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  1. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Alternative Names Ejaculation retrograde; Dry climax Images Male reproductive system References Bhasin S, Basson R. Sexual dysfunction in men and women. In: Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, eds. Williams ... management of male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . ...

  2. Emerging Trends in Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Shivamurthy, M C

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde signaling is defined as the signaling events leading from the plastids to the nucleus in plants and across the chemical synapse, from the postsynaptic neuron to the presynaptic neuron in animals. The discovery of various retrograde messengers has opened many avenues and clouds of thoughts as to the role of retrograde signaling. They have been implicated particularly in long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity. But the basic assumptions about retrograde signaling have not been studied upon for many years. This review focuses on established facts and hypothesis put forward in retrograde signaling.

  3. Retrograde and submental intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Cyrus A; Dhaliwal, Sukhdeep S

    2010-03-01

    Direct laryngoscopy remains the technique of choice for placing an endotracheal tube (ETT). However, alternative techniques are needed for the difficult airway or unsuccessful intubation. Retrograde intubation may be used in adult or pediatric patients, whether awake, sedated, or obtunded. Contraindications include nonpalpable neck landmarks, pretracheal mass, severe flexion deformities of the neck, tracheal stenosis, coagulopathies, and infections. Submental intubation allows simultaneous access to the dental occlusion and nasal pyramid without the morbidity associated with tracheostomy. Contraindications include patients who require long periods of assisted ventilation and a severe traumatic wound on the floor of mouth. Complications include localized infection and sepsis, poor wound healing or scarring, and postoperative salivary fistula.

  4. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  5. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  6. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Umut; Duncan, Olivia F.; Gatt, Ariana P.; Dionne, Marc S.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Mitochondria communicate their bioenergetic status to the cell via mitochondrial retrograde signaling. To investigate the role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in neurons, we induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the Drosophila nervous system. Neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction causes reduced viability, defects in neuronal function, decreased redox potential, and reduced numbers of presynaptic mitochondria and active zones. We find that neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction stimulates a retrograde signaling response that controls the expression of several hundred nuclear genes. We show that the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIFα) ortholog Similar (Sima) regulates the expression of several of these retrograde genes, suggesting that Sima mediates mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Remarkably, knockdown of Sima restores neuronal function without affecting the primary mitochondrial defect, demonstrating that mitochondrial retrograde signaling is partly responsible for neuronal dysfunction. Sima knockdown also restores function in a Drosophila model of the mitochondrial disease Leigh syndrome and in a Drosophila model of familial Parkinson’s disease. Thus, mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal activity and can be manipulated to enhance neuronal function, despite mitochondrial impairment. PMID:26489648

  7. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation.

  8. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  9. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  10. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  11. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  12. Recovery from retrograde amnesia: a learning process.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A M; Tyler, J; Jinich, D

    1974-04-01

    Retrograde amnesia was produced in rats by electroconvulsive shock. Memory recovered if the animals were given repeated test trials. Memory did not recover if steps were taken to reduce the conditioning properties of the test trials; the manipulations included eliminating the response, altering the apparatus cues, or extinguishing conditioned "fear" by confining animals to the apparatus during the first test trial.

  13. Retrograde replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    A technique is described for replacement of the entire thoracic aorta. In this "pull-through" technique, which utilizes hypothermic circulatory arrest, the graft is implanted in a retrograde fashion, thus providing protection for the spinal cord and brain and avoiding injury to the vagus and phrenic nerves. PMID:7647599

  14. From retrograde signaling to flowering time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changquan; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Plant's transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is balanced by intricate cascade of genes regulated by both endogenous and environmental inputs. Stress causes suppression of vegetative growth and acceleration of flowering as an emergency response for preservation of the species. Recently, we determined that expression levels of a transcription factor with 2 B-Box motifs, BBX19, is notably reduced in response to accumulation of high levels of Methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), a plastidial produced isoprenoids intermediate that also functions as a stress-specific retrograde signaling metabolite. We now have identified BBX19 as a repressor of Flower locus T (FT) expression and the corresponding downstream genes, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), Leafy (LFY) and Fruitful (FUL), through competition with CONSTANS (CO). Collectively our finding identifies BBX19 as a link between the stress-specific retrograde signal MEcPP and regulation of flowering time by depleting the active CO pool required for transcription of FT.

  15. The surgical correction of retrograde ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, J I; Solish, G I; Boorjian, P; Waterhouse, R K

    1975-12-01

    Two patients with retrograde ejaculation subsequent to Y-V plasty of the bladder neck underwent a surgical procedure to reconstruct the internal vesical sphincter and correct the phenomenon. The approach is transvesical and the internal vesical sphincter is reconstructed to the diameter of a No. 16 Foley catheter. The normal muscle of the bladder neck is approximated after the mucosa and scar tissue are excised. Both patients now have normal ejaculation and one has fathered a child.

  16. SNAP-tagging the retrograde route.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a chemical biology strategy to identify proteins that follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus, via endosomes. The general principle is the following: plasma membrane proteins are covalently tagged with a first probe. Only the ones that are then transported to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes are covalently bound to a capture reagent that has been engineered into this compartment. Specifically, the first probe is benzylguanine (BG) that is conjugated onto primary amino groups of plasma-membrane proteins. The capture reagent includes an O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase-derived fragment, the SNAP-tag, which forms a covalent linkage with BG. The SNAP-tag is fused to the GFP-tagged Golgi membrane anchor from galactosyl transferase for proper targeting to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes. Cell-surface BG-tagged proteins that are transported to trans-Golgi/TGN membranes (i.e., that are retrograde cargoes) are thereby covalently captured by the SNAP-tag fusion protein. For identification, the latter is immunopurified using GFP-Trap, and associated retrograde cargo proteins are identified by mass spectrometry. We here provide a step-by-step protocol of this method.

  17. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  18. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases.

  19. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases. PMID:27652230

  20. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  1. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  2. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  3. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques.

  4. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25520276

  5. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  6. Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting for acute mesenteric arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie; Wisniewski, Paul; Sarmiento, Jose; Vo, Trung; Aka, Paul K; Hsu, Jeffrey H; Tayyarah, Majid

    2010-08-01

    Retrograde superior mesenteric artery stenting (ROMS) represents a significant development in the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia. Compared to traditional surgical mesenteric bypass, ROMS is a less invasive technique that avoids many complications associated with emergent mesenteric bypass. This case report illustrates that retrograde superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenting is an option for the treatment of acute mesenteric ischemia for patients in extremis.

  7. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  8. Neurexin and neuroligin mediate retrograde synaptic inhibition in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhitao; Hom, Sabrina; Kudze, Tambudzai; Tong, Xia-Jing; Choi, Seungwon; Aramuni, Gayane; Zhang, Weiqi; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2012-08-24

    The synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin alter the development and function of synapses and are linked to autism in humans. Here, we found that Caenorhabditis elegans neurexin (NRX-1) and neuroligin (NLG-1) mediated a retrograde synaptic signal that inhibited neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. Retrograde signaling was induced in mutants lacking a muscle microRNA (miR-1) and was blocked in mutants lacking NLG-1 or NRX-1. Release was rapid and abbreviated when the retrograde signal was on, whereas release was slow and prolonged when retrograde signaling was blocked. The retrograde signal adjusted release kinetics by inhibiting exocytosis of synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are distal to the site of calcium entry. Inhibition of release was mediated by increased presynaptic levels of tomosyn, an inhibitor of SV fusion.

  9. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  10. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    PubMed

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated.

  11. Asteroids in Retrograde Orbits: Interesting Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2014-12-01

    We present the most interesting examples of the orbital evolution of asteroids in retrograde orbits (i > 90°). First, we used the latest observational data to determine nominal and averaged orbital elements of these objects. Next, the equations of motion of these asteroids were integrated backward 1 My, taking into account the propagation of observational errors. We used so-called 'cloning' procedure to reproduce the reliability of initial data. We obtained some possible scenarios of the orbit inversion in the past, what is often caused by the long-term influence of outer planets. For two most interesting cases (Apollo and Amor type) we did additional calculations: 100 My in the future. Additionally, we investigated the potential influence of Yarkovski/YORP effects on the long-time orbital evolution.

  12. PRODUCTION OF NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS ON RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B.; Ngo, H.; Granvik, M.; Larson, S.

    2012-04-20

    While computing an improved near-Earth object (NEO) steady-state orbital distribution model, we discovered in the numerical integrations the unexpected production of retrograde orbits for asteroids that had originally exited from the accepted main-belt source regions. Our model indicates that {approx}0.1% (a factor of two uncertainty) of the steady-state NEO population (perihelion q < 1.3 AU) is on retrograde orbits. These rare outcomes typically happen when asteroid orbits flip to a retrograde configuration while in the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and then live for {approx}0.001 to 100 Myr. The model predicts, given the estimated near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population, that a few retrograde 0.1-1 km NEAs should exist. Currently, there are two known MPC NEOs with asteroidal designations on retrograde orbits which we therefore claim could be escaped asteroids instead of devolatilized comets. This retrograde NEA population may also answer a long-standing question in the meteoritical literature regarding the origin of high-strength, high-velocity meteoroids on retrograde orbits.

  13. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  14. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  15. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in cross-fused ectopic kidney.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Kabar, Mucahit; Resorlu, Berkan; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Kilinc, Muhammet Fatih; Karakan, Tolga

    2015-02-01

    Cross-fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly in which both kidneys are fused and located on the same side. We report a case of right-to-left cross-fused renal ectopia and nephrolithiasis, in whom retrograde intrarenal surgery was used to treat the stone disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of retrograde intrarenal surgery of a crossed-fused ectopic kidney. PMID:25481231

  16. Continuous normothermic retrograde cardioplegia for valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Martella, A T; Hoffman, D M; Nakao, T; Frater, R W

    1994-07-01

    We have studied warm heart surgery, deemed as continuous warm blood cardioplegia and normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as an alternative to the technique of intermittent cold cardioplegia for valvular surgery. Between August 1990 and January 1994, 137 consecutive patients underwent valve repair or replacement using normothermic CPB. Eighty-six of these patients received continuous normothermic retrograde blood cardioplegia via the coronary sinus (CNRC). Fifty-one patients received intermittent cold blood cardioplegia (ICBC). All procedures were performed by the same surgeon (RWMF). The two groups were matched for age, sex, NYHA class, preoperative ejection fraction, diagnosis, procedure and activated clotting time. Warm blood cardioplegia was delivered continuously via the coronary sinus after antegrade arrest (oxygenated blood 1:4 to 1:3, 37 degrees C, 250-300 ml/min, maintaining coronary sinus pressures of 40-60 mmHg. Perioperative myocardial infarction was significantly less prevalent (4.6 vs. 8.0%; p < 0.05) in the warm cardioplegia group. Cardiac output immediately after bypass was significantly higher than before bypass only in the CNRC group (4.1 +/- 0.8 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 L/min; p < 0.01). CNRC patients had significantly higher incidence of spontaneous resumption of sinus rhythm at cross-clamp removal (80 of 86, 93%) compared to the hypothermic patients (14 of 51, 27%, p < 0.001). The time from removal of the aortic cross-clamp to discontinuation of CPB (reperfusion time) was significantly shorter in the warm cardioplegia group (43 +/- 7.4 versus 75 +/- 10.2 min; p < 0.001.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Retrograde resonance in the planar three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2013-12-01

    We continue the investigation of the dynamics of retrograde resonances initiated in Morais and Giuppone (Mon Notices R Astron Soc 424:52-64, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21151.x, 2012). After deriving a procedure to deduce the retrograde resonance terms from the standard expansion of the three-dimensional disturbing function, we concentrate on the planar problem and construct surfaces of section that explore phase-space in the vicinity of the main retrograde resonances (2/1, 1/1 and 1/2). In the case of the 1/1 resonance for which the standard expansion is not adequate to describe the dynamics, we develop a semi-analytic model based on numerical averaging of the unexpanded disturbing function, and show that the predicted libration modes are in agreement with the behavior seen in the surfaces of section.

  18. Choledocholithiasis diagnostics - endoscopic ultrasound or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography?

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, Jarosław

    2014-06-01

    It is estimated that 3.4% of patients qualified for cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis have a coexisting choledocholithiasis. For decades, endoscopic ascending retrograde cholangiopancreatography has been the golden diagnostic standard in cases of suspected choledocholithiasis. The method is associated with a relatively high rate of complications, including acute pancreatitis, the incidence of which is estimated to range between 0.74% and 1.86%. The mechanism of this ERCP-induced complication is not fully understood, although factors increasing the risk of acute pancreatitis, such as sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, previous acute pancreatitis, narrow bile ducts or difficult catheterization of Vater's ampulla are known. It has been suggested to discontinue the diagnostic endoscopic retrograde ascending cholangiopancreatography and replace it with endoscopic ultrasonography due to possible and potentially dangerous complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography has sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 95% regardless of gallstone diameter, as opposed to magnetic resonance cholangiography. However, both of these parameters depend on the experience of the performing physician. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography allows to limit the number of performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures by more than 2/3. Ascending endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography combined with an endoscopic incision into the Vater's ampulla followed by a mechanical evacuation of stone deposits from the ducts still remains a golden standard in the treatment of choledocholithiasis. Despite some limitations such as potentially increased treatment costs as well as the necessity of the procedure to be performed by a surgeon experienced in both endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography as well as endoscopic ultrasonography, the diagnostic endoscopic ultrasonography followed by a simultaneous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography aimed at gallstone removal is

  19. Dynein is the motor for retrograde axonal transport of organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapp, B.J.; Reese, T.S.

    1989-03-01

    Vesicular organelles in axons of nerve cells are transported along microtubules either toward their plus ends (fast anterograde transport) or toward their minus ends (retrograde transport). Two microtubule-based motors were previously identified by examining plastic beads induced to move along microtubules by cytosol fractions from the squid giant axon: (i) an anterograde motor, kinesin, and (ii) a retrograde motor, which is characterized here. The retrograde motor, a cytosolic protein previously termed HMW1, was purified from optic lobes and extruded axoplasm by nucleotide-dependent microtubule affinity and release; microtubule gliding was used as the assay of motor activity. The following properties of the retrograde motor suggest that it is cytoplasmic dynein: (i) sedimentation at 20-22 S with a heavy chain of Mr greater than 200,000 that coelectrophoreses with the alpha and beta subunits of axonemal dynein, (ii) cleavage by UV irradiation in the presence of ATP and vanadate, and (iii) a molecular structure resembling two-headed dynein from axonemes. Furthermore, bead movement toward the minus end of microtubules was blocked when axoplasmic supernatants were treated with UV/vanadate. Treatment of axoplasmic supernatant with UV/vanadate also blocks the retrograde movement of purified organelles in vitro without changing the number of anterograde moving organelles, indicating that dynein interacts specifically with a subgroup of organelles programmed to move toward the cell body. However, purified optic lobe dynein, like purified kinesin, does not by itself promote the movement of purified organelles along microtubules, suggesting that additional axoplasmic factors are necessary for retrograde as well as anterograde transport.

  20. ABI4 and its role in chloroplast retrograde communication

    PubMed Central

    León, Patricia; Gregorio, Josefat; Cordoba, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of plastids is a landmark event in plant evolution. The proper functionality of these organelles depends on strict and continuous communication between the plastids and the nucleus to precisely adjust gene expression in response to the organelle’s requirements. Signals originating from the plastids impact the expression of a variety of nuclear genes, and this retrograde communication is essential to couple the nuclear expression of plastid-localized products with organelle gene expression and, ultimately, functionality. Major advances have been made in this field over the past few years with the characterization of independent retrograde signaling pathways and the identification of some of their components. One such factor is the nuclear transcriptional factor ABI4 (ABA-INSENTIVE 4). ABI4, together with the plastid PPR GUN1 protein, has been proposed to function as a node of convergence for multiple plastid retrograde signaling pathways. ABI4 is conserved among plants and also plays important roles in various critical developmental and metabolic processes. ABI4 is a versatile regulator that positively and negatively modulates the expression of many genes, including other transcriptional factors. However, its mode of action during plastid retrograde signaling is not fully understood. In this review, we describe the current evidence that supports the participation of ABI4 in different retrograde communication pathways. ABI4 is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. A known regulator of ABI4 includes the PTM transcription factor, which moves from the chloroplast to the nucleus. This transcription factor is a candidate for the transmission of retrograde signals between the plastid and ABI4. PMID:23335930

  1. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm with retrograde approach.

    PubMed

    Narin, Nazmi; Ozyurt, Abdullah; Baykan, Ali; Uzüm, Kazım

    2014-04-01

    A three-year-old girl with multiple heart malformations admitted to the pediatric cardiology unit because of excessive sweating and fatigue. Abnormal color Doppler flow was detected into the right atrium from the dilated coronary sinus on the echocardiographic examination, and ruptured sinus Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) was diagnosed. Although in most such cases, an antegrade transcatheter approach has been used, a retrograde approach can be used as a cost-effective treatment modality in those cases with selective high-risk surgery. In this report, we present a patient with ruptured SVA, which was closed via Amplatzer vascular plug-4 by retrograde approach. PMID:24769826

  2. Tracking retrograde flow in keratocytes: news from the front.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, Pascal; Danuser, Gaudenz; Bohnet, Sophie; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2005-03-01

    Actin assembly at the leading edge of the cell is believed to drive protrusion, whereas membrane resistance and contractile forces result in retrograde flow of the assembled actin network away from the edge. Thus, cell motion and shape changes are expected to depend on the balance of actin assembly and retrograde flow. This idea, however, has been undermined by the reported absence of flow in one of the most spectacular models of cell locomotion, fish epidermal keratocytes. Here, we use enhanced phase contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle tracking to analyze the motion of the actin network in keratocyte lamellipodia. We have detected retrograde flow throughout the lamellipodium at velocities of 1-3 microm/min and analyzed its organization and relation to the cell motion during both unobstructed, persistent migration and events of cell collision. Freely moving cells exhibited a graded flow velocity increasing toward the sides of the lamellipodium. In colliding cells, the velocity decreased markedly at the site of collision, with striking alteration of flow in other lamellipodium regions. Our findings support the universality of the flow phenomenon and indicate that the maintenance of keratocyte shape during locomotion depends on the regulation of both retrograde flow and actin polymerization. PMID:15635099

  3. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  4. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  5. Retrograde fluids in granulites: Stable isotope evidence of fluid migration

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J. ); Valley, J.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Widespread retrograde alteration assemblages document the migration of mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluids into granulite facies rocks in the Adirondack Mountains. Fluid migration is manifest by (1) veins and patchy intergrowths of chlorite {plus minus} sericite {plus minus} calcite, (2) small veins of calcite, many only identifiable by cathodoluminescence, and (3) high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich or mixed H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} fluid inclusions. The distinct and varied textural occurrences of the alteration minerals indicate that fluid-rock ratios were low and variable on a local scale. Stable isotope ratios of C, O, and S have been determined in retrograde minerals from samples of the Marcy anorthosite massif and adjacent granitic gneisses (charnockites). Retrograde calcite in the anorthosite has a relatively small range in both {delta}{sup 18}O{sub SMOW} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} (8.6 to 14.9% and {minus}4.1 to 0.4%, respectively), probably indicating that the hydrothermal fluids that precipitated the calcite had exchanged with a variety of crustal lithologies including marbles and orthogneisses, and that calcite was precipitated over a relatively narrow temperature interval. Values of {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} that range from 2.8 to 8.3% within the anorthosite can also be interpreted to reflect exchange between orthogneisses and metasediments. The recognition of retrograde fluid migration is particularly significant in granulite facies terranes because the controversy surrounding the origin of granulites arises in part from differing interpretations of fluid inclusion data, specifically, the timing of entrapment of high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich inclusions. Results indicate that retrograde fluid migration, which in some samples may leave only cryptic petrographic evidence, is a process capable of producing high-density, CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions.

  6. Effects of chitin nano-whiskers on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and potato starches.

    PubMed

    Ji, Na; Liu, Chengzhen; Zhang, Shuangling; Yu, Jing; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Starch is very prone to retrogradation after gelatinization. Inhibition of starch retrogradation has been an important factor in improving the quality of food. For the first time, we investigated the effect of nano-materials, represented by chitin nano-whiskers (CNWs), on the short- and long-term retrogradation of maize and potato starches. Rapid Visco-Analyser results showed that the addition of CNWs significantly decreased the setback values of maize and potato starches, which suggested that CNWs could retard the short-term retrogradation of starch. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results showed that the percentage of retrogradation of maize and potato starches significantly decreased (P<0.05), suggesting the inhibition of long-term retrogradation. The CNWs could be used as a new inhibitor of starch retrogradation to develop starch-based food with longer shelf life. PMID:27507508

  7. Retrograde enhancement by alcohol of delayed free recall performance.

    PubMed

    Mann, R E; Cho-Young, J; Vogel-Sprott, M

    1984-04-01

    Two experiments are reported in which retrograde enhancement of human memory by alcohol was observed. In both studies male undergraduate volunteers performed an immediate free recall task before and after consuming either alcohol (0.66 abs alc/kg) or placebo. About two hours later, many words as they could delayed free recall was tested when subjects were asked to write down as many words as they could remember from the free recall trials in the session. Subjects given alcohol recalled significantly more words from lists heard before drinking than subjects given placebo; this effect appeared more pronounced for words from the primacy portion of the lists. The possibility that this retrograde enhancement effect is due to alcohol's effects on brain reward systems is raised.

  8. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  9. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL. PMID:22924043

  10. Retrograde trafficking of AB₅ toxins: mechanisms to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Linstedt, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial AB5 toxins are a clinically relevant class of exotoxins that include several well-known members such as Shiga, cholera, and pertussis toxins. Infections with toxin-producing bacteria cause devastating human diseases that affect millions of individuals each year and have no definitive medical treatment. The molecular targets of AB5 toxins reside in the cytosol of infected cells, and the toxins reach the cytosol by trafficking through the retrograde membrane transport pathway that avoids degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Focusing on Shiga toxin as the archetype member, we review recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the retrograde trafficking of AB5 toxins and highlight how these basic science advances are leading to the development of a promising new therapeutic approach based on inhibiting toxin transport.

  11. Ureteroscopy assisted retrograde nephrostomy for complete staghorn renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus.

  12. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL.

  13. Subversion of Retrograde Trafficking by Translocated Pathogen Effectors.

    PubMed

    Personnic, Nicolas; Bärlocher, Kevin; Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert the endocytic bactericidal pathway to form specific replication-permissive compartments termed pathogen vacuoles or inclusions. To this end, the pathogens employ type III or type IV secretion systems, which translocate dozens, if not hundreds, of different effector proteins into their host cells, where they manipulate vesicle trafficking and signaling pathways in favor of the intruders. While the distinct cocktail of effectors defines the specific processes by which a pathogen vacuole is formed, the different pathogens commonly target certain vesicle trafficking routes, including the endocytic or secretory pathway. Recently, the retrograde transport pathway from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network emerged as an important route affecting pathogen vacuole formation. Here, we review current insight into the host cell's retrograde trafficking pathway and how vacuolar pathogens of the genera Legionella, Coxiella, Salmonella, Chlamydia, and Simkania employ mechanistically distinct strategies to subvert this pathway, thus promoting intracellular survival and replication. PMID:26924068

  14. Retrograde amnesia induced by drugs acting on different molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Bonini, Juliana S; Coitinho, Adriana S; Vianna, Monica R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2004-06-01

    The gamma aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-sub(A)) agonist, muscimol, the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), and the inhibitor of the extracellularly regulated kinases (ERKs), UO 126, cause retrograde amnesia when administered to the hippocampus. In the present study, the authors found that they all cause retrograde amnesia for 1-trial inhibitory avoidance, not only when infused into the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus, but also when infused into the basolateral amygdala or the entorhinal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices. The posttraining time course of the effect of each drug was, however, quite different across brain structures. Thus, in all of them, NMDA receptors and the ERK pathway are indispensable for memory consolidation, and GABA-sub(A) receptor activation inhibits memory consolidation: but in each case, their influence is interwoven differently.

  15. Retrograde approach for closure of ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jayaranganath, M; Subramanian, Anand; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa

    2010-07-01

    Though ruptured sinuses of Valsalva have been traditionally managed surgically, they are amenable to transcatheter closure. Various devices have been used for closure of these defects. We describe a novel technique of closure of a ruptured right sinus of Valsalva into the right ventricular outflow tract. A muscular ventricular septal defect occluder was deployed retrogradely, without resorting to the usual antegrade technique involving formation of an arteriovenous loop. PMID:20603510

  16. Air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, M; Chiaramonte, G; Arcadipane, A; Burgio, G; Traina, M

    2011-01-01

    This is a case of a venous air embolism in a pediatric patient with splenomesenteric portal shunt for portal cavernoma, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography under inhalator general anesthesia, without using N2O. There is ample data in the literature about the occurrence of venous air embolism during an endoscopic procedure. We believe it is important to call attention to this rare, but possible, and sometimes fatal, complication.

  17. [Successful recanalisation of RCA CTO using retrograde approach].

    PubMed

    Król, Marek; Skwarna, Bartosz; Buszman, Paweł

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old female two years after CABG presented with unstable angina and inferior wall ischaemia. Coronary angiography revealed occluded graft to RCA and chronic total occlusion of RCA with good collateral flow from distal LAD to RCA. The CTO was successfully crossed and dilated through epicardial collaterals from distal LAD (retrograde approach). Finally, antegrade angioplasty with two stents implantation was performed achieving TIMI 3 flow.

  18. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Synapses by Retrograde Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, Wade G.; Carey, Megan R.; Best, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Throughout the brain postsynaptic neurons release substances from their cell bodies and dendrites that regulate the strength of the synapses they receive. Diverse chemical messengers have been implicated in retrograde signaling from postsynaptic neurons to presynaptic boutons. Here we provide an overview of the signaling systems that lead to rapid changes in synaptic strength. We consider the capabilities, specializations and physiological roles of each type of signaling system. PMID:19640475

  19. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  20. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  1. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related adverse events: general overview.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) represents a monumental advance in the management of patients with pancreaticobiliary diseases, but is a complex and technically demanding procedure with the highest inherent risk of adverse events of all routine endoscopic procedures. Overall adverse event rates for ERCP are typically reported as 5-10%. The most commonly reported adverse events include post-ERCP pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, infection (cholangitis), and cardiopulomary or "sedation related" events. This article evaluates patient-related and procedure-related risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events, and discusses strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and management of these events.

  2. Motor neurons control locomotor circuit function retrogradely via gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianren; Ampatzis, Konstantinos; Björnfors, E Rebecka; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2016-01-21

    Motor neurons are the final stage of neural processing for the execution of motor behaviours. Traditionally, motor neurons have been viewed as the 'final common pathway', serving as passive recipients merely conveying to the muscles the final motor program generated by upstream interneuron circuits. Here we reveal an unforeseen role of motor neurons in controlling the locomotor circuit function via gap junctions in zebrafish. These gap junctions mediate a retrograde analogue propagation of voltage fluctuations from motor neurons to control the synaptic release and recruitment of the upstream V2a interneurons that drive locomotion. Selective inhibition of motor neurons during ongoing locomotion de-recruits V2a interneurons and strongly influences locomotor circuit function. Rather than acting as separate units, gap junctions unite motor neurons and V2a interneurons into functional ensembles endowed with a retrograde analogue computation essential for locomotor rhythm generation. These results show that motor neurons are not a passive recipient of motor commands but an integral component of the neural circuits responsible for motor behaviour.

  3. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  4. Functional focal retrograde amnesia: lost access to abstract autobiographical knowledge?

    PubMed

    Stracciari, Andrea; Mattarozzi, Katia; Fonti, Cristina; Guarino, Maria

    2005-10-01

    We describe three patients exhibiting an acute reversible amnesia characterised by an impaired recollection of past events with preserved anterograde memory, thus consistent with a focal retrograde amnesia (FRA). This occurred after variable events: state of fugue, road accident, post-traumatic headache. Retrograde amnesia affected autobiographical memory so severely as to cover all of the patients' lives and to erase knowledge of their own identity. The retrieval of public events was variably affected, ranging from normality to severe impairment. No lesions were found on neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings were unimpressive. FRA subsided in a few days, leaving a gap for the onset. The hypothesis of a psychogenic amnesia is considered, but overcoming the organic/psychogenic dichotomy the episodes appear as examples of "functional" memory inhibition, potentially triggered by different conditions, including events classifiable as psychic trauma. The clinical and neuropsychological traits of functional FRA are discussed. According to a current theory of autobiographical memory, the memory profile may be explained by a lost access to abstract autobiographical knowledge. Given some analogies with the more common transient global amnesia, a mechanism of spreading depression may also be hypothesised for functional FRA. PMID:16191819

  5. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in Nepal: an early experience.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, P R; Luitel, B R; Luitel, B R

    2013-06-01

    With the advancement in technology and miniaturization of instruments, retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) with flexible ureteroscope is gaining popularity. Flexible ureteroscope is introduced into renal collecting system through the urethra. Holmium YAG (Ho-YAG) Laser fiber of different sizes is introduced through the ureteroscope and renal stones are pulverized. Removal of renal stones less than 15 mm in size with RIRS has sharply reduced post operative morbidity. This is a Prospective study comprised of 58 RIRS performed from January 2013 to July 2013. Preoperative investigations like full blood count (FBC), renal function test (RFT), serological investigations, urine culture, intravenous urogram or CT-urogram, chest ray and electrocardiogram were done in all patients. Renal stones less than 15 mm in size were included for RIRS. Intra renal stones were treated with 7.5 Fr flexible ureteroscope (Flex - X2) using Holmium-YAG laser. Mean stone burden in our study was 10.5 +/- 3.3 mm. Out of 32 male patients, 29 (90.6%) required pre-stenting before RIRS and all 58 patients with successful dusting of stones in single sitting were discharged on next day. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery is advanced and successful technique and a viable alternative to Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) and Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the treatment of selected intrarenal stones with minimum morbidity.

  6. Control of synaptic function by endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    KANO, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Since the first reports in 2001, great advances have been made towards the understanding of endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that one of the two major endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is produced from membrane lipids upon postsynaptic Ca2+ elevation and/or activation of Gq/11-coupled receptors, and released from postsynaptic neurons. The released 2-AG then acts retrogradely onto presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and induces suppression of neurotransmitter release either transiently or persistently. These forms of 2-AG-mediated retrograde synaptic modulation are functional throughout the brain. The other major endocannabinoid, anandamide, mediates a certain form of endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (LTD). Anandamide also functions as an agonist for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) and mediates endocannabinoid-independent and TRPV1-dependent forms of LTD. It has also been demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system itself is plastic, which can be either up- or down-regulated by experimental or environmental conditions. In this review, I will make an overview of the mechanisms underlying endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation. PMID:25169670

  7. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  8. Retrograded starches as potential anodes in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wen, Yan; Zhu, Wei; Li, Lin; Zhang, Kunsheng; Wang, Wanyu

    2012-11-01

    Retrograded starch is a crystal formed by starch molecules with hydrogen bonds. Many literatures have reported its physicochemical character, but its crystal structure is so far unclear. As we isolate amylose and amylopectin from retrograded maize, sweet potato and potato starches in 4.0 M KOH solutions and make them retrograde alone in neutral solution (adjusted by HCl) to form crystal, a new phenomenon appears, crystals of KCl do not appear in retrograded potato amylose, potato amylopectin, and maize amylose, indicating that those crystals may absorb K⁺ and (or) Cl⁻, and those ions probably act with aldehyde of starch or hydroxy of fatty acid attached in starch, such characteristic may make retrograded starches replace graphite as anode with high-capacity in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

  9. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives. PMID:26428142

  10. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  11. Inhibition of wheat starch retrogradation by tea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Sun, Binghua; Zhang, Shikang; Zhu, Yuejin; Tian, Yaoqi

    2015-12-10

    The effect of four industrial tea derivatives (tea polyphenols [TPS], tea water-soluble extracts [TSE], tea polysaccharides [TSS], and green tea powder [GTP]), on the retrogradation of wheat starch was investigated using texture profile analysis (TPA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rapid viscosity analysis (RVA), and the α-amylase-iodine method. The addition of the four tea derivatives resulted in decreased hardness and increased cohesiveness of the starch gel as shown by the TPA test. The DSC data demonstrated an increase in the enthalpy change of starch gelatinization and a decrease in the enthalpy change of starch recrystallite dissociation. The RVA results indicated that the peak viscosity, representing the intermolecular forces of wheat starch, was reduced after addition of TPS, TSE, and TSS, respectively, but was increased by GTP. Furthermore, the half crystallization time in the Avrami equation almost doubled after the separate addition of the tea derivatives.

  12. Antegrade versus retrograde intramedullary nailing of proximal third femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kevin M; Ali, Ashley; Boudreau, John A; Cannada, Lisa K; Watson, John T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the results of proximal third femur fractures treated with retrograde nailing (RGN) and compare those results to a cohort from the same period treated with antegrade nailing (AGN). Adult patients with femur fractures within 10 cm of the lesser trochanter who were treated with intramedullary nails were reviewed. Two groups, patients treated with AGN (n = 35) and RGN (n = 34), were compiled. Demographic information, comorbidities, associated injuries, radiographic outcomes, complications, and secondary procedures were compared. There were two malunions in the AGN group and three in the RGN group. The AGN group had two nonunions while the RGN group had one. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that a higher body mass index (BMI) (p = .011) and a higher AO/OTA fracture classification (p = .019) were the only factors predictive of malunion. Regardless of starting point, there were no differences between groups in the number of secondary procedures, nonunions, malunions, or time until union.

  13. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  14. Comparison of antegrade and retrograde laparoscopic radical prostatectomy techniques.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Volkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Resorlu, Berkan; Yigitbasi, Ismail; Yavuzsan, Abdullah H; Tasci, Ali I

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of antegrade and retrograde approaches on functional recovery and surgical outcomes of extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). We analyzed 135 patients who underwent extraperitoneal LRP, with the retrograde technique performed on 42 (31%; Group 1) and the antegrade technique on 93 (69%; Group 2). Both groups were statistically similar with respect to age, clinical stage, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, prostate volume, and previous surgical history. Mean operative time was significantly longer in Group 1 (244±18.3 vs. 203.3±18.4 min, p<0.001), whereas mean anastomosis times for both groups were similar (35.8±7.2 vs. 34.7±5.8 min, p=0.155). Estimated blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in Group 2. A significant difference was observed for both hospitalization (6.79±3.3 vs. 5.46±3.08 days, respectively; p=0.026) and catheterization times (12.24±2.1 vs. 11±1.08 days, respectively; p=0.001) for Group 2. The total complication rate was 47.6% in Group 1, and 11.8% in Group 2 (p<0.01). Rates of positive surgical margins were 14.2% and 15% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. At the 12-month interval from operation, similar recoveries in urinary continence were obtained for both groups (81% in Group 1; 91% in Group 2). Upon comparison of the two LRP techniques, we found that both were effective; however, the latter resulted in lower minor complication rate, lower blood loss, shorter operation time, and shorter length of hospital stay. PMID:27523453

  15. Feasibility of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Thomas; Willard, Michael D; Ruhnke, Isabelle; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Cats are predisposed to diseases of the biliary tract and the exocrine pancreas and these can be challenging to diagnose. In humans and dogs > 10 kg, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has been successfully used to diagnose some of these disorders. The purpose of our study was to determine whether ERCP would also be feasible in cats using a pediatric duodenoscope. Four purpose-bred, clinically healthy, castrated domestic shorthair cats participated in two studies. Study 1 compared standard white light endoscopy with chromoendoscopy for localizing the major duodenal papilla. In Study 2 ERCP was performed. Repeated clinical examinations and measurements of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) were performed before and up to 18 hours after interventions on all cats. Chromoendoscopy was subjectively judged to be superior for localizing the major papilla. Insertion of the ERCP catheter was best accomplished when cats were in dorsal recumbency. Complete ERCP was successful in two cats. In the other cats, either retrograde cholangiography or pancreatography was possible. Serum fPLI concentrations increased temporarily in two cats during Study 2 when measured immediately, 2, 4, and 18 h after ERCP. Peak fPLI concentrations were detected either immediately after ERCP or 2 h later. No clinical signs of complications were observed within 18 h after the procedures. Findings indicated that ERCP is technically demanding but feasible in healthy cats. Future studies need to determine whether the temporary increases in serum fPLI concentrations are clinically important and to investigate the utility of ERCP in feline patients.

  16. Right medial thalamic lesion causes isolated retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Miller, L A; Caine, D; Harding, A; Thompson, E J; Large, M; Watson, J D

    2001-01-01

    Pervasive retrograde amnesia without anterograde memory impairment has rarely been described as a consequence of circumscribed brain damage. We report this phenomenon in a 33 yr-old, right-handed man (JG) in association with the extension in the right thalamus of a previously small, bilateral thalamic lesion. JG presented with a dense amnesia for autobiographical material more than a few years old, with some sparing of recent memories. Furthermore, he was completely unable to recognise famous people or world events. Many other aspects of semantic knowledge were intact and there was no evidence of general intellectual impairment, executive dysfunction or loss of visual imagery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an acute lesion in the right thalamus and two small, symmetrical, bilateral non-acute thalamic lesions. Follow-up neuropsychological assessment indicated a stable pattern of impaired retrograde and spared anterograde memory over 18 months and psychiatric assessments yielded no evidence of confabulation, malingering or other symptoms to suggest psychogenic amnesia. JG's profile indicates that the division of declarative memory into just two categories - episodic and semantic - is inadequate. Rather, his case adds to the growing body evidence to suggest that world knowledge pertaining to people and events is stored or accessed similarly to autobiographical information and differently from other types of more general factual knowledge. We hypothesize that the right mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and immediately surrounding regions comprise the central processing mechanism referred to by McClelland (Revue Neurologique, 150 (1994) 570) and Markowitsch (Brain Research Review, 21 (1995) 117) as responsible for inducing and co-ordinating the recall of these sorts of cortically stored memory engrams.

  17. Effects of protein in wheat flour on retrogradation of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Xijun, Lian; Junjie, Guo; Danli, Wang; Lin, Li; Jiaran, Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Albumins, globulins, gliadins, and glutenins were isolated from wheat flour and the effects of those proteins on retrogradation of wheat starch were investigated. The results showed that only glutenins retarded retrogradation of wheat starch and other 3 proteins promoted it. The results of IR spectra proved that no S-S linkage formed during retrogradation of wheat starch blended with wheat proteins. Combination of wheat starch and globulins or gliadins through glucosidic bonds hindered the hydrolysis of wheat starch by α-amylase. The melting peak temperatures of retrograded wheat starch attached to different proteins were 128.46, 126.14, 132.03, 121.65, and 134.84 °C for the control with no protein, albumins, glutenins, globulins, gliadins groups, respectively, and there was no second melting temperature for albumins group. Interaction of wheat proteins and starch in retrograded wheat starch greatly decreased the endothermic enthalpy (△H) of retrograded wheat starch. Retrograded wheat starch bound to gliadins might be a new kind of resistant starch based on glycosidic bond between starch and protein.

  18. RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 Promote Retrograde Transport in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Dubey, Jyoti; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde transport is a critical mechanism for recycling certain membrane cargo. Following endocytosis from the plasma membrane, retrograde cargo is moved from early endosomes to Golgi followed by transport (recycling) back to the plasma membrane. The complete molecular and cellular mechanisms of retrograde transport remain unclear. The small GTPase RAB-6.2 mediates the retrograde recycling of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) subunit GLR-1 in C. elegans neurons. Here we show that RAB-6.2 and a close paralog, RAB-6.1, together regulate retrograde transport in both neurons and non-neuronal tissue. Mutants for rab-6.1 or rab-6.2 fail to recycle GLR-1 receptors, resulting in GLR-1 turnover and behavioral defects indicative of diminished GLR-1 function. Loss of both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 results in an additive effect on GLR-1 retrograde recycling, indicating that these two C. elegans Rab6 isoforms have overlapping functions. MIG-14 (Wntless) protein, which undergoes retrograde recycling, undergoes a similar degradation in intestinal epithelia in both rab-6.1 and rab-6.2 mutants, suggesting a broader role for these proteins in retrograde transport. Surprisingly, MIG-14 is localized to separate, spatially segregated endosomal compartments in rab-6.1 mutants compared to rab-6.2 mutants. Our results indicate that RAB-6.1 and RAB-6.2 have partially redundant functions in overall retrograde transport, but also have their own unique cellular- and subcellular functions. PMID:26891225

  19. Retrograde mechanochemical ablation of the small saphenous vein for the treatment of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hayley M; Lane, Tristan R A; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-10-01

    We present the first case of retrograde ablation of the small saphenous vein to treat active venous ulceration. A 73-year-old gentleman with complicated varicose veins of the left leg and a non-healing venous ulcer despite previous successful endovenous treatment to his left great saphenous vein underwent mechanochemical ablation of his small saphenous vein with the ClariVein® system, under local anaesthetic, using a retrograde cannulation technique. Post-operatively the patient had improved symptomatically and the ulcer size had reduced. This report highlights that patients with small saphenous vein incompetence and active ulceration can be treated successfully with retrograde mechanochemical ablation.

  20. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R; Mans, Dorus A; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J F; Taylor, S Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A; Scambler, Peter J; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M; Beales, Philip L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M; Witman, George B

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  1. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  2. Retrograde Proximal Anterior Tibial Artery Access for Treating Femoropopliteal Segment Occlusion: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Affonso, Breno Boueri; Golghetto Domingos, Fernanda Uchiyama; da Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Bortolini, Edgar; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Some challenges have been detected when there are long and complex lesions of femoropopliteal arterial occlusive disease, even with descriptions of the retrograde pedal approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the retrograde proximal anterior tibial artery access for treatment of femoropopliteal segment occlusion when antegrade recanalization failed (retrograde recanalization and rearranging the system into an antegrade position). Technical and clinical success was achieved in 100% of 4 cases, with an improvement of at least 2 Rutherford classes. Minor complication, small hematoma in an anterior compartment of the limb, occurred in 1 patient. No sign of compartmental syndrome was observed. PMID:26902943

  3. Retrograde amnesia in patients with rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Margaret G; Lafleche, Ginette M C

    2004-03-01

    The retrograde amnesia of patients with memory loss related to rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms is compared with the retrograde amnesia of temporal amnesic patients and nonamnesic control participants. Two tests which focus on popular culture but which differ according to extent of news exposure and the cognitive processes necessary for task performance were used to measure retrograde memory. ACoA patients demonstrated more significant retrograde memory problems than did nonamnesic controls; however, the severity and pattern of their memory loss was less severe than that seen in association with temporal amnesia. Different factors influenced the remote memory loss of respective groups: ACoA patients' problems were related to impaired lexical retrieval whereas temporal amnesic patients had problems secondary to both retrieval and storage deficits. PMID:15012842

  4. Yeast as a tool to study mitochondrial retrograde pathway en route to cell stress response.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling is a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, by which dysfunctional mitochondria relay signals that lead to cell stress adaptation in physiopathological conditions by changes in nuclear gene expression. The best comprehension of components and regulation of retrograde signaling have been obtained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where retrograde target gene expression is regulated by RTG genes. In this chapter, we describe the methods to measure mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation in yeast cells by monitoring the mRNA levels of RTG target genes, such as those encoding for peroxisomal citrate synthase, aconitase, and NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit 1, as well as the phosphorylation status of Rtg1/3p transcriptional factor which controls RTG target gene transcription. PMID:25634284

  5. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour. PMID:26868561

  6. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization of a Pelvic Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuzaki, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Sumi, Seiya; Ogata, Ichiro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Kawakami, Shigeo; Ueda, Shohichi

    1999-11-15

    We successfully performed embolization therapy for a pelvic arteriovenous malformation by the retrograde transvenous approach using a liquid embolic material. This malformation was unique in that it had a single draining vein, which allowed this technique employing an occlusion balloon.

  7. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour.

  8. Hippocampal lesions produce both nongraded and temporally graded retrograde amnesia in the same rat.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Sekeres, Melanie J; Binns, Malcolm A; Moscovitch, Morris

    2013-05-01

    Rats were administered contextual fear conditioning and trained on a water-maze, spatial memory task 28 days or 24 h before undergoing hippocampal lesion or control surgery. When tested postoperatively on both tasks, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited retrograde amnesia for spatial memory at both delays but temporally graded retrograde amnesia for the contextual fear response. In demonstrating both types of retrograde amnesia in the same animals, the results parallel similar observations in human amnesics with hippocampal damage and provide compelling evidence that the nature of the task and the type of information being accessed are crucial factors in determining the pattern of retrograde memory loss associated with hippocampal damage. The results are interpreted as consistent with our transformation hypothesis (Winocur et al. (2010a) Neuropsychologia 48:2339-2356; Winocur and Moscovitch (2011) J Int Neuropsychol Soc 17:766-780) and at variance with standard consolidation theory and other theoretical models of memory. PMID:23401223

  9. Retrograde Tibiopedal Access as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Intervention Complications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Retrograde pedal access has been well described in the literature as a secondary approach for limb salvage in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. In this manuscript we are presenting a case where retrograde tibiopedal access has been used as a bail-out procedure for the management of superficial femoral artery (SFA) intervention complications. Procedure/Technique. After development of a perforation while trying to cross the totally occluded mid SFA using the conventional CFA access, we were able to cross the mid SFA lesion after accessing the posterior tibial artery in a retrograde fashion and delivered a self-expanding stent which created a flap that sealed the perforation without the need for covered stent. Conclusion. Retrograde tibiopedal access is a safe and effective approach for delivery of stents from the distal approach and so can be used as a bail-out technique for SFA perforation. PMID:27803837

  10. Patient and staff exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Buls, N; Pages, J; Mana, F; Osteaux, M

    2002-05-01

    Despite a number of efforts being put into the radiological protection of both patient and staff during interventional radiological (IR) procedures during recent years, information about radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures remains scarce. The purpose of this study was to estimate both patient and staff radiation doses during therapeutic ERCP procedures by direct measurement and to compare these results with data from other IR procedures. For 54 patients, effective dose and skin dose were estimated by measuring the dose-area product. For staff, entrance surface doses to the lens of the eye, thyroid and hands were estimated by thermoluminescent dosemeters. A median effective dose of 7.3 mSv and a median entrance surface dose of 271 mGy per procedure were estimated for patients. The gastroenterologist received a median dose of 0.34 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0.30 mGy to the skin at the level of the thyroid and 0.44 mGy to the skin of the hands, per procedure. When comparing the dosimetric quantities presented in this study with data from other IR procedures, it is clear that patient skin doses and doses to staff are high owing to the use of inappropriate X-ray equipment. ERCP requires the same radiation protection practice as all IR procedures. It should be consistently included in future multicentre IR patient and staff dose survey studies at national or international level.

  11. Interferon gamma induces retrograde dendritic retraction and inhibits synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Jung; Beck, Hiroko Nagasawa; Lein, Pamela J; Higgins, Dennis

    2002-06-01

    The expression of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) increases after neural injury, and it is sustained in chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. To understand how exposure to this proinflammatory cytokine might affect neural function, we examined its effects on cultures of neurons derived from the central and peripheral nervous systems. IFNgamma inhibits initial dendritic outgrowth in cultures of embryonic rat sympathetic and hippocampal neurons, and this inhibitory effect on process growth is associated with a decrease in the rate of synapse formation. In addition, in older cultures of sympathetic neurons, IFNgamma also selectively induces retraction of existing dendrites, ultimately leading to an 88% decrease in the size of the arbor. Dendritic retraction induced by IFNgamma represents a specific cellular response because it occurs without affecting axonal outgrowth or cell survival, and it is not observed with tumor necrosis factor alpha or other inflammatory cytokines. IFNgamma-induced dendritic retraction is associated with the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), and expression of a dominant-negative STAT1 construct attenuates the inhibitory effect of IFNgamma. Moreover, retrograde dendritic retraction is observed when distal axons are selectively exposed to IFNgamma. These data imply that IFNgamma-mediated STAT1 activation induces both dendritic atrophy and synaptic loss and that this occurs both at the sites of IFNgamma release and at remote loci. Regressive actions of IFNgamma on dendrites may contribute to the neuropathology of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations.

  13. HUMERAL NAIL: COMPARISON OF THE ANTEGRADE AND RETROGRADE APPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Bencić, Ivan; Cengić, Tomislav; Prenc, Jakov; Bulatović, Nikola; Matejcić, Aljoša

    2016-03-01

    Application of humeral nail in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures is a relatively novel method of fracture fixation. Its application at Clinical Department of Traumatology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center began in 2001. The operative procedure should be performed using a minimally invasive technique without fracture opening in order to maintain optimal conditions for fracture healing including hematoma management. However, in everyday practice it is often impossible to obtain satisfactory fracture reduction using the closed procedure, so open reduction and additional fixation with wires or screws are mandatory. Over the last 14 years, fixation of fractures with the locking nail was performed in more than 400 patients. Cases of pseudarthrosis and pathological fractures were also managed successfully. There were more female patients. The mean time from injury to surgery was 2.4 days. Surgery was performed immediately upon admission to the emergency service whenever possible. This study comprised 234 patients with humeral shaft fractures treated with the humeral nail (antegrade insertion was applied in 103 and retrograde in 131 patients). The aim of the study was to stress out the complexity of appropriate operative treatment of humeral shaft fractures using intramedullary fixation, as well as the importance of proper reduction and stable fixation. PMID:27333726

  14. Retrograde amnesia and the volume of critical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Lasserson, D; Kingsley, D R; Bello, F; Rush, C; Stanhope, N; Stevens, T G; Goodman, G; Buckman, J R; Heilpern, G; Kendall, B E; Colchester, A C F

    2003-01-01

    There are many controversies concerning the structural basis of retrograde amnesia (RA). One view is that memories are held briefly within a medial temporal store ("hippocampal complex") before being "consolidated" or reorganised within temporal neocortex and/or networks more widely distributed within the cerebral cortex. An alternative view is that the medial temporal lobes are always involved in the storage and retrieval (reactivation) of autobiographical memories (multiple trace theory). The present study used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 40 patients with focal pathology/volume loss in different sites, to examine the correlates of impairment on three different measures of RA. The findings supported the view that widespread neural networks are involved in the storage and retrieval of autobiographical and other remote memories. Brain volume measures in critical structures could account for 60% of variance on autobiographical memory measures (for incidents and facts) in diencephalic patients and for 60-68% of variance in patients with frontal lesions. Significant correlations with medial temporal lobe volume were found only in the diencephalic group, in whom they were thought to reflect thalamic changes, but not in patients with herpes encephalitis or hypoxia in whom the temporal lobes were particularly implicated. The latter finding fails to support one of the main predictions of multiple trace theory, as presently expounded. PMID:14750651

  15. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.

  16. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignancy of the bile ducts that carries high morbidity and mortality. Patients with CCA typically present with obstructive jaundice, and associated complications of CCA include cholangitis and biliary sepsis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a valuable treatment modality for patients with CCA, as it enables internal drainage of blocked bile ducts and hepatic segments by using plastic or metal stents. While there remains debate as to if bilateral (or multi-segmental) hepatic drainage is required and/or superior to unilateral drainage, the underlying tenant of draining any persistently opacified bile ducts is paramount to good ERCP practice and good clinical outcomes. Endoscopic therapy for malignant biliary strictures from CCA has advanced to include ablative therapies via ERCP-directed photodynamic therapy (PDT) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). While ERCP techniques cannot cure CCA, advancements in the field of ERCP have enabled us to improve upon the quality of life of patients with inoperable and incurable disease. ERCP-directed PDT has been used in lieu of brachytherapy to provide neoadjuvant local tumor control in patients with CCA who are awaiting liver transplantation. Lastly, mounting evidence suggests that palliative ERCP-directed PDT, and probably ERCP-directed RFA as well, offer a survival advantage to patients with this difficult-to-treat malignancy. PMID:26140095

  17. Retrograde amnesia in praying mantis after two successive learning processes.

    PubMed

    Zabala, N A; Maldonado, H

    1990-01-01

    Learning and memory consolidation was investigated in the mantis Stagmatoptera biocellata, by two successive trainings: a) the attack (A) avoidance training in which animals were not allowed to catch a mobile star, followed by the deimatic reaction (DR) avoidance training of not displaying this defensive response, or b) DR-avoidance training followed by A-avoidance training. The results showed that the presence and the 1 of A-avoidance learning and DR-avoidance learning did not affect the learning of the other training. Total retention of A-avoidance memory was demonstrated when A-avoidance training was given first, whereas DR-avoidance memory was significantly lost (716%) when the DR-avoidance training was given first. The retroactive forgetting of DR-avoidance memory is considered as retrograde amnesia rather than retroactive memory inhibition because it depends on the activity during A-avoidance training (number of attacks) and not the quantity of A-avoidance learning. The magnitude of the amnesic effect due to this distracting activity in the A-avoidance training appears to be remarkably similar to that reported in a previous work using nitrogen-induced anoxia as the amnesic factor. PMID:2152377

  18. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  19. Posterior tibial artery access using transradial techniques: retrograde approach to inaccessible lower extremity lesions.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Juan Carlos; Singh, Vikas; Martinez, Claudia A

    2012-06-01

    Percutaneous intervention of chronic limb ischemia is often limited by vascular access especially in patients with previous surgical interventions. This warrants development of alternative endovascular techniques, particularly for patients in whom traditional ipsilateral antegrade or contralateral retrograde access has failed or is not possible. We describe a novel approach to the posterior tibial artery using retrograde access with transradial techniques including closure devices in two patients with inaccessible antegrade access. PMID:21432983

  20. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  1. Retrograde labelling of serotonergic projections onto the neuroendocrine bag cells of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; Blankenship, J E

    1991-02-25

    Injection of rhodamine-conjugated latex microspheres into the right bag cell cluster of Aplysia brasiliana yielded retrograde labelling of a small number of cells in the cerebral and abdominal ganglia. Subsequent staining for serotonin immunoreactivity demonstrated consistent double-labelling in specific cerebral and abdominal ganglion serotonergic cells. The double-labelled populations were also stained in vivo by prior treatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. These retrogradely labelled serotonergic neurons may represent sources of inhibitory input to the neuroendocrine bag cells.

  2. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  3. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome.

  4. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  5. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Karim, Abdul-Rahman R; Vo, Minh; Main, Michael L; Grantham, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  6. Control of respiration-driven retrograde flow in the subdiaphragmatic venous return of the Fontan circulation

    PubMed Central

    Vukicevic, M; Conover, T; Jaeggli, M; Zhou, J; Pennati, G; Hsia, TY; Figliola, RS

    2014-01-01

    Respiration influences the subdiaphragmatic venous return in the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) of the Fontan circulation whereby both the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein flows can experience retrograde motion. Controlling retrograde flows could improve patient outcomes. Using a patient-specific model within a Fontan mock circulatory system with respiration, we inserted a valve into the IVC to examine its effects on local hemodynamics while varying retrograde volumes by changing vascular impedances. A bovine valved conduit reduced IVC retrograde flow to within 3% of antegrade flow in all cases. The valve closed only under conditions supporting retrograde flow and its effects on local hemodynamics increased with larger retrograde volume. Liver and TCPC pressures improved only while the valve leaflets were closed while cycle-averaged pressures improved only slightly (italic>1 mm Hg). Increased pulmonary vascular resistance raised mean circulation pressures but the valve functioned and cardiac output improved and stabilized. Power loss across the TCPC improved by 12–15% (pbold>0.05) with a valve. The effectiveness of valve therapy is dependent on patient vascular impedance. PMID:24814833

  7. Retrogradation of Waxy Rice Starch Gel in the Vicinity of the Glass Transition Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Udomrati, Sunsanee

    2013-01-01

    The retrogradation rate of waxy rice starch gel was investigated during storage at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature of a maximally concentrated system (Tg′), as it was hypothesized that such temperatures might cause different effects on retrogradation. The Tg′ value of fully gelatinized waxy rice starch gel with 50% water content and the enthalpy of melting retrograded amylopectin in the gels were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Starch gels were frozen to −30°C and stored at 4, 0, −3, −5, and −8°C for 5 days. The results indicated that the Tg′ value of gelatinized starch gel annealed at −7°C for 15 min was −3.5°C. Waxy rice starch gels retrograded significantly when stored at 4°C with a decrease in the enthalpy of melting retrograded starch in samples stored for 5 days at −3, −5, and −8°C, respectively, perhaps due to the more rigid glass matrix and less molecular mobility facilitating starch chain recrystallization at temperatures below Tg′. This suggests that retardation of retrogradation of waxy rice starch gel can be achieved at temperature below Tg′. PMID:26904602

  8. Properties of Cores Formed by Retrograde Minor Mergers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J.

    1999-09-01

    In the last 10 years over a dozen elliptical galaxies have been observed to posses a core which rotates counter to the rest of the galaxy. In one formation scenario, dynamical friction causes a compact companion to spiral into the center of a much larger elliptical galaxy on a retrograde orbit relative to the larger galaxy's rotation. If the core of the smaller galaxy is not tidally disrupted it may carry some of it's orbital angular momentum to the center. I present results from N-body simulations, which cover the parameter space over which satellite accretion is most likely to form counter rotating cores. The kinematic parts of the results are analyzed using the penalized likelihood method of Merritt to calculate 2D line-of-sight velocity fields, including third and fourth order Gauss-Hermite terms. By combining this method with IRAF, the photometric aspects of the results are analyzed and compared with observations. The results indicate that dissipationless satellite accretion can only form counter rotating cores when the larger galaxy's intrinsic angular momentum is almost perfectly antiparallel to the orbital angular momentum of the satellite. In most other cases a kinematically distinct core is formed. I present statistical properties of the cores, which include the deviations from pure isophote ellipses as well as deviations of the line-of-sight velocity profiles from a pure Gaussian form. To test the robustness of the results, some of the simulations are redone with a minor amount of dissipation added to the satellite. These simulations indicate that including small amounts of gas does not significantly effect the conclusions. I would like to thank the Student Stipend Committee for making this presentation possible.

  9. Continued evidence for safety of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Sean; Beirne, Joshua; Delgi-Esposti, Silvia; Habr, Fadlallah

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To report the safety of continued use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) during pregnancy at various maternal ages. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of pregnant patients who underwent ERCP at a tertiary academic center was undertaken between 2002 and 2012. Pertinent past medical history and initial presenting laboratory data were collected. Review of the procedure note for each ERCP performed provided documentation of lead shielding, type of sedation, fluoroscopy time, and post-procedure complications. Patients’ clinical courses were reviewed until the time of delivery and pregnancy complications with fetal outcomes were examined. Data was stratified based upon the mother’s age at the time of ERCP: 18-21, 22-29, and ≥ 30 years of age. RESULTS: Twenty pregnant patients who underwent ERCP between 2002 and 2012 were identified. The mean age at the time of ERCP was 26.4 years (18-38 years) and the average trimester was the second. The indications for ERCP were choledocholithiasis in 17 patients, gallstone pancreatitis in 2 patients, and cholangitis in 1 patient. The mean fluoroscopy time of ERCP was 3.8 min (0.3-23.6 min). Sphincterotomy was performed in 18 patients with therapeutic intent and not as a prophylactic measure to prevent recurrences. Clinical documentation of use of protective shielding was found in only 8 notes (40%). Post procedure complications were limited to two cases of post-ERCP pancreatitis (10%). Elective cholecystectomy was performed shortly after ERCP in 11 of the pregnant patients. Birth records were available for 16 patients, of which 15 had full-term pregnancies. Cesarean sections were performed in 5 (31%) patients. Term birth weight was greater than 2500 g in all cases except one in which the mother had a known hypercoagulable state. CONCLUSION: ERCP during pregnancy is both safe and efficacious regardless of maternal age or trimester. PMID:25132918

  10. Laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients

    PubMed Central

    Snauwaert, Christophe; Laukens, Pierre; Dillemans, Bruno; Himpens, Jacques; De Looze, Danny; Deprez, Pierre Henri; Badaoui, Abdenor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in bariatric patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is challenging due to the long anatomical route required to reach the biliopancreatic limb. Aim: Assessment of the feasibility and performance of laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Methods: A retrospective multicenter observational consecutive-patient cohort study of all patients in the period May 2008 to September 2014 with a history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who presented with complicated biliary disease and who underwent a laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure was similar in all centers and was performed through a 15 mm or 18 mm trocar that was inserted in the gastric remnant. Cholecystectomy was performed concomitantly when indicated. Results: In total, 23 patients underwent a laparoscopy-assisted transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure. Two patients required a mini-laparotomy for transgastric access because of a complex surgical history resulting in multiple adhesions. Indications included ascending cholangitis, choledocholithiasis, and biliary pancreatitis. Of the 23 patients, 13 underwent concomitant cholecystectomy. All patients successfully underwent biliary cannulation and sphincterotomy. No endoscopic procedure-related complications (i. e. bleeding, pancreatitis or retroperitoneal perforation) occurred. Mean hospital stay was 2.8 days (range 2 – 4). Conclusions: Transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a feasible approach in the treatment of pancreaticobiliary disease in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients, without major complications in our series and allows endoscopic treatment and cholecystectomy to be performed consecutively in a single procedure. In Roux-en-Y gastric

  11. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts.

  12. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts. PMID:22884958

  13. The retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starches as observed with FT-IR, 13C NMR and DSC.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wang, Changjun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Li, Lin

    2014-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starch with wavelengths of maximum absorbance, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and DSC. The results show that the starches in retrograded glutinous rice starch and glutinous rice amylopectin could not form double helix. The IR results show that protein inhabits in glutinous rice and maize starches in a different way and appearance of C-H symmetric stretching vibration at 2852 cm(-1) in starch might be appearance of protein. Retrogradation untied the protein in glutinous amylopectin. Enthalpies of sweet potato and maize granules are higher than those of their retrograded starches. The (13)C NMR results show that retrogradation of those two starches leads to presence of β-anomers and retrogradation might decompose lipids in glutinous rice amylopectin into small molecules. Glutinous rice starch was more inclined to retrogradation than buckwheat starch. The DSC results show that the second peak temperatures for retrograded glutinous rice and buckwheat starches should be assigned to protein. The SEM results show that an obvious layer structure exists in retrograded glutinous rice amylopectin.

  14. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    accretion only explores the late evolution stages of the binary in an otherwise unperturbed retrograde disc to illustrate how eccentricity evolves with time in relation to the shape of the underlying surface density distribution.

  15. Retrograde versus Antegrade Approach for the Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Mykoniatis, Ioannis; Isid, Ayman; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Rosenberg, Shilo; Hidas, Guy; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of retrograde versus antegrade ureteroscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with proximal ureteral stones >15 mm, treated in our institution from January 2011 to January 2016. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative outcomes, and complications were recorded and compared between the two techniques. Results. Our analysis included 57 patients. Thirty-four patients (59.6%) underwent retrograde and 23 patients (40.4%) underwent antegrade ureteroscopy. There was no significant difference in patients' demographics and stone characteristics between the groups. Stone-free rate was significantly higher (p = 0.033) in the antegrade group (100%) compared to retrograde one (82.4%). Fluoroscopy time, procedure duration, and length of hospitalization were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in retrograde approach. On the other hand, the need for postoperative stenting was significantly lower in the antegrade group (p < 0.001). No difference was found between the groups (p = 0.745) regarding postoperative complications. Conclusions. Antegrade ureteroscopy is an efficient and safe option for the management of large proximal ureteral stones. It may achieve high stone-free rates compared to retrograde ureteroscopy with the drawback of longer operative time, fluoroscopy time, and length of hospitalization. PMID:27766263

  16. Kinematical evolution of tidally limited star clusters: the role of retrograde stellar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The presence of an external tidal field often induces significant dynamical evolutionary effects on the internal kinematics of star clusters. Previous studies investigating the restricted three-body problem with applications to star cluster dynamics have shown that unbound stars on retrograde orbits (with respect to the direction of the cluster's orbit) are more stable against escape than prograde orbits, and predicted that a star cluster might acquire retrograde rotation through preferential escape of stars on prograde orbits. In this study, we present evidence of this prediction, but we also illustrate that there are additional effects that cannot be accounted for by the preferential escape of prograde orbits alone. Specifically, in the early evolution, initially underfilling models increase their fraction of retrograde stars without losing significant mass, and acquire a retrograde angular velocity. We attribute this effect to the development of preferentially eccentric/radial orbits in the outer regions of star clusters as they are expanding into their tidal limitation. We explore the implications of the evolution of the fraction of prograde and retrograde stars for the evolution of the cluster internal rotation, and its dependence on the initial structural properties. Although all the systems studied here evolve towards an approximately solid-body internal rotation with angular velocity equal to about half of the angular velocity of the cluster orbital motion around the host galaxy, the evolutionary history of the radial profile of the cluster internal angular velocity depends on the cluster initial structure.

  17. Recruitment of actin modifiers to TrkA endosomes governs retrograde NGF signaling and survival

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Anthony W.; Hillaire, Coryse St.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Glebova, Natalia O.; Philippidou, Polyxeni; Halegoua, Simon; Ginty, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary NGF and NT3 collaborate to support development of sympathetic neurons. Although both neurotrophins activate TrkA-dependent axonal extension, NGF is unique in its ability to promote retrograde transport of TrkA endosomes and retrograde survival. Here, we report that actin depolymerization is essential for initiation of NGF/TrkA endosome trafficking and that a Rac1–cofilin signaling module associated with TrkA early endosomes supports their maturation to retrograde transport-competent endosomes. Moreover, the actin-regulatory endosomal components are absent from NT3-formed TrkA endosomes, explaining the failure of NT3 to support retrograde TrkA transport and survival. The inability of NT3 to activate Rac1-GTP–cofilin signaling is likely due to the labile nature of NT3/TrkA complexes within the acidic environment of TrkA early endosomes. Thus, TrkA endosomes associate with actin-modulatory proteins to promote F-actin disassembly enabling their maturation into transport-competent signaling endosomes. Differential control of this process explains how NGF in final targets, but not NT3 from intermediate targets, supports retrograde survival of sympathetic neurons. PMID:21816277

  18. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia. PMID:24834048

  19. Retrogradation of Maize Starch after High Hydrostatic Pressure Gelation: Effect of Amylose Content and Depressurization Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Swedlund, Peter; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been employed to gelatinize or physically modify starch dispersions. In this study, waxy maize starch, normal maize starch, and two high amylose content starch were processed by a HHP of the order of 600 MPa, at 25°C for 15min. The effect of HHP processing on the crystallization of maize starches with various amylose content during storage at 4°C was investigated. Crystallization kinetics of HHP treated starch gels were investigated using rheology and FTIR. The effect of crystallization on the mechanical properties of starch gel network were evaluated in terms of dynamic complex modulus (G*). The crystallization induced increase of short-range helices structures were investigated using FTIR. The pressure releasing rate does not affect the starch retrogradation behaviour. The rate and extent of retrogradation depends on the amylose content of amylose starch. The least retrogradation was observed in HHP treated waxy maize starch. The rate of retrogradation is higher for HHP treated high amylose maize starch than that of normal maize starch. A linear relationship between the extent of retrogradation (phase distribution) measured by FTIR and G* is proposed. PMID:27219066

  20. Effect of storage time on the retrogradation of banana starch extrudate.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Ottenhof, M-A; Agama-Acevedo, E; Farhat, I A

    2005-02-23

    Starch was isolated from banana starch and the retrogradation phenomenon was studied using diverse techniques, including an enzymatic measurement. Wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) showed that the sample stored for 7 h presented small peaks and when the storage time increased the peaks increased in intensity. The type of diffraction pattern found in banana extrudates is typical of the A-type crystal polymorph. The crystallinity index from the diffractograms, showed a plateau after approximately 20 h of storage. The short-range order measurement with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that banana starch retrogradation reached a maximum value at approximately 11 h of storage, a value that agrees with the results obtained with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), because the maximum enthalpy value (approximately 5 J/g) was calculated in the stored sample for 8 h, without changes in the stored samples for more time. Retrograded resistant starch values did not change after 12 h of storage, obtaining the maximum starch retrogradation level. FTIR, DSC, and the enzymatic technique showed the changes at the molecular level in starch during storage; in the case of WAXS, they determine the long-range order that explains the differences found in the starch retrogradation pattern measurement in banana starch.

  1. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  2. Evidence for a unidirectional retrograde communication between distal His bundle and atria.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J W

    1980-01-01

    Intracardiac electrogram recordings are presented suggesting the existence in one patient with recurrent supraventricular tachycardia of a functionally unidirectional retrograde connection between the distal His bundle and the low right atrium. Recordings obtained during junctional rhythm showed a short ventriculoatrial conduction time which did not lengthen during rapid or premature ventricular pacing. During an episode of supraventricular tachycardia induced by a single atrial premature stimulus, an infra-His Wenckebach period occurred during which retrograde ventriculoatrial conduction remained constant until ventricular capture was blocked, but atrial activation persisted with the same retrograde atrial activation sequence seen in the previous beats of supraventricular tachycardia. The findings appear to document participation in supraventricular tachycardia of a type of atrio-His fibre originally described by Brechenmacher. PMID:7378222

  3. Effect of high-speed jet on flow behavior, retrogradation, and molecular weight of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Luo, Shun-Jing; BeMiller, James N; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei

    2015-11-20

    Effects of high-speed jet (HSJ) treatment on flow behavior, retrogradation, and degradation of the molecular structure of indica rice starch were investigated. Decreasing with the number of HSJ treatment passes were the turbidity of pastes (degree of retrogradation), the enthalpy of melting of retrograded rice starch, weight-average molecular weights and weight-average root-mean square radii of gyration of the starch polysaccharides, and the amylopectin peak areas of SEC profiles. The areas of lower-molecular-weight polymers increased. The chain-length distribution was not significantly changed. Pastes of all starch samples exhibited pseudoplastic, shear-thinning behavior. HSJ treatment increased the flow behavior index and decreased the consistency coefficient and viscosity. The data suggested that degradation of amylopectin was mainly involved and that breakdown preferentially occurred in chains between clusters.

  4. A new link between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    The retrograde actin flow, continuous centripetal movement of the cell peripheral actin networks, is widely observed in adherent cells. The retrograde flow is believed to facilitate cell migration when linked to cell adhesion molecules. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the functional relationship between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions (FAs). We also introduce our recent study in which single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy dissected the complex interactions between FAs and the local actin flow. FAs do not simply impede the actin flow, but actively attract and remodel the local actin network. Our findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms for protrusion and traction force generation at the cell leading edge. Furthermore, we discuss possible roles of the actin flow-FA interaction based on the accumulated knowledge and our SiMS study. PMID:25190817

  5. [Shock wave lithotripsy, retrograde intrarenal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole renal stones?].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alejandro; Gallegos, Héctor; Salvadó, José A

    2015-09-09

    Among the therapeutic alternatives available for the treatment of lower pole renal calculi are extracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and retrograde intrarenal surgery. There is controversy about which of these techniques is more effective, especially for stones smaller than 20 mm. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded percutaneous nephrolithotomy probably increases success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In comparison to retrograde intrarenal surgery, it may increase success rate, but it is not clear if it decreases the need of retreatment. Retrograde intrarenal surgery may increase success rate, and probably decreases need of retreatment compared to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

  6. Retrograde diurnal motion of the instantaneous rotation axis observed by a large ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.

    2016-07-01

    Ring laser gyroscope technique directly senses the Earth's instantaneous rotation pole (IRP), whose polar motion contains strong retrograde diurnal components induced by external torques due to the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun. The first direct measurement of this retrograde diurnal motion with three large ring lasers was reported by Schreiber et al. (J Geophys Res 109(B18):B06405, 2004). Since then many technical improvements led to a significant increase in precision and stability of ring laser gyroscopes; however, precise determination of amplitude and phase at main partial waves has not been given in the literature. In this paper, I will report on determination of the retrograde diurnal motion of the IRP at main partial waves (Oo_1, J_1, K_1, M_1, O_1, Q_1 ) by the ring laser "G", located in Wettzell, Germany, which is the most stable one amongst the currently running large ring laser gyroscopes.

  7. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with (/sup 3/H)choline

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-07-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following (/sup 3/H)choline application in their zone of termination. (/sup 3/H)Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After (/sup 3/H)choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic.

  8. Interactions among endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, and retrograde movements of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and bead movements on the cell surface were investigated in the thin peripheral region of A6 cells, a frog kidney cell line. ER tubules were often aligned with microtubules, as shown by double-labeling with DiOC6(3) and anti-tubulin in fixed cells. In living cells stained with DiOC6(3) and observed in time lapse, there were frequent extensions, but few retractions, of ER tubules. In addition, there was a steady retrograde (towards the cell center) movement of all of the ER at approximately 0.3 microns/min. Since microtubules are often aligned with the ER, microtubules must also be moving retrogradely. By simultaneous imaging, it was found that the ER moves retrogradely at the same rate as aminated latex beads on the cell surface. This indicates that the mechanisms for ER and bead movement are closely related. Cytochalasin B stopped bead and ER movement in most of the cells, providing evidence that actin is involved in both retrograde movements. The ER retracted towards the cell center in nocodazole while both ER and microtubules retracted in taxol. Time lapse observations showed that for both drugs, the retraction of the ER is the result of retrograde movement in the absence of new ER extensions. Presumably, ER extensions do not occur in nocodazole because of the absence of microtubules, and do not occur in taxol because taxol-stabilized microtubules move retrogradely and there is no polymerization of new microtubule tracks for ER elongation. PMID:7859292

  9. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  10. Combined Retrograde/Antegrade Approach to Transcatheter Closure of an Aortic Paravalvular Leak

    PubMed Central

    Damluji, Abdulla A.; Kaynak, Husnu E.

    2015-01-01

    New interventional techniques have made transcatheter closure of aortic paravalvular leaks a viable therapeutic option to treat the sequelae of these defects, including congestive heart failure and hemolysis. We report the transcatheter closure of an aortic paravalvular leak via a combined retrograde/antegrade approach. This was necessary because of difficulty in crossing the defect with a sheath from the retrograde approach. This technique might be useful in application to other difficult structural heart interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a treated paravalvular leak around a Mitroflow® Aortic Pericardial Heart Valve. PMID:26504437

  11. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related adverse events: post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and not uncommonly is the reason behind ERCP-related lawsuits. Patients at high risk for PEP include young women with abdominal pain, normal liver tests, and unremarkable imaging. Procedure-related factors include traumatic and persistent cannulation attempts, multiple injections of the pancreatic duct, pancreatic sphincterotomy, and, possibly, use of precut sphincterotomy. Aggressive hydration, use of rectal indomethacin, and prophylactic pancreatic stenting can diminish the risk (and likely severity) of PEP. Though hugely beneficial, these measures do not supersede careful patient selection and technique.

  13. Comparison of nerve terminal events in vivo effecting retrograde transport of vesicles containing neurotrophins or synaptic vesicle components.

    PubMed

    Weible, M W; Ozsarac, N; Grimes, M L; Hendry, I A

    2004-03-15

    Although vesicular retrograde transport of neurotrophins in vivo is well established, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that underlie vesicle endocytosis and formation before transport. We demonstrate that in vivo not all retrograde transport vesicles are alike, nor are they all formed using identical mechanisms. As characterized by density, there are at least two populations of vesicles present in the synaptic terminal that are retrogradely transported along the axon: those containing neurotrophins (NTs) and those resulting from synaptic vesicle recycling. Vesicles containing nerve growth factor (NGF), NT-3, or NT-4 had similar densities with peak values at about 1.05 g/ml. Synaptic-derived vesicles, labeled with anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), had densities with peak values at about 1.16 g/ml. We assayed the effects of pharmacologic agents in vivo on retrograde transport from the anterior eye chamber to the superior cervical ganglion. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH (PI-3) kinase and actin function blocked transport of both anti-DBH and NGF, demonstrating an essential role for these molecules in retrograde transport of both vesicle types. Dynamin, a key element in synaptic vesicle recycling, was axonally transported in retrograde and anterograde directions, and compounds able to interfere with dynamin function had a differential effect on retrograde transport of NTs and anti-DBH. Okadaic acid significantly decreased retrograde axonal transport of anti-DBH and increased NGF retrograde transport. We conclude that there are both different and common proteins involved in endocytosis and targeting of retrograde transport of these two populations of vesicles. PMID:14994338

  14. Retrograde approach for percutaneous closure in a patient with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    İlkay, Erdoğan; Çelebi, Özlem Özcan; Kaçmaz, Fehmi; Pampal, Kutluk

    2014-12-01

    In this report, we present a 37-year-old male with ruptured right sinus of Valsalva. He was treated by percutaneous closure of the rupture using the retrograde approach. The procedure was performed successfully within 26 minutes. We think this approach may be used in future instead of the antegrade approach. PMID:25620339

  15. Tracking Retrograde Flow in Keratocytes: News from the FrontV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vallotton, Pascal; Danuser, Gaudenz; Bohnet, Sophie; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2005-01-01

    Actin assembly at the leading edge of the cell is believed to drive protrusion, whereas membrane resistance and contractile forces result in retrograde flow of the assembled actin network away from the edge. Thus, cell motion and shape changes are expected to depend on the balance of actin assembly and retrograde flow. This idea, however, has been undermined by the reported absence of flow in one of the most spectacular models of cell locomotion, fish epidermal keratocytes. Here, we use enhanced phase contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle tracking to analyze the motion of the actin network in keratocyte lamellipodia. We have detected retrograde flow throughout the lamellipodium at velocities of 1–3 μm/min and analyzed its organization and relation to the cell motion during both unobstructed, persistent migration and events of cell collision. Freely moving cells exhibited a graded flow velocity increasing toward the sides of the lamellipodium. In colliding cells, the velocity decreased markedly at the site of collision, with striking alteration of flow in other lamellipodium regions. Our findings support the universality of the flow phenomenon and indicate that the maintenance of keratocyte shape during locomotion depends on the regulation of both retrograde flow and actin polymerization. PMID:15635099

  16. Self-repair in a bidirectionally coupled astrocyte-neuron (AN) system based on retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wade, John; McDaid, Liam; Harkin, Jim; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Kelso, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that retrograde signaling via astrocytes may underpin self-repair in the brain. Faults manifest themselves in silent or near silent neurons caused by low transmission probability (PR) synapses; the enhancement of the transmission PR of a healthy neighboring synapse by retrograde signaling can enhance the transmission PR of the “faulty” synapse (repair). Our model of self-repair is based on recent research showing that retrograde signaling via astrocytes can increase the PR of neurotransmitter release at damaged or low transmission PR synapses. The model demonstrates that astrocytes are capable of bidirectional communication with neurons which leads to modulation of synaptic activity, and that indirect signaling through retrograde messengers such as endocannabinoids leads to modulation of synaptic transmission PR. Although our model operates at the level of cells, it provides a new research direction on brain-like self-repair which can be extended to networks of astrocytes and neurons. It also provides a biologically inspired basis for developing highly adaptive, distributed computing systems that can, at fine levels of granularity, fault detect, diagnose and self-repair autonomously, without the traditional constraint of a central fault detect/repair unit. PMID:23055965

  17. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  18. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-10-01

    Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine how water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Coal drying experiments were begun using thermal, microwave, and chemical methods; NMR data were collected. A stirred microautoclave reactor system was acquired.

  19. A comparison of Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities

    PubMed Central

    Roghanizad, Nasrin; Kalhori, Katayoun AM; Khalilak, Zohreh; Esmaeili, Maryam Ali; de Fatima Zanirato Lizarelli, Rosane

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight maxillary anterior teeth were used in this study. After removing the crowns, the canals were prepared with the step-back technique and filled with guttapercha. Three millimeters below the apex; each root was cut with a fissure diamond bur. The root surfaces were then covered with nail polish and three millimeters deep retrograde class I cavities were prepared, using Er, Cr: YSGG laser (group L=12 roots) or ultrasonic retro-tip (group U=12 roots). Four roots were arranged for negative and positive control groups. Retrograde cavities were then filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and teeth were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 72 hours. The amount of dye penetration in sagittal sections of each tooth was measured with a stereomicroscope. An independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cavities prepared with the Er, Cr: YSGG laser (1.61 + 0.81) showed significantly less micro-leakage than those prepared with the ultrasound (2.55+ 1.84) (P value =0.02). Conclusions: Under the conditions of this research, the use of Er, Cr: YSGG laser for retrograde cavity preparation causes significantly less apical leakage and may increase the success rate of endodontic surgeries. PMID:25941423

  20. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells.

  1. A Hands-on Exploration of the Retrograde Motion of Mars as Seen from the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincelli, M. M.; Otranto, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a set of activities based on the use of a celestial simulator to gain insights into the retrograde motion of Mars as seen from the Earth. These activities provide a useful link between the heliocentric concepts taught in schools and those tackled in typical introductory physics courses based on classical mechanics for…

  2. Behavioral and Functional Neuroanatomical Correlates of Anterograde Autobiographical Memory in Isolated Retrograde Amnesic Patient M. L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Brian; Svoboda, Eva; Turner, Gary R.; Mandic, Marina; Mackey, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Patient M. L. [Levine, B., Black, S. E., Cabeza, R., Sinden, M., Mcintosh, A. R., Toth, J. P., et al. (1998). "Episodic memory and the self in a case of isolated retrograde amnesia." "Brain", "121", 1951-1973], lost memory for events occurring before his severe traumatic brain injury, yet his anterograde (post-injury) learning and memory appeared…

  3. Persistence and variability of ice-stream grounding lines on retrograde bed slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, Alexander A.; Schoof, Christian; Tziperman, Eli

    2016-08-01

    In many ice streams, basal resistance varies in space and time due to the dynamically evolving properties of subglacial till. These variations can cause internally generated oscillations in ice-stream flow. However, the potential for such variations in basal properties is not considered by conventional theories of grounding-line stability on retrograde bed slopes, which assume that bed properties are static in time. Using a flow-line model, we show how internally generated, transient variations in ice-stream state interact with retrograde bed slopes. In contrast to predictions from the theory of the marine ice-sheet instability, our simulated grounding line is able to persist and reverse direction of migration on a retrograde bed when undergoing oscillations in the grounding-line position. In turn, the presence of a retrograde bed may also suppress or reduce the amplitude of internal oscillations in ice-stream state. We explore the physical mechanisms responsible for these behaviors and discuss the implications for observed grounding-line migration in West Antarctica.

  4. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    PubMed

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells. PMID:26641717

  5. On Common Ground: Jost's (1897) Law of Forgetting and Ribot's (1881) Law of Retrograde Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2004-01-01

    T. Ribot's (1881) law of retrograde amnesia states that brain damage impairs recently formed memories to a greater extent than older memories, which is generally taken to imply that memories need time to consolidate. A. Jost's (1897) law of forgetting states that if 2 memories are of the same strength but different ages, the older will decay more…

  6. Rare complication of anterior communicating artery aneurysm coiling: Transient retrograde amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Jayaraman, Anand; Chandramouli, BA

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is an unusual and rare complication following endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysms. We present a case of anterior communicating artery (ACOM) aneurysm in which the patient developed retrograde amnesia following endovascular coiling of the aneurysm. On imaging there was infarct involving bilateral fornices. The patient showed significant clinical improvement on follow up. PMID:26246104

  7. [Tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis by retrograde intramedullary nail--a case report].

    PubMed

    Lipiński, Łukasz; Synder, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    We described a case of 64 year old overweight women, who was treated with revision tibio-talo-calcaneal artrodesis with the use of retrograde intramedullary nail. The procedure was performed after failed primary arthrodesis with the use of lateral approach and fibula osteotomy. Stabilization with intramedullary nail gave good clinical and functional result with a good bone healing. PMID:22235644

  8. Seizures and retrograde amnesia with cerebrospinal fluid changes following H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mitrakrishnan, Shivanthan; Ranjanie, Gamage; Thirunavakarasu, Thivakaran; Manjula, Caldera; Nayananjani, Karunasena

    2011-08-26

    Vaccination against H1N1 influenza of healthcare workers of has been a standard measure to control the epidemic in many countries. Most side effects are minor and transient. Guillain Barre Syndrome and optic neuritis have been major concerns. We report a case of seizures with retrograde amnesia associated with cerebrospinal fluid changes following the H1N1 vaccine.

  9. Differential proteomics reveals multiple components in retrogradely transported axoplasm after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Perlson, Eran; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I; Burlingame, Alma L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2004-05-01

    Information on axonal damage is conveyed to neuronal cell bodies by a number of signaling modalities, including the post-translational modification of axoplasmic proteins. Retrograde transport of a subset of such proteins is thought to induce or enhance a regenerative response in the cell body. Here we report the use of a differential 2D-PAGE approach to identify injury-correlated retrogradely transported proteins in nerves of the mollusk Lymnaea. A comprehensive series of gels at different pI ranges allowed resolution of approximately 4000 spots by silver staining, and 172 of these were found to differ between lesioned versus control nerves. Mass spectrometric sequencing of 134 differential spots allowed their assignment to over 40 different proteins, some belonging to a vesicular ensemble blocked by the lesion and others comprising an up-regulated ensemble highly enriched in calpain cleavage products of an intermediate filament termed RGP51 (retrograde protein of 51 kDa). Inhibition of RGP51 expression by RNA interference inhibits regenerative outgrowth of adult Lymnaea neurons in culture. These results implicate regulated proteolysis in the formation of retrograde injury signaling complexes after nerve lesion and suggest that this signaling modality utilizes a wide range of protein components.

  10. Hydrogen transfer in the formation and destruction of retrograde products in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, D.F.; Malhotra, R.

    2006-06-01

    The conversion of coals to volatiles or liquids during pyrolysis and liquefaction is notoriously limited by the formation of retrograde products. Analysis of literature data for coals with grafted structures and for polymeric coal models demonstrates that the formation of volatile products from these materials does not correlate primarily with the weakness of the original bonding but correlates with the facility for retrogressive reaction. This analysis suggests further that simple recombination of resonance-stabilized radicals does not tend to yield true retrograde products, except in the case of aryloxy radicals. For pure hydrocarbon structural elements, radical addition to aromatic systems appears to be a key class of retrograde reactions, where the key factor is the kinetics of radical or H-atom loss from a cyclohexadienyl intermediate. We have used a mechanistic numerical model with a detailed set of radical reactions and thermochemically based kinetic parameters operating on a limited set of hydrocarbon structures to delineate important factors in mitigating retrograde processes. This showed that, not only the cleavage of critical bonds in the original coal structures but also the net prevention of retrogression may be due to the H-transfer-induced cleavage of strong bonds.

  11. Malingering and retrograde amnesia: the historic case of the Collegno amnesic.

    PubMed

    Zago, Stefano; Sartori, Giuseppe; Scarlato, Guglielmo

    2004-06-01

    Assessment of feigned cognitive disorders is an important field of neuropsychology because of its applications to forensic settings. Strategies for detecting malingering in amnesia are available for anterograde amnesia. Less attention has been given to malingering in retrograde amnesia. The case of the 'Smemorato di Collegno' (The Collegno Amnesic) is probably the most famous case of malingered retrograde amnesia ever known in Italy. In 1926, a man who appeared to have lost all his autobiographical memories and identity spent nearly a year in the Collegno asylum of Turin without a name. He was later initially identified as Giulio Canella, Director of the 'Scuola Normale di Verona' who had disappeared during the war in 1916. He was suspected of later identified as being Mario Bruneri, a petty crook from Turin who played the part of an amnesic whose retrograde memory gradually returned. A lengthy investigation was required before this conclusion was reached. Several clinicians and renowned academics evaluated the case, but only Alfredo Coppola, diagnosed "malingered retrograde amnesia" using a method that was extremely innovative for the times. The aim of the present paper is to review the original cognitive evaluation and the strategies used for malingering detection in the "Collegno case". The outcome of the case is then discussed in the light of present-day forensic neuropsychology and the level of advancement of mental examination achieved in the 1920s in Europe is highlighted. PMID:15259331

  12. Reconsidering the nature and mode of action of metabolite retrograde signals from the chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Estavillo, Gonzalo M.; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant organelles produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression in order to coordinate their biogenesis, maintain homeostasis, or optimize their performance under adverse conditions. Many signals of different chemical nature have been described in the past decades, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and adenosine derivatives. While the effects of retrograde signaling on gene expression are well understood, the initiation and transport of the signals and their mode of action have either not been resolved, or are a matter of speculation. Moreover, retrograde signaling should be considered as part of a broader cellular network, instead of as separate pathways, required to adjust to changing physiologically relevant conditions. Here we summarize current plastid retrograde signaling models in plants, with a focus on new signaling pathways, SAL1-PAP, methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), and β-cyclocitral (β-CC), and outline missing links or future areas of research that we believe need to be addressed to have a better understanding of plant intracellular signaling networks. PMID:23316207

  13. Reexposure to the Amnestic Agent Alleviates Cycloheximide-Induced Retrograde Amnesia for Reactivated and Extinction Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, James F.; Olson, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both…

  14. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  15. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  16. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  17. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  18. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Miller, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique “myogenic” transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons. PMID:27517091

  19. Percutaneous transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leak via transarterial retrograde approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ho-Ping; Huang, Chi-Hung; Hou, Shaw-Min; Hsiung, Ming-Chon; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Yin, Wei-Hsian

    2015-01-01

    Repeat surgery has usually been considered the first choice to solve paravalvular leaks of prosthetic valves, but it carries a high operative risk, a high mortality rate and an increased risk for re-leaks. Percutaneous closure of such defects is possible, and different approaches and devices are used for this purpose. For mitral paravalvular leaks, constructing an arterio-venous wire loop for delivering the closure device through an antegrade approach is the most commonly used technique. Transcatheter closure can also be performed through a transapical approach or retrograde transfemoral arterial approach. We present a case of 68-year-old man with a mitral paravalvular leak that was successfully closed using an Amplatzer® Duct Occluder II, via retrograde transfemoral arterial approach under three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic guidance, without the use of a wire loop. The initial attempt to cross the paravalvular defect was unsuccessful, but the obstacle was finally overcome by introducing complex interventional techniques. PMID:26788047

  20. Retrograde enhancement of memory by mild flurothyl treatment in the chick.

    PubMed

    Cherkin, A; Meinecke, R O; Garman, M W

    1975-02-01

    Strong flurothyl treatment (1.7% v/v for 8 min) produces retrograde amnesia in chicks when administered as long as 24 hr after one-trial avoidance training with a strongly aversive stimulus. Mild flurothyl treatment (0.2% v/v for 8 min) produced retrograde enhancement when administered as long as 16 min after similar training with a moderately aversive stimulus. The moderate training followed by mild flurothyl treatment enhanced 24-hr retention to the level found after strong training alone. Enhanced retention persisted for at least 72 hr; nonspecific performance effects faded within 48 hr. The predominant dose-dependent and time-dependent enhancement effect of mild flurothyl treatment is interpreted as improved memory consolidation.

  1. [The evaluation of the retrograde memory in the Quebec population aged: PUB-40 and PUB-12].

    PubMed

    Langlois, Roxane; Joubert, Sven; Benoit, Sophie; Dostie, Valérie; Rouleau, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    Memory assessment represents an important part of the clinical neuropsychologist's duties in a geriatric context. In fact, in Canada, about one-third of seniors report memory complaints, with different causes. Based on the underlying etiology, different components of memory may be affected in older adults. Nonautobiographical retrograde memory (public or semantic) is an important aspect of memory to assess; nevertheless, there is currently no reliable and standardized clinical tool to evaluate this aspect of memory in the elderly Quebecer population. The aims of this research were therefore: (1) to develop a protocol specifically aimed at assessing non-autobiographical retrograde memory in this population, the PUB-40; (2) to obtain reference data among 105 healthy subjects; and (3) to develop a short version based on the items which discriminated a group of 20 patients with amnestic Mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) from older healthy subjects.

  2. Detection of retrograde gas streaming in the SB0 galaxy NGC 4546

    SciTech Connect

    Galletta, G.

    1987-07-01

    Spectroscopic observations are reported of the almost edge-on SB0 galaxy NGC 4546 which reveal a striking discordance between the derived emission and absorption-line velocities. The gas clouds show velocities that are similar in amplitude but opposite in direction from the stars. This discordance is seen in observations obtained through slits oriented in a wide range of position angles. NGC 4546 is thus, at present, unique as a disk system exhibiting large-scale retrograde motions relative to the stellar component. Orbits elongated both along the bar major axis (prograde, stars) and along the bar intermediate axis (retrograde, gas) are found. The possibility that this material originated from an infall is discussed. 27 references.

  3. LRRK2 regulates retrograde synaptic compensation at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Jay; Tsurudome, Kazuya; Liao, Edward H.; Kauwe, Grant; Gray, Lindsay; Yanagiya, Akiko; R. Calderon, Mario; Sonenberg, Nahum; Haghighi, A. Pejmun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease gene leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in a number of processes including the regulation of mitochondrial function, autophagy and endocytic dynamics; nevertheless, we know little about its potential role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Here we demonstrate that postsynaptic knockdown of the fly homologue of LRRK2 thwarts retrograde, homeostatic synaptic compensation at the larval neuromuscular junction. Conversely, postsynaptic overexpression of either the fly or human LRRK2 transgene induces a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release by increasing the size of the release ready pool of vesicles. We show that LRRK2 promotes cap-dependent translation and identify Furin 1 as its translational target, which is required for the synaptic function of LRRK2. As the regulation of synaptic homeostasis plays a fundamental role in ensuring normal and stable synaptic function, our findings suggest that aberrant function of LRRK2 may lead to destabilization of neural circuits. PMID:27432119

  4. Effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of maize starch and waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Siming; Liu, Youming; Liu, Ru

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch. Experimental results showed that the salting-out or structure-making ions, such as F(-) and SO4(2-), decreased the swelling power, solubility and transparency of both starches, but increased the gelatinization temperature, enthalpy, and syneresis, due to the tendency of these ions to protect the hydrogen bond links among starch molecules. On the other hand, the salting-in or structure-breaking ions, such as I(-) and SCN(-), exhibited the opposite effects. Microscopic observations confirmed such effects of salts on both starches. Furthermore, the effects of salts were more significant on waxy maize and on normal maize starch. Generally, salts could significantly influence on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch, following the order of the Hofmeister series. PMID:27507481

  5. Deubiquitination, a new player in Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mickaël; Stutz, Françoise; Dargemont, Catherine

    2003-12-26

    Modification by ubiquitin plays a major role in a broad array of cellular functions. Although reversal of this process, deubiquitination, likely represents an important regulatory step contributing to cellular homeostasis, functions of deubiquitination enzymes still remain poorly characterized. We have previously shown that the ubiquitin protease Ubp3p requires a co-factor, Bre5p, to specifically deubiquitinate the coat protein complex II (COPII) subunit Sec23p, which is involved in anterograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments. In the present report, we show that disruption of BRE5 gene also led to a defect in the retrograde transport from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum. Further analysis indicate that the COPI subunit beta'-COP represents another substrate of the Ubp3p.Bre5p complex. All together, our results indicate that the Ubp3p.Bre5p deubiquitination complex co-regulates anterograde and retrograde transports between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments.

  6. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  7. Effect of retrogradation time on preparation and characterization of proso millet starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjie; Gong, Min; Li, Ying; Xiong, Liu

    2014-10-13

    Starch nanoparticles were prepared from proso millet starch using a green and facile method combined with enzymolysis and recrystallization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the starch nanoparticles prepared with different retrogradation time (0.5, 4, 12, and 24h). The results showed that the sizes of the starch nanoparticles were between 20 nm and 100 nm. The crystal pattern changed from A-type (native starch) to B-type (nanoparticles), and the relative crystallinity of the nanoparticles increased obviously, as compared with the native starch. The nanoparticles prepared with the 12h retrogradation time had the highest degree of crystallinity (47.04%). Compared to conventional acid hydrolysis to make starch nanoparticles, the present approach has the advantage of being quite rapid and presenting a higher yield (about 55%).

  8. Relative importance of moisture migration and amylopectin retrogradation for pound cake crumb firming.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Delcour, J A

    2013-12-15

    Moisture migration largely impacts cake crumb firmness during storage at ambient temperature. To study the importance of phenomena other than crumb to crust moisture migration and to exclude moisture and temperature gradients during baking, crustless cakes were baked using an electrical resistance oven (ERO). Cake crumb firming was evaluated by texture analysis. First, ERO cakes with properties similar to those baked conventionally were produced. Cake batter moisture content (MC) was adjusted to ensure complete starch gelatinisation in the baking process. In cakes baked conventionally, most of the increase in crumb firmness during storage was caused by moisture migration. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) showed that the population containing protons of crystalline starch grew during cake storage. These and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data pointed to only limited amylopectin retrogradation. The limited increase in amylopectin retrogradation during cake storage cannot solely account for the significant firming of ERO cakes and, hence, other phenomena are involved in cake firming.

  9. Retrograde amnesia after hippocampal damage: recent vs. remote memories in two tasks.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, R J; Weisend, M P; Mumby, D; Astur, R S; Hanlon, F M; Koerner, A; Thomas, M J; Wu, Y; Moses, S N; Cole, C; Hamilton, D A; Hoesing, J M

    2001-01-01

    We review evidence from experiments conducted in our laboratory on retrograde amnesia in rats with damage to the hippocampal formation. In a new experiment reported here, we show that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced hippocampal damage produced retrograde amnesia for both hidden platform and two-choice visible platform discriminations in the Morris water task. For both problems there was a significant trend for longer training-surgery intervals to be associated with worse retention performance. Little support is offered by our work for the concept that there is a process involving hippocampal-dependent consolidation of memories in extrahippocampal permanent storage sites. Long-term memory consolidation may take place within the hippocampus. The hippocampus may be involved permanently in storage and/or retrieval of a variety of relational and nonrelational memories if it was intact at the time of learning, even involving information which is definitely not affected in anterograde amnesia after hippocampal damage.

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously.

  11. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously. PMID:23986827

  12. Retrograde Transpubic Approach for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Cementoplasty of Acetabular Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bauones, Salem; Freire, Veronique; Moser, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of painful and disabling anterior acetabular bone metastasis treated with bipolar radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty. Due to the high risk of complications related to the proximity of the femoral neurovascular structures with a direct approach, we successfully performed a retrograde transpubic approach under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance. In the present report, we describe this approach detailing its indications, advantages, and the technical tips to achieve a safe and satisfactory procedure. PMID:26491595

  13. Functional relationship between mTERF4 and GUN1 in retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Duorong; Liu, Zhixin; Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling plays an important role in regulating the expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) in accordance with physiological demands on chloroplast biogenesis and function. Despite its fundamental importance, little is known about the molecular nature of the plastid gene expression (PGE)-dependent type of retrograde signaling. PGE is a multifaceted process, and several factors, including pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, are involved in its regulation. The PPR protein GUN1 plays a central role in PGE-dependent retrograde signaling. In this study, we isolated a mutant exhibiting up-regulation of CHLOROPHYLL A/B-BINDING PROTEIN (CAB) under normal growth conditions (named coe1 for CAB overexpression 1). The coe1 mutant has a single-base mutation in the gene for mitochondrial transcription termination factor 4 (mTERF4)/BSM/RUG2, which plays a role in regulating the processing of certain plastid transcripts. Defects in GUN1 or mTERF4 de-repressed the expression of specific plastid mRNAs in the presence of lincomycin (LIN). In wild-type plants, treatment with LIN or spectinomycin (SPE) inhibited processing of plastid transcripts. Comparative analysis revealed that in gun1 and coe1/mterf4, but not in wild-type, gun4, or gun5 plants, the processing of plastid transcripts and expression levels of Lhcb1 mRNA were affected in opposite ways when plants were grown in the presence of LIN or SPE. In addition, the coe1 mutation affected the intracellular accumulation and distribution of GUN1, as well as its plastid signaling activity. Taken together, these results suggest that GUN1 and COE1 cooperate in PGE and retrograde signaling. PMID:26685190

  14. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  15. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  16. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  17. Comparison of commonly used retrograde tracers in rat spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, You-Lai; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four fluorescent dyes, True Blue (TB), Fluoro-Gold (FG), Fluoro-Ruby (FR), and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), in retrograde tracing of rat spinal motor neurons. We transected the muscle branch of the rat femoral nerve and applied each tracer to the proximal stump in single labeling experiments, or combinations of tracers (FG-DiI and TB-DiI) in double labeling experiments. In the single labeling experiments, significantly fewer labeled motor neurons were observed after FR labeling than after TB, FG, or DiI, 3 days after tracer application. By 1 week, there were no significant differences in the number of labeled neurons between the four groups. In the double-labeling experiment, the number of double-labeled neurons in the FG-DiI group was not significantly different from that in the TB-DiI group 1 week after tracer application. Our findings indicate that TB, FG, and DiI have similar labeling efficacies in the retrograde labeling of spinal motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve when used alone. Furthermore, combinations of DiI and TB or FG are similarly effective. Therefore, of the dyes studied, TB, FG and DiI, and combinations of DiI with TB or FG, are the most suitable for retrograde labeling studies of motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve. PMID:26692873

  18. Retrograde NGF Axonal Transport—Motor Coordination in the Unidirectional Motility Regime

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Praveen D.; Che, Daphne L.; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed motion analysis of retrograde nerve growth factor (NGF) endosomes in axons to show that mechanical tugs-of-war and intracellular motor regulation are complimentary features of the near-unidirectional endosome directionality. We used quantum dots to fluorescently label NGF and acquired trajectories of retrograde quantum-dot-NGF-endosomes with <20-nm accuracy at 32 Hz in microfluidic neuron cultures. Using a combination of transient motion analysis and Bayesian parsing, we partitioned the trajectories into sustained periods of retrograde (dynein-driven) motion, constrained pauses, and brief anterograde (kinesin-driven) reversals. The data shows many aspects of mechanical tugs-of-war and multiple-motor mechanics in NGF-endosome transport. However, we found that stochastic mechanical models based on in vitro parameters cannot simulate the experimental data, unless the microtubule-binding affinity of kinesins on the endosome is tuned down by 10 times. Specifically, the simulations suggest that the NGF-endosomes are driven on average by 5–6 active dyneins and 1–2 downregulated kinesins. This is also supported by the dynamics of endosomes detaching under load in axons, showcasing the cooperativity of multiple dyneins and the subdued activity of kinesins. We discuss the possible motor coordination mechanism consistent with motor regulation and tugs-of-war for future investigations. PMID:26039170

  19. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  20. Clustering of a kinesin-14 motor enables processive retrograde microtubule-based transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Erik; Yamada, Moé; Vale, Ronald D.; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The molecular motors kinesin and dynein drive bidirectional motility along microtubules (MTs) in most eukaryotic cells. Land plants, however, are a notable exception, because they contain a large number of kinesins but lack cytoplasmic dynein, the foremost processive retrograde transporter. It remains unclear how plants achieve retrograde cargo transport without dynein. Here, we have analysed the motility of the six members of minus-end-directed kinesin-14 motors in the moss Physcomitrella patens and found that none are processive as native dimers. However, when artificially clustered into as little as dimer of dimers, the type-VI kinesin-14 (a homologue of Arabidopsis KCBP (kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein)) exhibited highly processive and fast motility (up to 0.6 μm s−1). Multiple kin14-VI dimers attached to liposomes also induced transport of this membrane cargo over several microns. Consistent with these results, in vivo observations of green fluorescent protein-tagged kin14-VI in moss cells revealed fluorescent punctae that moved processively towards the minus-ends of the cytoplasmic MTs. These data suggest that clustering of a kinesin-14 motor serves as a dynein-independent mechanism for retrograde transport in plants. PMID:26322239

  1. Preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: What can be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Stimac, Davor; Zerem, Enver; Jovanović, Predrag; Blazevic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The incidence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis varies substantially and is reported around 1%-10%, although there are some reports with an incidence of around 30%. Usually, PEP is a mild or moderate pancreatitis, but in some instances it can be severe and fatal. Generally, it is defined as the onset of new pancreatic-type abdominal pain severe enough to require hospital admission or prolonged hospital stay with levels of serum amylase two to three times greater than normal, occurring 24 h after ERCP. Several methods have been adopted for preventing pancreatitis, such as pharmacological or endoscopic approaches. Regarding medical prevention, only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, namely diclofenac sodium and indomethacin, are recommended, but there are some other drugs which have some potential benefits in reducing the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Endoscopic preventive measures include cannulation (wire guided) and pancreatic stenting, while the adoption of the early pre-cut technique is still arguable. This review will attempt to present and discuss different ways of preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:25632179

  2. Posttraumatic Retrograde and Anterograde Amnesia: Pathophysiology and Implications in Grading and Safe Return to Play

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The presence of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) and loss of consciousness have been main factors used in a number of concussion guidelines. In this article, the focus is on using PTA (both retrograde and anterograde) as salient indicators of traumatic brain injury severity and the most reliable index of outcome prediction, even in mild cases. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search for the years 1990–2000 using the key words posttraumatic retrograde and anterograde amnesia, concussion and mild traumatic brain injury was done. Data Synthesis: On-the-field testing of PTA is a salient and integral component of the initial and follow-up neurologic assessments of the head-injured athlete. Conclusions/Recommendations: Initial and follow-up assessments of PTA, anterograde and retrograde, are an essential part of the neurologic evaluation of the head-injured athlete. Increasingly, neuropsychological testing, including computer models, is being employed in this assessment. The importance of not just PTA but all postconcussion signs and symptoms being absent at rest and exertion before allowing the athlete to return to play is emphasized. PMID:12937491

  3. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  4. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF NATURALLY TILTED, RETROGRADELY PRECESSING, NODAL SUPERHUMPING ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2012-02-15

    Accretion disks around black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf systems are thought to sometimes tilt, retrogradely precess, and produce hump-shaped modulations in light curves that have a period shorter than the orbital period. Although artificially rotating numerically simulated accretion disks out of the orbital plane and around the line of nodes generate these short-period superhumps and retrograde precession of the disk, no numerical code to date has been shown to produce a disk tilt naturally. In this work, we report the first naturally tilted disk in non-magnetic cataclysmic variables using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Our simulations show that after many hundreds of orbital periods, the disk has tilted on its own and this disk tilt is without the aid of radiation sources or magnetic fields. As the system orbits, the accretion stream strikes the bright spot (which is on the rim of the tilted disk) and flows over and under the disk on different flow paths. These different flow paths suggest the lift force as a source to disk tilt. Our results confirm the disk shape, disk structure, and negative superhump period and support the source to disk tilt, source to retrograde precession, and location associated with X-ray and He II emission from the disk as suggested in previous works. Our results identify the fundamental negative superhump frequency as the indicator of disk tilt around the line of nodes.

  6. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  7. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement.

  8. Geldanamycin Enhances Retrograde Transport of Shiga Toxin in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Roger; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) has been shown to alter endosomal sorting, diverting cargo destined for the recycling pathway into the lysosomal pathway. Here we investigated whether GA also affects the sorting of cargo into the retrograde pathway from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. As a model cargo we used the bacterial toxin Shiga toxin, which exploits the retrograde pathway as an entry route to the cytosol. Indeed, GA treatment of HEp-2 cells strongly increased the Shiga toxin transport to the Golgi apparatus. The enhanced Golgi transport was not due to increased endocytic uptake of the toxin or perturbed recycling, suggesting that GA selectively enhances endosomal sorting into the retrograde pathway. Moreover, GA activated p38 and both inhibitors of p38 or its substrate MK2 partially counteracted the GA-induced increase in Shiga toxin transport. Thus, our data suggest that GA-induced p38 and MK2 activation participate in the increased Shiga toxin transport to the Golgi apparatus. PMID:26017782

  9. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats’ performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects’ performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans. PMID:26795072

  10. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-21

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats' performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects' performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans.

  11. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation.

  12. Factors Predicting Coronary Sinus Rupture Following Cannula Insertion for Retrograde Cardioplegia

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Zokaei, Abdolhamid

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary sinus rupture (CSR) is a rare preventable complication of cannula insertion for retrograde cardioplegia. In the hands of an inexperienced surgeon, this complication has the risk of potential mortality and morbidity, and its repair is technically challenging. Techniques for repairing CSR have been reported previously. In this study, we determined predictors of CSR following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods Over a four-year period, we retrospectively analyzed 1500 patients in whom a retrograde coronary sinus catheter was used to administer cardioplegic solution. CSR occurred in 15 patients. (12 women and 3 men). Variables such as age, weight, body mass index, gender, aortic clamp time, pump time, cardiomegaly, ejection fraction, and number of grafts were determined for each patient. Factors correlated with CSR were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, and odd ratios of significant variables were determined. Results In multiple regression analysis, factors such as female gender, age, weight, and body mass index showed a significant correlation with CSR, and their odd ratios were 4.2, 1.0, 0.96, and 2.2, respectively. Conclusion In all 15 cases, a retrograde cannula with a self-inflatable balloon was used and 12 patients were woman with low body mass index. Forceful insertion due to coronary sinus web, fragility of arteries in thin patients, or a small coronary sinus caused CSR in the hands of an inexperienced surgeon. PMID:22259260

  13. Transneuronal retrograde dual viral labelling of central autonomic circuitry: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, G J

    2000-10-01

    Viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has become an important neuroanatomical tract-tracing tool for characterization of limbic neuronal networks. Recently, dual viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has been introduced; a method employing differential transgene expression of two genetically engineered virus strains to identify double infected cells with selective antibodies. In this way, interactions of parallel networks can be revealed. The use of this method will increase the understanding of the function of the limbic system, for example in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis, but is associated with limitations related to the use of genetically engineered virus strains. Virulence, speed of replication and retrograde transport may be affected by the insertion or deletion of genes in the viral genome. Moreover, the rate of replication and transport can be affected by the immune system of the host and competition between the two viruses. There may be selective affinity of the virus strain for the sympathetic or parasympathetic systems. False negative results are the most important risk in dual viral labelling addressed in this review. Several control experiments are presented that can help to reduce the risk of obtaining false negative results. PMID:11593764

  14. Axonal autophagosomes recruit dynein for retrograde transport through fusion with late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiu-Tang; Zhou, Bing; Lin, Mei-Yao; Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-05-11

    Efficient degradation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) via lysosomes is an important cellular homeostatic process. This is particularly challenging for neurons because mature acidic lysosomes are relatively enriched in the soma. Although dynein-driven retrograde transport of AVs was suggested, a fundamental question remains how autophagosomes generated at distal axons acquire dynein motors for retrograde transport toward the soma. In this paper, we demonstrate that late endosome (LE)-loaded dynein-snapin complexes drive AV retrograde transport in axons upon fusion of autophagosomes with LEs into amphisomes. Blocking the fusion with syntaxin17 knockdown reduced recruitment of dynein motors to AVs, thus immobilizing them in axons. Deficiency in dynein-snapin coupling impaired AV transport ,: resulting in AV accumulation in neurites and synaptic terminals. Altogether, our study provides the first evidence that autophagosomes recruit dynein through fusion with LEs and reveals a new motor-adaptor sharing mechanism by which neurons may remove distal AVs engulfing aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles for efficient degradation in the soma.

  15. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material.

    PubMed

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental groups in dye penetration scores (P>0.05). Conclusion . Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  16. None detectable retrograde transport of Chinese botulinum toxin type A in mice by single intramuscular injection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bin; Yao, Lin-Lin; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) can specifically cleave synaptosomal associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) into cleaved SNAP-25 (cl.SNAP-25), thus blocking the synaptic transmission in motor end plate and resulting in paralysis. It has been widely applied in clinical for treatment of various conditions characterized by muscle hyperactivity, such as dystonia and spasticity. BoNT/A is used locally, with little diffusion. Its paralyzing role is considered to be restricted to the nerve muscle junction, or close to the injection site. Recently, more and more studies, however, have suggested that BoNT/A also has central effects. In addition, some investigators have demonstrated that BoNT/A enters into central nervous system via retrograde transport after local intramuscular administration. The retrograde axonal transport of Chinese BoNT/A (CBoNT/A) was studied in this paper, which was rare in report. And the results showed that cl.SNAP-25 appeared not only at the injection site but also in contralateral muscle. Retrograde transport, however, was non-existent or too little to be detected in our study. PMID:26629081

  17. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation. PMID:26041205

  18. Silver glass ionomer cement as a retrograde filling material: a study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pissiotis, E; Sapounas, G; Spångberg, L S

    1991-05-01

    Comparison was made of the apical microleakage of retrograde fillings with amalgam and with silver glass ionomer cements using a modified dye penetration method. Forty instrumented human teeth were divided into four groups. Each group was characterized by a different retrograde filling material or technique: Group 1--silver glass ionomer (SGI); group 2--SGI with previous acid wash of the cavity; group 3--SGI in a previously acid washed cavity, protected with varnish; and group 4--zinc-free amalgam. A paper cone for dye adsorption analysis was placed in contact with retrofill and the main canal was obturated with thermoplasticized gutta-percha. All teeth were coated, immersed in methylene blue dye, and evacuated to assure complete penetration of the dye in any possible void. Later the teeth were cleared and evaluated under stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis showed that group 1 had the least microleakage of all. In addition, the biocompatibility of the SGI and varnish was compared with that of amalgam using the 51Cr release evaluation method. The results showed that SGI and varnish were less cytotoxic than amalgam. It was concluded that SGI cement can be considered an alternative retrograde filling material.

  19. Relay of retrograde synaptogenic signals through axonal transport of BMP receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca B.; Machamer, James B.; Kim, Nam Chul; Hays, Thomas S.; Marqués, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neuronal function depends on the retrograde relay of growth and survival signals from the synaptic terminal, where the neuron interacts with its targets, to the nucleus, where gene transcription is regulated. Activation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction results in nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated form of the transcription factor Mad in the motoneuron nucleus. This in turn regulates transcription of genes that control synaptic growth. How BMP signaling at the synaptic terminal is relayed to the cell body and nucleus of the motoneuron to regulate transcription is unknown. We show that the BMP receptors are endocytosed at the synaptic terminal and transported retrogradely along the axon. Furthermore, this transport is dependent on BMP pathway activity, as it decreases in the absence of ligand or receptors. We further demonstrate that receptor traffic is severely impaired when Dynein motors are inhibited, a condition that has previously been shown to block BMP pathway activation. In contrast to these results, we find no evidence for transport of phosphorylated Mad along the axons, and axonal traffic of Mad is not affected in mutants defective in BMP signaling or retrograde transport. These data support a model in which complexes of activated BMP receptors are actively transported along the axon towards the cell body to relay the synaptogenic signal, and that phosphorylated Mad at the synaptic terminal and cell body represent two distinct molecular populations. PMID:22573823

  20. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation.

  1. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  2. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  3. Reduced liver uptake of arterially infused melphalan during retrograde rat liver perfusion with unaffected liver tumor uptake.

    PubMed

    Rothbarth, Joost; Sparidans, Rolf W; Beijnen, Jos H; Schultze-Kool, Leo J; Putter, Hein; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Mulder, Gerard J

    2002-11-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP) with melphalan is used for patients with nonresectable metastases confined to the liver. To improve the efficacy of IHP and to reduce the toxicity to the liver, reversion (retrograde perfusion) of the bloodstream through the liver in a rat model was studied. For liver tumor induction male WAG/Rij rats were inoculated with CC531 cells, a colorectal tumor cell line. After 11 to 12 days the tumor-bearing rat livers were perfused by single-pass perfusion through either the portal (orthograde) or caval vein (retrograde) for different time periods. During perfusion melphalan (160 Schultze) was infused in the hepatic artery. Melphalan concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rapid extraction of melphalan by the liver occurred in the first 5 min, reaching steady state after 10 to 20 min for both perfusion directions. The melphalan concentration of the outflow perfusate was significantly higher in the retrograde perfusion compared with the orthograde perfusion. The melphalan content of the tumor tissue was unaffected by perfusion direction at any time point. To the contrary, the melphalan uptake in liver tissue was strongly influenced: the melphalan content after 40-min retrograde perfusion was 12% of that after orthograde perfusion. The average tumor/liver concentration ratio was 6 for orthograde perfusion and 30 for retrograde perfusion. In conclusion, retrograde IHP with continuous melphalan infusion in the hepatic artery provides a high tumor uptake of melphalan with potentially reduced liver toxicity compared with orthograde IHP. PMID:12388659

  4. A single-center experience with retrograde reperfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kniepeiss, Daniela; Iberer, Florian; Grasser, Barbara; Schaffellner, Silvia; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Tscheliessnigg, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    Poor graft function secondary to injury by ischemia and reperfusion remains a major problem with regard to morbidity and mortality in clinical liver transplantation (LTX). Up to one fifth of patients suffer from poor initial liver function due to severe damage to hepatocytes. This situation leads either to primary nonfunction described in approximately 6% of LTX or to slow recovery. We present a new method of reperfusion during LTX. From July 1998 to July 2002, 42 LTX in 39 recipients, (10 female, 52 years old (26-70) were performed. LTX was carried out in piggy-back technique. After completing the piggy-back anastomosis, the caval vein was declamped immediately, and retrograde low pressure reperfusion of the graft with low oxygenated venous blood was established. Portal anastomosis was performed using a running suture. In order to provide optimal retrograde liver perfusion, no clamping of the donor portal vein was done. After completing portal anastomosis, the recipient portal vein was declamped immediately. During arterial anastomosis, the transplanted liver was antegradely perfused via the portal vein. After completing hepatic artery anastomosis, declamping of the hepatic artery was done and arterial perfusion started. No backtable or in-situ-flushing except the described reperfusion technique was performed. Forty-two LTX in 39 recipients using piggy-back technique and retrograde reperfusion via the caval vein followed by antegrade reperfusion via the portal vein were performed; 38 out of 39 patients (97.44%) were alive and well at day 8 after LTX. One patient (2.56%) died of a pre-existing portal vein thrombosis on day 2 after LTX. Three patients had to undergo retransplantation for hepatic artery thrombosis (7.14%). Liver enzymes, bilirubine, prothrombine time and AT III on day 1, 3, 5 and 8 after LTX showed favourable values. Median aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) was 219 U/l on day 1 after LTX. One-month survival rate was 95.23%, and 1-year survival rate

  5. Outcome and Safety of Anterograde and Retrograde Single-Balloon Enteroscopy: Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Chiung; Chen, Peng-Jen; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Huang, Tien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) is designed for identifying possible small bowel lesions with balloon-assisted enteroscopy that allows deep intubation of the intestine. However, data regarding the outcome and safety of SBE remain limited. We conducted this study to evaluate the outcome and safety of anterograde and retrograde SBE approaches. This retrospective review from a tertiary medical center in Taiwan included endoscopic reports and chart data from 128 patients with 200 anterograde and retrograde procedures from September 2009 to November 2014. In this study, the most common indication for both anterograde and retrograde SBE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (64.4% vs. 60.6%). There were no significant differences between anterograde and retrograde approaches in terms of the diagnostic yield (69.3% vs. 52.5%) and intervention rate (23.8% vs. 17.2%). The procedure time was shorter for anterograde SBE than for retrograde SBE (68.1 ± 23.9 vs. 76.8 ± 27.7 min, P = 0.018). In addition, among the subgroup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiologies for those in different age-groups were angiodysplasia (≥ 65 years), non-specific ulcers (30–64 years), and Meckel’s diverticulum (< 30 years). The major complication rate during the study was 1.5%; the rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia was higher for patients who underwent anterograde SBE than for those who underwent retrograde SBE (13.9% vs. 2%, P = 0.005). The outcome and safety of anterograde and retrograde SBE are similar. However, anterograde SBE has a shorter procedural time and a higher rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia. PMID:27548619

  6. Functional results after cholesteatoma surgery in an adult population using the retrograde mastoidectomy technique.

    PubMed

    Minovi, Amir; Venjacob, Johanna; Volkenstein, Stefan; Dornhoffer, John; Dazert, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    In this retrospective study, we analyzed the functional results after using the retrograde mastoidectomy technique for cholesteatoma removal in an adult patient population. The described technique was used at a tertiary referral center for cholesteatoma removal in 218 adult patients, representing 242 operated ears, with an average follow-up time of 20.3 months. With the retrograde mastoidectomy technique, the cholesteatoma is removed posteriorly through the canal wall, from the epitympanic region toward the mastoid, with the option to reconstruct the posterior bony canal wall or create an open mastoid cavity, depending on the size of the defect. Primary surgery was carried out in 58.7 % ears, with the remaining 41.3 % representing revision surgery. In 151 cases, the posterior canal wall was reconstructed, and in 91 cases a classical CWD with an open mastoid cavity was created. In the majority of the cases (n = 213, 88.0 %), a primary hearing restoration was performed. There were 18 recurrences (12.7 %) in primary cases and 22 recurrences (22 %) in revision surgeries. Ninety percent of the recurrences (36 of 40 cases) occurred within 5 years. A postoperative air-bone gap of less than 20 dB was achieved in 61.6 % of the operated ears. Ears with a reconstructed posterior canal wall had significantly better hearing results than those cases in which a CWD procedure was used (air-bone gap of 17.6 versus 22.5 dB, p < 0.05). The retrograde mastoidectomy technique for cholesteatoma removal resulted in satisfying hearing results in the majority of the cases, with a recurrence rate comparable to the current literature.

  7. Preliminary studies on long distance, retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase in equine peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Fubini, S L; Cummings, J F; Todhunter, R J

    1985-11-01

    As a prelude to studies on retrograde axonal transport of neurotoxin (ie, so-called suicide transport) as a means to prevent post neurectomy neuroma formation, preliminary studies were conducted with an innocuous enzymatic marker, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The proximal stumps of resected medial and lateral palmar digital nerves in six ponies were injected via a tuberculin syringe and needle with 50 micron 1 of a 30 per cent solution of HRP in order to assess long distance retrograde axonal transport. The dorsal root ganglion of the cervical spinal enlargement (ie, C6, C7, C8, T1, T2) were removed at post injection intervals of two, four, six, eight, 10 and 12 days. These were sectioned serially and reacted by the tetramethylbenzidine method to demonstrate transported enzyme in the ganglionic cell bodies which give rise to sensory fibres of the palmar digital nerves. Enzyme, retrogradely transported over axon lengths of 115 cm, was first demonstrated in spinal ganglia four days after injections of the palmar digital nerves. The calculated transport velocity of 287 mm/day, although almost certainly an underestimate, greatly exceeded rates of 72 to 120 mm/day recorded previously with HRP in the peripheral nerves of small laboratory animals. The intensity of the HRP reaction product in ganglionic neurons was strong at four days and it remained unabated in ganglia examined at six, eight, 10 and 12 days post injection. The major sources of the sensory fibres of the palmar digital nerves appeared to be the ganglia of the C8 and T1 spinal segments which contained more than 90 per cent of all labelled neurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Efficacy of retrograde ureteropyeloscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi >2 cm.

    PubMed

    Bader, M J; Gratzke, C; Walther, S; Weidlich, P; Staehler, M; Seitz, M; Sroka, R; Reich, O; Stief, C G; Schlenker, B

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the efficacy and safety of retrograde ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi greater than 2 cm in diameter. A total of 24 patients with a stone burden >2 cm were treated with retrograde ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy. Primary study endpoints were number of treatments until the patient was stone free and perioperative complications with a follow-up of at least 3 months after intervention. In 24 patients (11 women and 13 men, 20-78 years of age), a total of 40 intrarenal calculi were treated with retrograde endoscopic procedures. At the time of the initial procedure, calculi had an average total linear diameter of 29.75 ± 1.57 mm and an average stone volume of 739.52 ± 82.12 mm(3). The mean number of procedures per patient was 1.7 ± 0.8 (range 1-3 procedures). The overall stone-free rate was 92%. After 1, 2 and 3 procedures 54, 79 and 92% of patients were stone free, respectively. There were no major complications. Minor postoperative complications included pyelonephritis in three cases (7.5%), of whom all responded immediately to parenteral antibiotics. In one patient the development of steinstrasse in the distal ureter required ureteroscopic fragment disruption and basketing. Ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy represents an efficient treatment option and allows the treatment of large intrarenal calculi of all compositions and throughout the whole collecting system even for patients with a stone burden of more than 2 cm size. PMID:20204341

  9. Comparison of commonly used retrograde tracers in rat spinal motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You-lai; Li, Hai-yan; Zhang, Pei-xun; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na; Kou, Yu-hui; Jiang, Bao-guo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four fluorescent dyes, True Blue (TB), Fluoro-Gold (FG), Fluoro-Ruby (FR), and 1,1’-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), in retrograde tracing of rat spinal motor neurons. We transected the muscle branch of the rat femoral nerve and applied each tracer to the proximal stump in single labeling experiments, or combinations of tracers (FG-DiI and TB-DiI) in double labeling experiments. In the single labeling experiments, significantly fewer labeled motor neurons were observed after FR labeling than after TB, FG, or DiI, 3 days after tracer application. By 1 week, there were no significant differences in the number of labeled neurons between the four groups. In the double-labeling experiment, the number of double-labeled neurons in the FG-DiI group was not significantly different from that in the TB-DiI group 1 week after tracer application. Our findings indicate that TB, FG, and DiI have similar labeling efficacies in the retrograde labeling of spinal motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve when used alone. Furthermore, combinations of DiI and TB or FG are similarly effective. Therefore, of the dyes studied, TB, FG and DiI, and combinations of DiI with TB or FG, are the most suitable for retrograde labeling studies of motor neurons in the rat femoral nerve. PMID:26692873

  10. Changes in the HOAr isotope composition of clays during retrograde alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.R.; Kyser, T.K.; Mehnert, H.H.; Hoeve, J.

    1987-01-01

    K-Ar ages of illite alteration associated with Middle Proterozoic Athabasca unconformity-type U deposits in Saskatchewan range from 414 to 1493 Ma. The K-Ar ages correlate with water contents and ??D values such that illites with young K-Ar ages have ??D values as low as -169 and water contents as high as 7.7 wt.% whereas illites with older ages have ??D values near -70 and water contents near 4 wt.%. Water extracted at 400??C from illites with low ??D values and high water contents has low ??D and ??18O values similar to those of modern meteoric water suggesting that some of the illites associated with the original deposition of the ore underwent varying degrees of retrograde alteration. The alteration is initiated by hydration of sites in the interlayer region of the illite which results in the partial resetting of the K-Ar ages and introduction of excess structural water in the form of interlamellar water. The interlamellar water is enriched in 18O by about 7 per mil relative to the water that physically surrounded the clay particle. Further alteration decreases the ??D value and increases the ??18O value of the illite by isotopic exchange between the mineral and the interlamellar water. Although the chemical compositions and XRD patterns of the altered illites indicate that no detectable smectite component is present in the samples, the isotopic results suggest that the altered illites may be an early precursor in the formation of mixed-layer illite/smectite by retrograde alteration of pure illite. The wide variation of ??D values of chlorite and kaolinite from these U deposits is analogous to that of the illite suggesting that retrograde alteration of clays by meteoric water can be substantial. The general association of altered clays with areas containing the highest concentrations of U is probably related to localized permeability within the ore zone. ?? 1987.

  11. Trafficking of cell surface beta-amyloid precursor protein: retrograde and transcytotic transport in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), the principal constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived by proteolysis from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta PP). The mechanism of A beta production in neurons, which are hypothesized to be a rich source of A beta in brain, remains to be defined. In this study, we describe a detailed localization of cell surface beta PP and its subsequent trafficking in primary cultured neurons. Full-length cell surface beta PP was present primarily on perikarya and axons, the latter with a characteristic discontinuous pattern. At growth cones, cell surface beta PP was inconsistently detected. By visualizing the distribution of beta PP monoclonal antibodies added to intact cultures, beta PP was shown to be internalized from distal axons or terminals and retrogradely transported back to perikarya in organelles which colocalized with fluid-phase endocytic markers. Retrograde transport of beta PP was shown in both hippocampal and peripheral sympathetic neurons, the latter using a compartment culture system that isolated cell bodies from distal axons and terminals. In addition, we demonstrated that beta PP from distal axons was transcytotically transported to the surface of perikarya from distal axons in sympathetic neurons. Indirect evidence of this transcytotic pathway was obtained in hippocampal neurons using antisense oligonucleotide to the kinesin heavy chain to inhibit anterograde beta PP transport. Taken together, these results demonstrate novel aspects of beta PP trafficking in neurons, including retrograde axonal transport and transcytosis. Moreover, the axonal predominance of cell surface beta PP is unexpected in view of the recent report of polarized sorting of beta PP to the basolateral domain of MDCK cells. PMID:7721945

  12. Retrograde Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Left Anterior Descending Chronic Total Occlusion Via an Ipsilateral Intraseptal Collateral Channel Using a Single Guiding Catheter.

    PubMed

    Chon, Min Ku; Kim, Jeong Su; Chun, Kook Jin

    2016-06-01

    Successful recanalization of chronic total occlusion (CTO) of coronary arteries has improved symptoms and mortality. In CTO cases, retrograde approach from opposite coronary artery has a better chance of procedural success. But the retrograde approach from opposite site is not always suitable. In certain CTO cases, the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery is supplied from the intraseptal collateral channel. Controlled antegrade and retrograde tracking (CART) strategy has been developed to improve guidewire crossing and successful recanalization. We report a case of the retrograde percutaneous coronary intervention for the LAD CTO lesion via an ipsilateral intraseptal collateral channel, which was successfully revascularized with reverse CARTtechnique using a single 8-French guiding catheter.

  13. [Retrograde type A dissection after endovascular stent grafting of type B dissection].

    PubMed

    Misfeld, M; Nötzold, A; Geist, V; Richardt, G; Sievers, H H

    2002-03-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a disease with high mortality. Whereas acute dissection of the ascending aorta (Standford type A) is treated surgically, acute dissection of Stanford type B (descending aorta) is principally treated conservatively, but surgically in case of complications. Recently, another therapeutical option for the treatment of type B dissection has been developed using endovascular stent-grafts. We report on a 64-year-old woman with typical signs of acute aortic dissection. Computer tomography and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated Stanford type B dissection. The patient was treated with an endovascular stent-graft, because of malperfusion of the right leg and chest pain. After successful closure of the entry by the stent, the patient developed acute right-sided hemiplegia one day after the intervention due to retrograde dissection into the aortic arch and ascending aorta. Upon immediate operation, the origin of the initially type B dissection was still sufficiently occluded by the endovascular stent-graft; however, there was another entry between the innominate artery and the left carotic artery near one proximal end of the stent's strut. Using deep hypothermia and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, the ascending aorta and proximal arch were replaced with a 28 mm Dacron-Velour tube and the aortic root was remodelled with a tongue-shaped Dacron graft preserving the valve cusps according to a modified Yacoub procedure. After the operation, neurological symptoms diminished and the patient could walk on the ward on day eleven. This case demonstrates retrograde type A dissection as a complication after interventional treatment of type B dissection using an endovascular stent-graft. The reason for this delayed complication is speculative. Aortic wall damage during stent inserting could be a possible cause. It is also likely that the patient initially had type B dissection with retrograde dissection of the distal part of the aortic arch

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  15. Retrograde Pedal/Tibial Artery Access for Treatment of Infragenicular Arterial Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular intervention has emerged as an accepted modality for treating patients with critical limb ischemia. However, this therapy poses multiple challenges to the interventionalist due to the presence of widespread multilevel disease, long and complex occlusive lesions, and the common involvement of the tibial vessels. Retrograde pedal/tibial access is a relatively new technique that allows the treatment of tibial occlusive lesions when conventional endovascular techniques fail. This article reviews the technical details and published data regarding this technique and evaluates its use in this difficult-to-treat patient population. PMID:23805338

  16. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. [Dogs; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone.

  17. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  18. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging reveals net retrograde aqueductal flow in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ringstad, Geir; Emblem, Kyrre Eeg; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to assess the net aqueductal stroke volume (ASV) and CSF aqueductal flow rate derived from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) in patients with probable idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) before and after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery, and to compare observations with intracranial pressure (ICP) scores. METHODS PC-MRI at the level of the sylvian aqueduct was undertaken in patients undergoing assessment for probable iNPH. Aqueductal flow in the craniocaudal direction was defined as positive, or antegrade flow, and net ASV was calculated by subtracting retrograde from antegrade aqueductal flow. Aqueductal flow rate per minute was calculated by multiplying net ASV by heart rate. During the same hospital admission, clinical examination was performed using NPH score and overnight continuous ICP monitoring. Twelve patients were followed prospectively 12 months after shunt placement with clinical assessment and a second PC-MRI. The study also included 2 healthy controls. RESULTS Among 21 patients examined for iNPH, 17 (81%) received a shunt (shunt group), and 4 were treated conservatively (conservative group). Among the patients with shunts, a clinical improvement was observed in 16 (94%) of the 17. Net ASV was negative in 16 (76%) of 21 patients before shunt placement and in 5 (42%) of 12 patients after shunt placement, and increased from a median of -5 μl (range -175 to 27 μl) to a median of 1 μl (range -61 to 30 μl; p = 0.04). Among the 12 patients with PC-MRI after shunt placement, 11 were shunt responders, and in 9 of these 11 either a reduced magnitude of retrograde aqueductal flow, or a complete reversal from retrograde to antegrade flow, occurred. Net ASV was significantly lower in the shunt group than in the conservative group (p = 0.01). The aqueductal flow rate increased from -0.56 ml/min (range -12.78 to 0.58 ml/min) to 0.06 ml/min (range -4.51 to 1.93 ml/min; p = 0.04) after shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS In

  19. Repair of Late Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection After TEVAR: Causes and Management.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Fraga-Manteiga, Daniel; Gulias, Daniel; Cuenca, Jose J

    2016-03-01

    One of the most feared complications of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) and hybrid arch repair is retrograde type A aortic dissection (RTAD). More than two-thirds of RTAD occurs in the immediate postoperative period and first postoperative month. In presentations beyond that point, progression of the native aortopathy must be considered. We report a late presentation of an RTAD seven months after hybrid repair of an aortic intramural hematoma with an ulcer-like projection, and review the causes and management of this TEVAR complication.

  20. Using balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy for postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Velázquez-Aviña, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is technically more challenging in patients with postsurgical anatomy such as Roux-en-Y anastomosis, frequently mandating an operative intervention. Although limited, there is growing evidence that ERCP can be performed using the balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy (BOAE) in patients with complex postoperative anatomy. We present the technical aspects of performing ERCP with the BOAE in patients presenting with complex postsurgical anatomy having biliary problems. ERCP using the BOAE is feasible in patients with complex postsurgical anatomy, permitting diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in 80% of patients. PMID:25364385

  1. Lightening up Light Therapy: Activation of Retrograde Signaling Pathway by Photobiomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Photobiomodulation utilizes monochromatic (or quasimonochromatic) light in the electromagnetic region of 600∼1000 nm for the treatment of soft tissues in a nondestructive and nonthermal mode. It is conceivable that photobiomodulation is based upon the ability of the light to alter cell metabolism as it is absorbed by general hemoproteins and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in particular. Recently it has been suggested radiation of visible and infrared (IR) activates retrograde signaling pathway from mitochondria to nucleus. In this review, the role of COX in the photobiomodulation will be discussed. Further a possible role of water as a photoreceptor will be suggested. PMID:25489415

  2. The effect of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the apical leakage of retrograde cavity

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Fekrazad, Reza; Dehghan Menshadi, Fatemeh; Seifi, Massoud

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Controversial results have been reported when organic acids, ultrasonic instruments and laser techniques were used to remove smear layer in endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of removing debris and smear layer by Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the apical leakage of retrograde cavities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this ex vivo study, 24 extracted mandibular single-rooted teeth were selected and instrumented up to K-file size #35. Approximately 3 mm of root apices were dissected perpendicular to the root’s long axis. Retrograde cavities with 3 mm depth were prepared and the teeth were randomly assigned to two groups. In one group, the retrograde cavities were filled with amalgam and in the other group, the dentinal surface of the retrograde cavities were lased with Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2W, 15 seconds, G4 tip). The cavities were filled with amalgam; all tooth surfaces except for dissected outsides were covered with blue wax. Then the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye for 48 hours. The amount of dye penetration into sagittal sections was measured by stereomicroscope at ×20 magnification by two independent observers who were blinded to the experiment. Data were statistically analyzed using student t-test. RESULTS: This study demonstrated that dye penetration was 0.8 mm (±0.53) in the lased and 0.97 mm (±0.54) in the non-lased group. It showed that, Er,Cr:YSGG laser can remove the debris and smear layer and consequently reduces the amount of dye penetration, although, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: This study showed that dye penetration was less in lased group because of the better seal of the dissected surface due to the better removal of the debris and smear layer by laser; further investigations are recommended in this field. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):144-8] PMID:24019836

  3. Selective labeling of retinal ganglion cells with calcium indicators by retrograde loading in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Behrend, Matthew R.; Ahuja, Ashish K.; Humayun, Mark S.; Weiland, James D.; Chow, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a retrograde loading technique that makes it possible for the first time to rapidly load a calcium indicator in the majority of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in salamander retina, and then to observe physiological activity of these dye-loaded cells. Dextran-conjugated calcium indicator, dissolved in water, was applied to the optic nerve stump. Following dye loading, the isolated retina was mounted on a microelectrode array to demonstrate that electrical activity and calcium activity were preserved, as the retina responded to electrical stimuli. PMID:19428523

  4. A Class of Selenocentric Retrograde Orbits With Innovative Applications to Human Lunar Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Lester, Daniel F.; Thronson, Harley A.; Barbee, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Selenocentric distant retrograde orbits with radii from approx. 12,500 km to approx. 25,000 km are assessed for stability and for suitability as crewed command and control infrastructure locations in support of telerobotic lunar surface operations and interplanetary human transport. Such orbits enable consistent transits to and from Earth at virtually any time if they are coplanar with the Moon's geocentric orbit. They possess multiple attributes and applications distinct from NASA's proposed destination orbit for a redirected asteroid about 70,000 km from the Moon.

  5. A dispersive wave pattern on Jupiter's fastest retrograde jet at 20°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; Fletcher, L. N.; Adamoli, G.; Jacquesson, M.; Vedovato, M.; Orton, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    A compact wave pattern has been identified on Jupiter's fastest retrograding jet at 20°S (the SEBs) on the southern edge of the South Equatorial Belt. The wave has been identified in both reflected sunlight from amateur observations between 2010 and 2015, thermal infrared imaging from the Very Large Telescope and near infrared imaging from the Infrared Telescope Facility. The wave pattern is present when the SEB is relatively quiescent and lacking large-scale disturbances, and is particularly notable when the belt has undergone a fade (whitening). It is generally not present when the SEB exhibits its usual large-scale convective activity ('rifts'). Tracking of the wave pattern and associated white ovals on its southern edge over several epochs have permitted a measure of the dispersion relationship, showing a strong correlation between the phase speed (-43.2 to -21.2 m/s) and the longitudinal wavelength, which varied from 4.4 to 10.0° longitude over the course of the observations. Infrared imaging sensing low pressures in the upper troposphere suggest that the wave is confined to near the cloud tops. The wave is moving westward at a phase speed slower (i.e., less negative) than the peak retrograde wind speed (-62 m/s), and is therefore moving east with respect to the SEBs jet peak. Unlike the retrograde NEBn jet near °N, which is a location of strong vertical wind shear that sometimes hosts Rossby wave activity, the SEBs jet remains retrograde throughout the upper troposphere, suggesting the SEBs pattern cannot be interpreted as a classical Rossby wave. 2D windspeeds and thermal gradients measured by Cassini in 2000 are used to estimate the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity gradient as a means of understanding the origin of the a wave. We find that the vorticity gradient is dominated by the baroclinic term and becomes negative (changes sign) in a region near the cloud-top level (400-700 mbar) associated with the SEBs. Such a sign reversal is a necessary (but

  6. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, José A; Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  7. The absence of a mitochondrial genome in rho0 yeast cells extends lifespan independently of retrograde regulation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Dong Kyun; Poyton, Robert O

    2009-01-01

    The absence of mtDNA in rho0 yeast cells affects both respiration and mitochondrial-nuclear communication (e.g., retrograde regulation, intergenomic signaling, or pleiotropic drug resistance). Previously, it has been reported that some rho0 strains have increased replicative lifespans, attributable to the lack of respiration and retrograde regulation. Here, we have been able to confirm that rho0 cells exhibit increased replicative lifespans but have found that this is not associated with the lack of respiration or reduced oxidative stress but instead, is related to the lack of mtDNA per se in rho0 cells. Also, we find no correlation between the strength of retrograde regulation and lifespan. Furthermore, we find that pdr3- or rtg2- mutations are not responsible for lifespan extension in rho0 cells, ruling out a specific role for PDR3-pleiotropic drug resistance or RGT2-retrograde regulation pathways in the extended lifespans of rho0 cells. Surprisingly, Rtg3p, which acts downstream of Rtg2p, is required for lifespan increase in rho0 cells. Together, these findings indicate that the loss of mtDNA per se and not the lack of respiration lead to extended longevity in rho0 cells. They also suggest that Rtg3p, acting independently of retrograde regulation, mediates this effect, possibly via intergenomic signaling.

  8. Retrograde flow detection in the radial artery as a means to assess palmar collateral circulation in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Leenhoven, T; vd Lei, J; Okken, A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to determine whether Doppler ultrasound can be used in newborn infants to assess the adequacy of palmar collateral circulation. Retrograde flow in the radial artery, distal to the site of manual occlusion of the vessel, was studied by Doppler technique. Forty-seven newborn infants, who underwent percutaneous radial artery cannulation were studied. Prior to cannulation palmar collateral circulation was tested in each infant, using the timed Allen test and was considered to be adequate. Pulsatile retrograde flow could be demonstrated in 11 out of 47 infants, but not in 36 of the 47 studied. During the period of cannulation none of the infants showed any sign of vascular insufficiency of the hand. It can be concluded that in newborn infants, the detection of pulsatile retrograde flow in the radial artery, using a Doppler flow meter, does not appear to have advantages over the Allen test as an indicator of adequate palmar collateral circulation.

  9. Clinical evaluation of double-channel gastroscope for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Wen; Wang, Guoxin; Liu, Xiang; Ge, Nan; Guo, Jintao

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the use of a double-channel gastroscope in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and interventions. Material and methods From January 2008 to December 2013, 18 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy were enrolled in this study. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed using a straight forward gastroscope with double working channel (4.2-mm diameter, 2.8-mm diameter). Results The success rate of selective cannulation and accomplishment of planned procedures was 15 out of 18 patients (83.3%), and no serious complications were encountered. Conclusions The double-channel gastroscope appears to be useful in performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. PMID:27713777

  10. The microRNA miR-1 regulates a MEF-2 dependent retrograde signal at neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Simon, David J.; Madison, Jon M.; Conery, Annie L.; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L.; Soskis, Michael; Ruvkun, Gary B.; Kaplan, Joshua M.; Kim, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We show that miR-1, a conserved muscle specific microRNA, regulates aspects of both pre- and post-synaptic function at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions. miR-1 regulates the expression level of two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (UNC-29 and UNC-63), thereby altering muscle sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh). miR-1 also regulates the muscle transcription factor MEF-2, which results in altered pre-synaptic ACh secretion, suggesting that MEF-2 activity in muscles controls a retrograde signal. The effect of the MEF-2-dependent retrograde signal on secretion is mediated by the synaptic vesicle protein RAB-3. Finally, acute activation of levamisole-sensitive nAChRs stimulates MEF-2-dependent transcriptional responses, and induces the MEF-2-dependent retrograde signal. We propose that miR-1 refines synaptic function by coupling changes in muscle activity to changes in pre-synaptic function. PMID:18510933

  11. NEXT GENERATION OF TELESCOPES OR DYNAMICS REQUIRED TO DETERMINE IF EXO-MOONS HAVE PROGRADE OR RETROGRADE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen M.; Fujii, Yuka

    2014-08-20

    We survey the methods proposed in the literature for detecting moons of extrasolar planets in terms of their ability to distinguish between prograde and retrograde moon orbits, an important tracer of the moon formation channel. We find that most moon detection methods, in particular, sensitive methods for detecting moons of transiting planets, cannot observationally distinguishing prograde and retrograde moon orbits. The prograde and retrograde cases can only be distinguished where the dynamical evolution of the orbit due to, e.g., three body effects is detectable, where one of the two cases is dynamically unstable, or where new observational facilities, which can implement a technique capable of differentiating the two cases, come online. In particular, directly imaged planets are promising targets because repeated spectral and photometric measurements, which are required to determine moon orbit direction, could also be conducted with the primary interest of characterizing the planet itself.

  12. Nucleotide specificities of anterograde and retrograde organelle transport in Reticulomyxa are indistinguishable

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Membrane-bound organelles move bidirectionally along microtubules in the freshwater ameba, Reticulomyxa. We have examined the nucleotide requirements for transport in a lysed cell model and compared them with kinesin and dynein-driven motility in other systems. Both anterograde and retrograde transport in Reticulomyxa show features characteristic of dynein but not of kinesin-powered movements: organelle transport is reactivated only by ATP and no other nucleoside triphosphates; the Km and Vmax of the ATP-driven movements are similar to values obtained for dynein rather than kinesin-driven movement; and of 15 ATP analogues tested for their ability to promote organelle transport, only 4 of them did. This narrow specificity resembles that of dynein-mediated in vitro transport and is dissimilar to the broad specificity of the kinesin motor (Shimizu, T., K. Furusawa, S. Ohashi, Y. Y. Toyoshima, M. Okuno, F. Malik, and R. D. Vale. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 112: 1189-1197). Remarkably, anterograde and retrograde organelle transport cannot be distinguished at all with respect to nucleotide specificity, kinetics of movement, and the ability to use the ATP analogues. Since the "kinetic fingerprints" of the motors driving transport in opposite directions are indistinguishable, the same type of motor(s) may be involved in the two directions of movement. PMID:1825662

  13. The precise localization of nigral afferents in the rat as determined by a retrograde tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Bunney, B S; Aghajanian, G K

    1976-12-01

    Afferent innervation of the rat substantia nigra (SN) was studied by the retrograde horseradish peroxidase (HRP) method. High concentrations of HRP were deposited in discrete subregions of the SN by means of a microiontophoretic delivery system. Using this technique it was possible to demonstrate that the caudatonigral projection system is arranged topographically; All portions of the caudate-putamen except for a central medial core were found to contain HRP positive cells, indicative of retrograde transport. In the positive areas a much larger percentage of cells (30-50%) were found to participate in this projection than has previously been reported. Only medium size cells (12-20 mum) were found to contain the HRP reaction product. Other areas found to heavily innervate the SN were the globus pallidus, central nucleus of the amygdala and dorsal raphe nucleus. Areas containing fewer reactive cells but which also appear to innervate the SN included the prefrontal cortex and lateral habenula. These results emphasize the importance of striatonigral projections which recent studies have suggested contain a GABAergic link.

  14. Comparison of percutaneous and endoscopic retrograde removal of postoperatively retained bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Becker, C D; Eigenmann, F; Scheurer, U; Halter, F

    1993-01-01

    Forty-one patients underwent nonsurgical removal of postoperatively retained bile duct stones in two nonrandomized groups. The endoscopic-retrograde technique was used in 21 patients, and succeeded in 19. The percutaneous approach through the T-tube tract was used in 22 patients, including the two in whom endoscopic stone removal had failed, and was successful in 21 patients. Individual preferences and prior history introduced a selection bias against the percutaneous technique. Auxiliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) was used in 2 patients whose stones could not be fragmented mechanically by the percutaneous basket technique. ESWL was successful in one patient but failed in the second. Because endoscopy had also failed in this case, the patient subsequently underwent repeat surgery. Procedure-related complications were minor with both techniques and were readily treated by conservative measures. We conclude that both the retrograde and the percutaneous approaches are effective and safe. The endoscopic approach appears convenient because there is no need to await maturation of the percutaneous tract, but sphincterotomy carries a small but distinctive risk. Because the percutaneous approach uses an existing tract, is only minimally invasive and leaves the sphincter of Oddi intact, it is preferable in those patients who have T-tubes of appropriate size and position in place.

  15. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults.

    PubMed

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  16. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-07-10

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation.

  17. Surgical Results of Retrograde Mastoidectomy with Primary Reconstruction of the Ear Canal and Mastoid Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chao-Yin; Huang, Bor-Rong; Chang, Wei-Kang; Tsai, Yang-Lien; Lin, Yuan-Yung; Tsai, Wan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the long-term hearing results and the impact of mastoid exclusion/obliteration in patients with cholesteatoma (102 ears) who underwent retrograde tympanomastoidectomy and in whom bone chips/paté were applied as the sole materials during the procedure. In 79 ears, this was combined with ossiculoplasty in a single-stage procedure. In >71% of ears, the results of audiometric testing were monitored for more than 2 years. The results suggested there was a significant gain in hearing following surgery, with respect to the postoperative change in both air-conduction thresholds and air-bone gaps (P < 0.001). Linear regression analyses of pure-tone averages at different frequencies, before and after surgery, demonstrated that patients benefitted from a postoperative hearing gain at low and middle frequencies, but their hearing often deteriorated at frequencies of 8000 Hz. As for the impact of the type of tympanoplasty on hearing outcomes, type III-interposition markedly increased hearing gain. The overall rate of postoperative adverse events was 8.8%. We conclude that reconstruction of the ear canal and mastoid via mastoid exclusion/obliteration using bone chips/paté can be considered as an alternative procedure following retrograde mastoidectomy. It gives excellent surgical results and has fewer postoperative adverse events. PMID:25861632

  18. Interaction between plastid and mitochondrial retrograde signalling pathways during changes to plastid redox status

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Nicolás E.; Guinea-Díaz, Manuel; Whelan, James; Strand, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts depend upon each other; photosynthesis provides substrates for mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial metabolism is essential for sustaining photosynthetic carbon assimilation. In addition, mitochondrial respiration protects photosynthesis against photoinhibition by dissipating excess redox equivalents from the chloroplasts. Genetic defects in mitochondrial function result in an excessive reduction and energization of the chloroplast. Thus, it is clear that the activities of mitochondria and plastids need to be coordinated, but the manner by which the organelles communicate to coordinate their activities is unknown. The regulator of alternative oxidase (rao1) mutant was isolated as a mutant unable to induce AOX1a expression in response to the inhibitor of the mitochondrial cytochrome c reductase (complex III), antimycin A. RAO1 encodes the nuclear localized cyclin-dependent kinase E1 (CDKE1). Interestingly, the rao1 mutant demonstrates a genome uncoupled phenotype also in response to redox changes in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Thus, CDKE1 was shown to regulate both LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEX B (LHCB) and ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE 1 (AOX1a) expression in response to retrograde signals. Our results suggest that CDKE1 is a central nuclear component integrating mitochondrial and plastid retrograde signals and plays a role in regulating energy metabolism during the response to stress. PMID:24591717

  19. Osmotically induced cell volume changes alter anterograde and retrograde transport, Golgi structure, and COPI dissociation.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Linstedt, A D

    1999-05-01

    Physiological conditions that impinge on constitutive traffic and affect organelle structure are not known. We report that osmotically induced cell volume changes, which are known to occur under a variety of conditions, rapidly inhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport in mammalian cells. Both ER export and ER Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC)-to-Golgi trafficking steps were blocked, but retrograde transport was active, and it mediated ERGIC and Golgi collapse into the ER. Extensive tubulation and relatively rapid Golgi resident redistribution were observed under hypo-osmotic conditions, whereas a slower redistribution of the same markers, without apparent tubulation, was observed under hyperosmotic conditions. The osmotic stress response correlated with the perturbation of COPI function, because both hypo- and hyperosmotic conditions slowed brefeldin A-induced dissociation of betaCOP from Golgi membranes. Remarkably, Golgi residents reemerged after several hours of sustained incubation in hypotonic or hypertonic medium. Reemergence was independent of new protein synthesis but required PKC, an activity known to mediate cell volume recovery. Taken together these results indicate the existence of a coupling between cell volume and constitutive traffic that impacts organelle structure through independent effects on anterograde and retrograde flow and that involves, in part, modulation of COPI function. PMID:10233155

  20. Surgical results of retrograde mastoidectomy with primary reconstruction of the ear canal and mastoid cavity.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Yin; Huang, Bor-Rong; Chen, Hsin-Chien; Shih, Cheng-Ping; Chang, Wei-Kang; Tsai, Yang-Lien; Lin, Yuan-Yung; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the long-term hearing results and the impact of mastoid exclusion/obliteration in patients with cholesteatoma (102 ears) who underwent retrograde tympanomastoidectomy and in whom bone chips/paté were applied as the sole materials during the procedure. In 79 ears, this was combined with ossiculoplasty in a single-stage procedure. In >71% of ears, the results of audiometric testing were monitored for more than 2 years. The results suggested there was a significant gain in hearing following surgery, with respect to the postoperative change in both air-conduction thresholds and air-bone gaps (P < 0.001). Linear regression analyses of pure-tone averages at different frequencies, before and after surgery, demonstrated that patients benefitted from a postoperative hearing gain at low and middle frequencies, but their hearing often deteriorated at frequencies of 8000 Hz. As for the impact of the type of tympanoplasty on hearing outcomes, type III-interposition markedly increased hearing gain. The overall rate of postoperative adverse events was 8.8%. We conclude that reconstruction of the ear canal and mastoid via mastoid exclusion/obliteration using bone chips/paté can be considered as an alternative procedure following retrograde mastoidectomy. It gives excellent surgical results and has fewer postoperative adverse events. PMID:25861632

  1. The Effect of Three Gums on the Retrogradation of Indica Rice Starch

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rukun; Huang, Min; Li, Bin; Zhou, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Retrograded starch (RS3) was produced from indica rice starch with three kinds of gums (konjac glucomannan, KGM; carrageenan, CA, USA; and gellan, GA, USA) by autoclaving, respectively, and the effect of the gums on the retrogradation behavior of starch was estimated. The influences of polysaccharide concentration, sodium chloride concentration, autoclaving time, refrigerated time, and pH value on RS3 formation were discussed. Except for sodium chloride’s persistent restraint on RS3, the others all forced RS3 yields higher at first, but lowered it after the peak value. The influencing sequence of these impact factors was: sodium chloride concentration > polysaccharide concentration > autoclaving time > refrigerated time > pH value. The results also proved that in the three gums, KGM plays the most significant role in RS3 changing. It was concluded that the incorporation of each of these three gums into starch, especially KGM, results in an increase or decrease of RS3 under different conditions. This phenomenon could be taken into consideration when developing starchy food with appropriate amount of RS3. PMID:22822444

  2. Endoscopic dilation of complete oesophageal obstructions with a combined antegrade-retrograde rendezvous technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Reto; Meyenberger, Christa; Putora, Paul Martin; Albrecht, Franziska; Broglie, Martina Anja; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic rendezvous technique for complete oesophageal obstruction and the swallowing outcome. METHODS: This single-centre case series includes consecutive patients who were unable to swallow due to complete oesophageal obstruction and underwent combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation (CARD) within the last 10 years. The patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, endoscopic therapy, adverse events, and outcomes were obtained retrospectively. Technical success was defined as effective restoration of oesophageal patency. Swallowing success was defined as either percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG)-tube independency and/or relevant improvement of oral food intake, as assessed by the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) (≥ level 3). RESULTS: The cohort consisted of six patients [five males; mean age 71 years (range, 54-74)]. All but one patient had undergone radiotherapy for head and neck or oesophageal cancer. Technical success was achieved in five out of six patients. After discharge, repeated dilations were performed in all five patients. During follow-up (median 27 mo, range, 2-115), three patients remained PEG-tube dependent. Three of four patients achieved relevant improvement of swallowing (two patients: FOIS 6, one patient: FOIS 7). One patient developed mediastinal emphysema following CARD, without a need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The CARD technique is safe and a viable alternative to high-risk blind antegrade dilation in patients with complete proximal oesophageal obstruction. Although only half of the patients remained PEG-tube independent, the majority improved their ability to swallow. PMID:26900299

  3. Gelatinization and retrogradation phenomena in starch/montmorillonite nanocomposites plasticized with different glycerol/water ratios.

    PubMed

    Lara, Sandra Camila; Salcedo, Felipe

    2016-10-20

    This study aims to gain insights into the intermolecular interactions present in thermoplastic starch (TPS)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites prepared using water and/or glycerol as plasticizers. Specifically, the impact of using different glycerol/water proportions on the nature of gelatinization and retrogradation processes is studied. Nanocomposites were characterized by rheometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-rays diffraction (XRD). It is shown that clay tactoids preferentially interact with glycerol molecules rather than starch macromolecules. Consequently, the effects of MMT incorporation strongly depend on the glycerol/water ratio; when a ratio of 0.5 is used minor variations were observed on the starch gelatinization process-although stronger clays-starch interactions were evident-whereas at higher ratios the addition of clays significantly increased the gelatinization temperature, up to values over 100°C. In the gelatinization process of starch in TPS samples having only glycerol as a plasticizer, the leaching of amylose and the melting of amylopectin crystalline domains seem to occur simultaneously. This different gelatinization mechanism produces a TPS having a substantially different morphology, which exhibited reduced retrogradation characteristics.

  4. [Successful selective electrical ablation of the retrograde pathway in atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia associated with syncope].

    PubMed

    Lukl, J; Cíhalík, C

    1992-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to the intensive care unit on account of repeatedly occurring syncopes which developed at the peak of physical exertion. The attack was reproduced by exercise on a bicycle ergometer: the patient developed paroxysmal tachycardia with a narrow QRS and a frequency of 160/min leading after 20 sec. to severe hypotension and loss of consciousness. The same tachycardia caused by programmed atrial stimulation caused a drop of tension in the recumbent position by 30 mmHg and after more detailed analysis during electrophysiological examination it was evaluated as atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. By an electric discharge of 300 J administered by means of a stimulation electrode 7F USCI into the area of the AV node the retrograde conduction through the perinodal rapid pathways was completely interrupted and 1st. degree atrioventricular block developed. Repeated electrophysiological examination and exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer provided evidence of the disappearance of the retrograde pathway and the impossibility to elicit AVNRT. The authors express the view that the rapid perinodal pathway is interrupted in successful cases in both directions and the 1st. degree AV block is due to conduction along a slow pathway and not incidental slowing of conduction along the rapid pathway which is the generally accepted interpretation. Modification of the atrioventricular conduction by interruption of the rapid pathway by fulguration is according to data in the literature and the described patient a method which makes is possible to cure severe atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardias.

  5. Gelatinization and retrogradation phenomena in starch/montmorillonite nanocomposites plasticized with different glycerol/water ratios.

    PubMed

    Lara, Sandra Camila; Salcedo, Felipe

    2016-10-20

    This study aims to gain insights into the intermolecular interactions present in thermoplastic starch (TPS)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites prepared using water and/or glycerol as plasticizers. Specifically, the impact of using different glycerol/water proportions on the nature of gelatinization and retrogradation processes is studied. Nanocomposites were characterized by rheometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-rays diffraction (XRD). It is shown that clay tactoids preferentially interact with glycerol molecules rather than starch macromolecules. Consequently, the effects of MMT incorporation strongly depend on the glycerol/water ratio; when a ratio of 0.5 is used minor variations were observed on the starch gelatinization process-although stronger clays-starch interactions were evident-whereas at higher ratios the addition of clays significantly increased the gelatinization temperature, up to values over 100°C. In the gelatinization process of starch in TPS samples having only glycerol as a plasticizer, the leaching of amylose and the melting of amylopectin crystalline domains seem to occur simultaneously. This different gelatinization mechanism produces a TPS having a substantially different morphology, which exhibited reduced retrogradation characteristics. PMID:27474559

  6. Efficacy of seven retrograde tracers, compared in multiple-labelling studies of feline motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Richmond, F J; Gladdy, R; Creasy, J L; Kitamura, S; Smits, E; Thomson, D B

    1994-07-01

    The labelling efficacies of 7 retrograde tracers were evaluated following cut nerve exposure or intramuscular injection into the serially compartmentalized neck muscle, biventer cervicis. Tested tracers included Fast Blue (FB), Fluorogold (FG), dextran conjugated to fluorescein (FD), dextran conjugated to rhodamine (Fluororuby (FR), 3000 and 10,000 MW), fluorescent latex microspheres, horseradish peroxidase coupled to colloidal gold, and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). In 2 animals, horseradish peroxidase was also employed and spinal cords were processed for peroxidase activity to evaluate its effect on the appearance of cells labelled with fluorescent tracers. Four tracers, FB, FG, FD and FR, could be observed in motoneurones under the conditions of our study. FB and FG labelled comparable numbers of motoneurones following cut nerve exposure, but dissimilar numbers following intramuscular injection. FG diffused extensively following injection and was found in motoneurones not only in the appropriate ipsilateral segment but also adjacent ipsilateral and contralateral segments. Intramuscular injections of FB usually labelled fewer cells than cut nerve exposure, but evidence for spurious labelling following intramuscular injection could also be found. FD or FR labelled motoneurones following cut nerve exposure but not following intramuscular injection. The conjugated dextrans labelled more variable numbers of cells than FB or FG, but the labelled cells had similar patterns of distribution. The remaining tracers were ineffective as retrograde markers in our study, and the possible reasons for these failures are discussed.

  7. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults

    PubMed Central

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  8. Neuronal protease-activated receptor 1 drives synaptic retrograde signaling mediated by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Kano, Masanobu

    2011-02-23

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a member of the G-protein coupled receptors that are proteolytically activated by serine proteases. Recent studies suggest a definite contribution of PAR1 to brain functions, including learning and memory. However, cellular mechanisms by which PAR1 activation influences neuronal activity are not well understood. Here we show that PAR1 activation drives retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and thereby regulates synaptic transmission. In cultured hippocampal neurons from rat, PAR1 activation by thrombin or PAR1-specific peptide agonists transiently suppressed inhibitory transmission at cannabinoid-sensitive, but not cannabinoid-insensitive, synapses. The PAR1-induced suppression of synaptic transmission was accompanied by an increase in paired-pulse ratio, and was blocked by a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist. The PAR1-induced suppression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of postsynaptic diacylglycerol lipase (DGL), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of the major endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and was absent in knock-out mice lacking the α isoform of DGL. The PAR1-induced IPSC suppression remained intact under the blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors and was largely resistant to the treatment that blocked Ca(2+) elevation in glial cells following PAR1 activation, which excludes the major contribution of glial PAR1 in IPSC suppression. We conclude that activation of neuronal PAR1 triggers retrograde signaling mediated by 2-AG, which activates presynaptic CB(1) receptors and suppresses transmitter release at hippocampal inhibitory synapses.

  9. Retrograde episodic memory and emotion: a perspective from patients with dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Nadine; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2009-09-01

    With his recent definition of episodic memory Tulving [Tulving, E. (2005). Episodic memory and autonoesis: Uniquely human? In H. Terrace & J. Metcalfe (Eds.), The missing link in cognition: Evolution of self-knowing consciousness (pp. 3-56). New York: Oxford University Press] claims that this memory system is uniquely human and thereby distinguishes human beings from other, even highly developed, mammals. First we will define the term episodic memory as it is currently used in neuropsychological research by specifying the three underlying concepts of subjective time, autonoëtic consciousness, and the self. By doing so, we will strongly focus on retrograde episodic memory and its relation to emotion and self-referential processing. We support this relation with a discussion of autobiographical memory functions in psychiatric disorders such as dissociative amnesia. To illustrate the connection of emotion and retrograde episodic memory we shortly present neuropsychological data of two cases of dissociative amnesia. Both cases serve to point to the protective mechanism of a block of self-endangering memories from the episodic memory system, often described as the mnestic block syndrome. On the basis of these cases and supportive results from further cases we will conclude by pointing out similarities and differences of patients with organic and dissociative (psychogenic) amnesia.

  10. Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nailing: 29 patients’ clinical and functional evaluation☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Thiago Barbosa; Júnior, Márcio Oliveira Calábria; de Castro, Régis Vieira; Martins, Jefferson Soares; Costa, Edegmar Nunes; Albieri, Alexandre Daher; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinically and functionally the pos-operative results of patients submitted to tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis for the treatment of traumatic arthropathy and neuropathy. Methods Retrospective study of 29 patients undergoing ankle arthrodesis with intramedullary retrograde nail. All patients were evaluated for fusion time, AOFAS and VAS scores, satisfaction, and complications of surgery. The mean follow-up was 36 months (range 6–60 months). Results The union rate was 82%, and the consolidation occurred on average at 16 weeks (10–24 weeks). The pos-operative AOFAS score improved in 65.5% (average of 57.7 on neurological cases and 75.7 on cases pos-traumatic) and VAS score improved 94.1% (average of 2.3 on neurological cases and 4,2 on post-traumatic cases), and 86% of patients were satisfied with the procedure performed. Complications occurred in 11 patients (38%), including pseudoarthrosis (17.24%), infection (17.24%), material failure (13.8%) and fracture (13.8%). Conclusion Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with retrograde intramedullary nail proved to be a good option for saving the ankle joint, with improvement of clinical and functional scores (AOFAS = 65.5% and VAS = 94.1%). PMID:26229773

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration with Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate Liquid Sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Il Soo; Kwon, So Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Shim, Chan Sup; Lee, Tae Yoon; Kim, Jeong Han

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) liquid sclerotherapy of gastric varices. Materials and Methods Between February 2012 and August 2014, STS liquid sclerotherapy was performed in 17 consecutive patients (male:female = 8:9; mean age 58.6 years, range 44–86 years) with gastric varices. Retrograde venography was performed after occlusion of the gastrorenal shunt using a balloon catheter and embolization of collateral draining veins using coils or gelfoam pledgets, to evaluate the anatomy of the gastric varices. We prepared 2% liquid STS by mixing 3% STS and contrast media in a ratio of 2:1. A 2% STS solution was injected into the gastric varices until minimal filling of the afferent portal vein branch was observed (mean 19.9 mL, range 6–33 mL). Patients were followed up using computed tomography (CT) or endoscopy. Results Technical success was achieved in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%). The procedure failed in one patient because the shunt could not be occluded due to the large diameter of gastrorenal shunt. Complete obliteration of gastric varices was observed in 15 of 16 patients (93.8%) with follow-up CT or endoscopy. There was no rebleeding after the procedure. There was no procedure-related mortality. Conclusion BRTO using STS liquid can be a safe and useful treatment option in patients with gastric varices. PMID:26957907

  12. Glucocorticoids aggravate retrograde memory deficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Li; Yang, Shu-Yuan; Dong, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Ning

    2009-02-11

    Administration of glucocorticoid to patients with head injury has previously been demonstrated to impair memory. We hypothesize that glucocorticoids promote post-traumatic hippocampal apoptosis, resulting in retrograde memory deficiency associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring spatial memory deficiency in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and receiving dexamethasone (DXM at 0.5-10 mg/kg) or methylprednisolone (MP at 5-30 mg/kg); we also examined neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus. Adult male Wistar rats were trained for the acquisition of spatial memory, then subjected to FPI and tested for spatial reference memory on post-injury days 7 and 14 using the Morris Water Maze. Brain tissue from injured rats was examined 24 h to 2 weeks after injury. The percent time in the goal quadrant, which measures spatial reference memory, was significantly lower in injured rats receiving either high-dose DXM or MP than in control groups. TUNEL-positive cells in hippocampus were first detected 24 h post-injury, plateauing at 48h. The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in injured rats treated with either DXM or MP. The data suggest that glucocorticoid therapy for TBI may increase neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus and, as a result, aggravate retrograde memory deficits induced by TBI.

  13. Distant Retrograde Orbits for space-based Near Earth Objects detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramacchia, Michele; Colombo, Camilla; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco

    2016-09-01

    We analyse a concept for the detection of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) from a space-based network of telescopes on retrograde Distant Periodic Orbits. Planar periodic orbits are designed in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem, starting from initial conditions in the Hill's problem available from the literature. A family of retrograde orbits centred at the Earth is selected as baseline, based on their maximum distance from Earth, larger than the Earth-L2 distance. Indeed, spacecraft on such orbits can detect PHAs incoming from the Sun direction, which could not otherwise be monitored from current Earth-based systems. A trade-off on the orbit amplitude, asteroid diameter to be detected, and the constellation size is performed considering current visible sensor telescope technology. The Chelyabinsk meteor scenario is studied and the potential warning time that could be gained with a space-based survey system with respect to an Earth based-survey system is shown.

  14. Slit2 as a β-catenin/Ctnnb1-dependent retrograde signal for presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Shen, Chengyong; Bowman, Andrew; Li, Lei; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Lin, Thiri W; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction formation requires proper interaction between motoneurons and muscle cells. β-Catenin (Ctnnb1) in muscle is critical for motoneuron differentiation; however, little is known about the relevant retrograde signal. In this paper, we dissected which functions of muscle Ctnnb1 are critical by an in vivo transgenic approach. We show that Ctnnb1 mutant without the transactivation domain was unable to rescue presynaptic deficits of Ctnnb1 mutation, indicating the involvement of transcription regulation. On the other hand, the cell-adhesion function of Ctnnb1 is dispensable. We screened for proteins that may serve as a Ctnnb1-directed retrograde factor and identified Slit2. Transgenic expression of Slit2 specifically in the muscle was able to diminish presynaptic deficits by Ctnnb1 mutation in mice. Slit2 immobilized on beads was able to induce synaptophysin puncta in axons of spinal cord explants. Together, these observations suggest that Slit2 serves as a factor utilized by muscle Ctnnb1 to direct presynaptic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07266.001 PMID:26159615

  15. Properties of retrograded and acetylated starch produced via starch extrusion or starch hydrolysis with pullulanase.

    PubMed

    Kapelko, M; Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Styczyńska, M; Wilczak, A

    2013-09-12

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of serial modifications of starch, including firstly starch extrusion or hydrolysis with pullulanase, followed by retrogradation (through freezing and defrosting of pastes) and acetylation (under industrial conditions), on its susceptibility to amylolysis. The method of production had a significant effect on properties of the resultant preparations, whilst the direction and extent of changes depended on the type of modification applied. In the produced starch esters, the degree of substitution, expressed by the per cent of acetylation, ranged from 3.1 to 4.4 g/100 g. The acetylation had a significant impact on contents of elements determined with the atomic emission spectrometry, as it contributed to an increased Na content and decreased contents of Ca and K. The DSC thermal characteristics enabled concluding that the modifications caused an increase in temperatures and a decrease in heat of transition (or its lack). The acetylation of retrograded starch preparations increased their solubility in water and water absorbability. The modifications were found to exert various effects on the rheological properties of pastes determined based on the Brabender's pasting characteristics and flow curves determined with the use of an oscillatory-rotating viscosimeter. All starch acetates produced were characterized by ca. 40% resistance to amylolysis.

  16. Localized regulation of axonal RanGTPase controls retrograde injury signaling in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Dmitry; Hanz, Shlomit; Yoo, Soonmoon; Iavnilovitch, Elena; Willis, Dianna; Gradus, Tal; Vuppalanchi, Deepika; Segal-Ruder, Yael; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Hieda, Miki; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Fainzilber, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peripheral sensory neurons respond to axon injury by activating an importin-dependent retrograde signaling mechanism. How is this mechanism regulated? Here we show that Ran GTPase and its associated effectors RanBP1 and RanGAP regulate the formation of importin signaling complexes in injured axons. A gradient of nuclear RanGTP versus cytoplasmic RanGDP is thought to be fundamental for the organization of eukaryotic cells. Surprisingly, we find RanGTP in sciatic nerve axoplasm, distant from neuronal cell bodies and nuclei, and in association with dynein and importin α. Following injury, localized translation of RanBP1 stimulates RanGTP dissociation from importins and subsequent hydrolysis, thereby allowing binding of newly synthesized importin β to importin α and dynein. Perturbation of RanGTP hydrolysis or RanBP1 blockade at axonal injury sites reduces the neuronal conditioning lesion response. Thus, neurons employ localized mechanisms of Ran regulation to control retrograde injury signaling in peripheral nerve. PMID:18667152

  17. Counterpulsation with symphony prevents retrograde carotid, aortic, and coronary flows observed with intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Bartoli, Carlo R; Spence, Paul A; Dowling, Robert D; Koenig, Steven C

    2012-07-01

    A counterpulsation device (Symphony) is being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for advanced heart failure (HF) patients. In acute animal experiments, flow waveform patterns in the aortic, carotid, and coronary arteries were compared during Symphony and intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support. Human data were examined for similarities. The 30-mL Symphony was compared to a 40-mL IABP in calves with cardiac dysfunction (80-100 kg, n = 8). Aortic pressures and aortic, carotid, and coronary artery flows were simultaneously recorded at baseline (devices off) and during 1:1 and 1:2 support. Forward, retrograde, and mean flows were calculated and compared for each test condition. Findings were also compared to aortic flow measurements recorded in HF patients (n = 21) supported by 40-mL IABP. IABP caused significant retrograde flows in the aorta, coronary (IABP: -24 ± 8 mL/min, Symphony: -6 ± 2 mL/min, baseline: -2 ± 1 mL/min, P < 0.05), and carotid arteries (IABP: -30 ± 5 mL/min, Symphony: -0 ± 0 mL/min, baseline: -0 ± 0 L/min, P < 0.05) during ventricular systole compared to the Symphony. IABP support produced higher diastolic pressure and flow augmentation compared to Symphony. Due to retrograde flows during IABP support, Symphony provided higher overall coronary, carotid, and aortic flows. Similar reduction in total aortic flows due to retrograde flow was observed in HF patients during IABP support. Counterpulsation with an IABP via aortic volume displacement produces retrograde flows during rapid balloon deflation that reduces total flow. Counterpulsation with Symphony via volume removal eliminates retrograde flow and improves total flow more than that achieved with IABP. The Symphony may provide long-term hemodynamic benefits in HF patients.

  18. Acute inhibition of diacylglycerol lipase blocks endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde signalling: evidence for on-demand biosynthesis of 2-arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Tanimura, Asami; Kita, Yoshihiro; Sano, Yoshikazu; Shimizu, Takao; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kano, Masanobu

    2013-10-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) produced by diacylglycerol lipase α (DGLα) is one of the best-characterized retrograde messengers at central synapses. It has been thought that 2-AG is produced 'on demand' upon activation of postsynaptic neurons. However, recent studies propose that 2-AG is pre-synthesized by DGLα and stored in neurons, and that 2-AG is released from such 'pre-formed pools' without the participation of DGLα. To address whether the 2-AG source for retrograde signalling is the on-demand biosynthesis by DGLα or the mobilization from pre-formed pools, we examined the effects of acute pharmacological inhibition of DGL by a novel potent DGL inhibitor, OMDM-188, on retrograde eCB signalling triggered by Ca(2+) elevation, Gq/11 protein-coupled receptor activation or synergy of these two stimuli in postsynaptic neurons. We found that pretreatment for 1 h with OMDM-188 effectively blocked depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), a purely Ca(2+)-dependent form of eCB signalling, in slices from the hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum. We also found that at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum OMDM-188 abolished synaptically induced retrograde eCB signalling, which is known to be caused by the synergy of postsynaptic Ca(2+) elevation and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (I-mGluR) activation. Moreover, brief OMDM-188 treatments for several minutes were sufficient to suppress both DSI and the I-mGluR-induced retrograde eCB signalling in cultured hippocampal neurons. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that 2-AG for synaptic retrograde signalling is supplied as a result of on-demand biosynthesis by DGLα rather than mobilization from presumptive pre-formed pools.

  19. Acute inhibition of diacylglycerol lipase blocks endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde signalling: evidence for on-demand biosynthesis of 2-arachidonoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Tanimura, Asami; Kita, Yoshihiro; Sano, Yoshikazu; Shimizu, Takao; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kano, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) produced by diacylglycerol lipase α (DGLα) is one of the best-characterized retrograde messengers at central synapses. It has been thought that 2-AG is produced ‘on demand’ upon activation of postsynaptic neurons. However, recent studies propose that 2-AG is pre-synthesized by DGLα and stored in neurons, and that 2-AG is released from such ‘pre-formed pools’ without the participation of DGLα. To address whether the 2-AG source for retrograde signalling is the on-demand biosynthesis by DGLα or the mobilization from pre-formed pools, we examined the effects of acute pharmacological inhibition of DGL by a novel potent DGL inhibitor, OMDM-188, on retrograde eCB signalling triggered by Ca2+ elevation, Gq/11 protein-coupled receptor activation or synergy of these two stimuli in postsynaptic neurons. We found that pretreatment for 1 h with OMDM-188 effectively blocked depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), a purely Ca2+-dependent form of eCB signalling, in slices from the hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum. We also found that at parallel fibre–Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum OMDM-188 abolished synaptically induced retrograde eCB signalling, which is known to be caused by the synergy of postsynaptic Ca2+ elevation and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (I-mGluR) activation. Moreover, brief OMDM-188 treatments for several minutes were sufficient to suppress both DSI and the I-mGluR-induced retrograde eCB signalling in cultured hippocampal neurons. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that 2-AG for synaptic retrograde signalling is supplied as a result of on-demand biosynthesis by DGLα rather than mobilization from presumptive pre-formed pools. PMID:23858009

  20. Vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration of portosystemic shunts for refractory hepatic encephalopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonathan K; Cho, Sung-Ki; Kee, Stephen; Lee, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    While balloon-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) has been used for two decades in Asia for the management of gastric variceal bleeding, it is still an emerging therapy elsewhere. Given the shunt closure brought about by the procedure, BRTO has also been used for the management of portosystemic encephalopathy with promising results. Modified versions of BRTO have been developed, including plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO), where a vascular plug is deployed within a portosystemic shunt. To our knowledge, we present the first North American case of PARTO in the setting of a large splenorenal shunt for the management of portosystemic encephalopathy.

  1. Retrograde Stent-assisted Coil Embolization of Wide-neck or Branch-incorporated Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kyu Sun; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Je Il; Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Choong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular coil embolization using a balloon- or stent-assisted technique for the treatment of wide-necked posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysms is well established. However, complete aneurysm occlusion with preservation of the PcomA can be difficult in case of wide-neck aneurysms with a PcomA incorporation. We present two cases of stent-assisted coil embolization using a retrograde approach through the posterior circulation for wide-neck or branch-incorporated PcomA aneurysms. Retrograde stenting was successful without periprocedural complications. These aneurysms were completely occluded. The patency of the PcomA was maintained in all cases. PMID:27790404

  2. Gαq/11-mediated intracellular calcium responses to retrograde flow in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Benoît; Frangos, John A

    2012-08-15

    Disturbed flow patterns, including reversal in flow direction, are key factors in the development of dysfunctional endothelial cells (ECs) and atherosclerotic lesions. An almost immediate response of ECs to fluid shear stress is the increase in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Whether the source of [Ca(2+)](i) is extracellular, released from Ca(2+) intracellular stores, or both is still undefined, though it is likely dependent on the nature of forces involved. We have previously shown that a change in flow direction (retrograde flow) on a flow-adapted endothelial monolayer induces the remodeling of the cell-cell junction along with a dramatic [Ca(2+)](i) burst compared with cells exposed to unidirectional or orthograde flow. The heterotrimeric G protein-α q and 11 subunit (Gα(q/11)) is a likely candidate in effecting shear-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) since its expression is enriched at the junction and has been previously shown to be activated within seconds after onset of flow. In flow-adapted human ECs, we have investigated to what extent the Gα(q/11) pathway mediates calcium dynamics after reversal in flow direction. We observed that the elapsed time to peak [Ca(2+)](i) response to a 10 dyn/cm(2) retrograde shear stress was increased by 11 s in cells silenced with small interfering RNA directed against Gα(q/11). A similar lag in [Ca(2+)](i) transient was observed after cells were treated with the phospholipase C (PLC)-βγ inhibitor, U-73122, or the phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC inhibitor, edelfosine, compared with controls. Lower levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation seconds after the onset of flow correlated with the increased lag in [Ca(2+)](i) responses observed with the different treatments. In addition, inhibition of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor entirely abrogated flow-induced [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our results identify the Gα(q/11)-PLC pathway as the initial trigger for retrograde flow

  3. Antioxidant drugs to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: What does evidence suggest?

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Dávalos-Cobián, Carlos; García-Correa, Jesús; Ambriz-González, Gabriela; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; García-Rentería, Jesús; Rendón-Félix, Jorge; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Cuesta-Márquez, Lizbeth Araceli; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Cortés-Flores, Ana Olivia; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether or not the use of antioxidant supplementation aids in the prevention of post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. METHODS: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was made to evaluate the preventive effect of prophylactic antioxidant supplementation in post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The inclusion criteria included: acute post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis in adults; randomized clinical trials with the use of any antioxidant as an intervention compared with placebo, to reduce PEP. The outcome measure was the incidence and severity of PEP. Twelve RCTs involving 3110 patients since 1999 were included. The antioxidants used were selenite, β-carotene, and pentoxifylline (each one in one trial), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in three trials, and allopurinol in six trials. The group of patients treated with NAC received different doses; either oral or intravenous, and allopurinol-treated patients received five different oral doses in two different administration periods. The results are expressed with raw numbers, proportions, as well as mean and standard deviations. The incidence of pancreatitis between groups was analyzed with Pearson’s χ2 test or Fisher’s exact test (F). The main outcome is expressed as relative risks and 95%CI. RESULTS: The incidence of pancreatitis in all antioxidant treatment groups was 8.6%, whereas it was 9.7% in the control group. The antioxidants used were selenite, β-carotene, and pentoxifylline (each one in one trial), NAC in three trials, and allopurinol in six trials. In allopurinol trials, three different dosifications were used; two trials reported a low dosage (of less than 400 mg), two trials reported a moderate dose (600 mg) and the remaining two employed higher doses (more than 900 mg). Supplementation was not associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of PEP [relative risk (RR) = 0

  4. Deficiency in the Lipid Exporter ABCA1 Impairs Retrograde Sterol Movement and Disrupts Sterol Sensing at the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Rogers, Maximillian A; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Chang, Catherine C Y; Ishigami, Masato; Kishimoto, Takuma; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Furukawa, Koichi; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2015-09-25

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis involves sterol sensing at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and sterol export from the plasma membrane (PM). Sterol sensing at the ER requires efficient sterol delivery from the PM; however, the macromolecules that facilitate retrograde sterol transport at the PM have not been identified. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol and phospholipid export to apolipoprotein A-I for the assembly of high density lipoprotein (HDL). Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease, a familial HDL deficiency. Several lines of clinical and experimental evidence suggest a second function of ABCA1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in addition to mediating cholesterol efflux. Here, we report the unexpected finding that ABCA1 also plays a key role in facilitating retrograde sterol transport from the PM to the ER for sterol sensing. Deficiency in ABCA1 delays sterol esterification at the ER and activates the SREBP-2 cleavage pathway. The intrinsic ATPase activity in ABCA1 is required to facilitate retrograde sterol transport. ABCA1 deficiency causes alternation of PM composition and hampers a clathrin-independent endocytic activity that is required for ER sterol sensing. Our finding identifies ABCA1 as a key macromolecule facilitating bidirectional sterol movement at the PM and shows that ABCA1 controls retrograde sterol transport by modulating a certain clathrin-independent endocytic process.

  5. Hippocampus and Retrograde Amnesia in the Rat Model: A Modest Proposal for the Situation of Systems Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Robert J.; Sparks, Fraser T.; Lehmann, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The properties of retrograde amnesia after damage to the hippocampus have been explicated with some success using a rat model of human medial temporal lobe amnesia. We review the results of this experimental work with rats focusing on several areas of consensus in this growing literature. We evaluate the theoretically significant hypothesis that…

  6. Percutaneous Retrograde Transfemoral Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak in 3 Patients without Construction of an Arteriovenous Wire Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Teoman; Sahin, Tayfun; Ural, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous closure of paravalvular leaks has emerged as an alternative to repeated surgeries. Different percutaneous techniques and various devices have been used, off-label, for paravalvular leak closure. For mitral leaks, antegrade transseptal, retrograde transfemoral, and retrograde transapical techniques have been developed. In the antegrade transseptal approach, an arteriovenous guidewire loop is often created to advance the delivery sheath. In retrograde transfemoral closure, the wire in the left atrium is usually snared after transseptal puncture, to pull it from the femoral vein. The delivery sheath and closure device will subsequently be deployed from the left atrium. Each of these procedures takes time, is costly, and increases the risk of complications. We present the cases of 3 patients in whom we closed mitral paravalvular leaks by means of a retrograde transfemoral approach, with use of an Amplatzer™ Duct Occluder II device and without the construction of an arteriovenous wire loop. We think that this approach can be very useful in a specific group of patients—reducing costs, fluoroscopy times, and complications related to transseptal puncture and construction of an arteriovenous wire loop. In our institution, this reported technique is routinely used for mitral paravalvular leak closure. PMID:24808777

  7. The postsynaptic t-SNARE Syntaxin 4 controls traffic of Neuroligin 1 and Synaptotagmin 4 to regulate retrograde signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kathryn P; Zhang, Yao V; Piccioli, Zachary D; Perrimon, Norbert; Littleton, J Troy

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic cells can induce synaptic plasticity through the release of activity-dependent retrograde signals. We previously described a Ca2+-dependent retrograde signaling pathway mediated by postsynaptic Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4). To identify proteins involved in postsynaptic exocytosis, we conducted a screen for candidates that disrupted trafficking of a pHluorin-tagged Syt4 at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here we characterize one candidate, the postsynaptic t-SNARE Syntaxin 4 (Syx4). Analysis of Syx4 mutants reveals that Syx4 mediates retrograde signaling, modulating the membrane levels of Syt4 and the transsynaptic adhesion protein Neuroligin 1 (Nlg1). Syx4-dependent trafficking regulates synaptic development, including controlling synaptic bouton number and the ability to bud new varicosities in response to acute neuronal stimulation. Genetic interaction experiments demonstrate Syx4, Syt4, and Nlg1 regulate synaptic growth and plasticity through both shared and parallel signaling pathways. Our findings suggest a conserved postsynaptic SNARE machinery controls multiple aspects of retrograde signaling and cargo trafficking within the postsynaptic compartment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13881.001 PMID:27223326

  8. Integrating bio-prosthetic valves in the Fontan operation - Novel treatment to control retrograde flow in caval veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukicevic, Marija; Conover, Timothy; Zhou, Jian; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Figliola, Richard

    2012-11-01

    For a child born with only one functional heart ventricle, the sequence of palliative surgeries typically culminates in the Fontan operation. This procedure is usually successful initially, but leads to later complications, for reasons not fully understood. Examples are respiratory-dependent retrograde flows in the caval and hepatic veins, and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), hypothesized to be responsible for elevated pressure in the liver and disease of the liver and intestines. Here we study the parameters responsible for retrograde flows in the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein (HV), and investigate two novel interventions to control retrograde flow: implanting either a Medtronic Contegra valved conduit or an Edwards lifescience pericardial aortic valve in the IVC or HV. We performed the experiments in a multi-scale, patient specific mock circuit, with normal and elevated PVR, towards the optimization of the Fontan circulation. The results show that both valves can significantly reduce retrograde flows in the veins, suggesting potential advantages in the treatment of the patients with congenital heart diseases. Fondation Leducq

  9. Tension pneumothorax complicating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: case report and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashaal, Yousef I; Hefny, Ashraf F; Safi, Farouk; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2011-01-01

    Perforation of the duodenum, which is usually retroperitoneal, is a known complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Association of the duodenal perforation with pneumothorax is rare and the development of tension pneumothorax is even rarer. We report a case of tension pneumothorax following an ERCP, which we successfully treated with chest tube insertion and laparotomy, and systematically review the other 10 cases reported in the literature. Four of these 10 cases had tension pneumothorax. All were to the right side of the chest. Patients were mainly female (7/10). The median (range) age was 70.5 (55-89) years. Four patients required surgery (40%) and one patient, who was not operated on, died (10%). Clinicians should be aware of this serious complication. Unexplained chest pain, dyspnoea, and oxygen desaturation with abdominal distension during ERCP must raise this possibility. Early clinical recognition and prompt management is essential to improve the outcome.

  10. Antegrade and retrograde decremental conduction properties of an accessory pathway associated with the coronary sinus musculature.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kohki; Naito, Shigeto; Kaseno, Kenichi; Oshima, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old man underwent catheter ablation of an orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. The sinus rhythm electrocardiogram exhibited a normal PQ interval and no delta waves, but atrial pacing produced a prolonged PQ interval and wide QRS morphology with right bundle-branch block due to antegrade accessory pathway (AP) conduction. During the tachycardia, atrial double potentials consisting of the coronary sinus musculature (CSM) and left atrial (LA) potentials were observed. Ventricular extrastimulation exhibited retrograde decremental conduction with an identical atrial activation sequence as during the tachycardia. A radiofrequency application within the posterolateral CS during ventricular pacing eliminated the CSM-LA conduction and concomitantly the ventriculoatrial conduction via the AP was abolished. In this case, the CSM was associated with the bidirectional decremental conduction properties of the AP, and the antegrade slow conduction resulted in the absence of a shortening of the PQ interval and delta waves during sinus rhythm despite the continuous presence of antegrade AP conduction.

  11. Vibration-induced disruption of retrograde axoplasmic transport in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S; Sanger, James R; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Riley, Danny A

    2005-10-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) results from excessive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration. Whether the peripheral nerve damage characteristic of HAVS is a direct result of vibration or is secondary to vascular insufficiency remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of vibration exposure on axoplasmic transport in peripheral nerves and soleus motor neurons. Sciatic nerves and motor neurons from rats following two 5-h periods of vibration exposure demonstrated disruption in retrograde transport compared to normal. After 10 days of vibration (5 h/day), axoplasmic transport failed to recover within 24-48 h in most rats. This study demonstrates that disrupted axoplasmic transport is an early consequence of short-term vibration exposure. The effects of vibration on axoplasmic transport also appear to be cumulative. This study provides a new biological way to evaluate measures to prevent early vibration injury.

  12. Kinetics on the turbidity change of wheat starch during its retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Soma; Ogawa, Takenobu; Nakagawa, Kyuya; Adachi, Shuji

    2016-08-01

    Wheat starch dispersions of 10-40% (w/w) were gelatinized and the change in turbidity of each solution during storage was measured in the 400-1100 nm wavelength range. The relative transmittance, defined as the ratio of transmittance at any storage time to that at the initial time, decreased when the solutions were stored at 5 and 30 °C; the decrease, reflecting the progress of retrogradation, was larger at 5 °C than at 30 °C. Most of the changes in relative transmission taking place over 14 days were achieved during the first 90 min. The change in the relative transmittance is inversely proportional to the energy required for deformation. The kinetics on change in relative transmittance can be expressed by Weibull equation. The larger rate constant at higher starch concentration could be ascribed to the state of the starch granules, which depended on starch concentration.

  13. Tension pneumothorax complicating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: case report and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashaal, Yousef I; Hefny, Ashraf F; Safi, Farouk; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2011-01-01

    Perforation of the duodenum, which is usually retroperitoneal, is a known complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Association of the duodenal perforation with pneumothorax is rare and the development of tension pneumothorax is even rarer. We report a case of tension pneumothorax following an ERCP, which we successfully treated with chest tube insertion and laparotomy, and systematically review the other 10 cases reported in the literature. Four of these 10 cases had tension pneumothorax. All were to the right side of the chest. Patients were mainly female (7/10). The median (range) age was 70.5 (55-89) years. Four patients required surgery (40%) and one patient, who was not operated on, died (10%). Clinicians should be aware of this serious complication. Unexplained chest pain, dyspnoea, and oxygen desaturation with abdominal distension during ERCP must raise this possibility. Early clinical recognition and prompt management is essential to improve the outcome. PMID:21515213

  14. Dual targeting and retrograde translocation: regulators of plant nuclear gene expression can be sequestered by plastids.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kirsten; Oetke, Svenja; Krupinska, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the developmental or metabolic state of plastids can trigger profound changes in the transcript profiles of nuclear genes. Many nuclear transcription factors were shown to be controlled by signals generated in the organelles. In addition to the many different compounds for which an involvement in retrograde signaling is discussed, accumulating evidence suggests a role for proteins in plastid-to-nucleus communication. These proteins might be sequestered in the plastids before they act as transcriptional regulators in the nucleus. Indeed, several proteins exhibiting a dual localization in the plastids and the nucleus are promising candidates for such a direct signal transduction involving regulatory protein storage in the plastids. Among such proteins, the nuclear transcription factor WHIRLY1 stands out as being the only protein for which an export from plastids and translocation to the nucleus has been experimentally demonstrated. Other proteins, however, strongly support the notion that this pathway might be more common than currently believed.

  15. Retrograde Rotablator in Limb Salvage: A New Technique Using an Open Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tamashiro, Alberto; Villegas, Miguel; Tamashiro, Gustavo; Enterrios, Daniel; Dini, Andres; Balestrini, Aristobulo; Diaz, Jose A.

    2006-10-15

    Conventional vascular surgery and balloon angioplasty have poor results in severe and diffuse atherosclerotic disease of the infrapopliteal arteries. High-speed rotational atherectomy (Auth Rotablator) has not succeeded either, because of poor long-term patency and the non-reflow phenomenon. We report a case of limb salvage with long occlusion of the three infrapopliteal vessels. The anterior tibial artery was treated with retrograde Auth Rotablator atherectomy by an open approach through the pedal artery, resulting in full patency of the anterior tibial artery and healing of the skin lesions. The microparticulate debris from the ablation was drained out through the pedal arteriotomy, avoiding the complications associated with conventional antegrade high-speed rotational atherectomy.

  16. Retrograde percutaneous repair of aortic coarctation utilizing trans-septal puncture in patients with complex anatomy.

    PubMed

    Misenheimer, Jacob A; Poommipanit, Paul; Amin, Zahid

    2016-02-15

    Coarctation of the aorta (COA) is one of the more common congenital anomalies, occurring in four in ten thousand live births and accounting for five to eight percent of all congenital heart defects. COA lesions can be challenging to treat percutaneously, especially if complex vascular anatomy is a barrier to crossing the lesion. We present two cases of COA that utilized a trans-septal approach to cross the lesion in anterograde fashion, subsequently facilitating retrograde stenting of the lesions after snaring and externalizing the wire. In both cases, the trans-septal approach was employed because traditional femoral and radial approaches failed due to complex anatomy, and the trans-septal approach allowed for effective intervention without the need for surgery.

  17. Isosorbide, a green plasticizer for thermoplastic starch that does not retrogradate.

    PubMed

    Battegazzore, Daniele; Bocchini, Sergio; Nicola, Gabriele; Martini, Eligio; Frache, Alberto

    2015-03-30

    Isosorbide is a non-toxic biodegradable diol derived from bio-based feedstock. It can be used for preparing thermoplastic starch through a semi-industrial process of extrusion. Isosorbide allows some technological advantages with respect to classical plasticizers: namely, direct mixing with starch, energy savings for the low processing temperature required and lower water uptake. Indeed, maize starch was directly mixed with the solid plasticizer and direct fed in the main hopper of a co-rotating twin screw extruder. Starch plasticization was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMTA). Oxygen permeability, water uptake and mechanical properties were measured at different relative humidity (R.H.) values. These three properties turned out to be highly depending on the R.H. No retrogradation and changing of the material properties were occurred from XRD and DMTA after 9 months. PMID:25563947

  18. Fatal air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): An 'impossible' diagnosis for the forensic pathologist.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Matteo; Battistini, Alessio; Pellegrinelli, Moira; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Fatal air embolism related to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a very rare phenomenon. The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old female patient who developed this mortal complication; a computed tomography (CT) examination was performed in articulo mortis by the physicians. Autopsy was unreliable because of bizarre post-mortem changes (reabsorption of intra-cardiac gas vs. conservation of intra-cranial gas) and a lack of strong diagnostic value of histological findings. The right diagnosis was possible thanks only to the CT examination that permitted the assumption of this possible cause of death before the autopsy and to prepare the necessary procedures to recognise and probe air embolism. This case exemplifies how early post-mortem imaging can be crucial to avoid a wrong diagnosis.

  19. Axonal autophagosomes use the ride-on service for retrograde transport toward the soma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiu-Tang; Zhou, Bing; Lin, Mei-Yao; Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) via lysosomes is an important homeostatic process in cells. Neurons are highly polarized cells with long axons, thus facing special challenges to transport AVs generated at distal processes toward the soma where mature acidic lysosomes are relatively enriched. We recently revealed a new motor-adaptor sharing mechanism driving autophagosome transport to the soma. Late endosome (LE)-loaded dynein-SNAPIN motor-adaptor complexes mediate the retrograde transport of autophagosomes upon their fusion with LEs in distal axons. This motor-adaptor sharing mechanism enables neurons to maintain effective autophagic clearance in the soma, thus reducing autophagic stress in axons. Therefore, our study reveals a new cellular mechanism underlying the removal of distal AVs engulfing aggregated misfolded proteins and dysfunctional organelles associated with several major neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10/sup 4/ dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-..mu..sec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10/sup 6/ rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10/sup 6/ rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  1. Forces from the rear: deformed microtubules in neuronal growth cones influence retrograde flow and advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Philipp; Heine, Paul; Goettgens, Barbara; Käs, Josef A.

    2013-01-01

    The directed motility of growth cones at the tip of neuronal processes is a key function in neuronal path-finding and relies on a complex system of interacting cytoskeletal components. Despite intensive research in this field, many aspects of the mechanical roles of actin structures and, in particular, of microtubules throughout this process remain unclear. Mostly, force generation is ascribed to actin-myosin-based structures such as filopodia bundles and the dynamic polymer gel within the lamellipodium. Our analysis of microtubule buckling and deformation in motile growth cones reveals that extending microtubule filaments contribute significantly to the overall protrusion force. In this study, we establish a relationship of the local variations in stored bending energy and deformation characteristics to growth cone morphology and retrograde actin flow. This implies the relevance of microtubule pushing and deformation for general neurite advancement as well as steering processes.

  2. Effect of gelatinized-retrograded and extruded starches on characteristics of cookies, muffins and noodles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shagun; Singh, Narpinder; Katyal, Mehak

    2016-05-01

    The effect of substitution of wheat flour with gelatinized-retrograded starch (GRS) and extruded starch (ES) at 10 and 20 % levels on characteristics of cookies, muffins and noodles was evaluated. Cookies made by substitution of flour with GRS or ES were lighter in color, showed higher spread ratio and resistant starch (RS) content. Muffins made by substitution of flour with GRS or ES were lighter in color, showed less height, specific volume and gas cells and higher RS content. Muffins containing GRS were less firm while those made by incorporating ES showed higher firmness than those made without substitution. Noodles made with substitution of flour with GRS or ES showed higher RS content and reduced water uptake, gruel solid loss, hardness and adhesiveness. Cookies and noodles prepared with and without substitution of flour with GRS or ES did not show any significant differences in terms of overall acceptability scores.

  3. Retrograde delivery of stem cells: promising delivery strategy for myocardial regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaihong; Mo, Xuming; Lu, Shihong; Han, Zhongchao

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The current strategies for treatment are limited, and new therapeutic approaches are needed. Experimental studies and clinical trials suggest that stem cell transplantation may improve cardiac function and prevent cardiac remodeling of the injured heart. Although the results of the studies were exciting, many problems remain to be resolved such as the best method of delivering the targeted cells. Direct injection into the myocardium and intracoronary artery infusion are the two most used methods of delivery in clinical settings. However, in a portion of patients with occluded coronary arteries and poor collaterals, transplanted cells may not reach the target ischemic lesion. To resolve this problem, we hypothesize that retrograde coronary venous delivery of stem cells may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the patients with occluded coronary arteries and poor collaterals.

  4. Thalamic contributions to anterograde, retrograde, and implicit memory: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hampstead, Benjamin M; Koffler, Sandra P

    2009-09-01

    Learning and memory deficits are typically associated with damage or dysfunction of medial temporal lobe structures; however, diencephalic lesions are another common cause of severe and persistent memory deficits. We focus specifically on the thalamus and review the pathological and neuropsychological characteristics of two common causes of such damage: Korsakoff's syndrome and stroke. We then present a patient who had sustained bilateral medial thalamic infarctions that affected the medial dorsal nucleus and internal medullary lamina. This patient demonstrated the characteristic temporally graded retrograde amnesia and a profound anterograde memory (i.e., explicit memory) deficit within the context of relatively preserved implicit memory. Implications of this explicit-implicit discrepancy are discussed within the context of cognitive rehabilitation techniques that hold promise for more severely impaired patients. PMID:19548181

  5. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients’ haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  6. Biliary and pancreatic stenting: Devices and insertion techniques in therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Arena, Monica; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Consolo, Pierluigi; Opocher, Enrico; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Stents are tubular devices made of plastic or metal. Endoscopic stenting is the most common treatment for obstruction of the common bile duct or of the main pancreatic duct, but also employed for the treatment of bilio-pancreatic leakages, for preventing post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis and to drain the gallbladder and pancreatic fluid collections. Recent progresses in techniques of stent insertion and metal stent design are represented by new, fully-covered lumen apposing metal stents. These stents are specifically designed for transmural drainage, with a saddle-shape design and bilateral flanges, to provide lumen-to-lumen anchoring, reducing the risk of migration and leakage. This review is an update of the technique of stent insertion and metal stent deployment, of the most recent data available on stent types and characteristics and the new applications for biliopancreatic stents. PMID:26862364

  7. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  8. WASP-8b: a retrograde transiting planet in a multiple system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Gillon, M.; Hebb, L.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R.

    2010-07-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-8b, a transiting planet of 2.25 ± 0.08 MJup on a strongly inclined eccentric 8.15-day orbit, moving in a retrograde direction to the rotation of its late-G host star. Evidence is found that the star is in a multiple stellar system with two other companions. The dynamical complexity of the system indicates that it may have experienced secular interactions such as the Kozai mechanism or a formation that differs from the “classical” disc-migration theory. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m ESO telescope and the EULER Swiss telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/517/L1

  9. Sudden Death After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Zelić, Marko; Stimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There are only a few cases found in literature regarding air embolism in endoscopic procedures, especially in connection to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We are presenting a case of a 56-year-old female patient who suffered from non-Hodgkin lymphoma located in her right groin. She was also diagnosed with choledocholithiasis and underwent ERCP to remove the gallstones. Immediately after the procedure she went into sudden cardiac arrest and subsequently died, despite all of our efforts. We reviewed literature in order to identify possible causes of death because fatal outcome following an uneventful and successful procedure was not expected. It is important to bear in mind all possible complications of ERCP. Our focus during the literature search was on air embolism. PMID:25501087

  10. A hypothalamic projection to the turtle red nucleus: an anterograde and retrograde tracing study.

    PubMed

    Herrick, J L; Keifer, J

    1997-10-01

    It is well known that the reptilian red nucleus lacks a descending motor cortical input to the red nucleus, but has a well-developed cerebellar input. The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is a descending rubral input that originates from the hypothalamus. Using an in vitro preparation from the turtle, injections of neurobiotin into the red nucleus resulted in retrograde labeling of neurons in the suprapeduncular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Injections of either neurobiotin or fluorescein dextran into the suprapeduncular nucleus resulted in anterograde labeling of axons and terminal boutons in the red nucleus. The majority of these terminations appeared to lie in the medial part of the red nucleus. These data have implications for the potential control of the somatic motor system of reptiles by limbic system inputs.

  11. Effects of charge-carrying amino acids on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of potato starch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenting; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Cui, Min

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of charge-carrying amino acids (lysine (Lys), arginine (Arg), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu)) on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of potato starch. Acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu) showed a decreasing trend in swelling power and granule size of potato starch, but increased amylose leaching and gelatinization temperature. Alkaline amino acid (Arg) showed an increasing trend in swelling power and granule size of potato starch, but decreasing amylose leaching and gelatinization temperature. Lys had no effect on the swelling power of potato starch, except at a high content (0.2 mol/kg). Like other two acidic amino acids, Lys also increased gelatinization temperature. Moreover, the addition of alkaline amino acids (Arg) decreased syneresis value of potato starch but acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu) increased it. Compared to Arg, the syneresis of potato starch with Lys was similar to that of its native starch.

  12. Origins of spinal cholinergic pathways in amphibians demonstrated by retrograde transport and choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Morona, Ruth; Moreno, Nerea; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-09-25

    The existence of propriospinal cholinergic pathways and the origin of supraspinal cholinergic descending projections have been investigated in anuran and urodele amphibians. Retrograde tract tracing techniques with dextran amines injected in the spinal cord at different levels were combined with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The analysis of the brachial, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord demonstrated that doubly labeled cells were present only close to the injection site. Thus, the participation of the spinal cholinergic cells in distant intersegmental connections is not present, or is very limited, in amphibians. In anurans, tracer applications to the brachial cord revealed cholinergic cells of origin of spinal projections located in four distinct brain nuclei. The most rostrally located cells were found bilaterally in the preoptic area, among the magnocellular cells. In the ipsilateral isthmic region, the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus also showed doubly labeled cells. Throughout the brainstem, abundant codistribution was observed but actual coexistence of the tracer and ChAT was only found in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the inferior reticular nucleus. In the case of the urodele, abundant codistribution between retrogradely labeled cells and ChAT-positive neurons in zones like the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the isthmic region and the rhombencephalic reticular formation was observed, but the only doubly labeled cells were the Mauthner neurons. The present results in amphibians contrast with previous data in mammals in which is striking the presence of a widespread intrinsic cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord and the virtual absence of cholinergic projections descending from the brainstem.

  13. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D

    2015-03-24

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1-positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42-associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling.

  14. Influence of age on the late retrograde effects of sciatic nerve section in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kerezoudi, E; King, R H; Muddle, J R; O'Neill, J A; Thomas, P K

    1995-01-01

    The influence of age on the late retrograde effects of unilateral sciatic nerve section was investigated in rats. Operations were performed on young rats aged 3 months and older rats aged 15 and 18 months, with survival times ranging from 6 to 15 months depending upon age at the time of operation. As in previous studies, axonal atrophy was found in myelinated fibres proximal to nerve transection. This was observed to be greater in animals operated upon at 3 months of age than in those in which the sciatic nerve was transected at 15 and 18 months. In the sciatic nerve, focal intramyelinic oedema was present at a low frequency on the operated side just proximal to the section at all survival times but not on the unoperated side except in 1 old animal. Its frequency increased with age both in the dorsal and ventral roots on both sides but it was not more common on the operated side. Retrograde axonal atrophy is therefore unlikely to contribute to its occurrence. In the dorsal root ganglia the main abnormality was the presence of vacuolated neurons on the operated side. Nuclear eccentricity was also observed on the operated side in young animals in a proportion of the neurons; its frequency increased with age on the normal side and there was no difference in the older animals between operated and control sides. The possibility is discussed that growth factor deprivation secondary to axotomy is implicated in these changes. If so, there are age differences in its effect in giving rise to axonal atrophy and neuronal vacuolation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7591983

  15. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  16. Exoplanets in binary star systems: on the switch from prograde to retrograde orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. P. S.; Mourão, D. C.; de Moraes, R. Vilhena; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-01-01

    The eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism, based on the secular theory, has been proposed as a mechanism that plays an important role in producing orbits that switch from prograde to retrograde. In the present work we study the secular dynamics of a triple system composed of a Sun-like central star and a Jupiter-like planet, which are under the gravitational influence of another perturbing star (brown dwarf). The perturbation potential is developed in closed form up to the fifth order in a small parameter (α =a1/a2), where a1 is the semimajor axis of the extrasolar planet and a2 is the semimajor axis of the perturbing star. To eliminate the short-period terms of the perturbation potential, the double-average method is applied. In this work we do not eliminate the nodes, a standard method in the literature, before deriving the equations of motion. The main goal is to study the effects of the higher-order terms of the expansion of the perturbing force due to the third body in the orbital evolution of the planet. In particular, we investigate the inclination and the shape (eccentricity) of these orbits. We show the importance of the higher-order terms in changing the inversion times of the flip, i.e., the times where the inclination of the inner planet flips from prograde to retrograde trajectories. We also show the dependence of the first flip with respect to the semimajor axis and eccentricity of the orbit of the planet. The general conclusion is that the analytical model increases its accuracy with the inclusion of higher-order terms. We also performed full numerical integrations using the Bulirsch-Stoer method available in the Mercury package for comparison with the analytical model. The results obtained with the equations developed in this work are in accordance with direct numerical simulations.

  17. The Retrograde Transvenous Push-Through Method: A Novel Treatment of Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations with Dominant Venous Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, Walter A. Müller-Wille, René Teusch, Veronika I.; Dudeck, Oliver; Cahill, Anne M.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Uller, Wibke

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel retrograde transvenous embolization technique of peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsWe conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent transvenous retrograde Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow over a 29-month period. The embolization is aimed at retrograde filling of the nidus after building a solid plug in the dominant venous outflow (push-through). Classification, clinical signs, technical aspects, clinical and technical success rates, and complications were recorded. Short-term outcome was assessed.Results11 Symptomatic patients (8 female; mean age 31.4 years) were treated at our Vascular Anomalies Center with this method between January 2012 and May 2014. The AVMs were located on the upper extremity (n = 3), pelvis (n = 2), buttock (n = 2), and lower extremity (n = 4). Retrograde embolization was successfully carried out after preparatory transarterial-flow reduction in eight cases (73 %) and venous-flow reduction with Amplatzer Vascular Plugs in four cases (36 %). Complete devascularization (n = 10; 91 %) or 95 % devascularization (n = 1; 9 %) led to complete resolution (n = 8; 73 %) or improvement of clinical symptoms (n = 3; 27 %). One minor complication occurred (pain and swelling). During a mean follow-up time of 8 months, one clinically asymptomatic recurrence of AVM was detected.ConclusionInitial results suggest that retrograde transvenous Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow is a safe and effective novel technique with a low complication rate.

  18. Impact of local hydrothermal treatment during bread baking on soluble amylose, firmness, amylopectin retrogradation and water mobility during bread staling.

    PubMed

    Besbes, Emna; Le Bail, Alain; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hydrothermal processing undergone by bread dough during baking on the degree of starch granule disruption, on leaching of soluble amylose, on water mobility, on firmness and on amylopectin retrogradation during staling has been investigated. Two heating rates during baking have been considered (4.67 and 6.31 °C/min) corresponding respectively to baking temperature of 220 and 240 °C. An increase in firmness and in the amount of retrogradated amylopectin accompanied by a decrease in freezable water has been observed during staling. Although a lower heating rate yielded in larger amount of retrogradated amylopectin retrogradation, it resulted in a lower firmness. Additionally, the amount of soluble amylose and the relaxation times of water measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR (T20, T21 and T22) decreased during staling. It was demonstrated that the amount of soluble amylose was higher for bread crumb baked at lower heating rate, indicating that an increasing amount of amylose is leached outside the starch granules. This was corresponding to a greater amount of retrograded amylopectin during staling. Moreover, it was found that the degree of gelatinization differs locally in a same bread slice between the top, the centre and the bottom locations in the crumb. This was attributed to the differences in kinetics of heating, the availability of water during baking and the degree of starch granule disruption during baking. Based on first order kinetic model, it was found that staling kinetics were faster for samples baked at higher heating rate.

  19. Impact of local hydrothermal treatment during bread baking on soluble amylose, firmness, amylopectin retrogradation and water mobility during bread staling.

    PubMed

    Besbes, Emna; Le Bail, Alain; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hydrothermal processing undergone by bread dough during baking on the degree of starch granule disruption, on leaching of soluble amylose, on water mobility, on firmness and on amylopectin retrogradation during staling has been investigated. Two heating rates during baking have been considered (4.67 and 6.31 °C/min) corresponding respectively to baking temperature of 220 and 240 °C. An increase in firmness and in the amount of retrogradated amylopectin accompanied by a decrease in freezable water has been observed during staling. Although a lower heating rate yielded in larger amount of retrogradated amylopectin retrogradation, it resulted in a lower firmness. Additionally, the amount of soluble amylose and the relaxation times of water measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR (T20, T21 and T22) decreased during staling. It was demonstrated that the amount of soluble amylose was higher for bread crumb baked at lower heating rate, indicating that an increasing amount of amylose is leached outside the starch granules. This was corresponding to a greater amount of retrograded amylopectin during staling. Moreover, it was found that the degree of gelatinization differs locally in a same bread slice between the top, the centre and the bottom locations in the crumb. This was attributed to the differences in kinetics of heating, the availability of water during baking and the degree of starch granule disruption during baking. Based on first order kinetic model, it was found that staling kinetics were faster for samples baked at higher heating rate. PMID:26787950

  20. Retrograde pedal access with a 20-gauge intravenous cannula after failed antegrade recanalization of a tibialis anterior artery in a diabetic patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Colkesen, Yucel

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde tibiopedal approach is being used frequently in below-the-knee vascular interventions. In patients with diabetic foot pathology, complex anatomy often requires a retrograde technique when the distal vascular anatomy and puncture site is suitable. The dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries can be punctured because of their relatively superficial position. We report a retrograde puncturing technique in patients with chronic total occlusions. After failed antegrade recanalization, puncturing and cannulation of a tiny dorsalis pedis artery with a narrow bore [20-gauge (0.8 mm)] intravenous cannula is described. PMID:26257023

  1. Guidance of Axons by Local Coupling of Retrograde Flow to Point Contact Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Robert H.; Hagen, Kate M.; Lumbard, Derek C.; Dent, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Growth cones interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrin receptors at adhesion sites termed point contacts. Point contact adhesions link ECM proteins to the actin cytoskeleton through numerous adaptor and signaling proteins. One presumed function of growth cone point contacts is to restrain or “clutch” myosin-II-based filamentous actin (F-actin) retrograde flow (RF) to promote leading edge membrane protrusion. In motile non-neuronal cells, myosin-II binds and exerts force upon actin filaments at the leading edge, where clutching forces occur. However, in growth cones, it is unclear whether similar F-actin-clutching forces affect axon outgrowth and guidance. Here, we show in Xenopus spinal neurons that RF is reduced in rapidly migrating growth cones on laminin (LN) compared with non-integrin-binding poly-d-lysine (PDL). Moreover, acute stimulation with LN accelerates axon outgrowth over a time course that correlates with point contact formation and reduced RF. These results suggest that RF is restricted by the assembly of point contacts, which we show occurs locally by two-channel imaging of RF and paxillin. Further, using micropatterns of PDL and LN, we demonstrate that individual growth cones have differential RF rates while interacting with two distinct substrata. Opposing effects on RF rates were also observed in growth cones treated with chemoattractive and chemorepulsive axon guidance cues that influence point contact adhesions. Finally, we show that RF is significantly attenuated in vivo, suggesting that it is restrained by molecular clutching forces within the spinal cord. Together, our results suggest that local clutching of RF can control axon guidance on ECM proteins downstream of axon guidance cues. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we correlate point contact adhesions directly with clutching of filamentous actin retrograde flow (RF), which our findings strongly suggest guides developing axons. Acute assembly of new point contact

  2. The time course of retrograde trans-synaptic degeneration following occipital lobe damage in humans.

    PubMed

    Jindahra, Panitha; Petrie, Aviva; Plant, Gordon T

    2012-02-01

    Following damage to the human post-geniculate visual pathway retrograde trans-synaptic degeneration of the optic nerve fibres occurs. It has been known for some time from investigations carried out in primates that a decline in the number of retinal ganglion cells follows occipital lobectomy. However, this is not detectable in all species studied and whether this occurs in humans was controversial until recent studies that have shown that following lesions of the occipital lobe, the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measured by optical coherence tomography is reduced and corresponding shrinkage of the optic tract can be demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging. The time course of the degeneration in humans is, however, unknown. In the present study, we have used optical coherence tomography to demonstrate for the first time progressive thinning of the retinal nerve fibre layer following occipital lobe/optic radiation damage due to stroke. First, in a group of 38 patients the measurement was taken on a single occasion at a known time interval since the stroke, ranging from 6 days to 67 years. Here, a negative straight line relationship (linear regression r = 0.54, P < 0.001) was found between nerve fibre layer thickness and elapsed time since injury in log years, giving a rate of decline of 9.08 µm per log year after adjusting for age. This indicates a decelerating rate of loss that differs from the rate of decline found with chronological age in this same group, which shows a steady rate of thinning by 0.4 µm per year (P = 0.006) after adjusting for duration of the disease. In a second study serial measurements were taken following the acute event in a group of seven patients with homonymous hemianopia; here a negative straight line relationship was found between time and nerve fibre layer thickness in micrometres over a period of data collection beginning at a mean of 36.9 days post-stroke (range 5-112) and ending at a mean of 426.6 days post

  3. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A; Bhatty, Tanweer A

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before.

  4. Analytical solutions of actin-retrograde-flow in a circular stationary cell: a mechanical point of view.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, V A; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2014-03-01

    The network of actin filaments in the lamellipodium (LP) of stationary and migrating cells flows in a retrograde direction, from the membrane periphery toward the cell nucleus. We have theoretically studied this phenomenon in the circular stationary (fully spread) cells. Adopting a continuum view on the LP actin network, new closed-form solutions are provided for the actin-retrograde-flow (ARF) in a polar coordinate system. Due to discrepancy in the mechanical models of the actin network in the ARF regime, solutions are provided for both assumptions of solid and fluid behavior. Other involved phenomena, including polymerizing machine at the membrane periphery, cytosol drag, adhesion friction, and membrane tension, are also discussed to provide an overall quantitative view on this problem.

  5. Tyrosine 3-hydroxylase in rat brain and adrenal medulla: hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde tracing.

    PubMed Central

    Schalling, M; Hökfelt, T; Wallace, B; Goldstein, M; Filer, D; Yamin, C; Schlesinger, D H

    1986-01-01

    Rat brain and adrenal gland were analyzed by hybridization histochemistry using an RNA probe complementary to mRNA for tyrosine 3-hydroxylase (TyrOHase; tyrosine 3-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.16.2), by immunohistochemistry using TyrOHase antiserum, and by retrograde tracing using the fluorescent compound Fast blue. Cell bodies in the ventral mesencephalon contained mRNA for TyrOHase, and these cells were also TyrOHase immunoreactive. After injection of Fast blue into the striatum, such double-labeled cells in addition contained the retrograde tracer, showing that these cells send axonal projections to the injection site. These results show that hybridization histochemistry can be used to identify transmitter-specific neuron populations and that their projections can be established. Images PMID:2874560

  6. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A; Bhatty, Tanweer A

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before. PMID:27141199

  7. Management of a large periapical lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde restoration with eighteen months evident follow up

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ajinkya M; Kokate, Sharad R; Shah, Reema A

    2013-01-01

    Injury to anterior teeth is a common event. It requires a treatment approach that assures the complete biologic healing and functional restoration of the tooth or teeth involved. A cystic lesion, which is unable to heal nonsurgically, heals well with surgical intervention and use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as retrograde filling has been reported in literature. Another material with largely improved handling properties; Biodentine™ (Septodont, St. Maurdes Fossés, France) was introduced in 2011. It is a calcium silicate based material and manufacturers claim that it can be used for crown and root dentin repair treatment, repair of perforations or resorptions, apexification, and root end fillings. This article presents a case report of surgical management of a large cystic lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde filling material which has not been reported in literature so far. Eighteen months radiographic follow-up exhibited completely healed cystic lesion. PMID:24347897

  8. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A.; Bhatty, Tanweer A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before. PMID:27141199

  9. Percutaneous Retrograde Recanalization of the Celiac Artery by Way of the Superior Mesenteric Artery for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, George Chacko, Sujith Thomas

    2013-02-15

    A 52-year-old man presented with recurrent postprandial abdominal pain, sitophobia, and progressive weight loss. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) due to subtotal occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and flush occlusion of the celiac artery (CA) was diagnosed. Retrograde recanalization of the CA by way of a collateral channel from the SMA was performed using contemporary recanalization equipment. The CA and SMA were then stented, resulting in sustained resolution of CMI-related symptoms.

  10. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signaling in the prors1-1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Tadini, Luca; Romani, Isidora; Pribil, Mathias; Jahns, Peter; Leister, Dario; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE) and the thylakoid redox state (TRS) activate retrograde signaling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE), according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1) which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signaling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signaling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific), which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins. PMID:23293642

  11. Combined 3DISCO clearing method, retrograde tracer and ultramicroscopy to map corneal neurons in a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Launay, Pierre-Serge; Godefroy, David; Khabou, Hanen; Rostene, William; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2015-10-01

    Tissue clearing and subsequent imaging of intact transparent tissues have provided an innovative way to analyze anatomical pathways in the nervous system. In this study, we combined a recent 3-dimensional imaging of solvent cleared organ (3DISCO) procedure, light-sheet microscopy, fluorescent retrograde tracer, and Imaris software to 3D map corneal sensory neurons within a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG). We first established the optimized steps to easily and rapidly clear a fixed TG. We found that the 3DISCO procedure gave excellent results and took less than 3 h to clear the TG. In a second set of experiments, a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin B Alexa 594-conjugated) was applied to de-epithelialized cornea to retrograde-labeled corneal sensory neurons. Two days later, TGs were cleared by the 3DISCO method and serial imaging was performed using light-sheet ultramicroscopic technology. High-resolution images of labeled neurons can be easily and rapidly obtained from a 3D reconstructed whole mouse TG. We then provided a 3D reconstruction of corneal afferent neurons and analyzed their precise localization in the TG. Thus, we showed that neurons supplying corneal sensory innervation exhibit a highly specific limited dorsomedial localization within the TG. We report that our combined method offers the possibility to perform manual (on 20 μm sections) and automated (on 3D reconstructed TG) counting of labeled cells in a cleared mouse TG. To conclude, we illustrate that the combination of the 3DISCO clearing method with light-sheet microscopy, retrograde tracer, and automatic counting represents a rapid and reliable method to analyze a subpopulation of neurons within the peripheral and central nervous system.

  12. Accessory Pancreatic Duct-Portal Vein Fistula: A Rare Complication of Chronic Pancreatitis during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Lin, Jung-Chun; Kawashima, Yohei; Maruno, Atsuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis, hemorrhage and perforation are the most frequent complications associated with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We report a rare case of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula, which occurred during ERCP in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula created during ERCP by the use of a guide wire. PMID:25473386

  13. Anterograde or Retrograde Transsynaptic Circuit Tracing in Vertebrates with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Beier, Kevin T; Mundell, Nathan A; Pan, Y Albert; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have been used as transsynaptic tracers, allowing one to map the inputs and outputs of neuronal populations, due to their ability to replicate in neurons and transmit in vivo only across synaptically connected cells. To date, their use has been largely restricted to mammals. In order to explore the use of such viruses in an expanded host range, we tested the transsynaptic tracing ability of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vectors in a variety of organisms. Successful infection and gene expression were achieved in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Moreover, rVSV enabled transsynaptic tracing of neural circuitry in predictable directions dictated by the viral envelope glycoprotein (G), derived from either VSV or rabies virus (RABV). Anterograde and retrograde labeling, from initial infection and/or viral replication and transmission, was observed in Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, jellyfish, zebrafish, chickens, and mice. These vectors are widely applicable for gene delivery, afferent tract tracing, and/or directional connectivity mapping. Here, we detail the use of these vectors and provide protocols for propagating virus, changing the surface glycoprotein, and infecting multiple organisms using several injection strategies. PMID:26729030

  14. Extraoral Retrograde Root Canal Filling of an Orthodontic-induced External Root Resorption Using CEM Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kheirieh, Sanam; Fazlyab, Mahta; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Eghbal, Mohamad Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory external root resorption (IERR) after orthodontic treatments is an unusual complication. This case report describes a non-vital maxillary premolar with symptomatic extensive IERR (with a crown/root ratio of 1:1) after receiving orthodontic treatment. The first appointment included drainage, chemo-mechanical preparation of the canal and intra-canal medication with calcium hydroxide (CH) along with prescription of analgesic/antibiotic. The subsequent one-week follow-up revealed the persistence of symptoms and formation of a sinus tract. Finally, extraoral endodontic treatment was planned; the tooth was atraumatically extracted and retrograde root canal filling with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed followed by tooth replantation. Clinical signs/symptoms subsided during 7 days postoperatively. The sinus tract also resolved after one week. Six-month and one-year follow-ups revealed complete healing and a fully functional asymptomatic tooth. This case study showed favorable outcomes in a refractory periapical lesion associated with orthodontically induced extensive IERR. The chemical as well as biological properties of CEM cement may be a suitable endodontic biomaterial for these cases. PMID:24688586

  15. [Clinical application of retrograde island flap from back of the hand].

    PubMed

    Lu, L J

    1991-10-01

    With the blood vessels filled with dye, 12 fresh specimens of adult human hand were dissected. At web spaces, anastomoses between artereiae palmariae dorsales and arteriae digitalis palmares communes or their branches were always present. The anastomotic branch was 0.4-0.8 mm thick and 11-14 mm long, and was accompanied by 2 veins, lying superficially in the subcutaneous space. With the anastomotic branch as an axis and the arteriae palmares dorsales as pedicle, a retrograde island flap back of the hand was designed and employed to cover skin defect of finger in 11 patients. One of the flaps was transposed together with an extensor tendon. The defect was covered by suturing together the skin edges on both sides and healed nicely. The 11 transpositioned flaps varying from 3.5 x 2.2 cm2 in size were taken successfully. Follow-up examination for 2-10 months after operation revealed fine texture of and good sensation over the flaps, and good function of the transplanted extensor tendon. We conclude that this kind of flap is physiologically sound and easy to be made for the repair of palmar defect and in finger defect.

  16. Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a patient with situs inversus viscerum

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Zeng, Hao; Pan, Xiao-Lin; Lv, Nong-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Situs inversus viscerum (SIV) is a rare congenital condition characterized by complete transposition of all viscera. This anatomical pathology makes endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) technically difficult. We report a new case of a 70-year-old Chinese male with total SIV who had obstructive jaundice. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography demonstrated a number of stones in the gallbladder and common bile duct (CBD). Therapeutic ERCP was performed to relieve biliary obstruction and remove the CBD stones. This procedure started with the patient in a supine position and the endoscopist at the left side of the table. When the papilla was maintained, the patient was repositioned to a prone position and standard endoscopic sphincterotomy and endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation procedures were conducted. ERCP was performed successfully and relevant complications did not occur in this patient. We also present a review of the literature published between 1985 and 2014 in the PubMed and EMBASE databases. There were eight published cases during this period, with one each from America, Finland, India, Italy, South Korea and Pakistan, and two from Spain. Our case is the first reported in China. PMID:25987802

  17. Habenular and other midbrain raphe afferents demonstrated by a modified retrograde tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Aghajanian, G K; Wang, R Y

    1977-02-18

    Afferents to th midbrain dorsal and median raphe nuclei in the rat were studied by means of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) retrograde transport method. The HRP was given by means of a modified iontophoretic delivery technique. This technique permitted an efficient and localized deposition of a high concentration of HRP into the raphe nuclei. Afferents to the raphe as determined by this method could be categorized into 2 classes; those exclusively to the raphe and those also positive for adjacent reticular formation. The most striking afferent area to the raphe, both in terms of selectivity and density, was the lateral habenula. This result is in accord with previous studies using degeneration methods which indicate an habenular projection to the raphe area. There were afferents exclusively positive for the dorsal raphe nucleus emanating from the nucleus of the solitary tract. Most other raphe afferent areas were also positive for the reticular formation (e.g;, prefrontal cortex, medial forebrain bundle, preoptic nuclei, and reticular formation). The existence of a major afferent system from the lateral habenula to the midbrain raphe is consistent with the concept of a "dorsal pathway" which might be responsible for relaying information from forebrain limbic structures to the "midbrain limbic areas".

  18. Microtubule plus end–associated CLIP-170 initiates HSV-1 retrograde transport in primary human cells

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic microtubules (MTs) continuously explore the intracellular environment and, through specialized plus end–tracking proteins (+TIPs), engage a variety of targets. However, the nature of cargoes that require +TIP-mediated capture for their movement on MTs remains poorly understood. Using RNA interference and dominant-negative approaches, combined with live cell imaging, we show that herpes simplex virus particles that have entered primary human cells exploit a +TIP complex comprising end-binding protein 1 (EB1), cytoplasmic linker protein 170 (CLIP-170), and dynactin-1 (DCTN1) to initiate retrograde transport. Depletion of these +TIPs completely blocked post-entry long-range transport of virus particles and suppressed infection ∼5,000-fold, whereas transferrin uptake, early endosome organization, and dynein-dependent movement of lysosomes and mitochondria remained unaffected. These findings provide the first insights into the earliest stages of viral engagement of MTs through specific +TIPs, akin to receptors, with therapeutic implications, and identify herpesvirus particles as one of a very limited number of cargoes absolutely dependent on CLIP-170–mediated capture to initiate transport in primary human cells. PMID:26504169

  19. Clinical applications of retrograde autologous priming in cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, G.W.; Nie, Y.F.; Jiao, Z.Y.; Zhao, W.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde autologous priming (RAP) has been routinely applied in cardiac pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, this technique is performed in pediatric patients weighing more than 20 kg, and research about its application in pediatric patients weighing less than 20 kg is still scarce. This study explored the clinical application of RAP in CPB in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated with CPB using RAP, while the control group was treated with conventional CPB (priming with suspended red blood cells, plasma and albumin). The hematocrit (Hct) and lactate (Lac) levels at different perioperative time-points, mechanical ventilation time, hospitalization duration, and intraoperative and postoperative blood usage were recorded. Results showed that Hct levels at 15 min after CPB beginning (T2) and at CPB end (T3), and number of intraoperative blood transfusions were significantly lower in the experimental group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in CPB time, aortic blocking time, T2-Lac value or T3-Lac between the two groups (P>0.05). Postoperatively, there were no significant differences in Hct (2 h after surgery), mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time, or postoperative blood transfusion between two groups (P>0.05). RAP can effectively reduce the hemodilution when using less or not using any banked blood, while meeting the intraoperative perfusion conditions, and decreasing the perioperative blood transfusion volume in pediatric patients. PMID:27119427

  20. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered anatomy: How to deal with the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Moreels, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered anatomy is challenging. Several operative interventions of both the gastrointestinal tract and the biliary and/or pancreatic system lead to altered anatomy, rendering ERCP more difficult or even impossible with a conventional side-viewing duodenoscope. Adapted endoscopes are available to reach the biliopancreatic system and to perform ERCP in patients with altered anatomy. However, both technical difficulties and complications determine the procedure’s success. Different technical approaches have been described and are highly dependent on local expertise and endoscopic equipment. Standardized practical guidelines are currently unavailable. This review focuses on the challenges encountered during ERCP in patients with altered anatomy and how to deal with them. The first challenge is reaching the papilla or the bilioenteric/pancreatoenteric anastomosis in the patient with postoperative altered anatomy. The second challenge is the cannulation of the biliopancreatic system and performing all conventional ERCP interventions and the third challenge is the control of possible complications. The available literature data on this topic is reviewed and illustrated with clinical cases. PMID:25132917

  1. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying wig be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semisolid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction.

  2. Axon Degeneration Gated by Retrograde Activation of Somatic Pro-apoptotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Simon, David J; Pitts, Jason; Hertz, Nicholas T; Yang, Jing; Yamagishi, Yuya; Olsen, Olav; Tešić Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-02-25

    During development, sensory axons compete for limiting neurotrophic support, and local neurotrophin insufficiency triggers caspase-dependent axon degeneration. The signaling driving axon degeneration upon local deprivation is proposed to reside within axons. Our results instead support a model in which, despite the apoptotic machinery being present in axons, the cell body is an active participant in gating axonal caspase activation and axon degeneration. Loss of trophic support in axons initiates retrograde activation of a somatic pro-apoptotic pathway, which, in turn, is required for distal axon degeneration via an anterograde pro-degenerative factor. At a molecular level, the cell body is the convergence point of two signaling pathways whose integrated action drives upregulation of pro-apoptotic Puma, which, unexpectedly, is confined to the cell body. Puma then overcomes inhibition by pro-survival Bcl-xL and Bcl-w and initiates the anterograde pro-degenerative program, highlighting the role of the cell body as an arbiter of large-scale axon removal.

  3. Retrosplenial Cortical Contributions to Anterograde and Retrograde Memory in the Monkey.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark J; Mitchell, Anna S

    2016-06-01

    Primate retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is important for memory but patient neuropathologies are diffuse so its key contributions to memory remain elusive. This study provides the first causal evidence that RSC in macaque monkeys is crucial for postoperative retention of preoperatively and postoperatively acquired memories. Preoperatively, monkeys learned 300 object-in-place scene discriminations across sessions. After RSC removal, one-trial postoperative retention tests revealed significant retrograde memory loss for these 300 discriminations relative to unoperated control monkeys. Less robust evidence was found for a deficit in anterograde memory (new postoperative learning) after RSC lesions as new learning to criterion measures failed to reveal any significant learning impairment. However, after achieving ≥90% learning criterion for the postoperatively presented novel 100 object-in-place scene discriminations, short-term retention (i.e., measured after 24 h delay) of this well-learnt set was impaired in the RSC monkeys relative to controls. A further experiment assessed rapid "within" session acquisition of novel object-in-place scene discriminations, again confirming that new learning per se was unimpaired by bilateral RSC removal. Primate RSC contributes critically to memory by supporting normal retention of information, even when this information does not involve an autobiographical component.

  4. Different Effects of Tetrahymena IFT172 Domains on Anterograde and Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Che-Chia

    2008-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles are multiprotein complexes that move bidirectionally along the cilium/flagellum. The Tetrahymena IFT172 gene encodes a protein with an N-terminal WD domain (WDD) and a C-terminal repeat domain (RPD). Epitope-tagged Ift172p localized to the basal body and in cilia along the axoneme, and IFT172 knockout cells lost cilia and motility. Using serial deletion constructs to rescue the knockout cells, we found that neither the WDD nor the RPD alone is sufficient to assemble cilia. Ift172p containing only the WDD or the RPD failed to enter cilia. Constructs with a partial truncation of the RPD still rescued although cilia were assembled less efficiently, indicating that the WDD and a part of the RPD are sufficient for anterograde transport. Partial truncation of the RPD caused the accumulation of truncated Ift172p itself and of Ift88p at ciliary tips, suggesting that IFT turnaround or retrograde transport was affected. These results implicate different regions of Ift172p in different steps of the IFT process. PMID:18199688

  5. Who experiences endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease?

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sun-Hyung; Cho, Sungsin; Han, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. But, some patients suffer from retained common bile duct stones after LC. The aim of this study is to analyze the predicting factors associated with subsequent postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) after LC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of every LC performed between July 2006 and September 2012. We classify 28 patients who underwent ERCP within 6 months after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease as the ERCP group and 56 patients who underwent LC for symptomatic gallstone disease during same period paired by sex, age, underlying disease, operation history, and body mass index as the control group. To identify risk factor performing postoperative ERCP after LC, we compared admission route, preoperative biochemical liver function test, number of gall stones, gallstone size, adhesion around GB, wall thickening of GB, and existence of acute cholecystitis between the 2 groups. Results Admission route, preoperative AST, ALT, and ALP, stone size, longer operation time, and acute cholecystitis were identified as risk factors of postoperative ERCP in univariate analyses. But, longer operation time (P = 0.004) and acute cholecystitis (P = 0.048) were identified as independent risk factors of postoperative ERCP in multivariate analyses. Conclusion The patient who underwent ERCP after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease are more likely experienced longer operation time and acute cholecystitis than the patient who did not undergo ERCP after LC. PMID:27274506

  6. The Retrograde Transposition of the Remnant Earlobe in Patients With Low-Set Microtia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Hu, Jin-Tian; Zhou, Xu; Li, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Yong-Biao; Cao, Yi-Lin; Zhang, Qing-Guo; Liu, Tun

    2015-10-01

    During auricle reconstruction, lobular transposition has become a routine technique applied by most of surgeons. But to some low-set remnant ears, it is difficult to manipulate the conventional lobule transposition method in clinical application. In this article, the authors introduce a method to retrogradely transpose the remnant ear with the the ratio of length:width of the lobular flap being 4-5:1. The lobule transposition could be applied during the first stage of Nagata method or the third stage using expansion method. The authors take the superior part of the remnant ear as the pedicle and make the incision at the middle and inferior parts of the remnant ear to form the lobular flap. Then the inferior lobule is rotated posteriorly and superiorly to cover the rear end of the framework and to form the inferior part of helical rim. The results of the reconstructed auricles are satisfactory with aesthetic natural earlobes and the location of the reconstructed ear is symmetric to the contralateral ear. The authors believe that to the 2% to 5% patients with low-set microtia, this is a good way to make use of remnant ear for the purpose of a real earlobe. PMID:26468806

  7. Retrograde transport is not required for cytosolic translocation of the B-subunit of Shiga toxin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Castillo, Maria Daniela; Tran, Thi; Bobard, Alexandre; Renard, Henri-François; Rathjen, Stefan J; Dransart, Estelle; Stechmann, Bahne; Lamaze, Christophe; Lord, Mike; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Enninga, Jost; Tartour, Eric; Johannes, Ludger

    2015-07-01

    Antigen-presenting cells have the remarkable capacity to transfer exogenous antigens to the cytosol for processing by proteasomes and subsequent presentation on major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) molecules, a process termed cross-presentation. This is the target of biomedical approaches that aim to trigger a therapeutic immune response. The receptor-binding B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB) has been developed as an antigen delivery tool for such immunotherapy applications. In this study, we have analyzed pathways and trafficking factors that are involved in this process. A covalent conjugate between STxB and saporin was generated to quantitatively sample the membrane translocation step to the cytosol in differentiated monocyte-derived THP-1 cells. We have found that retrograde trafficking to the Golgi complex was not required for STxB-saporin translocation to the cytosol or for STxB-dependent antigen cross-presentation. Depletion of endosomal Rab7 inhibited, and lowering membrane cholesterol levels favored STxB-saporin translocation. Interestingly, experiments with reducible and non-reducible linker-arm-STxB conjugates led to the conclusion that after translocation, STxB remains associated with the cytosolic membrane leaflet. In summary, we report new facets of the endosomal escape process bearing relevance to antigen cross-presentation.

  8. The Role of Central and Enteric Nervous Systems in the Control of the Retrograde Giant Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Ivan M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The role of the enteric (ENS) and central (CNS) nervous systems in the control of the retrograde giant contraction (RGC) associated with vomiting is unknown. Methods The effects of myotomy or mesenteric nerve transection (MNT) on apomorphine-induced emesis were investigated in 18 chronically instrumented dogs Results Neither surgery affected the RGC orad of the surgical site or the velocity of the RGC over the entire small intestine. Myotomy blocked the RGC for 17 ± 5 cm aborad of the myotomy, and the velocity of the RGC from 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus slowed (18.1 ± 3.0 to 9.0 ± 0.8 cm/sec) such that the RGC orad and aborad of the myotomy occurred simultaneously. After MNT, the RGC was unchanged up to 66 ± 6 cm from the pylorus, and the sequence of the RGC across the denervated intestine was unaltered. The velocity of the RGC from 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus increased from 12.8 ± 1.6 to 196 ± 116 cm/sec. After myotomy or MNT, the percent occurrence and magnitude of the RGC across the intestine 100 to 70 cm from the pylorus decreased. Conclusions The CNS activates the RGC 10 to 20 cm aborad of its innervation of the intestine and controls the RGC sequence. On the other hand, the ENS plays a role in initiation and generation of the RGC. PMID:26645249

  9. Recent Advanced Endoscopic Management of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Related Duodenal Perforations.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon Mee

    2016-07-01

    The management strategy for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related duodenal perforation can be determined based on the site and extent of injury, the patient's condition, and time to diagnosis. Most cases of perivaterian or bile duct perforation can be managed with a biliary stent or nasobiliary drainage. Duodenal wall perforations had been treated with immediate surgical repair. However, with the development of endoscopic devices and techniques, endoscopic closure has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment that uses through-the-scope clips, ligation band, fibrin glue, endoclips and endoloops, an over-the-scope clipping device, suturing devices, covering luminal stents, and open-pore film drainage. Endoscopic therapy could be instituted in selected patients in whom perforation was identified early or during the procedure. Early diagnosis, proper conservative management, and effective endoscopic closure are required for favorable outcomes of non-surgical management. If endoscopic treatment fails, or in the cases of clinical deterioration, prompt surgical management should be considered. PMID:27484814

  10. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery in Patients Who Previously Underwent Open Renal Stone Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Erdal; Saribacak, Ali; Ozkanli, Ahmet Oguz; Başar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To ascertain whether retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) is as effective in patients treated previously with open renal stone surgery (ORSS) on the same kidney as in patients with no previous ORSS. Methods. There were 32 patients with renal stones who had previous ORSS and were treated with RIRS in the study group (Group 1). A total of 38 patients with renal stones who had no previous ORSS and were treated with RIRS were selected as the control group (Group 2). Recorded data regarding preoperative characteristics of the patients, stone properties, surgical parameters, outcomes, SFRs (no fragments or small fragments <4 mm), and complications between groups were compared. Results. Mean age, mean BMI, mean hospital stay, and mean operative time were not statistically different between groups. Mean stone size (10.1 ± 5.6 versus 10.3 ± 4.2; p = 0.551) and mean stone burden (25.4 ± 14.7 versus 23.5 ± 9.9; p = 0.504) were also similar between groups. After the second procedures, SFRs were 100% and 95% in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 0.496). No major perioperative complications were seen. Conclusion. RIRS can be safely and effectively performed with acceptable complication rates in patients treated previously with ORSS as in patients with no previous ORSS. PMID:26357570

  11. Retrosplenial Cortical Contributions to Anterograde and Retrograde Memory in the Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Mark J.; Mitchell, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    Primate retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is important for memory but patient neuropathologies are diffuse so its key contributions to memory remain elusive. This study provides the first causal evidence that RSC in macaque monkeys is crucial for postoperative retention of preoperatively and postoperatively acquired memories. Preoperatively, monkeys learned 300 object-in-place scene discriminations across sessions. After RSC removal, one-trial postoperative retention tests revealed significant retrograde memory loss for these 300 discriminations relative to unoperated control monkeys. Less robust evidence was found for a deficit in anterograde memory (new postoperative learning) after RSC lesions as new learning to criterion measures failed to reveal any significant learning impairment. However, after achieving ≥90% learning criterion for the postoperatively presented novel 100 object-in-place scene discriminations, short-term retention (i.e., measured after 24 h delay) of this well-learnt set was impaired in the RSC monkeys relative to controls. A further experiment assessed rapid “within” session acquisition of novel object-in-place scene discriminations, again confirming that new learning per se was unimpaired by bilateral RSC removal. Primate RSC contributes critically to memory by supporting normal retention of information, even when this information does not involve an autobiographical component. PMID:26946129

  12. Mitochondria Retrograde Signaling and the UPRmt: Where Are We in Mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Arnould, Thierry; Michel, Sébastien; Renard, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial unfolded protein response is a form of retrograde signaling that contributes to ensuring the maintenance of quality control of mitochondria, allowing functional integrity of the mitochondrial proteome. When misfolded proteins or unassembled complexes accumulate beyond the folding capacity, it leads to alteration of proteostasis, damages, and organelle/cell dysfunction. Extensively studied for the ER, it was recently reported that this kind of signaling for mitochondrion would also be able to communicate with the nucleus in response to impaired proteostasis. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) is activated in response to different types and levels of stress, especially in conditions where unfolded or misfolded mitochondrial proteins accumulate and aggregate. A specific UPRmt could thus be initiated to boost folding and degradation capacity in response to unfolded and aggregated protein accumulation. Although first described in mammals, the UPRmt was mainly studied in Caenorhabditis elegans, and accumulating evidence suggests that mechanisms triggered in response to a UPRmt might be different in C. elegans and mammals. In this review, we discuss and integrate recent data from the literature to address whether the UPRmt is relevant to mitochondrial homeostasis in mammals and to analyze the putative role of integrated stress response (ISR) activation in response to the inhibition of mtDNA expression and/or accumulation of mitochondrial mis/unfolded proteins. PMID:26258774

  13. Mitochondria Retrograde Signaling and the UPR mt: Where Are We in Mammals?

    PubMed

    Arnould, Thierry; Michel, Sébastien; Renard, Patricia

    2015-08-06

    Mitochondrial unfolded protein response is a form of retrograde signaling that contributes to ensuring the maintenance of quality control of mitochondria, allowing functional integrity of the mitochondrial proteome. When misfolded proteins or unassembled complexes accumulate beyond the folding capacity, it leads to alteration of proteostasis, damages, and organelle/cell dysfunction. Extensively studied for the ER, it was recently reported that this kind of signaling for mitochondrion would also be able to communicate with the nucleus in response to impaired proteostasis. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is activated in response to different types and levels of stress, especially in conditions where unfolded or misfolded mitochondrial proteins accumulate and aggregate. A specific UPR(mt) could thus be initiated to boost folding and degradation capacity in response to unfolded and aggregated protein accumulation. Although first described in mammals, the UPR(mt) was mainly studied in Caenorhabditis elegans, and accumulating evidence suggests that mechanisms triggered in response to a UPR(mt) might be different in C. elegans and mammals. In this review, we discuss and integrate recent data from the literature to address whether the UPR(mt) is relevant to mitochondrial homeostasis in mammals and to analyze the putative role of integrated stress response (ISR) activation in response to the inhibition of mtDNA expression and/or accumulation of mitochondrial mis/unfolded proteins.

  14. Failure of lower motor neuron radial outgrowth precedes retrograde degeneration in a feline model of SMA

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, Erin N.; Joussemet, Béatrice; Costiou, Patrick; Fanuel, Dominique; Moullier, Philippe; Barkats, Martine; Fyfe, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Feline SMA is a fully penetrant, autosomal recessive lower motor neuron disease in domestic cats that clinically resembles human SMA Type III. A whole genome linkage scan identified a ~140 kilobase deletion that abrogates expression of LIX1, a novel SMA candidate gene of unknown function. To characterize the progression of feline SMA, we assessed pathological changes in muscle and spinal cord from 3 days of age to beyond onset of clinical signs. EMG analysis indicating denervation occurred between 10 and 12 weeks, with the first neurological signs occurring at the same time. CMAP amplitudes were significantly reduced in the soleus and extensor carpi radialis muscles at 8 to 11 weeks. Quadriceps femoris muscle fibers from affected cats appeared smaller at 10 weeks; by 12 weeks atrophic fibers were more prevalent than in age-matched controls. In affected cats, significant loss of L5 ventral root axons was observed at 12 weeks. By 21 weeks of age, affected cats had 40% fewer L5 motor axons than normal. There was no significant difference in total L5 soma number, even at 21 weeks; thus degeneration begins distal to the cell body and proceeds retrogradely. Morphometric analysis of L5 ventral roots and horns revealed that 4 weeks prior to axon loss, motor axons in affected cats failed to undergo radial enlargement, suggesting a role for the putative disease gene, LIX1, in radial growth of axons. PMID:22120001

  15. Selective preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with sphincterotomy avoids bile duct exploration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Welbourn, C R; Mehta, D; Armstrong, C P; Gear, M W; Eyre-Brook, I A

    1995-01-01

    A policy of preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) for suspected bile duct stones was used in 1507 patients considered for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in three district general hospitals. Altogether 306 patients underwent ERC, and bile duct cannulation was achieved in 276 (90%). Bile ducts were cleared by endoscopic sphincterotomy in 128 of 161 patients (79%) with proven duct stones. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was completed in 1396 patients. Ten laparotomies were necessary for complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The complication rate for endoscopic sphincterotomy/laparoscopic cholecystectomy was 2.7%, with no mortality. Overall, a combined endoscopic/laparoscopic approach succeeded in 1386 patients (92%). Fourteen patients (1%) had retained stones during a median of 14 months (range 1-42) follow up, all of which were removed by ERC/endoscopic sphincterotomy. If a policy of selective ERC before laparoscopic cholecystectomy is used for all patients with symptomatic gall stones, most will avoid an open operation and laparoscopic exploration of the bile duct is not necessary. PMID:7489949

  16. Use of octreotide-acetate in preventing pancreatitis-like changes following therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, M; Supanc, V; Simicević, V N; Hrabar, D; Troskot, B; Smircić-Duvnjak, L; Bekavac-Beslin, M

    1999-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic sphincterectomy (EST). In addition, serum pancreatic enzymes increase without clinical symptoms in up to 75% of patients undergoing endoscopic procedures. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effects of octreotide in the prevention of these possible complications in patients undergoing therapeutic ERCP. The study was carried out in 209 subjects who were randomly allocated to two groups (A and B). Group A received 0.5 mg of octreotide-acetate subcutaneously one hour prior to ERCP; group B was given placebo. Serum amylase and lipase values were measured before premedication and 1.5, 2, 6 and 24 hours following endoscopy. Following ERCP, the increase in both amylase and lipase values was significantly greater in the control (placebo) group, but this significance disappeared 24 hours following the procedure. Symptoms of acute pancreatitis developed in 4 (3.85%) patients who were given octreotide-acetate, compared to 10 (9.52%) patients in the control group. The results obtained in our study seem to indicate that octreotide could prevent the increase in serum pancreatic enzymes, but no significant difference was observed in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis.

  17. Recent Advanced Endoscopic Management of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Related Duodenal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Mee

    2016-01-01

    The management strategy for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related duodenal perforation can be determined based on the site and extent of injury, the patient’s condition, and time to diagnosis. Most cases of perivaterian or bile duct perforation can be managed with a biliary stent or nasobiliary drainage. Duodenal wall perforations had been treated with immediate surgical repair. However, with the development of endoscopic devices and techniques, endoscopic closure has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment that uses through-the-scope clips, ligation band, fibrin glue, endoclips and endoloops, an over-the-scope clipping device, suturing devices, covering luminal stents, and open-pore film drainage. Endoscopic therapy could be instituted in selected patients in whom perforation was identified early or during the procedure. Early diagnosis, proper conservative management, and effective endoscopic closure are required for favorable outcomes of non-surgical management. If endoscopic treatment fails, or in the cases of clinical deterioration, prompt surgical management should be considered. PMID:27484814

  18. Venous arterialization for the treatment of large-area foot skin retrograde avulsion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wan-an; Jiang, Jia-xi; Tian, Feng; Li, Xiao-chuan; Tian, Li-jie

    2013-08-01

    Between 2009 and 2011, three patients with large-area foot skin retrograde avulsion (more than 1% of the body surface area) underwent venous arterialization. Anastomosis of the artery in the wound surface with the vein in the skin flap and an appropriate number of venous end-to-end anastomoses were performed. The skin flaps survived in all 3 patients. Six months postoperatively, the flap elasticity and appearance were close to that of normal skin, and foot function was better without scar contracture. When venous arterialization is used to treat foot avulsion, the following points should be noted. Surgical indications include no fresh bleeding from the wound edge of the avulsed skin after debridement, more complete avulsed skin, and superficial veins that do not completely separate from the avulsed skin. Venous arterialization is not suitable to avulsion with fresh bleeding, avulsed skin in small fragments, and avulsion with a subcutaneous venous network embolism. During debridement, the subcutaneous venous network should be protected to avoid exposing the vein stems outside the fat layer. If the avulsion is less than 1% of the body surface area, arterial-venous anastomosis can provide adequate blood supply. Venous-venous anastomosis is performed as much as possible to enhance venous return and decrease microcirculatory pressure, which is conducive to the establishment of effective blood circulation.

  19. Systemic and Local Responses to Repeated HL Stress-Induced Retrograde Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Matthew J.; Carmody, Melanie; Albrecht, Verónica; Pogson, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts of leaves under high light stress initiate signals to the nuclei of both exposed and distal leaves in order to acclimate against the potential threat of oxidative damage: a process known as high light systemic acquired acclimation (HL SAA). This study explores the nature of HL SAA, synergistic interactions with other environmental stresses, and the impact of repeated HL stress on the acclimation response of exposed and distal leaves. This necessitated the development of novel experimental systems to investigate the initiation, perception, and response to HL SAA. These systems were used to investigate the HL SAA response by monitoring the induction of mRNA in distal leaves not exposed to the HL stress. Acclimation to HL is induced within minutes and the response is proportionally dependent on the quality and quantity of light. HL SAA treatments in conjunction with variations in temperature and humidity reveal HL SAA is influenced by fluctuations in humidity. These treatments also result in changes in auxin accumulation and auxin-responsive genes. A key question in retrograde signaling is the extent to which transient changes in light intensity result in a “memory” of the event leading to acclimation responses. Repeated exposure to short term HL resulted in acclimation of the exposed tissue and that of emerging and young leaves (but not older leaves) to HL and oxidative stress. PMID:23335929

  20. Axon Degeneration Gated by Retrograde Activation of Somatic Pro-apoptotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Simon, David J; Pitts, Jason; Hertz, Nicholas T; Yang, Jing; Yamagishi, Yuya; Olsen, Olav; Tešić Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-02-25

    During development, sensory axons compete for limiting neurotrophic support, and local neurotrophin insufficiency triggers caspase-dependent axon degeneration. The signaling driving axon degeneration upon local deprivation is proposed to reside within axons. Our results instead support a model in which, despite the apoptotic machinery being present in axons, the cell body is an active participant in gating axonal caspase activation and axon degeneration. Loss of trophic support in axons initiates retrograde activation of a somatic pro-apoptotic pathway, which, in turn, is required for distal axon degeneration via an anterograde pro-degenerative factor. At a molecular level, the cell body is the convergence point of two signaling pathways whose integrated action drives upregulation of pro-apoptotic Puma, which, unexpectedly, is confined to the cell body. Puma then overcomes inhibition by pro-survival Bcl-xL and Bcl-w and initiates the anterograde pro-degenerative program, highlighting the role of the cell body as an arbiter of large-scale axon removal. PMID:26898330

  1. Simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization for gastric fundal varices

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kuraoka, Naosuke; Ogawa, Kohei; Sato, Munehiro; Aiba, Tsuneo; Yoneyama, Osamu; Furukawa, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Igarashi, Kentarou

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously reported the techniques and usefulness of simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and partial splenic embolization (PSE), based on the hypothesis that concomitant PSE can diminish the increase in portal venous pressure after B-RTO. Objective After experiencing more cases and performing longer-term follow-up, we re-evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE for gastric fundal varices (GVs). Methods We performed B-RTO in 36 consecutive patients treated for GVs from 2005 to 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE (Group 1) and 13 underwent B-RTO monotherapy (Group 2). The outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups except that the splenic volumes were larger in Group 1 than 2. B-RTO was technically successful in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%) in Group 1 and in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%) in Group 2. In all patients with ruptured GVs (six in Group 1 and five in Group 2), complete hemostasis was obtained by B-RTO. Exacerbation of esophageal varices was significantly less frequent in Group 1 than 2 (p = 0.0017). Conclusion Concomitant PSE with B-RTO may contribute to prevention of the exacerbation of esophageal varices after B-RTO. PMID:26966524

  2. Retrograde spread of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Campieri, M.; Lanfranchi, G.A.; Brignola, C.; Bazzocchi, G.; Gionchetti, P.; Minguzzi, M.R.; Cappello, I.P.; Corbelli, C.; Boschi, S.

    1986-02-01

    In an attempt to know the exact retrograde spread of high-dosage 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas, we have studied eight patients with active left-sided colitis, by adding a small amount of barium sulfate to the enemas and by checking the spread radiologically after 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 6 hours. Four grams of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas and 4 gm in 200-ml enemas were used. The same experiment was repeated in a subsequent attack, with enemas labeled with technetium-99m and checked by scintiscans in five of these patients. We always have observed a volume-dependent spread of enemas but, interestingly, in the patients studied with technetium-99m there was always a wider spread than that which was detected with barium enemas. In all five patients, 100-ml enemas reached the splenic flexure. In two patients with total colitis, a progression of 100-ml technetium-99m enemas was performed in the transverse colon, but the maximum opacity remained in the left side. We can conclude that 4 gm of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas can be suitable for treating patients with left-sided colitis, and will represent a valid addition for patients with more extensive colitis.

  3. Proteomic analysis of the Simkania-containing vacuole: the central role of retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Herweg, Jo-Ana; Pons, Valérie; Becher, Dörte; Hecker, Michael; Krohne, Georg; Barbier, Julien; Berger, Hilmar; Rudel, Thomas; Mehlitz, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Simkania negevensis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that grows in amoeba or human cells within a membrane-bound vacuole forming endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites. The membrane of this Simkania-containing vacuole (SnCV) is a critical host-pathogen interface whose origin and molecular interactions with cellular organelles remain poorly defined. We performed proteomic analysis of purified ER-SnCV-membranes using label free LC-MS(2) to define the pathogen-containing organelle composition. Of the 1,178 proteins of human and 302 proteins of Simkania origin identified by this strategy, 51 host cell proteins were enriched or depleted by infection and 57 proteins were associated with host endosomal transport pathways. Chemical inhibitors that selectively interfere with trafficking at the early endosome-to-trans-Golgi network (TGN) interface (retrograde transport) affected SnCV formation, morphology and lipid transport. Our data demonstrate that Simkania exploits early endosome-to-TGN transport for nutrient acquisition and growth.

  4. Evaluation of ultrasonic and ErCr:YSGG laser retrograde cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Batista de Faria-Junior, Norberto; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; de Toledo Leonardo, Renato; Camargo Villela Berbert, Fábio Luiz

    2009-05-01

    Root end cavity preparation techniques aim to create a clean and properly shaped cavity in a short time. Although the use of ultrasonics has been widely recommended, a laser can also be used. This study evaluated the time required and quality of retrograde cavity preparations using ultrasonics or ErCr:YSGG laser. Thirty single-rooted teeth were instrumented, root filled, submitted to apicectomies, and grouped. Root end cavities were prepared by using the following: group 1 (G1): CVD (6.1107-6) ultrasonic retrotips (CVD-Vale, São José dos Campos, Brazil); group 2 (G2): EMS (DT-060/Berutti) ultrasonic retrotips (EMS, LeSentier, Switzerland); and group 3 (G3): ErCr:YSGG (G6/Waterlase; Biolase Technology, San Clemente, CA) laser tips. The time taken to complete the preparation was recorded. Epoxy resin replicas of the root apices were examined under a scanning electron microscope. The parameters for evaluation were the presence of fractures, and the quality of the preparations. The Waterlase showed the highest mean time for preparation of the root end cavities (p < 0.05), and there was no significant difference between the CVD and EMS groups (p > 0.05). Fractures in the cavosurface angle occurred only in G2. G1 and G2 showed better scores for quality of preparation than G3 (p < 0.05). These results suggest that root end cavities should be prepared by ultrasonic tips.

  5. Retrograde ejaculation associated spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Courtney, Cynthia L; Strait, Karen R; Sharma, Prachi; Freebersyser, Julie E; Crane, Maria M

    2013-11-01

    Retrograde ejaculation (RE) has been reported in humans and animals but RE with subsequent sperm calculi has rarely been reported. This report documents clinical and pathological findings of spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four rhesus macaques. While this condition has been associated with repeated electroejaculation, spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis is highly unusual. The animals presented with either stranguria, dysuria, hematuria, distended abdomen or lethargy. Ultrasound examination revealed several hyperechoic masses within the lumen of the urinary bladder. The animals were euthanized due to poor prognosis or study end points. Postmortem examination revealed multiple angular, amorphous, soft to firm, pale yellow to greenish-brown and variably sized calculi in the lumen of the urinary bladder or prostatic/penile urethra. Histologically, the calculi were composed of numerous sperm embedded in abundant brightly eosinophilic matrix. Based on gross and histologic findings, RE associated sperm cystolithiasis was diagnosed, with ulcerative urethritis as the major primary apparent etiology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of four spontaneous cases of sperm cystolithiasis in rhesus macaques.

  6. Anterograde or Retrograde Transsynaptic Circuit Tracing in Vertebrates with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Beier, Kevin T; Mundell, Nathan A; Pan, Y Albert; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have been used as transsynaptic tracers, allowing one to map the inputs and outputs of neuronal populations, due to their ability to replicate in neurons and transmit in vivo only across synaptically connected cells. To date, their use has been largely restricted to mammals. In order to explore the use of such viruses in an expanded host range, we tested the transsynaptic tracing ability of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vectors in a variety of organisms. Successful infection and gene expression were achieved in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Moreover, rVSV enabled transsynaptic tracing of neural circuitry in predictable directions dictated by the viral envelope glycoprotein (G), derived from either VSV or rabies virus (RABV). Anterograde and retrograde labeling, from initial infection and/or viral replication and transmission, was observed in Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, jellyfish, zebrafish, chickens, and mice. These vectors are widely applicable for gene delivery, afferent tract tracing, and/or directional connectivity mapping. Here, we detail the use of these vectors and provide protocols for propagating virus, changing the surface glycoprotein, and infecting multiple organisms using several injection strategies.

  7. Retrograde methane-dominated fluid inclusions from high-temperature granulites of Rogaland, southwestern Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Kerkhof, A.M. ); Touret, J.L.R. ); Maijer, C.; Jansen, J.B.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Non-aqueous inclusions in the high-grade (800-1,000C; 4kbar) metamorphic Rogaland region, southwestern Norway, consist of mixtures of CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}. In particular the fluid inclusions in quartz veins in migmatites are characterized by high CH{sub 4} concentrations and they were re-equilibrated at temperatures below 500C during isobaric cooling. Observations by microthermometry demonstrated several complicated sequences of phase transitions, including partial and metastable homogenization (at lower temperature than melting), and S-L or S-V transitions. The phase behavior reflects a wide variation in composition and molar volume. Fluid compositions were measured by Raman microspectrometry. By this method, also small amounts of graphite have been detected in CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusions. The instantaneous formation of graphite in a CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusion by induction of the argon laser beam has been observed which points to the metastability of the CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture. The calculated densities of the observed fluid mixtures are relatively low, necessitating a revision of the earlier interpretation of these inclusions as containing pure high-density fluids. Inclusions in quartz, trapped after the peak of metamorphism, record fluid heterogeneity which may present evidence for fluid-deficient metamorphism during the retrograde M2-M3 metamorphism.

  8. Cholestatic hepatitis after ingestion of chaparral leaf: confirmation by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Alderman, S; Kailas, S; Goldfarb, S; Singaram, C; Malone, D G

    1994-10-01

    The use of herbal and other "natural" health products by healthy and ill people is more common than is appreciated by many health care providers. Since most of these substances are not categorized as medicines, they are exempt from U.S. Government approval processes, and are essentially uncontrolled. In this article we describe a patient who developed painless jaundice, fatigue, and pruritus after taking chaparral tablets, 160 mg/day, for approximately 2 months. Serial liver biopsies and serum chemistries documented severe cholestasis and hepatocellular injury, i.e., a severe cholangiolitic hepatitis. Serum enzyme levels were markedly elevated: alk. phos. to four-fold, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase to 25-fold, total bilirubin to 30-fold, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase to 35-fold. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed smooth, but severely narrowed biliary ducts without sclerosing cholangitis, distal obstruction, tumor, or stenosis. The diagnosis remained in doubt until the publication of two cases of chaparral hepatotoxicity. Because of the similarity of our patient's illness to those cases we concluded that chaparral was almost certainly the cause. Chaparral, also known as creosote or greasewood, is used by some practitioners to treat a diverse group of ailments including ethanol withdrawal. This report should heighten the awareness by primary care physicians and gastroenterologists that any chaparral herbal preparation is a potential hepatotoxin that can lead to serious illness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Retrosplenial Cortical Contributions to Anterograde and Retrograde Memory in the Monkey.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark J; Mitchell, Anna S

    2016-06-01

    Primate retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is important for memory but patient neuropathologies are diffuse so its key contributions to memory remain elusive. This study provides the first causal evidence that RSC in macaque monkeys is crucial for postoperative retention of preoperatively and postoperatively acquired memories. Preoperatively, monkeys learned 300 object-in-place scene discriminations across sessions. After RSC removal, one-trial postoperative retention tests revealed significant retrograde memory loss for these 300 discriminations relative to unoperated control monkeys. Less robust evidence was found for a deficit in anterograde memory (new postoperative learning) after RSC lesions as new learning to criterion measures failed to reveal any significant learning impairment. However, after achieving ≥90% learning criterion for the postoperatively presented novel 100 object-in-place scene discriminations, short-term retention (i.e., measured after 24 h delay) of this well-learnt set was impaired in the RSC monkeys relative to controls. A further experiment assessed rapid "within" session acquisition of novel object-in-place scene discriminations, again confirming that new learning per se was unimpaired by bilateral RSC removal. Primate RSC contributes critically to memory by supporting normal retention of information, even when this information does not involve an autobiographical component. PMID:26946129

  10. Retrograde labeling and fine structure of olfactory receptor neurons in cat sharks.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Rieko; Nakatani, Kei

    2012-08-01

    Ciliated and microvillar olfactory receptor cells have been reported in many fish species, including teleosts and elasmobranchs. Morphological studies have suggested that microvillar cells are the only olfactory receptor cells in the elasmobranchs; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. Here we used a cat shark (Scyliorhinus torazame) to determine the cell type of the olfactory receptor cells in elasmobranchs. Retrograde labeling with a fluorescent dye, Dil, labeled only cells in the second layer from the surface of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that ciliated cells located in the surface layer are not olfactory receptor cells. In addition, electron microscopic observation revealed that the labeled cells in the second layer have a thin dendritic knob extending from the cell body to the free surface of the epithelium. A part of the dendritic knob facing the mucous layer did not have ciliary structures. These results provide evidence that the aciliate cells are the only olfactory receptor cells in the cat shark olfactory organ. PMID:22873803

  11. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  12. Clinical applications of retrograde autologous priming in cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Fu, G W; Nie, Y F; Jiao, Z Y; Zhao, W Z

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde autologous priming (RAP) has been routinely applied in cardiac pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, this technique is performed in pediatric patients weighing more than 20 kg, and research about its application in pediatric patients weighing less than 20 kg is still scarce. This study explored the clinical application of RAP in CPB in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated with CPB using RAP, while the control group was treated with conventional CPB (priming with suspended red blood cells, plasma and albumin). The hematocrit (Hct) and lactate (Lac) levels at different perioperative time-points, mechanical ventilation time, hospitalization duration, and intraoperative and postoperative blood usage were recorded. Results showed that Hct levels at 15 min after CPB beginning (T2) and at CPB end (T3), and number of intraoperative blood transfusions were significantly lower in the experimental group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in CPB time, aortic blocking time, T2-Lac value or T3-Lac between the two groups (P>0.05). Postoperatively, there were no significant differences in Hct (2 h after surgery), mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time, or postoperative blood transfusion between two groups (P>0.05). RAP can effectively reduce the hemodilution when using less or not using any banked blood, while meeting the intraoperative perfusion conditions, and decreasing the perioperative blood transfusion volume in pediatric patients. PMID:27119427

  13. Retrograde transport is not required for cytosolic translocation of the B-subunit of Shiga toxin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Castillo, Maria Daniela; Tran, Thi; Bobard, Alexandre; Renard, Henri-François; Rathjen, Stefan J; Dransart, Estelle; Stechmann, Bahne; Lamaze, Christophe; Lord, Mike; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Enninga, Jost; Tartour, Eric; Johannes, Ludger

    2015-07-01

    Antigen-presenting cells have the remarkable capacity to transfer exogenous antigens to the cytosol for processing by proteasomes and subsequent presentation on major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) molecules, a process termed cross-presentation. This is the target of biomedical approaches that aim to trigger a therapeutic immune response. The receptor-binding B-subunit of Shiga toxin (STxB) has been developed as an antigen delivery tool for such immunotherapy applications. In this study, we have analyzed pathways and trafficking factors that are involved in this process. A covalent conjugate between STxB and saporin was generated to quantitatively sample the membrane translocation step to the cytosol in differentiated monocyte-derived THP-1 cells. We have found that retrograde trafficking to the Golgi complex was not required for STxB-saporin translocation to the cytosol or for STxB-dependent antigen cross-presentation. Depletion of endosomal Rab7 inhibited, and lowering membrane cholesterol levels favored STxB-saporin translocation. Interestingly, experiments with reducible and non-reducible linker-arm-STxB conjugates led to the conclusion that after translocation, STxB remains associated with the cytosolic membrane leaflet. In summary, we report new facets of the endosomal escape process bearing relevance to antigen cross-presentation. PMID:25977475

  14. Air rifle pellet injury to the heart with retrograde caval migration.

    PubMed

    Wascher, R A; Gwinn, B C

    1995-03-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the lethality of modern high-powered street weapons, and their impact on mortality from firearm injuries. Presented is a case of an air rifle BB injury to the chest, resulting in a penetrating injury of the right heart, with apparent retrograde embolization to the inferior vena cava. Although no clinical evidence of pericardial tamponade was present 4 hours following injury, 150 mL of pericardial blood was encountered at median sternotomy, secondary to a right atrial appendage entry wound. This case exemplifies three important principles regarding penetrating chest trauma and air guns: (1) Modern air rifles, capable of muzzle velocities as high as 900 fps, are intrinsically lethal weapons; (2) missiles within the cardiovascular system have a propensity for embolization, and often follow an intuitively unexpected course; and (3) young healthy patients with potentially lethal penetrating cardiac injuries, particularly those caused by low velocity firearms, may appear stable and minimally injured in the emergency room. A strong suspicion of cardiac injury and prompt intervention should be extended to airgun injuries of the thorax.

  15. The Cdc42-selective GAP Rich regulates postsynaptic development and retrograde BMP transsynaptic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Minyeop; Long, A. Ashleigh; Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kim, Sungdae; Bae, Yong Chul

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde bone morphogenetic protein signaling mediated by the Glass bottom boat (Gbb) ligand modulates structural and functional synaptogenesis at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating postsynaptic Gbb release are poorly understood. In this study, we show that Drosophila Rich (dRich), a conserved Cdc42-selective guanosine triphosphatase–activating protein (GAP), inhibits the Cdc42–Wsp pathway to stimulate postsynaptic Gbb release. Loss of dRich causes synaptic undergrowth and strongly impairs neurotransmitter release. These presynaptic defects are rescued by targeted postsynaptic expression of wild-type dRich but not a GAP-deficient mutant. dRich inhibits the postsynaptic localization of the Cdc42 effector Wsp (Drosophila orthologue of mammalian Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, WASp), and manifestation of synaptogenesis defects in drich mutants requires Wsp signaling. In addition, dRich regulates postsynaptic organization independently of Cdc42. Importantly, dRich increases Gbb release and elevates presynaptic phosphorylated Mad levels. We propose that dRich coordinates the Gbb-dependent modulation of synaptic growth and function with postsynaptic development. PMID:21041451

  16. Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media administered at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    PubMed

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-03-01

    Adverse reactions after intravascular administration of iodine contrast media are common and prophylactic regiments consisting of the use of steroids and low osmolality contrast media are highly effective in significantly decreasing the adverse reactions rate. The same type of contrast media are also used for opacification of the biliary tree and the pancreatic duct at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Systemic absorption of contrast media after ERCP routinely occurs. Although the adverse reaction rate appears to be very low the exact incidence remains unknown due to the retrospective nature of all reports. Despite the lack of formal recommendations, numerous prophylactic regiments are routinely used prior to ERCP in patients with history of prior reaction to intravascular contrast media. Moreover, the use of prophylaxis has even expanded to patients with no prior reaction to intravascular contrast media who are somehow perceived to be at increase risk (e.g. shellfish allergy). Recently, the first large scale prospective study reported exceedingly low incidence of adverse reaction to high oslmolality iodine-containing contrast media administered at the time of ERCP done without prophylactic premedication even in patients considered to be at the highest risk (prior severe reaction to intravascular contrast media administration). These data suggest that the use of prophylactic regiments prior to ERCP appears to be unnecessary.

  17. THE SPIN OF THE BLACK HOLE GS 1124–683: OBSERVATION OF A RETROGRADE ACCRETION DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, Warren R.; Miller, Jon M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Ebisawa, Ken E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu

    2014-04-01

    We re-examine archival Ginga data for the black hole binary system GS 1124–683, obtained when the system was undergoing its 1991 outburst. Our analysis estimates the dimensionless spin parameter a {sub *} = cJ/GM{sup 2} by fitting the X-ray continuum spectra obtained while the system was in the ''thermal dominant'' state. For likely values of mass and distance, we find the spin to be a{sub ∗}=−0.25{sub −0.64}{sup +0.05} (90% confidence), implying that the disk is retrograde (i.e., rotating antiparallel to the spin axis of the black hole). We note that this measurement would be better constrained if the distance to the binary and the mass of the black hole were more accurately determined. This result is unaffected by the model used to fit the hard component of the spectrum. In order to be able to recover a prograde spin, the mass of the black hole would need to be at least 15.25 M {sub ☉}, or the distance would need to be less than 4.5 kpc, both of which disagree with previous determinations of the black hole mass and distance. If we allow f {sub col} to be free, we obtain no useful spin constraint. We discuss our results in the context of recent spin measurements and implications for jet production.

  18. Suppressed expression of RETROGRADE-REGULATED MALE STERILITY restores pollen fertility in cytoplasmic male sterile rice plants

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Sota; Toriyama, Kinya

    2009-01-01

    Conflict/reconciliation between mitochondria and nuclei in plants is manifested by the fate of pollen (viable or nonviable) in the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)/fertility restoration (Rf) system. Through positional cloning, we identified a nuclear candidate gene, RETROGRADE-REGULATED MALE STERILITY (RMS) for Rf17, a fertility restorer gene for Chinese wild rice (CW)-type CMS in rice (Oryza sativa L.). RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of RMS restored fertility to a CMS plant, whereas its overexpression in the fertility restorer line induced pollen abortion. The mRNA expression level of RMS in mature anthers depended on cytoplasmic genotype, suggesting that RMS is a candidate gene to be regulated via retrograde signaling. We found that a reduced-expression allele of the RMS gene restored fertility in haploid pollen, whereas a normal-expression allele caused pollen to die in the CW-type CMS. RMS encodes a mitochondrial protein, 178 aa in length, of unknown function, unlike the majority of other Rf genes cloned thus far, which encode pentatricopeptide repeat proteins. The unique features of RMS provide novel insights into retrograde signaling and CMS. PMID:19458265

  19. Retroperitoneal hematoma: an unexpected complication during intervention on an occluded superficial femoral artery via a retrograde popliteal artery approach.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri I; Beedupalli, Jagan; Varma, Jai

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease involvement of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is common. Different endovascular techniques are used successfully for revascularization of this artery. A retrograde approach to chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the SFA through the ipsilateral popliteal artery has been used occasionally if an antegrade approach is not feasible or has failed. Some of the known complications encountered during this approach are arteriovenous fistula formation at the access site, occlusion of the popliteal artery if closure devices are used, and bleeding. There are no reports of perforation or bleeding of the SFA or the external iliac artery (EIA) during a popliteal approach, probably due to lack of flow in the occluded segment of the SFA. We report a case in which a retroperitoneal hematoma occurred due to retrograde blood flow through the established true channel in the proximal SFA and subsequently to the dissection plane with a wire tip perforation in the EIA, which was treated by stopping retrograde filling with prolonged balloon inflation in the distal SFA before the CTO. PMID:23890758

  20. Retrograde Endovenous Laser Ablation through Saphenopopliteal Junctional Area for Incompetent Small Saphenous Vein: Comparison with Antegrade Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Seok; Yun, Ik Jin; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Song Am; Chee, Hyun Keun; Hwang, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of retrograde endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) and to compare it with the conventional antegrade EVLA for incompetent small saphenous vein (SSV). Materials and Methods Small saphenous vein was cannulated via two approaches under ultrasound-guidance. One method involved puncturing the SSV cranially at mid-calf (the antegrade group). If the antegrade puncture into the SSV failed twice, the other approach for puncture was selected that involved puncturing the SSV toward the ankle (the retrograde group). Patients were evaluated in terms of technical & clinical success, closure rates of the SSV, and complications including pain, bruising, or paresthesia at all follow-up visits. Results The 1470 nm endovenous laser was used in all limbs. Technical success was seen in all limbs in both groups (100%). Closure rate in both groups showed about 95%, without significant difference (p = 0.685). Similar linear endovenous energy density was supplied during the EVLA in both groups (p = 0.876). Three frequent complications including bruising, pain, and paresthesia did not show statistical significance between groups (p = 0.465, 0.823, 1.000, respectively). Major complications were absent in both groups. Conclusion The EVLA for the incompetent SSV using a retrograde approach is safe and effective and should be considered the alternative method if the antegrade access fails due to vasospasm or small SSV diameter. PMID:27134525

  1. Case Report of Percutaneous Retrograde Transcollateral Recanalization of the Superior Mesenteric Artery via the Celiac Artery for Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Smith, Brigitte K.; Yamanouchi, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Revascularization for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be achieved through a bypass from the aorta or iliac arteries, embolectomy, open exposure of SMA and retrograde recanalization and stent, or percutaneous antegrade stenting. Flush occlusion of the SMA can make antegrade recanalization very challenging and is usually unsuccessful. We present a novel approach for recanalization of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) via the celiac artery for acute mesenteric ischemia. A 69-year-old lady with previous endarterectomy of SMA and extensive small bowel resection presented with severe abdominal pain, emesis, leukocytosis, and imaging finding of new SMA flush occlusion. She refused to consent for a laparotomy. Percutaneous retrograde transcollateral recanalization of SMA was performed via the celiac artery through the pancreaticoduodenal arcade, and the SMA then stented. This resulted in subsequent resolution of patient's symptoms and discharge. SMA revascularization with retrograde transcollateral wiring technique is an important tool in the armamentarium of the vascular care specialist when antegrade percutaneous approach and open exposure via laparotomy are not an option. PMID:26683911

  2. Dysfunction of Wntless triggers the retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport of Wingless and induces ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Lujun; Pei, Chunli; Lin, Xinhua; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2016-01-01

    Secreted Wnts play diverse roles in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. However, the cell-autonomous effect of unsecreted Wnts remains unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is observed in specialized secretory cells and participates in pathophysiological processes. The correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that Drosophila miR-307a initiates ER stress specifically in wingless (wg)-expressing cells through targeting wntless (wls/evi). This phenotype could be mimicked by retromer loss-of-function or porcupine (porc) depletion, and rescued by wg knockdown, arguing that unsecreted Wg triggers ER stress. Consistently, we found that disrupting the secretion of human Wnt5a also induced ER stress in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we showed that a C-terminal KKVY-motif of Wg is required for its retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport, thus inducing ER stress. Next, we investigated if COPI, the regulator of retrograde transport, is responsible for unsecreted Wg to induce ER stress. To our surprise, we found that COPI acts as a novel regulator of Wg secretion. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unknown Golgi-to-ER retrograde route of Wg, and elucidates a correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress during development. PMID:26887613

  3. Novel retrograde puncture method to establish preperitoneal space for laparoscopic direct inguinal hernia repair with internal ring suturing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Ma, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of a novel retrograde puncture approach to establish a preperitoneal space for laparoscopic direct inguinal hernia repair with inguinal ring suturing. Forty-two patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with retrograde puncture for preperitoneal space establishment as well as inguinal ring suturing between August 2013 and March 2014 at our hospital were enrolled. Preperitoneal space was successfully established in all patients, with a mean establishment time of 6 min. Laparoscopic repairs were successful in all patients, with a mean surgical time of 26±15.1 min. Mean postoperative hospitalization duration was 3.0±0.7 days. Two patients suffered from postoperative local hematomas, which were relieved after puncturing and drainage. Four patients had short-term local pain. There were no cases of chronic pain. Patients were followed up for 6 months to 1 year, and no recurrence was observed. Our results demonstrate that preperitoneal space established by the retrograde puncture technique can be successfully used in adult laparoscopic hernioplasty to avoid intraoperative mesh fixation, and thus reduce medical costs. PMID:27191609

  4. Athermal early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle during nerve-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Geoffrey; Dangle, Pankaj P; Palmer, Kenneth J; Samevedi, Srinivas; Patel, Vipul R

    2009-03-01

    While cancer control is the primary objective of radical prostatectomy, maintenance of sexual function is a priority for the majority of men presenting with prostate cancer. Preservation of the neurovascular bundles is the challenging and critical step of radical prostatectomy with regards to maintenance of potency. The objective of this study is to describe the surgical steps of our hybrid technique: athermal early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle during nerve-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. This technique involves releasing the neurovascular bundle in a retrograde direction from the apex toward the base of the prostate, during an antegrade prostatectomy. It is a hybrid of the traditional open and the laparoscopic approaches to nerve sparing. With this approach we are able to clearly delineate the path of the bundle and avoid inadvertently injuring it when controlling the prostatic pedicle. Our hybrid nerve-sparing technique combines aspects of the traditional open anatomical approach with those of the laparoscopic antegrade approach. The benefits of robotic technology allow a retrograde neurovascular bundle dissection to be performed during an antegrade radical prostatectomy. PMID:27628447

  5. Dual Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Gastric Varix Draining into the Left Adrenal Vein and Left Inferior Phrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Norifumi Ninoi, Teruhisa; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Akira; Sakai, Yukimasa; Sato, Kimihiko; Hamuro, Masao; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2004-09-15

    A 66-year-old woman with a gastric varix, draining into a dilated left adrenal vein and a left inferior phrenic vein, was treated with dual balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Under balloon occlusion of the left adrenal vein and the left inferior phrenic vein, retrograde injection of a sclerosant (5% ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix was performed. Two weeks later, disappearance of flow in the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic ultrasound examination.

  6. Application of a snare technique in retrograde chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention – a step by step practical approach and an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hsiu-Yu; Lee, Wei-Chieh; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Chiung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) has recently become popular among interventional cardiologists. CTO originating from the ostium has been one of the most difficult CTO lesions to treat with PCI for a number of reasons. Our aim was to illustrate a specific technique during retrograde CTO PCI referred to as the “snare technique.” We retrospectively examined the use of “snare technique” among 371 consecutive retrograde CTO PCIs performed at our institution between 2006 and 2015. “Snare technique” was used in 10 patients among the 371 retrograde CTO PCIs. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of patients with or without “snare technique” were similar. The “snare technique” group had significantly fewer side branches at occlusion (30.0% vs 71.2%, P = 0.01) and a higher incidence of externalization (90% vs 25.5%, P < 0.001). The contrast volume was significantly lower in the “snare technique” group (285.0 ± 68.5 vs 379.2 ± 144.0, P = 0.04). The incidence of major complications, retrograde success, or final success did not differ between the groups. The “snare technique” is safe and feasible in retrograde CTO PCI, especially in cases of difficult coronary engagement in cases such as ostial occlusion, challenging coronary anatomy, or retrograde guidewire cannot get in antegrade guiding catheter. PMID:27741138

  7. An investigational study of minimum rotational pump speed to avoid retrograde flow in three centrifugal blood pumps in a pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joseph B; Guan, Yulong; McCoach, Robert; Kunselman, Allen R; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2011-05-01

    During extracorporeal life support with centrifugal blood pumps, retrograde pump flow may occur when the pump revolutions decrease below a critical value determined by the circuit resistance and the characteristics of the pump. We created a laboratory model to evaluate the occurrence of retrograde flow in each of three centrifugal blood pumps: the Rotaflow, the CentriMag, and the Bio-Medicus BP-50. At simulated patient pressures of 60, 80, and 100 mmHg, each pump was evaluated at speeds from 1000 to 2200 rpm and flow rates were measured. Retrograde flow occurred at low revolution speeds in all three centrifugal pumps. The Bio-Medicus pump was the least likely to demonstrate retrograde flow at low speeds, followed by the Rotaflow pump. The CentriMag pump showed the earliest transition to retrograde flow, as well as the highest degree of retrograde flow. At every pump speed evaluated, the Bio-Medicus pump delivered the highest antegrade flow and the CentriMag pump delivered the least.

  8. Insights into the Internalization and Retrograde Trafficking of Dengue 2 Virus in BHK-21 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasmine; Shah, Paresh S.; Cecilia, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) enters cells via endocytosis, traffics to perinuclear (PN) region, the site of morphogenesis and exits by exocytosis. This study aims to understand the role of dynamin II, endosomes, microtubules (MT) and dynein in the early events of DENV replication. Findings Using double immunoflourescence labelling of DENV-2 infected BHK-21 cells it was observed that the surface envelope (E) protein of the virion associated with dynamin II from 0–30 min post infection (p.i.). The sphincter like array of dynamin II supported its pinchase-like activity. The association with endosomes was observed from 0 min at cell periphery to 30 min in the perinuclear (PN) region, suggesting that internalization continued for 30 min. Association of E protein with alpha-tubulin was observed from 8 h indicating that it was the newly translated protein that trafficked on the MT. Dynein was found to associate with the E protein from 4 h in the cytoplasm to 48 h in the PN region and dissociate at 72 h. Association of E protein with dynein was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Overexpression of dynamitin, which disrupts the dynein complex, resulted in loss of trafficking of viral E and core proteins. The findings corroborated with the growth kinetics assessed by quantitation of viral RNA in infected BHK-21 cells. The detection of E protein at 4 h–8 h correlated with detectable increase in viral RNA from 8 h. The detection of high concentrations of E protein in the PN region at 24–48 h coincided with release of virus into the supernatant starting from 36 h p.i. The dissociation of dynein from E protein by 72 h was coincident with maximum release of virus, hinting at a possible negative feedback for viral protein translation. Conclusion The study shows for the first time the association of dynamin II with DENV-2 during entry and dynein dependent retrograde trafficking of DENV proteins on microtubules. PMID:21991304

  9. Performance of bile aspiration plus brushing to diagnose malignant biliary strictures during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Gael S.; Bichard, Philippe; Fior-Gozlan, Michele; Roth, Hubert; Auroux, Jean; Risse, Olivier; Letoublon, Christian; Laverrière, Marie Hélène; Bricault, Ivan; Leroy, Vincent; Decaens, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endobiliary brushing during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the main technique used to diagnose a malignant stricture, but has a poor sensitivity. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of bile aspiration associated with biliary brushing during ERCP to diagnose a malignant stricture, compared to brushing alone. Patients and methods: Between January 2007 and December 2012, all consecutive patients undergoing ERCP to treat a biliary stricture were included. After a biliary sphincterotomy, 3 mL to 10 mL of bile was aspirated into the brush catheter and collected in a dry sterile tube before and after brushing (to yield three samples). Brushing was performed as commonly recommended. Results: One hundred eleven patients (68 males, 43 females) were included; mean age 67 ± 15.4 years. A final diagnosis of malignant stricture was established in 51 patients, including 43 cholangiocarcinomas; 60 patients had benign strictures. Specificity (Sp) and positive predictive values were 100% for all samples. The diagnostic performance of the three-sample combination of bile aspiration + brushing + bile aspiration was significantly greater than brushing alone (P = 0.004): sensitivity (Se) = 84.3 % vs. Se = 66.7 %. The three-sample combination gave a negative predictive value of 88.2 %, and a diagnostic accuracy of 92.8 %. When suspicious results were added to malignant results as positive results, the three-sample combination gave Sp = 91.7 % and Se = 94.1 %. Conclusions: In cases of biliary stricture, conducting bile aspiration before and after brushing significantly increased the ability to diagnose a malignant stricture with a sensitivity of 84.3 % (P = 0.004). PMID:27652308

  10. Impaired retrograde transport by the Dynein/Dynactin complex contributes to Tau-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Butzlaff, Malte; Hannan, Shabab B; Karsten, Peter; Lenz, Sarah; Ng, Josephine; Voßfeldt, Hannes; Prüßing, Katja; Pflanz, Ralf; Schulz, Jörg B; Rasse, Tobias; Voigt, Aaron

    2015-07-01

    The gene mapt codes for the microtubule-associated protein Tau. The R406W amino acid substitution in Tau is associated with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) characterized by Tau-positive filamentous inclusions. These filamentous Tau inclusions are present in a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To gain more insights into the pathomechanism of tauopathies, we performed an RNAi-based large-scale screen in Drosophila melanogaster to identify genetic modifiers of Tau[R406W]-induced toxicity. A collection of RNAi lines, putatively silencing more than 7000 genes, was screened for the ability to modify Tau[R406W]-induced toxicity in vivo. This collection covered more than 50% of all protein coding fly genes and more than 90% of all fly genes known to have a human ortholog. Hereby, we identified 62 genes that, when silenced by RNAi, modified Tau-induced toxicity specifically. Among these 62 modifiers were three subunits of the Dynein/Dynactin complex. Analysis on segmental nerves of fly larvae showed that pan neural Tau[R406W] expression and concomitant silencing of Dynein/Dynactin complex members synergistically caused strong pathological changes within the axonal compartment, but only minor changes at synapses. At the larval stage, these alterations did not cause locomotion deficits, but became evident in adult flies. Our data suggest that Tau-induced detrimental effects most likely originate from axonal rather than synaptic dysfunction and that impaired retrograde transport intensifies detrimental effects of Tau in axons. In conclusion, our findings contribute to the elucidation of disease mechanisms in tauopathies like FTDP-17 or AD. PMID:25794683

  11. The Retrograde Ventriculosinusal Shunt in an Animal Experimental Model of Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Fernando Campos Gomes; Becco, Rodrigo; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco; Souza, Podalyro Amaral de; Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes de; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-01-01

    Currently, hydrocephalus treatment is performed mainly with ventriculoperitoneal shunting. This experimental study aims at assessing whether the experimental model of hydrocephalus in dogs is applicable to the laboratory study of the retrograde ventriculosinusal shunt (RVSS). Four mongrel dogs were assessed. After randomization, the animals were divided into two groups: an experimental group that underwent the induction of hydrocephalus/RVSS and a control group, for the measurement of the mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure and pressure in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The controls presented a mean arterial pressure of 68 mm Hg (71 and 65), an intracranial pressure of 163 mm H2O (149.6 and 176.8) and a pressure at the SSS of 40 mm H2O (40 and 40). The kaolin injection into the cisterna magna at a concentration of 0.3 mg/ml was capable of inducing the clinical and radiological mechanism of hydrocephalus (intracranial pressure = 250 mm H2O, pressure at the SSS = 50 mm H2O). The caliber of the SSS was 2.5 ± 1.0 mm. The fact that the SSS caliber of the dog was the same size as the external diameter of the catheter used resulted in the complete obstruction of the SSS when the catheter was inserted. We believe we could design and perform an experimental model to test the RVSS. It is applicable and feasible. The model of hydrocephalus, the surgical apparatus and the scenario were adequate, but the shunt system needs to be proportionally made to the canine anatomy.

  12. When the past is lost: focal retrograde amnesia. Focus on the "functional" form.

    PubMed

    Stracciari, Andrea; Fonti, Cristina; Guarino, Maria

    2008-01-01

    We report the clinical findings and neuropsychological profiles of a sample of patients exhibiting a focal retrograde amnesia (FRA) seen consecutively during the period 1992-2007. The cohort comprised 13 patients, five males, with a mean age of 30 years (range 16-49). They were given a neurologic examination, psychiatric interview and formal neuropsychological examination (all but one) during the amnesic phase, underwent neuroimaging, and were followed up for six months to ten years. All presented with an acute amnesia characterized by an impaired recollection of memories predating the acute event, with spared or minimally and transiently affected anterograde memory, thus consistent with FRA. The events triggering FRA varied widely: mild to severe head injury, road accident without head injury, seizure, dissociative fugue, BDZ overdose, posttraumatic headache, syncope, migraine attack, acute distress. The neuropsychological hallmark of FRA was a selective or prominent impairment of autobiographical memory. The defect was often so severe as to cover most or all of the patients' lives and, in some cases, to erase the knowledge of their own identity. Conventional neuroimaging (brain CT and MRI) was unimpressive. Cerebral SPECT/PET disclosed unilateral frontal hypoperfusion in three (two left). All but one patient fully recovered, time of recovery ranging from three days to six months. FRA is a condition reflecting a block of memory function triggered by heterogeneous events, including both physical and psychic insults. Analogies shared with the more frequently encountered and better known condition of transient global amnesia suggests common pathogenetic mechanisms. A tentative nosographic classification of FRA is finally offered. PMID:19641249

  13. Autonomous Orbit Determination between a Lunar Satellite and a Distant Retrograde Orbit Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Tang, Jingshi; Liu, Lin; Liu, Peng

    Currently, orbit determination of lunar satellites heavily rely on ground stations on the Earth. The observation data suffers from problems such as low accuracy and bad visibility. An efficient way to release the burden of the ground stations and to enhance the observation accuracy is to use the inter-satellite range data between two lunar satellites. However, a well-known problem of only using this type of data is the overall rotation of the orbital plane (undetermined orbit inclination, ascending nod and perigee). Some external reference sources should be introduced into the system to avoid the overall rotation. Recently, an interesting idea is to use a probe around the Earth-Moon CLP (collinear libration point) as the reference source. The orbit of the CLP probe is unknown a priori. It is determined simultaneously with the lunar satellite’s orbit by using the inter-satellite range data between them. There are many advantages of this idea, but also some problems. One main problem is caused by the strong instability of the motions around the CLPs. Probes usually need a frequent orbit control, but the accuracy of the orbit determination of the CLP probes from a short arc between two maneuvers is usually unsatisfied. In this contribution, another kind of special probe other than the CLP probe is considered. It lies on a DRO (distant retrograde orbit) around the Moon. The DROs usually have much better stability property than the CLP orbits, so DRO probes don’t need a frequent orbit control. At the same time, our studies show that the OD accuracy is comparable to that of the CLP probe. The work is firstly done in the CRTBP (circular restricted three-body problem) model, by studying the OD results of different amplitude (both in plane and out of plane) for the DROs. Then, the study is generated to the real force model of the Earth-Moon system.

  14. Additive effects of forgetting and fornix transfection in the temporal gradient of retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Gaffan, D

    1993-10-01

    Nine Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) learned to discriminate among 320 complex naturalistic scenes (Set A) for food reward. Six months later they learned to discriminate among a further 192 scenes (Set B). Immediately after learning Set B the animals were given a preoperative retention test of both sets, consisting of a single trial with every scene they had learned. Three monkeys were then operated upon to transect the fornix, the other six forming an unoperated control group. Two weeks after operation the scenes were presented once each in a postoperative retention test. The animals with fornix transection showed significantly poorer memory than the control animals at the postoperative retention test. Furthermore, within the fornix-transected animals' performance, postoperative amnesia for Set B was more marked than amnesia for Set A, by comparison with the animals' own preoperative retention of the two sets. However, a similar pattern of performance was also seen within the control animals' results, in that they forgot more of Set B than of Set A in the interval between the preoperative and postoperative retention tests. There was no significant difference between the groups in the gradient of forgetting, defined as the difference between forgetting of Set B and forgetting of Set A in the interval between the preoperative and postoperative retention tests. These results give no support to the idea that the severity of retrograde amnesia is graded as a function of the remoteness of the memory at the onset of amnesia, and they give some indication of possible reasons why the impression of such a gradient is frequently reported clinically. PMID:8290022

  15. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. Materials and Methods From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Results Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. Conclusion PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:26957908

  16. Retrogradational fluvio-paralic coal-forming environments, South Island, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M. ); Sykes, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The West Coast Region of South Island, New Zealand, records Paleogene history of peneplanation, fluvio-paralic aggradation, and marine transgression. At Buller coalfield, Eocene Brunner coal measures rest unconformably on Paleozoic to Cretaceous basement rocks and interfinger upward with Eocene, marine Kaiata Formation. During Eocene, rising sea level controlled the architecture of fluvio-paralic deposits and strongly influenced the origin and properties of Brunner coals. The Brunner coal measures contain as much as 40-ft thick, high to low volatile bituminous coal beds with 0.5-16% ash and 1-9% sulfur that is greatest in the upper coal beds. The Brunner can be divided informally into lower and upper coal measures. The lower coal measures are dominated by pebble conglomerates and multierosional, trough-crossbedded conglomeratic sandstones; the upper coal measures by stacked, multilateral, trough crossbedded, granular sandstones with subordinate siltstones and mudstones. Bioturbated sandstones with brackish-marine Ophiomorpha-like trace fossils are common in the upper coal measures. The lower coal measures were deposited in exhumed paleovalleys of the peneplain surface. These valleys, as deep as 50 ft, were initially aggraded by gravelly braided streams. Raised bogs formed in abandoned braid valleys and extended onto surrounding basement highs. The upper coal measures were deposited in sandy bedload, meandering streams with paralic wave-reworked deltas, and attached barriers. Peat bogs in the paralic environments accumulated thin coals, whereas bogs that developed on abandoned meander ridges formed thick, lenticular coals. Sea-level rise resulted in inundation introducing sulfur into the peat and resulted in high sinuosity fluvial architecture. Gradual incursion of brackish-marine waters favored bioturbation of paralic sediments along retrograding coastlines.

  17. Is it necessary to actively remove stone fragments during retrograde intrarenal surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, You Jin; Bak, Dong Jae; Chung, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Based on the experiences of our center, we sought to verify the necessity of actively removing stones during retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for the management of renal stones. Materials and Methods From March 2010 to March 2015, 248 patients underwent RIRS at our center. We classified these patients into 2 groups according to the performance of active stone removal; group A (n=172) included the patients whose stones were actively removed using a stone basket, and group B (n=76) included the patients whose stones were fragmented with laser lithotripsy without active removal of the fragments. We retrospectively compared the operation time, success rate, and complication rate between the 2 groups. Results There were no significant differences between groups A and B in terms of mean age (56.1 years vs. 58.6 years), male to female ratio (115:57 vs. 46:30), mean body mass index (24.5 kg/m2 vs. 25.0 kg/m2), mean preoperative size of stone (11.1 mm vs. 11.1 mm), the ratio of unilateral and bilateral stones (136:36 vs. 64:12), success rate (89.0% vs. 86.8%), operation time (82.5 minutes vs. 82.1 minutes), overall complication rate (9.9% vs. 11.8%), incidence of febrile urinary tract infection (6.4% vs. 2.6%), gross hematuria (1.7% vs. 2.6%), or postoperative de novo hydronephrosis (2.9% vs. 5.3%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that during RIRS, fragmentation only, without the active removal of stones, is a safe and effective technique in which the surgical outcomes are comparable to those of procedures involving the active removal of stones. PMID:27437537

  18. Retrograde tracing of spinal cord connections to the cervix with pregnancy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Michael A; Groves, Mary M; Yellon, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the uterus, the cervix is well innervated during pregnancy and the density of nerve fibers increases before birth. To assess neural connections between the cervix and the spinal cord, the cervix of pregnant mice was injected with the trans-synaptic retrograde neural tract tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV). After 5 days, the virus was present in nerve cells and fibers in specific areas of the sensory, autonomic, and motor subdivisions of the thoracolumbar spinal cord. In nonpregnant controls, the virus was predominantly distributed in laminae I–III in the dorsal gray sensory areas with the heaviest label in the substantia gelatinosa compared with the autonomic or motor areas. Labeled cells and processes were sparse in other regions, except for a prominent cluster in the intermediolateral column (lamina VII). Photomicrographs of spinal cord sections were digitized, and the total area with the virus was estimated. Compared with nonpregnant controls, the area with PRV was significantly decreased in all the spinal cord subdivisions in pregnant mice except in the intermediolateral column. However, areas with the virus were equivalent in mice injected with PRV at 4 days or 1 day before birth. These findings suggest that the predominant innervation of the murine cervix is from the sensory regions of the thoracolumbar spinal cord, and that these connections diminish with pregnancy. The results raise the possibility that the remaining connections from sensory and autonomic subdivisions, particularly the intermediolateral column, of the thoracolumbar spinal cord may be important for increased density of nerve fibers in the cervix as pregnancy nears term. PMID:19965985

  19. Characteristic Findings of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis on Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography: Which is the Most Common Finding?

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad; Shahnazi, Anahita; Rasoulzadeh, Aida; Shams, Esmaeel; Mohammadi, Manijeh; Darabi, Farideh; Behdad, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease and one of the most common indications for liver transplantation in adults. There are conflicting data regarding characteristic findings of PSC disease on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP). We undertook this study to clarify whether there is a specific pattern of involvement of the biliary tract in patients with PSC and to evaluate features of PSC disease on ERCP in order to be able to manage this disease better. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients admitted to Taleghani Hospital in 2004–2010 and diagnosed to have PSC on the basis of typical cholangiographic findings in combination with clinical and laboratory data. Patients suspected to have secondary sclerosing cholangitis were excluded. Demographic and clinical data were recorded, along with cholangiographic findings and the frequency of large duct and small duct PSC. Results Forty-five patients of mean age 34.8 (range 15–66) years were included. Twenty-nine patients (64.4%) had inflammatory bowel disease, and the frequency of large duct PSC and small duct PSC was 93.4% and 6.6%, respectively. The intrahepatic ducts alone were involved in 11 (24.4%) patients and the extrahepatic ducts were involved in 14 (31.1%), with 17 (37.7%) patients having both intrahepatic and extrahepatic PSC. Three (6.6%) patients did not have bile duct involvement on ERCP, and their disease was diagnosed by liver biopsy as small duct PSC. The most common type of cholangiographic feature of intrahepatic duct involvement was type 2, found in 15 (33.3%) patients, with type 3 being the most common type of extrahepatic duct involvement and detected in 16 (35.5%) patients. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the most common PSC finding on ERCP is involvement of both the extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, with small duct PSC being less common than large duct PSC. PMID:24833928

  20. Comparison of Clinical Effects of Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol Used for Analgesia in Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, Nuran; Bakan, Nurten; Karaören, Gülşah; Tomruk, Senay Göksu; Sökmen, Hacı Mehmet; Yanlı, Yonca; Akçay, Mehmet Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare 50 mg dexketoprofen vs. 1 g paracetamol that were parenterally administered before endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) under sedoanalgesia with comparable anaesthesia depth regarding haemodynamic, pain, narcotic analgesic requirement, recovery and post-procedural cognitive functions. Methods Overall, 80 ASA I–III patients aged 18–75 years who were undergoing scheduled ERCP were randomly assigned into three groups. In all patients, the mini-mental test (MMT) was conducted before the procedure. No drug was administered to controls (Group C; n=26); patients were transferred to ERCP unite 30 min after parenteral dexketoprofen (50 mg) in group D (n=27) and paracetamol (1 g) in group P (n=27). The standard monitoring was applied. After intravenously administering loading doses of midazolam (0.02 mgkg) and propofol (1 mg kg−1), propofol infusion was administered at a dose of 2–4 mg kg−1 h−1 to maintain a bispectral index value of 50–70. Fentanyl (0.05 μg kg−1) was intravenously administered when patients experienced pain. Haemodynamic effects, additional analgesic requirement, adverse effects during procedure, time to reach Aldrete score of 9 and satisfaction of an endoscopist and patient were recorded. MMT was repeated 3 h after completing the procedure. Results Fentanyl requirement during the procedure was significantly low in group D (p<0.05). Apnoea during the procedure and nausea after the procedure were least common in group D while significantly lower than group C (p<0.05). There was no significant difference with respect to MMT scores and endoscopist’s satisfaction, while patient satisfaction was greater in group P. Conclusion Parenterally administered dexketoprofen provided better haemodynamic effect and pain control, thereby decreasing incidence of adverse events by reducing the requirement for narcotic analgesics. PMID:27366549

  1. Immune dysfunction in patients with obstructive jaundice before and after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Camara, Miguel; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Zaitoun, Abed M.; Eremin, Oleg; Aithal, Guruprasad P.

    2016-01-01

    This prospective observational study investigated monocyte cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in patients with obstructive jaundice (OJ) before and after endoscopic biliary drainage. Dendritic cell (DC) subsets and their expression of co-stimulatory molecules were also studied. Forty patients with OJ and ten non-jaundiced patients with normal gastroscopy findings were recruited. Ten healthy volunteers provided control blood samples for immunological assays. Patients with OJ had blood and duodenal mucosa sampled at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and further blood sampled during the recovery phase. Monocyte cytokine responses to LPS, DC subsets and co-stimulatory molecule expression were compared with controls. Duodenal morphology and occludin expression were also assessed. Monocytes obtained before ERCP from jaundiced patients demonstrated reduced cytokine responses to endotoxin compared with controls (IL-1β: 2678 compared with 4631 pg/ml, P=0.04 and IL-6: 3442 compared with 6157 pg/ml, P=0.002). Monocytes from patients with malignancy had poorer responses to endotoxin than from those with benign OJ (IL-1β: 2025 compared with 3332 pg/ml, P=0.001). After ERCP, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes obtained from jaundiced patients increased (IL-1β: 2150 compared with 2520 pg/ml, P=0.03 and IL-6: 2488 compared with 3250 pg/ml, P=0.01). Occludin expression (85 compared with 95%, P=0.004) and mean duodenal villus height (334 compared with 404 μm, P=0.03) were lower in jaundiced patients. Before biliary drainage, patients with OJ had a higher percentage of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and greater mDC expression of CD40 (P=0.04) and CD86 (P=0.04). Monocytes from patients with OJ had lower proinflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS, an effect reversed following biliary drainage. PMID:27252406

  2. More support for the extreme S-type retrograde planet in the spectroscopic binary ν Octantis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Benjamin Earl; Ramm, David; Endl, Michael; Gunn, Fraser; Hearnshaw, John; Kilmartin, Pam; Bergmann, Christoph; Brogt, Erik

    2015-12-01

    ν Octantis is a single-lined spectroscopic binary system consisting of a K-giant primary and a secondary orbiting near 1050 days. Radial velocity observations reveal an additional ~400 day periodicity with a semi-amplitude of 40 m/s. If this signal is planetary in nature, the ν Octantis system would be unique amongst all known exoplanet systems in that long-term stability can only be achieved if the orbit is retrograde with respect to the stellar companions (i.e. mutual inclination ~ 180°).Spectral line analyses suggest this signal is unlikely to be due to surface activity or pulsations (Ramm 2015). We also rule out an exotic scenario where the secondary itself is a binary.We report an analysis of 1437 radial velocity measurements taken with HERCULES at the Mt. John Observatory spanning nearly 13 years, 1180 being new iodine iodine-cell velocities (2009-2013). The sensitive orbital dynamics of the two-companion model allow us to constrain the three-dimensional orbital architecture directly from the observations. Posterior samples obtained from an n-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (Nelson et al. 2014) yields a mutual inclination of 158.4 ± 1.2°. None of these are dynamically stable beyond 106 years. However, a grid search around the posterior sample suggests that they are in close proximity to a region of parameter space that is stable for at least 106 years.If real, the tight orbital architecture here imposes a considerable challenge for formation of this dynamically extreme system.

  3. ν Octantis: a conjectured S-type retrograde planet in a spectroscopic binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Benjamin E.; Ramm, David; Endl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ν Octantis is a single-lined spectroscopic binary system consisting of a K-giant primary and a secondary orbiting near 1050 days. Radial velocity observations reveal an additional ~400 day periodicity with a semi-amplitude of 40 m/s. If this signal is planetary in nature, the ν Octantis system would be unique amongst all known exoplanet systems in that long-term stability can only be achieved if the orbit is retrograde with respect to the stellar companions (i.e. mutual inclination ~ 180°).Spectral line analyses suggest this signal is unlikely to be due to surface activity or pulsations (Ramm 2015). We also rule out an exotic scenario where the secondary itself is a binary.We report an analysis of 1437 radial velocity measurements taken with HERCULES at the Mt. John Observatory spanning nearly 13 years, 1180 being new iodine iodine-cell velocities (2009-2013). The sensitive orbital dynamics of the two-companion model allow us to constrain the three-dimensional orbital architecture directly from the observations. Posterior samples obtained from an n-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (Nelson et al. 2014) yields a mutual inclination of 158.4 ± 1.2°. None of these are dynamically stable beyond 106 years. However, a grid search around the posterior sample suggests that they are in close proximity to a region of parameter space that is stable for at least 106 years.If real, the tight orbital architecture here imposes a considerable challenge for formation of this dynamically extreme system.

  4. Afferent projections to the different medial amygdala subdivisions: a retrograde tracing study in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Otero-García, Marcos; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    The medial amygdaloid nucleus (Me) is a key node in the socio-sexual brain, composed of anterior (MeA), posteroventral (MePV) and posterodorsal (MePD) subdivisions. These subdivisions have been suggested to play a different role in reproductive and defensive behaviours. In the present work we analyse the afferents of the three Me subdivisions using restricted injections of fluorogold in female outbred CD1 mice. The results reveal that the MeA, MePV and MePD share a common pattern of afferents, with some differences in the density of retrograde labelling in several nuclei. Common afferents to Me subdivisions include: the accessory olfactory bulbs, piriform cortex and endopiriform nucleus, chemosensory amygdala (receiving direct inputs from the olfactory bulbs), posterior part of the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTM), CA1 in the ventral hippocampus and posterior intralaminar thalamus. Minor projections originate from the basolateral amygdala and amygdalo-hippocampal area, septum, ventral striatum, several allocortical and periallocortical areas, claustrum, several hypothalamic structures, raphe and parabrachial complex. MeA and MePV share minor inputs from the frontal cortex (medial orbital, prelimbic, infralimbic and dorsal peduncular cortices), but differ in the lack of main olfactory projections to the MePV. By contrast, the MePD receives preferential projections from the rostral accessory olfactory bulb, the posteromedial BSTM and the ventral premammillary nucleus. In summary, the common pattern of afferents to the Me subdivisions and their interconnections suggest that they play cooperative instead of differential roles in the various behaviours (e.g., sociosexual, defensive) in which the Me has been shown to be involved.

  5. Anesthesia for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: target-controlled infusion versus standard volatile anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Motiaa, Youssef; Bensghir, Mustapha; Jaafari, Abdelhamid; Meziane, Mohammed; Ahtil, Redouane; Kamili, Noureddine Drissi

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a technique used both for diagnosis and for the treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases. ERCP has some anesthetic implications and specific complications. The primary outcome aim was to compare two protocols in terms of time of extubation. We also compared anesthetic protocols in terms of hemodynamic and respiratory instability, antispasmodics needs, endoscopist satisfaction, and recovery room stay. Methods Patients were randomized into two groups standard anesthesia group (Gr: SA) in whom induction was done by propofol, fentanyl and cisatracurium and maintenance was done by a mixture of oxygen, nitrousoxide (50%:50%) and sevoflurane; and intravenous anesthesia group to target concentration (Gr: TCI) in whom induction and maintenance of anesthesia were done with propofol with a target 0.5-2 μg/mL, and remifentanil with a target of 0.75-2 ng/mL. Results 90 patients were included. Extubation time was shorter in Gr: TCI, 15±2.6 vs. 27.4±7.1 min in Gr: SA (P<0.001). The incidence of hypotension was higher in GrL: SA (P=0.009). Satisfaction was better in Gr: TCI (P=0.003). Antispasmodic need was higher in Gr: SA (P=0.023). Six patients in Gr: SA group had desaturation in post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) versus one patient from Gr: TCI (P=0.049). Patients in Gr: TCI had shorter PACU stay 40.2±7.3 vs. 58.7±12.4 min (P<0.001). Conclusion The use of TCI mode allows better optimization of general anesthesia technique during ERCP. PMID:27708522

  6. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Sanna, C; Saracco, G M; Reggio, D; Moro, F; Ricchiuti, A; Strignano, P; Mirabella, S; Ciccone, G; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The most frequent complications are strictures and leakages in OLT cases with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction (D-D), which can be treated with dilatation or stent placement during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), although this procedure is burdened with potentially severe complications, such as retroperitoneal perforation, acute pancreatitis, septic cholangitis, bleeding, recurrence of stones, strictures due to healing process. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of this treatment and the complications related to the procedure. Among 1634 adult OLTs, we compared postprocedural complications and mortality rates with a group of 5852 nontransplanted patients (n-OLTs) who underwent ERCP. Of 472 (28,8%) post-OLT biliary complications, 319 (67.6%) occurred in D-D biliary anstomosis cases and 94 (29.5%) patients underwent 150 ERCP sessions. Among 49/80 patients (61.2%) who completed the procedure, ERCP treatment was successful. Overall complication rate was 10.7% in OLT and 12.8% in n-OLT (P = NS). Compared with the n-OLT group, post-ERCP bleeding was more frequent in OLT (5.3% vs 1.3%, P = .0001), while the incidence of pancreatitis was lower (4.7% vs 9.6%, P = .04). Procedure-related mortality rate was 0% in OLT and 0.1% in n-OLT (P = NS). ERCP is a safe procedure for post-OLT biliary complications in the presence of a D-D anastomosis. Morbidity and mortality related with this procedure are acceptable and similar to those among nontransplanted population. PMID:19460551

  7. Retrograde intrarenal surgery for lower pole renal calculi smaller than one centimeter

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hemendra Navinchandra

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recently there has been an increasing interest in the application of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for managing renal calculi. In this review we discuss its application for the management of lower calyceal (LC) stones less than 10 mm in maximum dimension. Materials and Methods: Literature was reviewed to summarize the technical development in flexible ureterorenoscopy and its accessories. Further, the indications, outcome and limitations of RIRS for LC calculi < 1 cm were reviewed. Results: Use of access sheath and displacement of LC stone to a more favorable location is increasingly employed during RIRS. Patients who are anticoagulated or obese; those with adverse stone composition and those with concomitant ureteral calculi are ideally suited for RIRS. It is used as a salvage therapy for shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) refractory calculi but with a lower success rate (46-62%). It is also increasingly being used as a primary modality for treating LC calculi, with a stone-free rate ranging from 50-90.9%. However, the criteria for defining stone-free status are not uniform in the literature. The impact of intrarenal anatomy on stone-free rates after RIRS is unclear; however, unfavorable lower calyceal anatomy may hamper the efficacy of the procedure. The durability of flexible ureteroscopes remains an important issue. Conclusions: RIRS continues to undergo significant advancements and is emerging as a first-line procedure for challenging stone cases. The treatment of choice for LC calculi < 1 cm depends on patient's preference and the individual surgeon's preference and level of expertise. PMID:19468515

  8. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  9. Lower Provider Volume is Associated with Higher Failure Rates for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Imler, Timothy D.; Xu, Huiping; Teal, Evgenia; French, Dustin D.; Imperiale, Thomas F.; Rosenman, Marc B.; Wilson, Jeffery; Hui, Siu L.; Sherman, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Background Among physicians who perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), the relationship between procedure volume and outcome is unknown. Objective Quantify the ERCP volume-outcome relationship by measuring provider-specific failure rates, hospitalization rates and other quality measures. Research Design Retrospective Cohort Subjects 16,968 ERCPs performed by 130 physicians between 2001-2011, identified in the Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) Measures Physicians were classified by their average annual INPC volume and stratified into low (<25/year) and high (≥25/year). Outcomes included failed procedures, defined as repeat ERCP, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or surgical exploration of the bile duct ≤ 7 days after the index procedure, hospitalization rates, and 30-day mortality. Results Among 15,514 index ERCPs, there were 1,163 (7.5%) failures; the failure rate was higher among low (9.5%) compared to high volume (5.7%) providers (p<0.001). A second ERCP within 7 days (a subgroup of failure rate) occurred more frequently when the original ERCP was performed by a low (4.1%) versus a high volume physician (2.3%, p=0.013). Patients were more frequently hospitalized within 24 hours when the ERCP was performed by a low (28.3%) vs. high volume physician (14.8%, p=0.002). Mortality within 30 days was similar (low – 1.9%, high – 1.9%). Among low volume physicians and after adjusting, the odds of having a failed procedure decreased 3.3% (95% CI 1.6-5.0%, p<0.001) with each additional ERCP performed per year. Conclusions Lower provider volume is associated with higher failure rate for ERCP, and greater need for post-procedure hospitalization. PMID:24226304

  10. Efficacy and safety of emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for acute cholangitis in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tohda, Gen; Ohtani, Masahiro; Dochin, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the efficacy and safety of emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in elderly patients with acute cholangitis. METHODS From June 2008 to May 2016, emergency ERCPs were performed in 207 cases of acute cholangitis at our institution. Patients were classified as elderly if they were aged 80 years and older (n = 102); controls were under the age of 80 years (n = 105). The patients’ medical records were retrospectively reviewed for comorbidities, laboratory data, etiology of cholangitis (presence of biliary stones, biliary stricture and malignancy), details of the ERCP (therapeutic approaches, technical success rates, procedure duration), ERCP-related complications and mortality. RESULTS The frequency of comorbidities was higher in the elderly group than the control group (91.2% vs 67.6%). Periampullary diverticulum was observed in the elderly group at a higher frequency than the control group (24.5% vs 13.3%). Between the groups, there was no significant difference in the technical success rates (95.1% vs 95.2%) or endoscopic procedure durations. With regard to the frequency of ERCP-related complications, there was no significant difference between the two groups (6.9% vs 6.7%), except for a lower rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis in the elderly group than in the control group (1.0% vs 3.8%). Neither angiographic nor surgical intervention was required in any of the cases with ERCP-related complications. There was no mortality during the observational periods. CONCLUSION Emergency ERCP for acute cholangitis can be performed safely even in elderly patients aged 80 years and older. PMID:27729744

  11. Characterization of a Novel Yeast SNARE Protein Implicated in Golgi Retrograde Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Pokrovskaya, Irina D.; McNew, James A.; Waters, M. Gerard

    1997-01-01

    The protein trafficking machinery of eukaryotic cells is employed for protein secretion and for the localization of resident proteins of the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Protein transit between organelles is mediated by transport vesicles that bear integral membrane proteins (v-SNAREs) which selectively interact with similar proteins on the target membrane (t-SNAREs), resulting in a docked vesicle. A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNARE protein, which has been termed Vti1p, was identified by its sequence similarity to known SNAREs. Vti1p is a predominantly Golgi-localized 25-kDa type II integral membrane protein that is essential for yeast viability. Vti1p can bind Sec17p (yeast SNAP) and enter into a Sec18p (NSF)-sensitive complex with the cis-Golgi t-SNARE Sed5p. This Sed5p/Vti1p complex is distinct from the previously described Sed5p/Sec22p anterograde vesicle docking complex. Depletion of Vti1p in vivo causes a defect in the transport of the vacuolar protein carboxypeptidase Y through the Golgi. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Vti1p show a similar carboxypeptidase Y trafficking defect, but the secretion of invertase and gp400/hsp150 is not significantly affected. The temperature-sensitive vti1 growth defect can be rescued by the overexpression of the v-SNARE, Ykt6p, which physically interacts with Vti1p. We propose that Vti1p, along with Ykt6p and perhaps Sft1p, acts as a retrograde v-SNARE capable of interacting with the cis-Golgi t-SNARE Sed5p. PMID:9398683

  12. The effect of retrograde and anterograde glucose administration on memory performance in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Sünram-Lea, Sandra I; Foster, Jonathan K; Durlach, Paula; Perez, Catalina

    2002-08-21

    Memory for a list of 20 words can be enhanced by preceding learning by consumption of 25 g of glucose, compared with consumption of an equally sweet aspartame solution (Psychopharmacology 137 (1998) 259; Psychopharmacology 157 (2001) 46). However, using this anterograde administration procedure, it is impossible to separate whether glucose affects encoding, consolidation, or retrieval. The present placebo-controlled, double-blind study investigated the effect of anterograde and retrograde administration on memory performance in healthy young participants. In order to evaluate whether post-acquisition administration of glucose can improve memory performance and to compare possible differences in the size of the effect, participants were administered 25 g of glucose immediately before or immediately after presentation of a word list. Moreover, in order to investigate whether the effect of glucose administration on memory performance is time-dependent, a third group received 25 g of glucose 15 min before learning the word list. Word- list recall was tested 30 min and 24 h after word list presentation. Measures of spatial memory performance and working memory were also evaluated. The results of this study showed that both pre- and post-acquisition oral glucose administration (25 g) can improve memory performance. However, as the time interval between anterograde glucose administration and memory encoding increased, the glucose memory facilitation effect decreased. This study provides evidence that glucose enhances memory performance in healthy young people even when it is given after learning has taken place, and that this effect is observed at least up to 24 h after glucose administration. Moreover, it provides evidence that the effect of glucose on memory performance may be time-dependent, as the enhancement of retention was decreased when the administration-learning interval was increased.

  13. Locking plate versus retrograde intramedullary nail fixation for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Shi, Zhongmin; Mei, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis (TTCA) surgery is indicated for the end-stage disease of the tibiotalar and subtalar joints. Although different fixation technique of TTCA has been proposed to achieve high fusion rate and low complication rate, there is still no consensus upon this point. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy of retrograde intramedullary nail fixation (RINF) and locking plate fixation (LPF) for TTCA. Materials and Methods: Fifty four patients who underwent TTCA through the lateral approach with lateral fibular osteotomy using RINF (32 patients, 18 male/14 female, mean age: 48) or LPF (22 patients, 12 male/10 female, mean age: 51) between January 2007 and January 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical characteristics, surgery (operation time, blood loss) outcomes (postoperative fusion rates, visual analog scale and foot and ankle surgery score and complications) were compared. Results: The LPF group had a shorter operation time (72.3 ± 9.2 vs. 102.8 ± 11.1 min, P < 0.001), less blood loss (75.9 ± 20.2 vs. 140.0 ± 23.8 ml, P < 0.001) and less intraoperative fluoroscopy sessions (3.6 ± 0.9 vs. 8.4 ± 1.3, P < 0.001) than the RINF group. Patients were followed up for 12–24 months (mean of 16.2 months). Both groups had similar postoperative fusion rates (90.6% and 95.4%) and the LPF group showed a nonsignificant lower complication rate (18.2% vs. 28.1% respectively). Patients at higher risk on nonunion due to rheumatoid diseases may have a lower nonunion rate with LPF than RINF (one out of eight vs. three out of nine, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The LPF for TTCA was simpler to perform compared with RINF, but with similar postoperative outcomes and complication rates. PMID:26015614

  14. Synthesis and characterization of retrograded starch nanoparticles through homogenization and miniemulsion cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbo; Zheng, Jiong; Zhang, Fusheng; Kan, Jianquan

    2016-10-20

    A new and convenient route to synthesizing retrograded starch nanoparticles (RS3NPs) through homogenization combined with a water-in-oil miniemulsion cross-linking technique was developed. The RS3NPs were optimized using Box-Behnken experimental design. Homogenization pressure (X1), oil/water ratio (X2), and surfactant (X3) were selected as independent variables, whereas particle size was considered as a dependent variable. Results indicated that homogenization pressure was the main contributing variable for particle size. The optimum values for homogenization pressure, oil/water ratio, and surfactant were 30MPa, 9.34:1, and 2.54g, respectively, whereas the particle size was predicted to be 288.2 nm. Morphological, physical, chemical, and functional properties of the RS3NPs were the assessed. Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering images showed that RS3NP granules were broken down to size of about 222.2nm. X-ray diffraction results revealed a disruption in crystallinity. The RS3NPs exhibited a slight decrease in To, but Tp and Tc increased and narrowest Tc-To. The solubility and swelling power were also increased. New peaks at 1594.84 and 1403.65cm(-1) were observed in the FTIR graph. However, homogenization minimally influenced the antidigestibility of RS3NPs. The absorption properties improved, and the adsorption kinetic described the contact time on the adsorption of captopril onto RS3NPs. In vitro release experiment indicated that the drug was released as follows: 21% after 2h in SGF, 42.78% at the end of 8h (2h in SGF and 6h in SIF), and 92.55% after 12h in SCF. These findings may help better utilize RS3NP in biomedical applications as a drug delivery material. PMID:27474611

  15. Prograde and retrograde metamorphic processes in high-pressure subduction zone serpentinites from East Thessaly, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsovitis, Petros

    2016-04-01

    highly comparable with the P-T estimates from the East Thessaly metabasic rocks (˜350 ° C; P≈10-11 kbars)[5], suggesting that the entire metaophiolitic formation underwent blueschist facies metamorphism, comparable with high-pressure metaophiolitic formations appearing in Evia, Attica and the Cyclades. The East Thessaly serpentinites exhibit significantly high PM-normalized Pb, U enrichments and rather high Cs, La, As and Sb concentrations, which are comparable with subduction-related serpentinites, formed after mantle wedge peridotite hydration, and that have interacted with sedimentary derived fluids [2,6,7,8]. These serpentinites were also partly affected by de-serpentinization retrograde metamorphism (estimated at P<8 kbar and T<350 ° C) which is noticed by the following: secondary crosscuting antigorite veins occasionally with chlorite, coronas of chlorite along Cr-magnetite crystals, appearance of secondary calcite veins and talc. In the Kalochori-Chasanbali area, intense carbonization processes formed ophicalcite breccias enveloped by imbricated serpentinites[9], whereas talc-rich serpentinites appear in the region of Sklithro. Retrograde metamorphism may have occurred during exhumation, possibly within a serpentinite channel[8]. In addition, their retrograde history can also be indirectly identified through the study of their rodingite intrusions and more specifically through the formation of late-stage vesuvianite-rich dykes at low-moderate temperature conditions (T=250-300 oC) and subsequent derodingitization processes, forming metarodingites. The latter include abundant high-Mg replacive chlorite formed by continuous serpentinization which provided Mg2+ to the infiltrating fluids, causing the partial breakdown of Ca-bearing minerals. References. [1] Pe-Piper & Piper 2002: Borntraeger, Stuttgart, 1-645; [2] Lafay et al 2013: Chem Geol 343, 38-54; [3] Schwartz et al 2013: Lithos 178, 197-210; [4] Guillot, et al 2015: Tectonophysics 646, 1-19; [5] Perraki et

  16. An Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized RRL protein mediates abscisic acid signal transduction through mitochondrial retrograde regulation involving ABI4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Kede

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling have been studied for many years; however, how mitochondria-localized proteins play roles in ABA signalling remains unclear. Here an Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRL (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH-LIKE) was shown to function in ABA signalling. A previous study had revealed that the Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRG (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH) is required for cell division in the root meristem. RRL shares 54% and 57% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with RRG; nevertheless, RRL shows a different function in Arabidopsis. In this study, disruption of RRL decreased ABA sensitivity whereas overexpression of RRL increased ABA sensitivity during seed germination and seedling growth. High expression levels of RRL were found in germinating seeds and developing seedlings, as revealed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining of ProRRL-GUS transgenic lines. The analyses of the structure and function of mitochondria in the knockout rrl mutant showed that the disruption of RRL causes extensively internally vacuolated mitochondria and reduced ABA-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) in the alternative respiratory pathway is increased by mitochondrial retrograde regulation to regain ROS levels when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is impaired. The APETALA2 (AP2)-type transcription factor ABI4 is a regulator of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a (AOX1a) in mitochondrial retrograde signalling. This study showed that ABA-induced AOX1a and ABI4 expression was inhibited in the rrl mutant, suggesting that RRL is probably involved in ABI4-mediated mitochondrial retrograde signalling. Furthermore, the results revealed that ABI4 is a downstream regulatory factor in RRL-mediated ABA signalling in seed germination and seedling growth.

  17. Acute liver function decompensation in a patient with sickle cell disease managed with exchange transfusion and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Mel A.; Changela, Kinesh; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Jelin, Abraham; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis is a relatively uncommon complication of homozygous sickle cell anemia, which may lead to acute hepatic failure and death. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion is used as salvage therapy in life threatening situations. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell anemia who presented to the emergency room with fatigue, malaise, dark urine, lower back pain, scleral icterus and jaundice. She was found to have marked hyperbilirubinemia, which persisted after exchange transfusion. Because of the concomitant presence of gallstones and choledocholithiasis, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and laparoscopic cholecystectomy followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and sphincterotomy. PMID:25177368

  18. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  19. Cold Agglutinin Autoantibodies in a Patient without a Visible Coronary Sinus Ostium: Strategies for Myocardial Protection without Using Retrograde Cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Heath, Michele; Yalamuri, Suraj; Walker, Julie; Maxwell, Cory; Williams, Adam; McCartney, Sharon; Daneshmand, Mani

    2016-06-01

    The presence of cold agglutinins (CA) during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass usually creates the need for an altered surgical plan. In this case, the CA were discovered after the initiation of bypass, limiting the time, and cardioplegia solutions that could be used in the new approach. The inability to cannulate the coronary sinus with a retrograde cardioplegia catheter excluded the standard approach to myocardial preservation with CA of using continuous warm blood. For this case, we used intermittent cold crystalloid delivered via the antegrade needle for the first half of the procedure and through the saphenous vein graft anastomosis during the aortic valve portion of the cross-clamp period. PMID:27578898

  20. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO.

  1. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO. PMID:27014763

  2. The ins and outs of nuclear re-export of retrogradely transported tRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; Eswara, Manoja Bk; Mangroo, Dev

    2010-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae intron-containing pre-tRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for removal of the introns, and the spliced tRNAs are returned to the nucleus for reasons that are not understood. The re-imported spliced tRNAs are then subjected to aminoacylation in the nucleolus to ensure that they are functional prior to re-export to the cytoplasm. Previous studies have shown that re-imported spliced tRNAs and mature tRNAs made entirely in the nucleus from intronless precursors are retained in the nucleus of S. cerevisiae in response to glucose, amino acid, nitrogen or inorganic phosphate deprivation. Contrary to these studies, we recently reported that starvation of S. cerevisiae of amino acids or nitrogen results in nuclear accumulation of re-imported spliced tRNAs, but not tRNAs made from intronless precursors. This finding suggests that separate pathways are used for nuclear export of retrogradely transported spliced tRNAs and tRNAs made from intronless pre-tRNAs. In addition, the data support the conclusion that the nuclear re-export pathway for retrogradely transported spliced tRNAs, but not the pathway responsible for nuclear export of tRNAs derived from intronless precursors is regulated during amino acid or nitrogen starvation. This regulation appears to occur at a step after the re-imported spliced tRNAs have undergone aminoacylation quality assurance and, in part, involves the TORC1 signalling pathway. Moreover, it was established that Utp9p is an intranuclear component that only facilitates nuclear re-export of retrogradely transported spliced tRNAs by the β-karyopherin Msn5p. Utp9p acts in concert with Utp8p, a key player in nuclear tRNA export in S. cerevisiae, to translocate aminoacylated re-imported spliced tRNAs from the nucleolus to Msn5p and assist with formation of the Msn5p-tRNA-Gsp1p-GTP export complex. This pathway, however, is not the only one responsible for nuclear re-export of retrogradely transported spliced tRNAs.

  3. Retrograde Trafficking Inhibitor of Shiga Toxins Reduces Morbidity and Mortality of Mice Infected with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Secher, T.; Shima, A.; Hinsinger, K.; Cintrat, J. C.; Johannes, L.; Barbier, J.; Gillet, D.

    2015-01-01

    The most deadly outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 occurred in Europe in 2011. Here, we evaluated the effects of the retrograde trafficking inhibitor Retro-2cycl in a murine model of E. coli O104:H4 infection. Systemic treatment with Retro-2cycl significantly reduced body weight loss and improved clinical scores and survival rates for O104:H4-infected mice. The present data established that Retro-2cycl contributes to the protection of mice against O104:H4 infection and may represent a novel approach to limit Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-induced toxicity. PMID:25987610

  4. Syntaxin 5-Dependent Retrograde Transport to the trans-Golgi Network Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu E.; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular transport of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) is still incompletely understood. In particular, the trafficking steps preceding the release of incoming AAV particles from the endosomal system into the cytoplasm, allowing subsequent nuclear import and the initiation of gene expression, remain to be elucidated fully. Others and we previously showed that a significant proportion of viral particles are transported to the Golgi apparatus and that Golgi apparatus disruption caused by the drug brefeldin A efficiently blocks AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) transduction. However, because brefeldin A is known to exert pleiotropic effects on the entire endosomal system, the functional relevance of transport to the Golgi apparatus for AAV transduction remains to be established definitively. Here, we show that AAV2 trafficking toward the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the Golgi apparatus correlates with transduction efficiency and relies on a nonclassical retrograde transport pathway that is independent of the retromer complex, late endosomes, and recycling endosomes. AAV2 transduction is unaffected by the knockdown of syntaxins 6 and 16, which are two major effectors in the retrograde transport of both exogenous and endogenous cargo. On the other hand, inhibition of syntaxin 5 function by small interfering RNA silencing or treatment with cyclized Retro-2 strongly decreases AAV2 transduction and transport to the Golgi apparatus. This inhibition of transduction is observed with several AAV serotypes and a number of primary and immortalized cells. Together, our data strongly suggest that syntaxin 5-mediated retrograde transport to the Golgi apparatus is a broadly conserved feature of AAV trafficking that appears to be independent of the identity of the receptors used for viral attachment. IMPORTANCE Gene therapy constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of life-threatening conditions refractory to any other form of remedy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV

  5. Microleakage Evaluation Around Retrograde Filling Materials Prepared Using Conventional and Ultrasonic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, Nagesh; Thumu, Jayaprakash; Vemuri, Sayesh; Chukka, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of the retrograde cavity preparation and the material used to restore is of utmost importance to achieve successful surgical endodontics. Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the apical micro-leakage of root end cavities filled with Mineral trioxide aggregate, Biodentine and light cure GIC using two different cavity preparation techniques that is conventional bur preparation and ultrasonic tip preparation. Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted single rooted human teeth (except mandibular incisors) with one canal, fully developed apices and without any major carious lesion are collected for the study. The teeth were sectioned at CEJ to standardize the length. Roots are instrumented upto master apical file 40 K size and obturated with gutta percha and AH plus sealer in lateral condensation technique. The teeth were then resected apically at 90° angle axis to the long axis of the root removing 3 mm of the apex. The teeth were divided in to four groups of 20 each- • Group I- samples restored with MTA. • Group II- samples restored with Biodentine. • Group III- (Positive control group)- samples restored with Light activated GIC. • Group IV - (negative control group)- no filling material. Each group is divided into two subgroups (a, b) of ten teeth each 1. Retropreparation done with ultrasonic retrotip. 2. Retropreparation done with conventional bur. The teeth were then immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B dye for 48 h. The teeth were split longitudinally and the interface between the restored material and the canal wall is observed under Confocal laser scanning microscope. Depth of dye penetration was examined under stereomicroscope. Results: The statistical analysis was performed by One way ANOVA, t test. Pair wise comparision was done by Newman – Keuls multiple post hoc test. The mean values of Dye penetration for Group Ia (321.23), Group Ib (490.11), Group IIa (1065.14), Group IIb (1170.96), Group IIIa (1888.90), Group

  6. Tracing retrograde fluid sources in serpentinite and greenschist facies rocks from Syros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, M.; Raia, N.; Barnes, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cyclades are a prime locality for studying a fossil subduction zone and volatile transfer that occurs within convergent margin and back-arc settings. We have begun to constrain the composition and timing of influx for fluids that caused retrograde metamorphism in southern Syros lithologies. Most of the southern part of the island has experienced greenschist facies metamorphism, and as a reconnaissance study, we have analyzed carbonate veins from metabasalt and serpentinite lithologies. Calcite veins from serpentinites and one carbonate vein from metabasite average low δ13C values: δ13C = -8.98‰ and δ13C = -8.33‰, respectively. Relative to the preceding samples, other carbonate veins from metabasites [avg. δ13C = -0.27‰] and a dolomite vein from serpentinite (δ13C = -2.90‰) are enriched in 13C. In contrast, δ18O values are homogenous and range from +24.2‰ to +28.1‰. Carbonates with low δ13C values are consistent with derivation of carbon from organic matter, and have δ18O values that reflect interaction and precipitation from meteoric water. Based on an estimated mean annual value of Syros meteoric water (δ18O = -5.4‰), calcite/dolomite-water equilibrium fractionation estimate reaction temperatures of ~25-44 °C. Samples with higher δ13C values likely reflect C contribution from dissolved limestone, wherein CO2-bearing fluids retain constant δ18O values because of the high abundance of water in the metamorphic fluid, but constantly change δ13C because of the abundant carbonate in the region that is readily dissolved. To help constrain fluid sources, we will determine oxygen isotope values of silicate minerals formed during various stages of retrogression. Petrography on thin sections will also assist in determining if various stages of retrogression exist. Ar-Ar dating of micas will be carried-out to determine the timing of fluid-assisted retrogression.

  7. Performance characteristics of retrograde single-balloon endoscopy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Kaci E; Kapoor, Karan; Goldberg, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the technical success, diagnostic yield (DY) and therapeutic potential of retrograde single balloon enteroscopy (rSBE). METHODS A retrospective review of 136 rSBE procedures performed at a tertiary academic referral center from January 2006 and September 2013 was completed. Patient characteristics including age, gender and inpatient status were collected. The indication for the procedure was categorized into one of three groups: Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), evaluation for Crohn’s disease and abnormal imaging. Procedural characteristics including insertion depth (ID), procedure time, concordance with pre-procedural imaging and complications were also recorded. Lastly, DY, defined as the percentage of cases producing either a definitive diagnosis or findings that could explain clinical symptoms and therapeutic yield (TY), defined as the percentage of cases in which a definitive intervention was performed, were determined. Mucosal tattooing and biopsy alone were not included in the TY. RESULTS A total of 136 rSBE procedures were identified. Mean patient age was 57.5 (± 16.2) years, 67 (49.2%) were male, and 110 (80.9%) procedures were performed on an outpatient basis. Indications for rSBE included GIB in 55 (40.4%), evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 29 (21.3%), and imaging suggestive of pathology other than GIB or IBD in 43 (31.6%). Nine (6.6%) rSBEs were performed for other indications. Mean ID was 68.3 (± 39.3) cm proximal to the ileocecal valve and mean time to completion was 41.7 (± 15.5) min. Overall, 73 (53.7%) cases were diagnostic and 25 (18.4%) cases were therapeutic in which interventions (argon plasma coagulation, stricture dilatation, polypectomy, etc.) were performed. Pre-procedural imaging was performed in 88 (64.7%) patients. Endoscopic concordance of positive imaging findings was seen in 31 (35.2%) cases. Follow up data was available in 93 (68.4%) patients; 2 (2.2%) reported post-procedural abdominal

  8. Suppository naproxen reduces incidence and severity of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: Randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of rectally administered naproxen for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: This double-blind randomized control trial conducted from January 2013 to April 2014 at the Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center in Rasht, Iran. A total of 324 patients were selected from candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP by using the simple sampling method. Patients received a single dose of Naproxen (500 mg; n = 162) or a placebo (n = 162) per rectum immediately before ERCP. The overall incidence of PEP, incidence of mild to severe PEP, serum amylase levels and adverse effects were measured. The primary outcome measure was the development of pancreatitis onset of pain in the upper abdomen and elevation of the serum amylase level to > 3 × the upper normal limit (60-100 IU/L) within 24 h after ERCP. The severity of PEP was classified according to the duration of therapeutic intervention for PEP: mild, 2-3 d; moderate 4-10 d; and severe, > 10 d and/or necessitated surgical or intensive treatment, or contributed to death. RESULTS: PEP occurred in 12% (40/324) of participants, and was significantly more frequent in the placebo group compared to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). Of the participants, 25.9% (84/324) developed hyperamylasemia within 2 h of procedure completion, among whom only 35 cases belonged to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). The incidence of PEP was significantly higher in female sex, in patients receiving pancreatic duct injection, more than 3 times pancreatic duct cannulations, and ERCP duration more than 40 min (Ps < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the procedures or factors that might increase the risk of PEP, sphincterotomy, precut requirement, biliary duct injection and number of pancreatic duct cannulations. In the subgroup of patients with pancreatic duct injection, the rate of pancreatitis in

  9. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for suspected choledocholithiasis: From guidelines to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Joana; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the practical applicability of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines in suspected cases of choledocholithiasis. METHODS: This was a retrospective single center study, covering a 4-year period, from January 2010 to December 2013. All patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for suspected choledocholithiasis were included. Based on the presence or absence of predictors of choledocholithiasis (clinical ascending cholangitis, common bile duct (CBD) stones on ultrasonography (US), total bilirubin > 4 mg/dL, dilated CBD on US, total bilirubin 1.8-4 mg/dL, abnormal liver function test, age > 55 years and gallstone pancreatitis), patients were stratified in low, intermediate or high risk for choledocholithiasis. For each predictor and risk group we used the χ2 to evaluate the statistical associations with the presence of choledocolithiasis at ERCP. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 21.0. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 268 ERCPs were performed for suspected choledocholithiasis. Except for gallstone pancreatitis (P = 0.063), all other predictors of choledocholitiasis (clinical ascending cholangitis, P = 0.001; CBD stones on US, P ≤ 0.001; total bilirubin > 4 mg/dL, P = 0.035; total bilirubin 1.8-4 mg/dL, P = 0.001; dilated CBD on US, P ≤ 0.001; abnormal liver function test, P = 0.012; age > 55 years, P = 0.002) showed a statistically significant association with the presence of choledocholithiasis at ERCP. Approximately four fifths of patients in the high risk group (79.8%, 154/193 patients) had confirmed choledocholithiasis on ERCP, vs 34.2% (25/73 patients) and 0 (0/2 patients) in the intermediate and low risk groups, respectively. The definition of “high risk group” had a sensitivity of 86%, positive predictive value 79.8% and specificity 56.2% for the presence of choledocholithiasis at ERCP. CONCLUSION: The

  10. Immediate detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related periampullary perforation: Fluoroscopy or endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Yasuaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Gibo, Junya; Kanayama, Kenji; Fukuda, Shinichiro; Hamada, Shouhei; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Kubokawa, Masaru; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and intraoperative detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations to support immediate or early diagnosis. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent ERCP procedures at our hospital between January 2008 and June 2013 were retrospectively enrolled in the study (n = 2674). All procedures had been carried out using digital fluoroscopic assistance with the patient under conscious sedation. For patients showing alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy, a short-type double balloon enteroscope had been applied. Cases of perforation had been identified by the presence of air in or leakage of contrast medium into the retroperitoneal space, or upon endoscopic detection of an abdominal cavity related to the perforated lumen. For patients with ERCP-related perforations, the data on medical history, endoscopic findings, radiologic findings, diagnostic methods, management, and clinical outcomes were used for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: Of the 2674 ERCP procedures performed during the 71-mo study period, only six (0.22%) resulted in perforations (male/female, 2/4; median age: 84 years; age range: 57-97 years). The cases included an endoscope-related duodenal perforation, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic sphincterotomy, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic papillary balloon dilation, and a periampullary or bile duct perforation secondary to endoscopic instrument trauma. No cases of guidewire-related perforation occurred. The video endoscope system employed in all procedures was only able to immediately detect the endoscope-related perforation; the other five perforation cases were all detected by subsequent digital fluoroscope applied intraoperatively (at a median post-ERCP intervention time of 15 min). Three out of the six total perforation cases, including the single case of endoscope-related duodenal injury, were surgically treated; the remaining three cases were

  11. Performance characteristics of retrograde single-balloon endoscopy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Kaci E; Kapoor, Karan; Goldberg, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the technical success, diagnostic yield (DY) and therapeutic potential of retrograde single balloon enteroscopy (rSBE). METHODS A retrospective review of 136 rSBE procedures performed at a tertiary academic referral center from January 2006 and September 2013 was completed. Patient characteristics including age, gender and inpatient status were collected. The indication for the procedure was categorized into one of three groups: Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), evaluation for Crohn’s disease and abnormal imaging. Procedural characteristics including insertion depth (ID), procedure time, concordance with pre-procedural imaging and complications were also recorded. Lastly, DY, defined as the percentage of cases producing either a definitive diagnosis or findings that could explain clinical symptoms and therapeutic yield (TY), defined as the percentage of cases in which a definitive intervention was performed, were determined. Mucosal tattooing and biopsy alone were not included in the TY. RESULTS A total of 136 rSBE procedures were identified. Mean patient age was 57.5 (± 16.2) years, 67 (49.2%) were male, and 110 (80.9%) procedures were performed on an outpatient basis. Indications for rSBE included GIB in 55 (40.4%), evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 29 (21.3%), and imaging suggestive of pathology other than GIB or IBD in 43 (31.6%). Nine (6.6%) rSBEs were performed for other indications. Mean ID was 68.3 (± 39.3) cm proximal to the ileocecal valve and mean time to completion was 41.7 (± 15.5) min. Overall, 73 (53.7%) cases were diagnostic and 25 (18.4%) cases were therapeutic in which interventions (argon plasma coagulation, stricture dilatation, polypectomy, etc.) were performed. Pre-procedural imaging was performed in 88 (64.7%) patients. Endoscopic concordance of positive imaging findings was seen in 31 (35.2%) cases. Follow up data was available in 93 (68.4%) patients; 2 (2.2%) reported post-procedural abdominal

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in octogenarians: A population-based study using the nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clancy J.; Coe, Adam; Fino, Nora F.; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In the elderly population, there is a growing demand for minimally invasive procedures as the incidence of pancreaticobiliary disease increases with age. Patients with advanced age offer unique challenges for any procedure because they also tend to have a higher rate of baseline comorbidities and malignancy. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mortality and length of stay of octogenarians undergoing inpatient endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients and methods: Using the 2007 – 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we performed a retrospective analysis of health-related outcomes among 80- to 89-year-old patients undergoing inpatient ERCP. Surgical patients were excluded. Results: An estimated 61,322 octogenarians underwent inpatient ERCP in the United States from 2007 to 2010. The mean age was 84.2 (SE 0.02) with 59.5 % (n = 36,460) of the patients being female. A large majority of the patients were white (79. %, n = 41,144) and 63.5 % (n = 38,940) had a comorbidity index of at least 2. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days (SE 0.08) with an in-hospital mortality of 3.1 % (n = 1,919). The primary discharge diagnosis was most often biliary stone disease (55.9 %, n = 34,263). A diagnosis of any infection was recorded in 45.0 % (n = 27,609) of patients. Infection was associated with a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 3.3, 95 % CI 2.6 – 4.2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: ERCP is now routinely being performed during inpatient admissions for octogenarians with diseases of the biliary tract. The mortality of octogenarians undergoing inpatient ERCP is higher than previous reports and is likely due to superimposed infection during the same admission. PMID:27556068

  13. Comparison of sonoelastography with sonourethrography and retrograde urethrography in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Shyam Manoharlal; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher Singh; Jaipal, Usha; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Agarwal, Neeraj; Vyas, Nachiket

    2016-01-01

    Objective Retrograde urethrography (RUG) is the most common and preferred imaging modality for imaging of the anterior urethral strictures despite its well-known limitations and disadvantages. Sonourethrography (SUG) was introduced in 1988 to overcome the limitations of RUG and to provide more accurate results. As proper selection of imaging modality is very important for planning the treatment, various advances in this area are required. One of the major factors for recurrence of stricture disease is spongiofibrosis. Sonoelastography (SE) is a newer technique, tried in various other pathologies. In this study, we have used this technique for the first time to assess its efficacy in the evaluation of anterior urethral stricture disease by comparison with RUG and SUG. Material and methods Between August 2014 and May 2015, 77 patients with clinical features of anterior urethral stricture disease were included in the study and evaluated by RUG followed by SUG and SE for stricture location, length, depth of spongiofibrosis and periurethral pathologies. The results were then correlated with operative and histopathological findings. Results Overall diagnostic accuracy of SE, SUG, and RGU for the estimation of stricture location, and length were estimated 92.68% vs. 91.54%, 79% vs. 78.87% and 80.48% vs. 43.66%, respectively, while for depth of spongiofibrosis SE, and SUG had accuracy rates of 87.3%, 48%, respectively. The mean length measured on SE was nearest to the mean intra-operative stricture length (21.34+11.8 mm). SE findings significantly correlated with the colour of bladder mucosa on cystoscopic examination (p=0.003) whereas the association was non-significant (p=0.127) for difficulty in incision. While a nonsignificant correlation existed between SUG findings related both to the colour of the bladder mucosa and difficulty in incision on cystoscopy, SE findings had a significant association (p<0.001) with histopathology findings for severe degree of fibrosis

  14. Computer animation in teaching science: Effectiveness in teaching retrograde motion to 9th graders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenk, Kristin Elmstrom

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether an instructional approach which includes computer animations is more effective than a traditional textbook-only approach in helping ninth grade students learn an abstract concept, in this case planetary retrograde motion. This investigation uses a quasi-experimental design with convenient sampling. The independent variable is the type of instruction provided to students; traditional text-based instruction (control group) compared to traditional instruction which also includes the viewing of 4 computer animations (treatment). Two conditions of the treatment examine the relative advantage of the order of the presentation of the animations and text-based instruction, as well as the quality of understanding and the retention of the learning over time. The dependent variable is student achievement which is measured using an instrument designed specifically for this study. Comparison of the independent variable to the dependent variable based upon the results from a Repeated Measure Factorial Design in ANOVA indicates that the treatment is an effective instructional technique. The posttest1 mean score of the treatment groups was significantly greater than the posttest1 mean score of the control group. Further posthoc tests indicate that there was no significant difference between the two treatments (1 and 2); read/animation versus animation/read. However, there was a significant difference in the mean score depending on the pathway, students enrolled in the A pathway achieved a significantly higher mean score after the treatment than students in the B pathway. The A pathway (n = 185) represent the larger heterogeneous population of students as compared to the B pathway (n=16) which includes students with lower cognitive abilities and special needs. When all of the students are included in the analysis the results indicate that students do not retain their understanding of the concept. However, when the students in the B

  15. 1O2-Mediated and EXECUTER-Dependent Retrograde Plastid-to-Nucleus Signaling in Norflurazon-Treated Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Apel, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast development depends on the synthesis and import of a large number of nuclear-encoded proteins. The synthesis of some of these proteins is affected by the functional state of the plastid via a process known as retrograde signaling. Retrograde plastid-to-nucleus signaling has been often characterized in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to norflurazon (NF), an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis. Results of this work suggested that, throughout seedling development, a factor is released from the plastid to the cytoplasm that indicates a perturbation of plastid homeostasis and represses nuclear genes required for normal chloroplast development. The identity of this factor is still under debate. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were among the candidates discussed as possible retrograde signals in NF-treated plants. In the present work, this proposed role of ROS has been analyzed. In seedlings grown from the very beginning in the presence of NF, ROS-dependent signaling was not detectable, whereas, in seedlings first exposed to NF after light-dependent chloroplast formation had been completed, enhanced ROS production occurred and, among others, 1O2-mediated and EXECUTER-dependent retrograde signaling was induced. Hence, depending on the developmental stage at which plants are exposed to NF, different retrograde signaling pathways may be activated, some of which are also active in non-treated plants under light stress. PMID:23376773

  16. A mechanistic approach to studies of the possible digestion of retrograded starch by α-amylase revealed using a log of slope (LOS) plot

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hamung; Day, Richard; Butterworth, Peter J.; Ellis, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    The rate and extent of digestibility of starch were analysed using the logarithm of the slope (LOS) method. Digestibility curves with α-amylase were obtained for starches in their native, gelatinised and 24 h retrograded form. A LOS plot of the digestibility curves was then constructed, which allowed the rate constant (k) and the concentration of the product at the end of the reaction (C∞) to be calculated. It also allowed the identification of rapid and slow phases in starch digestion. Upon gelatinisation, both k and C∞ increased with dramatic changes notably in C∞; however after starch samples had been stored for 24 h at room temperature, k was not affected but C∞ decreased. This suggests that retrograded starch is virtually inert to amylase action. Both k and C∞ were strongly related to the increase in degree of order of the α-glucan chains, monitored by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, in retrograded starch. PMID:25256473

  17. A mechanistic approach to studies of the possible digestion of retrograded starch by α-amylase revealed using a log of slope (LOS) plot.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hamung; Day, Richard; Butterworth, Peter J; Ellis, Peter R

    2014-11-26

    The rate and extent of digestibility of starch were analysed using the logarithm of the slope (LOS) method. Digestibility curves with α-amylase were obtained for starches in their native, gelatinised and 24h retrograded form. A LOS plot of the digestibility curves was then constructed, which allowed the rate constant (k) and the concentration of the product at the end of the reaction (C∞) to be calculated. It also allowed the identification of rapid and slow phases in starch digestion. Upon gelatinisation, both k and C∞ increased with dramatic changes notably in C∞; however after starch samples had been stored for 24h at room temperature, k was not affected but C∞ decreased. This suggests that retrograded starch is virtually inert to amylase action. Both k and C∞ were strongly related to the increase in degree of order of the α-glucan chains, monitored by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, in retrograded starch.

  18. L1-dependent neuritogenesis involves ankyrinB that mediates L1-CAM coupling with retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazunari; Yoshihara, Fumie; Tojima, Takuro; Ooashi, Noriko; Yoon, Woohyun; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Bennett, Vann; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1-CAM) plays critical roles in neurite growth. Its cytoplasmic domain (L1CD) binds to ankyrins that associate with the spectrin-actin network. This paper demonstrates that L1-CAM interactions with ankyrinB (but not with ankyrinG) are involved in the initial formation of neurites. In the membranous protrusions surrounding the soma before neuritogenesis, filamentous actin (F-actin) and ankyrinB continuously move toward the soma (retrograde flow). Bead-tracking experiments show that ankyrinB mediates L1-CAM coupling with retrograde F-actin flow in these perisomatic structures. Ligation of the L1-CAM ectodomain by an immobile substrate induces L1CD-ankyrinB binding and the formation of stationary ankyrinB clusters. Neurite initiation preferentially occurs at the site of these clusters. In contrast, ankyrinB is involved neither in L1-CAM coupling with F-actin flow in growth cones nor in L1-based neurite elongation. Our results indicate that ankyrinB promotes neurite initiation by acting as a component of the clutch module that transmits traction force generated by F-actin flow to the extracellular substrate via L1-CAM.

  19. Nucleation and growth of retrograde shear zones: an example from the Needle Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Richard G.

    Brittle and ductile deformation features are heterogeneously developed in late Proterozoic retrograde, normal-slip shear zones that cross-cut amphibolites and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses in the Needle Mountains. Replacement of amphibolite-grade minerals by greenschist facies assemblages is spatially related to transgranular fractures that cross-cut the older gneissosity. Steeply dipping, chlorite-lined slip surfaces are associated with chlorite + quartz ± muscovite-filled dilational jogs and narrow breccia zones. Arrays of slip surfaces are transitional into similarly oriented phyllonite zones, within which the foliation locally overprints early cataclastic zones. The nucleation of these shear zones under greenschist facies conditions involved fluid infiltration along early transgranular fractures and hydration of Fe-Mg-bearing minerals. Initial displacement occurred by slip along these fractures and local cataclasite development. Fluids were episodically drawn into dilatant sites along these slip surfaces. A transition to plastic deformation resulted directly from the metamorphic breakdown of feldspars and amphiboles to phyllosilicates, which allowed strain localization into narrow phyllonite zones. Thus, dilatancy produced by early brittle deformation appears to be the main process by which fluids infiltrate into developing greenschist-grade, retrograde shear zones. Reaction-softening via hydration reactions causes a brittle-to-plastic transition and results in strain localization.

  20. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Transfer to Renal Tubule Cells via a Retrograde Ureteral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Daniel C.; Fogelgren, Ben; Park, Kwon Moo; Heidenberg, Jessica; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; Bennett, Jean; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Gene therapy involves delivery of exogenous DNA to provide a therapeutic protein. Ideally, a gene therapy vector should be non-toxic, non-immunogenic, easy to produce, and efficient in protecting and delivering DNA into target cells. Methods Adeno-associated virus (AAV) offers these advantages and few, if any, disadvantages, and over 100 isolates exist. We previously showed that AAV-mediated gene therapy can be used to restore vision to patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis, a disease of childhood blindness. Results Here we show that novel recombinant AAV2/8 and AAV2/9 transduce kidney tubule cells with high efficiency both in vitroin cell culture and in vivoin mice. In addition, we adapted and modified a retrograde approach to allow for optimal transgene delivery to renal tubular cells that further minimizes the risk of an immunogenic reaction. Conclusions We believe that recombinant AAV2, especially AAV2/8, gene delivery to renal tubule cells via a retrograde approach represents a viable method for gene therapy for a multitude of renal disorders ranging from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to acute kidney injury. PMID:22470395

  1. Fission of SNX-BAR–coated endosomal retrograde transport carriers is promoted by the dynamin-related protein Vps1

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Liu, Jingxuan; West, Matthew; Wang, Jing; Odorizzi, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Retromer is an endosomal sorting device that orchestrates capture and packaging of cargo into transport carriers coated with sorting nexin BAR domain proteins (SNX-BARs). We report that fission of retromer SNX-BAR–coated tubules from yeast endosomes is promoted by Vps1, a dynamin-related protein that localizes to endosomes decorated by retromer SNX-BARs and Mvp1, a SNX-BAR that is homologous to human SNX8. Mvp1 exhibits potent membrane remodeling activity in vitro, and it promotes association of Vps1 with the endosome in vivo. Retrograde transport carriers bud from the endosome coated by retromer and Mvp1, and cargo export is deficient in mvp1- and vps1-null cells, but with distinct endpoints; cargo export is delayed in mvp1-null cells, but cargo export completely fails in vps1-null cells. The results indicate that Mvp1 promotes Vps1-mediated fission of retromer- and Mvp1-coated tubules that bud from the endosome, revealing a functional link between the endosomal sorting and fission machineries to produce retrograde transport carriers. PMID:24567361

  2. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  3. Retrograde femoral arterial perfusion and stroke risk during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: is there cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    Recent data have suggested that retrograde arterial perfusion (RAP) during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) is associated with a higher stroke rate than sternotomy approaches. To assess whether there is genuine cause for concern, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of this data. A multitude of confounding factors obfuscate interpretation of the data including imprecise definitions of MIMVS, the effect of the substantial learning curve, retrospective comparisons of small historic cohorts with baseline differences and differing risk profiles for atherosclerosis, different methods of aortic occlusion and lack of reporting of peripheral vascular disease (PVD)/aortic assessment in patient populations. In patients with severe (grades IV and V) aortic arch/ascending aortic atherosclerosis, RAP has clearly been shown to be associated with an increase in risk of cerebral embolic complications. It would be reasonable to assume that grades IV/V atheroma anywhere along the aorto-iliac axis (from femoral cannulation site to carotid arteries) may also increase the risk of stroke. Hence those at risk of severe atherosclerotic vascular disease should be screened to fully assess the aortoiliac axis. Apart from this patient group, there is no convincing evidence (without confounding variables) that retrograde perfusion per se during minimally invasive mitral surgery increases the risk of stroke. This may be due to the largely differing aetiologies of vascular and mitral degenerative disease. PMID:24350000

  4. Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Seligra, Paula González; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Biodegradable and non-retrogradable starch-glycerol based films were obtained using citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent at 75°C. This material allowed decreasing water vapor permeability (WVP) more than 35%, remained amorphous for at least 45 days as a result of the network formed by the CA that avoided starch retrogradation and maintained the degradability in compost, occurring only six days after the films without citric acid. A simulation of the gelatinization process of starch-glycerol with and without CA, using a differential thermal analysis device, showed that the system with CA completed the gelatinization 5°C before than the other and, CA first reacted with glycerol and then starch-glycerol-CA reaction occurred. The temperature at which the gelatinization process was carried out was critical to obtain the best results. An increase of gelatinization process temperature at 85°C in system with CA, led to a worsening on WVP and its integrity after a swelling process with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compared to the films processed at 75°C.

  5. Autobiographic memory: phenomenological aspects, personal semantic knowledge, generic events and characters (one case of pure retrograde memory recovery).

    PubMed

    Thomas Antérion, C; Mazzola, L; Laurent, B

    2008-06-01

    Tulving et al. [Brain Cogn 8 (1988) 3-20] proposed an operational distinction concerning memory between a semantic component consisting of general information about the individual's past and an episodic component, containing memories of specific events that can be situated in space and time. After a mild head trauma and in the context of professional troubles, patient FF displayed a pure retrograde amnesia concerning both his biographical identity and semantic memories. The patient could no longer access his memories. However, these did not seem completely lost since his answers to tests concerning historical events were better than random, his answers to a television quiz were automatic, he showed temporal transfer phenomena (ecmnesia) and since he retrieved the entirety of his memories within nine months. The patient FF illustrates the loss of retrograde autobiographic memory and the recovery of episodic memories, which requires three elements: a sense of subjective time, an autonoetic awareness (the ability to be aware of subjective time) and a "self" that can travel in subjective time.

  6. Anterograde and retrograde amnesia in a person with bilateral fornix lesions following removal of a colloid cyst.

    PubMed

    Poreh, Amir; Winocur, Gordon; Moscovitch, Morris; Backon, Matti; Goshen, Elinor; Ram, Zvi; Feldman, Zeev

    2006-01-01

    AD, a 45-year-old man, presented with a severe and global anterograde amnesia following surgery for removal of a colloid cyst. Structural neuroimaging confirmed bilateral lesions to the fornix and a small lesion in the basal forebrain. Testing for remote episodic memory of autobiographical events, and for remote semantic memory of personal and public events, and of famous people, revealed that AD had a severe retrograde amnesia for autobiographical episodes that covered his entire lifetime, and a time-limited retrograde amnesia for semantic memory. Because the fornix and basal forebrain lesions disrupted major afferent and efferent pathways of the hippocampus, it was concluded that the integrity of the hippocampus and its projections are needed to retain and/or recover autobiographical memories no matter how old they are. By contrast, hippocampal contribution to semantic memory is time-limited. These findings were interpreted as consistent with Multiple Trace Theory, which holds that the hippocampal system is essential for recovering contextually rich memories no matter how old they are, but is not needed for recovering semantic memories.

  7. Identification of auditory neurons by retrograde labelling for patch-clamp recordings in a mixed culture of chick brainstem.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Marcus J; Kuenzel, Thomas; Luksch, Harald; Wagner, Hermann

    2008-03-30

    We present a method to identify specific sub-populations of auditory neurons in a mixed primary cell culture of the chicken brainstem, allowing the study of individual neurons with a known identity in vitro. To label specific afferent cell types, we injected retrograde tracers (dextrans coupled to fluorescent dyes) into either the mid-line or the superior olivary nuclei (SON) of the isolated chicken brainstem in vitro. Mid-line injections resulted in stable labelling of neurons of the nucleus magnocellularis (NM), whereas injections into the SON retrogradely labelled neurons of the nucleus laminaris (NL). The fluorescent label survives the dissociation procedure and is detectable for at least 1 week in vitro. Only about 0.1% of all cells in vitro are pre-labelled. The auditory identity of the pre-labelled neurons was confirmed with calretinin immunocytochemistry and electrophysiological recordings, where the cells had typical firing patterns of auditory brainstem neurons. In the future, this method can be combined with single cell PCR to match nuclear origin, firing patterns and the expression of functional molecules in vitro.

  8. Retrogradely transported fluorogold accumulates in lysosomes of neurons and is detectable ultrastructurally using post-embedding immuno-gold methods.

    PubMed

    Persson, Stefan; Havton, Leif A

    2009-10-30

    For ultrastructural studies, it is of great interest to be able to combine anatomical tracer techniques with sensitive immunohistochemical methods. Fluorogold (FG) is a fluorescent and retrogradely transported anatomical tracer, which is commonly used to label neurons in the brain and spinal cord for light microscopic studies. We here describe a method for detecting FG-labeled somata in the electron microscope using a high resolution post-embedding immuno-gold method. For this purpose, spinal motoneurons were retrogradely labeled by an intraperitoneal injection of FG in the adult rat. The rats were intravascularly perfused with a fixative solution containing 2% paraformaldehyde and 1-2% glutaraldehyde. Vibratome sections of spinal cord tissues were cryo-protected in glycerol, freeze substituted in methanol containing uranyl acetate, and embedded in the Lowicryl HM20 resin at low temperatures. Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated atypical lysosome-like structures in the cytoplasm of FG-labeled motoneurons. Subsequent post-embedding immuno-gold labeling demonstrated prominent accumulation of FG in numerous lysosomes but not in other organelles or cytoplasmic compartments of the labeled neurons. The protocol is versatile and allows for combining anatomical tracing of neurons with, e.g., neuro-transmitter studies in the electron microscope. We suggest that the described method for sensitive detection of FG in the spinal cord may also have broad applicability to other areas of the central nervous system.

  9. Retrograde rotation of the large-scale flow in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection with high Rossby number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Li, Hui-Min; Wang, Xue-Ying

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation θ (t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the presence of week rotations Ω . Linear retrograde rotations of the LSC circulating plane are observed over the entire Rossby-number range (1 <= Ro <= 300) studied. When the Ro increases, the ratio of the retrograde rotation rate, γ = - < . θ > / Ω remains nearly a constant 0.12 in the range of (1 <= Ro <= 80) and starts to increases when Ro > 80 . When Ro ~= 300 , γ approaches a value of 0.36 close to the prediction from previous theoretical models. In a background of linear rotations, erratic changes in θ (t) accompanied by decreasing in the LSC amplitude δ are observed. These small- δ events give rise to the increasing γ with very high Ro numbers (80 <= Ro <= 300). In this range, the diffusivity of θ is proportional to δ-2 . Moreover, the occurrence frequency of the small- δ events, and their average duration are independent on Ro. We propose a model to include additional viscous damping for the LSC azimuthal motion due to turbulent viscosity and provide theoretical interpretations of the experimental results. Work supported by NSFC Grant No. 11202151.

  10. Nanoparticle-assisted optical tethering of endosomes reveals the cooperative function of dyneins in retrograde axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Chowdary, Praveen D; Che, Daphne L; Kaplan, Luke; Chen, Ou; Pu, Kanyi; Bawendi, Moungi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-12-10

    Dynein-dependent transport of organelles from the axon terminals to the cell bodies is essential to the survival and function of neurons. However, quantitative knowledge of dyneins on axonal organelles and their collective function during this long-distance transport is lacking because current technologies to do such measurements are not applicable to neurons. Here, we report a new method termed nanoparticle-assisted optical tethering of endosomes (NOTE) that made it possible to study the cooperative mechanics of dyneins on retrograde axonal endosomes in live neurons. In this method, the opposing force from an elastic tether causes the endosomes to gradually stall under load and detach with a recoil velocity proportional to the dynein forces. These recoil velocities reveal that the axonal endosomes, despite their small size, can recruit up to 7 dyneins that function as independent mechanical units stochastically sharing load, which is vital for robust retrograde axonal transport. This study shows that NOTE, which relies on controlled generation of reactive oxygen species, is a viable method to manipulate small cellular cargos that are beyond the reach of current technology.

  11. Structural optimization of a retrograde trafficking inhibitor that protects cells from infections by human polyoma- and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Carney, Daniel W; Nelson, Christian D S; Ferris, Bennett D; Stevens, Julia P; Lipovsky, Alex; Kazakov, Teymur; DiMaio, Daniel; Atwood, Walter J; Sello, Jason K

    2014-09-01

    Human polyoma- and papillomaviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses that cause severe pathologies and mortalities. Under circumstances of immunosuppression, JC polyomavirus causes a fatal demyelinating disease called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and the BK polyomavirus is the etiological agent of polyomavirus-induced nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis. Human papillomavirus type 16, another non-enveloped DNA virus, is associated with the development of cancers in tissues like the uterine cervix and oropharynx. Currently, there are no approved drugs or vaccines to treat or prevent polyomavirus infections. We recently discovered that the small molecule Retro-2(cycl), an inhibitor of host retrograde trafficking, blocked infection by several human and monkey polyomaviruses. Here, we report diversity-oriented syntheses of Retro-2(cycl) and evaluation of the resulting analogs using an assay of human cell infections by JC polyomavirus. We defined structure-activity relationships and also discovered analogs with significantly improved potency as suppressors of human polyoma- and papillomavirus infection in vitro. Our findings represent an advance in the development of drug candidates that can broadly protect humans from non-enveloped DNA viruses and toxins that exploit retrograde trafficking as a means for cell entry.

  12. Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Seligra, Paula González; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Biodegradable and non-retrogradable starch-glycerol based films were obtained using citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent at 75°C. This material allowed decreasing water vapor permeability (WVP) more than 35%, remained amorphous for at least 45 days as a result of the network formed by the CA that avoided starch retrogradation and maintained the degradability in compost, occurring only six days after the films without citric acid. A simulation of the gelatinization process of starch-glycerol with and without CA, using a differential thermal analysis device, showed that the system with CA completed the gelatinization 5°C before than the other and, CA first reacted with glycerol and then starch-glycerol-CA reaction occurred. The temperature at which the gelatinization process was carried out was critical to obtain the best results. An increase of gelatinization process temperature at 85°C in system with CA, led to a worsening on WVP and its integrity after a swelling process with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compared to the films processed at 75°C. PMID:26794739

  13. Tumour recurrence after surgical removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma using a retrograde facial nerve dissection technique.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Barry; Bharadwaj, Girish

    2012-07-01

    Recurrence after surgical removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma using retrograde facial nerve dissection is not well researched. We adopted retrograde nerve dissection for parotid surgery for benign disease as a standard procedure in 1995. The objective of this study was to establish the rate of recurrence of primary tumours associated with the technique after removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma. We recruited 59 patients over a 16-year (1995-2011) period and collected the data prospectively. Eight patients were excluded as they had died or had been lost to follow up. Male:female ratio was 16:35 and age range was 15-69 years. The mean tumour size as measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 27.4mm. Thirty-eight patients had superficial parotidectomy, 8 had total parotidectomy, and 5 had partial superficial parotidectomy. Mean follow up from the date of operation was 104 months (median 98, range 17-171). All patients were reviewed and examined in 2011 to establish whether the tumour had recurred. One patient had developed a solitary nodular recurrence 8 years after the initial procedure. Recurrence was 2%. The rate of clinically apparent recurrence after parotidectomy for pleomorphic salivary adenoma in this study is low and is comparable with others reported.

  14. Relationship between retrograde coronary blood flow and the extent of no-reflow and infarct size in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Terrovitis, John; Tsolakis, Elias; Drakos, Stavros; Dalianis, Argirios; Bonios, Michael; Koudoumas, Dimitrios; Malliaras, Konstantinos; Nanas, John

    2011-02-01

    Recanalization of an infarct-related artery does not predictably reflect tissue reperfusion. We examined the relationship between coronary blood flow (CBF) pattern during reperfusion and infarcted (IA) and no-reflow (NR) area in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model. The mid-left anterior descending artery of 18 pigs was occluded for 1 h and reperfused for 2 h. CBF during reperfusion was measured with a transit-time ultrasound flowmeter, while systemic arterial and left atrial pressures were monitored. IA and NR were measured with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride and thioflavin staining, respectively. In 13 pigs, early systolic retrograde CBF developed within the first 30 min and persisted throughout reperfusion. No retrograde CBF was observed in five pigs. Mean retrograde CBF at 2 h of reperfusion predicted a larger IA (r = 0.71; p = 0.001). Time-to-development of retrograde CBF was inversely related to IA (r = -0.55; p = 0.019) and NR (r = -0.62; p = 0.006). A larger IA (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.24, p = 0.037) and NR (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.18, p = 0.037) predicted the presence of retrograde CBF. Retrograde CBF during recanalization of the infarct-related artery predicts IA and NR and might be used as an index of successful reperfusion at the tissue level. PMID:21153063

  15. The Analgesic Effect on Neuropathic Pain of Retrogradely Transported botulinum Neurotoxin A Involves Schwann Cells and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ricordy, Ruggero; Uggenti, Carolina; Tata, Ada Maria; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia

    2012-01-01

    In recent years a growing debate is about whether botulinum neurotoxins are retrogradely transported from the site of injection. Immunodetection of cleaved SNAP-25 (cl-SNAP-25), the protein of the SNARE complex targeted by botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), could represent an excellent approach to investigate the mechanism of action on the nociceptive pathways at peripheral and/or central level. After peripheral administration of BoNT/A, we analyzed the expression of cl-SNAP-25, from the hindpaw’s nerve endings to the spinal cord, together with the behavioral effects on neuropathic pain. We used the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in CD1 mice as animal model of neuropathic pain. We evaluated immunostaining of cl-SNAP-25 in the peripheral nerve endings, along the sciatic nerve, in dorsal root ganglia and in spinal dorsal horns after intraplantar injection of saline or BoNT/A, alone or colocalized with either glial fibrillar acidic protein, GFAP, or complement receptor 3/cluster of differentiation 11b, CD11b, or neuronal nuclei, NeuN, depending on the area investigated. Immunofluorescence analysis shows the presence of the cl-SNAP-25 in all tissues examined, from the peripheral endings to the spinal cord, suggesting a retrograde transport of BoNT/A. Moreover, we performed in vitro experiments to ascertain if BoNT/A was able to interact with the proliferative state of Schwann cells (SC). We found that BoNT/A modulates the proliferation of SC and inhibits the acetylcholine release from SC, evidencing a new biological effect of the toxin and further supporting the retrograde transport of the toxin along the nerve and its ability to influence regenerative processes. The present results strongly sustain a combinatorial action at peripheral and central neural levels and encourage the use of BoNT/A for the pathological pain conditions difficult to treat in clinical practice and dramatically impairing patients’ quality of life. PMID:23110146

  16. Comparison of retrograde endo-pyelotomy and endo-balloon rupture of the ureteropelvic junction in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Pearle, M S; Moon, Y T; Endicott, R C; Gardner, S M; Humphrey, P; Clayman, R V

    1994-12-01

    Excellent results and durable success have been achieved with antegrade and retrograde endo-pyelotomy for treating primary and secondary ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Recently, a 30F dilating balloon was used to rupture the ureteropelvic junction (ENDOBRST) with encouraging results. While balloon distention of the ureteropelvic junction is a technically simpler procedure than endo-pyelotomy, clinical and laboratory data comparing the 2 methods are lacking. In an acute and chronic animal study we compared endo-pyelotomy via a ureteral cutting balloon incision to balloon rupture (that is 30F) of the normal ureteropelvic junction in each of 20 female farm pigs. Eight pigs were harvested acutely after treatment, and a macroscopic and histological examination of the treated ureteropelvic junction was completed. In 11 chronic pigs after endo-pyelotomy a 7F double pigtail ureteral stent was placed bilaterally and then removed after 6 weeks. Evaluation in the chronic group consisted of a furosemide washout renogram and retrograde pyelogram immediately preoperatively and 6 weeks after stent removal. The animals were likewise harvested 6 weeks after stent removal. One control pig underwent passage of the balloon cutting catheter and balloon dilating catheters without activation or dilation, respectively. Ureteral stents were placed bilaterally for 6 weeks and the pig was otherwise treated similarly to the other chronic study animals. In the acute group all ureters after endo-pyelotomy demonstrated retroperitoneal extravasation of contrast material. At harvest the ureters had been cleanly incised along a length of 3 to 4 cm. through the adventitial layer. In contrast, the balloon treated ureters showed free retroperitoneal extravasation in only half of the animals. Among the balloon treated ureters 7 of 8 had a linear tear of varying length (1 to 5 cm.) involving all but a thin adventitial layer of tissue. Histologically, the endo-pyelotomy ureters demonstrated a clean

  17. Binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in cultured rat sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Claude, P.; Hawrot, E.; Dunis, D.A.; Campenot, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons internalize nerve growth factor (NGF) and transport it retrogradely to their cell bodies where it appears to serve a trophic function in maintaining neuronal survival. We have characterized the binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF by cultured rat sympathetic neurons. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, sympathetic neurons possessed approximately 2 X 10(7) specific, cell surface NGF binding sites per neuron with an apparent affinity constant of 2 to 5 X 10(9) M. The density of binding sites on the plasma membrane of the neurites approximately twice that on the plasma membrane of the cell bodies. Because of the extensive network of neuronal processes, the neurites probably account for more than 99.5% of the total binding in mature cultures. Using electron microscope autoradiography, we localized the distribution of /sup 125/I-NGF in the cell body following a 1-hr exposure to /sup 125/I-NGF. The majority of silver grains were associated with lysosomal organelles, including secondary lysosomes, residual bodies, and multivesicular bodies (MVB). The MVB were the most heavily labeled, with a labeling density (L.D.) of 21, while the lysosomes had a L.D. of 3.1. To study the retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF, neurons were grown in compartmentalized culture dishes and their distal processes were exposed to /sup 125/I-NGF. Radioactive material was transported to the cell bodies at the rate of approximately 3 mm/hr. The transport mechanism was sensitive to colchicine and was saturable with respect to NGF. After 8 hr of transport, when the radioactivity in the cell bodies had reached a steady state, the label again was localized primarily to the MVB (L.D. . 16.8) and the lysosomes (L.D. . 3.8). The nuclei were not labeled significantly and had an overall L.D. of 0.47. We saw no evidence for the accumulation of NGF by the nuclear membrane, the nucleolus, or chromatin.

  18. Tubulin-tyrosine Ligase (TTL)-mediated Increase in Tyrosinated α-Tubulin in Injured Axons Is Required for Retrograde Injury Signaling and Axon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjun; Cho, Yongcheol; Watt, Dana; Cavalli, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Injured peripheral neurons successfully activate a pro-regenerative program to enable axon regeneration and functional recovery. The microtubule-dependent retrograde transport of injury signals from the lesion site in the axon back to the cell soma stimulates the increased growth capacity of injured neurons. However, the mechanisms initiating this retrograde transport remain poorly understood. Here we show that tubulin-tyrosine ligase (TTL) is required to increase the levels of tyrosinated α-tubulin at the axon injury site and plays an important role in injury signaling. Preventing the injury-induced increase in tyrosinated α-tubulin by knocking down TTL impairs retrograde organelle transport and delays activation of the pro-regenerative transcription factor c-Jun. In the absence of TTL, axon regeneration is reduced severely. We propose a model in which TTL increases the levels of tyrosinated α-tubulin locally at the injury site to facilitate the retrograde transport of injury signals that are required to activate a pro-regenerative program.

  19. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-10-01

    Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine how water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Coal drying experiments were begun using thermal, microwave, and chemical methods; NMR data were collected. A stirred microautoclave reactor system was acquired.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  1. External-to-Internal Iliac Stent-Graft: Medium-Term Patency Following Exclusion of a Retrogradely Perfused Common Iliac Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, Marcus John; McPherson, Simon

    2010-08-15

    Following complicated aortic aneurysm surgery a complete left iliac occlusion resulted in buttock claudication. A retrogradely perfused right common iliac aneurysm expanded. Exclusion was by external-to-internal iliac stent-graft. No deterioration in claudication occurred with medium-term stent-graft patency.

  2. Retrograde Percutaneous Drilling for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Head of the Talus: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Laura; Sanpera, Ignacio; Masrouha, Karim; Sanpera-Iglesias, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus might be a more common cause of pain than previously recognized, especially among those involved in athletic activities. However, the location of an osteochondral lesion on the talar head is much less common than such lesions localized to the dome of the talus and can pose diagnostic difficulties. We present the case of a 14-year-old soccer player who complained of longstanding pain in his left foot. After unsuccessful conservative treatment consisting of rest and bracing, he was ultimately treated with retrograde percutaneous drilling of the talar head performed by a medial approach. This was followed by casting and non-weightbearing for 6 weeks, after which physical therapy was undertaken. He was able to return to full activity and remained asymptomatic during a 5-year observation period. Although rare, osteochondritis dissecans of the talar head should be considered in young athletes with persistent foot pain that is unresponsive to reasonable therapy.

  3. Ciliary abnormalities due to defects in the retrograde transport protein DYNC2H1 in short-rib polydactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Amy E; Merriman, Barry; Farrington-Rock, Claire; Camacho, Natalia; Sebald, Eiman T; Funari, Vincent A; Schibler, Matthew J; Firestein, Marc H; Cohn, Zachary A; Priore, Mary Ann; Thompson, Alicia K; Rimoin, David L; Nelson, Stanley F; Cohn, Daniel H; Krakow, Deborah

    2009-04-01

    The short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndromes are a heterogeneous group of perinatal lethal skeletal disorders with polydactyly and multisystem organ abnormalities. Homozygosity by descent mapping in a consanguineous SRP family identified a genomic region that contained DYNC2H1, a cytoplasmic dynein involved in retrograde transport in the cilium. Affected individuals in the family were homozygous for an exon 12 missense mutation that predicted the amino acid substitution R587C. Compound heterozygosity for one missense and one null mutation was identified in two additional nonconsanguineous SRP families. Cultured chondrocytes from affected individuals showed morphologically abnormal, shortened cilia. In addition, the chondrocytes showed abnormal cytoskeletal microtubule architecture, implicating an altered microtubule network as part of the disease process. These findings establish SRP as a cilia disorder and demonstrate that DYNC2H1 is essential for skeletogenesis and growth.

  4. Preserved Renal Function in Kidney Transplantation over a Thrombosed Aortobifemoral Bypass Graft: The Role of Retrograde Flow and Early Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Pampa-Saico, Saúl; Jiménez-Alvaro, Sara; Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Sánchez, Juan; Chinchilla, Antonio; Marcén, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) thrombosis is not uncommon, and when the artery of a renal graft is implanted on a bypass the risk of graft loss is high. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a previous history of ABFB under antiplatelet therapy and a kidney allograft implanted on the vascular prosthesis, who presented with acute limb ischemia and severe renal impairment. Imaging techniques revealed a complete thrombosis of the proximal left arm of the ABFB. However, a faint retrograde flow over the graft was observed thanks to the recanalization of distal left bypass by collateral native arteries. This unusual situation not previously reported in a kidney transplant setting, together with an early diagnosis, allowed graft survival until an early local thrombolysis resolved the problem. Two years later, renal function remains normal. PMID:27579209

  5. Combined Retrograde-Antegrade Arterial Recanalization Through Collateral Vessels: Redefinition of the Technique for Below-the-Knee Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, L. Morelli, L. G.

    2011-02-15

    The effectiveness of below-the-knee PTA to obtain successful revascularization in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) has been well established, and many centers have adopted endovascular intervention as the first-line treatment in patients with chronic lower-extremity disease. The well-known complex and multilevel arterial disease in patients with CLI have lead to interventionists to continuously implement different technologies and techniques. The aim of the present study was to standardize and redefine a technique characterized for combined retrograde-antegrade recanalization of a native leg artery through a collateral arterial branch by using a single access. This concept has been well described in coronary arteries and recently in pelvic and tibial arteries.

  6. Preserved Renal Function in Kidney Transplantation over a Thrombosed Aortobifemoral Bypass Graft: The Role of Retrograde Flow and Early Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Alvaro, Sara; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Sánchez, Juan; Chinchilla, Antonio; Marcén, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) thrombosis is not uncommon, and when the artery of a renal graft is implanted on a bypass the risk of graft loss is high. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a previous history of ABFB under antiplatelet therapy and a kidney allograft implanted on the vascular prosthesis, who presented with acute limb ischemia and severe renal impairment. Imaging techniques revealed a complete thrombosis of the proximal left arm of the ABFB. However, a faint retrograde flow over the graft was observed thanks to the recanalization of distal left bypass by collateral native arteries. This unusual situation not previously reported in a kidney transplant setting, together with an early diagnosis, allowed graft survival until an early local thrombolysis resolved the problem. Two years later, renal function remains normal. PMID:27579209

  7. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: casual parameters and duration of memory loss. Final report for November 84

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron-beam exposure was investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task for 10, 1, and 0.1 microsecond pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 1,000,000 rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (1,000,000 rad/s) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory system activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  8. Low-Thrust Transfers from Distant Retrograde Orbits to L2 Halo Orbits in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Nathan L.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Steven P.; Heiligers, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of transfers between distant retrograde orbits (DROs) and L2 halo orbits in the Earth-Moon system that could be flown by a spacecraft with solar electric propulsion (SEP). Two collocation-based optimal control methods are used to optimize these highly-nonlinear transfers: Legendre pseudospectral and Hermite-Simpson. Transfers between DROs and halo orbits using low-thrust propulsion have not been studied previously. This paper offers a study of several families of trajectories, parameterized by the number of orbital revolutions in a synodic frame. Even with a poor initial guess, a method is described to reliably generate families of solutions. The circular restricted 3-body problem (CRTBP) is used throughout the paper so that the results are autonomous and simpler to understand.

  9. Retrograde Percutaneous Drilling for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Head of the Talus: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Laura; Sanpera, Ignacio; Masrouha, Karim; Sanpera-Iglesias, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus might be a more common cause of pain than previously recognized, especially among those involved in athletic activities. However, the location of an osteochondral lesion on the talar head is much less common than such lesions localized to the dome of the talus and can pose diagnostic difficulties. We present the case of a 14-year-old soccer player who complained of longstanding pain in his left foot. After unsuccessful conservative treatment consisting of rest and bracing, he was ultimately treated with retrograde percutaneous drilling of the talar head performed by a medial approach. This was followed by casting and non-weightbearing for 6 weeks, after which physical therapy was undertaken. He was able to return to full activity and remained asymptomatic during a 5-year observation period. Although rare, osteochondritis dissecans of the talar head should be considered in young athletes with persistent foot pain that is unresponsive to reasonable therapy. PMID:25459089

  10. SWIFT J1910.2-0546: A possible black hole binary with a retrograde spin or truncated disk

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, R. C.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Maitra, D.; King, A.; Degenaar, N.; Walton, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first results from a long (51 ks) XMM-Newton observation of the Galactic X-ray binary SWIFT J1910.2-0546 in an intermediate state, obtained during its 2012 outburst. A clear, asymmetric iron emission line is observed and physically motivated models are used to fully describe the emission-line profile. Unlike other sources in their intermediate spectral states, the inner accretion disk in SWIFT J1910.2-0546 appears to be truncated, with an inner radius of r {sub in} =9.4{sub −1.3}{sup +1.7} r {sub g} at a 90% confidence limit. Quasi-periodic oscillations are also found at approximately 4.5 and 6 Hz, which correlates well with the break frequency of the underlying broad-band noise. Assuming that the line emission traces the innermost stable circular orbit, as would generally be expected for an intermediate state, the current observation of SWIFT J1910.2-0546 may offer the best evidence for a possible retrograde stellar mass black hole with a spin parameter a < – 0.32cJ/GM{sup 2} (90% confidence). Although this is an intriguing possibility, there are also a number of alternative scenarios which do not require a retrograde spin. For example, the inner accretion disk may be truncated at an unusually high luminosity in this case, potentially suffering frequent evaporation/condensation, or it could instead be persistently evacuated through mass loss in a relativistic jet. Further observations are required to distinguish between these different interpretations.

  11. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen (1O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the 1O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of 1O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of 1O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent 1O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  12. Vascular Plug Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO) for Gastric Varix Bleeding Patients in the Emergent Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heechul; Lee, Chun Kyon; Kim, Gun Bea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of vascular plug assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) for bleeding gastric varix performed in the emergent clinical setting and describe the mid-term clinical results. Materials and Methods From April 2012 to January 2015, emergent PARTO was tried in total 9 patients presented with active gastric varix bleeding. After initial insufficient or failure of endoscopic approach, they underwent PARTO in the emergent clinical setting. Gelatin sponge embolization of both gastrorenal (GR) shunt and gastric varix was performed after retrograde transvenous placement of a vascular plug in GR shunt. Coil assisted RTO (CARTO) was performed in one patient who had challenging GR shunt anatomy for vascular plug placement. Additional embolic materials, such as microcoils and NBCA glue-lipiodol mixture, were required in three patients to enhance complete occlusion of GR shunt or obliteration of competitive collateral vessels. Clinical success was defined as no variceal rebleeding and disappearance of gastric varix. Results All technical and clinical success–i.e., complete GR shunt occlusion and offending gastric varix embolization with immediate bleeding control–was achieved in all 9 patients. There was no procedure-related complication. All cases showed successful clinical outcome during mean follow up of 17 months (12–32 months), evidenced by imaging studies, endoscopy and clinical data. In 4 patients, mild worsening of esophageal varices or transient ascites was noted as portal hypertensive related change. Conclusion Emergent PARTO is technically feasible and safe, with acceptable mid-term clinical results, in treating active gastric varix bleeding. PMID:27189294

  13. Retrograde upper-pole calyceal access for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy of stones in the lower-pole calyx

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present the results of upper calyceal access during percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) for stones in the lower calyx, as PCNL is considered the most effective minimally invasive surgery for managing lower calyceal stones, with percutaneous access either directly to the lower calyx or through an upper or middle calyx. Patients and methods The study included 76 patients with single (51) and multiple (25) stones in the lower calyx, and stones in the lower calyx plus renal pelvis (six) and associated pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO, five). They were managed by PCNL using retrograde access through the upper-pole calyx in addition to laser endopyelotomy for the PUJO. Results The mean duration required for establishing the retrograde nephrostomy tract was 14.4 min, and for completing the procedure was 40 min. The mean fluoroscopy exposure time was 3.2 min. Access from the upper calyx allowed easy and rapid advancement of the nephroscope to the lower calyx. The stones varied in size, at 10–25 mm. Stones were cleared completely in 70 of the 76 patients (92%); the stone-free rate was 100%. The residual stone fragments (2–4 mm) in the remaining six patients (8%) were considered insignificant. Complications were minor in four patients (5%), and included pleural effusion in two, bleeding in one and an arteriovenous fistula in one. Conclusions Upper-pole calyceal access for PCNL provides easy and effective clearance of stones in the lower calyx. This access should be considered for PCNL of single or multiple stones in the lower calyx. PMID:26558049

  14. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  15. Cortical Blindness and Retrograde Amnesia Following Cerebral Angiography Studied by Early Diffusion Weighted MR imaging. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Roccatagliata, L; Taveira-Lopes, L; Rossignol, M-D; Biondi, A

    2009-12-14

    Cortical blindness is a well described neuro-ophthalmologic complication of angiography due to neurotoxicity following contrast media exposure. A rarer association with retrograde amnesia has also been reported. Since ischemic stroke due to embolism remains the most common aetiology of neurological complications of diagnostic and therapeutic arterial catheterisation, prompt identification of the mechanism responsible for the clinical symptoms is essential for patient management. Although CT and conventional MRI findings have been reported in this condition, experience with diffusion weighted (DW) sequences is lacking especially in cases associated with memory impairment. A 65-year-old man with tinnitus underwent cerebral angiography for suspicion of a dural arteriovenous fistula. During the procedure the patient developed complete loss of vision and rapidly became confused. Brain CT showed bilateral cortical enhancement in the occipital lobes. MR with DWI was performed 3.5 hours after angiography. Early DWI showed no signal abnormalities thereby excluding an ischaemic complication. Gradual improvement of visual function occurred over the next 24 hours. After 48 hours the patient was alert and orientated but profound retrograde amnesia persisted with no memory for the events of the day of angiography. CT follow-up at one year was normal. DWI is invaluable in the evaluation of patients with cortical blindness with or without memory deficits precipitated by angiography and may advance understanding of the pathophysiology. Diffusion-weighted MRI is crucial in differentiating neuro-ophthalmologic complications precipitated by intracortical contrast leakage after angiography from an ischaemic stroke needing a prompt and often invasive treatment. PMID:24209406

  16. Mg chelatase in chlorophyll synthesis and retrograde signaling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: CHLI2 cannot substitute for CHLI1

    PubMed Central

    Brzezowski, Pawel; Sharifi, Marina N.; Dent, Rachel M.; Morhard, Marius K.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The oligomeric Mg chelatase (MgCh), consisting of the subunits CHLH, CHLI, and CHLD, is located at the central site of chlorophyll synthesis, but is also thought to have an additional function in regulatory feedback control of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway and in chloroplast retrograde signaling. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, two genes have been proposed to encode the CHLI subunit of MgCh. While the role of CHLI1 in A. thaliana MgCh has been substantially elucidated, different reports provide inconsistent results with regard to the function of CHLI2 in Mg chelation and retrograde signaling. In the present report, the possible functions of both isoforms were analyzed in C. reinhardtii. Knockout of the CHLI1 gene resulted in complete loss of MgCh activity, absence of chlorophyll, acute light sensitivity, and, as a consequence, down-regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. These observations indicate a phenotypical resemblance of chli1 to the chlh and chld C. reinhardtii mutants previously reported. The key role of CHLI1 for MgCh reaction in comparison with the second isoform was confirmed by the rescue of chli1 with genomic CHLI1. Because CHLI2 in C. reinhardtii shows lower expression than CHLI1, strains overexpressing CHLI2 were produced in the chli1 background. However, no complementation of the chli1 phenotype was observed. Silencing of CHLI2 in the wild-type background did not result in any changes in the accumulation of tetrapyrrole intermediates or of chlorophyll. The results suggest that, unlike in A. thaliana, changes in CHLI2 content observed in the present studies do not affect formation and activity of MgCh in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26809558

  17. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  18. D-(/sup 3/H)aspartate retrograde labelling of callosal and association neurons of somatosensory areas I and II of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaresi, P.; Fabri, M.; Conti, F.; Manzoni, T.

    1987-09-08

    Experiments were carried out on cats to ascertain whether corticocortical neurons of somatosensory areas I (SI) and II (SII) could be labelled by retrograde axonal transport of D-(/sup 3/H)aspartate (D-(/sup 3/H)Asp). This tritiated enantiomer of the amino acid aspartate is (1) taken up selectively by axon terminals of neurons releasing aspartate and/or glutamate as excitatory neurotransmitter, (2) retrogradely transported and accumulated in perikarya, (3) not metabolized, and (4) visualized by autoradiography. A solution of D-(/sup 3/H)Asp was injected in eight cats in the trunk and forelimb zones of SI (two cats) or in the forelimb zone of SII (six cats). In order to compare the labelling patterns obtained with D-(/sup 3/H)Asp with those resulting after injection of a nonselective neuronal tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was delivered mixed with the radioactive tracer in seven of the eight cats. Furthermore, six additional animals received HRP injections in SI (three cats; trunk and forelimb zones) or SII (three cats; forelimb zone). D-(/sup 3/H)Asp retrograde labelling of perikarya was absent from the ipsilateral thalamus of all cats injected with the radioactive tracer but a dense terminal plexus of anterogradely labelled corticothalamic fibers from SI and SII was observed, overlapping the distribution area of thalamocortical neurons retrogradely labelled with HRP from the same areas. D-(/sup 3/H)Asp-labelled neurones were present in ipsilateral SII (SII-SI association neurones) in cats injected in SI. In these animals a bundle of radioactive fibres was observed in the rostral portion of the corpus callosum entering the contralateral hemisphere. There, neurones retrogradely labelled with silver grains were present in SI (SI-SI callosal neurons).

  19. Retrograde axonal transport of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the adult nigrostriatal system suggests a trophic role in the adult.

    PubMed Central

    Tomac, A; Widenfalk, J; Lin, L F; Kohno, T; Ebendal, T; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L

    1995-01-01

    The recently cloned, distant member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), has potent trophic actions on fetal mesencephalic dopamine neurons. GDNF also has protective and restorative activity on adult mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and potently protects motoneurons from axotomy-induced cell death. However, evidence for a role for endogenous GDNF as a target-derived trophic factor in adult midbrain dopaminergic circuits requires documentation of specific transport from the sites of synthesis in the target areas to the nerve cell bodies themselves. Here, we demonstrate that GDNF is retrogradely transported by mesencephalic dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. The pattern of retrograde transport following intrastriatal injections indicates that there may be subpopulations of neurons that are GDNF responsive. Retrograde axonal transport of biologically active 125I-labeled GDNF was inhibited by an excess of unlabeled GDNF but not by an excess of cytochrome c. Specificity was further documented by demonstrating that another TGF-beta family member, TGF-beta 1, did not appear to affect retrograde transport. Retrograde transport was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry by using intrastriatal injections of unlabeled GDNF. GDNF immunoreactivity was found specifically in dopamine nerve cell bodies of the substantia nigra pars compacta distributed in granules in the soma and proximal dendrites. Our data implicate a specific receptor-mediated uptake mechanism operating in the adult. Taken together, the present findings suggest that GDNF acts endogenously as a target-derived physiological survival/maintenance factor for dopaminergic neurons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7667281

  20. Retrograde Intramedullary Nailing with a Blocking Pin Technique for Reduction of Periprosthetic Supracondylar Femoral Fracture after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Technical Note with a Compatibility Chart of the Nail to Femoral Component

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Takasago, Tomoya; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) present a clear management challenge, and retrograde intramedullary nails have recently gained widespread acceptance in treatment of these fractures. In two cases, we found a blocking screw technique, first reported by Krettek et al., was useful in the reduction of the fractures. Both patients attained preinjury mobility after intramedullary nailing. Moreover, we present a chart summarizing the notch designs of various femoral components because some prosthetic knee designs are not amenable to retrograde nailing. We hope this will be helpful in determining indications for retrograde nailing in periprosthetic fractures after TKA. PMID:25574411

  1. Using Digital Computer Field Mapping of Outcrops to Examine the Preservation of High-P Rocks During Pervasive, Retrograde Greenschist Fluid Infiltration, Tinos, Cyclades Archipelago, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeding, C. M.; Ague, J. J.; Broecker, M.

    2001-12-01

    Digital field mapping of outcrops on the island of Tinos, Greece, was undertaken to investigate the nature of retrograde fluid infiltration during exhumation of high-P metamorphic rocks of the Attic-Cycladic blueschist belt. High-resolution digital photographs of outcrops were taken and loaded into graphics editing software on a portable, belt-mounted computer in the field. Geologic features from outcrops were drawn and labeled on the digital images using the software in real-time. The ability to simultaneously identify geologic features in outcrops and digitize those features onto digital photographs in the field allows the creation of detailed, field-verified, outcrop-scale maps that aid in geologic interpretation. During Cretaceous-Eocene subduction in the Cyclades, downgoing crustal material was metamorphosed to eclogite and blueschist facies. Subsequent Oligocene-Miocene exhumation of the high-P rocks was accompanied by pervasive, retrograde fluid infiltration resulting in nearly complete greenschist facies overprinting. On Tinos, most high-P rocks have undergone intense retrogression; however, adjacent to thick marble horizons with completely retrograded contact zones, small (sub km-scale) enclaves of high-P rocks (blueschist and minor eclogite facies) were preserved. Field observations suggest that the remnant high-P zones consist mostly of massive metabasic rocks and minor adjacent metasediments. Within the enclaves, detailed digital outcrop maps reveal that greenschist retrogression increases in intensity outward from the center, implying interaction with a fluid flowing along enclave perimeters. Permeability contrasts could not have been solely responsible for preservation of the high-P rocks, as similar rock suites distal to marble contacts were completely overprinted. We conclude that the retrograded contacts of the marble units served as high-permeability conduits for regional retrograde fluid flow. Pervasive, layer-parallel flow through metasediments

  2. Outcome analysis of retrograde nailing and less invasive stabilization system in distal femoral fractures: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, Christian; von Rüden, Christian; Pötzel, Tobias; Woltmann, Alexander; Bühren, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Background: Two major therapeutic principles can be employed for the treatment of distal femoral fractures: retrograde intramedullary (IM) nailing (RN) or less invasive stabilization on system (LISS). Both operative stabilizing systems follow the principle of biological osteosynthesis. IM nailing protects the soft-tissue envelope due to its minimally invasive approach and closed reduction techniques better than distal femoral locked plating. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare outcome of distal femur fracture stabilization using RN or LISS techniques. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from 2003 to 2008, we analyzed 115 patients with distal femur fracture who had been treated by retrograde IM nailing (59 patients) or LISS plating (56 patients). In the two cohort groups, mean age was 54 years (17–89 years). Mechanism of injury was high energy impact in 57% (53% RN, 67% LISS) and low-energy injury in 43% (47% RN, 33% LISS), respectively. Fractures were classified according to AO classification: there were 52 type A fractures (RN 31, LISS 21) and 63 type C fractures (RN 28, LISS 35); 32% (RN) and 56% (LISS) were open and 68% (RN) and 44% (LISS) were closed fractures, respectively. Functional and radiological outcome was assessed. Results: Clinical and radiographic evaluation demonstrated osseous healing within 6 months following RN and following LISS plating in over 90% of patients. However, no statistically significant differences were found for the parameters time to osseous healing, rate of nonunion, and postoperative complications. The following complications were treated: hematoma formation (one patient RN and three patients LISS), superficial infection (one patient RN and three patients LISS), deep infection (2 patients LISS). Additional secondary bone grafting for successful healing 3 months after the primary operation was required in four patients in the RN (7% of patients) and six in the LISS group (10% of patients

  3. Oxygen isotope variations in granulite-grade iron formations: constraints on oxygen diffusion and retrograde isotopic exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, Z.D.; O'Neil, J.R.; Essene, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios of various minerals were measured in a granulite-grade iron formation in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Estimates of temperature and pressure for the terrane using well calibrated geothermometers and geobarometers are 730??50?? C and 5.5??0.5 kbar. The mineral constraints on fluid compositions in the iron formation during retrogression require either very CO2-rich fluids or no fluid at all. In the iron formation, isotopic temperature estimates from quartz-magnetite fractionations are controlled by the proximity to the enclosing granitic gneiss, and range from 500?? C (??qz - mt=10.0???) within 2-3 meters of the orthogneiss contact to 600?? C (??qz - mt=8.0???) farther from the contact. Temperature estimates from other isotopic thermometers are in good agreement with those derived from the quartz-magnetite fractionations. During prograde metamorphism, the isotopic composition of the iron formation was lowered by the infiltration of an external fluid. Equilibrium was achieved over tens of meters. Closed-system retrograde exchange is consistent with the nearly constant whole-rock ??18Owr value of 8.0??0.6???. The greater ??qz-mt values in the iron formation near the orthogneiss contact are most likely due to a lower oxygen blocking temperature related to greater exchange-ability of deformed minerals at the contact. Cooling rates required to preserve the quartz-magnetite fractionations in the central portion of the iron formation are unreasonably high (???800?? C/Ma). In order to preserve the 600?? C isotopic temperature, the diffusion coefficient D (for ??-quartz) should be two orders of magnitude lower than the experimentally determined value of 2.5??10-16 cm2/s at 833 K. There are no values for the activation energy (Q) and pre-exponential diffusion coefficient (D0), consistent with the experimentally determined values, that will result in reasonable cooling rates for the Wind River iron formation. The discrepancy between the diffusion

  4. A retrograde adeno-associated virus for collecting ribosome-bound mRNA from anatomically defined projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Snyder, Denise R.; Jones, Alexander; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    The brain contains a large variety of projection neurons with different functional properties. The functional properties of projection neurons arise from their connectivity with other neurons and their molecular composition. We describe a novel tool for obtaining the gene expression profiles of projection neurons that are anatomically defined by the location of their soma and axon terminals. Our tool utilizes adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), which we found to retrogradely transduce projection neurons after injection at the site of the axon terminals. We used AAV9 to express Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP)-tagged ribosomal protein L10a (EGFP-L10a), which enables the immunoprecipitation of EGFP-tagged ribosomes and associated mRNA with a method known as Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP). To achieve high expression of the EGFP-L10a protein in projection neurons, we placed its expression under control of a 1.3 kb alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Camk2a) promoter. We injected the AAV9-Camk2a-TRAP virus in either the hippocampus or the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) of the mouse brain. In both brain regions the 1.3 kb Camk2a promoter did not confer complete cell-type specificity around the site of injection, as EGFP-L10a expression was observed in Camk2a-expressing neurons as well as in neuronal and non-neuronal cells that did not express Camk2a. In contrast, cell-type specific expression was observed in Camk2a-positive projection neurons that were retrogradely transduced by AAV9-Camk2a-TRAP. Injection of AAV9-Camk2a-TRAP into the BNST enabled the use of TRAP to collect ribosome-bound mRNA from basal amygdala projection neurons that innervate the BNST. AAV9-Camk2a-TRAP provides a single-virus system that can be used for the molecular profiling of anatomically defined projection neurons in mice and other mammalian model organisms. In addition, AAV9-Camk2a-TRAP may enable the discovery of protein synthesis

  5. [Antegrade flow in the aorta ascendens despite aortic atresia: 2 case reports with retrograde coronary perfusion through coronary fistulas and sinusoids].

    PubMed

    Jux, C; Kaulitz, R; von Wasielewski, R; Peuster, M; Fink, C; Paul, T; Hausdorf, G

    2000-06-01

    In aortic atresia, coronary perfusion normally occurs through retrograde blood flow in the ascending aorta. We report on two patients with antegrade flow in the ascending aorta despite aortic atresia. In one patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (aortic atresia, severe mitral stenosis), an intact interatrial septum/premature closure of the foramen ovale was found. While no other way of left atrial or ventricular decompression was found, echocardiography, angiography and the post-mortem examination showed left ventricular to coronary sinusoids as the sole pathway for systemic oxygenation. In a second patient with complex congenital heart disease, including aortic atresia, antegrade flow in the ascending aorta was through a left coronary fistula with shunt flow originating from the pulmonary trunk. This report describes systemic perfusion depending on retrograde coronary flow due to coronary-cameral (sinusoids) and coronary arterio-venous fistulas leading to the phenomenon of antegrade blood flow in the ascending aorta despite aortic atresia. PMID:10929434

  6. Retrograde wire-assisted percutaneous transcatheter closure of persistent ductus arteriosus with Amplatzer duct occluder in the elderly: A new application.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Ho-Tsung; Lin, Lung-Chun; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Ho, Shinn-Ge; Tseng, Chuen-Den; Chiang, Fu-Tein

    2004-02-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has been well established in the pediatric field. For moderate- to large-sized PDA, the newly developed Amplatzer duct occluder had offered a good solution, but it depends on stiff wire and delivery sheath. We reported two elderly patients of PDA with vascular anatomy too difficult to be antegradely approached and were closed by a retrograde technique by an assisting wire from the descending aorta. The wire served as a guide and tracked the delivery system to cross the ductus from the venous side smoothly. This retrograde wire-assisted technique could be utilized to overcome the PDA of difficult vascular anatomy, which could not be easily fulfilled by conventional antegrade venous approach. PMID:14755825

  7. Successful Revascularization of an LCx CTO Lesion by Retrograde Approach From an Acute Thrombotic SVG Without Protection Device in an ACS Patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei Mei; Wang, Ji Hung

    2016-05-25

    We describe a patient who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery with the presentation of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnostic coronary angiogram showed acute thrombotic and occluded saphenous vein graft (SVG) and proximal right coronary artery (RCA) drug eluting stent (DES) instent restenosis (ISR) with chronic total occlusion (CTO). Our strategy was to recanalize the native left circumflex coronary artery (LCx) CTO instead of SVG or RCA instent CTO. After heparinization for 5 days, the LCx antegrade approach and the retrograde approach from left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) septal branches were first attempted but failed, and the LCx CTO was successfully revascularized retrogradely via the acute thrombotic SVG without an embolic protection device (EPD).

  8. Secure Surgical Method for Catheter Placement via the Occipital Artery to Achieve Retrograde Superselective Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Advanced Oral Cancer: Alternative to Approach via the Superficial Temporal Artery.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshinori; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hirota, Makoto; Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-06-01

    We describe secure surgical method for catheter placement using ultrasonic scalpel via the occipital artery to achieve retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for advanced oral cancer, as alternative to approach via the superficial temporal artery. PMID:24822164

  9. Provenance of metasedimentary rocks from the Ceará Central Domain of Borborema Province, NE Brazil: implications for the significance of associated retrograded eclogites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancelmi, Matheus Fernando; Santos, Ticiano José Saraiva dos; Amaral, Wagner da Silva; Fuck, Reinhardt Adolfo; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Zincone, Stefano Albino

    2015-03-01

    In the Forquilha area (NE Brazil), in NW Borborema Province, high to ultra-high pressure rocks are an important geological key to understanding West Gondwana amalgamation. U-Pb geochronological data for a retrograded eclogite sample yielded an upper intercept age of ca. 1520 Ma and a lower intercept age of ca. 620 Ma. These ages most likely represent the crystallization age of the basaltic protolith and the regional metamorphism, respectively. The retrograded eclogites are enclosed in migmatized quartz-feldspathic gneiss and sillimanite (after kyanite)-garnet-biotite gneiss. Detrital U-Pb zircon data for these paragneisses show only Paleoproterozoic zircon grains with ages clustering from ca. 1800 Ma (the maximum depositional age) to ca. 2480 Ma, and frequency peaks at 2.2-2.0 Ga. Combined with Nd isotopic data from the Forquilha paragneisses, one can assume a single Paleoproterozoic source. Basement rocks of the Ceará Central and the Rio Grande do Norte domains are the most likely candidates. The absence of Meso- and Neoproterozoic zircon grains suggest that the retrograded eclogite bodies possibly do not represent slivers of oceanic rocks captured in active margin sequences during subduction. It was identified that the high-pressure rocks of the Forquilha area are in tectonic contact with high-pressure granulite facies rocks of the Ceará Complex (Independência unit) that present detrital zircon records of an active margin setting, with ages ranging from ca. 660 Ma to 2200 Ma. Metamorphism of this sequence occurred at ca. 650 Ma. Considering previous studies, field relationships, and metamorphic paragenesis, a tectonic scenario is inferred, in which the Forquilha retrograded eclogites represent Mesoproterozoic basaltic rocks of an extensional event that were metamorphosed under eclogite facies conditions during Late Neoproterozoic continental subduction/collision, and juxtaposed to an active margin sequence during the exhumation process.

  10. A novel dynein light intermediate chain colocalizes with the retrograde motor for intraflagellar transport at sites of axoneme assembly in chlamydomonas and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Catherine A; Tritschler, Douglas; Taulman, Patrick; Bower, Raqual; Yoder, Bradley K; Porter, Mary E

    2003-05-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT). Anterograde IFT is driven by kinesin II, whereas retrograde IFT requires cytoplasmic dynein 1b (cDHC1b). Little is known about how cDHC1b interacts with its cargoes or how it is regulated. Recent work identified a novel dynein light intermediate chain (D2LIC) that colocalized with the mammalian cDHC1b homolog DHC2 in the centrosomal region of cultured cells. To see whether the LIC might play a role in IFT, we characterized the gene encoding the Chlamydomonas homolog of D2LIC and found its expression is up-regulated in response to deflagellation. We show that the LIC subunit copurifies with cDHC1b during flagellar isolation, dynein extraction, sucrose density centrifugation, and immunoprecipitation. Immunocytochemistry reveals that the LIC colocalizes with cDHC1b in the basal body region and along the length of flagella in wild-type cells. Localization of the complex is altered in a collection of retrograde IFT and length control mutants, which suggests that the affected gene products directly or indirectly regulate cDHC1b activity. The mammalian DHC2 and D2LIC also colocalize in the apical cytoplasm and axonemes of ciliated epithelia in the lung, brain, and efferent duct. These studies, together with the identification of an LIC mutation, xbx-1(ok279), which disrupts retrograde IFT in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicate that the novel LIC is a component of the cDHC1b/DHC2 retrograde IFT motor in a variety of organisms.

  11. Concomitant Retrograde Coronary Venous Infusion of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Enhances Engraftment and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cardiac Repair after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Zhen, Lei; Miao, Huangtai; Sun, Qiwei; Yang, Ya; Que, Bin; Lopes Lao, Edmundo Patricio; Wu, Xingxin; Ren, Hongmei; Shi, Shutian; Lau, Wayne B.; Ma, Xinliang; Ma, Changsheng; Nie, Shaoping

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) increases the migration and viability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro. Retrograde coronary venous infusion can provide both increased regional bFGF concentrations and homogeneous cell dissemination. We determined whether retrograde delivery of bFGF enhances the potency of transplanted MSCs for cardiac repair in a canine infarct model. Methods and Results: Under hypoxic conditions, cellular migration was significantly increased in MSCs co-cultured with bFGF compared to vascular endothelial growth factor or insulin-like growth factor, and bFGF promoted MSCs differentiation into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. A canine infarct model was employed by coronary ligation. One week later, animals were subjected to retrograde infusion of combination bFGF (200ng/mL) and MSCs (1×108 cells) (n=5), MSCs (1×108 cells, n=5), bFGF (200ng/mL, n=5), or placebo (phosphate-buffered saline, n=3). Four weeks after infusion, only the bFGF+MSCs therapy exhibited significantly increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by echocardiography (p<0.01 vs pre-infusion), and the treatment effect (delta LVEF) was greater in the bFGF+MSCs group compared to saline (7.43±1.51% versus -10.07±2.94%; p<0.001). Morphologic analysis revealed an increased infarct wall thickness in the bFGF+MSCs group compared to all others (p<0.05), accompanied by increased vascular density and reduced apoptosis. Immunofluorescence demonstrated increased cell engraftment and enhanced vascular differentiation in the bFGF+MSCs group compared to MSCs alone (p<0.05). Conclusions: Retrograde coronary venous bFGF infusion augments engraftment and differentiation capacity of transplanted MSCs, recovering cardiac function and preventing adverse remodeling. This novel combined treatment and delivery method is a promising strategy for cardiac repair after ischemic injury. PMID:26155315

  12. Bleeding Duodenal Varices Successfully Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO) Assisted by CT During Arterial Portography

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu Sugimoto, Koji; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Masahiko; Hirota, Shozo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices.

  13. Effect of precut sphincterotomy on post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Abhishek; Winn, Jessica; Siddique, Sameer; Arif, Murtaza; Arif, Zainab; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Puli, Srinivas R; Ibdah, Jamal A; Bechtold, Matthew L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a systemic review and meta-analysis to investigate the role of early precut technique. Multiple randomized controlled trails (RCTs) have reported conflicting results of the early precut sphincterotomy. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Database of Systematic Reviews, and recent abstracts from major conference proceedings were searched (June 2013). Randomized and non-randomized studies comparing early precut technique with prolonged standard methods were included. Pooled estimates of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP), cannulation and adverse events were analyzed by using odds ratio (OR). Random and fixed effects models were used as appropriate. Publication bias was assessed by funnel plots. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed by calculating I2 measure of inconsistency. RESULTS: Seven randomized and seven non-randomized trials met inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of RCTs showed a decrease trend for PEP with early precut sphincterotomy but was not statistically significant (OR = 0.58; 95%CI: 0.32-1.05; P = 0.07). No heterogeneity was noted among the studies with I2 of 0%. CONCLUSION: Early precut technique for common bile duct cannulation decreases the trend of post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:24744601

  14. Coordinated regulation of endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic suppression in the cerebellum by neuronal and astrocytic monoacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Vickstrom, Casey R.; Li, Yan; Viader, Andreu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Liu, Qing-song

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates retrograde synaptic depression including depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI). 2-AG is degraded primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Using knockout mice in which MAGL is deleted globally or selectively in neurons or astrocytes, we investigated the relative contribution of neuronal and astrocytic MAGL to the termination of DSE and DSI in Purkinje cells (PCs) in cerebellar slices. We report that neuronal MAGL plays a predominant role in terminating DSE at climbing fiber (CF) to PC synapses, while both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL significantly contributes to the termination of DSE at parallel fiber (PF) to PC synapses and DSI at putative Stellate cell to PC synapses. Thus, DSE and DSI at different synapses is not uniformly affected by global and cell type-specific knockout of MAGL. Additionally, MAGL global knockout, but not cell type-specific knockout, caused tonic activation and partial desensitization of the CB1 receptor at PF-PC synapses. This tonic CB1 activation is mediated by 2-AG since it was blocked by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor DO34. Together, these results suggest that both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL contribute to 2-AG clearance and prevent CB1 receptor over-stimulation in the cerebellum. PMID:27775008

  15. Rewiring AMPK and mitochondrial retrograde signaling for metabolic control of aging and histone acetylation in respiratory-defective cells.

    PubMed

    Friis, R Magnus N; Glaves, John Paul; Huan, Tao; Li, Liang; Sykes, Brian D; Schultz, Michael C

    2014-04-24

    Abnormal respiratory metabolism plays a role in numerous human disorders. We find that regulation of overall histone acetylation is perturbed in respiratory-incompetent (ρ(0)) yeast. Because histone acetylation is highly sensitive to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) availability, we sought interventions that suppress this ρ(0) phenotype through reprogramming metabolism. Nutritional intervention studies led to the discovery that genetic coactivation of the mitochondrion-to-nucleus retrograde (RTG) response and the AMPK (Snf1) pathway prevents abnormal histone deacetylation in ρ(0) cells. Metabolic profiling of signaling mutants uncovered links between chromatin-dependent phenotypes of ρ(0) cells and metabolism of ATP, acetyl-CoA, glutathione, branched-chain amino acids, and the storage carbohydrate trehalose. Importantly, RTG/AMPK activation reprograms energy metabolism to increase the supply of acetyl-CoA to lysine acetyltransferases and extend the chronological lifespan of ρ(0) cells. Our results strengthen the framework for rational design of nutrient supplementation schemes and drug-discovery initiatives aimed at mimicking the therapeutic benefits of dietary interventions.

  16. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-zheng; Hicks, Derrick; de Souza, Amancio; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context. PMID:26733689

  17. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  18. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  19. [Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a retrograde, locked intramedullary nail in treatment of posttraumatic hindfoot and distal tibia deformity--preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Łukasz; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej; Kedzierski, Michał; Kotrych, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The authors reviewed their results of tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis by retrograde intramedullary nail as a salvage procedure in treatment of the most severe squeal of talar, calcanear, ankle and pilon fractures in twelve patients. Their average age was 55 years. The average follow up ranged from 8 to 25 months. Patients were assessed by AOFAS hindfoot scale and patient satisfaction. The arthrodesis was performed via lateral, transfibular approach. Solid fusion was achieved in all but one patient. In four patients final foot position was not an optimal one for hindfoot arthrodesis. 15 months after surgery a below knee amputation was performed in one patient because of limb ischemia due to posttraumatic lesion of booth tibialis anterior and posterior arteries. Nail construct allows to perform an intrafragmentry compression between bone ends what enhances bone healing and fusion but in some cases nail introducing must be accompanied by osteotomies or pseudoarthrosis resection. The transfibular, lateral approach is extremely useful in exploration of talocalcaneal ant talocrulaljoints. Resection of lateral malleolus reduces soft tissue tension and serve as a source of bone grafts, necessary in many reconstructive procedure. PMID:19241888

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage Using a Fully Covered Metallic Stent after Failed Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jintao; Sun, Siyu; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Study Aims. Endoscopic ultrasound- (EUS-) guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an alternative treatment for biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In this study, we present the outcomes of inpatients with obstructive jaundice treated with EUS-BD using a fully covered metallic stent after failed ERCP. Patients and Methods. A total of 21 patients with biliary obstruction due to malignant tumors and prior unsuccessful ERCP underwent EUS via an intra- or extrahepatic approach with fully covered metallic stent between March 2014 and October 2015. A single endoscopist performed all procedures. Results. Seven patients underwent hepatogastrostomy (HGS) and 14 underwent choledochoduodenostomy (CDS). The technical and clinical success rates were both 100%. There was no difference in efficacy between HGS and CDS. Adverse events occurred in three patients, including two in the HGS group (1 bile leakage and 1 sepsis) and one in the CDS group (sepsis). Four patients died as a result of their primary tumors during a median follow-up period of 13 months (range: 3-21 months). No patient presented with stent migration. Conclusion. EUS-BD using a fully covered metallic stent appears to be a safe and effective method for the treatment of obstructive jaundice. PMID:27594881

  1. Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) starch, a side product in functional food production, as a potential source of retrograded starch.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinfeng; Kreft, Ivan; Chao, Guimei; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xiaojin; Wang, Li; Wang, Pengke; Gao, Xiaoli; Feng, Baili

    2016-01-01

    A starch rich fraction is a side product in Tartary buckwheat processing. This study investigated the fractions that are of technological and nutritional interest. Tartary buckwheat starch granules had a diameter of 3-14 μm, and presented a typical type "A" X-ray diffraction pattern. They contained nearly 39.0% amylose. The solubility of Tartary buckwheat starch was much lower at 70-90 °C (ranging within 9.9-10.4% at 90 °C) than that in maize (up to 49.3%) and potato (up to 85.0%) starch. The starch of one variety of Tartary buckwheat had significantly lower solubility at 70 °C and 80 °C than that of common buckwheat. The starch peak viscosity and breakdown were higher and pasting time was shorter in Tartary buckwheat than in that of the starch of common buckwheat. Tartary buckwheat starch had unique pasting and physicochemical properties, and is thereby capable of being exploited as a suitable raw material of retrograded starch in food processing.

  2. Common Pharmacophore of Structurally Distinct Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Intracellular Retrograde Trafficking of Ribosome Inactivating Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shichao; Park, Jewn Giew; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2013-12-01

    We reported previously (+/-)-2-(5-methylthiophen-2-yl)-3-phenyl-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H)-one [(+/-)-Retro-2cycl] as the chemical structure of Retro-2 that showed mouse protection against ricin, a notorious ribosome inactivating protein (RIP). Herein we report our chemical resolution of (+/-)-Retro-2cycl, analog synthesis, and cell-based evaluation showing that the two optically pure enantiomers and their achiral analog have nearly the same degree of cell protection against ricin as (+/-)-Retro-2cycl. We also report our computational studies explaining the lack of stereo preference and revealing a common pharmacophore of structurally distinct inhibitors of intracellular retrograde trafficking of RIPs. This pharmacophore comprises a central aromatic ring o-substituted by an aromatic ring and a moiety bearing an O or S atom attached to sp2 C atom(s). These results offer new insights into lead identification and optimization for RIP antidote development to minimize the global health threat caused by ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  3. Involvement of Golgi-associated retrograde protein complex in the recycling of the putative Dnf aminophospholipid flippases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Shingo; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is enriched in the cytosolic leaflet of the eukaryotic plasma membranes. To identify genes involved in the establishment and regulation of the asymmetric distribution of PE on the plasma membrane, we screened the deletion strain collection of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for hypersensitive mutants to the lantibiotic peptide Ro09-0198 (Ro) that specifically binds to PE on the cell surface and inhibits cellular growth. Deletion mutants of VPS51, VPS52, VPS53, and VPS54 encoding the components of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, YPT6 encoding a Rab family small GTPase that functions with GARP complex, RIC1 and RGP1 encoding its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), and TLG2 encoding t-SNARE exhibited hypersensitivity to Ro. The mutants deleted for VPS51, VPS52, VPS53, and VPS54 were impaired in the uptake of fluorescently labeled PE. In addition, aberrant intracellular localization of the EGFP-tagged Dnf2p, the putative inward-directed phospholipid translocase (flippase) of the plasma membrane, was observed in the mutant defective in the GARP complex, Ypt6p, its GEF proteins, or Tlg2p. Our results suggest that the GARP complex is involved in the recycling of Dnf flippases.

  4. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P.; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R.; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E.; Carpizo, Darren R.; Kim, Seung K.; Winslow, Monte M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  5. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  6. Results of the unidirectional Centri-Safe arterial valve for prevention of retrograde flow during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Esper, E; Devineni, R; Shah, N S; Wurzel, D; Brownstein, L; Heagney, M G; Slukis, M J; Kolff, J

    1994-01-01

    Retrograde blood from the aortic cannula into the cardiopulmonary circuit may lead to aortic air emboli when nonocclusive centrifugal pumps are used. The authors tested a nonregurgitant, unidirectional valve containing a Teflon ball occluder to prevent backflow. In vitro measurements of leakage rate, forward flow pressure drop, burst strength, and hemolysis levels along with animal (n = 12) and human (n = 12) in vivo hematologic and hemolysis levels were measured. Data were analyzed by paired and unpaired Student's t-test. Pressure drop differences at flows of 5 l/min were 7.3 +/- 0.3 mmHg before and 7.6 +/- 0.1 mmHg after 10,800 cycles of pulsatile pumping. (P = NS). Leakage rate during this period at pressures of 100 mmHg was not significant. Volume required to close the Teflon ball was less than 1 ml. Hemolysis analysis done in vitro and in vivo in control (no valve) and experimental (valve) groups used hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, plasma free hemoglobin, and lactic dehydrogenase as hemolysis indices. There were no statistical differences. The authors conclude that the CentriSafe valve (Cardiac Systems, Inc., Conshohocken, PA) is safe and prevents fatal backflow and air emboli. The valve is nonthrombotic in anticoagulated blood, can be opened and closed thousands of times, and has a burst strength equal to or greater than other components in the perfusion setup.

  7. Rabies Virus CVS-N2c(ΔG) Strain Enhances Retrograde Synaptic Transfer and Neuronal Viability.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Thomas R; Murray, Andrew J; Turi, Gergely F; Wirblich, Christoph; Croce, Katherine R; Schnell, Matthias J; Jessell, Thomas M; Losonczy, Attila

    2016-02-17

    Virally based transsynaptic tracing technologies are powerful experimental tools for neuronal circuit mapping. The glycoprotein-deletion variant of the SAD-B19 vaccine strain rabies virus (RABV) has been the reagent of choice in monosynaptic tracing, since it permits the mapping of synaptic inputs to genetically marked neurons. Since its introduction, new helper viruses and reagents that facilitate complementation have enhanced the efficiency of SAD-B19(ΔG) transsynaptic transfer, but there has been little focus on improvements to the core RABV strain. Here we generate a new deletion mutant strain, CVS-N2c(ΔG), and examine its neuronal toxicity and efficiency in directing retrograde transsynaptic transfer. We find that by comparison with SAD-B19(ΔG), the CVS-N2c(ΔG) strain exhibits a reduction in neuronal toxicity and a marked enhancement in transsynaptic neuronal transfer. We conclude that the CVS-N2c(ΔG) strain provides a more effective means of mapping neuronal circuitry and of monitoring and manipulating neuronal activity in vivo in the mammalian CNS. PMID:26804990

  8. A recurrent empyema with peripheral bronchopleural fistulas treated by retrograde bronchial sealing with Gore Tex plugs: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin-Young; Kim, Dohun; Hong, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Si-Wook

    2015-12-01

    Bronchopleural fistulae (BPF) are communications between the bronchial tree and the pleural spaces. This anomaly is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and its management in some patients remains a major therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Here we report a case involving a 62-year-old man with chronic empyema associated with multiple BPF caused by severe necrotizing pneumonia with parapneumonic effusion in the left lower lobe. His BPF were treated by decortication and retrograde surgical sealing with Gore-Tex plugs that were sutured to the parenchyma and bronchus and reinforced by glue and an intercostal muscle flap. The air leakage stopped immediately after surgery and the chronic empyema resolved. His subsequent postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged 14 days after surgery. At the 8-month follow-up visit, stable surgical outcomes with no BPF recurrence were observed. In summary, we described a novel and easy surgical technique for the repair of intractable peripheral BPF in select patients. PMID:26793385

  9. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery versus Percutaneous Lithotripsy to Treat Renal Stones 2-3 cm in Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Kursad; Tanik, Serhat; Sener, Nevzat Can; Albayrak, Sebahattin; Tuygun, Can; Bakirtas, Hasan; Imamoglu, M. Abdurrahim; Gurdal, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) performed using a flexible ureterorenoscope marked the beginning of a new era in urology. Today, even staghorn stones are successfully treated via RIRS. The recommended treatment for larger stones is percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). However, the question of whether PNL or RIRS should be the first-line treatment option for larger stones remains controversial. In this study, we contribute to the debate by comparing the success and complication rates of PNL and RIRS that were used to treat renal pelvis stones 2-3 cm in diameter. Materials and Methods. The medical records of 154 patients (74 PNL, 80 RIRS) were retrospectively evaluated. PNL patients were placed in Group 1 and RIRS patients in Group 2. Results. The complete stone-free rates were 95.5% in the PNL group and 80.6% in the RIRS group 1 month postoperatively (P = 0.061). The respective complication rates (evaluated using the Clavien system) were 13.5% and 8.8% (P = 0.520). Conclusions. RIRS affords a comparable success rate, causes fewer complications than PNL, and seems to be a promising alternative to PNL when larger stones are to be treated. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25821828

  10. The combined use of vibrostimulation and in vitro fertilization: successful pregnancy outcome from a retrograde specimen obtained from a spinal cord-injured male.

    PubMed

    Elliot, S; Szasz, G; Zouves, C

    1991-12-01

    While pregnancies have been documented through the independent use of the vibrator method, from other methods of procuring ejaculate from spinal cord injured men, and from artificial insemination using a retrograde specimen, we believe that this is the first case report of a live birth resulting from a retrograde ejaculate obtained by vibration from a spinal cord-injured male whose partner underwent in vitro fertilization. Vibrostimulation may well be successful in the two-thirds of men whose spinal cord lesions are at the T10 neurological level and above, who have an intact bulbocavernosus reflex and anal tone but no pain or temperature sensation of the genitalia. Blood pressure monitoring, prevention of autonomic dysreflexia, alkalinization, dilution and infection control of urine, and retrograde specimen retrieval are all important techniques to ensure patient safety and optimal ejaculates. The timing of ovulation and insemination is the crucial factor for the partner of a SCI male whose sperm quality is poor. A complete gynecological workup, including studies of tubal patency, should be done before embarking on a series of artificial inseminations. Stimulation of ovulation and well-timed inseminations should optimize the chance of conception. Depending on semen analysis, female partner factors, and emotional and financial costs, IVF can appropriately be either an early or a final option.

  11. Single-particle tracking uncovers dynamics of glutamate-induced retrograde transport of NF-κB p65 in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Widera, Darius; Klenke, Christin; Nair, Deepak; Heidbreder, Meike; Malkusch, Sebastian; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Retrograde transport of NF-κB from the synapse to the nucleus in neurons is mediated by the dynein/dynactin motor complex and can be triggered by synaptic activation. The caliber of axons is highly variable ranging down to 100 nm, aggravating the investigation of transport processes in neurites of living neurons using conventional light microscopy. We quantified for the first time the transport of the NF-κB subunit p65 using high-density single-particle tracking in combination with photoactivatable fluorescent proteins in living mouse hippocampal neurons. We detected an increase of the mean diffusion coefficient ([Formula: see text]) in neurites from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] after stimulation with glutamate. We further observed that the relative amount of retrogradely transported p65 molecules is increased after stimulation. Glutamate treatment resulted in an increase of the mean retrograde velocity from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], whereas a velocity increase from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] was observed for anterogradely transported p65. This study demonstrates for the first time that glutamate stimulation leads to an increased mobility of single NF-κB p65 molecules in neurites of living hippocampal neurons. PMID:27226975

  12. Single-particle tracking uncovers dynamics of glutamate-induced retrograde transport of NF-κB p65 in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Widera, Darius; Klenke, Christin; Nair, Deepak; Heidbreder, Meike; Malkusch, Sebastian; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike; Kaltschmidt, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Retrograde transport of NF-κB from the synapse to the nucleus in neurons is mediated by the dynein/dynactin motor complex and can be triggered by synaptic activation. The caliber of axons is highly variable ranging down to 100 nm, aggravating the investigation of transport processes in neurites of living neurons using conventional light microscopy. We quantified for the first time the transport of the NF-κB subunit p65 using high-density single-particle tracking in combination with photoactivatable fluorescent proteins in living mouse hippocampal neurons. We detected an increase of the mean diffusion coefficient ([Formula: see text]) in neurites from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] after stimulation with glutamate. We further observed that the relative amount of retrogradely transported p65 molecules is increased after stimulation. Glutamate treatment resulted in an increase of the mean retrograde velocity from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], whereas a velocity increase from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] was observed for anterogradely transported p65. This study demonstrates for the first time that glutamate stimulation leads to an increased mobility of single NF-κB p65 molecules in neurites of living hippocampal neurons.

  13. A cell-based screen for inhibitors of flagella-driven motility in Chlamydomonas reveals a novel modulator of ciliary length and retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Feldman, Jessica L; Wilson, Christopher W; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Snedecor, June; Williams, Janice; Sun, Zhaoxia; Marshall, Wallace F

    2011-03-01

    Cilia are motile and sensory organelles with critical roles in physiology. Ciliary defects can cause numerous human disease symptoms including polycystic kidneys, hydrocephalus, and retinal degeneration. Despite the importance of these organelles, their assembly and function is not fully understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model system for studies of ciliary assembly and function. Here we describe our initial efforts to build a chemical-biology toolkit to augment the genetic tools available for studying cilia in this organism, with the goal of being able to reversibly perturb ciliary function on a rapid time-scale compared to that available with traditional genetic methods. We screened a set of 5520 compounds from which we identified four candidate compounds with reproducible effects on flagella at nontoxic doses. Three of these compounds resulted in flagellar paralysis and one induced flagellar shortening in a reversible and dose-dependent fashion, accompanied by a reduction in the speed of intraflagellar transport. This latter compound also reduced the length of cilia in mammalian cells, hence we named the compound "ciliabrevin" due to its ability to shorten cilia. This compound also robustly and reversibly inhibited microtubule movement and retrograde actin flow in Drosophila S2 cells. Ciliabrevin may prove especially useful for the study of retrograde actin flow at the leading edge of cells, as it slows the retrograde flow in a tunable dose-dependent fashion until flow completely stops at high concentrations, and these effects are quickly reversed upon washout of the drug.

  14. RETROGRADE INTUBATION VIA LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY IN A PAEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH FALLOT-TYPE VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT AND CLEFT PALATE DEFORMITY.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Taner; Erbatur, Serkan

    2016-02-01

    We report the case ofa pediatric patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and cleft palate deformity with difficult intubation in which a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was used and converted into an endotracheal tube through retrograde intubation. The patient with TOF was scheduled for repair of the congenital bilateral cleft lip and palate. Inhalational induction with 4% sevoflurane was started. Conventional tracheal intubation was impossible because the patient had a difficult airway, and the procedure could cause severe cyanosis and respiratory distress. An LMA was inserted to maintain ventilation and anesthesia and to facilitate intubation. Retrograde intubation and a catheter mount were used to convert the LMA into a conventional endotracheal tube without difficulty. Airway management for patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity is not clear. Retrograde intubation permits replacing an LMA with an endotracheal tube. This method enables maintaining the airway until the LMA is exchanged with an endotracheal tube. This technique seems useful to facilitate difficult airway intubation in pediatric patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity. PMID:27382820

  15. Retrograde Approach Using Surgical Cutdown Technique for Limb Salvage in a Case of Critical Limb Ischemia With Severely Calcified Tibial Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Tatsuya; Iida, Osamu; Suemitsu, Kotaro; Tsuji, Yoriko; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    We here report a successful angioplasty for tibial artery occlusion using direct tibial puncture and subsequent retrograde approach under surgical cutdown technique. An 82-year-old man with ulcer/gangrene in first and second digits was referred to our hospital for endovascular therapy (EVT) of lower extremity ischemia. Diagnostic angiogram revealed anterior tibial artery (ATA) occlusion with severe calcification. Subintimal angioplasty was attempted using a 0.014-inch hydrophilic guidewire but was unsuccessful. A retrograde approach was subsequently attempted for ATA recanalization. However, because of severe calcification of dorsal pedis artery (DPA), percutaneous distal puncture was also unsuccessful. Direct puncture under surgical cutdown technique for DPA was subsequently performed and was successful. A 0.014-inch hydrophilic wire was advanced in retrograde fashion across the ATA occlusion and was used to access the microcatheter positioned at the proximal ATA via antegrade approach. Angioplasty of the ATA occlusion was performed using a 2.5-/3.0-mm tapered balloon. Completion angiogram revealed restoration of flow without dissection. Skin perfusion pressure was dramatically improved. Complete wound healing was achieved 5 months after EVT. PMID:27207678

  16. Re-examination of topographic distribution of thalamic neurons projecting to the caudate nucleus. A retrograde labeling study in the cat.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, S; Mengual, E; Velayos, J L; Giménez-Amaya, J M

    1998-08-01

    The distribution of thalamic neurons projecting directly to the caudate nucleus (CN) was examined using the retrograde labeling method. Horseradish peroxidase conjugated with wheat germ agglutinin (HRP-WGA) or a fluorescent tracer (either Fast Blue (FB) or Diamidino Yellow (DY)) was injected into various parts of the CN. The main findings were as follows: (1) labeled neurons were distributed most densely in the intralaminar nuclei, midline thalamic nuclei and centre median-parafascicular complex, and less densely in the ventroanterior (VA), ventrolateral (VL) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei. (2) After injections into the rostral parts of the CN, a moderate number of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies was observed in VA, VL and VM. However, only very few, if any, labeled neurons were found in these nuclei after injections into the caudal parts of the CN. (3) After injections into the most dorsolateral parts of the CN, labeled neurons were seen in the lateralmost part of the VA and VL. (4) Many retrogradely labeled neurons were consistently found in the lateral wing of the rhomboid nucleus after injections into the CN. (5) No clear topography was detected in the arrangement of labeled neurons in the rhomboid, dorsal mediodorsal, centrolateral or paracentral nuclei. (6) After injections into the rostral parts of the CN, the most prominent labeling was observed in the ventral part of the centre médian-parafascicular complex.

  17. Large impacted upper ureteral calculi: A comparative study between retrograde ureterolithotripsy and percutaneous antegrade ureterolithotripsy in the modified lateral position

    PubMed Central

    Moufid, Kamal; Abbaka, Najib; Touiti, Driss; Adermouch, Latifa; Amine, Mohamed; Lezrek, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Context: The treatment for patients with large impacted proximal ureteral stone remains controversial, especially at institutions with limited resources. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare and to evaluate the outcome and complications of two main treatment procedures for impacted proximal ureteral calculi, retrograde ureterolithotripsy (URS), and percutaneous antegrade ureterolithotripsy (Perc-URS). Settings and Design: Our inclusion criteria were solitary, radiopaque calculi, >15 mm in size in a functioning renal unit. Only those patients in whom the attempt at passing a guidewire or catheter beyond the calculus failed were included in this study. Patients and Methods: Between January 2007 and July 2011, a total of 52 patients (13 women and 39 men) with large impacted upper-ureteral calculi >15 mm and meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. Of these, Perc-URS was done in 22 patients (group 1) while retrograde ureteroscopy was performed in 30 patients (group 2). We analyzed operative time, incidence of complications during and after surgery, the number of postoperative recovery days, median total costs associated per patient per procedure, and the stone-free rate immediately after 5 days and after 1 month. Statistical Analysis Used: Bivariate analysis used the Student t-test and the Mann-Whitney test to compare two means and Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to compare two percentages. The significance level was set at 0.05. Results: The mean age was 42.3 years (range 22-69). The mean stone sizes (mm) were 34 ± 1.2 and 29.3 ± 1.8 mm in group 1 and 2, respectively. In the Perc-URS group, 21 patients (95.45%) had complete calculus clearance through a single tract in one session of percutaneous surgery, whereas in the URS group, only 20 patients (66.7%) had complete stone clearance (P = 0.007). The mean operative time was higher in the Perc-URS group compared to group 2 (66.5 ± 21.7 vs. 52.13 ± 17.3 min, respectively; P = 0.013). Complications

  18. Retrograded eclogite xenoliths from mid-Tertiary potassic lavas along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, T. J.; Riggs, N.; Ort, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    A suite of xenolith-bearing, alkalic volcanic rocks erupted in small domes and plugs along the southwest margin of the Colorado Plateau (current Transition Zone) in Arizona between 30 Ma and 22 Ma. The onset of volcanic activity slightly precedes the earliest phase of mid-Tertiary extension and metamorphic core complex denudation in western/southern Arizona (27-25 Ma), which occurred along detachment faults that dip gently beneath the CP margin. Lavas are highly potassic (up to 6% Wt. K2O) and rich in incompatible trace elements (Ba up to 1900 ppm and Sr up to 1250 ppm), suggesting an enriched mantle melting source. Xenoliths are dominantly eclogite and pyroxenite that have been slightly to completely retrograded to amphibolite assemblages. The most common xenolith mineral assemblage consists of: 1) omphacite that has been completely replaced by an irregular symplectite of cpx and low-Ca plagioclase, 2) garnet that is partially replaced and rimmed by a fine, lamellar symplectite of high-Ca plagioclase, pargasitic amphibole, and Fe-Ti oxides, 3) coarse pargasitic amphibole that has overgrown or partially replaced the cpx-plag symplectite, 4) rutile that has been partially replaced by ilmenite and magnetite, and 4) apatite, zircon, and other accessory minerals. Xenoliths contain evidence for melt interaction prior to entrainment, including plagioclase veins containing hercynite and hogbomite that are cut by sharp contacts with the host lava. Results of this and other studies suggest that these veins formed by reactions between the eclogite assemblage (likely including spinel) and a locally derived melt. However, textural relations and geochemical differences suggest that this melt was not the host melt that entrained the xenoliths. Pyroxene and garnet thermobarometry from this and other studies on the primary eclogitic assemblages indicate temperatures from 500 to 900C at 11 to 20 kb. Mineral chemistry analyses of amphibole, plagioclase, hornblende, and garnet in the

  19. Attachment of ribosomal complexes and retrograde scanning during initiation on the Halastavi árva virus IRES

    PubMed Central

    Abaeva, Irina S.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U.T.

    2016-01-01

    Halastavi árva virus (HalV) has a positive-sense RNA genome, with an 827 nt-long 5′ UTR and an intergenic region separating two open reading frames. Whereas the encoded proteins are most homologous to Dicistrovirus polyproteins, its 5′ UTR is distinct. Here, we report that the HalV 5′ UTR comprises small stem-loop domains separated by long single-stranded areas and a large A-rich unstructured region surrounding the initiation codon AUG828, and possesses cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. In contrast to most viral IRESs, it does not depend on structural integrity and specific interaction of a structured element with a translational component, and is instead determined by the unstructured region flanking AUG828. eIF2, eIF3, eIF1 and eIF1A promote efficient 48S initiation complex formation at AUG828, which is reduced ∼5-fold on omission of eIF1 and eIF1A. Initiation involves direct attachment of 43S preinitiation complexes within a short window at or immediately downstream of AUG828. 40S and eIF3 are sufficient for initial binding. After attachment, 43S complexes undergo retrograde scanning, strongly dependent on eIF1 and eIF1A. eIF4A/eIF4G stimulated initiation only at low temperatures or on mutants, in which areas surrounding AUG828 had been replaced by heterologous sequences. However, they strongly promoted initiation at AUG872, yielding a proline-rich oligopeptide. PMID:26783202

  20. Attachment of ribosomal complexes and retrograde scanning during initiation on the Halastavi árva virus IRES.

    PubMed

    Abaeva, Irina S; Pestova, Tatyana V; Hellen, Christopher U T

    2016-03-18

    Halastavi árva virus (HalV) has a positive-sense RNA genome, with an 827 nt-long 5' UTR and an intergenic region separating two open reading frames. Whereas the encoded proteins are most homologous to Dicistrovirus polyproteins, its 5' UTR is distinct. Here, we report that the HalV 5' UTR comprises small stem-loop domains separated by long single-stranded areas and a large A-rich unstructured region surrounding the initiation codon AUG828, and possesses cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. In contrast to most viral IRESs, it does not depend on structural integrity and specific interaction of a structured element with a translational component, and is instead determined by the unstructured region flanking AUG828. eIF2, eIF3, eIF1 and eIF1A promote efficient 48S initiation complex formation at AUG828, which is reduced ∼5-fold on omission of eIF1 and eIF1A. Initiation involves direct attachment of 43S preinitiation complexes within a short window at or immediately downstream of AUG828. 40S and eIF3 are sufficient for initial binding. After attachment, 43S complexes undergo retrograde scanning, strongly dependent on eIF1 and eIF1A. eIF4A/eIF4G stimulated initiation only at low temperatures or on mutants, in which areas surrounding AUG828 had been replaced by heterologous sequences. However, they strongly promoted initiation at AUG872, yielding a proline-rich oligopeptide. PMID:26783202