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Sample records for ruthenium nitrates

  1. Study on volatilization mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide from nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate by using mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi; Shibata, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In a cooling malfunction accident of a high-level liquid waste (HLLW) tank, behavior of ruthenium (Ru) attracts much attention, since Ru could be oxidized to a volatile chemical form in the boiling and drying of HLLW, and part of radioactive Ru can potentially be released to the environment. In this study, nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO3)3) dissolved in nitric acid (HNO3), which is commonly contained in a simulated HLLW, was dried and heated up to 723 K, and the evolved gas was introduced into a mass spectrometer. The well-known volatile species, ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) was detected in a temperature range between 390 K and 500 K with the peak top around 440 K. Various gases such as HNO3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO) also evolved due to evaporation of the nitric acid and decomposition of the nitrate ions. The ion current of RuO4 seems to increase with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO3 decreases. More volatilization of RuO4 was observed from the HNO3 solution containing not only Ru(NO)(NO3)3 but also cerium nitrate (Ce(NO3)3·6H2O) which was added for extra supply of nitrate ion, compared with that from the HNO3 solution containing only Ru(NO)(NO3)3. These experimental results suggest that Ru could be oxidized to form RuO4 by the nitrate ion as well as HNO3.

  2. Z-Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts: Comparison of Nitrate and Nitrite X-type Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pribisko, Melanie A.; Ahmed, Tonia S.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru-based metathesis catalysts, 3 and 4, have been synthesized for the purpose of comparing their catalytic properties to those of their cis-selective nitrate analogues, 1 and 2. Although catalysts 3 and 4 exhibited slower initiation rates than 1 and 2, they maintained high cis-selectivity in homodimerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization reactions. Furthermore, the nitrite catalysts displayed higher cis-selectivity than 2 for ring-opening metathesis polymerizations, and 4 delivered higher yields of polymer. PMID:25484484

  3. SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Beederman, M.; Vogler, S.; Hyman, H.H.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from a rathenium containing aqueous solution is described. The separation is accomplished by adding sodium nitrite, silver nitrate and ozone to the ruthenium containing aqueous solution to form ruthenium tetroxide and ihen volatilizing off the ruthenium tetroxide.

  4. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  5. RECOVERY OF RUTHENIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Grummitt, W.E.; Hardwick, W.H.

    1961-01-01

    A process is given for the recovery of ruthenium from its aqueous solutions by oxidizing the ruthenium to the octavalent state and subsequently extracting the ruthenium into a halogen-substituted liquid paraffin.

  6. Radiochemistry of ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, W W; Metcalf, S G; Barney, G S

    1984-06-01

    Information on ruthenium is presented. Topics include the following; isotopes and nuclear properties of ruthenium; review of the chemistry of ruthenium including metal and alloys, compounds of ruthenium, and solution chemistry; separation methods including volatilization of RuO{sub 4}, precipitation and coprecipitation, solvent extraction, chromatographic techniques, and analysis for radioruthenium. 445 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Metals fact sheet: Ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Ruthenium, named after Ruthenia, a province in Western Russia, was discovered in 1827 by Osann in placer ores from Russia`s Ural mountains. A minor platinum group metal (PGM), Ruthenium was the last of the PGMs to be isolated. In 1844, Klaus prepared the first 6 grams of pure ruthenium metal.

  8. PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING THORIUM AND URANIUM WITH RESPECT TO RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Meservey, A.A.; Rainey, R.H.

    1959-10-20

    The control of ruthenium extraction in solvent-extraction processing of neutron-irradiated thorium is presented. Ruthenium is rendered organic-insoluble by the provision of sulfite or bisulfite ions in the aqueous feed solution. As a result the ruthenium remains in the aqueous phase along with other fission product and protactinium values, thorium and uranium values being extracted into the organic phase. This process is particularly applicable to the use of a nitrate-ion-deficient aqueous feed solution and to the use of tributyl phosphate as the organic extractant.

  9. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  10. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  11. Special Issue on Ruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dragutan, Ileana; Dragutan, Valerian; Demonceau, Albert

    2017-02-08

    The organic chemistry of ruthenium has been one of the most vigorously growing research areas over the past decades. Considerable effort has been extended towards the design and application of a broad series of ruthenium complexes, which culminated with the development by Ryoji Noyori (2001 Nobel Prize for Chemistry) of chiral ruthenium catalysts for stereoselective hydrogenation reactions [1], and the discovery by Robert H. Grubbs (2005 Nobel Prize for Chemistry) of well-defined ruthenium- benzylidene catalysts for olefin metathesis [2] [...].

  12. RUTHENIUM DECONTAMINATION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.

    1960-07-19

    A liquid-liquid extraction method of separating uranium from fission products is given. A small amount of a low molecular weight ketone is added to an acidic aqueous solution containing neutron-irradiated uranium and its associated fission products. The resulting solution is digested and then contacted with an organic liquid that extracts uranium values. The purpose of the step of digesting the aqueous solution in the presence of the ketone is to suppress the extractability of ruthenium.

  13. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  14. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  15. SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Callis, C.F.; Moore, R.L.

    1959-09-01

    >The separation of ruthenium from aqueous solutions containing uranium plutonium, ruthenium, and fission products is described. The separation is accomplished by providing a nitric acid solution of plutonium, uranium, ruthenium, and fission products, oxidizing plutonium to the hexavalent state with sodium dichromate, contacting the solution with a water-immiscible organic solvent, such as hexone, to extract plutonyl, uranyl, ruthenium, and fission products, reducing with sodium ferrite the plutonyl in the solvent phase to trivalent plutonium, reextracting from the solvent phase the trivalent plutonium, ruthenium, and some fission products with an aqueous solution containing a salting out agent, introducing ozone into the aqueous acid solution to oxidize plutonium to the hexavalent state and ruthenium to ruthenium tetraoxide, and volatizing off the ruthenium tetraoxide.

  16. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Flávia de Castro; Vilanova-Costa, Cesar Augusto Sam Tiago; de Lima, Aliny Pereira; Ribeiro, Alessandra de Santana Braga Barbosa; da Silva, Hugo Delleon; Pavanin, Luiz Alfredo; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium complexes have attracted much attention as possible building blocks for new transition-metal-based antitumor agents. The present study examines the mitotoxic and clastogenic effects induced in the root tips of Allium cepa by cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate {cis-[Ru(C(2)O(2))(NH(3))(4)](2)(S(2)O(6))} at different exposure durations and concentrations. Correlation tests were performed to determine the effects of the time of exposure and concentration of ruthenium complex on mitotic index (MI) and mitotic aberration index. A comparison of MI results of cis-[Ru(C(2)O(2))(NH(3))(4)](2)(S(2)O(6)) to those of lead nitrate reveals that the ruthenium complex demonstrates an average mitotic inhibition eightfold higher than lead, with the frequency of cellular abnormalities almost fourfold lower and mitotic aberration threefold lower. A. cepa root cells exposed to a range of ruthenium complex concentrations did not display significant clastogenic effects. Cis-tetraammine(oxalato)ruthenium(III) dithionate therefore exhibits a remarkable capacity to inhibit mitosis, perhaps by inhibiting DNA synthesis or blocking the cell cycle in the G2 phase. Further investigation of the mechanisms of action of this ruthenium complex will be important to define its clinical potential and to contribute to a novel and rational approach to developing a new metal-based drug with antitumor properties complementary to those exhibited by the drugs already in clinical use.

  18. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  19. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  20. Nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Parker, J O

    1987-11-16

    The organic nitrates are the most widely used agents in the management of patients with angina pectoris. When initially administered by the oral route, the nitrates produce profound changes in systemic hemodynamics and significant and prolonged improvement in exercise duration. It has been shown that during short periods of regular oral nitrate administration, the hemodynamic, antiischemic and antianginal effects of the nitrates are greatly reduced. Thus, when initially administered, oral isosorbide dinitrate prolongs exercise duration for a period of several hours, but during sustained 4-times-daily therapy, exercise tolerance is improved for only 2 hours after administration. Studies with transdermal preparations of isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin also show improvement during short-term administration for up to 8 hours, but after several days of once-daily therapy, the effects of these agents are similar to placebo. It is apparent that nitrate tolerance is a clinically relevant problem. Although tolerance develops rapidly during nitrate therapy, it is reversed promptly during nitrate-free periods. Oral nitrates maintain their antianginal effects when given 2 or 3 times daily with provision of a nitrate-free period. Studies are currently underway to investigate the effects of intermittent administration schedules with transdermal nitrate preparations.

  1. Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangfei; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2015-04-21

    One of the major advances in medical science has been the development of antimicrobials; however, a consequence of their widespread use has been the emergence of drug-resistant populations of microorganisms. There is clearly a need for the development of new antimicrobials--but more importantly, there is the need for the development of new classes of antimicrobials, rather than drugs based upon analogues of known scaffolds. Due to the success of the platinum anticancer agents, there has been considerable interest in the development of therapeutic agents based upon other transition metals--and in particular ruthenium(II/III) complexes, due to their well known interaction with DNA. There have been many studies of the anticancer properties and cellular localisation of a range of ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells over the last decade. However, only very recently has there been significant interest in their antimicrobial properties. This review highlights the types of ruthenium complexes that have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and discusses the relationship between chemical structure and biological processing--including site(s) of intracellular accumulation--of the ruthenium complexes in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  2. The influence of ruthenium on vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Bart; Boydens, Charlotte; Van de Voorde, Johan

    2015-09-01

    Over the past few years, ruthenium has been under attention for development of organometallic drugs with various therapeutic applications. Because of its favourable characteristics, ruthenium is perfectly suitable for drug design. Ruthenium-containing complexes exert a wide range of biological effects. However, so far, the influence of ruthenium itself on vascular tone has never been studied. The effect of ruthenium was analysed through organ bath studies measuring isometric tension on mice thoracic aorta. After obtaining a stable contraction plateau, cumulative concentration-response curves of the ruthenium-compounds (RuCl3 , Ruthenium Red, [RuCl2 (CO)3 ]2 and RuCl2 (DMSO)4 ) (30-600 μmol/l) were performed. The effect of RuCl3 after contraction with different contractile agents was evaluated. Furthermore, the influence of ruthenium-containing molecules on endogenous (acetylcholine) and exogenous (sodium nitroprusside) NO-mediated relaxations was determined. All studied ruthenium compounds elicit, to some extent, a decrease of the contraction level. Looking further into the underlying mechanism, we found that RuCl3 relaxes aortic rings only when contracted with norepinephrine. This RuCl3 -induced relaxation can be prevented by the antioxidants ascorbic acid and N-acetyl L-cysteine. In addition, ruthenium compounds may diminish acetylcholine- or sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. Ruthenium-containing molecules can influence vascular tone induced by norepinephrine due to oxidative inactivation. Moreover, they can undermine NO-mediated responses. This should be considered when developing ruthenium-containing drugs. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Ming; Liao, Kai-Jun; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2011-10-14

    Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by the reaction of alkanethiolate-protected ruthenium nanoparticles with tert-butyl nitrite ((t)BuONO), and their water-soluble derivatives are able to deliver NO to proteins such as reduced myoglobin upon light irradiation in aqueous media.

  4. IR-doped ruthenium oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparing a metal-doped ruthenium oxide material by heating a mixture of a doping metal and a source of ruthenium under an inert atmosphere. In some embodiments, the doping metal is in the form of iridium black or lead powder, and the source of ruthenium is a powdered ruthenium oxide. An iridium-doped or lead-doped ruthenium oxide material can perform as an oxygen evolution catalyst and can be fabricated into electrodes for electrolysis cells.

  5. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  6. Dialkylmethyl-2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamidoammonium iodide as a ruthenium selective ligand from nitric acid medium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Ghosh, Sunil K; Sharma, Joti N

    2015-09-15

    A new class of quaternary ammonium iodide based ligands with 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamide as an alkyl appendage have been designed, synthesized and tested for their ability to extract ruthenium selectively from nitric acid medium. The 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamido ammonium iodide with two propyl and a methyl substituents showed best results for the recovery of ruthenium. The optimized concentration of the solvent was found to be 0.2M in 30% isodecyl alcohol/n-dodecane. The stoichiometry of the complex was ascertained by slope analysis method and was found to be 1:1 with respect to ligand L(+)I(-) and Ru(NO)(NO3)3. Ruthenium formed an adduct of structure LRu(NO)(NO3)3 I in the extraction medium. Iodide ion played an important role in the formation of the stable and extractable complex of ruthenium. No extraction was observed when iodide was replaced by nitrate anion in the ligand. The ligand also showed good selectivity for ruthenium in the presence of other metal ions commonly found in nitric acid solutions of nuclear waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electronic Transitions of Ruthenium Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of ruthenium monoxide (RuO) molecule in the spectral region between 545nm to 640nm has been recorded and analyzed using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The RuO molecule was produced by reacting laser- ablated ruthenium atoms with N_{2}O seeded in argon. Nine vibrational bands were recorded and they are identified to be belonging to four electronic transition systems, namely the [18.1]Ω = 4 - X^{5} Δ_4 transition, [16.0]^{5} Φ_5 - X^{5} Δ_4 transition, [18.1]Ω = 3 - X^{5} Δ_3, and [15.8] ^{5} Φ_4 - X^{5} Δ_3 transition. RuO has been determined to have a X^{5} Δ_4 ground state. A least squares fit of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and the low-lying electronic states. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to help with the assignment of the observed electronic states.

  8. Luminescent tetrametallic complexes of ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.R. Jr.; Brewer, K.J.; Gettliffe, G.; Petersen, J.D. )

    1989-01-11

    Tetrametallic complexes constructed around the metal core Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} (where dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) have been prepared and characterized. The complexes, which have the general formula Ru((dpp)ML{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup n+}, where ML{sub 2} = Ru{sup II}(bpy){sub 2} (n = 8), Ru{sup II}(phen){sub 2} (n = 8), and Ru{sup II}(tpy)Cl (n = 5) and bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and tpy = 2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double prime}-terpyridine, are prepared from the reaction of Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} with ML{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in ethanol/water. The tetrametallic complexes luminesce at room temperature in acetonitrile with emissions characteristic of a single ruthenium center with excited-state lifetimes in the 100-ns range. Electrochemically, the most facile reductions occur at the dpp ligand, and the lower energy oxidation is a single peak associated with the three peripheral ruthenium centers. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Regulation of a cerium(IV)-driven O₂ evolution reaction using composites of liposome and lipophilic ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Koshiyama, Tomomi; Kanda, Nao; Iwata, Koki; Honjo, Masayuki; Asada, Sana; Hatae, Tatsuru; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Masaki; Okamura, Masaya; Kuga, Reiko; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Ohba, Masaaki

    2015-09-14

    A composite containing a liposome and a lipophilic ruthenium complex was synthesized to regulate an O2 evolution reaction using cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as an oxidizing reagent. We found that the surrounding environment of the reaction centre is an important factor for controlling the O2 evolution catalytic reaction. We successfully regulated the reaction activity using the linker length of the lipophilic ligand and using the head groups of the phospholipid component.

  10. Ruthenium Sesquisilicide: A Promising Thermoelectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, Cronin B.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experimental investigation of thermoelectric properties of ruthenium sesquisilicide (RU2Si3). Suggests suitably doped Ru2Si3 could have thermoelectric figures of merit two or more times as large as SiGe.

  11. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2006-02-07

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having an atomic ratio of platinum to ruthenium that is between about 0.7 and about 1.2. Alternatively, the catalyst may contain platinum at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 50 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 55 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having a difference between the concentrations of ruthenium and platinum that is no greater than about 20 atomic percent.

  12. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2005-07-26

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum, ruthenium, and nickel, wherein the nickel is at a concentration that is less than about 10 atomic percent.

  13. Lead-ruthenium pyrochlores as oxygen electrocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. B.; Taylor, E. J.; Moniz, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of lead-ruthenium pyrochlores of the structure Pb2(Ru/2-x/Pb/x/) O7-y for use as oxygen electrocatalysts in alkaline media is discussed. Lead-ruthenium pyrochlore mixed metal oxides were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, dry powder conductivity, and chemical stability. Gas diffusion electrodes were developed specifically for the lead-ruthenium pyrochlore materials. Also investigated were the effects of varying electrode fabrication parameters on the oxygen reduction performance of the lead-ruthenium pyrochlore electrocatalyst. Long-term stability performance was also evaluated. The oxygen reduction performance of the pyrochlore electrocatalyst is considerably higher than that of the state-of-the-art gold-platinum alloy electrocatalyst currently used by NASA. Furthermore, the pyrochlore electrocatalysts are attractive candidates for high-performance pressurized alkaline fuel cells.

  14. Lead-ruthenium pyrochlores as oxygen electrocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. B.; Taylor, E. J.; Moniz, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of lead-ruthenium pyrochlores of the structure Pb2(Ru/2-x/Pb/x/) O7-y for use as oxygen electrocatalysts in alkaline media is discussed. Lead-ruthenium pyrochlore mixed metal oxides were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, dry powder conductivity, and chemical stability. Gas diffusion electrodes were developed specifically for the lead-ruthenium pyrochlore materials. Also investigated were the effects of varying electrode fabrication parameters on the oxygen reduction performance of the lead-ruthenium pyrochlore electrocatalyst. Long-term stability performance was also evaluated. The oxygen reduction performance of the pyrochlore electrocatalyst is considerably higher than that of the state-of-the-art gold-platinum alloy electrocatalyst currently used by NASA. Furthermore, the pyrochlore electrocatalysts are attractive candidates for high-performance pressurized alkaline fuel cells.

  15. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  16. Photonastic effects in ruthenium sulfoxide polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, Jeffrey J.; Livshits, Maksim Y.; Shin, Jisoo

    2016-09-01

    We have established that film morphology and laser induced heating from dye absorption are important parameters in the creation of new photonastic materials. Photonastic is defined as regular, repeatable movement in a pre-programmed direction following exposure to light. This work builds upon the development of photonastic polymers of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, where the action of bending is ascribed to phototriggered isomerization of a sulfoxide ligand in a ruthenium coordination complex that is covalently attached to polynorbornene. The bending is analyzed in terms of a bilayer cantilever model.

  17. Bis(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    reactions with isosbestic points were generally observed in these redox processes. The electronic spectra of 02, 01, S, RI and R2 are shown Tor the (1...oOFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract NOOOl4-84-G-0201 Task No. 0051-865 Technical Report *23 Bis(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series By...Classit’.’-tion) Bix(Dioxolene)(Bipyridine)Ruthenium Redox Series 12 PERSON4AL AUTHOR(S) A.B. P. Lever*, Pamela R. &uburn, Elaine S. Dodsworth, Masa-A

  18. Effects of structure of nitrator on nitration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shiying, Yin; Benli, Yin

    1995-12-01

    It is well-known that nitration of dinitrotoluene (DNT) proceeds quite slowly. Unsatisfactory structure of nitrator could cause an incomplete nitration in the nitrator, and nitration continues in the separator. This, in turn, increases the temperature difference between nitrator and separator. It was found that the nitration degree of DNT in nitrator could be estimated by this temperature difference. We investigated the relationship between the nitrator`s structure and the above temperature difference, and based on the research results obtained we could make nitration complete in nitrator, improve the quality of trinitrotoluene (TNT), lower the consumption of raw materials, especially sulfuric acid, and increase the safety of production.

  19. Decarboxylation of cinnamic acids by ruthenium sawhorses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ruthenium sawhorse has proven effective in the conversion of trans-cinnamic acid, and substituted trans-cinnamic acids, giving an effective source of biobased styrene and styrene analogs. The reaction is especially versatile, as it achieves product without utilizing co-reagents. However, the opt...

  20. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous ruthenium species.

    PubMed

    Miradji, Faoulat; Souvi, Sidi; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent; Vallet, Valérie

    2015-05-21

    The review of thermodynamic data of ruthenium oxides reveals large uncertainties in some of the standard enthalpies of formation, motivating the use of high-level relativistic correlated quantum chemical methods to reduce the level of discrepancies. The reaction energies leading to the formation of ruthenium oxides RuO, RuO2, RuO3, and RuO4 have been calculated for a series of reactions. The combination of different quantum chemical methods has been investigated [DFT, CASSCF, MRCI, CASPT2, CCSD(T)] in order to predict the geometrical parameters, the energetics including electronic correlation and spin-orbit coupling. The most suitable method for ruthenium compounds is the use of TPSSh-5%HF for geometry optimization, followed by CCSD(T) with complete basis set (CBS) extrapolations for the calculation of the total electronic energies. SO-CASSCF seems to be accurate enough to estimate spin-orbit coupling contributions to the ground-state electronic energies. This methodology yields very accurate standard enthalpies of formations of all species, which are either in excellent agreement with the most reliable experimental data or provide an improved estimate for the others. These new data will be implemented in the thermodynamical databases that are used by the ASTEC code (accident source term evaluation code) to build models of ruthenium chemistry behavior in severe nuclear accident conditions. The paper also discusses the nature of the chemical bonds both from molecular orbital and topological view points.

  1. Ruthenium-Ruthenium-Bonded [Bis{corrolato-ruthenium(III)}](n) (n=0, +1, -1) Complexes: Model Compounds for the Photosynthetic Special Pair.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Woormileela; Sommer, Michael G; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Patra, Bratati; Filippou, Vasileios; Sarkar, Biprajit; Kar, Sanjib

    2017-02-16

    We present herein the synthesis of three new bis(corrolato-ruthenium(III)) complexes containing unsupported Ru-Ru bonds and their characterization in different redox states. The (1) H NMR spectra of the bis(corrolato-ruthenium(III)) complexes displayed "normal" chemical shifts and the compounds proved to be EPR-silent. Crystallographic characterization of the dimers indicated Ru-Ru distances of 2.175 Å, consistent with a triple bond between the two ruthenium centers. All of the synthesized complexes undergo two successive reversible oxidations and a single reversible reduction. A combination of UV/Vis/NIR/EPR spectroelectrochemical studies and DFT calculations established the redox state distributions in these ruthenium-ruthenium-bonded dimers. Whereas reduction of the dimers is metal-based and leads to metal-metal-bonded mixed-valent Ru(II) -Ru(III) species, one-electron oxidation largely retains the Ru(III) -Ru(III) situation with the generation of metal-bound corrolato radicals. The present study thus concerns the first UV/Vis/NIR/EPR spectroelectrochemical characterization and DFT calculations of ruthenium-ruthenium-bonded rotationally ordered corrole dimers. The mean plane separation between the two corrole units in these dimers is around 3.543 Å, which is in close agreement to that in the "special pair" in chlorophyll. Oxidation of these ruthenium-ruthenium-bonded dimers gives rise to two new electronic absorption bands in the NIR region (similar to those of the special pair), which have apparently not been mentioned/observed in earlier reports on ruthenium-ruthenium-bonded corrole dimers. These bands mainly originate from inter-corrole transitions.

  2. Fabrication Technology of Ruthenium Microelectrode Pattern for RF MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    Ruthenium (Ru), which is one of noble metals, has been intensively considered as an electrode material of DRAM capacitors, since Ru has high oxidation resistance and high electrical conductivity even in the oxidized state. Furthermore, Ru is also expected to be used as an electrode material of acoustic devices, e.g. FBAR, because of its superior acoustic properties such as high Young's modulus and density. For such applications, a precise etching technique for Ru microelectrode patterns is required. Ru etching proceeds by producing volatile oxidized Ru (RuO4), and is possible using plasma with O2 or O2 plus halogenous gas, e.g. Cl2 and CF4. However, the plasma etching also attacks resist and/or an underlayer of Si, SiN etc. In this study, a wet etching process with cerium (IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)-based etchant and a dry etching process with O3 gas were investigated as low-damage Ru etching processes. O3 gas etching is better for patterning Ru microelectrodes than CAN-based wet etching. For O3 gas etching, diluted HF pretreatment is effective to reduce side etching and to improve etching uniformity

  3. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  4. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body.

    PubMed

    Leggett, R W

    2012-03-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for workers and subsequently will revisit its models for members of the public. This paper summarises the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new biokinetic model for systemic ruthenium. In contrast to the ICRP's current model, the proposed model depicts recycling of ruthenium between tissues and blood and a non-uniform distribution of systemic ruthenium. The paper also points out inconsistencies between the ICRP's respiratory model for RuO(4) vapour and reported data, and inconsistencies between the ICRP's default gastrointestinal (GI) uptake value and data for some forms of ruthenium. Dosimetric implications of the proposed systemic model and the findings for inhaled RuO(4) vapour and GI uptake of ruthenium are examined.

  5. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued... potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and cured poultry products. ...

  6. Transient photocyclization in ruthenium(ii) polypyridine complexes of indolamines.

    PubMed

    Carrone, G; Zayat, L; Slep, L D; Etchenique, R

    2017-01-18

    Ruthenium polypyridine complexes have proved to be useful caging groups for visible-light photodelivery of biomolecules. In most photoreactions, one ligand is expelled upon irradiation, yielding ruthenium mono-aqua complexes and no other photoproduct. In this work we show that a long-lived transient photoproduct is generated when the ruthenium complexes involve indolamines. The spatial conformation of this species is compatible with a cyclic structure that contains both the amine and the normally non-coordinating aromatic ring coordinated to the ruthenium center.

  7. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126..., ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. (a) When any item of ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo...

  8. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126..., ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. (a) When any item of ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo...

  9. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126..., ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. (a) When any item of ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo...

  10. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126..., ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. (a) When any item of ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo...

  11. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia.

  12. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, H.

    1990-07-31

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation. 1 fig.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1990-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  15. Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Potential Apoptosis Inducers in Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kangdi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Chengxi; Tan, Weijun; Mei, Wenjie

    2017-01-01

    Herein, the development of ruthenium complexes as potential apoptosis inducers, as well as their underlying mechanism has been reviewed. In recent years, various ruthenium complexes have been designed and their in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activities against various types of tumor cells have been evaluated extensively. It's demonstrated that ruthenium complexes can induce apoptosis of tumor cells through the signal pathway of mitochondria-mediated, death receptor-mediated, and/or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways. Alternately, the binding behavior of these ruthenium(II) complexes with DNA, especially with Gquadruplex DNA may play a key role in the DNA damage of tumor cells, and thus provides a versatile tool to rational design novel ruthenium complexes with high activity and selectivity.

  16. Side-on bound diazene and hydrazine complexes of ruthenium.

    PubMed

    Field, Leslie D; Li, Hsiu L; Dalgarno, Scott J

    2010-07-05

    The reaction of cis-[RuCl(2)(PP)(2)] (PP = depe, dmpe) with hydrazine afforded end-on bound ruthenium(II) hydrazine complexes. Treatment of the hydrazine complexes with strong base afforded the side-on bound ruthenium(0) diazene complexes cis-[Ru(eta(2)-NH=NH)(PP)(2)]. Treatment of cis-[Ru(eta(2)-NH=NH)(depe)(2)] with weak acid under chloride-free conditions afforded the side-on bound hydrazine complex cis-[Ru(eta(2)-N(2)H(4))(depe)(2)](2+). These are the first reported side-on bound diazene and hydrazine complexes of ruthenium, and they have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (31)P, (15)N) and by X-ray crystallography. The interconversion between the ruthenium diazene and the ruthenium hydrazine by acid-base treatment was reversible.

  17. Application of ruthenium catalyzed oxidation of [tris(2-aminoethyl)amine] in trace determination of ruthenium in environmental water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Surendra; Naik, Radhey M.; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2008-10-01

    The ruthenium catalyzed oxidation of tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) by hexacyanoferrate(III) has been utilized for the development of a new and sensitive catalytic kinetic method (CKM) for the determination of ruthenium(III). The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by the decrease in absorbance at 420 nm ( λmax of [Fe(CN) 6] 3-). The CKM developed utilizes fixed time procedure under optimum reaction conditions where the change in absorbance (Δ At) versus ruthenium(III) concentrations is plotted. The calibration curve recommended for the method is linear in the concentration range 10.11-252.67 ng ml -1 with very good accuracy and reproducibility and a maximum error 2.20%. The detection limits of the method for ruthenium(III) corresponding to 10, 15 and 20 min are 8.02, 5.03 and 3.15 ng ml -1, respectively. The ruthenium(III) has also been determined in the presence of several other interfering and non-interfering cations and anions and no foreign ions interfered in the determination of ruthenium(III) up to five-fold higher concentration of the foreign ions tested. The method is highly sensitive, selective and stable. It has successfully been applied for the determination of trace ruthenium(III) in some synthetic and environmental water samples. A review of most of the published catalytic kinetic and some other important methods for the determination of ruthenium has also been presented.

  18. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and...

  19. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and...

  20. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and...

  1. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and...

  2. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  3. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  4. Characterization and dissolution properties of ruthenium oxides.

    PubMed

    Luxton, Todd P; Eick, Matthew J; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-07-01

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O and RuO(2)) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation state. Surface charging experiments indicate a large quantity of reactive functional groups for both materials and a decrease in the acidity of the surface functional groups with crystallization of the hydrous oxide. Dissolution studies conducted in acidic and basic pH environments indicate Ru-oxides are insoluble in 0.1 M HCl and slightly soluble in 0.1 M NaOH. Oxalate and ascorbate (5 mM) promoted dissolution of RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O demonstrated an increase in dissolution rates with decreasing pH and increasing ligand surface coverage. XPS analysis of the RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O surface after ligand promoted dissolution revealed the reduction of Ru(IV) to Ru(III) indicating that both ascorbate and oxalate reductively dissolve RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O. Dissolution experiments with RuO(2) resulted in dissolution only for 5 mM oxalate at pH 3. Dissolution rates calculated for RuO(2)·1·10H(2)O and RuO(2) are compared with previously published dissolution rates for iron oxides, demonstrating an order of magnitude decrease in the oxalate and ascorbate promoted dissolution. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  6. Interaction of ruthenium red with Ca2(+)-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Charuk, J.H.; Pirraglia, C.A.; Reithmeier, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The interaction of ruthenium red, ((NH3)5Ru-O-Ru(NH3)4-O-Ru(NH3)5)Cl6.4H2O, with various Ca2(+)-binding proteins was studied. Ruthenium red inhibited Ca2+ binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein, calsequestrin, immobilized on Sepharose 4B. Furthermore, ruthenium red bound to calsequestrin with high affinity (Kd = 0.7 microM; Bmax = 218 nmol/mg protein). The dye stained calsequestrin in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or on nitrocellulose paper and was displaced by Ca2+ (Ki = 1.4 mM). The specificity of ruthenium red staining of several Ca2(+)-binding proteins was investigated by comparison with two other detection methods, 45Ca2+ autoradiography and the Stains-all reaction. Ruthenium red bound to the same proteins detected by the 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Ruthenium red stained both the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter and the Ca2(+)-ATPase of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. Ruthenium red also stained the EF hand conformation Ca2(+)-binding proteins, calmodulin, troponin C, and S-100. This inorganic dye provides a simple, rapid method for detecting various types of Ca2(+)-binding proteins following electrophoresis.

  7. Nitrate leaching index

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  8. Decomposition Pathways of Z-Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Myles B.; Lan, Yu; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Liu, Peng; Endo, Koji; Day, Michael W.; Houk, K. N.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The decomposition of a Z-selective ruthenium metathesis catalyst and structurally similar analogs has been investigated utilizing X-ray crystallography and density functional theory. Isolated X-ray crystal structures suggest that recently reported C-H activated catalysts undergo decomposition via insertion of the alkylidene moiety into the chelating ruthenium-carbon bond followed by hydride elimination, which is supported by theoretical calculations. The resulting ruthenium hydride intermediates have been implicated in previously observed olefin migration, and thus lead to unwanted byproducts in cross metathesis reactions. Preventing these decomposition modes will be essential in the design of more active and selective Z-selective catalysts. PMID:22500642

  9. Building Indenylidene-Ruthenium Catalysts for Metathesis Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavier, Hervé; Nolan, Steven P.

    Ruthenium-mediated olefin metathesis has emerged as an indispensable tool in organic synthesis for the formation carbon-carbon double bonds, attested by the large number of applications for natural product synthesis. Among the numerous catalysts developed to mediate olefin metathesis transformations, ruthenium-indenylidene complexes are robust and powerful pre-catalysts. The discovery of this catalyst category was slightly muddled due to a first mis-assignment of the compound structure. This report provides an overview of the synthetic routes for the construction of the indenylidene pattern in ruthenium complexes. The parameters relating to the indenylidene moiety construction will be discussed as well as the mechanism of this formation

  10. Characteristics and reactivity of ruthenium-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoya; Kotani, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takahiko

    2016-11-14

    In this perspective, we have surveyed the synthetic procedure, characteristics, and reactivity of high-valent ruthenium-oxo complexes. The ruthenium-oxo complexes have served as ideal species to elucidate the characteristics of metal-oxo complexes in terms of not only geometrical and electronic structures but also oxidation reactivity and mechanisms of oxidation reactions. Due to the high stability and excellent reversibility of redox processes, ruthenium-oxo complexes have provided significant mechanistic insights into the oxidation of organic compounds including alcohols, alkenes, and alkanes and also water on the basis of detailed kinetic analysis.

  11. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  12. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  13. Ruthenium-containing bond coats for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, B.; Cao, F.; Murphy, K. S.; Levi, C. G.; Pollock, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Bond coats for zirconia-based thermal barrier coating systems applied to nickel-based superalloys are typically composed of the B2 NiAl phase. Since RuAl has the same B2 crystal structure but a melting point 400°C higher than NiAl, ruthenium-modified aluminide bond coats could provide improved system temperature capability. Creep experiments on ternary Al-Ni-Ru alloys demonstrate greatly improved creep properties with increasing ruthenium content. Processing paths for ruthenium-modified NiAl-based bond coatings have been established within the bounds of commercially available coating systems. The oxidation resistance of ruthenium-modified bond coats during thermal cycling has been examined, and potential thermal barrier coating system implications are discussed.

  14. Effect of ruthenium on nitrogen fixation by some nitrogen fixers.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Gaur, N

    1979-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium chloride in the culture media on the nitrogen-fixing ability of the three nitrogen fixers (unidentified species of Azotobacter, designated here as D3, B3, and B), isolated from Allahabad soil, was studied. It was observed that the nitrogen-fixing ability of the organisms is much increased in presence of 25-75 micro M concentration of ruthenium chloride in the culture media, while sugar consumption remains more or less steady. Also, if mg nitrogen fixed/g carbon consumed in two culture media with successive increasing concentrations of ruthenium chloride is compared by calculating the difference in increase of the amount of nitrogen fixed and carbon consumed in these two culture media, it was observed that high amounts of nitrogen are fixed by B3 and B between 25-50 micro M, and between 50-75 micro M concentration of ruthenium chloride by D3.

  15. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Nickel/ruthenium catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Sealock, John L.

    1998-01-01

    A method of hydrogenation using a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional ruthenium metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional ruthenium metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst during hydrogenation reactions.

  17. Nonproductive events in ring-closing metathesis using ruthenium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian C; Keitz, Benjamin K; Kuhn, Kevin M; Thomas, Renee M; Grubbs, Robert H

    2010-06-30

    The relative TONs of productive and nonproductive metathesis reactions of diethyl diallylmalonate are compared for eight different ruthenium-based catalysts. Nonproductive cross metathesis is proposed to involve a chain-carrying ruthenium methylidene. A second more-challenging substrate (dimethyl allylmethylallylmalonate) that forms a trisubstituted olefin product is used to further delineate the effect of catalyst structure on the relative efficiencies of these processes. A steric model is proposed to explain the observed trends.

  18. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  19. Reactivity of Metal Nitrates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-20

    amines, where nitration would not be a competing process. Acetanilide . Despite the complexity encountered with aniline, the corresponding amide... acetanilide , though having an N-hydrogen atom, was nitrated without tar formation, although this was not accomplished efficiently. After reaction for 24 h... acetanilide , in the absence of a N-hydrogen atom. However, the reverse proved to be the case, for after one day at room temperature nearly 60% of starting

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  1. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  2. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Waldt, Eugen; Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  3. A promising new thermoelectric material - Ruthenium silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, Cronin B.; Mccormack, Joseph A.; Zoltan, Andrew; Zoltan, Leslie D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical efforts directed toward increasing thermoelectric figure of merit values by a factor of 2 or 3 have been encouraging in several respects. An accurate and detailed theoretical model developed for n-type silicon-germanium (SiGe) indicates that ZT values several times higher than currently available are expected under certain conditions. These new, high ZT materials are expected to be significantly different from SiGe, but not unreasonably so. Several promising candidate materials have been identified which may meet the conditions required by theory. One such candidate, ruthenium silicide, currently under development at JPL, has been estimated to have the potential to exhibit figure of merit values 4 times higher than conventional SiGe materials. Recent results are summarized.

  4. Lightening up Ruthenium Complexes to Fight Cancer?

    PubMed

    Mari, Cristina; Gasser, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In medicine, light is used in a medical treatment called photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat some types of cancer and skin diseases. This technique generally allows for reduced side effects compared to traditional chemotherapy. However, PDT is not fully effective on hypoxic tumors (i.e. lacking oxygen). To overcome this important drawback, photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT) agents have been designed to obtain light-mediated cancer cell death via an oxygen-independent mechanism. Ruthenium complexes have already been and are currently deeply explored as traditional anticancer agents. However, as reported in this short review article, such compounds can also bring novel opportunities in the field of light-mediated cancer treatment. Herein, we report on our findings in the optimization of Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes as PDT and PACT agents for the potential treatment of cancer and, interestingly, also of bacterial infections.

  5. Nuclear targets of photodynamic tridentate ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Hammitt, Richard; Thummel, Randolph P; Liu, Yao; Turro, Claudia; Snapka, Robert M

    2009-12-28

    Octahedral ruthenium complexes, capable of photodynamic singlet oxygen production at near 100% efficiency, were shown to cause light-dependent covalent crosslinking of p53 and PCNA subunits in mammalian cells and cell lysates. Azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, greatly reduced the p53 photocrosslinking, consistent with the idea that singlet oxygen is the reactive oxygen species involved in p53 photocrosslinking. A photodynamically inactive ruthenium complex, [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+) (tpy = [2,2';6',2'']-terpyridine), had no effect on p53 or PCNA photocrosslinking. Photodynamic damage to p53 has particular relevance since p53 status is an important determinant of phototoxicity and the effectiveness of photodynamic cancer therapy. The two photodynamic complexes studied, [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+), where pydppn = (3-(pyrid-2'-yl)-4,5,9,16-tetraaza-dibenzo[a,c]naphthacene, and [Ru(pydppn)(2)](2+), differed in their efficiency of p53 and PCNA photocrosslinking in cells, but showed similar efficiency of photocrosslinking in cell lysates, suggesting that they differ in their ability to enter cells. Photocrosslinking of PCNA by [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) increased linearly with concentration, time of uptake, or light exposure. Both [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) and [Ru(pydppn)(2)](2+) caused photodynamic protein-DNA crosslinking in cells, but [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) was more efficient. The efficiency of photodynamic protein-DNA crosslinking by [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) in cells increased with increasing levels of photodynamic damage. Photodynamic damage by [Ru(tpy)(pydppn)](2+) caused inhibition of DNA replication in a classical biphasic response, suggesting that DNA damage signaling and cell cycle checkpoint pathways were still operative after significant damage to nuclear proteins.

  6. Antimicrobial ruthenium complex coating on the surface of titanium alloy. High efficiency anticorrosion protection of ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    El-Gamel, Nadia E A; Fekry, Amany M

    2015-08-01

    A ruthenium complex was prepared and structurally characterized using various techniques. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of ruthenium complex were evaluated. High significant antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans was recorded. Minor cytotoxicity records were reported at the highest concentration level using MTT assay. The influence of Cu(II), Cr(III), Fe(III) and Ru(III) metal ions of salen Schiff base on the corrosion resistance of Ti-alloy in 0.5M HCl was studied. In vitro corrosion resistance was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and confirmed by surface examination via scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique. Both impedance and phase angle maximum (θ(max)) values were at maximum in the case of the ruthenium complex with promising antibacterial and antifungal activities. The surface film created by the ruthenium complex was highly resistant against attack or deterioration by bacteria. The EIS study showed high impedance values for the ruthenium complex with increasing exposure time up to 8 days. SEM images showed uniform distribution and adsorption of Ru(III) ions on Ti-alloy surface. The ruthenium complex, as a model of organic-inorganic hybrid complex, offered new prospects with desired properties in industrial and medical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  8. Bioremediation of nitrated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, D.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.; Jass, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the manufacture of nitrated aromatic and heterocyclic compounds intermediates are produced as well as the final products, e.g. TNT (trinitrotoluene), and RDX (cyclotri-methylene trinitramine). The red water produced is a dilute effluent containing TNT and other nitrated intermediates. Many of the intermediates are also to be found in contaminated land areas as well as the primary manufacturing products as contaminants in ground adjacent to production and storage areas. Two intermediates included as by-products are p-nitrophenol and resorcinol; both are hydroxylated aromatics and one (the former) is also nitrated. If these rings can be hydroxylated and oxidized by pure or mixed microbial cultures then the notion of using microbes for the detoxification of a wide range of nitrated aromatics and heterocyclics is possible. It is proposed in the study to accelerate this degradative process in the first instance for p-nitrophenol and resorcinol, and secondly for TNT and RDX. The use of microbes to degrade nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzenes, and mono-nitro phenols, have been described. In order to determine how aromatic degrading bacteria can also degrade substituted and nitrated aromatics several pure and mixed cultures have been utilized to demonstrate enzyme adaptation.

  9. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Teresa L.; Phillips, Susan R.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, lightdriven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes…

  10. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Teresa L.; Phillips, Susan R.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, lightdriven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes…

  11. Nitrates and Nitrites TNC Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Nitrates and Nitrites Presentation gives an overview of nitrates and nitrites in drinking water, why it is important to monitor them and what to do in cases where the results exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL).

  12. Nitrate Leaching Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  13. Ruthenium Catalysis in the Synthesis of Six-Membered Heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min

    Owing to the cost-effectiveness and versatility of ruthenium in catalysis, the utilization of ruthenium for developing atom and step-economic methodologies, allowing for the synthesis of six-membered heterocycles, is of particular importance in synthetic chemistry because of the important value of such compounds employed in discovering biologically and pharmacologically active compositions, the preparation of novel materials with specific functions, etc. This chapter highlights the recent 15 years' advances on ruthenium-catalyzed synthesis of six-membered heterocycles, with particular focus on the related approaches and mechanistic basis, which includes the synthesis of N-heterocycles, O-heterocycles, N,O-heterocycles, and other type of heteroatom-heterocycles.

  14. Adapting Ruthenium Sensitizers to Cobalt Electrolyte Systems.

    PubMed

    Amit Kumar, Sangeeta; Urbani, Maxence; Medel, María; Ince, Mine; González-Rodríguez, David; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Bhaskarwar, Ashok N; Torres, Tomás; Nazeeruddin, Md K; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-02-06

    In this work, we report the use of bulky substitutions in a new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) bipyridine complex, Ru(NCS)2LL', coded TT-230 to obtain high open-circuit potential in a dye-sensitized solar cell (where L is a bipyridine ligand appended with two cyclopenta(2,1-b;3,4-bA)dithiophene moieties, and L' = 4,4,'-dicarboxylic acid 2,2'-bipyridine). The electrolytes based on cobalt complexes have shown significant advantages in terms of attainable open-circuit potential compared to the standard iodide/tri-iodide redox mediators. These merits of the cobalt complexes were previously realized with a porphyrin sensitizer, achieving a VOC greater than 1 V in DSC. However, with conventional Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes such as the C101 dye, similar increase in the VOC could not be attained due to the enhanced recombination. In this work, we have shown that the use of bulky substituents can prevent the back reaction of photogenerated electron and subsequently increase the open-circuit potential of the device. The recombination processes were investigated by transient photovoltage decay measurements.

  15. Neutron Scattering from Magnetically Frustrated Ruthenium Pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Collin

    2008-03-01

    Spin-1 ruthenium pyrochlores feature strong exchange interactions and deeply suppressed N'eel ordering. In addition a doping induced metallic phase has been demonstrated. I discuss neutron scattering experiments that explore the strongly frustrated quantum magnetism of Y2Ru2O7 [1] and Pr2-xBixRu2O7 [2]. In Y2Ru2O7 (θCW= --1100 K, TN=77 K) much of the magnetic spectral weight is concentrated in a 20 meV spectral peak above an 11 meV low temperature gap in the excitation spectrum. In Pr2-xBixRu2O7 magnetic order which occurs for T

  16. Nickel/ruthenium catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, J.L.

    1998-09-29

    A method of hydrogenation is described using a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional ruthenium metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional ruthenium metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst during hydrogenation reactions. 2 figs.

  17. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R. Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  18. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  19. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  20. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  1. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation study: Formation of ammonia from nitrate and nitrate in hydrogen generating systems

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1996-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Departrnent of Energy (DOE) to immobilize pretreated highly radioactive wastes in glass for permanent disposal in the HWVP, formic acid is added to the waste before vitrification to adjust glass redox and melter feed rheology. The operation of the glass melter and durability of the glass are affected by the glass oxidation state. Formation of a conductive metallic sludge in an over-reduced melt can result in a shortened melter lifetime. An over-oxidized melt may lead to foaming and loss of ruthenium as volatile RuO{sub 4}. Historically, foaming in the joule heated ceramic melter has been attributed to gas generation in the melt which is controlled by instruction of a reductant such as formic acid into the melter feed. Formic acid is also found to decrease the melter feed viscosity thereby facilitating pumping. This technical report discusses the noble metal catalyzed formic acid reduction of nitrite and/or nitrate to ammonia, a problem of considerable concern because of the generation of a potential ammonium nitrate explosion hazard in the plant ventilation system.

  2. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  3. Molecular Models of Ruthenium(II) Organometallic Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the featured molecules for the month of March, which appear in the paper by Ozerov, Fafard, and Hoffman, and which are related to the study of the reactions of a number of "piano stool" complexes of ruthenium(II). The synthesis of compound 2a offers students an alternative to the preparation of ferrocene if they are only…

  4. PRECIPITATION OF ZIRCONIUM, NIOBIUM, AND RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1958-08-12

    An improvement on the"head end process" for decontaminating dissolver solutions of their Zr, Ni. and Ru values. The process consists in adding a water soluble symmetrical dialkyl ketone. e.g. acetone, before the formation of the manganese dioxide precipitate. The effect is that upon digestion, the ruthenium oxide does not volatilize, but is carried on the manganese dioxide precipitate.

  5. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  6. Molecular dinitrogen complexes of ruthenium(II) porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Camenzind, M.J.; James, B.R.; Dolphin, D.; Sparapany, J.W.; Ibers, J.A.

    1988-08-24

    The existence of both mono- and bis(nitrogen) complexes of ruthenium have been previously established. Details on a series of complexes are presented herein, and results of an x-ray crystallographic study of Ru(TMP) (THF) (N/sub 2/) are reported. 30 references, 4 tables.

  7. Parameters governing ruthenium sawhorse-based decarboxylation of oleic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ruthenium-catalyzed decarboxylation of 9-cisoctadecenoic is a path to produce biobased olefins. Here, a mechanistic study of this reaction was undertaken utilizing a closed reaction system and a pressure reactor. The proposed mechanism of an isomerization followed by a decarboxylation reaction was c...

  8. Molecular Models of Ruthenium(II) Organometallic Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the featured molecules for the month of March, which appear in the paper by Ozerov, Fafard, and Hoffman, and which are related to the study of the reactions of a number of "piano stool" complexes of ruthenium(II). The synthesis of compound 2a offers students an alternative to the preparation of ferrocene if they are only…

  9. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qingfang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru{sub 2}P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO{sub 2} prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H{sub 2}-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru{sub 2}P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N{sub 2} adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  10. Improvement of ruthenium based decarboxylation of carboxylic acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The removal of oxygen atoms from biobased carboxylic acids is an attractive route to provide the drop in replacement feedstocks that industry needs to continue to provide high performance products. Through the use of ruthenium catalysis, an efficient method where this process can be accomplished on ...

  11. Ruthenium-catalyzed C–H activation of thioxanthones

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thioxanthones – being readily available in one step from thiosalicylic acid and arenes – were used in ruthenium-catalyzed C–H-activation reaction to produce 1-mono- or 1,8-disubstituted thioxanthones in good to excellent yields. Scope and limitation of this reaction are presented. PMID:25977717

  12. Ruthenium-catalyzed tertiary amine formation from nitroarenes and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Liu, Yong; Peng, Shengming; Shuai, Qi; Deng, Guojun; Li, Chao-Jun

    2010-11-05

    A highly selective ruthenium-catalyzed C-N bond formation was developed by using the hydrogen-borrowing strategy. Various tertiary amines were obtained efficiently from nitroarenes and primary alcohols. The reaction tolerates a wide range of functionalities. A tentative mechanism was proposed for this direct amination reaction of alcohols with nitroarenes.

  13. Ruthenium red-induced bundling of bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Beuria, Tushar K; Banerjee, Abhijit; Panda, Dulal

    2004-06-18

    The assembly of FtsZ plays a major role in bacterial cell division, and it is thought that the assembly dynamics of FtsZ is a finely regulated process. Here, we show that ruthenium red is able to modulate FtsZ assembly in vitro. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of ruthenium red on microtubule polymerization, we found that a substoichiometric concentration of ruthenium red strongly increased the light-scattering signal of FtsZ assembly. Further, sedimentable polymer mass was increased by 1.5- and 2-fold in the presence of 2 and 10 microm ruthenium red, respectively. In addition, ruthenium red strongly reduced the GTPase activity and prevented dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that 4-10 microm of ruthenium red produced thick bundles of FtsZ polymers. The significant increase in the light-scattering signal and pelletable polymer mass in the presence of ruthenium red seemed to be due to the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments into larger polymers rather than the actual increase in the level of polymeric FtsZ. Furthermore, ruthenium red was found to copolymerize with FtsZ, and the copolymerization of substoichiometric amounts of ruthenium red with FtsZ polymers promoted cooperative assembly of FtsZ that produced large bundles. Calcium inhibited the binding of ruthenium red to FtsZ. However, a concentration of calcium 1000-fold higher than that of ruthenium red was required to produce similar effects on FtsZ assembly. Ruthenium red strongly modulated FtsZ polymerization, suggesting the presence of an important regulatory site on FtsZ and suggesting that a natural ligand, which mimics the action of ruthenium red, may regulate the assembly of FtsZ in bacteria.

  14. Redox mediator effect on water oxidation in a ruthenium-based chromophore-catalyst assembly.

    PubMed

    Norris, Michael R; Concepcion, Javier J; Harrison, Daniel P; Binstead, Robert A; Ashford, Dennis L; Fang, Zhen; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-02-13

    The synthesis, characterization, and redox properties are described for a new ruthenium-based chromophore-catalyst assembly, [(bpy)(2)Ru(4-Mebpy-4'-bimpy)Ru(tpy)(OH(2))](4+) (1, [Ru(a)(II)-Ru(b)(II)-OH(2)](4+); bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; 4-Mebpy-4'-bimpy = 4-(methylbipyridin-4'-yl)-N-benzimid-N'-pyridine; tpy = 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine), as its chloride salt. The assembly incorporates both a visible light absorber and a catalyst for water oxidation. With added ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(IV), or CAN), both 1 and 2, [Ru(tpy)(Mebim-py)(OH(2))](2+) (Mebim-py = 2-pyridyl-N-methylbenzimidazole), catalyze water oxidation. Time-dependent UV/vis spectral monitoring following addition of 30 equiv of Ce(IV) reveals that the rate of Ce(IV) consumption is first order both in Ce(IV) and in an oxidized form of the assembly. The rate-limiting step appears to arise from slow oxidation of this intermediate followed by rapid release of O(2). This is similar to isolated catalyst 2, with redox potentials comparable to the [-Ru(b)-OH(2)](2+) site in 1, but 1 is more reactive than 2 by a factor of 8 due to a redox mediator effect.

  15. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  16. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  17. Nitration Studies in Oxynitrogen Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    the starting pyrene quantities could be accounted for fully in the products. The pyrene nitration yielded a mixture of 1,6-, 1,8- DNP and 1,3,6...trinitropyrene, with a very small quantity of 1,3- DNP . 1-NP in contrast yielded roughly equal quantities of the 3 dinitropyrene isomers. This result clearly...20 El1-NP nitrated 10 / 1,3- DNP 1,6. DNP 1,8- DNP . 1,3,6-TNP Nitration Products JA-61 26-19 FIGURE 1 PRODUCTS OF NITRATION OF PYR ENE AND 1-NITROPYRENE

  18. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of ruthenium complexes with tumor specific lectin, jacalin.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Reshma, Elamvazhuthi; Mariappan, Mariappan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-02-25

    Several ruthenium complexes are regarded as anticancer agents and considered as an alternative to the widely used platinum complexes. Owing to the preferential interaction of jacalin with tumor-associated T-antigen, we report the interaction of jacalin with four ruthenium complex namely, tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(N-[1,10]phenanthrolin-5-yl-pyrenylmethanimine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]-phenazine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(11-(9-acridinyl)dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine)ruthenium(II) chloride. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ruthenium complexes strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching procedure, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained for the interaction of different ruthenium complexes with jacalin are in the order of 10(5) M(-1), which is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one ruthenium complex, and the stoichiometry is found to be unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. In addition, agglutination activity of jacalin is largely unaffected by the presence of the ruthenium complexes, indicating that the binding sites for the carbohydrate and the ruthenium complexes are different. These results suggest that the development of lectin-ruthenium complex conjugate would be feasible to target malignant cells in chemo-therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of ruthenium complexes with tumor specific lectin, jacalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Reshma, Elamvazhuthi; Mariappan, Mariappan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-02-01

    Several ruthenium complexes are regarded as anticancer agents and considered as an alternative to the widely used platinum complexes. Owing to the preferential interaction of jacalin with tumor-associated T-antigen, we report the interaction of jacalin with four ruthenium complex namely, tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(N-[1,10]phenanthrolin-5-yl-pyrenylmethanimine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(11-(9-acridinyl)dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]phenazine)ruthenium(II) chloride. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ruthenium complexes strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching procedure, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained for the interaction of different ruthenium complexes with jacalin are in the order of 105 M-1, which is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one ruthenium complex, and the stoichiometry is found to be unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. In addition, agglutination activity of jacalin is largely unaffected by the presence of the ruthenium complexes, indicating that the binding sites for the carbohydrate and the ruthenium complexes are different. These results suggest that the development of lectin-ruthenium complex conjugate would be feasible to target malignant cells in chemo-therapeutics.

  20. Synthesis of PVP-stabilized ruthenium colloids with low boiling point alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Yu, Jiulong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hanfan

    2007-09-15

    A route to the preparation of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP)-stabilized ruthenium colloids by refluxing ruthenium(III) chloride in low boiling point alcohols was developed. Deep purple colloids with shuttle-like ruthenium particles were also synthesized. XPS measurement verified the nanoparticles were in the metallic state. The morphology of metal nanoparticles was characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, TEM and XRD.

  1. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface water bodies. See below regarding decriptions on how original data was produced. These data will be part of future ReVA publications. The first, https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip, contains the variables used in this study (of which AGSL is one) and is freely available to the public. The second, www.waratah.com/region3edt is available to the general public to learn more about the ReVA program within EPA Region 3. The third, http://www.waratah.com/revanew/Welcome.asp, provides additional information about the tools and variables used in this program, but users must first obtain a user name and password to access it. A user name and password may be obtained from Vasu Kilaru at kilaru.vasu@epa.gov.

  2. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.

    2014-09-29

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  3. CuAAC click reactions for the design of multifunctional luminescent ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Zabarska, Natalia; Stumper, Anne; Rau, Sven

    2016-02-14

    CuAAC (Cu(i) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition) click chemistry has emerged as a versatile tool in the development of photoactive ruthenium complexes with multilateral potential applicability. In this contribution we discuss possible synthetic approaches towards CuAAC reactions with ruthenium(ii) polypyridine complexes and their differences with respect to possible applications. We focus on two main application possibilities of the click-coupled ruthenium assemblies. New results within the development of ruthenium based photosensitizers for the field of renewable energy supply, i.e. DSSCs (dye-sensitized solar cells) and artificial photocatalysis for the production of hydrogen, or for anticancer photodynamic therapeutic applications are reviewed.

  4. Electrochemical capacitor performance of hydrous ruthenium oxide/mesoporous carbon composite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jong H.; Han, Sangjin; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Oh, Seung M.

    Ruthenium/carbon composite materials are prepared by impregnating ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate into a mesoporous carbon (average pore diameter=12 mn, pore volume=3.6 cm 3 g -1) and then heat treatment at 320 °C for 2 h under an argon atmosphere. The metallic ruthenium nanoparticles are converted to pseudo-capacitive hydrous ruthenium oxide by electrochemical oxidation at 0.75 V (versus SCE) for 2 h in 2.0 M H 2SO 4. The specific capacitance of the composite electrodes, which is the sum of the double-layer capacitance of mesoporous carbon and the pseudo-capacitance of hydrous ruthenium oxide, reaches 243 F g -1 with heavy loading. As the loading is increased, however, the degree of ruthenium utilization for a pseudo-capacitor becomes poorer, presumably due to a limited conversion to the hydrous oxide form. The rate capability of composite electrodes also decreases with increase in ruthenium loading, due to an increase in both the equivalent series resistance (ESR) and the overall capacitance value. The ESR enlargement is caused mainly an increase in the electrolyte resistance within pores which, in turn, results from a pore narrowing with ruthenium loading Hindered ionic motion in narrowed pores can explain this feature. An increase in the RC time constant with ruthenium loading is further verified by ac impedance measurements.

  5. Effect of nitrogen compounds on transport of ruthenium through the RCS.

    PubMed

    Kajan, Ivan; Kärkelä, Teemu; Auvinen, Ari; Ekberg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium is a fission product that can be released from the fuel in case of a severe nuclear accident. In this work the impact of the atmosphere composition, including air radiolysis products, on the transport of ruthenium through a primary circuit was examined. Experiments were performed at temperatures 1300, 1500 and 1700 K in a slightly humid air. In the experiments significant effect of nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO2) and nitric acid on the ruthenium chemistry in the model primary circuit was observed. The obtained results indicate a strong effect of air radiolysis products on the quantity partitioning of transported ruthenium to gaseous and aerosol compounds.

  6. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-09-01

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  7. Thermodynamic data bases for multivalent elements: An example for ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A careful consideration and understanding of fundamental chemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics is absolutely essential when modeling predominance regions and solubility behavior of elements that exhibit a wide range of valence states. Examples of this are given using the ruthenium-water system at 298.15 K, for which a critically assessed thermochemical data base is available. Ruthenium exhibits the widest range of known aqueous solution valence states. Known solid anhydrous binary oxides of ruthenium are crystalline RuO/sub 2/, RuO/sub 4/, and possibly RuO/sub 3/ (thin film), and known hydroxides/hydrated oxides (all amorphous) are Ru(OH)/sub 3/ . H/sub 2/O, RuO/sub 2/ . 2H/sub 2/O, RuO/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O, and a poorly characterized Ru(V) hydrous oxide. Although the other oxides, hydroxides, and hydrous oxides are generally obtained as precipitates from aqueous solutions, they are thermodynamically unstable with regard to RuO/sub 2/(cr) formation. Characterized aqueous species of ruthenium include RuO/sub 4/ (which slowly oxidizes water and which dissociates as a weak acid), RuO/sub 4//sup -/ and RuO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ (which probably contain lesser amounts of RuO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 2//sup -/ and RuO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 2//sup 2 -/, respectively, and other species), Ru(OH)/sub 2//sup 2 +/, Ru/sub 4/(OH)/sub 12//sup 4 +/, Ru(OH)/sub 4/, Ru/sup 3 +/, Ru(OH)/sup 2 +/, Ru(OH)/sub 2//sup +/, Ru/sup 2 +/, and some hydroxytetramers with formal ruthenium valences of 3.75 greater than or equal to Z greater than or equal to 2.0. Potential pH diagrams of the predominance regions change significantly with concentration due to polymerization/depolymerization reactions. Failure to consider the known chemistry of ruthenium can yield large differences in predicted solubilities.

  8. Preparation, stability, and photoreactivity of thiolato ruthenium polypyridyl complexes: Can cysteine derivatives protect ruthenium-based anticancer complexes?

    PubMed

    van Rixel, Vincent H S; Busemann, Anja; Göttle, Adrien J; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2015-09-01

    Ruthenium polypyridyl complexes may act as light-activatable anticancer prodrugs provided that they are protected by well-coordinated ligands that i) prevent coordination of other biomolecules to the metal center in the dark and ii) can be removed by visible light irradiation. In this paper, the use of monodentate thiol ligands RSH as light-cleavable protecting groups for the ruthenium complex [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(OH2)](PF6)2 ([1](PF6)2; tpy=2,2';6',2″-terpyridine, bpy=2,2'-bypyridine), is investigated. The reaction of [1](2+) with RSH=H2Cys (L-cysteine), H2Acys (N-acetyl-L-cysteine), and HAcysMe (N-acetyl-L-cysteine methyl ester), is studied by UV-visible spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Coordination of the monodentate thiol ligands to the ruthenium complex takes place upon heating to 353 K, but full conversion to the protected complex [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(SR)]PF6 is only possible when a large excess of ligand is used. Isolation and characterization of the two new thiolato complexes [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(κS-HCys)]PF6 ([2]PF6) and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(κS-HAcys)]PF6 ([3]PF6) is reported. [3]PF6 shows a metal-to-ligand charge-transfer absorption band that is red shifted (λmax=492 nm in water) compared to its methionine analogue [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(κS-HAmet)](Cl)2 ([5](Cl)2, λmax=452 nm; HAmet=N-acetyl-methionine). In the dark the thiolate ligand coordinated to ruthenium is oxidized even by traces of oxygen, which first leads to the sulfenato, sulfinato, and disulfide ruthenium complexes, and finally to the formation of the aqua complex [1](2+). [3]PF6 showed slow photosubstitution of the thiolate ligand by water under blue light irradiation, together with faster photooxidation of the thiolate ligand compared to dark conditions. The use of thiol vs. thioether monodentate ligands is discussed for the protection of anticancer ruthenium-based prodrugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Richards, Powell; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel Ruthenium-transferrin complex, prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40.degree. C. for about 2 hours, and purifying said complex by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex.

  10. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Richards, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel ruthenium-transferrin complex is disclosed which is prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40 C for about 2 hours. The complex is purified by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex. No Drawings

  11. The Growth of Monolayer Thin Films on a Ruthenium Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Chris; Jones, Joshua; Karsten, Pohl

    2004-03-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STMs) are able to acquire images of conductive surfaces with atomic resolution. At such a small scale even tiny impurities can affect the surface image making it necessary to perform STM experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum (10-11 Torr). An effective method for the cleaning of a Ruthenium sample will be developed through the use of a previously constructed sample holder, which contains a filament and a thermocouple to heat and measure sample temperature. Ruthenium samples will be flashed to a very high temperature (1700 K) very quickly in a low-pressure oxygen environment (10-8 Torr). Surface cleanliness will be measured by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Upon completion of a consistent method for surface cleaning, we deposit monolayer thick metal film such as copper, silver and gold by physical vapor deposition from tungsten baskets. Thickness, purity and atomic structure of the film will be measured using AES and STM.

  12. Hydrogen and oxygen adsorption stoichiometries on silica supported ruthenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoud, Romain; Delichere, Pierre; Gajan, David; Lukens, Wayne; Pelzer, Katrin; Basset, Jean-Marie; Candy, Jean-Pierre; Coperet, Christophe

    2008-12-01

    Treatment under H{sub 2} at 300 C of Ru(COD)(COT) dispersed on silica yields 2 nm ruthenium nanoparticles, [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}], according to EXAFS, HRTEM and XPS. H{sub 2} adsorption measurements on [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}] in the absence of O{sub 2} show that Ru particles adsorb up to ca. 2 H per surface ruthenium atoms (2H/Ru{sub s}) on various samples; this technique can therefore be used to measure the dispersion of Ru particles. In contrast, O{sub 2} adsorption on [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}] leads to a partial oxidation of the bulk at 25 C, to RuO{sub 2} at 200 C and to sintering upon further reduction under H{sub 2}, showing that O{sub 2} adsorption cannot be used to measure the dispersion of Ru particles.

  13. Is photoisomerization required for NO photorelease in ruthenium nitrosyl complexes?

    PubMed

    García, Juan Sanz; Alary, Fabienne; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Dixon, Isabelle M; Heully, Jean-Louis

    2016-11-01

    The factors that explain the competition between intramolecular NO linkage photoisomerization and NO photorelease in five ruthenium nitrosyl complexes were investigated. By applying DFT-based methods, it was possible to characterize the ground states and lowest triplet potential energy surfaces of these species, and to establish that both photoisomerization and photorelease processes can occur in the lowest triplet state of each species. This work highlights the crucial role of the sideways-bonded isomer, a metastable state also known as the MS2 isomer, in the photochemical loss of NO, while the results obtained also indicate that the population of the triplet state of this isomer is compulsory for both processes and show how photoisomerization and photorelease interfere. Graphical Abstract Illustration of the crucial role of the (3)MS2 state in the photoreactivities of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes.

  14. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  15. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  16. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  17. Characteristics of a promising new thermoelectric material - Ruthenium silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, Toshitaka; Vining, Cronin B.; Allevato, Camillo E.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary study on arc-melted samples has indicated that ruthenium silicide has the potential to obtain figure-of-merit values four times higher than that of conventional silicon-germanium material. In order to realize the high figure-of-merit values, high-quality crystal from the melt is needed. A Bridgman-like method has been employed and has realized much better crystals than arc-melted ones.

  18. Arsenate adsorption on ruthenium oxides: A spectroscopic and kinetic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Luxton, Todd P.; Eick, Matthew J.; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2008-12-08

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O) and crystalline (RuO{sub 2}) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was used to determine the local coordination environment of adsorbed arsenate. Additionally, pressure-jump (p-jump) relaxation spectroscopy was used to investigate the kinetics of arsenate adsorption/desorption on ruthenium oxides. Chemical relaxations resulting from the induced pressure change were monitored via electrical conductivity detection. EXAFS data were collected for two initial arsenate solution concentrations, 3 and 33 mM at pH 5. The collected spectra indicated a similar coordination environment for arsenate adsorbed to RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O for both arsenate concentrations. In contrast the EXAFS spectra of RuO{sub 2} indicated differences in the local coordination environments for the crystalline material with increasing arsenate concentration. Data analysis indicated that both mono- and bidentate surfaces complexes were present on both RuO{sub 2} {center_dot} 1.1H{sub 2}O and RuO{sub 2}. Relaxation spectra from the pressure-jump experiments of both ruthenium oxides resulted in a double relaxation event. Based on the relaxation spectra, a two step reaction mechanism for arsenate adsorption is proposed resulting in the formation of a bidentate surface complex. Analysis of the kinetic and spectroscopic data suggested that while there were two relaxation events, arsenate adsorbed to ruthenium oxide surfaces through both mono- and bidentate surface complexes.

  19. Nitrate transport system in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Schloemen, R H; Garrett, R H

    1974-04-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a K(m) for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with K(i) values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate.

  20. Electrochemical deposition of conducting ruthenium oxide films from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Warren, L.F.

    1984-02-01

    In the last decade, ruthenium oxide, RuO /sub x/ (x less than or equal to 2), has been used extensively as the active anode electrocatalyst constituent for Cl/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ evolution reactions, in chlorate production, and in metal electrowinning from mixed chloride-sulfate solutions. More recently, this material has been incorporated in several light-induced water electrolysis schemes and apparently possesses the ability to inhibit CdS photocorrosion by acting as a hole scavenger. The numerous applications for this catalyst material certainly warrant further studies of its electrochemical properties on a variety of substrates, e.g., semiconductors. The lack of a simple technique for controlled deposition of ruthenium oxide onto conducting substrates prompted us to investigate an electrochemical approach to this problem. We describe here a new way to electrochemically deposit conducting films of hydrated ruthenium oxide from an aqueous solution of the benzeneruthenium (II)aqua complex. The films slowly dissolve in aqueous electrolytes upon potential cycling, yet appear to be catalytic with regards to water oxidation.

  1. Thin film ruthenium microstructures for transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. S.; Cohn, I. A.; Vystavkin, A. N.; Kovalenko, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    The superconducting properties of ruthenium (Ru) thin films and microstructures are investigated. The microstructures are used as transition edge sensors (TES), working at He-3 evaporation cryostats' temperatures. Ruthenium is substantially inert, and the critical temperature Tc for bulk Ru samples is known from state of art to be 0.40-0.51 K. We investigated magnetron sputtered Ru thin films with thicknesses 13-300 nm on a Si substrate and electron lithography fabricated TES samples, based on the thin-film Ru microstructures. It has been found, that the Tc for the Ru thin films is 0.55-0.70 K, and the width of the transition region is 1-5 mK, and for the Ru TES Tc = 0.55 and ΔT = 4 mK. Furthermore, it was established that lithography process had no significant influence on the properties of the TES samples, so we were able to get consistent properties for several fabrication sessions. Therefore ruthenium is concluded to be a desirable material for transition edge sensors working at He-3 cryostats' temperatures.

  2. The Mystery of the Electronic Spectrum of Ruthenium Monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Christensen, Ryan M.; Dore, Jacob M.; Konder, Ricarda M.; Tokaryk, Dennis W.

    2016-06-01

    Using PH3 as a reactant gas and ruthenium as the target metal in the UNB laser ablation spectrometer, the ruthenium monophosphide molecule (RuP) has been detected. Dispersed fluorescence experiments have been performed to determine ground state vibrational frequencies and the presence of any low-lying electronic states. Rotationally resolved spectra of two vibrational bands at 577nm and 592nm have been taken; the bands have been identified as 1-0 and 0-0 bands based on isotopic shifts. Ruthenium has seven stable isotopes and rotational transitions have been observed for six of the RuP isotopologues. RuP is isoelectronic to RuN so it is expected that RuP will have a 2Σ+ ground state and low resolution spectra indicated a likely 2Σ+ - 2Σ+ electronic transition. Further investigation has led us to believe we are observing a 2Π - 2Σ+ transition but mysteriously some important rotational branches are missing. It is hoped that new data to be recorded on a second electronic system we have observed at 535nm will help shed light on this mystery.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Hydrogen, Carbon-Monoxide and Thiophene Adsorption on Ruthenium-Sulfide and Sulfided Ruthenium Catalysts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, William Herbert

    The "working surface" of ruthenium hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts has been modeled by preadsorption of sulfur, carbon and carbon plus sulfur on Ru(0001). Adsorption and decomposition of thiophene over these surfaces have been investigated using TDS/TPRS, XPS and EELS. Thiophene is proposed to decompose via a three-step mechanism involving: (i) initial thiophene cracking at 120 K yielding surface sulfur and hydrocarbon species, (ii) hydrogen desorption near 230 K providing additional decomposition ensembles and (iii) continued decomposition to form "metallocycle -like" intermediates which retain EELS features similar to thiophene. Preadsorbed carbon or carbon plus sulfur are not as effective for passivation of the surface toward metallocycle formation as preadsorbed sulfur alone. This result is attributed to the fact that carbon deposited from butadiene annealed and decomposed at 700 K forms islands, while sulfur establishes a well-ordered superlattice on the surface. The decrease in metallocycle formation with increasing poison levels appears to explain HDS selectivity and specific activity trends observed in our laboratory from mildly sulfided (10% H_2S/H_2 , 673 K, 2h) ruthenium catalysts retaining submonolayers of sulfur. Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS) has been used to characterize hydrogen adsorption sites on ruthenium sulfide. Hydrogen resides on sulfur anions to form SH groups, yielding two non-degenerate bending modes at 600 and 710 cm^{-1}. Complementary hydrogen adsorption and H_2/D _2 exchange data suggest that the active sites for hydrogen adsorption may be coordinatively unsaturated S-S anion pairs. Comparison of CO adsorption on sulfided Ru/Al _2O_3 to sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveals an adsorption site related to edge/corner atoms directly perturbed by sulfur, consistent with previous kinetic studies demonstrating higher specific activity for thiophene HDS over smaller ruthenium crystallites.

  4. Volatility of ruthenium-106, technetium-99, and iodine-129, and the evolution of nitrogen oxide compounds during the calcination of high-level, radioactive nitric acid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rimshaw, S.J.; Case, F.N.; Tompkins, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    The nitrate anion is the predominant constituent in all high-level nuclear wastes. Formic acid reacts with the nitrate anion to yield noncondensable, inert gases (N/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O), which can be scrubbed free of /sup 106/Ru, /sup 129/I, and /sup 99/Tc radioactivities prior to elimination from the plant by passing through HEPA filters. Treatment of a high-level authentic radioactive waste with two moles of formic acid per mole of nitrate anion leads to a low RuO/sub 4/ volatility of about 0.1%, which can be reduced to an even lower level of 0.007% on adding a 15% excess of formic acid. Without pretreatment of the nitrate waste with formic acid, a high RuO/sub 4/ volatility of approx. 35% is observed on calcining a 4.0 N HNO/sub 3/ solution in quartz equipment at 350/sup 0/C. The RuO/sub 4/ volatility falls to approx. 1.0% on decreasing the initial HNO/sub 3/ concentration to 1.0 N or lower. It is postulated that thermal denitration of a highly nitrated ruthenium complex leads to the formation of volatile RuO/sub 4/, while decarboxylation of a ruthenium-formate complex leads to the formation of nonvolatile RuO/sub 2/. Wet scrubbing with water is used to remove RuO/sub 4/ from the off-gas stream. In all glass equipment, small amounts of particulate RuO/sub 2/ are formed in the gas phase by decomposition of RuO/sub 4/. The /sup 99/Tc volatility was found to vary from 0.2 to 1.4% on calcining HNO/sub 3/ and HCOOH (formic acid) solutions over the temperature range of 250 to 600/sup 0/C. These unexpectedly low volatilities of /sup 99/Tc are correlated to the high thermal stability limits of various metal pertechnetates and technetates. Iodine volatilities were high, varying from a low of 30% at 350/sup 0/C to a high of 97% at 650/sup 0/C. It is concluded that with a proper selection of pretreatment and operating conditions the /sup 106/Ru and /sup 99/Tc activities can be retained in the calcined solid with recycle of the wet scrubbing solution.

  5. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Nitrate photolysis in salty snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. J.; Morenz, K.; Shi, Q.; Murphy, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate photolysis from snow can have a significant impact on the oxidative capacity of the local atmosphere, but the factors affecting the release of gas phase products are not well understood. Here, we report the first systematic study of the amounts of NO, NO2, and total nitrogen oxides (NOy) emitted from illuminated snow samples as a function of both nitrate and total salt (NaCl and Instant Ocean) concentration. We show that the release of nitrogen oxides to the gas phase is directly related to the expected nitrate concentration in the brine at the surface of the snow crystals, increasing to a plateau value with increasing nitrate, and generally decreasing with increasing NaCl or Instant Ocean (I.O.). In frozen mixed nitrate (25 mM) - salt (0-500 mM) solutions, there is an increase in gas phase NO2 seen at low added salt amounts: NO2 production is enhanced by 35% at low prefreezing [NaCl] and by 70% at similar prefreezing [I.O.]. Raman microscopy of frozen nitrate-salt solutions shows evidence of stronger nitrate exclusion to the air interface in the presence of I.O. than with added NaCl. The enhancement in nitrogen oxides emission in the presence of salts may prove to be important to the atmospheric oxidative capacity in polar regions.

  7. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Mechanism and Utility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyue; Kam, Lisa; Trerise, Ryan; Williams, Travis J

    2017-01-17

    One of the greatest challenges in using H2 as a fuel source is finding a safe, efficient, and inexpensive method for its storage. Ammonia borane (AB) is a solid hydrogen storage material that has garnered attention for its high hydrogen weight density (19.6 wt %) and ease of handling and transport. Hydrogen release from ammonia borane is mediated by either hydrolysis, thus giving borate products that are difficult to rereduce, or direct dehydrogenation. Catalytic AB dehydrogenation has thus been a popular topic in recent years, motivated both by applications in hydrogen storage and main group synthetic chemistry. This Account is a complete description of work from our laboratory in ruthenium-catalyzed ammonia borane dehydrogenation over the last 6 years, beginning with the Shvo catalyst and resulting ultimately in the development of optimized, leading catalysts for efficient hydrogen release. We have studied AB dehydrogenation with Shvo's catalyst extensively and generated a detailed understanding of the role that borazine, a dehydrogenation product, plays in the reaction: it is a poison for both Shvo's catalyst and PEM fuel cells. Through independent syntheses of Shvo derivatives, we found a protective mechanism wherein catalyst deactivation by borazine is prevented by coordination of a ligand that might otherwise be a catalytic poison. These studies showed how a bidentate N-N ligand can transform the Shvo into a more reactive species for AB dehydrogenation that minimizes accumulation of borazine. Simultaneously, we designed novel ruthenium catalysts that contain a Lewis acidic boron to replace the Shvo -OH proton, thus offering more flexibility to optimize hydrogen release and take on more general problems in hydride abstraction. Our scorpionate-ligated ruthenium species (12) is a best-of-class catalyst for homogeneous dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in terms of its extent of hydrogen release (4.6 wt %), air tolerance, and reusability. Moreover, a synthetically

  8. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of ruthenium-ketoconazole and ruthenium-clotrimazole complexes on cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Martínez, Alberto; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A.; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds have intriguing anti-cancer properties and some of these novel compounds are currently in clinical trials. To continue the development of new metal-based drug combinations, we coupled ruthenium (Ru) with the azole compounds ketoconazole (KTZ) and clotrimazole (CTZ), which are well-known antifungal agents that also display anticancer properties. We report the activity of a series of twelve Ru-KTZ and Ru-CTZ compounds against three prostate tumor cell lines with different androgen sensitivity, as well as cervical cancer and lymphoblastic lymphoma cell lines. In addition, human cell lines were used to evaluate the toxicity against non-transformed cells and to establish selectivity indexes. Our results indicate that the combination of ruthenium and KTZ/CTZ in a single molecule results in complexes that are more cytotoxic than the individual components alone, displaying in some cases low micromolar CC50 values and high selectivity indexes. Additionally, all compounds are more cytotoxic against prostate cell lines with lower cytotoxicity against non-transformed epidermal cell lines. Some of the compounds were found to primarily induce cell death via apoptosis yet weakly interact with DNA. Our studies also demonstrate that the cytotoxicity induced by our Ru-based compounds is not directly related to their ability to interact with DNA. PMID:24272524

  9. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  10. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  11. Ruthenium catalyzed synthesis of 2,3-unsaturated C-glycosides from glycals.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Batthula; Reddy, Thurpu Raghavender; Kashyap, Sudhir

    2015-04-10

    A highly efficient and convenient C-glycosylation method was developed using ruthenium(III) chloride for the synthesis of 2,3-unsaturated C-glycosides. Various nucleophiles such as allyl trimethylsilane, triethylsilane, trimethylsilyl cyanide, trimethylsilyl azide and heterocycles such as thiophene and furan reacted smoothly with glycals in the presence of catalytic amount of ruthenium trichloride under mild reaction conditions.

  12. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  13. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  14. Thermochemistry of Ruthenium Oxyhydroxide Species and Their Impact on Volatile Speciations in Severe Nuclear Accident Conditions.

    PubMed

    Miradji, Faoulat; Virot, François; Souvi, Sidi; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent; Vallet, Valérie

    2016-02-04

    Literature thermodynamic data of ruthenium oxyhydroxides reveal large uncertainties in some of the standard enthalpies of formation, motivating the use of high-level relativistic correlated quantum chemical methods to reduce the level of discrepancies. Reaction energies leading to the formation of all possible oxyhydroxide species RuOx(OH)y(H2O)z have been calculated for a series of reactions combining DFT (TPSSh-5%HF) geometries and partition functions, CCSD(T) energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limits. The highly accurate ab initio thermodynamic data were used as input data of thermodynamic equilibrium computations to derive the speciation of gaseous ruthenium species in the temperature, pressure and concentration conditions of severe nuclear accidents occurring in pressurized water reactors. At temperatures lower than 1000 K, gaseous ruthenium tetraoxide is the dominating species, between 1000 and 2000 K ruthenium trioxide becomes preponderant, whereas at higher temperatures gaseous ruthenium oxide, dioxide and even Ru in gaseous phase are formed. Although earlier studies predicted the formation of oxyhydroxides in significant quantities, the use of highly accurate ab initio thermodynamic data for ruthenium gaseous species leads to a more reliable inventory of gaseous ruthenium species in which gaseous oxyhydroxide ruthenium molecules are formed only in negligible amounts.

  15. Using ruthenium sawhorse based decarboxylation to produce industrial materials from oleic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ruthenium catalyzed isomerization and decarboxylation of 9-cis-octadecenoic acid are reported as part of the effort to produce valuable industrial materials from biobased sources. Initial studies have demonstrated the efficacy of ruthenium sawhorse materials and further mechanistic studies uncovered...

  16. Ruthenium-based nitric oxide-donating and carbon monoxide-donating molecules.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Bart; Boydens, Charlotte; Vanden Daele, Laura; Van de Voorde, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, the use of metallocomplexes for medical purposes has considerably grown. Because of its favourable characteristics, ruthenium has taken a significant place in this expanding field of research. Several ruthenium-containing metal compounds have been developed as delivery agents of physiological important molecules such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). This review focuses on the (vaso)relaxant capacity of ruthenium-based NO-donating and CO-donating molecules in view of their potential usefulness in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and erectile dysfunction. Ruthenium seems to be a valuable candidate for the design of NO-donating and CO-donating molecules. To date, ruthenium remains of interest in drug research as the search for new alternatives is still necessary. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Structure of ruthenium(II) complexes with coproporphyrin I tetraethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, S. A.; Andreev, S. V.; Zamilatskov, I. A.; Kurochkina, N. M.; Tyurin, V. S.; Senchikhin, I. N.; Ponomarev, G. V.; Erzina, D. R.; Chernyshev, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The reaction between coproporphyrin I tetraethyl ester and ruthenium(II) dodecacarbonyl in toluene is investigated. The formation of two different products, complexes 2 and 3 of ruthenium(II) with coproporphyrin I tetraethyl ester, studied by means of mass spectrometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, NMR, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis, is revealed. Structures are proposed for the products, of which ( 2) is a monocarbonyl complex of ruthenium(II) porphyrin that exists as a coordination polymer formed owing to intermolecular axial bonding between the oxygen atoms of carboethoxyl groups and ruthenium(II). The structure proposed for second product ( 3) is in the form of the corresponding monomer of a monocarbonyl complex of ruthenium(II) porphyrin. It is established that polymeric complex 2 transforms into monomeric complex 3 when it is heating in pyridine.

  18. Hydrogen generation from water/methanol under visible light using aerogel prepared strontium titanate (SrTiO3) nanomaterials doped with ruthenium and rhodium metals.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yenting; Klabunde, Kenneth J

    2012-07-27

    Nanostructured strontium titanate visible-light-driven photocatalysts containing rhodium and ruthenium were synthesized by a modified aerogel synthesis using ruthenium chloride and rhodium nitrate as dopant precursors, and titanium isopropoxide and strontium metal as the metal sources. The well-defined crystalline SrTiO(3) structure was confirmed by means of x-ray diffraction. After calcination at 500 °C, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy shows an increase in light absorption at 370 nm due to the presence of Rh(3 + ); however an increase of the calcination temperature to 600 °C led to a decrease in intensity, probably due to a loss of surface area. An increase in the rhodium doping level also led to an increase in absorption at 370 nm; however, the higher amounts of dopant lowered the photocatalytic activity. The modified aerogel synthesis allows greatly enhanced H(2) production performance from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation compared with lower surface area conventional materials. We believe that this enhanced activity is due to the higher surface areas while high quality nanocrystalline materials are still obtained. Furthermore, the surface properties of these nanocrystalline aerogel materials are different, as exhibited by the higher activities in alkaline solutions, while conventional materials (obtained via high temperature solid-state synthesis methods) only exhibit reasonable hydrogen production in acidic solutions. Moreover, an aerogel synthesis approach gives the possibility of thin-film formation and ease of incorporation into practical solar devices.

  19. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.; Kramer, C. M.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Nissen, D. A.; Goods, S. H.; Mar, R. W.; Munford, J. W.; Karnowsky, M. M.; Biefeld, R. N.; Norem, N. J.

    1981-03-01

    Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage, molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures were used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use was at temperatures of about 4500 C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 6000 C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program was developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms.

  20. Ammonium nitrate cold pack ingestion.

    PubMed

    Challoner, K R; McCarron, M M

    1988-01-01

    Disposable ammonium nitrate cold packs are widely used in emergency departments instead of ice bags. Five confused or suicidal patients who tore open a pack and ingested from 64 to 234 grams of ammonium nitrate in a single dose, and another patient who attempted to do so, are reported. It is known that chronic ingestion of 6 to 12 grams/day of ammonium nitrate may cause gastritis, acidosis, isosmotic diuresis, and nitrite toxicity manifesting as methemoglobinemia or vasodilatation. None of these patients developed severe toxicity, although three had symptoms of gastritis, three had slight methemoglobinemia, and two had mild hypotension. The product was removed from the stomach promptly in three of the five patients. None had pre-existing renal or intestinal dysfunction, which are known to enhance ammonium nitrate toxicity.

  1. The "silver-nitrate-oma".

    PubMed

    McBride, T J; Rand, B; Dhillon, S S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates and emphasises the unusual radiographic appearance of silver nitrate treatment in a 30-year-old patient, who subsequently underwent excision biopsy of a presumed potentially malignant lesion.

  2. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  3. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not exceed...

  4. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not exceed...

  5. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  6. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  7. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  8. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  9. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  10. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  11. Sodium nitrate ingestion increases skeletal muscle nitrate content in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyakayiru, Jean; Kouw, Imre W K; Cermak, Naomi M; Senden, Joan M; van Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate ([Formula: see text]) ingestion has been shown to have vasoactive and ergogenic effects that have been attributed to increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Recent observations in rodents suggest that skeletal muscle tissue serves as an endogenous [Formula: see text] "reservoir." The present study determined [Formula: see text] contents in human skeletal muscle tissue in a postabsorptive state and following ingestion of a sodium nitrate bolus (NaNO3). Seventeen male, type 2 diabetes patients (age 72 ± 1 yr; body mass index 26.5 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); means ± SE) were randomized to ingest a dose of NaNO3 (NIT; 9.3 mg [Formula: see text]/kg body wt) or placebo (PLA; 8.8 mg NaCl/kg body wt). Blood and muscle biopsy samples were taken before and up to 7 h following [Formula: see text] or placebo ingestion to assess [Formula: see text] [and plasma nitrite ([Formula: see text])] concentrations. Additionally, basal plasma and muscle [Formula: see text] concentrations were assessed in 10 healthy young (CON-Y; age 21 ± 1 yr) and 10 healthy older (CON-O; age 75 ± 1 yr) control subjects. In all groups, baseline [Formula: see text] concentrations were higher in muscle (NIT, 57 ± 7; PLA, 61 ± 7; CON-Y, 80 ± 10; CON-O, 54 ± 6 µmol/l) than in plasma (NIT, 35 ± 3; PLA, 32 ± 3; CON-Y, 38 ± 3; CON-O, 33 ± 3 µmol/l; P ≤ 0.011). Ingestion of NaNO3 resulted in a sustained increase in plasma [Formula: see text], plasma [Formula: see text], and muscle [Formula: see text] concentrations (up to 185 ± 25 µmol/l) in the NIT group (time effect P < 0.001) compared with PLA (treatment effect P < 0.05). In conclusion, basal [Formula: see text] concentrations are substantially higher in human skeletal muscle tissue compared with plasma. Ingestion of a bolus of dietary [Formula: see text] increases both plasma and muscle [Formula: see text] contents in humans.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Literature of the pharmacokinetics following dietary nitrate ingestion is usually limited to the changes

  12. Mononuclear ruthenium polypyridine complexes that catalyze water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of molecular water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) in the context of developing a system that would accomplish artificial photosynthesis. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes with polypyridine ligands have drawn considerable attention in this regard, due to their high catalytic activity and relatively simple structure. In this perspective review, we will discuss mononuclear Ru polypyridine WOCs by organizing them into four groups according to their ligand environments. Each group will be discussed with regard to three fundamental questions: first, how does the catalyst initiate O–O bond formation? Second, which step in the catalytic cycle is rate-determining? Third, how efficient is the catalyst according to the specific descriptors such as turnover frequency? All discussion is based on the high-valent ruthenium intermediates that are proposed in the catalytic cycle according to experimental observation and theoretical simulation. Two fundamental mechanisms are set forth. An acid–base mechanism that involves the attack of a water molecule on the oxo of a high valent Ru 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000

  13. Graphene-Ruthenium(II) complex composites for sensitive ECL immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Nan; Wang, Min; Wang, Feng-Bin; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2014-02-26

    Non-covalent modification method has been proven as an effective strategy for enhancing the chemical properties of graphene while the structure and electronic properties of graphene can be retained. This work describes a novel strategy to fabricate a solid-state electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor based on ruthenium(II) complex/3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid (PTCA)/graphene nanocomposites (Ru-PTCA/G) for sensitive detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP). It is found that immobilization of PTCA and reduction of GO can be simultaneously achieved in one-pot synthesis method under alkaline condition and moderate temperature, forming PTCA/G nanocomposites. Further covalent attachment of ruthenium(II) complex to the PTCA assembled on graphene sheets produces the functional Ru-PTCA/G nanocomposites which show good electrochemical activity and ca. 21 times higher luminescence quantum efficiency than the adsorbed derivative ruthenium(II) complex. The Ru-PTCA/G nanocomposites based solid-state ECL sensor exhibits high stability toward the determination of tripropylamine (TPA) coreactant. In addition, a new ECL immunosensor based on steric hindrance effect is fabricated by cross-linking α-fetoprotein antibody (anti-AFP) with chitosan covered on Ru-PTCA/G composites modified electrode for detection of cancer biomarker AFP. This ECL immunosensor shows an extremely sensitive response to AFP in a linear range of 5 pg·mL(-1) -10 ng·mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.2 pg·mL(-1) . The present approach is effective for various molecules immobilization and may become a promising technique for biomolecular detection.

  14. Antiparasitic activities of novel ruthenium/lapachol complexes.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marília I F; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; de Oliveira, Katia Mara; Rodrigues, Claudia; Ellena, Javier; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Rocha, Vinícius P C; Nonato, Fabiana R; Macedo, Taís S; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Soares, Milena B P; Batista, Alzir A

    2014-07-01

    The present study describes the synthesis, characterization, antileishmanial and antiplasmodial activities of novel diimine/(2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4'-methylbipyridine (Me-bipy) and 4,4'-methoxybipyridine (MeO-bipy)/phosphine/ruthenium(II) complexes containing lapachol (Lap, 2-hydroxy-3-(3-33 methyl-2-buthenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone) as bidentate ligand. The [Ru(Lap)(PPh3)2(bipy)]PF6 (1), [Ru(Lap)(PPh3)2(Me-bipy)]PF6 (2), [Ru(Lap)(PPh3)2(MeO-bipy)]PF6(3) and[Ru(Lap)(PPh3)2(phen)]PF6 (4) complexes, PPh3=triphenylphospine, were synthesized from the reactions of cis-[RuCl2(PPh3)2(X-bipy)] or cis-[RuCl2(PPh3)2(phen)], with lapachol. The [RuCl2(Lap)(dppb)] (5) [dppb=1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane] was synthesized from the mer-[RuCl3(dppb)(H2O)] complex. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy, (31)P{(1)H} and (1)H NMR, and cyclic voltammetry. The Ru(III) complex, [RuCl2(Lap)(dppb)], was also characterized by the EPR technique. The structure of the complexes [Ru(Lap)(PPh3)2(bipy)]PF6 and [RuCl2(Lap)(dppb)] was elucidated by X-ray diffraction. The evaluation of the antiparasitic activities of the complexes against Leishmania amazonensis and Plasmodium falciparum demonstrated that lapachol-ruthenium complexes are more potent than the free lapachol. The [RuCl2(Lap)(dppb)] complex is the most potent and selective antiparasitic compound among the five new ruthenium complexes studied in this work, exhibiting an activity comparable to the reference drugs.

  15. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-07

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls.

  16. Anticancer activity of structurally related ruthenium(II) cyclopentadienyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Côrte-Real, Leonor; Mendes, Filipa; Coimbra, Joana; Morais, Tânia S; Tomaz, Ana Isabel; Valente, Andreia; Garcia, M Helena; Santos, Isabel; Bicho, Manuel; Marques, Fernanda

    2014-08-01

    A set of structurally related Ru(η(5)-C5H5) complexes with bidentate N,N'-heteroaromatic ligands have been evaluated as prospective metallodrugs, with focus on exploring the uptake and cell death mechanisms and potential cellular targets. We have extended these studies to examine the potential of these complexes to target cancer cell metabolism, the energetic-related phenotype of cancer cells. The observations that these complexes can enter cells, probably facilitated by binding to plasma transferrin, and can be retained preferentially at the membranes prompted us to explore possible membrane targets involved in cancer cell metabolism. Most malignant tumors present the Warburg effect, which consists in increasing glycolytic rates with production of lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. The reliance of glycolytic cancer cells on trans-plasma-membrane electron transport (TPMET) systems for their continued survival raises the question of their appropriateness as a target for anticancer drug development strategies. Considering the interesting findings that some anticancer drugs in clinical use are cytotoxic even without entering cells and can inhibit TPMET activity, we investigated whether redox enzyme modulation could be a potential mechanism of action of antitumor ruthenium complexes. The results from this study indicated that ruthenium complexes can inhibit lactate production and TPMET activity in a way dependent on the cancer cell aggressiveness and the concentration of the complex. Combination approaches that target cell metabolism (glycolytic inhibitors) as well as proliferation are needed to successfully cure cancer. This study supports the potential use of some of these ruthenium complexes as adjuvants of glycolytic inhibitors in the treatment of aggressive cancers.

  17. Progress in doping of ruthenium silicide (Ru2Si3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, C. B.; Allevato, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Ruthenium silicide is currently under development as a promising thermoelectric material suitable for space power applications. Key to realizing the potentially high figure of merit values of this material is the development of appropriate doping techniques. In this study, manganese and iridium have been identified as useful p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Resistivity values have been reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Anomalous Hall effect results, however, complicate interpretation of some of the results and further effort is required to achieve optimum doping levels.

  18. Ruthenium Behavior at Phase Separation of Borosilicate Glass-12259

    SciTech Connect

    Enokida, Youichi; Sawada, Kayo

    2012-07-01

    The Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP) located in Aomori, Japan, vitrifies high level waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass. The HLW is generated from the reprocessing of spent fuel and contains ruthenium (Ru) and other platinum group metals (PGMs). Based on the recent consequences after a huge earthquake that occurred in Japan, a hypothetical blackout was postulated for the RRP to address additional safety analysis requirements. During a prolonged blackout, the borosilicate glass could phase separate due to cooling of the glass in the melter. The Ru present in the glass matrix could migrate into separate phases and impact the durability of the borosilicate glass. The durability of the glass is important for quality assurance and performance assessment of the vitrified HLW. A fundamental study was performed at an independent university to understand the impact of a prolonged blackout. Simulated HLW glasses were prepared for the RRP, and the Ru behavior in phase separated glasses was studied. The simulated HLW glasses contained nonradioactive elements and PGMs. The glass compositions were then altered to enhance the formation of the phase-separated glasses when subjected to thermal treatment at 700 deg. C for 24 hours. The synthesized simulated glasses contained 1.1 % Ru by weight as ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}). A portion of the RuO{sub 2} formed needle-shaped crystals in the glass specimens. After the thermal treatment, the glass specimen had separated into two phases. One of the two phases was a B{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich phase, and the other phase was a SiO{sub 2} rich phase. The majority of the chemical species in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich phase was leached away with the Material Characterization Center-3 (MCC-3) protocol standardized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using an aqueous low-concentrated nitric acid solution, but the leaching of the Ru fraction was very limited; less than 1% of the original Ru content. The Ru leaching was much less than

  19. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  20. Chiral-auxiliary-mediated asymmetric synthesis of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Wenzel, Marianne; Meggers, Eric

    2013-11-19

    An octahedral metal complex with 6 different monodentate ligands can form 15 diastereomers as pairs of enantiomers. As a result, the elaborate stereochemistry of octahedral coordination geometries provides tremendous opportunities in the fields of catalysis, the materials sciences, and the life sciences. The demand for enantiomerically pure coordination complexes for tasks related to the selective molecular recognition of biomacromolecules led us to develop synthetic methods to control the absolute stereochemistry at octahedral metal centers. A few years ago our laboratory therefore embarked on a project exploring new and general synthetic strategies for the asymmetric synthesis of inert octahedral transition metal complexes. We initially used the example of thermally inert ruthenium polypyridyl complexes and developed a family of chiral bidentate ligands, including salicyloxazolines, (mercaptophenyl)oxazolines, sulfinylphenols, N-acetylsulfinamides, a phosphinohydroxybinaphthyl, and even the amino acid proline to serve as chiral auxiliaries for asymmetric coordination chemistry. All these chiral auxiliaries strongly coordinate to ruthenium(II) in a bidentate, deprotonated fashion, allowing them to control the absolute metal-centered configuration in the course of subsequent ligand exchange reactions. Finally, we can remove them from the metal without any loss of chiral information and without leaving a chemical trace. A key feature of these chiral auxiliary ligands is their switchable binding strength. A chelate effect ensures that the chiral ligands coordinate very tightly to the metal center, placing their carbon-based, sulfur-based, or axial chirality in a well-defined position close to the metal center to efficiently establish the absolute metal-centered configuration. At the same time a coordinating phenolate, carboximidate, carboxylate, or thiophenolate moiety makes the coordination reversible by weakening the binding strength through protonation or

  1. Progress in doping of ruthenium silicide (Ru2Si3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, C. B.; Allevato, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Ruthenium silicide is currently under development as a promising thermoelectric material suitable for space power applications. Key to realizing the potentially high figure of merit values of this material is the development of appropriate doping techniques. In this study, manganese and iridium have been identified as useful p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Resistivity values have been reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Anomalous Hall effect results, however, complicate interpretation of some of the results and further effort is required to achieve optimum doping levels.

  2. Thermal properties of ruthenium alkylidene-polymerized dicyclopentadiene

    PubMed Central

    Vidavsky, Yuval; Navon, Yotam; Ginzburg, Yakov; Gottlieb, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Summary Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of ring opening methatesis polymerization (ROMP) derived polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD) revealed an unexpected thermal behavior. A recurring exothermic signal can be observed in the DSC analysis after an elapsed time period. This exothermic signal was found to be proportional to the resting period and was accompanied by a constant increase in the glass-transition temperature. We hypothesize that a relaxation mechanism within the cross-linked scaffold, together with a long-lived stable ruthenium alkylidene species are responsible for the observed phenomenon. PMID:26425203

  3. First polymer "ruthenium-cyclopentadienyl" complex as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Valente, Andreia; Garcia, Maria Helena; Marques, Fernanda; Miao, Yong; Rousseau, Cyril; Zinck, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    d-glucose end-capped polylactide ruthenium cyclopentadienyl complex (RuPMC) was newly synthesized by a straightforward method. RuPMC was tested against human MCF7 and MDAMB231 breast and A2780 ovarian adenocarcinoma revealing IC50 values in the micromolar range. A pH dependent hydrolysis is advanced by preliminary UV-visible spectroscopy. Cellular distribution studies showed that RuPMC is predominantly found in the nucleus and in the membrane. Data suggest potential application of RuPMC as a new drug delivery system for Ru(II)Cp compounds. © 2013.

  4. Threading of Binuclear Ruthenium Complex Through DNA Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Westerlund, Fredrik; McCauley, Micah; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Due to steric constraints the dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex can only intercalate DNA by threading, which requires local melting of the DNA to occur. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to threading compared to bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different drug concentrations and holding a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. We can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturation. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics. In addition, we obtain the minimum binding site size, which may be determined by either electrostatic repulsion or steric constraints.

  5. Ruthenium-catalyzed selective monoamination of vicinal diols.

    PubMed

    Bähn, Sebastian; Tillack, Annegret; Imm, Sebastian; Mevius, Kathleen; Michalik, Dirk; Hollmann, Dirk; Neubert, Lorenz; Beller, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The monoamination of vicinal diols in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium catalysts has been investigated. Among the various phosphines tested in combination with [Ru(3)(CO)(12)], N-phenyl-2-(dicyclohexyl-phosphanyl)pyrrole showed the best performance. After optimization of the reaction conditions this system was applied to different secondary amines and anilines as well as a number of vicinal diols. With the exception of ethylene glycol, monoamination of the vicinal diols occurred selectively and the corresponding amino alcohols were obtained in good yields, producing water as the only side product.

  6. Microscopic Understanding of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Donna L.

    2014-10-01

    Total energy calculations and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) image simulations were conducted in an effort to interpret new experimental images of CO and H adsorbed on the closepacked surface of ruthenium metal. The images are remarkable in suggesting that the adsorbed species are intermixed, plausibly accounting for the superior catalytic activity of this metal in forming hydrocarbons. Insight was gained over the short duration of the project, but a more accurate method of simulating images will be required before contact between theory and experiment points to a final result.

  7. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  8. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings.

    PubMed

    Warner, R L; Huffaker, R C

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  9. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  10. Ruthenium Complexes: An Emerging Ground to the Development of Metallopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abid, Mohammad; Shamsi, Farheen; Azam, Amir

    2016-01-01

    GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million cancer-related deaths worldwide. Cancer is rapidly becoming a major public health concern in India as well, with the number of new cancer cases anticipated to double within the next 20 years. The percentage of currently approved metallodrugs is very low, in contrast to the majority of drugs available as organic compounds. The search for alternative drugs to cisplatin, carboplatin and other derivatives is highly needed due to their severe side effects including nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Ruthenium, among other transition metal complexes appears to be a possible candidate for cancer therapy in the near future. The most significant rationale is ruthenium's octahedral chemistry and greater propensity to undergo redox reactions. The hypoxic environment of tumors favors the reduction of inert ruthenium (III) to active ruthenium (II) which opens new prospects for the development of novel prodrugs. Although studies suggest that ruthenium complexes penetrate well within the tumor cells and bind effectively to DNA, its binding to proteins is not very well explained. Ruthenium complexes are presently receiving great attention in the fields of biological, pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry as anticancer agents. This review poses a comprehensive overview of the studies on competent anticancer ruthenium complexes and the role of these metal complexes in relation to their anticancer properties as well as those under clinical trials.

  11. Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ruthenium-Doped Diamond like Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, M. K.; Ueno, M.; Lian, G.; Dickey, E. C.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated metalorganic precursor deposition using a Microwave Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma for depositing metal-doped diamondlike carbon films. Specifically, the deposition of ruthenium doped diamondlike carbon films was investigated using the decomposition of a novel ruthenium precursor, Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)-ruthenium (Ru(C5H4C2H5)2). The ruthenium precursor was introduced close to the substrate stage. The substrate was independently biased using an applied RF power. Films were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Four Point Probe. The conductivity of the films deposited using ruthenium precursor showed strong dependency on the deposition parameters such as pressure. Ruthenium doped sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of approx. 3 nm while un-doped diamondlike carbon sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of 11 nm. TEM results showed that ruthenium was atomically dispersed within the amorphous carbon network in the films.

  12. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  13. Arene-ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrophilic P-donor ligands: versatile catalysts in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2014-09-07

    In the last few years there has been increasing interest in the use of water as a reaction medium for catalysis, and therefore in designing water-soluble transition-metal catalysts. Half-sandwich (η(6)-arene)-ruthenium(ii) complexes are a versatile and well-known family of ruthenium compounds that exhibit a rich catalytic and coordination chemistry. This Perspective article focuses on the catalytic applications in aqueous media of (η(6)-arene)-ruthenium(ii) complexes containing water-soluble phosphines, and related hydrophilic P-donor ligands.

  14. meta-C-H Bromination on Purine Bases by Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Warratz, Svenja; Burns, David J; Zhu, Cuiju; Korvorapun, Korkit; Rogge, Torben; Scholz, Julius; Jooss, Christian; Gelman, Dmitri; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-02-01

    Methods for positionally selective remote C-H functionalizations are in high demand. Herein, we disclose the first heterogeneous ruthenium catalyst for meta-selective C-H functionalizations, which enabled remote halogenations with excellent site selectivity and ample scope. The versatile heterogeneous Ru@SiO2 catalyst was broadly applicable and could be easily recovered and reused, which set the stage for the direct fluorescent labeling of purines. In contrast to palladium, rhodium, iridium, or cobalt complexes, solely the ruthenium catalysis manifold provided access to meta-halogenated purine derivatives, illustrating the unique power of ruthenium C-H activation catalysis.

  15. Amorphous thin film ruthenium oxide as an electrode material for electrochemical capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.; Zheng, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Ruthenium oxide thin films of an amorphous phase were successfully prepared on a titanium (Ti) substrate at temperatures below 160 C. The sol-gel process using metal alkoxide precursor in nonaqueous solvents was used to prepare these films. The preliminary results showed that a specific capacitance of 430 F/g can be achieved for amorphous ruthenium oxide electrode in sulfuric acid. Films prepared by this method are compared with the films prepared by the thermal decomposition of the aqueous ruthenium chloride solution at temperatures above 300 C. The specific capacitance, the crystalline structure, and the surface morphology of these films as a function of the preparation temperature were also discussed.

  16. Organometallic ruthenium(II) arene compounds with antiangiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; van Beijnum, Judy R; Casini, Angela; Nazarov, Alexey A; Wagnieres, Georges; van den Bergh, Hubert; Dyson, Paul J; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2011-06-09

    The antimetastatic ruthenium(II) compounds [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(2)(PTA)] (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) (RAPTA-C) and [Ru(η(6)-toluene)Cl(2)(PTA)] (RAPTA-T), as well as their analogues [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(2)(DAPTA)] (DAPTA = (3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane)) (DAPTA-C) and [Ru(η(6)-toluene)Cl(2)(DAPTA)] (DAPTA-T), respectively, were tested in in vitro bioassays for endothelial cell function. All compounds showed low toxicity profiles and similar dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in endothelial cells at ≥100 μg/mL (∼200 μM). EC migration, measured 6 h after drug exposure, was also efficiently inhibited (ED(50) of ∼300 μg/mL, ∼500 μM, for all compounds). Since no cytostatic effect was noted, the inhibition of proliferation was considered mainly to consist of antiangiogenic activity. RAPTA-T and DAPTA-C were also tested in vivo in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and found to inhibit CAM development. Importantly, effective prevention of revascularization of the CAM after vaso-occlusive photodynamic therapy was observed. The reported ruthenium complexes show promising antimetastatic activity involving inhibition of angiogenesis and therefore are attractive agents for development of anticancer therapies based on combination of chemo- and angiostatic treatments.

  17. Committee's report on ruthenium fall-out incident

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, C.J.; Crawford, J.H.; Livingston, R.; Ritchie, R.H.; Rupp, A.F.; Taylor, E.H.

    1983-07-01

    Investigations of the fall-out incident of November 11 and 12, 1959, by responsible parties (Health Physics Division and Operations Division personnel) established beyond reasonable doubt that the incident had its origin in the expulsion of particles, heavily contaminated with ruthenium, which had been detached from the walls of the electric fan housing and ducts in the off-gas system associated with the brick stack. All available evidence indicates that the particles were loosened during maintenance work on the exhaust damper and the bearings of the electric fan and were carried up the stack in two bursts as particulate fall-out when this fan was put back into service. Radiographic and chemical analysis showed the activity to be almost entirely ruthenium (Ru/sup 106/) and its daughter rhodium (Rh/sup 106/) with very little, if any, strontium being present. This report summarizes the findings and sets forth the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee asked to investigate the incident.

  18. Ruthenium: A superior compensator of InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, A.; Stenzel, O.; Näser, A.; Zafar Iqbal, M.; Bimberg, D.; Schumann, H.

    1998-12-01

    The 4d-transition metal ruthenium presents a new dopant to fabricate thermally stable semi-insulating InP layers for both electron and hole injection. The layers are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using tertiarybutylphosphine and trimethylindium as source materials for InP growth. Using bis(η5-2,4-dimethyl-pentadienyl)ruthenium(II) as precursor Ru doping concentrations of the order of 4×1018cm-3 are achieved, determined by means of secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The Ru diffusion coefficient in InP is determined to DRu(800 °C)⩽1×10-15 cm2/s which is four orders of magnitude smaller than for Fe. Resistivities obtained under electron and hole injection are above 6×107Ω cm and 5×108 Ω cm, respectively. In deep level transient spectroscopy measurements under electron emission and hole emission, one deep level each with concentrations around 1016 cm-3, is observed.

  19. Histochemical localization of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, K C; Duke, S O

    1981-01-01

    NADH-dependent nitrate reductase (E.C. 1.6.6.1) was ultrastructurally localized in norflurazon-treated and control soybean cotyledons [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] by a method based upon the increase in osmiophilia due to the formation of an azo dye. The reaction product was observed in small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. An apparent transport of nitrite to the plastid, the site of nitrite reduction, may occur through fusion of the nitrite-containing vesicles with the chloroplast envelope. Plants grown in tungstate lacked nitrate reductase activity as measured by standard assay procedures, and showed no increase in osmiophilia, suggesting a degree of specificity of this cytochemical procedure.

  20. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  1. Nitrate transport and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Anne; David, Laure C; Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Marmagne, Anne; Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Chaillou, Sylvain; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Meyer, Christian; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    Plants have developed adaptive responses allowing them to cope with nitrogen (N) fluctuation in the soil and maintain growth despite changes in external N availability. Nitrate is the most important N form in temperate soils. Nitrate uptake by roots and its transport at the whole-plant level involves a large panoply of transporters and impacts plant performance. Four families of nitrate-transporting proteins have been identified so far: nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF), nitrate transporter 2 family (NRT2), the chloride channel family (CLC), and slow anion channel-associated homologues (SLAC/SLAH). Nitrate transporters are also involved in the sensing of nitrate. It is now well established that plants are able to sense external nitrate availability, and hence that nitrate also acts as a signal molecule that regulates many aspects of plant intake, metabolism, and gene expression. This review will focus on a global picture of the nitrate transporters so far identified and the recent advances in the molecular knowledge of the so-called primary nitrate response, the rapid regulation of gene expression in response to nitrate. The recent discovery of the NIN-like proteins as master regulators for nitrate signalling has led to a new understanding of the regulation cascade.

  2. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  3. Platinum-ruthenium nanotubes and platinum-ruthenium coated copper nanowires as efficient catalysts for electro-oxidation of methanol

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Jie; Cullen, David A.; Forest, Robert V.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The sluggish kinetics of methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is a major barrier to the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In this study, we report a facile synthesis of platinum–ruthenium nanotubes (PtRuNTs) and platinum–ruthenium-coated copper nanowires (PtRu/CuNWs) by galvanic displacement reaction using copper nanowires as a template. The PtRu compositional effect on MOR is investigated; the optimum Pt/Ru bulk atomic ratio is about 4 and surface atomic ratio about 1 for both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs. Enhanced specific MOR activities are observed on both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs compared with the benchmark commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst (PtRu/C, Hispec 12100). Finally, x-raymore » photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals a larger extent of electron transfer from Ru to Pt on PtRu/CuNWs, which may lead to a modification of the d-band center of Pt and consequently a weaker bonding of CO (the poisoning intermediate) on Pt and a higher MOR activity on PtRu/CuNWs.« less

  4. Platinum-ruthenium nanotubes and platinum-ruthenium coated copper nanowires as efficient catalysts for electro-oxidation of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jie; Cullen, David A.; Forest, Robert V.; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Zheng, Whenchao; Chen, Jingguang G.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-15

    The sluggish kinetics of methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is a major barrier to the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In this study, we report a facile synthesis of platinum–ruthenium nanotubes (PtRuNTs) and platinum–ruthenium-coated copper nanowires (PtRu/CuNWs) by galvanic displacement reaction using copper nanowires as a template. The PtRu compositional effect on MOR is investigated; the optimum Pt/Ru bulk atomic ratio is about 4 and surface atomic ratio about 1 for both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs. Enhanced specific MOR activities are observed on both PtRuNTs and PtRu/CuNWs compared with the benchmark commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst (PtRu/C, Hispec 12100). Finally, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals a larger extent of electron transfer from Ru to Pt on PtRu/CuNWs, which may lead to a modification of the d-band center of Pt and consequently a weaker bonding of CO (the poisoning intermediate) on Pt and a higher MOR activity on PtRu/CuNWs.

  5. Preparation of olefins from synthesis gas using ruthenium supported on ceric oxide

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, R.

    1985-04-09

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  6. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

  7. Ruthenium carbonyl catalyst supported on ceric oxide for preparation of olefins from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, R.

    1985-04-02

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  8. Ruthenium carbonyl catalyst supported on ceric oxide for preparation of olefins from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  9. Preparation of olefins from synthesis gas using ruthenium supported on ceric oxide

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  10. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium alloys for use as a fuel cell catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    A noble metal alloy composition for a fuel cell catalyst, a ternary alloy composition containing platinum, ruthenium and palladium. The alloy shows increased activity as compared to well-known catalysts.

  11. Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Corbea, Javier Jesus Concepcion; Chen, Zoufeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L.; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

  12. Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Concepcion Corbea, Javier Jesus; Chen, Zuofeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-10-28

    The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

  13. Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Corbea, Javier Jesus Concepcion; Chen, Zuofeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L.; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2013-09-03

    The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

  14. Ruthenium complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives as a new class of apoptosis inducers.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng; Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie

    2012-01-28

    A series of ruthenium complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives have been synthesized and identified as able to target mitochondria and induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells through superoxide overproduction.

  15. Characterization of Palladium and Ruthenium after Reaction with Tetraphenylborate and Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.C.

    2001-09-11

    This report documents a second series of X-ray fine structure and chemical analyses to examine the form that Pd - and, to a lesser extent, ruthenium (Ru) - takes in simulated high-level slurries containing TPB salts.

  16. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  17. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  18. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  19. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... to best notify agents (AN Agents) when ammonium nitrate purchasers (AN Purchasers) submit those AN... directly to ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the...

  20. Inert Reassessment Document for Ammonium Nitrate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Magnesium nitrate is used in preservation. Other uses for magnesium nitrate include use as a catalyst in the manufacture of petrochemicals, as a densensitizer for lithographic plates and in pyrotechnics.

  1. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  2. Ruthenium on rutile catalyst, catalytic system, and method for aqueous phase hydrogenations

    DOEpatents

    Elliot, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2001-01-01

    An essentially nickel- and rhenium-free catalyst is described comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile. A catalytic system containing a nickel-free catalyst comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile, and a method using this catalyst in the hydrogenation of an organic compound in the aqueous phase is also described.

  3. 2-Nitroimidazole-ruthenium polypyridyl complex as a new conjugate for cancer treatment and visualization.

    PubMed

    Mazuryk, Olga; Maciuszek, Monika; Stochel, Grażyna; Suzenet, Franck; Brindell, Małgorzata

    2014-05-01

    A novel long-lifetime highly luminescent ruthenium polypyridyl complex containing 2-nitroimidazole moiety [Ru(dip)2(bpy-2-nitroIm)]Cl2 (dip=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, bpy-2-nitroIm=4-[3-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl]-2,2'-bipyridine) has been designed cancer treatment and imaging. The luminescence properties of the synthesized compound strongly depend on the oxygen concentration. Under oxygen-free conditions quantum yield of luminescence and the average lifetime of emission were found to be 0.034 and 1.9 μs, respectively, which is ca. three times higher in comparison to values obtained in air-equilibrated solution. The binding properties of the investigated ruthenium complex to human serum albumin have been studied and the apparent binding constant for the formation of the protein-ruthenium adduct was determined to be 1.1×10(5)M(-1). The quantum yield and the average lifetime of emission are greatly enhanced upon binding of ruthenium compound to the protein. The DNA binding studies revealed two distinguished binding modes which lead to a decrease in luminescence intensity of ruthenium complex up to 60% for [DNA]/[Ru]<2, and enhancement of emission for [DNA]/[Ru]>80. Preliminary biological studies confirmed fast and efficient accumulation of the ruthenium complex inside cells. Furthermore, the ruthenium complex was found to be relatively cytotoxic with LD50 of 12 and 13 μM for A549 and CT26 cell lines, respectively, under normoxic conditions. The retention and cellular uptake of ruthenium complex is enhanced under hypoxic conditions and its LD50 decreases to 8 μM for A549 cell line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  5. Stereoselective, Dual-Mode Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ring-Expansion of Alkynylcyclopropanols

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Xie, Jia; Maulide, Nuno

    2009-01-01

    A novel, dual-pathway ring-expansion of alkynylcyclopropanols is described. On treatment with a ruthenium catalyst, these compounds undergo highly selective enlargement to either (Z)-alkylidene cyclobutanones or β-substituted cyclopentenones. The unique ability to access the least selective double bond isomers of alkylidene cyclobutanones and the dramatic shift of reactivity observed further illustrate the particular intricacies of ruthenium catalysis when compared to other alkynophilic transition metals. PMID:19053484

  6. The synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of some alkyne, vinylidene, and butatrienylidene complexes of ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Lomprey, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Cumulene complexes of ruthenium were studied in regard to their preparation, characterization, and reactivity. This work is divided into two parts: first, a study of the alkyne to vinylidene isomerization on a ruthenium (II) center, and second the study of the synthesis of metal butatrienylidene complexes. The isomeric C[sub 2]H[sub 2] complexes [Ru([eta][sup 2]-HC[triple bond]CH) (PMe[sub 2]-Ph)[sub 2] (Cp)] [BF[sub 4

  7. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  8. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high nitrate supplement, but not by high nitrate foods in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gary D.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Dove, Robin W.; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/NO (nitric oxide) cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs. high nitrate diet, with and without a high nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics, and blood pressure using a randomized four period cross-over controlled design. We hypothesized that the high nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and blood pressure compared to the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were eight normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5±4.7 yrs) with no overt disease or medications that affect NO metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured prior to and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet+supplement (p<0.001 and =0.017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high nitrate diet+supplement (p=0.001 and 0.002), but not for control diet (p=0.713 and 0.741) or high nitrate diet (p=0.852 and 0.500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2 hr post-meal follow-up time-points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  9. Photochemical generation and kinetic studies of a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Vanover, Eric; Luo, Weilong; Newcomb, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Photo-disproportionation of a bis-porphyrin-diruthenium(IV) μ-oxo dimer gave a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) species and a putative poprhyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species that can be detected and studied in real time via laser flash photolysis methods. As determined by its spectral and kinetic behavior, the same oxo transient was also formed by photolysis of a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) N-oxide adduct. Second-order rate constants for reactions with several substrates at 22 °C were determined; representative values of rate constants were kox = 6.6 × 103 M−1 s−1 for diphenylmethanol, kox = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1 for styrene, and kox = 1.8 × 103 M−1 s−1 for cyclohexene. The putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo transient reacted 5–6 orders of magnitude faster than the corresponding trans-dioxoruthenium(VI)-oxo porphyrins, and the rate constants obtained in this work were similar to those of corrole-iron(V)-oxo derivative. The high reactivity for the photochemically generated ruthenium-oxo species in comparison to other poprhyrin-metal-oxo intermediates suggests it is a true ruthenium(V)-oxo species. PMID:24770388

  10. Phosphorescent ruthenium complexes with a nitroimidazole unit that image oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Son, Aoi; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Hara, Daiki; Ito, Takeo; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2015-02-02

    Understanding oxygen fluctuation in a cancerous tumor is important for effective treatment, especially during radiotherapy. In this paper, ruthenium complexes bearing a nitroimidazole group are shown to report the oxygen status in tumor tissue directly. The nitroimidazole group was known to be accumulated in hypoxic tumor tissues. On the other hand, the ruthenium complex showed strong phosphorescence around 600 nm. The emission of ruthenium is quenched instantaneously by molecular oxygen due to energy transfer between triplet states of oxygen and ruthenium complex, but the emission is then recovered by the removal of oxygen. Thus, we could observe oxygen fluctuation in tumor tissue in a real-time manner by monitoring the phosphorescence of the ruthenium complex. The versatility of the probe is demonstrated by monitoring oxygen fluctuation in living cells and tumor tissue planted in mice. The ruthenium complex promptly penetrated plasma membrane and accumulated in cells to emit its oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. In vivo experiments revealed that the oxygen level in tumor tissue seems to fluctuate at the sub-minute timescale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Photochemical generation and kinetic studies of a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Vanover, Eric; Luo, Weilong; Newcomb, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Photo-disproportionation of a bis-porphyrin-diruthenium(IV) μ-oxo dimer gave a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) species and a putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo species that can be detected and studied in real time via laser flash photolysis methods. As determined by its spectral and kinetic behavior, the same oxo transient was also formed by photolysis of a porphyrin-ruthenium(III) N-oxide adduct. Second-order rate constants for reactions with several substrates at 22 °C were determined; representative values of rate constants were kox = 6.6 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for diphenylmethanol, kox = 2.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for styrene, and kox = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for cyclohexene. The putative porphyrin-ruthenium(V)-oxo transient reacted 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than the corresponding trans-dioxoruthenium(VI) porphyrins, and the rate constants obtained in this work were similar to those of the corrole-iron(V)-oxo derivative. The high reactivity for the photochemically generated ruthenium-oxo species in comparison to other porphyrin-metal-oxo intermediates suggests that it is a true ruthenium(V)-oxo species.

  12. A New Homogeneous Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine Borane Starting with Ruthenium(III) Acetylacetonate

    PubMed Central

    Ünel Barın, Ebru; Masjedi, Mehdi; Özkar, Saim

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate was investigated for the first time in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane. During catalytic reaction, a new ruthenium(II) species is formed in situ from the reduction of ruthenium(III) and characterized using UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The most likely structure suggested for the ruthenium(II) species is mer-[Ru(N2Me4)3(acac)H]. Mercury poisoning experiment indicates that the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane is homogeneous catalysis. The kinetics of the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane starting with Ru(acac)3 were studied depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration and temperature. The hydrogen generation was found to be first-order with respect to catalyst concentration and zero-order regarding the substrate concentration. Evaluation of the kinetic data provides the activation parameters for the dehydrogenation reaction: the activation energy Ea = 85 ± 2 kJ·mol−1, the enthalpy of activation ∆H# = 82 ± 2 kJ·mol−1 and the entropy of activation; ∆S# = −85 ± 5 J·mol−1·K−1. The ruthenium(II) catalyst formed from the reduction of ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate provides 1700 turnovers over 100 hours in hydrogen generation from the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane before deactivation at 60 °C.

  13. Corrosion Investigations of Ruthenium in Potassium Periodate Solutions Relevant for Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Jinshan; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium is the most promising material for the barrier layer used for the sub 14 nm technology node in integrated circuits manufacturing. Potassium periodate (KIO4)-based slurry is used in the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process of the barrier layer. However, the electrochemical and corrosion properties of ruthenium have not been investigated in such slurry. In this paper, the electrochemical and corrosion behaviors of ruthenium in KIO4 solutions were investigated under static conditions but at different pH values by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, combined with surface chemical analysis using auger electron spectroscopy. Moreover, to study wear enhanced corrosion during CMP, tribocorrosion experiments were carried out to monitor the current density changes during and after mechanical scratching. The results show that at pH 6, ruthenium forms a relatively thick and heterogeneous surface film composed of RuO2·2H2O/RuO3, showing a high corrosion resistance and it exhibits a quick repassivation after mechanical scratching. At pH 4, ruthenium shows a passivation behavior with formation of a uniform and conductive oxide like RuO2·2H2O. It should be noted that there is a possible formation of RuO4 toxic gas under this condition, which should be avoided in the actual production. However, at pH 11, ruthenium exhibits no considerable passivity and the corrosion proceeds uniformly.

  14. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  15. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  16. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  17. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used...

  18. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used...

  19. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing...

  20. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of cod...

  1. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used...

  2. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with the...

  3. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  4. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  5. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  6. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  7. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  8. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  9. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  10. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  11. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  12. Anticancer Activity and Modes of Action of (arene) ruthenium(II) Complexes Coordinated to C-, N-, and O-ligands.

    PubMed

    Biersack, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    An overview of anticancer active (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes coordinated to period 2 element-based ligand systems, i.e., carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-coordinated ligands, is provided in this mini-review. A bridge is forged from the large group of anticancer active ruthenium compounds with monodentate and chelating nitrogen ligands via complexes of O,O-chelating ligands to organometallic ruthenium derivatives coordinated to carbon. (Arene)ruthenium(II) complexes with reduced side-effects and enhanced efficacy against cancer are highlighted. Pertinent literature is covered up to 2014.

  13. A selective, long-lived deep-red emissive ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes for the detection of BSA.

    PubMed

    Babu, Eththilu; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Singaravadivel, Subramanian; Bhuvaneswari, Jayaraman; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2014-09-15

    A selective, label free luminescence sensor for bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated using ruthenium(II) complexes over the other proteins. Interaction between BSA and ruthenium(II) complexes has been studied using absorption, emission, excited state lifetime and circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. The luminescence intensity of ruthenium(II) complexes (I and II), has enhanced at 602 and 613 nm with a large hypsochromic shift of 18 and 5 nm respectively upon addition of BSA. The mode of binding of ruthenium(II) complexes with BSA has analyzed using computational docking studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Decomposition and Stability Studies of TAGN (Triaminoguanidium Nitrate)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    and atomic absorption spectroscopy . TAGN (Triaminoquanidinium Nitrate), DAGN (Diaminoquanidinium Nitrate), Thermal analysis, Mass Spectroscopy, RDX (Trinitrotriazacyclohexane), Decomposition chemistry.

  15. A ruthenium water oxidation catalyst containing a bipyridine glycoluril ligand.

    PubMed

    Mane, Vishwanath S; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Thummel, Randolph P

    2017-10-03

    A mononuclear ruthenium complex [Ru(tpy)(bpg)H2O](2+) bearing a bipyridine glycoluril where bpg = 4b,5,7,7a-tetrahydro-4b,7a-nepiminomethanoimino-6H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthro-line-6,13-dione acts as a robust water oxidation catalyst (WOC) at pH = 1 using Ce(iv) as a sacrificial oxidant. The turn over number (TON) for water oxidation is found to be ∼5 times higher than the parent complex [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H2O](2+) where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine. The presence of intermolecular H-bonding groups and the electronic effect of the functionalized bipyridine ligand may play a significant role in water oxidation.

  16. Catalytic determination of ultratrace amounts of ruthenium with oscillopolarography monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhi-Liang; Wang Li-Sheng )

    1993-09-01

    The single sweep oscillopolarographic behaviour of Rhodamine B in sulphuric acid medium was investigated. A novel, sensitive and selective catalytic method with oscillopolarography monitoring for the determination of ultratrace amounts of ruthenium was described, based on the catalytic effect of Ru(III) on the slow redox reaction occurring between Rhodamine B and potassium periodate in sulphuric acid medium at 25[degrees]C. Single sweep oscillopolarography is used to monitor the changes in concentration of Rhodamine B by means of the second derivative wave [minus]0.55 V vs. SCE. The determination range from 8.2x10[sup [minus]10] to 2.5x10[sup [minus]8] M Ru was obtained by the initial rate procedure. Influence of 30 foreign ions was considered. Ru in ore samples was analysed by this method, with satisfactory results.

  17. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  18. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and anticancer activity of ruthenium-pyrazole complexes.

    PubMed

    David, Solene; Perkins, Richard S; Fronczek, Frank R; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S; Srivastava, Radhey S

    2012-06-01

    A series of new water soluble Ru(III) pyrazole complexes mer-[RuCl(3)(DMSO-S)(pyz)(2)] 1, mer-[RuCl(3)(DMSO-S)(DMSO-O)(pyz)] 2, mer-[RuCl(3)(bpy)(dmpyz)] 3, and mer-[RuCl(3)(DMSO-S)(dmpyz)(2)] 4 (pyz=pyrazole; dmpyz=3,5-dimethylpyrazole, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by use of a combination of spectroscopy (IR and UV-visible), X-ray diffraction, and cyclic voltammetry. The molecular X-ray structure of all reported compounds (1-4) revealed distorted octahedral coordination around ruthenium. The cytotoxicity assay on human breast cancer cells (MCF7) demonstrated that compounds 1 and 4 affect cell viability, whereas compounds 2 and 3 do not show appreciable activity. The IC(50) values for 1 and 4 lie within the range of 71-32μM in MCF7 cells.

  20. Similar Biological Activities of Two Isostructural Ruthenium and Osmium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska,J.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Smalley, K.; Carroll, P.; Webster, R.; Filippakopoulos, P.; Knapp, S.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we probe and verify the concept of designing unreactive bioactive metal complexes, in which the metal possesses a purely structural function, by investigating the consequences of replacing ruthenium in a bioactive half-sandwich kinase inhibitor scaffold by its heavier congener osmium. The two isostructural complexes are compared with respect to their anticancer properties in 1205?Lu melanoma cells, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, IC50 values against the protein kinases GSK-3? and Pim-1, and binding modes to the protein kinase Pim-1 by protein crystallography. It was found that the two congeners display almost indistinguishable biological activities, which can be explained by their nearly identical three-dimensional structures and their identical mode of action as protein kinase inhibitors. This is a unique example in which the replacement of a metal in an anticancer scaffold by its heavier homologue does not alter its biological activity.

  1. Modulating the Anticancer Activity of Ruthenium(II)-Arene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Catherine M; Păunescu, Emilia; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Griffioen, Arjan W; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-04-23

    Following the identification of [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate)], a ruthenium(II)-arene complex with a perfluoroalkyl-modified ligand that displays remarkable in vitro cancer cell selectivity, a series of structurally related compounds were designed. In the new derivatives, the p-cymene ring and/or the chloride ligands are substituted by other ligands to modulate the steric bulk or aquation kinetics. The new compounds were evaluated in both in vitro (cytotoxicity and migration assays) and in vivo (chicken chorioallantoic membrane) models and were found to exhibit potent antivascular effects.

  2. Thermal conductivity of ruthenium aluminide (RuAl)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.A.; Lang, C.I.

    1998-01-06

    Ruthenium aluminide (RuAl) is an intermetallic compound which exhibits strength at high temperatures together with attractive room temperature toughness. This combination of properties makes it a promising material for use at higher temperatures than currently possible with conventional titanium and nickel based alloys. Although high temperature applications will demand a knowledge and understanding of the thermal properties of RuAl, no such information is available in the scientific literature. In this paper, measurements of the thermal conductivity of RuAl are reported for the first time. Although the electrical properties of RuAl have previously been investigated, further electrical resistivity measurements have been made, using the same samples used to measure thermal conductivity. This allows a direct, meaningful comparison of electrical and thermal conductivity data, offering insights into the thermal transport mechanisms in RuAl. Microstructure is shown to have a significant influence on thermal and electrical properties.

  3. Catalytic determination of ultratrace amounts of ruthenium with oscillopolarographic detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Liang, J

    1991-06-01

    The oscillopolarographic behaviour of Methyl Red in sodium hydroxide medium has been studied, and the results show that the wave at -0.79 V is an irreversible two-electron adsorption wave. A very sensitive and selective catalytic reaction-oscillopolarographic method for the determination of Ru down to 3 ng/l. is described, based on the Ru(III)-catalysed redox reaction of Methyl Red and potassium periodate in hydrochloric acid medium. Potassium thiocyanate is used to quench the reaction and the oscillopolarography is then performed with sodium hydroxide as the supporting electrolyte. The influence of 41 foreign ions has been examined. Ruthenium in ore samples has been determined by the method, with satisfactory results.

  4. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  5. Nitrated fatty acids: Synthesis and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis, sample extraction from complex biological matrices, and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by LC-MS. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed. PMID:23200809

  6. Nitrated fatty acids: synthesis and measurement.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Steven R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia/reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis and sample extraction from complex biological matrices and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed.

  7. Pollution of drinking water with nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Cabel, B.; Kozicki, R.; Lahl, U.; Podbielshi, A.; Stachel, B.; Struss, S.

    1982-01-01

    The main sources of nitrate in man are food and drinking water. The legislature in West Germany intends to lower the permitted level of nitrate in drinking water from the present 90 mg/l to 50 mg/l in 1982. The European Community has issued a directive that recommends a level of only 25 mg/l, and for babies 10 mg/l nitrate should not be exceeded. At present, nitrate cannot be removed from raw water at an acceptable cost. The problem of high nitrate content is mainly one of drinking water generation from ground water. Several analyses indicate rising concentrations of nitrate in ground water in different regions of West Germany, especially in the last few years. The following sources of nitrate-contamination of ground water aquifers in West are discussed: natural sources; over-manuring of agricultural areas with natural organic fertilizers; over-manuring of agricultural areas with synthetic fertilizers.

  8. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate uptake has been studied in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. When these cells are incubated in the presence of nitrate, this ion is quickly taken up from the medium, and nitrite is excreted by the cells. Nitrite is excreted following classical saturation kinetics, its rate being independent of nitrate concentration in the incubation medium for nitrate concentration values higher than 3 micromolar. Nitrate uptake shows mixed-transfer kinetics, which can be attributed to the simultaneous contributions of mediated and diffusion transfer. Cycloheximide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibit the carrier-mediated contribution to nitrate uptake, without affecting the diffusion component. When cells are preincubated with nitrate, the net nitrogen uptake is increased. PMID:16660652

  9. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which have been proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The salt composition of greatest interest is drawsalt, nominally a 50-50 molar mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3 with a melting point of 220 C. Several technical uncertainties have been identified that must be resolved before nitrate based solar plants can be commercialized. Research programs at Sandia National Laboratories, universities, and industrial suppliers have been implemented to resolve these technical uncertainties. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications such as the repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration program are presented.

  10. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  11. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  12. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  13. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  14. Molten nitrate salt materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. M.

    1981-03-01

    An overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program is presented. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which were proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications are presented.

  15. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  16. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH{sub 3}, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250{degree}C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs < 4 as HNO{sub 3} or NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO{sub 3} to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions.

  17. Sol-gel synthesis of hydrous ruthenium oxide nanonetworks from 1,2-epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Jeremy; Bruce King, R.; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2007-08-15

    Hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O) xerogels were synthesized through the addition of a 1,2-epoxide, propylene oxide, to commercial hydrated ruthenium chloride, 'RuCl{sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O,' in ethanol. After a blue-black monolithic gel formed in 4 h, the samples were allowed to age for 24 h and were dried in ambient conditions. The dried samples were then characterized by XPS, XRD, DTA and TGA. XPS showed the Ru(3d{sub 5/2}) peak at a binding energy of 281.7 eV, corresponding to that of hydrous ruthenium oxide. XRD data revealed the synthesized material as amorphous. Heating the sample in inert atmospheres caused the complete reduction of the oxide to the zero-valent state, whereas heating the sample in air resulted in both crystalline anhydrous RuO{sub 2} and zero-valent ruthenium, depending on the method of heating. DTA traces showed an endotherm ending at 150 deg. C, corresponding to the loss of coordinated water, as well as two higher temperature crystallization exotherms when the sample was heated in both inert and oxygen-rich atmospheres. TGA runs also confirmed the complete reduction of the hydrous oxide when heated in nitrogen below 270 deg. C and the formation of anhydrous ruthenium oxide when heated in air, confirming the XRD results. - Graphical abstract: Heating of hydrous ruthenium oxide, RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O, under an inert atmosphere, results in its complete reduction to the zero-valent state, whereas heating it in air results in both crystalline anhydrous RuO{sub 2} and zero-valent ruthenium, depending on the method of heating.

  18. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co–Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  19. Structural basis and anticancer properties of ruthenium-based drug complexed with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Ho, Andy; Yue, Jiping; Kong, Linlin; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2014-10-30

    Ruthenium-based anticancer complexes have become increasingly popular for study over the last two decades. Although ruthenium complexes are currently being investigated in clinical trials, there are still some difficulties with their delivery and associated side effects. Human serum albumin (HSA)-based delivery systems are promising for improving anticancer drug targeting and reducing negative side effects. However, there have been few studies regarding the HSA delivery system for metal-based anticancer compounds and no mention of its structural mechanism. Therefore, we studied the structure and anticancer properties of the ruthenium-based compound [RuCl5(ind)](2-) in complex with HSA. The structure revealed that [RuCl5(ind)](2-) has two binding sites in HSA. In the IB subdomain, [RuCl5(ind)](2-) binds to a new sub-site by coordinating with His-146. In the IIA subdomain, ruthenium (III) of [RuCl5(ind)](2-) binds to the hydrophobic cavity and forms coordination bonds by replacing chlorine atoms with the His-242 and Lys-199 residues of HSA. Interestingly, [RuCl5(ind)](2-), together with HSA, can enhance cytotoxicity by two to five times in cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells in vitro. Compared with unbound drug, the HSA-[RuCl5(ind)](2-) complex promotes MGC-803 cell apoptosis and also has a stronger capacity for cell cycle arrest at the G2 phase in MGC-803. In conclusion, this study will guide the rational design and development of ruthenium-containing or ruthenium-centered drugs and an HSA delivery system for ruthenium-based drugs.

  20. Development of a stable cobalt-ruthenium Fisher-Tropsch catalyst. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1995-02-01

    The reverse micelle catalyst preparation method has been used to prepare catalysts on four supports: magnesium oxide, carbon, alumina- titania and steamed Y zeolite. These catalysts were not as active as a reference catalyst prepared during previous contracts to Union Carbide Corp. This catalyst was supported on steamed Y zerolite support and was impregnated by a pore-filling method using a nonaqueous solvent. Additional catalysts were prepared via pore- filling impregnation of steamed Y zeolites. These catalysts had levels of cobalt two to three and a half times as high as the original Union Carbide catalyst. On a catalyst volume basis they were much more active than the previous catalyst; on an atom by atom basis the cobalt was about of the same activity, i.e., the high cobalt catalysts` cobalt atoms were not extensively covered over and deactivated by other cobalt atoms. The new, high activity, Y zerolite catalysts were not as stable as the earlier Union Carbide catalyst. However, stability enhancement of these catalysts should be possible, for instance, through adjustment of the quantity and/or type of trace metals present. A primary objective of this work was determination whether small amounts of ruthenium could enhance the activity of the cobalt F-T catalyst. The reverse micelle catalysts were not activated by ruthenium, indeed scanning transmission electronic microscopy (STEM) analysis provided some evidence that ruthenium was not present in the cobalt crystallites. Ruthenium did not seem to activate the high cobalt Y zeolite catalyst either, but additional experiments with Y zeolite-supported catalysts are required. Should ruthenium prove not to be an effective promoter under the simple catalyst activation procedure used in this work, more complex activation procedures have been reported which are claimed to enhance the cobalt/ruthenium interaction and result in activity promotion by ruthenium.

  1. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co-Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  2. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Zhou, F. Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are <1%, much lower than 5%, the safe value for biomaterials according to ISO 10993-4 standard. Compared with conventional biomedical 316L stainless steel, Co–Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1–1.29 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  3. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  4. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  5. Skeletal muscle as an endogenous nitrate reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Piknova, Barbora; Park, Ji Won; Swanson, Kathryn M.; Dey, Soumyadeep; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family of enzymes form nitric oxide (NO) from arginine in the presence of oxygen. At reduced oxygen availability NO is also generated from nitrate in a two step process by bacterial and mammalian molybdopterin proteins, and also directly from nitrite by a variety of five-coordinated ferrous hemoproteins. The mammalian NO cycle also involves direct oxidation of NO to nitrite, and both NO and nitrite to nitrate by oxy-ferrous hemoproteins. The liver and blood are considered the sites of active mammalian NO metabolism and nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the liver and blood of several mammalian species, including human, have been determined. However, the large tissue mass of skeletal muscle had not been generally considered in the analysis of the NO cycle, in spite of its long-known presence of significant levels of active neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS1). We hypothesized that skeletal muscle participates in the NO cycle and, due to its NO oxidizing heme protein, oxymyoglobin, has high concentrations of nitrate ions. We measured nitrite and nitrate concentrations in rat and mouse leg skeletal muscle and found unusually high concentrations of nitrate but similar levels of nitrite, when compared to the liver. The nitrate reservoir in muscle is easily accessible via the bloodstream and therefore nitrate is available for transport to internal organs where it can be reduced to nitrite and NO. Nitrate levels in skeletal muscle and blood in nNOS−/− mice were dramatically lower when compared with controls, which support further our hypothesis. Although the nitrate reductase activity of xanthine oxidoreductase in muscle is less than that of liver, the residual activity in muscle could be very important in view of its total mass and the high basal level of nitrate. We suggest that skeletal muscle participates in overall NO metabolism, serving as a nitrate reservoir, for direct formation of nitrite and NO, and for determining levels of nitrate

  6. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  7. Syntheses and Characterization of Ruthenium(II) Tetrakis(pyridine)complexes: An Advanced Coordination Chemistry Experiment or Mini-Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Benjamin J.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for third-year undergraduate a student is designed which provides synthetic experience and qualitative interpretation of the spectroscopic properties of the ruthenium complexes. It involves the syntheses and characterization of several coordination complexes of ruthenium, the element found directly beneath iron in the middle of the…

  8. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  9. Syntheses and Characterization of Ruthenium(II) Tetrakis(pyridine)complexes: An Advanced Coordination Chemistry Experiment or Mini-Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Benjamin J.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for third-year undergraduate a student is designed which provides synthetic experience and qualitative interpretation of the spectroscopic properties of the ruthenium complexes. It involves the syntheses and characterization of several coordination complexes of ruthenium, the element found directly beneath iron in the middle of the…

  10. Directional photoinduced electron transfer in paraquat silicate thin films containing entrapped ruthenium(II)-tris(bathophenanthroline-disulfonate).

    PubMed

    Trammell, Scott A; Tsoi, Stanislav; Martin, Brett; Melde, Brian J; Moore, Martin M; Dressick, Walter J

    2011-10-28

    We have demonstrated directional photoinduced electron transfer in paraquat silicate thin films containing entrapped ruthenium(II)-tris(bathophenanthroline-disulfonate (RuBPS). The films were made by electrochemically-induced hydrolysis of a silane analogue of paraquat with ruthenium(II)-tris(bathophenanthroline-disulfonate as its ion pair.

  11. Sol gel synthesis of hydrous ruthenium oxide nanonetworks from 1,2-epoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jeremy; Bruce King, R.; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2007-08-01

    Hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO 2· xH 2O) xerogels were synthesized through the addition of a 1,2-epoxide, propylene oxide, to commercial hydrated ruthenium chloride, "RuCl 3· xH 2O," in ethanol. After a blue-black monolithic gel formed in 4 h, the samples were allowed to age for 24 h and were dried in ambient conditions. The dried samples were then characterized by XPS, XRD, DTA and TGA. XPS showed the Ru(3 d5/2) peak at a binding energy of 281.7 eV, corresponding to that of hydrous ruthenium oxide. XRD data revealed the synthesized material as amorphous. Heating the sample in inert atmospheres caused the complete reduction of the oxide to the zero-valent state, whereas heating the sample in air resulted in both crystalline anhydrous RuO 2 and zero-valent ruthenium, depending on the method of heating. DTA traces showed an endotherm ending at 150 °C, corresponding to the loss of coordinated water, as well as two higher temperature crystallization exotherms when the sample was heated in both inert and oxygen-rich atmospheres. TGA runs also confirmed the complete reduction of the hydrous oxide when heated in nitrogen below 270 °C and the formation of anhydrous ruthenium oxide when heated in air, confirming the XRD results.

  12. Metal-metal interactions in linear tri-, penta-, hepta-, and nona-nuclear ruthenium string complexes.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Mika; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2012-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methodology was used to examine the structural properties of linear metal string complexes: [Ru(3)(dpa)(4)X(2)] (X = Cl(-), CN(-), NCS(-), dpa = dipyridylamine(-)), [Ru(5)(tpda)(4)Cl(2)], and hypothetical, not yet synthesized complexes [Ru(7)(tpta)(4)Cl(2)] and [Ru(9)(ppta)(4)Cl(2)] (tpda = tri-α-pyridyldiamine(2-), tpta = tetra-α-pyridyltriamine(3-), ppta = penta-α-pyridyltetraamine(4-)). Our specific focus was on the two longest structures and on comparison of the string complexes and unsupported ruthenium backboned chain complexes, which have weaker ruthenium-ruthenium interactions. The electronic structures were studied with the aid of visualized frontier molecular orbitals, and Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was used to study the interactions between ruthenium atoms. The electron density was found to be highest and distributed most evenly between the ruthenium atoms in the hypothetical [Ru(7)(tpta)(4)Cl(2)] and [Ru(9)(ppta)(4)Cl(2)] string complexes.

  13. Transient Spectroscopic Characterization of the Genesis of a Ruthenium Complex Catalyst Supported on Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Isao; Gates, Bruce C.

    2010-01-12

    A mononuclear ruthenium complex anchored to dealuminated zeolite HY, Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sup 2+} (acac = acetylacetonate, C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sup 2}{sup -}), was characterized in flow reactors by transient infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Ru K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The combined results show how the supported complex was converted into a form that catalyzes ethene conversion to butene. The formation of these species resulted from the removal of acac ligands from the ruthenium (as shown by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra) and the simultaneous decrease in the symmetry of the ruthenium complex, with the ruthenium remaining mononuclear and its oxidation state remaining essentially unchanged (as shown by EXAFS and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra). The removal of anionic acac ligands from the ruthenium was evidently compensated by the bonding of other anionic ligands, such as hydride from H2 in the feed stream, to form species suggested to be Ru(H)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +}, which is coordinatively unsaturated and inferred to react with ethene, leading to the observed formation of butene in a catalytic process.

  14. Use of Ruthenium Photoreduction Techniques to Study Electron Transfer in Cytochrome Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Ruthenium photoreduction methods are described to study electron transfer from cytochrome c to cytochrome c oxidase, and within cytochrome oxidase. Methods are described to prepare a ruthenium cytochrome c derivative, Ru-39-Cc, by labeling the single sufhydryl group on horse K39C with (4-bromomethyl-4′methylbipyridine) (bis-bipyridine)ruthenium(II). The ruthenium complex attached to Cys-39 on the opposite side of the heme crevice does not interfere with the interaction with cytochrome oxidase. Laser flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between Ru-39-Cc and bovine cytochrome oxidase results in photoreduction of heme c within 1 μs, followed by electron transfer from heme c to CuA in cytochrome oxidase with a rate constant of 60,000 s−1 and from CuA to heme a with a rate constant of 20,000 s−1. A new ruthenium dimer, Ru2Z, has been developed to reduce CuA within 1 μs with a yield of 60%, followed by electron transfer from CuA to heme a and then to the heme a3/CuB binuclear center. Methods are described to measure the single-electron reduction of each of the intermediates involved in reduction of oxygen to water by cytochrome oxidase, including Pm, F, OH, and E. PMID:19348907

  15. Band Offsets of a Ruthenium Gate on Ultrathin High-k Oxide Films on Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan, S.; Bersch, W; Bartynski, R; Garfunkel, E; Vescovo, E

    2009-01-01

    Valence-band and conduction-band edges of ultrathin oxides and their shifts upon sequential metallization with ruthenium have been measured using synchrotron-radiation-excited x-ray, ultraviolet, and inverse photoemissions. From these techniques, the offsets between the valence-band and conduction-band edges of the oxides, and the ruthenium metal gate Fermi edge have been directly measured. In addition the core levels of the oxides and the ruthenium have been characterized. Upon deposition, Ru remains metallic and no chemical alteration of the underlying oxide gates, or interfacial SiO{sub 2} in the case of the high-? thin films, can be detected. However a clear shift of the band edges is measured for all samples due to the creation of an interface dipole at the ruthenium-oxide interface. Using the energy gap, the electron affinity of the oxides, and the ruthenium work function that have been directly measured on these samples, the experimental band offsets are compared to those predicted by the induced gap states model.

  16. Ligand Engineering for the Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Ruthenium Sensitizers and Cobalt Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Aghazada, Sadig; Gao, Peng; Yella, Aswani; Marotta, Gabriele; Moehl, Thomas; Teuscher, Joël; Moser, Jacques-E; De Angelis, Filippo; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-07-05

    Over the past 20 years, ruthenium(II)-based dyes have played a pivotal role in turning dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) into a mature technology for the third generation of photovoltaics. However, the classic I3(-)/I(-) redox couple limits the performance and application of this technique. Simply replacing the iodine-based redox couple by new types like cobalt(3+/2+) complexes was not successful because of the poor compatibility between the ruthenium(II) sensitizer and the cobalt redox species. To address this problem and achieve higher power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), we introduce here six new cyclometalated ruthenium(II)-based dyes developed through ligand engineering. We tested DSCs employing these ruthenium(II) complexes and achieved PCEs of up to 9.4% using cobalt(3+/2+)-based electrolytes, which is the record efficiency to date featuring a ruthenium-based dye. In view of the complicated liquid DSC system, the disagreement found between different characterizations enlightens us about the importance of the sensitizer loading on TiO2, which is a subtle but equally important factor in the electronic properties of the sensitizers.

  17. Quantitative study of ruthenium cross-over in direct methanol fuel cells during early operation hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoekel, A.; Melke, J.; Bruns, M.; Wippermann, K.; Kuppler, F.; Roth, C.

    2016-01-01

    In direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), ruthenium cross-over is an important degradation phenomenon. The loss of ruthenium from the anode, its transport through the membrane and its deposition onto the cathode are detrimental to the fuel cell performance and limit the fuel cell's lifetime. Here we present a quantitative study on the fraction of ruthenium being transferred from the anode to the cathode during early operation hours (0-100 h) of a DMFC. Already during fabrication of the MEA ruthenium is transferred to the cathode. In our pristine MEAs about 0.024 wt% Ru could be found in the cathode catalyst. The cell potential during operation seems to have only a minor influence on the dissolution process. In contrast, the operation time appears to be much more important. Our data hint at two dissolution processes: a fast process dominating the first hours of operation and a slower process, which is responsible for the ongoing ruthenium transfer during the fuel cell lifetime. After 2 h held at open circuit conditions the Ru content of the cathode side was 10 times higher than in the pristine MEA. In contrast, the slower process increased that amount only by a factor of two over the course of another 100 h.

  18. The inhibition of mitochondrial calcium transport by lanthanides and Ruthenium Red

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Ken C.; Bygrave, Fyfe L.

    1974-01-01

    An EGTA (ethanedioxybis(ethylamine)tetra-acetic acid)-quench technique was developed for measuring initial rates of 45Ca2+ transport by rat liver mitochondria. This method was used in conjunction with studies of Ca2+-stimulated respiration to examine the mechanisms of inhibition of Ca2+ transport by the lanthanides and Ruthenium Red. Ruthenium Red inhibits Ca2+ transport non-competitively with Ki 3×10−8m; there are 0.08nmol of carrier-specific binding sites/mg of protein. The inhibition by La3+ is competitive (Ki=2×10−8m); the concentration of lanthanide-sensitive sites is less than 0.001nmol/mg of protein. A further difference between their modes of action is that lanthanide inhibition diminishes with time whereas that by Ruthenium Red does not. Binding studies showed that both classes of inhibitor bind to a relatively large number of external sites (probably identical with the `low-affinity' Ca2+-binding sites). La3+ competes with Ruthenium Red for most of these sites, but a small fraction of the bound Ruthenium Red (less than 2nmol/mg of protein) is not displaced by La3+. The results are discussed briefly in relation to possible models for a Ca2+ carrier. PMID:4375957

  19. Biological processing of dinuclear ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Heimann, Kirsten; Dinh, Xuyen Thi; Keene, F Richard; Collins, J Grant

    2016-10-20

    The biological processing - mechanism of cellular uptake, effects on the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial membranes, intracellular sites of localisation and induction of reactive oxygen species - of two dinuclear polypyridylruthenium(ii) complexes has been examined in three eukaryotic cells lines. Flow cytometry was used to determine the uptake of [{Ru(phen)2}2{μ-bb12}](4+) (Rubb12) and [Ru(phen)2(μ-bb7)Ru(tpy)Cl](3+) {Rubb7-Cl, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and bbn = bis[4(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-1,n-alkane} in baby hamster kidney (BHK), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. The results demonstrated that the major uptake mechanism for Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl was active transport, although with a significant contribution from carrier-assisted diffusion for Rubb12 and passive diffusion for Rubb7-Cl. Flow cytometry coupled with Annexin V/TO-PRO-3 double-staining was used to compare cell death by membrane damage or apoptosis. Rubb12 induced significant direct membrane damage, particularly with HepG2 cells, while Rubb7-Cl caused considerably less membrane damage but induced greater levels of apoptosis. Confocal microscopy, coupled with JC-1 assays, demonstrated that Rubb12 depolarises the mitochondrial membrane, whereas Rubb7-Cl had a much smaller affect. Cellular localisation experiments indicated that Rubb12 did not accumulate in the mitochondria, whereas significant mitochondrial accumulation was observed for Rubb7-Cl. The effect of Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl on intracellular superoxide dismutase activity showed that the ruthenium complexes could induce cell death via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. The results of this study demonstrate that Rubb12 predominantly kills eukaryotic cells by damaging the cytoplasmic membrane. As this dinuclear ruthenium complex has been previously shown to exhibit greater toxicity towards bacteria than eukaryotic cells, the results of the present study suggest that

  20. Nitrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  1. Silver nitrate based gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, D.; Samuel, E. J. J.; Srinivasan, K.; Roopan, S. M.; Madhu, C. S.

    2017-05-01

    A new radiochromic gel dosimeter based on silver nitrate and a normoxic gel dosimeter was investigated using UV-Visible spectrophotometry in the clinical dose range. Gamma radiation induced the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the gel and is confirmed from the UV-Visible spectrum which shows an absorbance peak at around 450 nm. The dose response function of the dosimeter is found to be linear upto12Gy. In addition, the gel samples were found to be stable which were kept under refrigeration.

  2. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  3. Groundwater nitrate contamination: Factors and indicators

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation. PMID:22906701

  4. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  5. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2014-03-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as a likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photo rates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methyl vinyl ketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross-section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~ 3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  6. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  7. Groundwater nitrate contamination: factors and indicators.

    PubMed

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-11-30

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation.

  8. Is matching ruthenium with dithiocarbamato ligands a potent chemotherapeutic weapon in oncology?

    PubMed

    Nardon, Chiara; Brustolin, Leonardo; Fregona, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, several metal-based compounds have been designed and biologically investigated worldwide in order to obtain chemotherapeutics with a better toxicological profile and comparable or higher antiblastic activity than the clinically-established platinum-based drugs. In this context, researchers have addressed their attention to alternative nonplatinum derivatives able to maximize the anticancer activity of the new drugs and to minimize the side effects. Among them, a number of ruthenium complexes have been developed, including the compounds NAMI-A and KP1019, now in clinical trials. Here, we report the results collected so far for a particular class of ruthenium complexes - the ruthenium(II/III)-dithiocarbamates - which proved more potent than cisplatin in vitro, even at nanomolar concentrations, against a wide panel of human tumor cell lines.

  9. Recent advances in ruthenium complex-based light-driven water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Xue, Long-Xin; Meng, Ting-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2015-11-01

    The light driven splitting of water is one of the most attractive approaches for direct conversion of solar energy into chemical energy in the future. Ruthenium complexes as the water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) and light sensitizers have attracted increasing attention, and have made a great progress. This mini-review highlights recent progress on ruthenium complex-based photochemical and photoelectrochemical water oxidation catalysts. The recent representative examples of these ruthenium complexes that are in homogeneous solution or immobilized on solid electrodes, are surveyed. In particular, special attention has been paid on the supramolecular dyads with photosensitizer and WOC being covalently hold together, and grafted onto the solid electrode. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Disaggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide fibril formation by ruthenium polypyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengsen; Gong, Gehui; Wang, Wenji; Du, Weihong

    2017-05-01

    The toxicity of amyloid proteins is associated with many degenerative and systematic diseases. The aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide may induce pancreatic β-cell death, which is linked to type II diabetes. Ruthenium complexes are inhibitors of various proteins and potential anticancer metallodrugs, which can also be used to disaggregate amyloid proteins. This work reported that several ruthenium polypyridyl complexes remarkably affected the peptide aggregation by predominant hydrophobic interaction and metal coordination, as reflected by thermodynamic parameters and mass spectrometry analysis. Morphology and particle size analysis showed that the amyloid fibrils were disaggregated from long fibrils into small nano particles. Addition of these complexes also decreased the cytotoxicity induced by the peptide. The results indicated that ruthenium polypyridyl complexes may be potential metallodrugs to treat amyloidosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Method for the Preparation of Ruthenium Indenylidene-Ether Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Leonel R.; Tolentino, Daniel R.; Gallon, Benjamin J.; Schrodi, Yann

    2012-01-01

    The reactions between several derivatives of 1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-prop-2-yn-1-ol and different ruthenium starting materials [i.e., RuCl2(PPh3)3 and RuCl2(pcymene)(L), where L is tricyclohexylphosphine di-t-butylmethylphosphine, dicyclohexylphenylphosphine, triisobutylphosphine, triisopropylphosphine, or tri-npropylphosphine] are described. Several of these reactions allow for the easy, in-situ and atom-economic preparation of olefin metathesis catalysts. Organic precursor 1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-prop-2-yn-1-ol led to the formation of active ruthenium indenylidene-ether complexes, while 1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-prop-2-yn-1-ol and 1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-methyl-prop-2-yn-1-ol did not. It was also found that a bulky and strong σ-donor phosphine ligand was required to impart good catalytic activity to the new ruthenium complexes. PMID:22580400

  12. TCP suppression in a ruthenium-bearing single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. A.; Zhang, L.; Rae, C. M. F.; Tin, S.

    2008-07-01

    Ruthenium suppresses the precipitation of deleterious topologically close-packed (TCP) phases in high refractory content single-crystal nickel-based superalloys. The effectiveness of ruthenium as a TCP suppressant appears to be the net effect of its limited solubility in the TCP phase, a lower density of structural growth ledges for atomic attachment at the TCP/matrix interface, and destabilization of the γ' phase at elevated temperatures. These characteristics combine to limit the growth rates of TCP precipitates and decrease the driving force for their precipitation. Destabilization of the γ' phase upon the addition of ruthenium is particularly potent due to the sensitivity of the rhenium content in the γ matrix to changes in the γ' volume fraction.

  13. Conduction electron g-factors in ruthenium and osmium from de Haas-van Alphen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, V. E.; Coleridge, P. T.; Templeton, I. M.; Fawcett, E.; Muir, C.; Perz, J. M.

    1984-04-01

    Conduction electron g-factors have been deduced from de Haas-van Alphen line shapes in the hexagonal group VIII 4 d transition metal ruthenium and the electronically analogous 5 d metal osmium. The values for orbits normal to [0001] are 1.8±0.1 and 1.3±0.1 for the ellipsoids centered on the line LM in ruthenium and osmium, respectively, and 1.9±0.2 for the Γ-centered ellipsoid in ruthenium. The more marked suppression of the g-factor in osmium, where spin-orbit coupling is stronger, is consistent with recent theoretical studies of transition metal g-factor trends.

  14. Nonlinear optics and surface relief gratings in alkynyl-ruthenium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraoui, B.; Luc, J.; Meghea, A.; Czaplicki, R.; Fillaut, J.-L.; Migalska-Zalas, A.

    2009-02-01

    Generally, the organometallic complexes rich in carbon and containing π-conjugated chains are materials interesting for the study of electronic transfer processes. Currently, the ruthenium-acetylide organometallic complexes form part of the most studied organometallic compounds in nonlinear optics. In this work, we highlight the nonlinear optical properties and the photo-induced structure of new organometallic complexes containing a ruthenium-acetylide donor fragment able to compete with the strongest organic donors. We determine, using various experimental techniques (degenerate four-wave mixing, second and third harmonic generation), the influence of the functionalization of these molecular structures on the improvement of their second-and third-order nonlinear optical properties exploiting in particular the nature of the acceptor fragment and the π-conjugated transmitter. Also we present the dynamics of formation of photo-induced surface relief gratings using a transmission holographic technique and the atomic force microscopy on ruthenium-acetylide complexes containing an azobenzene fragment.

  15. Isomerization of methyl linoleate on ruthenium(III) alkoxide complex; Mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukesh, D.; Narasimhan, C.S.; Ramnarayan, K.; Deshpande, V.M

    1989-08-01

    The isomerization of methyl linoleate using ruthenium alkoxide complexes is described. With alcohols, such as isopropyl alcohol (IPA), 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octanol, isomerization of double bonds to produce a conjugated system is the main reaction, with hydrogenation being the side reaction. The latter is formed via the conjugated product. Based on kinetic and infrared spectroscopic data, it is concluded that the active catalytic species is a ruthenium hydride complex formed by the decomposition of the unstable alkoxide. The reaction is mathematically modeled, and the rate parameters are obtained by fitting the simulation to experimental data. These values are compared with data obtained from reactions carried out with supported ruthenium-nickel heterogeneous catalyst.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and in vitro cytotoxicity activities of ruthenium(II) Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyaraj, Subbaiyan; Butcher, Ray J.; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2012-12-01

    DNA binding, cleavage and cytotoxicity characteristics of a novel Schiff base ligand 3-(benzothiazol-2-yliminomethyl)-naphthalen-2-ol and ruthenium(II) complexes have been investigated. The DNA interaction properties of the complexes have been investigated using absorption spectra, as well as gel electrophoresis studies. Intrinsic binding constant (Kb) has been estimated under similar set of experimental conditions. Absorption spectral study indicate that the ligand and ruthenium(II) complexes has intrinsic binding constant in the range of 1.4-7.2 × 104 M-1. Ruthenium(II) complexes show more binding ability than the ligand. Further, in vitro cytotoxicity study of the ligand and the complexes exhibited antitumor activity against HeLa and HEp2 tumor cells.

  17. Stoichiometric photoisomerization of mononuclear ruthenium(II) monoaquo complexes controlling redox properties and water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirosato; Hakamata, Tomoya; Komi, Manabu; Yagi, Masayuki

    2011-06-15

    Although various reactions involved in photoexcited states of polypyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes have been extensively studied, photoisomerization of the complexes is very rare. We report the first illustration of stoichiometric photoisomerization of trans-[Ru(tpy)(pynp)OH(2)](2+) (1a) [tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; pynp = 2-(2-pyridyl)-1,8-naphthyridine] to cis-[Ru(tpy)(pynp)OH(2)](2+) (1a') and the isolation of 1a and 1a' for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Polypyridyl ruthenium(II) aquo complexes are attracting much attention related to proton-coupled electron transfer and water oxidation catalysis. We demonstrate that the photoisomerization significantly controls the redox reactions and water oxidation catalyses involving the ruthenium(II) aquo complexes 1a and 1a'.

  18. Ruthenium red inhibits tail skin vasodilatation evoked by intracerebroventricular injection of capsaicin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hajós, M; Jancsó, G; Mari, Z; Obál, F

    1991-04-01

    The effect of Ruthenium red on the tail skin vasodilatation evoked by an intracerebroventricular injection of capsaicin was studied in the anesthetized rat. Injection of capsaicin into the lateral ventricle resulted in a marked elevation of the tail skin temperature, indicative of peripheral vasodilatation. Ruthenium red, given by intracerebroventricular injection, significantly inhibited this response, which is known to be mediated by central warmth-sensitive neuronal structures. The findings suggest that the sensitivity to Ruthenium red, reportedly characteristic of the capsaicin-sensitive neurons in the peripheral nervous system, is also a trait of the capsaicin-sensitive nerve cells in the central nervous system. This is the first evidence indicating that similar molecular mechanisms, presumably involving changes in cellular calcium metabolism, contribute to the capsaicin-induced activation of neurons in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  19. Rigid 5'-6-locked phenanthroline-derived nucleosides chelated to ruthenium and europium ions.

    PubMed

    Gislason, Kristmann; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th

    2013-01-01

    We describe complexes of ruthenium and europium with rigid, 5'-6-locked 1,10-phenanthroline-containing nucleosides. Both nucleosides were synthesized from condensation of 5-amino-2'-deoxycytidine with the corresponding diketone. The ruthenium nucleoside displayed fluorescence characteristic of polypyridine ruthenium complexes with a maximum at 616 nm and a quantum yield of 0.011. Binding of europium to the 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diacid moiety of the lanthanide binding nucleoside showed formation of a 1:1 complex with emission at 570-630 nm, whose emission was enhanced by addition of two phenanthroline ligands. The lanthanide-binding nucleoside was incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides and shown to selectively bind one equivalent of europium ions.

  20. Hydrodefluorination of carbon-fluorine bonds by the synergistic action of a ruthenium-palladium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Sara; Mata, Jose A; Peris, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrodefluorination of organic molecules is a major organometallic challenge, owing to the strength of C-F sigma bonds, and it is a process with multiple industrial applications. Here we report a new heterodimetallic ruthenium-palladium complex based on a triazolyl-di-ylidene ligand. The complex is remarkably active in the hydrodefluorination of aromatic and aliphatic carbon-fluorine bonds under mild reaction conditions. We observe that both metals are required to promote the reaction process. The overall process implies that the palladium fragment facilitates the C-F activation, whereas the ruthenium centre allows the reduction of the substrate via transfer hydrogenation from isopropanol/sodium t-butoxide. The activity of this heterodimetallic complex is higher than that shown by a mixture of the related homodimetallic complexes of ruthenium and palladium, demonstrating the catalytic benefits of the heterodimetallic complex linked by a single-frame ligand.

  1. Isotopic separation of D sub 2 O from H sub 2 O using ruthenium adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, P.A.

    1990-04-10

    This paper describes a one-phase method for enriching the concentration of D{sub 2}O in solutions of D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O. It comprises: contacting in the absence of hydrogen gas steam phase D{sub 2}O and steam phase H{sub 2}O, with the hexagonal surface of crystalline ruthenium having a particle size greater than 10 nanometers so that sufficient (001) face is exposed to produce enriched D{sub 2}O. Also described is a one-phase method of enriching the concentration of D{sub 2}O and solutions of D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O. It comprises: contacting the D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O in the steam phase with the hexagonal surface of crystalline ruthenium wherein the ruthenium is divided into particles of about 1 micron to produce enriched D{sub 2}O.

  2. Water oxidation by Ruthenium complexes incorporating multifunctional biipyridyl diphosphonate ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Yan; Shaffer, David W.; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; ...

    2016-05-11

    Here, we describe herein the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium complexes with multifunctional bipyridyl diphosphonate ligands as well as initial water oxidation studies. In these complexes, the phosphonate groups provide redox-potential leveling through charge compensation and σ donation to allow facile access to high oxidation states. These complexes display unique pH-dependent electrochemistry associated with deprotonation of the phosphonic acid groups. The position of these groups allows them to shuttle protons in and out of the catalytic site and reduce activation barriers. A mechanism for water oxidation by these catalysts is proposed on the basis of experimental results and DFT calculations.more » The unprecedented attack of water at a neutral six-coordinate [RuIV] center to yield an anionic seven-coordinate [RuIV–OH]– intermediate is one of the key steps of a single-site mechanism in which all species are anionic or neutral. These complexes are among the fastest single-site catalysts reported to date.« less

  3. Ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts featuring unsymmetrical N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Veronica; Bertolasi, Valerio; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-14

    New ruthenium Grubbs' and Hoveyda-Grubbs' second generation catalysts bearing N-alkyl/N-isopropylphenyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands with syn or anti backbone configuration were obtained and compared in model olefin metathesis reactions. Different catalytic efficiencies were observed depending on the size of the N-alkyl group (methyl or cyclohexyl) and on the backbone configuration. The presence of an N-cyclohexyl substituent determined the most significant reactivity differences between catalysts with syn or anti phenyl groups on the backbone. In particular, anti catalysts proved highly efficient, especially in the ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of encumbered diolefins, while syn catalysts showed low efficiency in the RCM of less hindered diolefins. This peculiar behavior, rationalized through DFT studies, was found to be related to the high propensity of these catalysts to give nonproductive metathesis events. Enantiopure anti catalysts were also tested in asymmetric metathesis reactions, where moderate enantioselectivities were observed. The steric and electronic properties of unsymmetrical NHCs with the N-cyclohexyl group were then evaluated using the corresponding rhodium complexes. While steric factors proved unimportant for both syn and anti NHCs, a major electron-donating character was found for the unsymmetrical NHC with anti phenyl substituents on the backbone.

  4. Coordination of dibensothiophenes and corannulenes to organometallic ruthenium (II) fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Paul Anthony

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation contains five papers in the format required for journal publication which describe (in part) my research accomplishments as a graduate student at Iowa State University. This work can be broadly categorized as the binding of weakly-coordinating ligands to cationic organometallic ruthenium fragments, and consists of two main areas of study. Chapters 2-4 are investigations into factors that influence the binding of dibenzothiophenes to [Cp'Ru(CO)2(+ fragments, where Cp' = η5-C5H5 (Cp) and η5-C5Me5 (Cp*). Chapters 5 and 6 present the synthesis and structural characterization of complexes containing corannulene buckybowls that are η6-coordinated to [Cp*Ru(+ fragments. The first chapter contains a brief description of the difficulty in lowering sulfur levels in diesel fuel along with a review of corannulene derivatives and their metal complexes. After the final paper is a short summary of the work herein (Chapter 7). Each chapter is independent, and all equations, schemes, figures, tables, references, and appendices in this dissertation pertain only to the chapter in which they appear.

  5. Highly efficient and robust molecular ruthenium catalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Araujo, Carlos Moyses; Ahlquist, Mårten S G; Sun, Licheng

    2012-09-25

    Water oxidation catalysts are essential components of light-driven water splitting systems, which could convert water to H(2) driven by solar radiation (H(2)O + hν → 1/2O(2) + H(2)). The oxidation of water (H(2)O → 1/2O(2) + 2H(+) + 2e(-)) provides protons and electrons for the production of dihydrogen (2H(+) + 2e(-) → H(2)), a clean-burning and high-capacity energy carrier. One of the obstacles now is the lack of effective and robust water oxidation catalysts. Aiming at developing robust molecular Ru-bda (H(2)bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) water oxidation catalysts, we carried out density functional theory studies, correlated the robustness of catalysts against hydration with the highest occupied molecular orbital levels of a set of ligands, and successfully directed the synthesis of robust Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts. A series of mononuclear ruthenium complexes [Ru(bda)L(2)] (L = pyridazine, pyrimidine, and phthalazine) were subsequently synthesized and shown to effectively catalyze Ce(IV)-driven [Ce(IV) = Ce(NH(4))(2)(NO(3))(6)] water oxidation with high oxygen production rates up to 286 s(-1) and high turnover numbers up to 55,400.

  6. Homobimetallic Ruthenium-N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes For Olefin Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Xavier; Demonceau, Albert; Delaude, Lionel

    In this chapter, the synthesis and catalytic activity towards olefin metathesis of homobimetallic ruthenium (Ru)-alkylidene, -cyclodiene or -arene complexes bearing phosphine or N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the last category of bimetallic compounds. Three representatives of this new type of molecular scaffold were investigated. Thus, [(p-cymene)Ru(m-Cl)3RuCl (h2-C2H4)(L)] complexes with L = PCy3 (15a), IMes (16a), or IMesCl2 (16b) were prepared. They served as catalyst precursors for cross-metathesis (CM) of various styrene derivatives. These experiments revealed the outstanding aptitude of complex 16a (and to a lesser extent of 16b) to catalyze olefin metathesis reactions. Contrary to monometallic Ru-arene complexes of the [RuCl2(p-cymene)(L)] type, the new homobimetallic species did not require the addition of a diazo compound nor visible light illumination to initiate the ring-opening metathesis of norbornene or cyclooctene. When diethyl 2,2-diallylmalonate and N,N-diallyltosylamide were exposed to 16a,b, a mixture of cycloisomerization and ring-closing metathesis (RCM) products was obtained in a nonselective way. Addition of phenylacetylene enhanced the metathetical activity while completely repressing the cycloisomerization process.

  7. Water oxidation by Ruthenium complexes incorporating multifunctional biipyridyl diphosphonate ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yan; Shaffer, David W.; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Szalda, David J.; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-05-11

    Here, we describe herein the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium complexes with multifunctional bipyridyl diphosphonate ligands as well as initial water oxidation studies. In these complexes, the phosphonate groups provide redox-potential leveling through charge compensation and σ donation to allow facile access to high oxidation states. These complexes display unique pH-dependent electrochemistry associated with deprotonation of the phosphonic acid groups. The position of these groups allows them to shuttle protons in and out of the catalytic site and reduce activation barriers. A mechanism for water oxidation by these catalysts is proposed on the basis of experimental results and DFT calculations. The unprecedented attack of water at a neutral six-coordinate [RuIV] center to yield an anionic seven-coordinate [RuIV–OH] intermediate is one of the key steps of a single-site mechanism in which all species are anionic or neutral. These complexes are among the fastest single-site catalysts reported to date.

  8. Water oxidation by Ruthenium complexes incorporating multifunctional biipyridyl diphosphonate ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yan; Shaffer, David W.; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Szalda, David J.; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-05-11

    Here, we describe herein the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium complexes with multifunctional bipyridyl diphosphonate ligands as well as initial water oxidation studies. In these complexes, the phosphonate groups provide redox-potential leveling through charge compensation and σ donation to allow facile access to high oxidation states. These complexes display unique pH-dependent electrochemistry associated with deprotonation of the phosphonic acid groups. The position of these groups allows them to shuttle protons in and out of the catalytic site and reduce activation barriers. A mechanism for water oxidation by these catalysts is proposed on the basis of experimental results and DFT calculations. The unprecedented attack of water at a neutral six-coordinate [RuIV] center to yield an anionic seven-coordinate [RuIV–OH] intermediate is one of the key steps of a single-site mechanism in which all species are anionic or neutral. These complexes are among the fastest single-site catalysts reported to date.

  9. Ruthenium oxide modified nickel electrode for ascorbic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuan-Gee; Liao, Bo-Xuan; Weng, Yu-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Electrodes of ruthenium oxide modified nickel were prepared by a thermal decomposition method. The stoichiometry of the modifier, RuOx, was quantitatively determined to be a meta-stable phase, RuO5. The electrodes were employed to sense ascorbic acid in alkaline solution with a high sensitivity, 296 μAcm(-2) mM(-1), and good selectivity for eight kinds of disturbing reagents. We found that the ascorbic acid was oxidized irreversibly in solution. To match with the variation of the morphology, the sensitivity reached a maximum when the RuOx segregated with a nano-crystalline feature. We find that the substrate oxidized as the deposited RuOx grew thicker. The feature of the deposited RuOx changed from nano-particles to small islands resulting from the wetting effect of the substrate oxide, NiO; meanwhile the sensitivity decreased dramatically. The endurance of the RuOx/Ni electrode also showed a good performance after 38 days of successive test.

  10. Synthesis of ruthenium particles by photoreduction in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masafumi; Takahashi, Saki

    2008-09-01

    Colloidal dispersions of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium (Ru) particles have been synthesized by the photoreduction of Ru(III) ionic solutions in the presence of photo-activator such as benzophenone and benzoin. The size and the structure of the synthesized particles have been extensively investigated by UV-vis, transmission electron micrograph (TEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Metallic Ru particles with an average diameter of 1.3 nm were successfully synthesized in the presence of benzophenone, although mixtures of partly oxidized Ru particles and metallic Ru particles were synthesized in the presence of benzoin. Photoreduction of Ru(III) ionic precursors to Ru atoms was promoted by ketyl radicals, which is more efficiently generated by the photoirradiation of benzophenone than by that of benzoin. The photoirradiation of benzophenone in the Ru(III) ionic solutions is an efficient and convenient method to produce metallic Ru particles in polymer solutions rather than the refluxing and the hydrothermal method of ionic solutions of Ru.

  11. Highly efficient and robust molecular ruthenium catalysts for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Lele; Araujo, Carlos Moyses; Ahlquist, Mårten S.G.; Sun, Licheng

    2012-01-01

    Water oxidation catalysts are essential components of light-driven water splitting systems, which could convert water to H2 driven by solar radiation (H2O + hν → 1/2O2 + H2). The oxidation of water (H2O → 1/2O2 + 2H+ + 2e-) provides protons and electrons for the production of dihydrogen (2H+ + 2e- → H2), a clean-burning and high-capacity energy carrier. One of the obstacles now is the lack of effective and robust water oxidation catalysts. Aiming at developing robust molecular Ru-bda (H2bda = 2,2′-bipyridine-6,6′-dicarboxylic acid) water oxidation catalysts, we carried out density functional theory studies, correlated the robustness of catalysts against hydration with the highest occupied molecular orbital levels of a set of ligands, and successfully directed the synthesis of robust Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts. A series of mononuclear ruthenium complexes [Ru(bda)L2] (L = pyridazine, pyrimidine, and phthalazine) were subsequently synthesized and shown to effectively catalyze CeIV-driven [CeIV = Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6] water oxidation with high oxygen production rates up to 286 s-1 and high turnover numbers up to 55,400. PMID:22753518

  12. Diverse ruthenium nitrides stabilized under pressure: a theoretical prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunkun; Wu, Lailei; Wan, Biao; Lin, Yangzheng; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Rui; Li, Zhiping; Zhang, Jingwu; Gou, Huiyang

    2016-01-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to understand the structural stability, synthesis routes, mechanical and electronic properties of diverse ruthenium nitrides. RuN with a new I-4m2 symmetry stabilized by pressure is found to be energetically preferred over the experimental NaCl-type and ZnS-type ones. The Pnnm-RuN2 is found to be stable above 1.1 GPa, in agreement with the experimental results. Specifically, new stoichiometries like RuN3 and RuN4 are proposed firstly to be thermodynamically stable, and the dynamical and mechanical stabilities of the newly predicted structures have been verified by checking their phonon spectra and elastic constants. A phase transition from P4/mmm-RuN4 to C2/c-RuN4 is also uncovered at 23.0 GPa. Drawn from bonding and band structure analysis, P4/mmm-RuN4 exhibits semi-metal-like behavior and becomes a semiconductor for the high-pressure C2/c-RuN4 phase. Meanwhile the P21/c-RuN3 shows metallic feature. Highly directional covalent N-N and Ru-N bonds are formed and dominating in N-enriched Ru nitrides, making them promising hard materials. PMID:27627856

  13. Sweetening ruthenium and osmium: organometallic arene complexes containing aspartame.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jennifer C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    The novel organometallic sandwich complexes [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Ru(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (1) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Os(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (2) incorporating the artificial sweetener aspartame have been synthesised and characterised. A number of properties of aspartame were found to be altered on binding to either metal. The pK(a) values of both the carboxyl and the amino groups of aspartame are lowered by between 0.35 and 0.57 pH units, causing partial deprotonation of the amino group at pH 7.4 (physiological pH). The rate of degradation of aspartame to 3,6-dioxo-5-phenylmethylpiperazine acetic acid (diketopiperazine) increased over threefold from 0.12 to 0.36 h(-1) for 1, and to 0.43 h(-1) for 2. Furthermore, the reduction potential of the ligand shifted from -1.133 to -0.619 V for 2. For the ruthenium complex 1 the process occurred in two steps, the first (at -0.38 V) within a biologically accessible range. This facilitates reactions with biological reductants such as ascorbate. Binding to and activation of the sweet taste receptor was not observed for these metal complexes up to concentrations of 1 mM. The factors which affect the ability of metal-bound aspartame to interact with the receptor site are discussed.

  14. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  15. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  16. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  17. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  18. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  19. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  20. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  1. Arabidopsis nitrate transporter NRT1.9 is important in phloem nitrate transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-05-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport.

  2. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-07

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules.

  3. Regulation of nitrate assimilation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yoshitake; Shi, Wei; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate assimilation by cyanobacteria is inhibited by the presence of ammonium in the growth medium. Both nitrate uptake and transcription of the nitrate assimilatory genes are regulated. The major intracellular signal for the regulation is, however, not ammonium or glutamine, but 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), whose concentration changes according to the change in cellular C/N balance. When nitrogen is limiting growth, accumulation of 2-OG activates the transcription factor NtcA to induce transcription of the nitrate assimilation genes. Ammonium inhibits transcription by quickly depleting the 2-OG pool through its metabolism via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle. The P(II) protein inhibits the ABC-type nitrate transporter, and also nitrate reductase in some strains, by an unknown mechanism(s) when the cellular 2-OG level is low. Upon nitrogen limitation, 2-OG binds to P(II) to prevent the protein from inhibiting nitrate assimilation. A pathway-specific transcriptional regulator NtcB activates the nitrate assimilation genes in response to nitrite, either added to the medium or generated intracellularly by nitrate reduction. It plays an important role in selective activation of the nitrate assimilation pathway during growth under a limited supply of nitrate. P(II) was recently shown to regulate the activity of NtcA negatively by binding to PipX, a small coactivator protein of NtcA. On the basis of accumulating genome information from a variety of cyanobacteria and the molecular genetic data obtained from the representative strains, common features and group- or species-specific characteristics of the response of cyanobacteria to nitrogen is summarized and discussed in terms of ecophysiological significance.

  4. Ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of sugar alcohols by dichloroisocyanuric acid—A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshman Kumar, Y.; Venkata Nadh, R.; Radhakrishnamurti, P. S.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetics of ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of biologically important sugar alcohols (myo-inositol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol) by dichloroisocyanuric acid was carried out in aqueous acetic acid—perchloric medium. The reactions were found to be first order in case of oxidant and ruthenium(III). Zero order was observed with the concentrations of sorbitol and mannitol whereas, a positive fractional order was found in the case of inositol concentration. An inverse fractional order was observed with perchloric acid in oxidation of three substrates. Arrhenius parameters were calculated and a plausible mechanism was proposed.

  5. Bis(Cyclic Alkyl Amino Carbene) Ruthenium Complexes: A Versatile, Highly Efficient Tool for Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Gawin, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Anna; Guńka, Piotr A.; Dąbrowski, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The state‐of‐the‐art in olefin metathesis is application of N‐heterocyclic carbene (NHC)‐containing ruthenium alkylidenes for the formation of internal C=C bonds and of cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC)‐containing ruthenium benzylidenes in the production of terminal olefins. A straightforward synthesis of bis(CAAC)Ru indenylidene complexes, which are highly effective in the formation of both terminal and internal C=C bonds at loadings as low as 1 ppm, is now reported. PMID:27943616

  6. Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methane by Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Melo, Catarina I; Szczepańska, Anna; Bogel-Łukasik, Ewa; Nunes da Ponte, Manuel; Branco, Luís C

    2016-05-23

    The efficient transformation of carbon dioxide into fuels can be an excellent alternative to sequestration. In this work, we describe CO2 hydrogenation to methane in imidazolium-based ionic liquid media, using ruthenium nanoparticles prepared in situ as catalyst. The best yield of methane (69 %) was achieved using 0.24 mol % ruthenium catalyst (in [omim][NTf2 ], 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bistrifluoromethanesulfonylimide, at 40 bar of hydrogen pressure plus 40 bar of CO2 pressure, and at 150 °C. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A ruthenium-based biomimetic hydrogen cluster for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Hao; Chen, Mei-Hua; Du, Wan-Shan; Gliniak, Jacek; Lin, Jia-Hoa; Wu, Hsin-Hua; Chan, Hsin-Fang; Yu, Jen-Shiang K; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2015-04-20

    A ruthenium-based biomimetic hydrogen cluster, [Ru2 (CO)6 (μ-SCH2 CH2 CH2 S)] (1), has been synthesized and, in the presence of the P ligand tri(o-tolyl)phosphine, demonstrated efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation from formic acid decomposition. Turnover frequencies (TOFs) of 5500 h(-1) and turnover numbers (TONs) over 24 700 were obtained with less than 50 ppm of the catalyst, thus representing the highest TOFs for ruthenium complexes as well as the best efficiency for photocatalytic hydrogen production from formic acid. Moreover, 1 showed high stability with no significant degradation of the photocatalyst observed after prolonged photoirradiation at 90 °C.

  8. Bis(Cyclic Alkyl Amino Carbene) Ruthenium Complexes: A Versatile, Highly Efficient Tool for Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Gawin, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Anna; Guńka, Piotr A; Dąbrowski, Paweł; Skowerski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-19

    The state-of-the-art in olefin metathesis is application of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-containing ruthenium alkylidenes for the formation of internal C=C bonds and of cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC)-containing ruthenium benzylidenes in the production of terminal olefins. A straightforward synthesis of bis(CAAC)Ru indenylidene complexes, which are highly effective in the formation of both terminal and internal C=C bonds at loadings as low as 1 ppm, is now reported.

  9. Enantiotopos-selective C-H oxygenation catalyzed by a supramolecular ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Frost, James R; Huber, Stefan M; Breitenlechner, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Bach, Thorsten

    2015-01-07

    Spirocyclic oxindoles undergo an enantioselective oxygenation reaction (nine examples; e.r. up to 97:3) upon catalysis by a chiral ruthenium porphyrin complex (1 mol %). The catalyst exhibits a lactam ring, which is responsible for substrate association through hydrogen bonds, and an active ruthenium center, which is in a defined spatial relationship to the oxygenation substrate. DFT calculations illustrate the perfect alignment of the active site with the reactive C-H bond and suggest--in line with the kinetic isotope effect--an oxygen rebound mechanism for the reaction.

  10. Selective ruthenium labeling of the tryptophan residue in the bee venom Peptide melittin.

    PubMed

    Perekalin, Dmitry S; Novikov, Valentin V; Pavlov, Alexander A; Ivanov, Igor A; Anisimova, Natalia Yu; Kopylov, Alexey N; Volkov, Dmitry S; Seregina, Irina F; Bolshov, Michail A; Kudinov, Alexander R

    2015-03-23

    Melittin is a membrane-active peptide from bee venom with promising antimicrobial and anticancer activity. Herein we report on a simple and selective method for labeling of the tryptophan residue in melittin by the organometallic fragment [(C5 H5 )Ru](+) in aqueous solution and in air. Ruthenium coordination does not disturb the secondary structure of the peptide (as verified by 2D NMR spectroscopy), but changes the pattern of its intermolecular interactions resulting in an 11-fold decrease of hemolytic activity. The high stability of the organometallic conjugate allowed the establishment of the biodistribution of the labeled melittin in mice by inductively coupled plasma MS analysis of ruthenium.

  11. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative C-H alkenylations of sulfonic acids, sulfonyl chlorides and sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenbo; Mei, Ruhuai; Tenti, Giammarco; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-11-10

    Twofold C-H functionalization of aromatic sulfonic acids was achieved with an in situ generated ruthenium(II) catalyst. The optimized cross-dehydrogenative alkenylation protocol proved applicable to differently substituted arenes and a variety of alkenes, including vinyl arenes, sulfones, nitriles and ketones. The robustness of the ruthenium(II) catalyst was demonstrated by the chemoselective oxidative olefination of sulfonamides as well as sulfonyl chlorides. Mechanistic studies provided support for a reversible, acetate-assisted C-H ruthenation, along with a subsequent olefin insertion.

  12. Thermochemistry and Molecular Structure of a Remarkable Agostic Interaction in a Heterobifunctional Ruthenium-Boron Complex

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Brian L.; Williams, Travis J.

    2010-01-01

    A boron-pendant ruthenium species forms a unique agostic methyl bridge between the boron and ruthenium atoms in the presence of a ligating solvent, acetonitrile. NMR inversion-recovery experiments enable measurement of the activation and equilibrium thermochemistry for formation of the agostic bridge. The mechanism for bridge formation involves displacement of an acetonitrile ligand; thus, this is a rare example of a case where an agostic C—H ligand competitively displaces another tight-binding ligand from a coordinatively saturated complex. Characterization of this complex gives unique insights into development of C—H activation catalysis based on this ligand-metal bifunctional motif. PMID:20088526

  13. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  14. Conductive polymers derived from iron, ruthenium, and osmium metalloporphyrins: The shish-kebab approach

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; McDevitt, John T.; Yee, Gordon T.; Leidner, Charles R.; McCullough, Laughlin G.; Little, William A.; Torrance, Jerry B.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of pyrazine-bridged polymers of iron(II/III), ruthenium(II/III), and osmium(II/III) octaethylporphyrin (dubbed “shish-kebab” polymers) are presented. Optical and dc conductivity measurements reveal that the ruthenium and osmium polymers, when partially oxidized, are highly conductive. Electrochemical and ESR results are presented that indicate the existence of an interesting metal-centered conduction pathway. Unlike most of the previously reported porphyrinic molecular metals in which the conduction electrons are macrocyclic-based, electron transport in these materials proceeds exclusively along the metal-pyrazine backbone. PMID:16593717

  15. ECL performance of ruthenium tris-bipyridyl complexes covalently linked with phenothiazine through different bridge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiguo; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fengyu; Fan, Jiangli; Kehr, Jan; Sun, Licheng; Peng, Xiaojun

    2010-10-07

    Three ruthenium complexes 1a, 1b and 1c were synthesized, in which the phenothiazine moiety was covalently linked to the ruthenium complex through a 4 carbon chain and amide bond, respectively. The results demonstrate that one PTZ moiety is preferred to reach a good ECL performance, and the 4 carbon chain linked complex 1a exhibits the highest ECL enhancement (up to about 9 times), in comparison with the commonly utilized parent Ru(bpy)(3)(2+), permitting a lower detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-14) M with signal to noise of 3 for 20 mM DBAE at Au electrode.

  16. Formation of C-C bonds via ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation().

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph; Krische, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of diverse π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of aldehydes provides products of carbonyl addition. Dehydrogenation of primary alcohols in the presence of the same π-unsaturated reactants provides identical products of carbonyl addition. In this way, carbonyl addition is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. In this account, the discovery of ruthenium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming transfer hydrogenations and the recent development of diastereo- and enantioselective variants are discussed.

  17. Characterization of ruthenium red-binding sites of the Ca(2+)-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum and their interaction with Ca(2+)-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Corbalan-Garcia, S; Teruel, J A; Gomez-Fernandez, J C

    1992-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase has previously been shown to bind and dissociate two Ca2+ ions in a sequential mode. This behaviour is confirmed here by inducing sequential Ca2+ dissociation with Ruthenium Red. Ruthenium Red binds to sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (6 nmol/mg) with a Kd = 2 microM, producing biphasic kinetics of Ca2+ dissociation from the Ca(2+)-ATPase, decreasing the affinity for Ca2+ binding. Studies on the effect of Ca2+ on Ruthenium Red binding indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites, as suggested by the following observations: (i) micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ do not significantly alter Ruthenium Red binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum; (ii) quenching of the fluorescence of fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC) bound to Ca(2+)-ATPase by Ruthenium Red (resembling Ruthenium Red binding) is not prevented by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+; (iii) quenching of FITC fluorescence by Ca2+ binding to the high-affinity sites is achieved even though Ruthenium Red is bound to the Ca(2+)-ATPase; and (iv) micromolar Ca2+ concentrations prevent inhibition of the ATP-hydrolytic capability by dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide modification, but Ruthenium Red does not. However, micromolar concentrations of lanthanides (La3+ and Tb3+) and millimolar concentrations of bivalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) inhibit Ruthenium Red binding as well as quenching of FITC-labelled Ca(2+)-ATPase fluorescence by Ruthenium Red. Studies of Ruthenium Red binding to tryptic fragments of Ca(2+)-ATPase, as demonstrated by ligand blotting, indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the A1 subfragment. Our observations suggest that Ruthenium Red might bind to a cation-binding site in Ca(2+)-ATPase inducing fast release of the last bound Ca2+ by interactions between the sites. PMID:1280106

  18. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  19. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  20. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... comments. SUMMARY: This proposed rule would implement anti-terrorism measures to better secure the homeland... purpose of preventing the use of ammonium nitrate in an act of terrorism. This proposed rule seeks comment... Regulations Addressing Ammonium Nitrate a. Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards b. U.S. Coast...

  1. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism.

  2. NITRATE CONTAMINATION OF GROUND WATER (GW-761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of nitrate and related compounds in ground water is discussed from the perspectives of its natural as well as anthropogenic origins. A brief explanation of the nitrogen cycle touches on the production as well as utilization of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and nitrog...

  3. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  4. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  5. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  6. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  7. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T.

    1997-04-01

    Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

  9. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  10. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  11. Methemoglobinemia: nitrate toxicity in rural America

    SciTech Connect

    Kross, B.C.; Ayebo, A.D.; Fuortes, L.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Nitrates are frequently found in vegetables and ground water. Nitrate levels in ground water have increased over the past two decades because of the heightened use of nitrogenous fertilizers. Following ingestion, nitrates are converted to nitrites by fecal organisms. Nitrites are absorbed and form methemoglobin, which interferes with the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin. Infants are particularly susceptible to nitrate poisoning because fetal hemoglobin is more readily oxidized to methemoglobin. In infants, the most common source of nitrate exposure is well water, which is mixed with infant formula. Affected infants may present with asymptomatic cyanosis, which can progress to dyspnea and lethargy or coma. Blood methemoglobin concentrations are elevated. Treatment consists of the administration of oxygen and intravenous and oral methylene blue.24 references.

  12. Photoexpulsion of Surface-Grafted Ruthenium Complexes and Subsequent Release of Cytotoxic Cargos to Cancer Cells from Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Zhichang; Lei, Juying; Wu, Yilei; Strekalova, Elena; Malin, Dmitry; Ambrogio, Michael W.; Chen, Xinqi; Botros, Youssry Y.; Cryns, Vincent L.; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes have emerged both as promising probes of DNA structure and as anticancer agents because of their unique photophysical and cytotoxic properties. A key consideration in the administration of those therapeutic agents is the optimization of their chemical reactivities to allow facile attack on the target sites, yet avoid unwanted side effects. Here, we present a drug delivery platform technology, obtained by grafting the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) with ruthenium(II) dipyridophenazine (dppz) complexes. This hybrid nanomaterial displays enhanced luminescent properties relative to that of the ruthenium(II) dppz complex in a homogeneous phase. Since the coordination between the ruthenium(II) complex and a monodentate ligand linked covalently to the nanoparticles can be cleaved under irradiation with visible light, the ruthenium complex can be released from the surface of the nanoparticles by selective substitution of this ligand with a water molecule. Indeed, the modified MSNPs undergo rapid cellular uptake, and after activation with light, the release of an aqua ruthenium(II) complex is observed. We have delivered, in combination, the ruthenium(II) complex and paclitaxel, loaded in the mesoporous structure, to breast cancer cells. This hybrid material represents a promising candidate as one of the so-called theranostic agents that possess both diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:23815127

  13. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

    PubMed

    Bew, Sean P; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a 'halide for nitrate' substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile 'key building blocks' (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, 'off the shelf' materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an 'allylic halide for allylic nitrate' substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates ('isoprene nitrates') in 66-80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon-carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our 'halide for nitrate' substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

  14. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  15. Bacterial Nitration of 4-Chlorobiphenyl

    PubMed Central

    Sylvestre, Michel; Massé, Robert; Messier, François; Fauteux, Johanne; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean

    1982-01-01

    In the course of a study dealing with the biodegradation of 4-chlorobiphenyl by strain B-206, we noticed that the gram-negative bacterium accumulated different metabolic intermediates depending on the nitrogen source of the medium. Hence, in the presence of nitrate, strain B-206 produced four compounds which were identified as 2- and 4-hydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl and 2- and 4-hydroxy-mononitro-4′-chlorobiphenyl. The accumulation of these compounds in the culture medium indicated the presence of a monooxygenase in strain B-206 leading to the production of arene oxide intermediates. The possible transformation of 4-chlorobiphenyl to an arene oxide by this bacterial strain is a matter of concern because of the high reactivity of these arene oxides with biological material. PMID:16346111

  16. Global distribution of peroxyacetyl nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L. J.; Viezee, W.

    1986-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) atmospheric concentration samples were collected hourly from an ocean vessel 50 mi off the continental coast traveling from Seattle to Chile in 1984. Air concentration data for PAN and light hydrocarbons (LHC) were also taken by aircraft in the same period over Wyoming and Colorado and over the eastern Pacific. The PAN concentrations were higher and more variable in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, increased with altitude, and were higher in the winter than in summer. The summer PAN concentrations were higher in the continental troposphere than in the marine troposphere. The results show that photochemical models of the atmosphere which do not account for the reaction between nonmethane hydrocarbons and PAN will probably overestimate the abundances of NO(x) and HNO3. The collection of further PAN concentration data is recommended as a means to characterizing the moderating role of PAN in the photochemistry of the troposphere.

  17. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  18. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-06

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic water oxidation by ruthenium(II) quaterpyridine (qpy) complexes: evidence for ruthenium(III) qpy-N,N'''-dioxide as the real catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Ng, Siu-Mui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-22

    Polypyridyl and related ligands have been widely used for the development of water oxidation catalysts. Supposedly these ligands are oxidation-resistant and can stabilize high-oxidation-state intermediates. In this work a series of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(qpy)(L)2 ](2+) (qpy=2,2':6',2'':6'',2'''-quaterpyridine; L=substituted pyridine) have been synthesized and found to catalyze Ce(IV) -driven water oxidation, with turnover numbers of up to 2100. However, these ruthenium complexes are found to function only as precatalysts; first, they have to be oxidized to the qpy-N,N'''-dioxide (ONNO) complexes [Ru(ONNO)(L)2 ](3+) which are the real catalysts for water oxidation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition of ruthenium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai Keat, Lee

    Ruthenium (Ru) is one of the noble air-stable transition metals, which has excellent thermal chemical stability, low electrical resistivity, and relatively high work function near the valence band edge of Si. Recently, Ru has been introduced into the semiconductor industries as a result of the interesting chemical, physical, and electrical properties it possessed. So far, investigations of ruthenium films have been centered on material properties of Ru layers, growth using direct current/radiofrequency (DC/RF) magnetron sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition. However, comparatively little work has been carried out using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. In this research work, the growth of Ru film using PLD was investigated. The Ru films were deposited on silicon (Si) substrates employing 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser source. Laser fluence ranged from 2 to 8 J/cm2 was employed, with deposition duration from 5 to 180 minutes under high vacuum condition. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed to study the species and purity of the plasma during the deposition. It was observed that intensity of the Ru species spectra increased with increasing laser fluence and more prominent after laser fluence of 4 J/cm2. No impurities were observed. Film thicknesses ranging from 15 to 280 nm were obtained. As the deposition duration and the laser fluence increased, the thickness of the deposited Ru films increased. It is observed that there was a critical deposition duration value, and this value increases as the laser fluence increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra showed Ru with crystalline orientation of (101), (100), and (002) peaks. The XRD results revealed an enhanced diffraction peak when film thickness increased, under all laser fluences. Grain sizes were deduced from the XRD data by using the Scherrer's formula and the values fall in the range of 20 to 35 nm for the film thickness covering from 50 nm to 250 nm. Besides, the electrical properties of

  1. Sedimentary nitrate reduction and its effect on the N-isotopic composition of oceanic nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Sigman, D. M.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    A prerequisite for assessing denitrification fluxes in a specific environment using water column nitrate N isotope ratios is the knowledge of the expressed N isotope effects of water column and/or benthic denitrification in this environment. Here, we aim at assessing the effects of benthic nitrogen cycling on the N isotopic composition of the oceanic nitrate pool in deep-sea sediments, which are believed to harbour a large portion of the global benthic denitrification. We report 15N/14N ratios of pore water nitrate in pelagic sediments from the deep Bering Sea, where benthic nitrate reduction has previously been identified as a significant sink of fixed nitrogen. Porewater profiles from multicores indicate strong 15N enrichment in porewater nitrate at all stations, as one goes deeper in the sediments and nitrate concentrations decrease (δ15N generally reached 25-35‰). Our data are consistent with variable biological isotope effect (ɛ) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction ranging between 13 to 30 ‰. A one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model including organic matter degradation, nitrification, and denitrification indicates that, although denitrification leads to a pore water nitrate pool that is enriched in 15N, N isotope fractionation is poorly expressed at the scale of sediment-water nitrate exchange, independent of whether sediments are a net sink or a net source of nitrate. The apparent nitrate isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification on nitrate in overlying waters is generally below 2‰, as a result of diffusive transport limitation into, and within, the sediments and/or the production of light nitrate during nitrification. Thus, our data suggest that the low expressed isotope effect of benthic denitrification observed previously in reactive shelf sediments also applies to deep-sea sediments. However, where ammonium fluxes out of the sediments, it is enriched in 15-N, and may ultimately lead to an N-isotopic enrichment of the water-column nitrate

  2. Pseudo-constitutivity of nitrate-responsive genes in nitrate reductase mutants.

    PubMed

    Schinko, Thorsten; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Amillis, Sotiris; Strauss, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    In fungi, transcriptional activation of genes involved in NO3(-) assimilation requires the presence of an inducer (nitrate or nitrite) and low intracellular concentrations of the pathway products ammonium or glutamine. In Aspergillus nidulans, the two transcription factors NirA and AreA act synergistically to mediate nitrate/nitrite induction and nitrogen metabolite derepression, respectively. In all studied fungi and in plants, mutants lacking nitrate reductase (NR) activity express nitrate-metabolizing enzymes constitutively without the addition of inducer molecules. Based on their work in A. nidulans, Cove and Pateman proposed an "autoregulation control" model for the synthesis of nitrate metabolizing enzymes in which the functional nitrate reductase molecule would act as co-repressor in the absence and as co-inducer in the presence of nitrate. However, NR mutants could simply show "pseudo-constitutivity" due to induction by nitrate which accumulates over time in NR-deficient strains. Here we examined this possibility using strains which lack flavohemoglobins (fhbs), and are thus unable to generate nitrate internally, in combination with nitrate transporter mutations (nrtA, nrtB) and a GFP-labeled NirA protein. Using different combinations of genotypes we demonstrate that nitrate transporters are functional also in NR null mutants and show that the constitutive phenotype of NR mutants is not due to nitrate accumulation from intracellular sources but depends on the activity of nitrate transporters. However, these transporters are not required for nitrate signaling because addition of external nitrate (10 mM) leads to standard induction of nitrate assimilatory genes in the nitrate transporter double mutants. We finally show that NR does not regulate NirA localization and activity, and thus the autoregulation model, in which NR would act as a co-repressor of NirA in the absence of nitrate, is unlikely to be correct. Results from this study instead suggest that

  3. Pseudo-constitutivity of nitrate-responsive genes in nitrate reductase mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schinko, Thorsten; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Amillis, Sotiris; Strauss, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In fungi, transcriptional activation of genes involved in NO3- assimilation requires the presence of an inducer (nitrate or nitrite) and low intracellular concentrations of the pathway products ammonium or glutamine. In Aspergillus nidulans, the two transcription factors NirA and AreA act synergistically to mediate nitrate/nitrite induction and nitrogen metabolite derepression, respectively. In all studied fungi and in plants, mutants lacking nitrate reductase (NR) activity express nitrate-metabolizing enzymes constitutively without the addition of inducer molecules. Based on their work in A. nidulans, Cove and Pateman proposed an “autoregulation control” model for the synthesis of nitrate metabolizing enzymes in which the functional nitrate reductase molecule would act as co-repressor in the absence and as co-inducer in the presence of nitrate. However, NR mutants could simply show “pseudo-constitutivity” due to induction by nitrate which accumulates over time in NR-deficient strains. Here we examined this possibility using strains which lack flavohemoglobins (fhbs), and are thus unable to generate nitrate internally, in combination with nitrate transporter mutations (nrtA, nrtB) and a GFP-labeled NirA protein. Using different combinations of genotypes we demonstrate that nitrate transporters are functional also in NR null mutants and show that the constitutive phenotype of NR mutants is not due to nitrate accumulation from intracellular sources but depends on the activity of nitrate transporters. However, these transporters are not required for nitrate signaling because addition of external nitrate (10 mM) leads to standard induction of nitrate assimilatory genes in the nitrate transporter double mutants. We finally show that NR does not regulate NirA localization and activity, and thus the autoregulation model, in which NR would act as a co-repressor of NirA in the absence of nitrate, is unlikely to be correct. Results from this study instead suggest

  4. In vitro evaluation of ruthenium complexes for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenna; Xie, Qiang; Lai, Linglin; Mo, Zhentao; Peng, Xiaofang; Leng, Ennian; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hongxia; Li, Yiqi; Mei, Wenjie; Gao, Shuying

    2017-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising anti-tumor treatment strategy. Photosensitizer is one of the most important components of PDT. In this work, the anticancer activities of PDT mediated by six new ruthenium porphyrin complexes were screened. The mechanisms of the most efficacious candidate were investigated. Photocytotoxicity of the six porphyrins was tested. The most promising complex, Rup-03, was further investigated using Geimsa staining, which indirectly detects reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subcellular localization. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, c-Myc gene expression, and telomerase activities were also assayed. Rup-03 and Rup-04 had the lowest IC50 values. Rup-03 had an IC50 value of 29.5±2.3μM in HepG2 cells and 59.0±6.1μM in RAW264.7 cells, while Rup-04 had an IC50 value of 40.0±3.8μM in SGC-7901 cells. The complexes also induced cellular morphological changes and impaired cellular ability to scavenge ROS, and accumulated preferentially in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Rup-03 reduced MMP levels, induced apoptosis, and repressed both c-Myc mRNA expression and telomerase activity in HepG2 cells. Among six candidates, Rup-03-mediated PDT is most effective against HepG2 and RAW264.7, with a similar efficacy as that of Rup-04-mediated PDT against SGC-7901 cells. Repression of ROS scavenging activities and c-Myc expression, which mediated DNA damage-induced cell apoptosis and repression of telomerase activity, respectively, were found to be involved in the anticancer mechanisms of Rup-03. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ruthenium porphyrin-induced photodamage in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bogoeva, Vanya; Siksjø, Monica; Sæterbø, Kristin G; Melø, Thor Bernt; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Lindgren, Mikael; Gederaas, Odrun A

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment for solid malignant and flat tumors. Light activated sensitizers catalyze photochemical reactions that produce reactive oxygen species which can cause cancer cell death. In this work we investigated the photophysical properties of the photosensitizer ruthenium(II) porphyrin (RuP), along with its PDT efficiency onto rat bladder cancer cells (AY27). Optical spectroscopy verified that RuP is capable to activate singlet oxygen via blue and red absorption bands and inter system crossing (ISC) to the triplet state. In vitro experiments on AY27 indicated increased photo-toxicity of RuP (20μM, 18h incubation) after cell illumination (at 435nm), as a function of blue light exposure. Cell survival fraction was significantly reduced to 14% after illumination of 20μM RuP with 15.6J/cm(2), whereas the "dark toxicity" of 20μM RuP was 17%. Structural and morphological changes of cells were observed, due to RuP accumulation, as well as light-dependent cell death was recorded by confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry verified that PDT-RuP (50μM) triggered significant photo-induced cellular destruction with a photoxicity of (93%±0.9%). Interestingly, the present investigation of RuP-PDT showed that the dominating mode of cell death is necrosis. RuP "dark toxicity" compared to the conventional chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin was higher, both evaluated by the MTT assay (24h). In conclusion, the present investigation shows that RuP with or without photoactivation induces cell death of bladder cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. {sup 106}Ruthenium Plaque Therapy (RPT) for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Naoya; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ito, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Inaba, Koji; Kuroda, Yuki; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sakudo, Mototake; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Itami, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of episcleral {sup 106}ruthenium plaque therapy (RPT) in the management of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred one RPTs were retrospectively analyzed that were performed in 90 eyes of 85 patients with retinoblastoma at National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Each RPT had a corresponding tumor and 101 tumors were considered in the analysis of local control. Median follow-up length was 72.8 months. Median patient age at the RPT was 28 months. Median prescribed doses at reference depth and outer surface of the sclera were 47.4 Gy and 162.3 Gy, respectively. Results: Local control rate (LCR) and ocular retention rate (ORR) at 2 years were 33.7% and 58.7%, respectively. Unilateral disease, International Classification of Retinoblastoma group C or more advanced at the first presentation or at the time of RPT, vitreous and/or subretinal seeding, tumor size greater than 5 disc diameter (DD), reference depth greater than 5 mm, dose rate at reference depth lower than 0.7 Gy/hour, dose at the reference depth lower than 35 Gy, and (biologically effective dose with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10 Gy) at the reference depth lower than 40 Gy{sub 10} were associated with unfavorable LCR. Two patients died of metastatic disease. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 12 eyes (13.3%), proliferative retinopathy in 6 (6.7%), rubeosis iris in 2 (2.2%), and posterior subcapsular cataract in 23 (25.6%). Conclusion: RPT is an effective eye-preserving treatment for retinoblastoma.

  7. Regression of Lung Cancer by Hypoxia Sensitizing Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Abhishek; Janaratne, Thamara; Krishnan, Arthi; Singhal, Sharad S.; Yadav, Sushma; Dayoub, Adam S.; Hawkins, Doyle L.; Awasthi, Sanjay; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    The ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) Δ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)]Cl2 (Δ-[3]Cl2) and ΔΔ-[(phen)2Ru(tatpp)Ru(phen)2]Cl4 (ΔΔ-[4]Cl4) are a new generation of metal-based anti-tumor agents. These RPCs bind DNA via intercalation of the tatpp ligand which itself is redox-active and easily reduced at biologically relevant potentials. We have previously shown that RPC 44+ cleaves DNA when reduced by glutathione to a radical species, and that this DNA cleavage is potentiated under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here we show that 32+ also exhibits free-radical mediated DNA cleavage in vitro, and that 32+ and 44+ both exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cultured malignant cell lines, and marked inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The murine acute toxicity of RPCs 32+ and 44+ (maximum tolerable doses (MTD’s) ~ 65 µmol/kg) is comparable with that for cisplatin (LD50 ~57 µmol/kg) but unlike cisplatin, RPC’s are generally cleared from the body unchanged via renal excretion without appreciable metabolism or nephrotoxic side effects. RPCs 32+ and 44+ are demonstrated to suppress growth of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (~83%), show potentiated cytotoxicity in vitro under hypoxic conditions, and induce apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The novel hypoxia-enhanced DNA cleavage activity and biological activity suggest a promising new anti-cancer pharmacophore based on metal complexes with aromatic ligands that are easily reduced at biologically accessible potentials. PMID:23443803

  8. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Serin, Ramis B.; Abdullayeva, Nazrin; Sankir, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Thin-film ruthenium (Ru) and copper (Cu) binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min−1 was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation. PMID:28773097

  9. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Serin, Ramis B; Abdullayeva, Nazrin; Sankir, Mehmet

    2017-07-02

    Thin-film ruthenium (Ru) and copper (Cu) binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min(-1) was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation.

  10. A combined experimental and computational study on the cycloisomerization of 2-ethynylbiaryls catalyzed by dicationic arene ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kazuma; Shibuya, Masatoshi

    2015-05-04

    Ruthenium-catalyzed cycloisomerization of 2-ethynylbiaryls was investigated to identify an optimal ruthenium catalyst system. A combination of [η(6) -(p-cymene)RuCl2 (PR3 )] and two equivalents of AgPF6 effectively converted 2-ethynylbiphenyls into phenanthrenes in chlorobenzene at 120 °C over 20 h. Moreover, 2-ethynylheterobiaryls were found to be favorable substrates for this ruthenium catalysis, thus achieving the cycloisomerization of previously unused heterocyclic substrates. Moreover, several control experiments and DFT calculations of model complexes were performed to propose a plausible reaction mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Amidines for versatile ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative C-H activations with internal alkynes and acrylates.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; John, Michael; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-04-25

    Cationic ruthenium complexes derived from KPF6 or AgOAc enabled efficient oxidative CH functionalizations on aryl and heteroaryl amidines. Thus, oxidative annulations of diversely decorated internal alkynes provided expedient access to 1-aminoisoquinolines, while catalyzed C-H activations with substituted acrylates gave rise to structurally novel 1-iminoisoindolines. The powerful ruthenium(II) catalysts displayed a remarkably high site-, regio- and, chemoselectivity. Therefore, the catalytic system proved tolerant of a variety of important electrophilic functional groups. Detailed mechanistic studies provided strong support for the cationic ruthenium(II) catalysts to operate by a facile, reversible C-H activation.

  12. SEPARATION OF URANYL AND RUTHENIUM VALUES BY THE TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranyl values from ruthenium values contained in an aqueous 3 to 4 M nitric acid solution. After the addition of hydrogen peroxide to obtain a concentration of 0.3 M, the uranium is selectively extracted with kerosene-diluted tributyl phosphate.

  13. Probing the structural evolution of ruthenium doped germanium clusters: Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Shengjie; Hermann, Andreas; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Chuanzhao; Lu, Cheng; Xu, Hongguang; Zheng, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of ruthenium doped germanium clusters, RuGen− (n = 3–12), and their corresponding neutral species. Photoelectron spectra of RuGen− clusters are measured at 266 nm. The vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and adiabatic detachment energies (ADEs) are obtained. Unbiased CALYPSO structure searches confirm the low-lying structures of anionic and neutral ruthenium doped germanium clusters in the size range of 3 ≤ n ≤ 12. Subsequent geometry optimizations using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91/LANL2DZ level are carried out to determine the relative stability and electronic properties of ruthenium doped germanium clusters. It is found that most of the anionic and neutral clusters have very similar global features. Although the global minimum structures of the anionic and neutral clusters are different, their respective geometries are observed as the low-lying isomers in either case. In addition, for n > 8, the Ru atom in RuGen−/0 clusters is absorbed endohedrally in the Ge cage. The theoretically predicted vertical and adiabatic detachment energies are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The excellent agreement between DFT calculations and experiment enables a comprehensive evaluation of the geometrical and electronic structures of ruthenium doped germanium clusters. PMID:27439955

  14. Synthesis and anticancer activity of carbosilane metallodendrimers based on arene ruthenium(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Díaz, Marta; Elie, Benelita T; Gómez-Sal, Pilar; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez, Rafael; Contel, María; Javier de la Mata, F

    2016-04-28

    A series of new organometallic carbosilane dendrimers (first and second generation) and the corresponding non-dendritic mononuclear based on ruthenium arene fragments are described. The metallodendrimers were prepared by reactions of the precursor [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2]2 with carbosilane dendrimers functionalized with N-donor monodentate ligands such as NH2- and pyridine, or with N,O-, N,N-chelating imine ligands. While the dendrimer precursors are insoluble in DMSO or water, novel metallodendrimers are soluble in DMSO and some of them are even highly soluble in water. The molecular structure of the "Ru-NH2" mononuclear compound (zero generation) was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The cytotoxicity activity of these dendritic structures was evaluated in several human cancer cell lines and compared with that of the corresponding mononuclear ruthenium complexes. Most compounds display significant cytotoxic activities in the low micromolar range with the first generation ruthenium dendrimers being the most active compounds. The cell death type for selected compounds has been studied as well as their reactivity towards relevant biomolecules such as DNA, Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Cathepsin-B. All the data point to a mode of action different from that of cisplatin for most complexes. First generation ruthenium dendrimers inhibit Cathepsin-B, which may suggest potential antimetastatic properties of these compounds.

  15. Differential Reactivities of Enyne Substrates in Ruthenium- and Palladium-Catalyzed Cycloisomerizations

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Gutierrez, Alicia C.; Ferreira, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Complementary methods for the transition metal-catalyzed enyne cycloisomerizations of cyclic olefins have been developed. By using distinct ruthenium and palladium catalysts, decalins and 7,6-bicycles can be obtained with dichotomous stereochemical outcomes. The change in mechanism that accompanies the change in metal affords trans-fused 1,4-dienes with ruthenium and their cis-fused diastereomers under palladium catalysis. In the reactions under ruthenium catalysis, a coordinating group is required, and acts to direct the metal to the same side of the carbocycle, resulting in the observed trans diastereoselectivity. Subtle changes in the carbocyclic substrate led to the discovery of a heretofore-unobserved mechanistic pathway, providing bicyclic cycloisomerization products under palladium catalysis and tricyclic products under ruthenium catalysis in DMA. The differential effect of DMA supports a mechanism in which the coordination requirements of the two paths differ, allowing for the reaction to be shuttled through the metallacycle pathway (generating tricyclic products) when DMA is used as a solvent. PMID:20545356

  16. Investigation of ruthenium dioxide formation mechanisms in containment glass synthesized by liquid feed

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, K.; Shimada, T.; Sako, N.; Enokida, Y.; Schuller, S.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, T.

    2013-07-01

    The presenting paper focuses on the structural configuration of ruthenium in vitreous matrices with the objective of obtaining more insight into ruthenium incorporation and solubilization mechanisms in borosilicate glasses. To determine the structural effect of an increasing RuO{sub 2} in a borosilicate glass, a series of glass samples were selected from a benchmark composition. {sup 11}B NMR shows that the borate network is influenced by the presence of RuO{sub 2} in the glass: the addition of 2% RuO{sub 2} in a borosilicate glass led to a significant rise of BO{sub 4}. RuO{sub 2} precipitated in the glass does not seem to be the cause of this modification because when RuO{sub 2} increase there is no further change of BO{sub 4} fraction. This effect can be therefore attributed to RuO{sub 2} dissolved in the glass. RuO{sub 2} is known to have a very low solubility in borosilicate glasses (50 to 2000 ppm depending on the temperature, sodium concentration and conditions of synthesis). The link between the ruthenium and the borated network is not yet clearly identified, however, assumptions can be made such as the formation of Ru-O-B when a sufficient quantity of Ru is add (> 400 ppm). Ruthenium could play the role of silicon in increasing the possibility of bridging bond formation with boron coordination number IV.

  17. Selective nuclei accumulation of ruthenium(II) complex enantiomers that target G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongdong; Liu, Yanan; Yu, Qianqian; Liu, Du; Zhou, Yanhui; Liu, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Different enantiomers exhibit large differences in their biological activity and/or toxicity, but they rarely involve the relationship of the agents for molecular and cellular imaging with the chiral structure of ruthenium complexes. Here, we report that an enantiomer of a polypyridyl ruthenium complex can selectively accumulate in the nucleus of HepG2 cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies show that this phenomenon occurs via a non-endocytotic, but temperature-dependent, mechanism of cellular uptake in HepG2 cells. DNA oligonucleotides with repetitive tracts of guanine bases that can form G-quadruplex structures have aroused interest as therapeutic agents and as targets for anticancer drug design. Various biophysical techniques show that the Λ-enantiomer of ruthenium complexes can selectively stabilize human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and has a strong preference for G-quadruplex over duplex DNA. Judged from the NMR results, we speculate that at higher 4:1 ligand/G-quadruplex stoichiometry, complex Λ-Ru is likely to bind with each groove of the tetraplex in a dimeric form or intercalate with the G-tetrad in the 3' terminal face and coexist with other modes. The molecular modeling analysis is in agreement with the NMR titrations performed in this investigation indicating that ruthenium complexes are actually characterized by a mixed binding mode. The results provide many opportunities for the development of novel agents for living cell-related studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of Photoactive Ruthenium Complexes to Study Electron Transfer and Proton Pumping in Cytochrome Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the development and application of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO uses four electrons from Cc to reduce O2 to two waters, and pumps four protons across the membrane. The electron transfer reactions in cytochrome oxidase are very rapid, and cannot be resolved by stopped-flow mixing techniques. Methods have been developed to covalently attach a photoactive tris(bipyridine)ruthenium group [Ru(II)] to Cc to form Ru-39-Cc. Photoexcitation of Ru(II) to the excited state Ru(II*), a strong reductant, leads to rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in Cc, followed by electron transfer to CuA in CcO with a rate constant of 60,000 s−1. Ruthenium kinetics and mutagenesis studies have been used to define the domain for the interaction between Cc and CcO. New ruthenium dimers have also been developed to rapidly inject electrons into CuA of CcO with yields as high as 60%, allowing measurement of the kinetics of electron transfer and proton release at each step in the oxygen reduction mechanism. PMID:21939635

  19. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Novak, Maria S; Büchel, Gabriel E; Keppler, Bernhard K; Jakupec, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  20. Inhibitory effects of NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes on prion neuropeptide fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; He, Lei; Du, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Prion diseases are a group of infectious and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP) into its abnormal isoform PrP(Sc). PrP106-126 resembles PrP(Sc) in terms of physicochemical and biological characteristics and is used as a common model for the treatment of prion diseases. Inhibitory effects on fibril formation and neurotoxicity of the prion neuropeptide PrP106-126 have been investigated using metal complexes as potential inhibitors. Nevertheless, the binding mechanism between metal complexes and the peptide remains unclear. The present study is focused on the interaction of PrP106-126 with NAMI-A and NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes, including KP418, KP1019, and KP1019-2. Results demonstrated that these ruthenium complexes could bind to PrP106-126 in a distinctive binding mode through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes can also effectively inhibit the aggregation and fibril formation of PrP106-126. The complex KP1019 demonstrated the optimal inhibitory ability upon peptide aggregation, and cytotoxicity because of its large aromatic ligand contribution. The studied complexes could also regulate the copper redox chemistry of PrP106-126 and effectually inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species. Given these findings, ruthenium complexes with relatively low cellular toxicity may be used to develop potential pharmaceutical products against prion diseases.

  1. SORPTION OF ARSENATE AND ARSENITE ON A RUTHENIUM COMPOUND: A MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of arsenate and arsenite was examined on a ruthenium compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. Batch sorption experiments at pH 4,5,6, 7 and 8 were employed to construct constant solid solution ratio isotherms (CSI). After equilibration at the appropriate pH...

  2. Cytoxicity and Apoptotic Mechanism of Ruthenium(II) Amino Acid Complexes in Sarcoma-180 Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Aliny Pereira; Pereira, Flávia Castro; Almeida, Marcio Aurelio Pinheiro; Mello, Francyelli Mariana Santos; Pires, Wanessa Carvalho; Pinto, Thallita Monteiro; Delella, Flávia Karina; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Moreno, Virtudes; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; de Paula Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several decades, much attention has been focused on ruthenium complexes in antitumor therapy. Ruthenium is a transition metal that possesses several advantages for rational antitumor drug design and biological applications. In the present study, five ruthenium complexes containing amino acids were studied in vitro to determine their biological activity against sarcoma-180 tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the complexes was evaluated by an MTT assay, and their mechanism of action was investigated. The results demonstrated that the five complexes inhibited the growth of the S180 tumor cell line, with IC50 values ranging from 22.53 µM to 50.18 µM, and showed low cytotoxicity against normal L929 fibroblast cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the [Ru(gly)(bipy)(dppb)]PF6 complex (2) inhibited the growth of the tumor cells by inducing apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased number of Annexin V-positive cells and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Further investigation showed that complex 2 caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential; activated caspases 3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 and caused a change in the mRNA expression levels of caspase 3, caspase-9 as well as the bax genes. The levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bak were increased. Thus, we demonstrated that ruthenium amino acid complexes are promising drugs against S180 tumor cells, and we recommend further investigations of their role as chemotherapeutic agents for sarcomas. PMID:25329644

  3. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A RUTHENIUM COMPOUND: A MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity ruthenium compound with time at pH 6 employing batch methods and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopies. For the spectroscopic studies, Pb so...

  4. Olefin Ring Closing Metathesis and Hydrosilylation Reaction in Aqueous Medium by Grubbs Second Generation Ruthenium Catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Grubbs second generation ruthenium catalyst was shown to catalyze various olefin ring closing metathesis and hydrosilylation reactions in aqueous medium. Reactions proceeded in pure water without any additives or co-solvents, in a short period of time. We found that inhomogen...

  5. Effects of ruthenium seed layer on the microstructure and spin dynamics of thin permalloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Lichuan; Zhang Huaiwu; Tang Xiaoli; Bai Feiming; Zhong Zhiyong

    2013-02-07

    The spin dynamics and microstructure properties of a sputtered 12 nm Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} thin film have been enhanced by the use of a ruthenium seed layer. Both the ferromagnetic resonance field and linewidth are enhanced dramatically as the thickness of ruthenium seed layer is increased. The surface anisotropy energy constant can also be largely tailored from 0.06 to 0.96 erg/cm{sup -2} by changing the seed layer thickness. The changes to the dynamics magnetization properties are caused by both ruthenium seed layer induced changes in the Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} structure properties and surface topography properties. Roughness induced inhomogeneous linewidth broadening is also seen. The damping constant is highly tunable via the ruthenium thickness. This approach can be used to tailor both the structure and spin dynamic properties of thin Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} films over a wide range. And it may benefit the applications of spin dynamics and spin current based devices.

  6. Recent Advances on Dark and Light-Activated Cytotoxity of Imidazole-Containing Ruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Jia, Jia; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Imidazole derivatives have known to possess a diverse range of pharmacological activity. In particular, one of ruthenium-based derivatives, imidazolium [trans-RuCl4(1H-imidazole)(DMSOS)] (NAMI-A) which is now in clinical trials, opens a new avenue for developing promising ruthenium-based anticancer drugs alternative to Cisplatin. This mini-review overviews some representative examples of imidazole-containing ruthenium complexes (ICRCs) with in vitro anticancer activities. Special attention is paid on ICRCs with the activities more potent than Cisplatin, and their correlation with their DNA binding properties in the context of possible cancer chemotherapeutic applications. The ICRCs are divided into two main categories according to their dark and light activated cytotoxicity; the former case is further clarified into mononuclear complexes including tris(bidentate polypyridyl) ruthenium complexes and those containing monodentatively coordinative imidazole ligands as well as polynuclear complexes. The perspective, challenges and future efforts for investigations into ICRCs are pointed out or suggested.

  7. Synthesis, Anticancer Activity, and Genome Profiling of Thiazolo Arene Ruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Grozav, Adriana; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Balacescu, Loredana; Cheminel, Thomas; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Therrien, Bruno

    2015-11-12

    Sixteen hydrazinyl-thiazolo arene ruthenium complexes of the general formula [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(N,N'-hydrazinyl-thiazolo)Cl]Cl were synthesized. All complexes were tested in vitro for their antiproliferative activity on three tumor cell lines (HeLa, A2780, and A2780cisR) and on a noncancerous cell line (HFL-1). A superior cytotoxic activity of the ruthenium complexes as compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin, on both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells, was observed. In addition, the biological activity of two selected derivatives was evaluated using microarray gene expression assay and ingenuity pathway analysis. p53 signaling was identified as an important pathway modulated by both arene ruthenium compounds. New activated molecules such as FAS, ZMAT3, PRMT2, BBC3/PUMA, and PDCD4, whose overexpressions are correlated with overcoming resistance to cisplatin therapy, were also identified as potential targets. Moreover, the arene ruthenium complexes can be used in association with cisplatin to prevent cisplatin resistance development and synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

  8. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  9. Cis-Selective Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization with Ruthenium Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Keitz, Benjamin K.; Fedorov, Alexey; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Using a C-H activated, ruthenium-based metathesis catalyst, the cis selective ROMP of several monocyclic alkenes, as well as norbornene and oxanorbornene-type monomers is reported. The cis content of the isolated polymers depended heavily on monomer structure and temperature. By lowering the temperature, cis content as high as 96% could be obtained. PMID:22239675

  10. Strategy to tether organometallic ruthenium-arene anticancer compounds to recombinant human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ang, Wee Han; Daldini, Elisa; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Dyson, Paul J

    2007-10-29

    In order to utilize macromolecules for drug targeting and delivery, a strategy to tether organometallic ruthenium-arene drugs to carrier protein molecules was developed. The approach involves the design of a drug fragment capable of conjugating to linker molecules on a modified carrier protein via hydrazone bond formation. The proof-of-concept using recombinant human serum albumin is described.

  11. Ruthenium bipyridyl tethered porous organosilica: a versatile, durable and reusable heterogeneous photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Jana, Avijit; Mondal, John; Borah, Parijat; Mondal, Sujan; Bhaumik, Asim; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-07-07

    A versatile heterogeneous photocatalysis protocol was developed by using ruthenium bipyridyl tethered porous organosilica (Ru-POS). The versatility of the Ru-POS catalyst in organo-photocatalysis was explored by (i) oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch ester, (ii) reductive dehalogenation of alkyl halides, and (iii) functional group interconversion (FGI) of alcohols to alkyl halides.

  12. Probing the structural evolution of ruthenium doped germanium clusters: Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Shengjie; Hermann, Andreas; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Chuanzhao; Lu, Cheng; Xu, Hongguang; Zheng, Weijun

    2016-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of ruthenium doped germanium clusters, RuGen- (n = 3-12), and their corresponding neutral species. Photoelectron spectra of RuGen- clusters are measured at 266 nm. The vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and adiabatic detachment energies (ADEs) are obtained. Unbiased CALYPSO structure searches confirm the low-lying structures of anionic and neutral ruthenium doped germanium clusters in the size range of 3 ≤ n ≤ 12. Subsequent geometry optimizations using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91/LANL2DZ level are carried out to determine the relative stability and electronic properties of ruthenium doped germanium clusters. It is found that most of the anionic and neutral clusters have very similar global features. Although the global minimum structures of the anionic and neutral clusters are different, their respective geometries are observed as the low-lying isomers in either case. In addition, for n > 8, the Ru atom in RuGen-/0 clusters is absorbed endohedrally in the Ge cage. The theoretically predicted vertical and adiabatic detachment energies are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The excellent agreement between DFT calculations and experiment enables a comprehensive evaluation of the geometrical and electronic structures of ruthenium doped germanium clusters.

  13. Probing the structural evolution of ruthenium doped germanium clusters: Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Shengjie; Hermann, Andreas; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Chuanzhao; Lu, Cheng; Xu, Hongguang; Zheng, Weijun

    2016-07-21

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of ruthenium doped germanium clusters, RuGen(-) (n = 3-12), and their corresponding neutral species. Photoelectron spectra of RuGen(-) clusters are measured at 266 nm. The vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and adiabatic detachment energies (ADEs) are obtained. Unbiased CALYPSO structure searches confirm the low-lying structures of anionic and neutral ruthenium doped germanium clusters in the size range of 3 ≤ n ≤ 12. Subsequent geometry optimizations using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91/LANL2DZ level are carried out to determine the relative stability and electronic properties of ruthenium doped germanium clusters. It is found that most of the anionic and neutral clusters have very similar global features. Although the global minimum structures of the anionic and neutral clusters are different, their respective geometries are observed as the low-lying isomers in either case. In addition, for n > 8, the Ru atom in RuGen(-/0) clusters is absorbed endohedrally in the Ge cage. The theoretically predicted vertical and adiabatic detachment energies are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The excellent agreement between DFT calculations and experiment enables a comprehensive evaluation of the geometrical and electronic structures of ruthenium doped germanium clusters.

  14. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Teresa L; Phillips, Susan R; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2016-12-13

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, light-driven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes that provide a sterically bulky, photolabile moiety for transiently "caging" biologically active molecules. Photouncaging involves the use of visible (1-photon) or near-IR (2-photon) light to break one or more bonds between ruthenium and coordinated ligand(s), which can occur on short time scales and in high quantum yields. In this work we demonstrate the use of a model "caged" acetonitrile complex, Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)2(acetonitrile)2, or RuMeCN in an advanced synthesis and physical chemistry laboratory. Students made RuMeCN in an advanced synthesis laboratory course and performed UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The following semester students investigated RuMeCN photolysis kinetics in a physical chemistry laboratory. These two exercises may also be combined to create a 2-week module in an advanced undergraduate laboratory course.

  15. Design of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping in cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the development and application of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO uses four electrons from Cc to reduce O(2) to two waters, and pumps four protons across the membrane. The electron transfer reactions in cytochrome oxidase are very rapid, and cannot be resolved by stopped-flow mixing techniques. Methods have been developed to covalently attach a photoactive tris(bipyridine)ruthenium group [Ru(II)] to Cc to form Ru-39-Cc. Photoexcitation of Ru(II) to the excited state Ru(II*), a strong reductant, leads to rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in Cc, followed by electron transfer to Cu(A) in CcO with a rate constant of 60,000s(-1). Ruthenium kinetics and mutagenesis studies have been used to define the domain for the interaction between Cc and CcO. New ruthenium dimers have also been developed to rapidly inject electrons into Cu(A) of CcO with yields as high as 60%, allowing measurement of the kinetics of electron transfer and proton release at each step in the oxygen reduction mechanism.

  16. Olefin Ring Closing Metathesis and Hydrosilylation Reaction in Aqueous Medium by Grubbs Second Generation Ruthenium Catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Grubbs second generation ruthenium catalyst was shown to catalyze various olefin ring closing metathesis and hydrosilylation reactions in aqueous medium. Reactions proceeded in pure water without any additives or co-solvents, in a short period of time. We found that inhomogen...

  17. SORPTION OF ARSENATE AND ARSENITE ON A RUTHENIUM COMPOUND: A MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of arsenate and arsenite was examined on a ruthenium compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. Batch sorption experiments at pH 4,5,6, 7 and 8 were employed to construct constant solid solution ratio isotherms (CSI). After equilibration at the appropriate pH...

  18. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  19. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  20. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A RUTHENIUM COMPOUND: A MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity ruthenium compound with time at pH 6 employing batch methods and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopies. For the spectroscopic studies, Pb so...

  1. Method for producing electricity using a platinum-ruthenium-palladium catalyst in a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2004-01-27

    A method for producing electricity using a fuel cell that utilizes a ternary alloy composition as a fuel cell catalyst, the ternary alloy composition containing platinum, ruthenium and palladium. The alloy shows increased activity as compared to well-known catalysts.

  2. Cytoxicity and apoptotic mechanism of ruthenium(II) amino acid complexes in sarcoma-180 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aliny Pereira; Pereira, Flávia Castro; Almeida, Marcio Aurelio Pinheiro; Mello, Francyelli Mariana Santos; Pires, Wanessa Carvalho; Pinto, Thallita Monteiro; Delella, Flávia Karina; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Moreno, Virtudes; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; de Paula Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several decades, much attention has been focused on ruthenium complexes in antitumor therapy. Ruthenium is a transition metal that possesses several advantages for rational antitumor drug design and biological applications. In the present study, five ruthenium complexes containing amino acids were studied in vitro to determine their biological activity against sarcoma-180 tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the complexes was evaluated by an MTT assay, and their mechanism of action was investigated. The results demonstrated that the five complexes inhibited the growth of the S180 tumor cell line, with IC50 values ranging from 22.53 µM to 50.18 µM, and showed low cytotoxicity against normal L929 fibroblast cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the [Ru(gly)(bipy)(dppb)]PF6 complex (2) inhibited the growth of the tumor cells by inducing apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased number of Annexin V-positive cells and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Further investigation showed that complex 2 caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential; activated caspases 3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 and caused a change in the mRNA expression levels of caspase 3, caspase-9 as well as the bax genes. The levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bak were increased. Thus, we demonstrated that ruthenium amino acid complexes are promising drugs against S180 tumor cells, and we recommend further investigations of their role as chemotherapeutic agents for sarcomas.

  3. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  4. Advances in Photocatalysis: A Microreview of Visible Light Mediated Ruthenium and Iridium Catalyzed Organic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Day, Jon I; Teegardin, Kip; Weaver, Jimmie; Chan, John

    2016-07-15

    Photocatalytic organic transformations utilizing ruthenium and iridium complexes have garnered significant attention due to the access they provide to new synthetic spaces through new reaction mechanisms. A survey of the photophysical data and the diversity of transformations that may be accomplished utilizing commercially available photocatalysts is contained herein.

  5. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C-H amidation of arenes including weakly coordinating aromatic ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyu; Kim, Jinwoo; Chang, Sukbok

    2013-06-03

    C-H activation: The ruthenium-catalyzed direct sp(2) C-H amidation of arenes by using sulfonyl azides as the amino source is presented (see scheme). A wide range of substrates were readily amidated including arenes bearing weakly coordinating groups. Synthetic utility of the thus obtained products was demonstrated in the preparation of biologically active heterocycles.

  6. Metalation dictates remote regioselectivity: ruthenium-catalyzed functionalization of meta C(Ar)-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Juliá-Hernández, Francisco; Simonetti, Marco; Larrosa, Igor

    2013-10-25

    Remote control: The title reaction is effective for the sulfonation and alkylation of arenes bearing directing groups. Initial ortho metalation of the substrate forms an intermediate which does not evolve towards functionalization at the CM bond. Instead, the ruthenium catalyst acts as a strong electron-donating group, thus directing a remote electrophilic attack.

  7. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  8. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  9. Diphosphite ligands derived from carbohydrates as stabilizers for ruthenium nanoparticles: promising catalytic systems in arene hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Gual, Aitor; Axet, M Rosa; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Roucoux, Alain; Castillon, Sergio; Claver, Carmen

    2008-06-28

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) were prepared through the hydrogenation of [Ru(COD)(COT)] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, COT = 1,3,5-cyclooctatriene) in the presence of diphosphites derived from carbohydrates as stabilizing agents, and interestingly, structural modifications of the diphosphite backbone were found to influence nanoparticle size and dispersity, as well as their catalytic activity in arene hydrogenation.

  10. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Synthesis of β-Hydroxyamides from β-Ketonitriles in Water.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2016-12-02

    An unprecedented hydration/transfer hydrogenation tandem process for the catalytic conversion of β-ketonitriles into synthetically useful β-hydroxyamides in water has been developed, making use of the ruthenium(II) complex [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cymene){P(4-C6H4F)2Cl}] in combination with sodium formate.

  11. A GSH-activatable ruthenium(ii)-azo photosensitizer for two-photon photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Leli; Kuang, Shi; Li, Guanying; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-02-07

    A glutathione (GSH)-activatable ruthenium(ii)-azo photosensitizer was prepared. The complex had low toxicity towards cells under dark conditions. It exhibited excellent phototoxicity under two-photon excitation (810 nm) and thus was developed as a two-photon photodynamic anticancer agent for cancer therapy.

  12. Simultaneous determination of iron and ruthenium as ternary complexes by extractive second derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Toral, M I; Richter, P; Tapia, A E; Hernández, J

    1999-08-23

    A highly sensitive and selective second derivative spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of ruthenium and iron in mixtures. The method is based on the formation of the binary complexes of iron and ruthenium with 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) in the presence of ethyleneglycol. These complexes are formed at pH 4.0-6.0 upon heating at 90 degrees C for 60 min. The ternary perchlorate complexes are then separated by liquid-liquid extraction. The extracts were evaluated directly by derivative spectrophotometric measurement, using the zero-crossing approach for determination of both analytes. Ruthenium and iron were thus determined in the ranges 9.6-450 and 16.3-280 ng/ml, respectively, in the presence of one another. The detection limits achieved (3sigma) were found to be 2.9 ng/ml of ruthenium and 4.9 ng/ml of iron. The relative standard deviations were in all instances less than 1.5%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of both analytes in synthetic mixtures.

  13. An improved ruthenium catalyst for the environmentally benign amination of primary and secondary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Dirk; Tillack, Annegret; Michalik, Dirk; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2007-03-05

    The N-alkylation of amines in the presence of different ruthenium catalysts generated in situ was investigated. Among the various catalysts tested, the combination of [Ru3(CO)12] and N-phenyl-2-(dicyclohexylphosphanyl)pyrrole showed the best performance. By applying this novel catalyst, a variety of functionalized alcohols and amines were converted into the corresponding secondary amines in high yield.

  14. A new designed hydrazine group-containing ruthenium complex used for catalytic hydrogenation of esters.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuefeng; Wang, Qingli; Liu, Yuanhua; Wang, Fangyuan; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2015-08-07

    A hydrazine group-containing nitrogen-phosphine ligand and corresponding ruthenium complexes were synthesized. When these complexes were used for hydrogenation of esters, excellent performance was observed (TON up to 17, 200). A wide substrate scope was suitable for this catalytic system.

  15. Dithia[3.3]paracyclophane-based monometal ruthenium acetylide complexes: synthesis, characterization and substituent effects.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingxun; Ou, Yaping; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Jian-Long; Yin, Jun; Yu, Guang-Ao; Liu, Sheng Hua

    2013-05-21

    A series of dithia[3.3]metaparacyclophane-based monometal ruthenium acetylide complexes have been synthesized. All of the complexes have been fully characterised by NMR spectrometry, X-ray crystallography and elemental analyses. At the same time, their basic optical properties, such as UV/Vis absorption spectra, and electrochemical properties have been determined. (1)H NMR and X-ray crystal structure studies reveal that there are intramolecular C-H···π interactions in these ruthenium complexes, in both solution and solid states. Electrochemical studies reveal that the substituted groups on the dithia[3.3]paracyclophane ring can clearly affect the oxidation activities of the ruthenium center by way of the intramolecular C-H···π interaction. In addition, electron-donating groups facilitate the oxidation of the ruthenium center compared with electron-deficient groups. UV/Vis absorption and IR spectra of some complexes in neutral and oxidized states also have been studied. IR spectra studies indicated that the substituents in the cyclophane have some effects on the ν(C≡C) bands of these complexes in the neutral state and little effect on ν(C≡C) of these complexes in the oxidized state.

  16. CARBON-BASED REACTIVE BARRIER FOR NITRATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a common ground water contaminant related to agricultural activity, waste water disposal, leachate from landfills, septic systems, and industrial processes. This study reports on the performance of a carbon-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that was constructed for in-situ bioremediation of a ground water nitrate plume caused by leakage from a swine CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operation) lagoon. The swine CAFO, located in Logan County, Oklahoma, was in operation from 1992-1999. The overall site remediation strategy includes an ammonia recovery trench to intercept ammonia-contaminated ground water and a hay straw PRB which is used to intercept a nitrate plume caused by nitrification of sorbed ammonia. The PRB extends approximately 260 m to intercept the nitrate plume. The depth of the trench averages 6 m and corresponds to the thickness of the surficial saturated zone; the width of the trench is 1.2 m. Detailed quarterly monitoring of the PRB began in March, 2004, about 1 year after construction activities ended. Nitrate concentrations hydraulically upgradient of the PRB have ranged from 23 to 77 mg/L N, from 0 to 3.2 mg/L N in the PRB, and from 0 to 65 mg/L N hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Nitrate concentrations have generally decreased in downgradient locations with successive monitoring events. Mass balance considerations indicate that nitrate attenuation is dominantly from denitrification but with some component of

  17. CARBON-BASED REACTIVE BARRIER FOR NITRATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a common ground water contaminant related to agricultural activity, waste water disposal, leachate from landfills, septic systems, and industrial processes. This study reports on the performance of a carbon-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that was constructed for in-situ bioremediation of a ground water nitrate plume caused by leakage from a swine CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operation) lagoon. The swine CAFO, located in Logan County, Oklahoma, was in operation from 1992-1999. The overall site remediation strategy includes an ammonia recovery trench to intercept ammonia-contaminated ground water and a hay straw PRB which is used to intercept a nitrate plume caused by nitrification of sorbed ammonia. The PRB extends approximately 260 m to intercept the nitrate plume. The depth of the trench averages 6 m and corresponds to the thickness of the surficial saturated zone; the width of the trench is 1.2 m. Detailed quarterly monitoring of the PRB began in March, 2004, about 1 year after construction activities ended. Nitrate concentrations hydraulically upgradient of the PRB have ranged from 23 to 77 mg/L N, from 0 to 3.2 mg/L N in the PRB, and from 0 to 65 mg/L N hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Nitrate concentrations have generally decreased in downgradient locations with successive monitoring events. Mass balance considerations indicate that nitrate attenuation is dominantly from denitrification but with some component of

  18. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  19. Vertical Nitrate Fluxes in the Oligotrophic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Marlon R.; Harrison, W. Glen; Oakey, Neil S.; Hebert, David; Platt, Trevor

    1986-11-01

    The vertical flux of nitrate across the thermocline in the upper ocean imposes a rigorous constraint on the rate of export of organic carbon from the surface layer of the sea. This export is the primary means by which the oceans can serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the oligotrophic open ocean regions, which make up more than 75% of the world's ocean, the rate of export is currently uncertain by an order of magnitude. For most of the year, the vertical flux of nitrate is that due to vertical turbulent transport of deep water rich in nitrate into the relatively impoverished surface layer. Direct measurements of rates of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, coupled with highly resolved vertical profiles of nitrate and density in the oligotrophic eastern Atlantic showed that the rate of transport, averaged over 2 weeks, was 0.14 (0.002 to 0.89, 95% confidence interval) millimole of nitrate per square meter per day and was statistically no different from the integrated rate of nitrate uptake as measured by incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrate. The stoichiometrically equivalent loss of carbon from the upper ocean, which is the relevant quantity for the carbon dioxide and climate question, is then fixed at 0.90 (0.01 to 5.70) millimole of carbon per square meter per day. These rates are much lower than recent estimates based on in situ changes in oxygen over annual scales; they are consistent with a biologically unproductive oligotrophic ocean.

  20. Mechanistic study of hydrogen transfer to imines from a hydroxycyclopentadienyl ruthenium hydride. Experimental support for a mechanism involving coordination of imine to ruthenium prior to hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Samec, Joseph S M; Ell, Alida H; Aberg, Jenny B; Privalov, Timofei; Eriksson, Lars; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2006-11-08

    Reaction of [2,3,4,5-Ph(4)(eta(5)-C(4)COH)Ru(CO)(2)H] (2) with different imines afforded ruthenium amine complexes at low temperatures. At higher temperatures in the presence of 2, the complexes decomposed to give [Ru(2)(CO)(4)(mu-H)(C(4)Ph(4)COHOCC(4)Ph(4))] (1) and free amine. Electron-rich imines gave ruthenium amine complexes with 2 at a lower temperature than did electron-deficient imines. The negligible deuterium isotope effect (k(RuHOH)/k(RuDOD) = 1.05) observed in the reaction of 2 with N-phenyl[1-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethylidene]amine (12) shows that neither hydride (RuH) nor proton (OH) is transferred to the imine in the rate-determining step. In the dehydrogenation of N-phenyl-1-phenylethylamine (4) to the corresponding imine 8 by [2,3,4,5-Ph(4)(eta(4)-C(4)CO)Ru(CO)(2)] (A), the kinetic isotope effects observed support a stepwise hydrogen transfer where the isotope effect for C-H cleavage (k(CHNH)/k(CDNH) = 3.24) is equal to the combined (C-H, N-H) isotope effect (k(CHNH)/k(CDND) = 3.26). Hydrogenation of N-methyl(1-phenylethylidene)amine (14) by 2 in the presence of the external amine trap N-methyl-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethylamine (16) afforded 90-100% of complex [2,3,4,5-Ph(4)(eta(4)-C(4)CO)]Ru(CO)(2)NH(CH(3))(CHPhCH(3)) (15), which is the complex between ruthenium and the amine newly generated from the imine. At -80 degrees C the reaction of hydride 2 with 4-BnNH-C(6)H(9)=NPh (18), with an internal amine trap, only afforded [2,3,4,5-Ph(4)(eta(4)-C(4)CO)](CO)(2)RuNH(Ph)(C(6)H(10)-4-NHBn) (19), where the ruthenium binds to the amine originating from the imine, showing that neither complex A nor the diamine is formed. Above -8 degrees C complex 19 rearranged to the thermodynamically more stable [Ph(4)(eta(4)-C(4)CO)](CO)(2)RuNH(Bn)(C(6)H(10)-4-NHPh) (20). These results are consistent with an inner sphere mechanism in which the substrate coordinates to ruthenium prior to hydrogen transfer and are difficult to explain with the outer sphere pathway previously

  1. Use of Ruthenium Photooxidation Techniques to Study Electron Transfer in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Francis; Durham, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Ruthenium photooxidation methods are presented to study electron transfer between the cytochrome bc1 complex and cytochrome c, and within the cytochrome bc1 complex. Methods are described to prepare a ruthenium cytochrome c derivative, Ruz-39-Cc, by labeling the single sulfhydryl on yeast H39C;C102T iso-1-Cc with the reagent Ru(bpz)2(4-bromomethyl-4′-methylbipyridine). The ruthenium complex attached to Cys-39 on the opposite side of Cc from the heme crevice does not affect the interaction with cyt bc1. Laser excitation of reduced Ruz-39-Cc results in photooxidation of heme c within 1 μs with a yield of 20%. Flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between reduced yeast cytochrome bc1 and Ruz-39-Cc leads to electron transfer from heme c1 to heme c with a rate constant of 1.4 × 104 s-1. Methods are described for the use of the ruthenium dimer, Ru2D, to photooxidize cyt c1 in the cytochrome bc1 complex within 1 μs with a yield of 20%. Electron transfer from the Rieske iron-sulfur center [2Fe2S] to cyt c1 was detected with a rate constant of 6 × 104 s-1 in R. sphaeroides cyt bc1 using this method. This electron transfer step is rate-limited by the rotation of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein in a conformational gating mechanism. This method provides critical information on the dynamics of rotation of the iron-sulfur protein (ISP) as it transfers electrons from QH2 in the Qo site to cyt c1 These ruthenium photooxidation methods can be used to measure many of the electron transfer reactions in cytochrome bc1 complexes from any source. PMID:19348884

  2. The nature of unsupported uranium-ruthenium bonds: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Patel, Dipti; Cornish, Andrew D; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Liddle, Stephen T

    2011-09-26

    Four new uranium-ruthenium complexes, [(Tren(TMS))URu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)] (9), [(Tren(DMSB))URu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)] (10), [(Ts(Tolyl))(THF)URu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)] (11), and [(Ts(Xylyl))(THF)URu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)] (12) [Tren(TMS)=N(CH(2)CH(2)NSiMe(3))(3); Tren(DMSB)=N(CH(2)CH(2)NSiMe(2)tBu)(3)]; Ts(Tolyl)=HC(SiMe(2)NC(6)H(4)-4-Me)(3); Ts(Xylyl)=HC(SiMe(2)NC(6)H(3)-3,5-Me(2))(3)], were prepared by a salt-elimination strategy. Structural, spectroscopic, and computational analyses of 9-12 shows: i) the formation of unsupported uranium-ruthenium bonds with no isocarbonyl linkages in the solid state; ii) ruthenium-carbonyl backbonding in the [Ru(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)](-) ions that is tempered by polarization of charge within the ruthenium fragments towards uranium; iii) closed-shell uranium-ruthenium interactions that can be classified as predominantly ionic with little covalent character. Comparison of the calculated U-Ru bond interaction energies (BIEs) of 9-12 with the BIE of [(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(3)URu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)], for which an experimentally determined U-Ru bond disruption enthalpy (BDE) has been reported, suggests BDEs of approximately 150 kJ mol(-1) for 9-12.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer in ruthenium(II)/Tin(IV) multiporphyrin arrays.

    PubMed

    Indelli, M Teresa; Chiorboli, Claudio; Ghirotti, Marco; Orlandi, Michele; Scandola, Franco; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hee-Joon

    2010-11-18

    The photophysical behavior of a series of heterometallic arrays made of a central Sn(IV) porphyrin connected, respectively, to two (SnRu(2)), four (SnRu(4)), or six (SnRu(6)) ruthenium porphyrin units has been studied in dichloromethane. Two different motifs connect the ruthenium porphyrin units to central tin porphyrin core, axial coordination via ditopic bridging ligands and/or coordination to peripheral pyridyl groups of the central porphyrin ring. A remarkable number of electron transfer processes (photoinduced charge separation and recombination processes) have been time-resolved using a combination of emission spectroscopy and fast (nanosecond) and ultrafast (femtosecond) absorption techniques. In these systems both types of molecular components can be selectively populated by light absorption. In all the arrays, the local excited states of these units (the tin porphyrin singlet excited state and the ruthenium porphyrin triplet state) are quenched by electron transfer leading to a charge-separated state where the ruthenium porphyrin unit is oxidized and the tin porphyrin unit is reduced. For each array, the two forward electron transfer processes, as well as the charge recombination process leading back to the ground state, have been kinetically resolved. The rate constants obey standard free-energy correlations with the forward processes lying in the normal free-energy regime and the back reactions in the Marcus inverted region. The comparison between the trimeric (SnRu(2)) and pentameric (SnRu(4)) arrays shows that all the electron transfer processes are faster in the latter than in the former system. This can be rationalized in terms of differences in electronic factors (due to the different connecting motifs) and driving force. In less polar solvents, such as toluene, the energy of the charge-separated states is substantially lifted, leading to a switch (from electron transfer to triplet energy transfer) in the deactivation mechanism of the excited

  4. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  5. Groundwater Head Control of Catchment Nitrate Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Rode, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated nutrient fluxes from agricultural catchments affect downstream water resources. A method to assess nutrient fluxes is the evaluation of the export regime. The export regime classifies the relation between concentration and discharge and integrates mobilization as well as retention processes. Solutes can be exported chemostatically (variance of concentration << variance of discharge) or chemodynamically (variance of concentration ≥ variance of discharge). Starting point of this study is the evaluation of export regimes of nitrate in a series of neighboring sub-catchments of the Central German River Bode catchment. We found an accretion pattern of nitrate with increasing concentration when discharge is increasing and thus a chemodynamic export regime. Here we follow a nested approach and have a closer look at the controls of nitrate export in the small (1.4 km2) headwater catchment of the Sauerbach stream. The Sauerbach catchment is dominated by agricultural land use and is characterized by tile drains. We hypothesize that discharge as well as nitrate export is controlled by the groundwater head variability over time. To that end we follow a joint data analysis of discharge, groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile drains and surface water. At the gauging station the nitrate export is chemodynamic exhibiting the typical accretion pattern also found at the larger scale. Our data analysis shows that nitrate export regime is in two ways controlled by the depth to groundwater and the groundwater head variability: Discharge increases with increasing groundwater heads due to the activation of tile drains. On the other hand, depth to groundwater and passage through the unsaturated zone is the major control of aquifer nitrate concentration. At wells with larger depth to groundwater nitrate concentrations are significantly lower than at more shallow wells indicating retention processes in the unsaturated zone. Therefore the concentration in

  6. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  7. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  8. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... Administrative Review: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate (Ammonium Nitrate) from the Russian...

  9. Selective deposition of nanostructured ruthenium oxide using Tobacco mosaic virus for micro-supercapacitors in solid Nafion electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnerlich, Markus; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Culver, James N.; Ketchum, Douglas R.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional micro-supercapacitor has been developed using a novel bottom-up assembly method combining genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-1Cys), photolithographically defined micropillars and selective deposition of ruthenium oxide on multi-metallic microelectrodes. The three-dimensional microelectrodes consist of a titanium nitride current collector with two functionalized areas: (1) gold coating on the active electrode area promotes TMV-1Cys adhesion, and (2) sacrificial nickel pads dissolve in ruthenium tetroxide plating solution to produce ruthenium oxide on all electrically connected areas. The microfabricated electrodes are arranged in an interdigitated pattern, and the capacitance per electrode has been measured as high as 203 mF cm-2 with solid Nafion electrolyte. The process integration of bio-templated ruthenium oxide with microfabricated electrodes and solid electrolyte is an important advance towards the energy storage needs of mass produced self-sufficient micro-devices.

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed decarbonylative addition reaction of anhydrides with alkynes: a facile synthesis of isocoumarins and α-pyrones.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rashmi; Shekarrao, Kommuri; Gogoi, Sanjib; Boruah, Romesh C

    2015-06-21

    A novel ruthenium catalyzed straightforward and efficient synthesis of isocoumarin and α-pyrone derivatives has been accomplished by the decarbonylative addition reaction of anhydrides with alkynes under thermal conditions.

  11. High contrast solid state electrochromic devices based on Ruthenium Purple nanocomposites fabricated by layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Sahoo, Rabindra; Jinschek, Joerg R; Montazami, Reza; Yochum, Hank M; Beyer, Fredrick L; Kumar, Anil; Heflin, James R

    2008-08-21

    Electrochromic Ruthenium Purple-polymer nanocomposite films, fabricated by multilayer assembly, were found to exhibit sub-second switching speed and the highest electrochromic contrast reported to date for any inorganic material.

  12. Ruthenium Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Paraformaldehyde to Trifluoromethyl Allenes: CF3-Bearing All-Carbon Quaternary Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Brannon; Montgomery, T. Patrick; Krische, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Trifluoromethyl substituted allenes engage in ruthenium catalyzed reductive couplings with paraformaldehyde to form products of hydrohydroxymethylation as single regioisomers. This method enables generation of CF3-bearing all-carbon quaternary stereocenters. PMID:23841678

  13. Ruthenium-catalyzed aerobic oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids: a green, zero-waste route to biobased nitriles.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurens; Verduyckt, Jasper; Stassen, Ivo; Lagrain, Bert; De Vos, Dirk E

    2015-04-18

    Oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids into nitriles was performed using molecular oxygen as terminal oxidant and a heterogeneous ruthenium hydroxide-based catalyst. A range of amino acids was oxidized in very good yield, using water as the solvent.

  14. Global distribution of peroxyacetyl nitrate.

    PubMed

    Singh, H B; Salas, L J; Viezee, W

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) have a central role in the chemistry of the atmosphere, especially in key processes relating to ozone, hydroxyl-radical (OH) and acid formation. High reactivity of NOx (lifetime of 0.5-2 days) precludes hemispheric-scale transport and it has been proposed that non-methane hydrocarbons present in the troposphere can transform NOx into its organic forms principally as peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). PAN is highly stable in the colder regions of the middle and upper troposphere and can provide a mechanism for NOx storage and transport. Once transported, PAN and its homologues can easily release free NOx in warmer atmospheric conditions. PAN is probably ubiquitous and its concentrations could exceed those of NOx in clean tropospheric conditions. Here we present the first view of the global distribution of PAN based on extensive shipboard and aircraft measurements. PAN is more abundant in the Northern than in the Southern Hemisphere and in the continental than in the marine troposphere. In contrast to its behaviour in polluted atmospheres, PAN mixing ratios in winter greatly exceed those in summer. These measurements provide a basis for assessing the significance of PAN as a reservoir of NOx and for extending and validating reactive nitrogen chemistry theory in the troposphere.

  15. The pharmacology of aminoadamantane nitrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqiang; Eu, Jerry; Washburn, Mark; Gong, Tong; Chen, H-S Vincent; James, W Larrick; Lipton, Stuart A; Stamler, Jonathan S; Went, Gregory T; Porter, Seth

    2006-07-01

    Memantine, an aminodamantane, has recently been approved to treat moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease in the US after over 20 years on the market in Europe for treatment of Parkinson's disease. The unique properties of Memantine allow for its selective inhibition of abnormally active NMDA receptor channels while preserving normal glutamate activity and healthy neuronal function. Recently, it has been shown that compounds such as nitroglycerin, used for years for ischemic coronary disease, can also regulate the NMDA receptor channel. Novel compounds have been synthesized in an attempt to combine these activities, in an attempt to synergistically improve upon the activities of both nitrates and aminoadamantanes. We have subjected these compounds to several laboratory tests to compare their ability to affect the function of the NMDA receptor and to dilate blood vessels. These tests provide an initial indication of which of the compounds may have enhanced activity relative to memantine. The results also provide guidance for the synthesis of additional compounds that are likely to have the properties that are being sought.

  16. Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, Donald G.; Felt, Rowland E.; Agnew, Steve; Barney, G. Scott; McKibben, J. Malvyn; Garber, Robert; Lewis, Margie

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the chemical properties and safe conditions for handling and storing solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN, NH2OH•HNO3 or NH3OH+) in nitric acid (HNO3). Section 1.0 summarizes the accidents experienced within the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex involving HAN or hydroxylamine sulfate (HAS), a chemical with similar properties. Section 2.0 describes past and current uses of HAN by DOE, the U.S. Military and foreign countries. Section 3.0 presents the basic chemistry of HAN, including chemical reaction and energy content equations. Section 4.0 provides experience and insights gained from previous uncontrolled reactions involving HAN and experimental data from Hanford & Savannah River Site (SRS). This information was used to develop safe conditions for the storage and handling of HAN as presented in Section 5.0. Section 6.0 summarizes recommendations for safe facility operations involving HAN and future research needs.

  17. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  18. Red electroluminescence of ruthenium sensitizer functionalized by sulfonate anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Shahroosvand, Hashem; Abbasi, Parisa; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Janghouri, Mohammad

    2014-06-28

    We have synthesized five novel Ru(ii) phenanthroline complexes with an additional aryl sulfonate ligating substituent at the 5-position [Ru(L)(bpy)2](BF4)2 (1), [Ru(L)(bpy)(SCN)2] (2), [Ru(L)3](BF4)2 (3), [Ru(L)2(bpy)](BF4)2 (4) and [Ru(L)(BPhen)(SCN)2] (5) (where L = 6-one-[1,10]phenanthroline-5-ylamino)-3-hydroxynaphthalene 1-sulfonic, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, BPhen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline), as both photosensitizers for oxide semiconductor solar cells (DSSCs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The absorption and emission maxima of these complexes red shifted upon extending the conjugation of the phenanthroline ligand. Ru phenanthroline complexes exhibit broad metal to ligand charge transfer-centered electroluminescence (EL) with a maximum near 580 nm. Our results indicated that a particular structure (2) can be considered as both DSSC and OLED devices. The efficiency of the LED performance can be tuned by using a range of ligands. Device (2) has a luminance of 550 cd m(-2) and maximum efficiency of 0.9 cd A(-1) at 18 V, which are the highest values among the five devices. The turn-on voltage of this device is approximately 5 V. The role of auxiliary ligands in the photophysical properties of Ru complexes was investigated by DFT calculation. We have also studied photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductor solar cells based on Ru phenanthroline complexes and an iodine redox electrolyte. A solar energy to electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 0.67% was obtained for Ru complex (2) under standard AM 1.5 irradiation with a short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) of 2.46 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.6 V, and a fill factor (ff) of 40%, which are all among the highest values for ruthenium sulfonated anchoring groups reported so far. Monochromatic incident photon to current conversion efficiency was 23% at 475 nm. Photovoltaic studies clearly indicated dyes with two SCN substituents yielded a higher Jsc for the

  19. High temperature behavior of B2-based ruthenium aluminide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fang

    Ru-modified NiAl-based bond coats have the potential to improve the durability of Superalloy-Thermal Barrier Coating systems (TBCs) for advanced gas turbine engines. A fundamental understanding of the high temperature mechanical behavior across the Ni-Al-Ru B2 phase field can provide direction for the development of these new bond coats for TBCs. The purpose of this study has been to describe the fundamental processes of creep deformation in single phase B2 Ru-Al-Ni ternary alloys which would form the basis for the bond coats. To accomplish this, five ternary alloys with compositions located within the B2 field across the NiAl-RuAl phase region were fabricated and investigated. Special emphasis was placed on characterizing creep deformation and describing the operative creep mechanisms in these alloys. At room temperature, brittle failure was observed in the Ni-rich alloys in compression, while improved strength and ductility were displayed in two Ru-rich ternary alloys at temperatures up to 700°C. Exceptional creep strength was observed in these alloys, as compared to other high melting temperature B2 intermetallics. A continuous increase of the melting temperature and creep resistance with the increasing of the Ru/Ni ratio in these alloys was observed. Post-creep dislocation analyses identified the presence of <100> and <110> edge dislocations in the Ni-rich alloys, while uniformly distributed jogged <100> screw dislocations predominated in the Ru-rich ternary alloys. A transition of the creep mechanism from viscous glide controlled to jogged screw motion in these Ru-Al-Ni ternary B2 alloys with increasing Ru/Ni ratio is demonstrated by the characteristics of the creep deformation process, stress change creep tests, post-creep dislocation analyses, and numerical modeling. Additionally, the knowledge of the cyclic oxidation behavior of ruthenium aluminide-based alloy is essential, as many high-temperature applications for which this intermetallic might be

  20. New methods of nitrate removal from water.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, M; Singh, K P

    2001-01-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater resources originates mainly from the excessive use of fertilisers and uncontrolled land discharges of treated wastewater. This can cause potential health hazards to infants and pregnant women, thus limiting the direct use of the groundwater resources for the human consumption in several parts of the world, including India. The conventional processes used to eliminate nitrate from water are ion exchange, reverse osmosis and electro-dialysis. The utility of these processes has been limited due to their expensive operation and subsequent disposal problem of the generated nitrate waste brine. This paper presents a comprehensive account of the methods/techniques used for the removal of nitrate ion from water during the last 10 years with special reference to the biological denitrification and fate of the metals in decontamination processes.

  1. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  2. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ...- accessible Internet access could obtain the access necessary to register online. 3. How to best notify... ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the identity of...

  3. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly [Orlando, FL; Rossin, Joseph A [Columbus, OH; Knapke, Michael J [Columbus, OH

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  4. Nitrate inhibition of legume nodule growth and activity. II. Short term studies with high nitrate supply

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr) were grown in sand culture with 2 millimolar nitrate for 37 days and then supplied with 15 millimolar nitrate for 7 days. Control plants received 2 millimolar nitrate and 13 millimolar chloride and, after the 7-day treatment period, all plants were supplied with nil nitrate. The temporary treatment with high nitrate inhibited nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity by 80% whether or not Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids had nitrate reductase (NR) activity. The pattern of nitrite accumulation in nodules formed by NR/sup +/ rhizobia was inversely related to the decrease and recovery of nitrogenase activity. However, nitrite concentration in nodules formed by NR/sup -/ rhizobia appeared to be too low to explain the inhibition of nitrogenase. Nodules on plants treated with 15 millimolar nitrate contained higher concentrations of amino N and, especially, ureide N than control nodules and, after withdrawal of nitrate, reduced N content of treated and control nodules returned to similar levels. The accumulation of N/sub 2/ fixation products in nodules in response to high nitrate treatment was observed with three R. japonicum strains, two NR/sup +/ and one NR/sup -/.

  5. New insights into bioactivation of organic nitrates, nitrate tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Daiber, A; Wenzel, P; Oelze, M; Münzel, T

    2008-01-01

    Organic nitrates still represent a group of very effective anti-ischemic drugs used for the treatment of patients with stable angina, acute myocardial infarction and chronic congestive heart failure. Long-term therapy with organic nitrates, however, results in a rapid development of nitrate tolerance blunting their hemodynamic and antiischemic efficacy. Recent studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and a subsequent oxidative inactivation of nitrate reductase, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2), play an important role for the development of nitrate and crosstolerance. The present review focuses firstly on the role of ALDH-2 for organic nitrate bioactivation and secondly on the role of oxidative stress in the development of tolerance and cross-tolerance (endothelial dysfunction) in response to various organic nitrates. Finally, we would like to draw the reader's attention to the protective properties of the organic nitrate pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), which, in contrast to all other organic nitrates, is able to upregulate enzymes with a strong antioxidative capacity thereby preventing tolerance and the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  6. Organic nitrates and nitrate tolerance--state of the art and future developments.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic and antiischemic effects of nitroglycerin (GTN) are lost upon chronic administration due to the rapid development of nitrate tolerance. The mechanism of this phenomenon has puzzled several generations of scientists, but recent findings have led to novel hypotheses. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the mitochondria and the subsequent inhibition of the nitrate-bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) appear to play a central role, at least for GTN, that is, bioactivated by ALDH-2. Importantly, these findings provide the opportunity to reconcile the two "traditional" hypotheses of nitrate tolerance, that is, the one postulating a decreased bioactivation and the concurrent one suggesting a role of oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent animal and human experimental studies suggest that the organic nitrates are not a homogeneous group but demonstrate a broad diversity with regard to induction of vascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and other side effects. In the past, attempts to avoid nitrate-induced side effects have focused on administration schedules that would allow a "nitrate-free interval"; in the future, the role of co-therapies with antioxidant compounds and of activation of endogeneous protective pathways such as the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) will need to be explored. However, the development of new nitrates, for example, tolerance-free aminoalkyl nitrates or combination of nitrate groups with established cardiovascular drugs like ACE inhibitors or AT(1)-receptor blockers (hybrid molecules) may be of great clinical interest.

  7. Nitrate reduction in Haloferax alexandrinus: the case of assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Volkan; Kilic, Gözde Aydoğan; Kutlu, Hatice Mehtap; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2017-05-01

    Haloferax alexandrinus Strain TM JCM 10717(T) = IFO 16590(T) is an extreme halophilic archaeon able to produce significant amounts of canthaxanthin. Its genome sequence has been analysed in this work using bioinformatics tools available at Expasy in order to look for genes encoding nitrate reductase-like proteins: respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and/or assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas). The ability of the cells to reduce nitrate under aerobic conditions was tested. The enzyme in charge of nitrate reduction under aerobic conditions (Nas) has been purified and characterised. It is a monomeric enzyme (72 ± 1.8 kDa) that requires high salt concentration for stability and activity. The optimum pH value for activity was 9.5. Effectiveness of different substrates, electron donors, cofactors and inhibitors was also reported. High nitrite concentrations were detected within the culture media during aerobic/microaerobic cells growth. The main conclusion from the results is that this haloarchaeon reduces nitrate aerobically thanks to Nas and may induce denitrification under anaerobic/microaerobic conditions using nitrate as electron acceptor. The study sheds light on the role played by haloarchaea in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, paying special attention to nitrate reduction processes. Besides, it provides useful information for future attempts on microecological and biotechnological implications of haloarchaeal nitrate reductases.

  8. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  9. The UK Nitrate Time Bomb (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R.; Wang, L.; Stuart, M.; Bloomfield, J.; Gooddy, D.; Lewis, M.; McKenzie, A.

    2013-12-01

    The developed world has benefitted enormously from the intensification of agriculture and the increased availability and use of synthetic fertilizers during the last century. However there has also been unintended adverse impact on the natural environment (water and ecosystems) with nitrate the most significant cause of water pollution and ecosystem damage . Many countries have introduced controls on nitrate, e.g. the European Union's Water Framework and Nitrate Directives, but despite this are continuing to see a serious decline in water quality. The purpose of our research is to investigate and quantify the importance of the unsaturated (vadose) zone pathway and groundwater in contributing to the decline. Understanding nutrient behaviour in the sub-surface environment and, in particular, the time lag between action and improvement is critical to effective management and remediation of nutrient pollution. A readily-transferable process-based model has been used to predict temporal loading of nitrate at the water table across the UK. A time-varying nitrate input function has been developed based on nitrate usage since 1925. Depth to the water table has been calculated from groundwater levels based on regional-scale observations in-filled by interpolated river base levels and vertical unsaturated zone velocities estimated from hydrogeological properties and mapping. The model has been validated using the results of more than 300 unsaturated zone nitrate profiles. Results show that for about 60% of the Chalk - the principal aquifer in the UK - peak nitrate input has yet to reach the water table and concentrations will continue to rise over the next 60 years. The implications are hugely significant especially where environmental objectives must be achieved in much shorter timescales. Current environmental and regulatory management strategies rarely take lag times into account and as a result will be poorly informed, leading to inappropriate controls and conflicts

  10. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  11. Protein Nitration in Placenta – Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Webster, RP; Roberts, VHJ; Myatt, L

    2009-01-01

    Crucial roles of the placenta are disrupted in early and mid-trimester pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. The pathophysiology of these disorders includes a relative hypoxia of the placenta, ischemia/reperfusion injury, an inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species including nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide and superoxide have been shown to participate in trophoblast invasion, regulation of placental vascular reactivity and other events. Superoxide, which regulates expression of redox sensitive genes, has been implicated in up-regulation of transcription factors, antioxidant production, angiogenesis, proliferation and matrix remodeling. When superoxide and nitric oxide are present in abundance, their interaction yields peroxynitrite a potent pro-oxidant, but also alters levels of nitric oxide, which in turn affect physiological functions. The peroxynitrite anion is extremely unstable thus evidence of its formation in vivo has been indirect via the occurrence of nitrated moieties including nitrated lipids and nitrotyrosine residues in proteins. Formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (protein nitration) is a “molecular fingerprint” of peroxynitrite formation. Protein nitration has been widely reported in a number of pathological states associated with inflammation but is reported to occur in normal physiology and is thought of as a prevalent, functionally relevant post-translational modification of proteins. Nitration of proteins can give either no effect, a gain or a loss of function. Nitration of a range of placental proteins is found in normal pregnancy but increased in pathologic pregnancies. Evidence is presented for nitration of placental signal transduction enzymes and transporters. The targets and extent of nitration of enzymes, receptors, transporters and structural proteins may markedly influence placental cellular function in both physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:18851882

  12. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, David E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  13. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  14. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  15. Compartmental model of nitrate retention in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, B. R.; Campana, M. E.

    2007-02-01

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first-order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream and denitrification in the storage regions. In the context of a short-term nitrate injection we define nitrate assimilative capacity as 1 - ?, where the attenuation factor, ?, is the fraction of injected nitrate mass that is flushed past the outlet of stream. Net exchange with groundwater is modeled by allowing free stream discharge to vary from one reach section to the next. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to compare results of the compartmental model with the OTIS numerical model. Out of 350 Monte Carlo simulations of a stream consisting of five reach sections the highest relative percent difference was 15%, most being well below 10%, as determined using moment analysis on breakthrough curves. Moment analysis on published experimental breakthrough curves showed assimilative capacities did not differ from those determined with the compartmental model by more than about 0.035 and were well within the uncertainty due to possible errors in measured stream metrics and net exchange with groundwater. The results show that the compartmental modeling approach, commonly used in analysis of groundwater data, can also be useful in evaluating nitrate retention in streams.

  16. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  17. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Evans, Colin E; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit.

  18. Groundwater nitrate pollution in intensively farmed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Intensified agricultural practices that have developed during the past century have helped improve food security for many people but have also added to nitrate pollution in water supply. Balancing the water needs for agriculture with the need for clean groundwater for drinking requires understanding factors such as the routes by which nitrate enters the water supply and how long nitrate remains in the water. The Thames River catchment provides a good study example because the water quality in the river, which supplies drinking water to millions of people, has been monitored for the past 140 years, and the region has undergone significant agricultural development over the past century. Howden et al. studied nitrate transport from agricultural land to water in the Thames basin using a simple model that considers an estimate of the amount of nitrate that could leach the groundwater based on land use practices along with an algorithm that determines the route nitrate would take to reach surface water or groundwater from agricultural areas.

  19. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  20. Characterization of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates in Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Yu, Y.; Ezell, M.; Johnson, S. N.; Zellenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere significantly affect climate, human health and visibility. Knowledge of aerosol composition is necessary to understand and then predict the specific impacts of aerosols in the atmosphere. It is known that organic nitrates are present in particles, but there is limited knowledge of the individual compounds and quantity. This is in part due to the lack of a wide variety of proven analytical techniques for particulate organic nitrates. In this study, several known organic nitrates, as well as those present in complex mixtures formed from oxidation of "Ñ-pinene, were studied using a variety of techniques. These include Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of samples collected by impaction on ZnSe discs. Samples were also collected on quartz fiber filters and the extracts analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI- MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), HPLC-UV, LC-MS and GC-MS. In addition, real-time analysis was provided by SPLAT-II and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). FTIR analysis of particles collected on ZnSe discs provides information on the ratio of organic nitrate to total organic content, while the analysis of filter extracts allows identification of specific organic nitrates. These are compared to the particle mass spectrometry data and the implications for detecting and measuring particulate organic nitrate in air is discussed.

  1. Weekly cycles in fine particulate nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A.; Hering, Susanne V.

    Atmospheric responses to changes in emissions are a complex but central issue in control strategy design for pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Here, we investigate fine particle nitrate response to weekly cycles in emissions, which includes a large decrease in diesel NO x emissions among other changes. Nitrate concentrations were measured at 10-min time resolution for a year or longer at four US urban sites: Fresno and Claremont in California, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh. Weekly minima in nitrate concentrations were observed at Fresno, Claremont, and St. Louis, with mean reductions of 21-29% below weekly average values on Sundays or Mondays. The day of week with lowest nitrate varied with site and season. No significant day-of-week variations in nitrate were observed at Pittsburgh. Analysis of ammonium and sulfate measurements at Pittsburgh indicates that weekend sulfate reductions observed at this site during spring/summer months do not increase ammonia availability, but rather lead to more complete neutralization of S(VI). Fine particle nitrate measurements at Claremont were resolved into three size ranges (0.07-0.45, 0.45-1.0, and 1.0-2.5 μm); similar weekly reductions were seen for each size range.

  2. Ruthenium Red Colorimetric and Birefringent Staining of Amyloid-β Aggregates in Vitro and in Tg2576 Mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease most notably characterized by the misfolding of amyloid-β (Aβ) into fibrils and its accumulation into plaques. In this Article, we utilize the affinity of Aβ fibrils to bind metal cations and subsequently imprint their chirality to bound molecules to develop novel imaging compounds for staining Aβ aggregates. Here, we investigate the cationic dye ruthenium red (ammoniated ruthenium oxychloride) that binds calcium-binding proteins, as a labeling agent for Aβ deposits. Ruthenium red stained amyloid plaques red under light microscopy, and exhibited birefringence under crossed polarizers when bound to Aβ plaques in brain tissue sections from the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Staining of Aβ plaques was confirmed via staining of the same sections with the fluorescent amyloid binding dye Thioflavin S. In addition, it was confirmed that divalent cations such as calcium displace ruthenium red, consistent with a mechanism of binding by electrostatic interaction. We further characterized the interaction of ruthenium red with synthetic Aβ fibrils using independent biophysical techniques. Ruthenium red exhibited birefringence and induced circular dichroic bands at 540 nm upon binding to Aβ fibrils due to induced chirality. Thus, the chirality and cation binding properties of Aβ aggregates could be capitalized for the development of novel amyloid labeling methods, adding to the arsenal of AD imaging techniques and diagnostic tools. PMID:23509974

  3. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Ruthenium, Cobalt, and Black Diamond Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peethala, Brown Cornelius

    Ta/TaN bilayer serves as the diffusion barrier as well as the adhesion promoter between Cu and the dielectric in 32 nm technology devices. A key concern of future technology devices (<32 nm) for Cu interconnects is the extendibility of TaN/Ta/Cu-seed to sustain the diffusion barrier performance without forming voids and meeting the requirements of low resistivity. These are very challenging requirements for the Ta/TaN bilayer at a thickness of < 5 nm. Hence, ruthenium (Ru) and cobalt (Co), among these, are being considered for replacing Ta/TaN as barrier materials for Cu interconnects in future technology devices. Both are very attractive for reasons such as the capability of direct electroplating of Cu, lower resistivity and for a single layer (vs. a bilayer of Ta/TaN) to act as a barrier. During patterning, they need to be planarized using conventional chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to achieve a planar surface. However, CMP of these new barrier materials requires novel slurry compositions that provide adequate selectivity towards Cu and dielectric films, and minimize galvanic corrosion. Apart from the application as a barrier, Ru also has been proposed as a lower electrode material in metal-insulator-metal capacitors where high (> 50 nm/min) Ru removal rates (RRs) are required and as a stop layer in magnetic recording head fabrication where low (< 1 nm/min) Ru RRs are desired. A Ru removal rate of ˜60 nm/min was achieved with a colloidal silica-based slurry at pH 9 using potassium periodate (KIO4) as the oxidizer. At this pH, toxic RuO4 does not form eliminating a major challenge in Ru CMP. This removal rate was obtained by increasing the solubility of KIO4 by adding potassium hydroxide (KOH). It was also determined that increased the ionic strength is not responsible for the observed increase in Ru removal rate. Benzotirazole (BTA) and ascorbic acid were added to the slurry to reduce the open circuit potential (Eoc) difference between Cu and Ru to ˜20 m

  4. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium and ruthenium dioxide: New process development, fabrication of heterostructured nanoelectrodes, and applications in energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorczyk, Keith E.

    The ability to fabricate heterostructured nanomaterials with each layer of the structure having some specific function, i.e. energy storage, charge collection, etc., has recently attracted great interest. Of the techniques capable of this type of process, atomic layer deposition (ALD) remains unique due to its monolayer thickness control, extreme conformality, and wide variety of available materials. This work aims at using ALD to fabricate fully integrated heterostructured nanomaterials. To that end, two ALD processes, using a new and novel precursor, bis(2,6,6-trimethyl-cyclohexadienyl)ruthenium, were developed for Ru and RuO2 showing stable growth rates of 0.5 A/cycle and 0.4 A/cycle respectively. Both process are discussed and compared to similar processes reported in the literature. The Ru process is shown to have significantly lower nucleation while the RuO2 is the first fully characterized ALD process known. Using the fully developed RuO2 ALD process, thin film batteries were fabricated and tested in standard coin cell configurations. These cells showed high first cycle gravimetric capacities of ˜1400 mAh/g, which significantly degraded after ˜40 cycles. Rate performance was also studied and showed a decrease in 1st cycle capacity as a function of increased rate. These results represent the first reports of any RuO2 battery studied beyond 3 cycles. To understand the degradation mechanisms witnessed in the thin film studies in-situ TEM experiments were conducted. Single crystal RuO2 nanowires were grown using a vapor transport method. These nanowires were cycled inside a TEM using Li2O as an electrolyte and showed a ˜95% volume expansion after lithiation, ˜26% of which was irreversible. Furthermore, a chemical irreversibility was also witnessed, where the reaction products Ru and Li2O remain even after full delithiation. With these mechanisms in mind heterostructured nanowires were fabricated in an attempt to improve the cycling performance. Core/shell Ti

  5. Growth and characterization of CVD ruthenium and amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films for liner application in copper interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jinhong

    Copper interconnect requires liner materials that function as a diffusion barrier, a seed layer for electroplating, and an adhesion promoting layer. Ruthenium has been considered as a promising liner material, however it has been reported that Ru itself is not an effective Cu diffusion barrier due to its microstructure, which is polycrystalline with columnar grains. The screening study of Ru precursors revealed that all Ru films were polycrystalline with columnar structure, and, due to its strong 3D growth mode, a conformal and ultrathin Ru film was difficult to form, especially on high aspect ratio features. The microstructure of Ru films can be modified by incorporating P. Amorphous Ru(P) films are formed by chemical vapor deposition at 575 K using a single source precursor, cis-RuH2(P(CH3) 3)4, or dual sources, Ru3(CO)12 and P(CH3)3 or P(C6H5)3. The films contain Ru and P, which are in zero-valent states, and C as an impurity. Phosphorus dominantly affects the film microstructure, and incorporating >13% P resulted in amorphous Ru(P) films. Metastable Ru(P) remains amorphous after annealing at 675 K for 3 hr, and starts recrystallization at ˜775 K. The density of states analysis of the amorphous Ru(P) alloy illustrates metallic character of the films, and hybridization between Ru 4d and P 3p orbitals, which contributes to stabilizing the amorphous structure. Co-dosing P(CH) 3 with Ru3(CO)12 improves film step coverage, and the most conformal Ru(P) film is obtained with cis-RuH 2(P(CH3)3)4; a fully continuous 5 nm Ru(P) film is formed within 1 mum deep, 8:1 aspect ratio trenches. First principles density functional theory calculations illustrate degraded Cu/Ru adhesion by the presence of P at the interface, however, due to the strong Ru-Cu bonds, amorphous Ru(P) forms a stronger interface with Cu than Ta and TaN do. Cu diffusion studies at 575 K suggests improved barrier property of amorphous Ru(P) films over polycrystalline PVD Ru.

  6. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  7. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  8. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  9. Hydrido-ruthenium cluster complexes as models for reactive surface hydrogen species of ruthenium nanoparticles. Solid-state 2H NMR and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Torsten; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Yeping, Xu; Wächtler, Maria; del Rosal, Iker; Grünberg, Anna; Poteau, Romuald; Axet, Rosa; Lavigne, Guy; Chaudret, Bruno; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2010-08-25

    The (2)H quadrupolar interaction is a sensitive tool for the characterization of deuterium-metal binding states. In the present study, experimental solid-state (2)H MAS NMR techniques are used in the investigations of two ruthenium clusters, D(4)Ru(4)(CO)(12) (1) and D(2)Ru(6)(CO)(18) (2), which serve as model compounds for typical two-fold, three-fold, and octahedral coordination sites on metal surfaces. By line-shape analysis of the (2)H MAS NMR measurements of sample 1, a quadrupolar coupling constant of 67 +/- 1 kHz, an asymmetry parameter of 0.67 +/- 0.1, and an isotropic chemical shift of -17.4 ppm are obtained. In addition to the neutral complex, sample 2 includes two ionic clusters, identified as anionic [DRu(6)(CO)(18)](-) (2(-)) and cationic [D(3)Ru(6)(CO)(18)](+) (2(+)). By virtue of the very weak quadrupolar interaction (<2 kHz) and the strong low-field shift (+16.8 ppm) of 2(-), it is shown that the deuteron is located in the symmetry center of the octahedron spanned by the six ruthenium atoms. For the cationic 2(+), the quadrupolar interaction is similar to that of the neutral 2. Quantum chemical DFT calculations at different model structures for these ruthenium clusters were arranged in order to help in the interpretation of the experimental results. It is shown that the (2)H nuclear quadrupolar interaction is a sensitive tool for distinguishing the binding state of the deuterons to the transition metal. Combining the data from the polynuclear complexes with the data from mononuclear complexes, a molecular ruler for quadrupolar interactions is created. This ruler now permits the solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterization of deuterium adsorbed on the surfaces of catalytically active metal nanoparticles.

  10. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Evans, Colin E.; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit.—Ashmore, T., Fernandez, B. O., Evans, C. E., Huang, Y., Branco-Price, C., Griffin, J. L., Johnson, R. S., Feelisch, M., Murray, A. J. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate. PMID:25422368

  11. Nitrate loss associated with Federal Reference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Serve, A.; Brown, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The 24-h PM2.5 mass, measured by the Federal Reference Method (FRM) designated by EPA, reports the bulk PM2.5 mass retained on a single channel sampler with Teflon or Quartz filters. Semivolatile species such as nitrate can be lost from the Teflon filter during sampling and equilibration processes, and the FRM measurements may not reflect true ambient concentrations of total PM2.5. Consequently, FRM PM2.5 can be problematic when used for evaluating the fidelity of air quality models, especially for domains where particulate nitrate is a dominant contributor. In order to account for this discrepancy, a thermodynamic adjustment method was developed by EPA to determine the retained nitrate based upon the temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH). The nitrate adjustment method was evaluated for the eastern US where summertime is characterized by hot and humid weather and sulfate particles are the dominant inorganic contributor. Potential differences exist for applications to California due to its different PM2.5 composition and meteorology. In this study we, (1) evaluate EPA's nitrate adjustment method for California where particulate nitrate is a major contributor to total PM2.5 mass and (2) apply this method to adjusting simulated PM2.5 by the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model(CMAQ) over the California domain. The adjusted CMAQ outputs are then compared to the observed total PM2.5. The positive biases between CMAQ and observed PM2.5 can be largely explained by evaporative loss of nitrate on filters.

  12. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  13. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  14. Nitrate removal and denitrification affected by soil characteristics in nitrate treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2007-03-01

    Several small-scale surface flow constructed wetlands unplanted and planted (monoculture) with various macrophytes (Phragmites australis, Typha orientalis, Pennisetum purpureum, Ipomoea aquatica, and Pistia stratiotes) were established to continuously receive nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Soil characteristics and their effects on nitrate removal and soil denitrification were investigated. The results showed that planted wetland cells exhibited significantly higher (P < 0.05) nitrate removal efficiencies (70-99%) and soil denitrification rates (3.78-15.02 microg N2O-N/g dry soil/h) than an unplanted covered wetland cell (1%, 0.11 microg N2O-N/g/h). However, the unplanted uncovered wetland cell showed a nitrate removal efficiency (55%) lower than but a soil denitrification rate (9.12 microg N2O-N/g/h) comparable to the planted cells. The nitrate removal rate correlated closely and positively with the soil denitrification rate for the planted cells, indicating that soil denitrification is an important process for removing nitrate in constructed wetlands. The results of nitrogen budget revealed that around 68.9-90.7% of the overall nitrogen removal could be attributed to the total denitrification. The soil denitrification rate was found to correlate significantly (P < 0.01) with the extractable organic carbon, organic matter, and in situ-measured redox potential of wetland soil, which accordingly were concluded as suitable indicators of soil denitrification rate and nitrate removal rate in nitrate treatment wetlands.

  15. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. Complete denitrification could not be achieved at this C/N ratio, even after one week of reactor operation as the nitrite levels continued to accumulate. In order to improve denitrification performance, the reactor was fed with nitrate concentrations of 1354 mg L(-1), while keeping C/N ratio at 2. Subsequently, nitrate concentration in the feed was increased in a step-wise manner to establish complete denitrification of 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. The results show that substrate concentration plays an important role in denitrification of high strength nitrate by influencing nitrite accumulation. Complete denitrification of high strength nitrates can be achieved at lower substrate concentrations, by an appropriate acclimatization strategy.

  16. Extraction of lanthanide(III) and yttrium nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate from multicomponent solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Puzikov, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    The extraction of lanthanide(III) and yttrium nitrates from multicomponent solutions by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate at 298.15 K and pH 2 is examined. Physicochemical and mathematical models describing the distributions of lanthanide(III) (Pr-Lu) and Y in multicomponent solutions as a function of the total metal concentration in the aqueous phase and concentrate composition are presented.

  17. An unexpected truth: increasing nitrate loading can decrease nitrate export from watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askarizadeh Bardsiri, A.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.

    2015-12-01

    The discharge of anthropogenic nitrate (e.g., from partially treated sewage, return flows from agricultural irrigation, and runoff from animal feeding operations) to streams can negatively impact both human and ecosystem health. Managing these many point and non-point sources to achieve some specific end-point—for example, reducing the annual mass of nitrate exported from a watershed—can be a challenge, particularly in rapidly growing urban areas. Adding to this complexity is the fact that streams are not inert: they too can add or remove nitrate through assimilation (e.g., by stream-associated plants and animals) and microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions that occur in streambed sediments (e.g., respiration, ammonification, nitrification, denitrification). By coupling a previously published correlation for in-stream processing of nitrate [Mulholland et al., Nature, 2008, 452, 202-205] with a stream network model of the Jacksons Creek watershed (Victoria, Australia) I demonstrate that managing anthropogenic sources of stream nitrate without consideration of in-stream processing can result in a number of non-intuitive "surprises"; for example, wastewater effluent discharges that increase nitrate loading but decrease in-stream nitrate concentrations can reduce the mass of nitrate exported from a watershed.

  18. The Development and Study of Surface Bound Ruthenium Organometallic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Geoffrey Reuben

    The focus of this project has been on the use of mono-diimine ruthenium organometallic complexes, of the general structure [H(Ru)(CO)(L)2(L') 2][PF6] (L=PPh3, DPPENE and L'=Bpy, DcBpy, MBpyC, Phen, AminoPhen) bound to surfaces as luminescent probes. Both biological and inorganic/organic hybrid surfaces have been studied. The complexes were characterized both bound and unbound using standard analytical techniques such as NMR, IR and X-ray crystallography, as well as through several photophysical methods as well. Initially the study focused on how the photophyscial properties of the complexes were affected by incorporation into biological membranes. It was found that by conjugating the probes to a more rigid cholesterol moiety that luminescence was conserved, compared to conjugation with a far more flexible lipid moiety, where luminescence was either lost or reduced. Both the cholesterol and lipid conjugates were able to insert into a lipid membrane, and in the more rigid environment some of the lipid conjugates regained some of their luminescence, but often blue shifted and reduced, depending on the conjugation site. Silica Polyamine Composites (SPCs) were a hybrid material developed in the Rosenberg Lab as useful metal separation materials, that could be easily modified, and had several benefits over current commercially available polymers, or inorganic materials. These SPCs also provided an opportunity for the development of a heterogeneous platform for luminescent complexes as either catalysts or sensors. Upon binding of the luminescent Ru complexes to the surface no loss, or major change in luminescence was seen, however, when bound to the rigid surface a significant increase in excited state lifetime was measured. It is likely that through binding and interacting with the surface that the complexes lost non-radiative decay pathways, resulting in the increase in lifetime, however, these interactions do not seem to affect the energy level of the MLCT band in a

  19. Carbon deposition in the Bosch process with ruthenium and ruthenium-iron alloy catalysts. M.S. Thesis. Final Report, Jan. 1981 - Jul. 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.; Sophonpanich, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of ruthenium and the alloys 50Ru50Fe and 33Ru67Fe as alternatives to iron, nickel, and cobalt catalysts in recovering oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide was investigated. Carbon deposition boundaries over the unsupported alloys are reported. Experiments were also carried out over 50Ru50Fe and 97Ru3Fe3 catalysts supported on gamma-alumina to determine their performance in the synthesis of low molecular weight olefins. High production of ethylene and propylene would be beneficial for an improvement of an overall Bosch process, as a gas phase containing high olefin content would enhance carbon deposition in a Bosch reactor.

  20. Contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition to nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, M.

    1988-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitrate introduced into the Chesapeake Bay via atmospheric deposition may be a significant source of excess nutrients. In order to determine if concerns about atmospheric deposition are justified, modeled estimates of wetfall nitrate deposition over the Chesapeake Bay basin, based on monitoring data collected in 1984, were used to estimate basin-wide nitrate loading (1.38 x 10/sup 8/ kg) over the land area of the basin. Estimates of transfer coefficients and nitrate loadings to the Bay for various land-use categories were also calculated, using figures developed by the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program. The conservative nature of assumptions made in developing these figures suggests that the actual percentage contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition may be lower than the estimated value.