irradiated specimens decreased by 60% up to 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa followed by an increase up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results were in good accord with the one dimensional domain wall model considering the density of defects and wall energy.

  17. BWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report: Revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, D.; Stancavage, P.

    1994-07-01

    BWR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by the General Electric Company have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits, inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. The scope of the report includes the following components: access hole cover; control blades; control rod drive (CRD) housing; core plate; core shroud; core shroud head; core shroud head bolts; core spray internal piping; core spray sparger; feedwater sparger; intermediate range monitor (IRM) dry tubes; jet pump; jet pump sensing line; local power range monitor (LPRM); neutron source holder; orificed fuel support (OFS); source range monitor (SRM) dry tubes; steam dryer; steam dryer support ring; steam separator; and top guide. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of BWR RPV internals for license renewal.

  18. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs.

  19. Iron catalyst chemistry in modeling a high-pressure carbon monoxide nanotube reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Willis, Peter A.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is analyzed with the use of a chemical reaction model coupled with flow properties calculated along streamlines, calculated by the FLUENT code for pure carbon monoxide. Cold iron pentacarbonyl, diluted in CO at about 30 atmospheres, is injected into a conical mixing zone, where hot CO is also introduced via three jets at 30 degrees with respect to the axis. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Then iron nucleates and forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs by a disproportionation reaction (Boudouard) of CO on Fe-containing clusters. Alternative nucleation rates are estimated from the theory of hard sphere collision dynamics with an activation energy barrier. The rate coefficient for carbon nanotube growth is estimated from activation energies in the literature. The calculated growth was found be about an order of magnitude greater than measured, regardless of the nucleation rate. A study of cluster formation in an incubation zone prior to injection into the reactor shows that direct dimer formation from Fe atoms is not as important as formation via an exchange reaction of Fe with CO in FeCO.

  20. Transport Characteristics of Selected Pressurized Water Reactor LOCA-Generated Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Maji, Arup K.; Rao, Daseri V.; Letellier, Bruce; Bartlein, Luke; Marshall, Brooke

    2002-08-15

    In the unlikely event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor, break jet impingement would dislodge thermal insulation from nearby piping, as well as other materials within the containment, such as paint chips, concrete dust, and fire barrier materials. Steam/water flows induced by the break and by the containment sprays would transport debris to the containment floor. Subsequently, debris would likely transport to and accumulate on the suction sump screens of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps, thereby potentially degrading ECCS performance and possibly even failing the ECCS.A systematic study was conducted on various types of fibrous and metallic foil debris to determine their transport in water. Test results reported include incipient movement, bulk movement, accumulation on a screen, the ability of debris to jump over 5-cm (2-in.) and 15-cm (6-in.) curbs, and the effects of accelerating flow and turbulence. These data are currently being used in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics modeling to determine the potential for each debris type to reach the suction screen.

  1. Development of Pressurized Water Reactor Integrated Safety Analysis Methodology Using Multilevel Coupling Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Ziabletsev, Dmitri; Avramova, Maria; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2004-11-15

    The subchannel code COBRA-TF has been introduced for an evaluation of thermal margins on the local pin-by-pin level in a pressurized water reactor. The coupling of COBRA-TF with TRAC-PF1/NEM is performed by providing from TRAC to COBRA-TF axial and radial thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions and relative pin-power profiles, obtained with the pin power reconstruction model of the nodal expansion method (NEM). An efficient algorithm for coupling of the subchannel code COBRA-TF with TRAC-PF1/NEM in the parallel virtual machine environment was developed addressing the issues of time synchronization, data exchange, spatial overlays, and coupled convergence. Local feedback modeling on the pin level was implemented into COBRA-TF, which enabled updating the local form functions and the recalculation of the pin powers in TRAC-PF1/NEM after obtaining the local feedback parameters. The coupled TRAC-PF1/NEM/COBRA-TF code system was tested on the rod ejection accident and main steam line break benchmark problems. In both problems, the local results are closer than before the introduced multilevel coupling to the corresponding critical limits. This fact indicates that the assembly average results tend to underestimate the accident consequences in terms of local safety margins. The capability of local safety evaluation, performed simultaneously (online) with coupled global three-dimensional neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic calculations, is introduced and tested. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of the current work.

  2. Characterization of Nanostructural Features in Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Model Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B D; Odette, G R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Howell, R H; Sterne, P A

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the formation of a high number density of nanometer-sized copper rich precipitates and sub-nanometer defect-solute clusters. We present results of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) characterization of the nanostructural features formed in binary and ternary Fe-Cu-Mn alloys irradiated at {approx}290 C. These complementary techniques provide insight into the composition and character of both types of nanoscale features. The SANS measurements indicate populations of copper-manganese precipitates and smaller vacancy-copper-manganese clusters. The PAS characterization, including both Doppler broadening and positron lifetime measurements, indicates the presence of essentially defect-free Cu precipitates in the Fe-Cu-Mn alloy and vacancy-copper clusters in the Fe-Cu alloy. Thus the SANS and PAS provide a self-consistent picture of nanostructures composed of copper-rich precipitates and vacancy solute cluster complexes and tend to discount high Fe concentrations in the CRPs.

  3. Evolution of precipitation in reactor pressure vessel steel welds under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Kristina; Boåsen, Magnus; Stiller, Krystyna; Efsing, Pål; Thuvander, Mattias

    2017-05-01

    Reactor pressure vessel steel welds are affected by irradiation during operation. The irradiation results in nanometre cluster formation, which in turn affects the mechanical properties of the material, e.g. the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is shifted to higher levels. In this study, cluster formation is characterised in high Ni (1.58%) low Cu (0.04%) steel welds identical to Ringhals R4 welds, using atom probe tomography in both surveillance material and in material irradiated at accelerated dose rates. Clusters containing mainly Ni and Mn, but also some Si and Cu were observed in all of the irradiated materials. Their evolution did not change drastically during irradiation; the clusters grew and new clusters were nucleated. Hence, both the cluster number density and the average size increased with irradiation time. Some flux effects were observed when comparing the high flux material and the surveillance material. The surveillance material has a lower cluster number density, but larger clusters. The resulting impact on the mechanical properties of these two effects cancel out, resulting in a measured hardness that seems to be on the same trend as the high flux material. The dispersed barrier hardening model with an obstacle strength factor of 0.15 was found to reproduce the increase in hardness. In the investigated high flux materials, the clusters' Cu content was higher.

  4. Iron catalyst chemistry in modeling a high-pressure carbon monoxide nanotube reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Willis, Peter A.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is analyzed with the use of a chemical reaction model coupled with flow properties calculated along streamlines, calculated by the FLUENT code for pure carbon monoxide. Cold iron pentacarbonyl, diluted in CO at about 30 atmospheres, is injected into a conical mixing zone, where hot CO is also introduced via three jets at 30 degrees with respect to the axis. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Then iron nucleates and forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs by a disproportionation reaction (Boudouard) of CO on Fe-containing clusters. Alternative nucleation rates are estimated from the theory of hard sphere collision dynamics with an activation energy barrier. The rate coefficient for carbon nanotube growth is estimated from activation energies in the literature. The calculated growth was found be about an order of magnitude greater than measured, regardless of the nucleation rate. A study of cluster formation in an incubation zone prior to injection into the reactor shows that direct dimer formation from Fe atoms is not as important as formation via an exchange reaction of Fe with CO in FeCO.

  5. Nondestructive Magnetic Adaptive Testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomáš, I.; Vértesy, G.; Gillemot, F.; Székely, R.

    2013-01-01

    Inspection of neutron-irradiation-generated degradation of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (RPVS) is a very important task. In ferromagnetic materials, such as RPVS, the structural degradation is connected with a change of their magnetic properties. In this work, applicability of a novel magnetic nondestructive method (Magnetic Adaptive Testing, MAT), based on systematic measurement and evaluation of minor magnetic hysteresis loops, is shown for inspection of neutron irradiation embrittlement in RPVS. Three series of samples, made of JRQ, 15CH2MFA and 10ChMFT type steels were measured by MAT. The samples were irradiated by E > 1 MeV energy neutrons with total neutron fluence of 1.58 × 1019-11.9 × 1019 n/cm2. Regular correlation was found between the optimally chosen MAT degradation functions and the neutron fluence in all three types of the materials. Shift of the ductile-brittle transition temperature, ΔDBTT, independently determined as a function of the neutron fluence for the 15CH2MFA material, was also evaluated. A sensitive, linear correlation was found between the ΔDBTT and values of the relevant MAT degradation function. Based on these results, MAT is shown to be a promising (at least) complimentary tool of the destructive tests within the surveillance programs, which are presently used for inspection of neutron-irradiation-generated embrittlement of RPVS.

  6. Warm PreStress effect on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; Vaille, C.; Wident, P.; Moinereau, D.; Landron, C.; Chapuliot, S.; Benhamou, C.; Tanguy, B.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the Warm Prestress (WPS) effect on 16MND5 (A508 Cl3) RPV steel, irradiated up to a fluence of 13 ·1023 n .m-2 (E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 ° C, corresponding to more than 60 years of operations in a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Mechanical properties, including tensile tests with different strain rates and tension-compression tests on notched specimens, have been characterized at unirradiated and irradiated states and used to calibrate constitutive equations to describe the mechanical behavior as a function of temperature and fluence. Irradiation embrittlement has been determined based on Charpy V-notch impact tests and isothermal quasi-static toughness tests. Assessment of WPS effect has been done through various types of thermomechanical loadings performed on CT(0.5 T) specimens. All tests have confirmed the non-failure during the thermo-mechanical transients. Experimental data obtained in this study have been compared to both engineering-based models and to a local approach (Beremin) model for cleavage fracture. It is shown that both types of modeling give good predictions for the effective toughness after warm prestressing.

  7. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. W.; Han, L. Z.; Luo, X. M.; Liu, Q. D.; Gu, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe3C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo2C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained.

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Server, W. L.; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

  9. Aging mechanisms in the Westinghouse PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) Control Rod Drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aging assessment of the Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Control Rod System (CRD) has been completed as part of the US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research, (NPAR) Program. This study examined the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the system to determine its potential for degradation as the plant ages. Selected results from this study are presented in this paper. The operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. From our evaluation of the data, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and the operating environment, we conclude that the Westinghouse CRD system is subject to degradation which, if unchecked, could affect its safety function as a plant ages. Ways to detect and mitigate the effects of aging are included in this paper. The current maintenance for the control rod drive system at fifteen Westinghouse PWRs was obtained through a survey conducted in cooperation with EPRI and NUMARC. The results of the survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, or expanded preventive maintenance. Several of these activities have effectively addressed the aging issue. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Decision process involved in preparing the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport

    SciTech Connect

    Murphie, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    The most significant part of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project was the one-piece removal and shipment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Implicit in the RPV transport was the task of qualifying the RPV as a waste package acceptable for shipment. Soon after physical decommissioning began on September 1985, questions regarding the packaging certification and transport of the RPV from Shippingport, Pennsylvania to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Waste Burial Site necessitated reexamination of several planning assumptions. A complete reassessment of the regulatory requirements governing the RPV shipment resulted in a programmatic decision to obtain a type B(U) Certificate of Compliance and abandon the originally planned US Department of Transportation (DOT) low specific activity (LSA) shipment. The decision process resulting in this conclusion was extensive and involved many organizations and agencies. Incidental to this process, several subtle certification issues were identified that required resolution. Some of these issues involved the definition of LSA material for large packages; interpretation and compliance with DOE, DOT and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations for the transport of radioactive material; incorporation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations by the Panama Canal; and DOE policy requiring advance notification to states of radioactive waste shipments. 2 figs.

  11. Time-Varying Characteristics Analysis and Fuzzy Controller Systematic Design Method for Pressurized Water Reactor Power Control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shengzhi; Zhang Naiyao; Cui Zhenhua

    2004-11-15

    In this paper a systematic design method of fuzzy control systems is applied to the pressurized water reactor's (PWR) power control. The paper includes three parts. In the first part, a simplified time-varying linear model of the PWR power system is constructed, and its inner structure and time-varying characteristics are analyzed. That provides a solid basis for study and design of the nuclear reactor power control system. In the second part, a systematic design method of fuzzy control systems is introduced and applied to control the nuclear reactor power process. The design procedures and parameters are given in detail. This systematic design method has some notable advantages. The control of a global fuzzy model can be decomposed into controlling a set of linear submodels. Each submodel controller can be independently designed by using a linear quadratic regulator approach. This systematic design method gives a sufficient and necessary condition to guarantee the stability of fuzzy control systems; thus, better control performance can be obtained due to the accurate control gains. In the third part, the control performance of the nuclear reactor fuzzy control system is examined by simulation experiments, including nuclear reactor power shutdown, start-up, and adjustment operations. The satisfactory experiment results have shown that the systematic design method for fuzzy control systems is effective and feasible.

  12. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ~10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  13. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Karoutas, Zeses; Berndt, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuel rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid-structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.

  15. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Karoutas, Zeses; Berndt, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuel rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid–structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Furthermore, robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.

  16. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; ...

    2016-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuelmore » rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid–structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Furthermore, robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.« less

  17. Large-eddy simulation, fuel rod vibration and grid-to-rod fretting in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, Mark A.; Lu, Roger; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Karoutas, Zeses; Berndt, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration phenomenon that results in wear and fretting of the cladding material on fuel rods. GTRF is responsible for over 70% of the fuel failures in pressurized water reactors in the United States. Predicting the GTRF wear and concomitant interval between failures is important because of the large costs associated with reactor shutdown and replacement of fuel rod assemblies. The GTRF-induced wear process involves turbulent flow, mechanical vibration, tribology, and time-varying irradiated material properties in complex fuel assembly geometries. This paper presents a new approach for predicting GTRF induced fuel rod wear that uses high-resolution implicit large-eddy simulation to drive nonlinear transient dynamics computations. The GTRF fluid–structure problem is separated into the simulation of the turbulent flow field in the complex-geometry fuel-rod bundles using implicit large-eddy simulation, the calculation of statistics of the resulting fluctuating structural forces, and the nonlinear transient dynamics analysis of the fuel rod. Ultimately, the methods developed here, can be used, in conjunction with operational management, to improve reactor core designs in which fuel rod failures are minimized or potentially eliminated. Furthermore, robustness of the behavior of both the structural forces computed from the turbulent flow simulations and the results from the transient dynamics analyses highlight the progress made towards achieving a predictive simulation capability for the GTRF problem.

  18. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  19. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  20. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Classification of decommissioning wastes. Addendum 3

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.S.

    1984-09-01

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning of the reference pressurized water reactor power station are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. The 17,885 cubic meters of waste from DECON are classified as follows: Class A, 98.0%; Class B, 1.2%; Class C, 0.1%. About 0.7% (133 cubic meters) of the waste would be generally unacceptable for disposal using near-surface disposal methods.

  1. Corrigendum to ;Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R.E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    In our recent paper entitled ;Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel;[1], we make reference to a table within the article as providing the average compositions of the precipitates, when in fact the bulk compositions were given. In this correction, we present the average precipitate compositions for the data presented in Ref. [1]. These correct compositions are provided for information and do not alter the conclusions of the original manuscript.

  2. Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Chattin, Marc Rhea; Giaquinto, Joseph; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-09-01

    will behave during processing, scoping tests are being performed to determine the tritium content in the cladding pre- and post-tritium pretreatment. Samples of Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson pressurized water reactor cladding were heated to 1100–1200°C to oxidize the zirconium and release all of the tritium in the cladding sample. Cladding samples were also heated within the temperature range of 480–600ºC expected for standard air tritium pretreatment systems, and to a slightly higher temperature (700ºC) to determine the impact of tritium pretreatment on tritium release from the cladding. The tritium content of the Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson cladding was measured to be ~234 and ~500 µCi/g, respectively. Heating the Surry-2 cladding at 500°C for 24 h removed ~0.2% of the tritium from the cladding, and heating at 700°C for 24 h removed ~9%. Heating the H.B. Robinson cladding at 700°C for 24 h removed ~11% of the tritium. When samples of the Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson claddings were heated at 700°C for 96 h, essentially all of the tritium in the cladding was removed. However, only ~3% of the tritium was removed when a sample of Surry-2 cladding was heated at 600°C for 96 h. These data indicate that the amount of tritium released from tritium pretreatment systems will be dependent on both the operating temperature and length of time in the system. Under certain conditions, a significant fraction of the tritium could remain bound in the cladding and would need to be considered in operations involving cladding recycle.

  3. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a... components that are expected to experience significant thermal or stress effects during the thermal annealing operation; (ii) An evaluation of the effects of mechanical and thermal stresses and temperatures on the...

  4. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a... components that are expected to experience significant thermal or stress effects during the thermal annealing operation; (ii) An evaluation of the effects of mechanical and thermal stresses and temperatures on the...

  5. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a... components that are expected to experience significant thermal or stress effects during the thermal annealing operation; (ii) An evaluation of the effects of mechanical and thermal stresses and temperatures on the...

  6. Research and Development of High Temperature Light Water Cooled Reactor Operating at Supercritical-Pressure in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiaki Oka; Katsumi Yamada

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes the status and future plans of research and development of the high temperature light water cooled reactor operating at supercritical-pressure in Japan. It includes; the concept development; material for the fuel cladding; water chemistry under supercritical pressure; thermal hydraulics of supercritical fluid; and the conceptual design of core and plant system. Elements of concept development of the once-through coolant cycle reactor are described, which consists of fuel, core, reactor and plant system, stability and safety. Material studies include corrosion tests with supercritical water loops and simulated irradiation tests using a high-energy transmission electron microscope. Possibilities of oxide dispersion strengthening steels for the cladding material are studied. The water chemistry research includes radiolysis and kinetics of supercritical pressure water, influence of radiolysis and radiation damage on corrosion and behavior on the interface between water and material. The thermal hydraulic research includes heat transfer tests of single tube, single rod and three-rod bundles with a supercritical Freon loop and numerical simulations. The conceptual designs include core design with a three-dimensional core simulator and sub-channel analysis, and balance of plant. (authors)

  7. On the character of nanoscale features in reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Brian David

    Nanostructural features that form in reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation at around 290°C are responsible for significant hardening and embrittlement. It is well established that the nanostructural features can be separated into well formed precipitates and matrix features comprised of point defect clusters complexed with solutes, which may also include regions of solute enrichment that are not well formed precipitates. However, a more detailed atomicscale understanding of these features is needed to better interpret experimental measurements and provide a physical basis for predictive embrittlement models. The overall objective of this work is to provide atomic-level insight into the character of the nanostructural features and the physical processes involved in their formation. One focus of this work has been on modeling cascade aging; defined as the evolution of self-interstitial and vacancy defects spanning from their spatially correlated birth in displacement cascades over picoseconds to times on the order of >10 5 seconds, when defect populations have built up to steady-state values and no longer have a geometric correlation. During cascade aging, the self-interstitial and vacancy fluxes are responsible for radiation enhanced diffusion, resulting in wellformed precipitates, and are a direct source of matrix defect features. Many-bodied molecular-statics energy relaxation methods have been used to investigate the structure and energetics of self-interstitial and vacancy clusters. The characterization reveals that self-interstitial clusters form as highly kinked, prismatic, perfect proto dislocation loops and vacancy clusters form as faceted three-dimensional clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of self-interstitial cluster migration reveal that they undergo easy one-dimensional glide, probably due to the presence and easy motion of intrinsic kinks. Our study of the structural characteristics and mobility of the self

  8. Buoyancy induced limits for nanoparticle synthesis experiments in horizontal premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, C.; Faccinetto, A.; Kluge, S.; Kasper, T.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.; Wlokas, I.; Kempf, A.

    2013-06-01

    Premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors can be used to investigate the synthesis of nanoparticles. The present work examines the flow field inside such a reactor during the formation of carbon (soot) and iron oxide (from Fe(CO)5) nanoparticles, and how it affects the measurements of nanoparticle size distribution. The symmetry of the flow and the impact of buoyancy were analysed by three-dimensional simulations and the nanoparticle size distribution was obtained by particle mass spectrometry (PMS) via molecular beam sampling at different distances from the burner. The PMS measurements showed a striking, sudden increase in particle size at a critical distance from the burner, which could be explained by the flow field predicted in the simulations. The simulation results illustrate different fluid mechanical phenomena which have caused this sudden rise in the measured particle growth. Up to the critical distance, buoyancy does not affect the flow, and an (almost) linear growth is observed in the PMS experiments. Downstream of this critical distance, buoyancy deflects the hot gas stream and leads to an asymmetric flow field with strong recirculation. These recirculation zones increase the particle residence time, inducing very large particle sizes as measured by PMS. This deviation from the assumed symmetric, one-dimensional flow field prevents the correct interpretation of the PMS results. To overcome this problem, modifications to the reactor were investigated; their suitability to reduce the flow asymmetry was analysed. Furthermore, 'safe' operating conditions were identified for which accurate measurements are feasible in premixed low-pressure flat-flame reactors that are transferrable to other experiments in this type of reactor. The present work supports experimentalists to find the best setup and operating conditions for their purpose.

  9. Pressure Loss Predictions of the Reactor Simulator Subsystem at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.

    2016-01-01

    Testing of the Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center. The TDU consists of three subsystems: the reactor simulator (RxSim), the Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), and the heat exchanger manifold (HXM). An annular linear induction pump (ALIP) is used to drive the working fluid. A preliminary version of the TDU system (which excludes the PCU for now) is referred to as the "RxSim subsystem" and was used to conduct flow tests in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6). In parallel, a computational model of the RxSim subsystem was created based on the computer-aided-design (CAD) model and was used to predict loop pressure losses over a range of mass flows. This was done to assess the ability of the pump to meet the design intent mass flow demand. Measured data indicates that the pump can produce 2.333 kg/sec of flow, which is enough to supply the RxSim subsystem with a nominal flow of 1.75 kg/sec. Computational predictions indicated that the pump could provide 2.157 kg/sec (using the Spalart-Allmaras (S?A) turbulence model) and 2.223 kg/sec (using the k- turbulence model). The computational error of the predictions for the available mass flow is ?0.176 kg/sec (with the S-A turbulence model) and -0.110 kg/sec (with the k- turbulence model) when compared to measured data.

  10. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of {approximately}12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by {approximately}43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150.

  11. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  12. Dynamic Strain Aging in New Generation Cr-Mo-V Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new generation nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (CrMoV type) having compositional similarities with thick section 3Cr-Mo class of low alloy steels and adapted for nuclear applications was investigated for various manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA) using uniaxial tests. The steel investigated herein has undergone quenched and tempered treatment such that a tempered bainite microstructure with Cr-rich carbides was formed. The scope of the uniaxial experiments included tensile tests over a temperature range of 298 K to 873 K (25 °C to 600 °C) at two strain rates (10-3 and 10-4 s-1), as well as suitably designed transient strain rate change tests. The flow behavior displayed serrated flow, negative strain rate sensitivity, plateau behavior of yield, negative temperature ( T), and strain rate left( {dot{\\varepsilon }} right) dependence of flow stress over the temperature range of 523 K to 673 K (250 °C to 400 °C) and strain rate range of 5 × 10-3 s-1 to 3 × 10-6 s-1, respectively. While these trends attested to the presence of DSA, a lack of work hardening and near negligible impairment of ductility point to the fact that manifestations of embrittling features of DSA were significantly enervated in the new generation pressure vessel steel. In order to provide a mechanistic understanding of these unique combinations of manifestations of DSA in the steel, a new approach for evaluation of responsible solutes from strain rate change tests was adopted. From these experiments and calculation of activation energy by application of vacancy-based models, the solutes responsible for DSA were identified as carbon/nitrogen. The lack of embrittling features of DSA in the steel was rationalized as being due to the beneficial effects arising from the presence of dynamic recovery effects, presence of alloy carbides in the tempered bainitic structure, and formation of solute clusters, all of which hinder the possibilities for strong aging of dislocations.

  13. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0–100 MPa) and temperature (0–70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate. PMID

  14. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ(13)Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate.

  15. A Comparison of an AEDC and a Russian Developed Pressure Sensitive Paint in the AEDC Propulsion Wind Tunnel 16T

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    at AEDC uses platinum octaethylporphyrin ( PtOEP ) for the pressure sensitive luminescent molecule and is very sensitive to changes in temperature...luminescent molecule ( PtOEP or other) absorbs a photon of appropriate energy, the molecule enters an excited state. From this state, the molecule

  16. Design for Ceramic Membrane Reactor with two Reactant Gases at Different Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Mieville, Rodney L.

    1998-11-18

    The invention is a ceramic membrane reactor for syngas production having a reaction chamber, an inlet in the reactor for natural gas intake, a plurality of oxygen permeating ceramic slabs inside the reaction chamber with each slab having a plurality of passages paralleling the gas flow for transporting air through the reaction chamber, a manifold affixed to one end of the reaction chamber for intake of air connected to the slabs, a second manifold affixed to the reactor for removing the oxygen depleted air, and an outlet in the reaction chamber for removing syngas.

  17. Correlation of streamer current pulses associated with adjacent high voltage needles in atmospheric pressure cold plasma reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesize that for a 12 needle array in an atmospheric pressure cold plasma reactor there will be correlation between needle corona current pulses. Guaitella et al. have shown in their surface dielectric barrier discharge that synchronous surface streamers are likely triggered by photodesorbed negative charges with binding energy (at the surface of the dielectric) less than 3.5 eV. The reactor used in our work has two rings of axially aligned needles. The current in each needle is measured with broad band current sensors that respond primarily to free electron drift. Digital signal processing will be used to analyze correlation between streamer current pulses. A 60 Hz 10 kVRMS voltage source produces the streamers and concomitantly the cold plasma. The current pulse correlation will be studied between 1 needle and each of the other 11 needles with the expectation that nearest neighbor needles will have the highest correlation. Understanding correlated streamer current pulses will inform reactor modeling and reactor optimization. O. Guaitella, I. Marinov, A. Rousseau, Applied Physics Letters, 98, 2011.

  18. An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, Cole A; Godfrey, Andrew T; Terrani, Kurt A; Gehin, Jess C; Powers, Jeffrey J; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

  19. Disclosure of the oscillations in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessel steel damage at fast neutron intensity decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Fast neutron intensity influence on reactor materials radiation damage is a critically important question in the problem of the correct use of the accelerated irradiation tests data for substantiation of the materials workability in real irradiation conditions that is low neutron intensity. Investigations of the fast neutron intensity (flux) influence on radiation damage and experimental data scattering reveal the existence of non-monotonous sections in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steel damage. Discovery of the oscillations as indicator of the self-organization processes presence give reasons for new ways searching on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel radiation stability increasing and attempt of the self-restoring metal elaboration. Revealing of the wavelike process in the form of non monotonous parts of the kinetics of radiation embrittlement testifies that periodic transformation of the structure take place. This fact actualizes the problem of more precise definition of the RPV materials radiation embrittlement mechanisms and gives reasons for search of the ways to manage the radiation stability (nanostructuring and so on to stimulate the radiation defects annihilation), development of the means for creating of more stableness self recovering smart materials.

  20. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoye, Robert L. Z. E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; Muñoz-Rojas, David; Nelson, Shelby F.; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  1. Thermal-hydraulics of wave propagation and pressure distribution under hypothetical steam explosion conditions in the ANS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; N-Valenit, S.; Kim, S.H.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling and analysis framework for evaluation of dynamic loads, wave propagation, and pressure distributions (under hypothetical steam explosion conditions) around key structural boundaries of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor core region. A staged approach was followed, using simple thermodynamic models for bounding loads and the CTH code for evaluating realistic estimates in a staged multidimensional framework. Effects of nodalization, melt dispersal into coolant during explosion, single versus multidirectional dissipation, energy level of melt, and rate of energy deposition into coolant were studied. The importance of capturing multidimensional effects that simultaneously account for fluid-structural interactions was demonstrated. As opposed to using bounding loads from thermodynamic evaluations, it was revealed that the ANS reactor system will not be vulnerable to vertically generated missiles that threaten containment if realistic estimates of energetics are used (from CTH calculations for thermally generated steam explosions without significant aluminum ignition).

  2. Th/U-233 multi-recycle in pressurized water reactors : feasibility study of multiple homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, D.; Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Mohamed, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-01

    The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been considered in past literature, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of Th/U-233 fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches for sustainable multi-recycle without the need for external fissile material makeup have been investigated. The intent is to obtain a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications.

  3. Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulic Experimental Program (STEP). Volume 1. Mixing in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, A.R.; Zielke, L.A.

    1980-08-01

    This volume describes an experiment that was performed to determine the mixing characteristics of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. The objective of this project was to improve the subchannel computer code models of the reactor core. The experimental technique was isokinetic subchannel withdrawal of the entire flow from two sample subchannels. Once withdrawn, the sample fluid was condensed and its enthalpy was measured by regenerative heat exchange calorimetry. The test bundle was a 4 x 6 electrically heated array with a 50% power upset. The COBRA IIIC code was used to model the experiment and to determine the value of the thermal mixing coefficient, ..beta.., that was necessary to predict the measured results. Both single- and two-phase data were obtained over a range of PWR operating conditions. The results indicate that both single- and two-phase mixing is small. The COBRA model predicts the enthalpy data using a turbulent mixing coefficient, ..beta.. approx. = 0.002.

  4. Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions around the interfaces of carbides in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Tsuchiya, N.; Nagai, Y.; Almazouzi, A.; Hatakeyama, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohkubo, T.; van Walle, E.; Gerard, R.

    2010-10-01

    Irradiation-induced changes of the atomic distributions of solute and impurity elements around carbides in a reactor pressure vessel steel of a Belgium nuclear power reactor were investigated by laser-assisted local electrode-type three-dimensional atom probe, before and after in-service irradiation of 12 years. Before irradiation, nano-scale Fe-Mn-Cr-Mo carbides were found to be intragranular. The atomic distributions of Mn, Cr and Mo inside the carbide indicate that their concentrations around the inner carbide-matrix interface were enhanced, while a clear segregation of P at the interface was observed. After irradiation, the Mn concentration in the carbide increased substantially. In addition, the enhancement of Mn, Cr and Mo concentrations around the interface and the segregation of P were markedly intensified.

  5. Pressurized pyrolysis of dried distillers grains with solubles and canola seed press cake in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Funda; Miskolczi, Norbert; Saricaoğlu, Beyza

    2015-02-01

    Pressurized pyrolysis of biomasses was carried in a fixed bed reactor to obtain gases, bio-oils and chars at elevated temperatures. The products were characterized by GC-MS, FTIR, viscometer, SEM, BET and EDXRFS methods. Experiments were performed at 1, 5 and 10 bar pressure and 400, 500 and 600°C temperatures. The experimental results show that in all the experimental condition the yield of bio-oil from DDGS as higher than that of canola. Yield of non-condensable gases and chars increased, while that of liquid products decreased by pressure. Increasing pressure favoured the formation of low molecular weight gas, such as H2. Maximum surface area of chars was obtained at atmospheric pressure and the surface areas decreased rapidly with increasing pressure. GC/MS results shows that the amount of fatty acids in bio-oils was increased by increasing pressure and bio-oils showed non-Newtonian behavior. Based on EDXRFS results, bio-oils and char contained lots of elements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program Series 4 and 5)

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, R.G.; McGowan, J.J.; Menke, B.H.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    Multiple testing is done at two laboratories of typical nuclear pressure vessel materials (both irradiated and unirradiated) and statistical analyses of the test results. Multiple tests are conducted at each of several test temperatures for each material, standard deviations are determined, and results from the two laboratories are compared. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (current practice welds). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds.

  7. Neutronic analysis of candidate accident-tolerant cladding concepts in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGES

    George, Nathan Michael; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; ...

    2014-09-29

    A study analyzed the neutronics of alternate cladding materials in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment. Austenitic type 310 (310SS) and 304 stainless steels, ferritic Fe-20Cr-5Al (FeCrAl) and APMT™ alloys, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based materials were considered and compared with Zircaloy-4. SCALE 6.1 was used to analyze the associated neutronics penalty/advantage, changes in reactivity coefficients, and spectral variations once a transition in the cladding was made. In the cases examined, materials containing higher absorbing isotopes invoked a reduction in reactivity due to an increase in neutron absorption in the cladding. Higher absorbing materials produced a harder neutron spectrum in themore » fuel pellet, leading to a slight increase in plutonium production. A parametric study determined the geometric conditions required to match cycle length requirements for each alternate cladding material in a PWR. A method for estimating the end of cycle reactivity was implemented to compare each model to that of standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. By using a thinner cladding of 350 μm and keeping a constant outer diameter, austenitic stainless steels require an increase of no more than 0.5 wt% enriched 235U to match fuel cycle requirements, while the required increase for FeCrAl was about 0.1%. When modeling SiC (with slightly lower thermal absorption properties than that of Zircaloy), a standard cladding thickness could be implemented with marginally less enriched uranium (~0.1%). Moderator temperature and void coefficients were calculated throughout the depletion cycle. Nearly identical reactivity responses were found when coolant temperature and void properties were perturbed for each cladding material. By splitting the pellet into 10 equal areal sections, relative fission power as a function of radius was found to be similar for each cladding material. FeCrAl and 310SS cladding have a slightly higher fission power near the pellet’s periphery due to the

  8. Neutronic analysis of candidate accident-tolerant cladding concepts in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    George, Nathan Michael; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Maldonado, Ivan

    2014-09-29

    A study analyzed the neutronics of alternate cladding materials in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment. Austenitic type 310 (310SS) and 304 stainless steels, ferritic Fe-20Cr-5Al (FeCrAl) and APMT™ alloys, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based materials were considered and compared with Zircaloy-4. SCALE 6.1 was used to analyze the associated neutronics penalty/advantage, changes in reactivity coefficients, and spectral variations once a transition in the cladding was made. In the cases examined, materials containing higher absorbing isotopes invoked a reduction in reactivity due to an increase in neutron absorption in the cladding. Higher absorbing materials produced a harder neutron spectrum in the fuel pellet, leading to a slight increase in plutonium production. A parametric study determined the geometric conditions required to match cycle length requirements for each alternate cladding material in a PWR. A method for estimating the end of cycle reactivity was implemented to compare each model to that of standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. By using a thinner cladding of 350 μm and keeping a constant outer diameter, austenitic stainless steels require an increase of no more than 0.5 wt% enriched 235U to match fuel cycle requirements, while the required increase for FeCrAl was about 0.1%. When modeling SiC (with slightly lower thermal absorption properties than that of Zircaloy), a standard cladding thickness could be implemented with marginally less enriched uranium (~0.1%). Moderator temperature and void coefficients were calculated throughout the depletion cycle. Nearly identical reactivity responses were found when coolant temperature and void properties were perturbed for each cladding material. By splitting the pellet into 10 equal areal sections, relative fission power as a function of radius was found to be similar for each cladding material. FeCrAl and 310SS cladding have a slightly higher fission power near the pellet’s periphery due to

  9. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Terry, Totemeier

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  10. Radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels: An international review (Fourth Volume)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, L.E.

    1993-12-01

    The technical content is highly focused on the title subject, which is crucial to the continued operating safety of commercial nuclear electric power generating plants, as it treats the phenomenon of neutron embrittlement of the primary containment vessel of the nuclear reactor power source. Integrity of this nuclear reactor component is a primary goal of all the specialists who have participated in this series of four international meetings. These international meetings and the publication arising from them offer a progressive series of volumes that provide a valuable technical resource to nuclear power plant operators, national regulatory specialists, and researchers in this area of nuclear safety. The progressive nature of these publications is particularly valuable in teaching scientific and technical developments on what has become one of the most critical elements in reactor safety analysis with the aging of nuclear power reactors. The progress of research and vessel surveillance for neutron embrittlement reflects the aging of nuclear power reactors and, therefore, the attendant interest in assuring safe life attainment for this crucial element of electric power generation, as the authors approach the close of the Twentieth century. Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 papers of this book.

  11. The Low Temperature Oxidation of 2,7-Dimethyloctane in a Pressurized Flow Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, Farinaz

    The complexity of real fuels has fostered the use of simple mixtures of hydrocarbons whose combustion behavior approximates that of real fuels in both experimental and computational studies to develop models of the combustion of the real fuel. These simple mixtures have been called surrogates. Lightly branched paraffins are an important class of constituents in gasoline, diesel and aviation turbine fuels and therefore are primary candidates for use as a component in a surrogate. Unfortunately, fundamental studies on combustion characteristics of high molecular weight mono- and di-methylated iso-paraffins are scarce. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the low-temperature oxidation of 2,7-dimethyloctane (2,7-DMO) (C10H22), a lightly branched isomer of decane. Replicate 2,7-DMO oxidation experiments were conducted in a pressurized flow reactor (PFR) over the temperature range of 550 -- 850 K, at a pressure of 8 atm and an equivalence ratio of 0.3 in 4.21% oxygen / nitrogen. The reactivity was mapped by continuous monitoring of CO, CO 2, and O2 using a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon monoxide / carbon dioxide analyzer and an electrochemical oxygen sensor. For examining the underlying reaction chemistry, detailed speciation of samples was performed at selected temperatures using a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector coupled to a mass spectrometer. Comparable oxidation experiments for n-decane were carried out to examine the unique effects of branching on fuel reactivity and distribution of major stable intermediates. For both isomers, the onset of negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region was observed near 700 K, with the reactivity decreasing with increasing the temperature. The flow reactor study of n-decane oxidation confirmed that the isomerization reduces the amount of CO produced at peak reactivity. In addition to reaction inhibition, branching affected the distribution of C2-C 4 olefin intermediates. While the oxidation of

  12. Preliminary assessment of the effects of biaxial loading on reactor pressure vessel structural-integrity-assessment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-04-01

    Effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness were studied to determine potential impact on structural integrity assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient loading and pressure-temperature (PT) loading produced by reactor heatup and cooldown transients. Biaxial shallow-flaw fracture-toughness tests results were also used to determine the parameter controlling fracture in the transition temperature range, and to develop a related dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation. Shallow-flaw and biaxial loading effects were found to reduce the conditional probability of crack initiation by a factor of nine when the shallow-flaw fracture-toughness K{sub Jc} data set, with biaxial-loading effects adjustments, was substituted in place of ASME Code K{sub Ic} data set in PTS analyses. Biaxial loading was found to reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV steel such that the lower-bound curve was located between ASME K{sub Ic} and K{sub IR} curves. This is relevant to future development of P-T curve analysis procedures. Fracture in shallow-flaw biaxial samples tested in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture.

  13. High glucose selectivity in pressurized water hydrolysis of cellulose using ultra-fast reactors.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Dolores Bermejo, M; José Cocero, M

    2013-05-01

    A new reactor was developed for the selective hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study, the glucose selectivity obtained from cellulose was improved by using ultra-fast reactions in which a selective medium was combined with an effective residence time control. A selective production of glucose, fructose and cellobiose (50%) or total mono-oligo saccharides (>96%) was obtained from the cellulose in a reaction time of 0.03 s. Total cellulose conversion was achieved with a 5-hydroxymethylfural concentration lower than 5 ppm in a novel micro-reactor. Reducing the residence time from minutes to milliseconds opens the possibility of moving from the conventional m(3) to cm(3) reactor volumes.

  14. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-10-26

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

  15. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    SciTech Connect

    LEWIS, M.E.

    2000-04-06

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  16. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  17. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus

    2015-10-15

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  18. Effect of different carbon sources on the biological phosphorus removal by a sequencing batch reactor using pressurized pure oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Takaya; Arfarita, Novi; Yamamoto, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko; Kanno, Ariyo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon source on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from synthetic wastewater with acetate and two ratios of acetate/starch as a carbon source was investigated. Three pressurized pure oxygen sequencing batch reactor (POSBR) experiments were operated. The reactors (POSBR1, POSBR2 and POSBR3) were developed and studied at different carbon source ratios of 100% acetate, 75% acetate plus 25% starch and 50% acetate plus 50% starch, respectively. The results showed that POSBR1 had a higher phosphate release-to-uptake ratio and, respectively, in a much higher phosphorus removal efficiency (93.8%) than POSBR2 (84.7%) and POSBR3 (77.3%) within 30 days of operation. This indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased the higher the starch concentration was. It was also found that POSBR1 produced more polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) than the other reactors. Based on the effect of the carbon source on the PHA concentration and consumption, the conditions of POSBR1 were favourable for the growth of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms and therefore, beneficial for the biological phosphorus removal process. PMID:26019532

  19. Effect of different carbon sources on the biological phosphorus removal by a sequencing batch reactor using pressurized pure oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Takaya; Arfarita, Novi; Yamamoto, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko; Kanno, Ariyo

    2014-05-04

    The effect of different carbon source on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from synthetic wastewater with acetate and two ratios of acetate/starch as a carbon source was investigated. Three pressurized pure oxygen sequencing batch reactor (POSBR) experiments were operated. The reactors (POSBR1, POSBR2 and POSBR3) were developed and studied at different carbon source ratios of 100% acetate, 75% acetate plus 25% starch and 50% acetate plus 50% starch, respectively. The results showed that POSBR1 had a higher phosphate release-to-uptake ratio and, respectively, in a much higher phosphorus removal efficiency (93.8%) than POSBR2 (84.7%) and POSBR3 (77.3%) within 30 days of operation. This indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased the higher the starch concentration was. It was also found that POSBR1 produced more polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) than the other reactors. Based on the effect of the carbon source on the PHA concentration and consumption, the conditions of POSBR1 were favourable for the growth of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms and therefore, beneficial for the biological phosphorus removal process.

  20. An atmospheric pressure high-temperature laminar flow reactor for investigation of combustion and related gas phase reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Oßwald, Patrick; Köhler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A new high-temperature flow reactor experiment utilizing the powerful molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) technique for detailed observation of gas phase kinetics in reacting flows is presented. The reactor design provides a consequent extension of the experimental portfolio of validation experiments for combustion reaction kinetics. Temperatures up to 1800 K are applicable by three individually controlled temperature zones with this atmospheric pressure flow reactor. Detailed speciation data are obtained using the sensitive MBMS technique, providing in situ access to almost all chemical species involved in the combustion process, including highly reactive species such as radicals. Strategies for quantifying the experimental data are presented alongside a careful analysis of the characterization of the experimental boundary conditions to enable precise numeric reproduction of the experimental results. The general capabilities of this new analytical tool for the investigation of reacting flows are demonstrated for a selected range of conditions, fuels, and applications. A detailed dataset for the well-known gaseous fuels, methane and ethylene, is provided and used to verify the experimental approach. Furthermore, application for liquid fuels and fuel components important for technical combustors like gas turbines and engines is demonstrated. Besides the detailed investigation of novel fuels and fuel components, the wide range of operation conditions gives access to extended combustion topics, such as super rich conditions at high temperature important for gasification processes, or the peroxy chemistry governing the low temperature oxidation regime. These demonstrations are accompanied by a first kinetic modeling approach, examining the opportunities for model validation purposes.

  1. A high-pressure plug flow reactor for combustion chemistry investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhewen; Cochet, Julien; Leplat, Nicolas; Yang, Yi; Brear, Michael J.

    2017-10-01

    A plug flow reactor (PFR) is built for investigating the oxidation chemistry of fuels at up to 50 bar and 1000 K. These conditions include those corresponding to the low temperature combustion (i.e. the autoignition) that commonly occurs in internal combustion engines. Turbulent flow that approximates ideal, plug flow conditions is established in a quartz tube reactor. The reacting mixture is highly diluted by excess air to reduce the reaction rates for kinetic investigations. A novel mixer design is used to achieve fast mixing of the preheated air and fuel vapour at the reactor entrance, reducing the issue of reaction initialization in kinetic modelling. A water-cooled probe moves along the reactor extracting gases for further analysis. Measurement of the sampled gas temperature uses an extended form of a three-thermocouple method that corrects for radiative heat losses from the thermocouples to the enclosed PFR environment. Investigation of the PFR’s operation is first conducted using non-reacting flows, and then with isooctane oxidation at 900 K and 10 bar. Mixing of the non-reacting temperature and species fields is shown to be rapid. The measured fuel consumption and CO formation are then closely reproduced by kinetic modelling using an extensively validated iso-octane mechanism from the literature and the corrected gas temperature. Together, these results demonstrate the PFR’s utility for chemical kinetic investigations.

  2. Continuous-flow high pressure hydrogenation reactor for optimization and high-throughput synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard V; Godorhazy, Lajos; Varga, Norbert; Szalay, Daniel; Urge, Laszlo; Darvas, Ferenc

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a novel continuous-flow hydrogenation reactor and its integration with a liquid handler to generate a fully automated high-throughput hydrogenation system for library synthesis. The reactor, named the H-Cube, combines endogenous hydrogen generation from the electrolysis of water with a continuous flow-through system. The system makes significant advances over current batch hydrogenation reactors in terms of safety, reaction validation efficiency, and rates of reaction. The hydrogenation process is described along with a detailed description of the device's main parts. The reduction of a series of functional groups, varying in difficulty up to 70 degrees C and 70 bar are also described. The paper concludes with the integration of the device into an automated liquid handler followed by the reduction of a nitro compound in a high throughput manner. The system is fully automated and can conduct 5 reactions in the time it takes to perform and workup one reaction manually on a standard batch reactor.

  3. Applicability of GALE-86 Codes to Integral Pressurized Water Reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2012-06-01

    This report describes work that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is doing to assist the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of New Reactors (NRO) staff in their reviews of applications for nuclear power plants using new reactor core designs. These designs include small integral PWRs (IRIS, mPower, and NuScale reactor designs), HTGRs, (pebble-bed and prismatic-block modular reactor designs) and SFRs (4S and PRISM reactor designs). Under this specific task, PNNL will assist the NRC staff in reviewing the current versions of the GALE codes and identify features and limitations that would need to be modified to accommodate the technical review of iPWR and mPower® license applications and recommend specific changes to the code, NUREG-0017, and associated NRC guidance. This contract is necessary to support the licensing of iPWRs with a near-term focus on the B&W mPower® reactor design. While the focus of this review is on the mPower® reactor design, the review of the code and the scope of recommended changes consider a revision of the GALE codes that would make them universally applicable for other types of integral PWR designs. The results of a detailed comparison between PWR and iPWR designs are reported here. Also included is an investigation of the GALE code and its basis and a determination as to the applicability of each of the bases to an iPWR design. The issues investigated come from a list provided by NRC staff, the results of comparing the PWR and iPWR designs, the parameters identified as having a large impact on the code outputs from a recent sensitivity study and the main bases identified in NUREG-0017. This report will provide a summary of the gaps in the GALE codes as they relate to iPWR designs and for each gap will propose what work could be performed to fill that gap and create a version of GALE that is applicable to integral PWR designs.

  4. Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Christopher F.

    2006-07-01

    During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range

  5. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  6. On-site implementation of characterization and sizing techniques for outer-wall defects in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lasserre, F.; Chapuis, N.

    1994-12-31

    Pressurized reactor vessels in France have been examined from the inside with ultrasonic focused transducers since the very first inspection. The developments carried out to solve the problem of oversizing in the case of defects located near the outer surface in the welds or in the wall thickness and presented in the framework of the 10th and 11th conference of NDE in the nuclear and pressure vessels industries, now have applications through SPARTACUS software work. Indications detected during, the systematic inspection of welds and shells, corresponding to outer wall defects, trigger a digital acquisition of data, the scanning being limited to the area of interest. This acquisition is now followed by analysis through the new system CIVAMIS, which includes the main imaging tools of SPARTACUS, but which has been specifically developed to be implemented on site, for outer wall defects. Characteristics of CIVAMIS in relation with the initial structure of SPARTACUS are discussed on actual results.

  7. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  8. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herbschleb, C. T.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2014-08-15

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  9. A novel approach for optimal control of a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Saif, M.

    1989-02-01

    A novel approach for optimal control of the H.B. Robinson nuclear power plant is presented. Optimal linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory is used for the control purpose. The appealing feature of the LQR design used here over the previous applications of this technique to nuclear reactors is that the proposed controller design algorithm for the reactor is capable of selecting appropriate weighting matrices in the cost functional, so that all or a selected number of the open-loop system poles are placed at desired locations while the performance index is minimized. Another advantage of the approach is that since aggregation is used in designing such a controller, second- or fourth-order matrix computations are performed almost throughout the design procedure.

  10. Russians as People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wright

    This analysis of the Russian character in various aspects of Soviet society in its daily activities focuses on the cultural rather than the political. Included in the study are sections on: (1) hibernation and awakening; (2) the Russian scene; (3) being a Russian; (4) Russian society--mass and minority; (5) manners, morals, and taste; and (6)…

  11. Russians as People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wright

    This analysis of the Russian character in various aspects of Soviet society in its daily activities focuses on the cultural rather than the political. Included in the study are sections on: (1) hibernation and awakening; (2) the Russian scene; (3) being a Russian; (4) Russian society--mass and minority; (5) manners, morals, and taste; and (6)…

  12. Design, Construction and Testing of an In-Pile Loop for PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    corrosion resistance in a steam environment. For this reason zircaloy - 2 is used 109 as the primary cladding material in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR...Unfortunately, zircaloy - 2 was found to have a high affinity for monoatomic hydrogen, which formed an intermetallic compound of zirconium-hydride. The...built, the Loop duplicates the core and Steam Generator fluid surface film differential temperatures , bulk fluid temperatures , and wall fluid shear

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  14. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  15. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Sikik, E.; Van den Branden, G.; Koonen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration. The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration, based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  16. No sleep in the deep for Russian subs

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, J.

    1993-04-01

    In the Russian Far East, dozens of nuclear-powered submarines, once a threat to Western navies, are now a threat to the environment. Between mid-1989 and 1993, over 80 Russian nuclear submarines were removed from service. Nearly 80 more will be retired by the year 2000. Most of these submarines contain two nuclear reactors. The many decommisioned submarines have overwhelmed the limited funds and processing capacity of the Russian Navy. Problems include removal of the fuel, scrapping of the submarines, and safe disposal of the radioactive reactor vessels.

  17. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  18. Status of ITER task T213 collaborative irradiation screening experiment on Cu/SS joints in the Russian Federation SM-2-reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Specimen fabrication is underway for an irradiation screening experiment planned to start in January 1996 in the SM-2 reactor in Dimitrovgrad, Russia. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation at ITER-relevant temperatures on the bond integrity performance of Cu/SS and Be/Cu joints, as well as to further investigate the base metal properties of irradiated copper alloys. Specimens from each of the four ITER parties (U.S., EU, japan, and RF) will be irradiated to a dose of {approx}0.2 dpa at two different temperatures, 150 and 300{degrees}C. The specimens will consist of Cu/SS and Be/Cu joints in several different geometries, as well as a large number of specimens from the base materials. Fracture toughness data on base metal and Cu/SS bonded specimens will be obtained from specimens supplied by the U.S. Due to lack of material, the Be/Cu specimens supplied by the U.S will only be irradiated as TEM disks.

  19. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of as-irradiated, annealed and reirradiated reactor pressure vessel weld material of decommissioned reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.; Bergner, F.; Viehrig, H.-W.; Keiderling, U.

    2011-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was applied to characterize the microstructure of weld material taken from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the decommissioned VVER440 (230)-type nuclear power plant (NPP) Greifswald, Units 1, 2 and 4. The welding seam of highest neutron exposure of Unit 1 was subject to a large-scale annealing treatment in 1988 after about 11.5 effective years of operation. The same type of annealing was applied to Unit 2 in 1990 after about 11 effective years of operation. After final decommissioning of NPP Greifswald in 1990, RPV material was left in the reirradiated condition (Unit 1), in the as-annealed condition (Unit 2) and in the as-irradiated condition (Unit 4). Trepans of material from the highly irradiated RPV welds of these Units have recently become available for examination. The results of the SANS investigation are reported and compared with published results obtained for as-irradiated, post-irradiation annealed and reirradiated surveillance material of the same type. A general agreement was found indicating in particular the formation of irradiation-induced Cu-enriched clusters and efficient recovery as a result of the large-scale annealing treatments. The only essential difference was observed for the ratio of magnetic and nuclear scattering indicating differences of the cluster composition for the RPV wall and surveillance material.

  20. FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry analysis for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954, 3053 and 1165 using a WIMS calculated input spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.; Matsumoto, W.Y.; Morgan, W.C.; Suski, A.E.

    1988-05-01

    This report is in response to a request from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) that the PNL National Dosimetry Center (NDC) perform physics-dosimetry analyses (E > MeV) for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954 and 3053. As a result of these analyses, and recommendations for additional studies, two physics-dosimetry re-evaluations for Pressure Tube 1165 were also accomplished. The primary objective of Pacific Northwest Laboratories' (PNL) National Dosimetry Center (NDC) physics-dosimetry work for N Reactor was to provide FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry results to assist in the assessment of neutron radiation-induced changes in the physical and mechanical properties of N Reactor pressure tubes. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Analysis and selection of high pressure heaters design for a new generation of NPP with BN-1200 reactor plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Trifonov, N. N.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Esin, S. B.; Svyatkin, F. A.; Nikolaenkova, E. K.; Prikhod'ko, P. Yu.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    In the development of advanced high-power steam-turbine plants (STP), special attention is placed on the design of reliable and economical high-pressure heater (HPH) capable to maintain the specified thermal hydraulic performance during the entire service life. Comparative analysis of the known designs of HPH, such as the spiral-collector HPH, the collector-coiled HPH, the collector-platen HPH, modular HPH, and the chamber HPH, was carried out. The advantages and disadvantages of each design were pointed. For better comparison, the heaters are separated into two groups—horizontal and vertical ones. The weight and dimension characteristics, the materials and features of the basic elements, and operating features of variety HPH are presented. At operating the spiral-collector HPH used in the majority of regenerative schemes of high-pressure STP of thermal and nuclear power plants, the disadvantages reducing the economy and reliability of their operation were revealed. The recommendations directed to the reliability growth of HPH, the decrease of subcooling the feed water, the increase of compactness are stated. Some of these were developed by the specialists of OAO NPO TsKTI and are successfully implemented on the thermal power plants and nuclear power plants. Technical solutions to reduce the cost of regeneration system and the weight of chamber HPH, reduce the thickness of the tube plate of HPH, and reliability assurance of the cooler of steam and condensate built in the HPH casing under all operating conditions were proposed. Three types of feed water chambers for vertical and horizontal chamber HPH are considered in detail, the constructive solutions that have been implemented in HPH of the regeneration system of turbines of 1000 and 1200 MW capacity with water-moderated water-cooled power reactor (WMWCPR) are described. The optimal design of HPH for the regeneration system of high-pressure turbine plant with BN-1200 reactor was selected.

  2. Slurry pumping techniques for feeding high-pressure coal gasification reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, W. G.; Tarman, P. B.

    1977-01-01

    Operating experience in pumping coal and coal char slurries at pressures up to 1500 psig is discussed. The design specifications for the mixing tanks, pumps, piping, and slurry heaters are given along with pressure drop and minimum flow velocity data on water-lignite slurries.

  3. Status of Knowledge of Radiation Embrittlement in USA Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    NRC-FIN-5528 UNCLASSIFIED NRL-R-,737 NUREG -CR-2511 Ni." EEEIIEIIIEI mEE/hhhE AD ~ NUREG /CR-251 1 0 AD A I INRL Memo Rpt 4737 Status of Knowledge of...J2.75 ti a Tec nica for ati Irv Ce Spr ~~~ Sid 1 NUREG /CR-2511 NRL Memo Rpt 4737 R5 Status of Knowledge of Radiation Embrittlement in USA Reactor...vendor reports and correspondence; Commission papers; and applicant and licensee documents and correspondence. The following documents in the NUREG

  4. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1985-04-01

    This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

  5. Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A.

    2013-07-01

    A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

  6. Survey on Russian Society: Discover Russian and the Russians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Written primarily for the non-Russian speaking student, this course is designed to demonstrate how simple and interesting Russian studies can be. Performance objectives are presented in two categories: language and culture. After the statement of each language objective, letters indicate the language skills to which the objective is directed. The…

  7. Atmospheric pressure: Russian drug policy as a driver for violations of the UN Convention against Torture and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

    PubMed

    Golichenko, Mikhail; Sarang, Anya

    2013-06-14

    Responding to problematic drug use in Russia, the government promotes a policy of "zero tolerance" for drug use and "social pressure" against people who use drugs (PWUD), rejecting effective drug treatment and harm reduction measures. In order to assess Russian drug policy against the UN Convention Against Torture and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, we reviewed published data from government and non-governmental organizations, scientific publications, media reports, and interviews with PWUD. Drug-dependent people (DDP) are the most vulnerable group of PWUD. The state strictly controls all aspects of drug dependence. Against this background, the state promotes hatred towards PWUD via state-controlled media, corroding public perception of PWUD and of their entitlement to human rights. This vilification of PWUD is accompanied by their widespread ill-treatment in health care facilities, police detention, and prisons. In practice, zero tolerance for drug use translates to zero tolerance for PWUD. Through drug policy, the government deliberately amplifies harms associated with drug use by causing PWUD (especially DDP) additional pain and suffering. It exploits the particular vulnerability of DDP, subjecting them to unscientific and ideologically driven methods of drug prevention and treatment and denying access to essential medicines and services. State policy is to legitimize and encourage societal ill-treatment of PWUD. The government intentionally subjects approximately 1.7 million people to pain, suffering, and humiliation. Aimed at punishing people for using drugs and coercing people into abstinence, the official drug policy disregards the chronic nature of drug dependence. It also ignores the ineffectiveness of punitive measures in achieving the purposes for which they are officially used, that is, public safety and public health. Simultaneously, the government impedes measures that would eliminate the pain and suffering of DDP

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma Activation of CO2 in a Packed-Bed Dielectric Barrier Discharge Reactor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Danhua; Tu, Xin

    2017-08-17

    Direct conversion of CO2 into CO and O2 is performed in a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) non-thermal plasma reactor at low temperatures and atmospheric pressure. The maximum CO2 conversion of 22.6 % is achieved when BaTiO3 pellets are fully packed into the discharge gap. The introduction of γ-Al2 O3 or 10 wt % Ni/γ-Al2 O3 catalyst into the BaTiO3 packed DBD reactor increases both CO2 conversion and energy efficiency of the plasma process. Packing γ-Al2 O3 or 10 wt % Ni/γ-Al2 O3 upstream of the BaTiO3 bed shows higher CO2 conversion and energy efficiency compared with that of mid- or downstream packing modes because the reverse reaction of CO2 conversion-the recombination of CO and O to form CO2 -is more likely to occur in mid- and downstream modes. Compared with the γ-Al2 O3 support, the coupling of the DBD with the Ni catalyst shows a higher CO2 conversion, which can be attributed to the presence of Ni active species on the catalyst surface. The argon plasma treatment of the reacted Ni catalyst provides extra evidence to confirm the role of Ni active species in the conversion of CO2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Asymmetric blowdown loads on PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) primary systems: resolution of generic task action plan A-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hosford, S.B.; Mattu, R.; Meyer, R.O.; Throm, E.D.; Tinkler, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    NRC staff, after being informed of newly identified asymmetric loadings resulting from postulated ruptures of primary piping, initiated a generic investigation, Task Action Plan A-2, limited to pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) plants because of their higher primary system pressures. The intent of the investigation was to develop acceptable criteria and guidelines for evaluating plant analyses. The staff concludes that an acceptable basis is provided in this report for performing and reviewing plant analyses. Criteria were developed for evaluating loading transients, structural components, and the fuel assembly. The staff approved computer programs and modeling techniques submitted by each PWR vendor for development of the subcooled blowdown and cavity-pressure loading transients. Audit models were developed to evaluate the structural computer programs and modeling techniques. Methods have been approved for the structural-analysis method submitted by Westinghouse for the Indian Point Unit 3 plant. Criteria and guidelines are provided to perform a detailed evaluation of the fuel assembly. Acceptance criteria are also provided so deformed fuel-assembly spacer grids may be evaluated.

  10. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region.

  11. Influence of structural parameters on the tendency of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steel to temper embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Zabusov, O.; Fedotova, S.; Frolov, A.; Saltykov, M.; Maltsev, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the influence of structural parameters on the tendency of steels to reversible temper embrittlement was studied for assessment of performance properties of reactor pressure vessel steels with extended service life. It is shown that the growth of prior austenite grain size leads to an increase of the critical embrittlement temperature in the initial state. An embrittlement heat treatment at the temperature of maximum manifestation of temper embrittlement (480 °C) shifts critical embrittlement temperature to higher values due to the increase of the phosphorus concentration on grain boundaries. There is a correlation between phosphorus concentration on boundaries of primary austenite grains and the share of brittle intergranular fracture (that, in turn, depends on impact test temperature) in the fracture surfaces of the tested Charpy specimens.

  12. Structural evaluation of the Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    A structural evaluation of Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads under the normal and hypothetical accident conditions of 10 CFR 71 was performed. Component performance criteria for the Shippingport package and the corresponding structural acceptance criteria for these components were developed based on a review of the package geometry, the planned transport environment, and the external radiation standards and dispersal limits of 10 CFR 71. The evaluation was performed using structural analysis methods. A demonstration combining simplified model tests and nonlinear finite element analyses was made to substantiate the structural analysis methods used to evaluate the Shippingport package. The package was analyzed and the results indicate that the package meets external radiation standards and release limits of 10 CFR 71. 13 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Effect of lithium hydroxide on stability of fuel cladding oxide film in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environments

    SciTech Connect

    Saario, T.; Taehtinen, S.; Piippo, J.

    1997-09-01

    The trend in pressurized water reactors (PWR) toward higher burnups, increasing lithium concentrations, and higher coolant temperatures imposes a demand for better fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding properties. There is a lack of reliable and fast in-situ techniques to investigate zirconium alloys in high-temperature water environments. The contact electric resistance (CER) technique was used to measure the electric resistance of the oxide growing on a zirconium-based fuel cladding material. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) decreased electric resistance of the oxide when LiOH was in excess of {approximately} 70 ppm in PWR water at 300 C. Electric resistance of the oxide was dependent upon LiOH concentration and was shown to correlate inversely with the effect of LiOH on weight gain. Kinetics of the decrease of electric resistance indicated the mechanism of degradation was a phase transformation rather than a diffusion-limited process.

  14. Magnetic evaluation of irradiation hardening in A533B reactor pressure vessel steels: Magnetic hysteresis measurements and the model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Klingensmith, D.; Odette, G. R.; Kikuchi, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We report results of measurements of magnetic minor hysteresis loops for neutron-irradiated A533B nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels varying alloy composition and irradiation condition. A minor-loop coefficient, which is obtained from a scaling power law between minor-loop parameters exhibits a steep decrease just after irradiation, followed by a maximum in the intermediate fluence regime for most alloys. A model analysis assuming Avrami-type growth for Cu-rich precipitates and an empirical logarithmic law for relaxation of residual stress demonstrates that an increment of the coefficient due to Cu-rich precipitates increases with Cu and Ni contents and is in proportion to a yield stress change, which is related to irradiation hardening.

  15. On the correlation between irradiation-induced microstructural features and the hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Meslin, E.; Malerba, L.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    A correlation is attempted between microstructural observations by various complementary techniques, which have been implemented within the PERFECT project and the hardening measured by tensile tests of reactor pressure vessel steel and model alloys after irradiation to a dose of ˜7 × 10 19 n cm -2. This is done, using the simple hardening model embodied by the Orowan equation and applying the most suitable superposition law, as suggested by a parametric study using the DUPAIR line tension code. It is found that loops are very strong obstacles to dislocation motion, but due to their low concentration, they only play a minor role in the hardening itself. For the precipitates, the contrary is found, although they are quite soft (due to their very small sizes and their coherent nature), they still play the dominant role in the hardening. Vacancy clusters are important for the formation of both loops and precipitates, but they will play almost no role in the hardening by themselves.

  16. Russian Translation.

    PubMed

    O'dette, R E

    1957-03-29

    This discussion has described the status of the large United States program for translation from the Russian. A partial description of what is being done or planned, and by whom, has been provided as a guide for those who wish to follow the subject further. The urge to pass on useful information has necessarily restricted the space which might also have been profitably devoted to the philosophic aspects of the problem. Although it is not said with any sense of pride in achievement-because much more remains to be done than has been done-it would seem fair to describe the current national translation activity, including all contributions to it, as a phenomenon. Phenomena in scientific communication are not common: a full appreciation of their significance requires more analysis than results from a simple listing of their outward characteristics. But a few observations might be made in conclusion. Most United States scientists probably feel that, as a nation, we are and should be world leaders in science, even though this feeling is neither nurtured nor expressed in a spirit of violent competition. If this assumption is allowed, the point which seems to remain is that the United States will not retain its position casually. Our scientists expect to maintain an awareness of the scientific achievements and failures of the other nations of the world. But we must especially become more aware of the advances of Soviet science, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The evidence points toward this last conclusion, regardless of whether one is concerned with the production of ideas or things, increase in man's knowledge of himself and his environment, conflict between idealisms, or simply the national security.

  17. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 4-Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS-8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using relevant and well-documented critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors. The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SCALE-4 SAS2H analytical sequence. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code family was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all calculations. This volume of the report documents a reactor critical calculation for GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) during hot, zero-power startup testing for the beginning of cycle 5. This unit and cycle were selected because of their relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) cycle 5 startup occurred after an especially long downtime of 6.6 years; and (2) the core consisted primarily (75%) of burned fuel, with

  18. Inspection Head Design for the In-Service Inspection of Fuel Channels of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haruray, Amit Kumar; Veerapur, R.D.; Puri, R.K.; Singh, Manjit

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses the challenges associated with the mechanical design of Inspection Head for the in-service inspection (ISI) of fuel channels of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). ISI is carried out during shut down period in the reactor. Non Destructive Examination (NDE) of fuel channels is a mandatory requirement to acquire knowledge about the structural condition. A typical 220 MWe Reactor-core consists of 306 horizontal fuel channel assemblies (tubular in shape). There are typical design challenges due to their horizontal nature, long length (each assembly is around 9 meters long), and high radiation. Because of combined effect of above mentioned factors, these fuel channels develop permanent downward sag during service. This sag has to be negotiated by the Inspection Head. The Inspection Head houses all the NDE sensors and is deployed in the fuel channel with the help of reactor fuelling machine. It is driven inside the fuel channel by a separate external drive-system, which is capable of linearly advancing, retracting as well as rotating it all-round to achieve full-volumetric inspection. The paper also discusses an important design feature in the Inspection Head, which helps in maintaining a fixed distance between NDE sensors and the internal surface (ID) of the fuel channel, to enable us to obtain reliable and consistent inspection results. This objective is achieved with the help of two specially designed leaf-spring loaded roller modules, which are assembled in the Inspection Head at its front and rear, with NDE Sensor Module sandwiched between them. Another very important design feature in the Inspection Head helps the Spring-Loaded Roller Modules in carrying out their intended function of maintaining fixed distance despite the weight of the long drive extension links attached at the rear of Inspection Head or deviations due to any other reason. There are multiple drive extension links attached at the rear of the Inspection Head as the

  19. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Hao, Luhan; Li, Shijian; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2011-11-01

    Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  20. (Computational analysis of dynamic crack run-arrest phenomena in reactor pressure vessel steels)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.

    1987-04-28

    The traveler visited Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KFK), Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) to confer with Dr. H.K. Stamm and other staff members to accomplish several objectives that relate to the computational analysis of dynamic crack run-arrest phenomena in reactor implementation which is the product of approximately three years of KFK work in the area of unified constitutive theories for rate-dependent materials. In exchange, the traveler would discuss with KFK a computer implementation of five elastic and inelastic candidate fracture parameters utilized in the ORNL ADINA computer program for elasto-dynamic and viscoplastic-dynamic fracture analysis. An essential feature of this exchange would be in-depth discussions with the KFK staff concerning implementation, application, and future development of these computational techniques.

  1. Radiolysis of cesium iodide solutions in conditions prevailing in a pressurized water reactor severe accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, M. )

    1988-08-01

    Measurements were made of I/sub 2/ formed when aqueous cesium iodide (CsI) solutions were exposed to two temperatures, 43 and 95/sup 0/C, with irradiation. Iodine partition coefficients were obtained from the experiments. The parameters varied were dose, CsI concentration, and Cs/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ concentration, in the presence of air-carbon dioxide and air-carbon dioxide-hydrogen mixtures, to provide information to calculate the form in which iodine released from fuel as CsI in a reactor accident might reach the environment. In a series of experiments, a two-compartment cell was used to trap the gaseous iodine produced. In this case, it was found that the quantity of gaseous iodine produced increased approximately linearly with the dose (at the dose rate used).

  2. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J. W.; Corletti, M. M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-11-12

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States.

  3. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  4. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Koehler, R.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  5. The ReactorAFM: non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Roobol, S B; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Bergman, M; van Spronsen, M A; Onderwaater, W G; van der Tuijn, P C; Koehler, R; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  6. Generic analyses for evaluation of low Charpy upper-shelf energy effects on safety margins against fracture of reactor pressure vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50 requires that reactor pressure vessel beltline material maintain Charpy upper-shelf energies of no less than 50 ft-lb during the plant operating life, unless it is demonstrated in a manner approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), that lower values of Charpy upper-shelf energy provide margins of safety against fracture equivalent to those in Appendix G to Section XI of the ASME Code. Analyses based on acceptance criteria and analysis methods adopted in the ASME Code Case N-512 are described herein. Additional information on material properties was provided by the NRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Materials Engineering Branch. These cases, specified by the NRC, represent generic applications to boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor vessels. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 140.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  8. Analysis of operation of filters for post-accident decontamination of pressurized rooms of a nuclear power plants with a type VVER-440 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaichik, L. I.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Rotinov, A. G.; Sidorov, A. S.; Silina, N. N.; Chalyi, R. F.

    2007-05-01

    Operation of filters of postaccident decontamination of pressurized rooms of a nuclear power plant with a type-VVER-440 reactor is analyzed. The distribution of radioactive nuclides over filter stages, the time variation of the thermal state of filter, and the characteristic features of the processes of sorption in the section of fine cleaning are considered.

  9. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  10. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    View of Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participating in Russian extravehicular activity (EVA) 33. Also visible are the Progress spacecraft docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (DC1) with the Service Module (SM) .

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  12. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033402 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  13. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033400 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  14. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  15. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  16. Global threat reduction initiative Russian nuclear material removal progress

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, Kelly

    2008-07-15

    In December 1999 representatives from the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started discussing a program to return to Russia Soviet- or Russian-supplied highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel stored at the Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia. Trilateral discussions among the United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have identified more than 20 research reactors in 17 countries that have Soviet- or Russian-supplied HEU fuel. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program is an important aspect of the U.S. Government's commitment to cooperate with the other nations to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and weapons-usable proliferation-attractive nuclear materials. To date, 496 kilograms of Russian-origin HEU have been shipped to Russia from Serbia, Latvia, Libya, Uzbekistan, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, and the Czech Republic. The pilot spent fuel shipment from Uzbekistan to Russia was completed in April 2006. (author)

  17. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical vapour deposition of silicon under reduced pressure in a hot-wall reactor: Equilibrium and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Francis; Hottier, François; Cadoret, Robert

    1982-02-01

    Silicon chemical vapour deposition (SiH 2Cl 2/H 2 system), under reduced pressure conditions, in a hot-wall reactor, is presented. The vapour phase composition is assessed by evaluating two distnct equilbria. The "homogeneous equilibrium", which assumes that the vapour phase is not in equilibrium with solid silicon, is thought to give an adequate description of the vapour phase in the case of low pressure, high gas velocities, good temperature homogeneity conditions. A comparison with "heterogeneous equilibrium" enables us to calculate the supersaturation so evidencing a highly irreversible growth system. The experimental determination of the growth rate reveals two distinct temperature ranges: below 1000°C, polycrystalline films are usually obtained with a thermally activated growth rate (+40 kcal mole -1) and a reaction order, with respect to the predominant species SiCl 2, close to one; above 1000°C, the films are always monocrystalline and their growth rate exhibits a much lower or even negative activation energy, the reaction order in SiCl 2 remaining about one.

  19. Deformation studies from in situ SEM experiments of a reactor pressure vessel steel at room and low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourte, F.; Salez, T.; Guery, A.; Rupin, N.; Mahé, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the strain fields acquired at micro-structural scale for a pressure vessel steel, used in the French pressurized water reactors (PWR) and designated as 16MND5 or ASTM A508cl3. The experimental observations rely on specific specimen preparation, prior crystallographic orientation characterization by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), surface patterning using lithography and chemical etching. The specimens are loaded using a miniaturized tensile stage fitted within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber, and images acquired of a small area are used to measure displacement and strain fields using a Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. In addition, a specific setup allowed to cool down to -100 °C the specimen during the whole tensile test and the image acquisition. The experimental apparatus and the kinematic field measurements are introduced in two first sections of the paper. Then the results will be presented for two experiments, one conducted at room temperature and the other at -100 °C, including a comparison of strain localization features and a preliminary comparison of plasticity mechanisms.

  20. Calculation of the pressure vessel failure fraction of fuel particle of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 C

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, J.; Ueta, S.; Mozumi, Y.; Sato, H.; Sawa, K.; Motohashi, Y.

    2007-07-01

    In high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), coated particles are used as fuels. For upgrading HTGR technologies, present SiC coating layer which is used as the 3. layer could be replaced with ZrC coating layer which have much higher temperature stability in addition to higher resistance to chemical attack by fission product palladium than the SiC coating layer. The ZrC layer could deform plastically at high temperatures. Therefore, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency modified an existing pressure vessel failure fraction calculation code to treat the plastic deformation of the 3. layer in order to predict failure fraction of ZrC coated particle under irradiation. Finite element method is employed to calculate the stress in each coating layer. The pressure vessel failure fraction of the coated fuel particles under normal operating condition of GTHTR300C is calculated by the modified code. The failure fraction is evaluated as low as 3.5 x 10{sup -6}. (authors)